WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapid clinical feedback

  1. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  2. Providing Rapid Feedback in Generated Modular Language Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, L.C.L.; De Jonge, M.; Nilsson-Nyman, E.; Visser, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a pre-print of: Providing Rapid Feedback in Generated Modular Language Environments. Adding Error Recovery to Scannerless Generalized-LR Parsing. In: Gary T. Leavens, editor, Proceedings of the 24th ACM SIGPLAN Conference on Object-Oriented Programing, Systems, Languages, and

  3. Clinical performance feedback and quality improvement opportunities for perioperative physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye AD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alan David Kaye,1 Olutoyin J Okanlawon,2 Richard D Urman21Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston MA, USAAbstract: Clinical performance feedback is an important component of the ongoing development and education of health care practitioners. For physicians, feedback about their clinical practice and outcomes is central to developing both confidence and competence at all stages of their medical careers. Cultural and financial infrastructures need to be in place, and the concept of feedback needs to be readily embraced and encouraged by clinical leadership and other stakeholders. The "buy-in" includes the expectation and view that feedback occurs on a routine basis, and those engaged in the process are both encouraged to participate and held accountable. Feedback must be part of an overarching quality improvement and physician education agenda; it is not meant to be an isolated, fragmented initiative that is typically undermined by lack of resources or systemic barriers to gaining improvement within programs. Effective feedback should be an integral part of clinical practice. Anesthesiologists and other perioperative physicians are identifying specialty-specific indicators that can be used when creating a broader quality improvement agenda. Placing a more immediate formal feedback strategy that focuses on goal-oriented behavior is rapidly becoming a mainstay. Physicians may use their individual feedback reports for reflection and designing personal development plans as lifelong learners and leaders in improving patient care.Keywords: physician education, outcomes measurement, performance improvement, anesthesiology

  4. Rapid black hole growth under anisotropic radiation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yajima, Hidenobu; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Discovery of high-redshift (z > 6) supermassive black holes (BHs) may indicate that the rapid (or super-Eddington) gas accretion has aided their quick growth. Here, we study such rapid accretion of the primordial gas on to intermediate-mass (102-105 M⊙) BHs under anisotropic radiation feedback. We perform two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations that solve the flow structure across the Bondi radius, from far outside of the Bondi radius down to a central part that is larger than a circum-BH accretion disc. The radiation from the unresolved circum-BH disc is analytically modelled considering self-shadowing effect. We show that the flow settles into a steady state, where the flow structure consists of two distinct parts: (1) bipolar ionized outflowing regions, where the gas is pushed outward by thermal gas pressure and super-Eddington radiation pressure, and (2) an equatorial neutral inflowing region, where the gas falls towards the central BH without affected by radiation feedback. The resulting accretion rate is much higher than that in the case of isotropic radiation, far exceeding the Eddington-limited rate to reach a value slightly lower than the Bondi one. The opening angle of the equatorial inflowing region is determined by the luminosity and directional dependence of the central radiation. We find that photoevaporation from its surfaces set the critical opening angle of about 10° below which the accretion to the BH is quenched. We suggest that the shadowing effect allows even stellar-remnant BHs to grow rapidly enough to become high-redshift supermassive BHs.

  5. Assessment of clinical feedback given to medical students via an electronic feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughness, Gabrielle; Georgoff, Patrick E; Sandhu, Gurjit; Leininger, Lisa; Nikolian, Vahagn C; Reddy, Rishindra; Hughes, David T

    2017-10-01

    The feedback medical students receive during clinical rotations, traditionally verbal and not formally captured, plays a critical role in student development. This study evaluates written daily feedback given to students through a novel web-based feedback system. A Minute Feedback System was used to collect feedback given to medical students during their surgery clerkship from May 2015-April 2016. Using qualitative content analysis, feedback comments were categorized as: encouraging, corrective, specific, and nonspecific. Effective feedback was a combination of specific and either corrective or encouraging feedback; ineffective feedback contained only nonspecific comments; mediocre feedback contained elements of both effective and ineffective comments. 3191 feedback requests were sent by medical students and 2029 faculty/resident feedback responses were received. The overall response rate was 62%. Nonspecific feedback comprised 80% of faculty, 83% of senior resident, and 78% of junior resident comments. Specific feedback was given by only 35% of faculty, 17% of senior residents, and 26% of junior residents. Faculty provided Effective feedback in only 16% of comments, senior residents 8%, and junior residents 17%. Mediocre feedback comprised 13% of faculty, 9% of senior resident, and 7% of junior resident comments. Ineffective feedback comprised 67% of all feedback: 60% of faculty, 72% of senior resident, and 68% of junior resident feedback. The majority of resident and faculty feedback to medical students using an electronic, email-based application during their surgery clerkship was nonspecific and encouraging and therefore of limited effectiveness. This presents an opportunity for resident/faculty development and education regarding optimal feedback techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clarifying students' feedback-seeking behaviour in clinical clerkships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, Harold G. J.; Teunissen, Pim W.; Spruijt, Annemarie; Fokkema, Joanne P. I.; van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Context Why and how do students seek feedback on their performance in the clinical workplace and which factors influence this? These questions have remained largely unanswered in research into workplace learning during clinical clerkships. Research on feedback has focused mainly on feedback

  7. Clarifying students' feedback-seeking behaviour in clinical clerkships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Spruijt, A.; Fokkema, J.P.; Beukelen, P. van; Jaarsma, D.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Why and how do students seek feedback on their performance in the clinical workplace and which factors influence this? These questions have remained largely unanswered in research into workplace learning during clinical clerkships. Research on feedback has focused mainly on feedback

  8. Model depicting aspects of audit and feedback that impact physicians' acceptance of clinical performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Velma L; Hysong, Sylvia J

    2016-07-13

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a strategy that has been used in various disciplines for performance and quality improvement. There is limited research regarding medical professionals' acceptance of clinical-performance feedback and whether feedback impacts clinical practice. The objectives of our research were to (1) investigate aspects of A&F that impact physicians' acceptance of performance feedback; (2) determine actions physicians take when receiving feedback; and (3) determine if feedback impacts physicians' patient-management behavior. In this qualitative study, we employed grounded theory methods to perform a secondary analysis of semi-structured interviews with 12 VA primary care physicians. We analyzed a subset of interview questions from the primary study, which aimed to determine how providers of high, low and moderately performing VA medical centers use performance feedback to maintain and improve quality of care, and determine perceived utility of performance feedback. Based on the themes emergent from our analysis and their observed relationships, we developed a model depicting aspects of the A&F process that impact feedback acceptance and physicians' patient-management behavior. The model is comprised of three core components - Reaction, Action and Impact - and depicts elements associated with feedback recipients' reaction to feedback, action taken when feedback is received, and physicians modifying their patient-management behavior. Feedback characteristics, the environment, external locus-of-control components, core values, emotion and the assessment process induce or deter reaction, action and impact. Feedback characteristics (content and timeliness), and the procedural justice of the assessment process (unjust penalties) impact feedback acceptance. External locus-of-control elements (financial incentives, competition), the environment (patient volume, time constraints) and emotion impact patient-management behavior. Receiving feedback generated

  9. Clarifying students' feedback-seeking behaviour in clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Teunissen, Pim W; Spruijt, Annemarie; Fokkema, Joanne P I; van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-03-01

    Why and how do students seek feedback on their performance in the clinical workplace and which factors influence this? These questions have remained largely unanswered in research into workplace learning during clinical clerkships. Research on feedback has focused mainly on feedback providers. Whether and how feedback recipients actively seek feedback are under-examined issues. Research in organisational psychology has proposed a mechanism whereby feedback seeking is influenced by motives and goal orientation mediated by the perceived costs and benefits of feedback. Building on a recently published model of resident doctors' feedback-seeking behaviour, we conducted a qualitative study to explore students' feedback-seeking behaviours in the clinical workplace. Between April and June 2011, we conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with veterinary medicine students in Years 5 and 6 about their feedback-seeking behaviour during clinical clerkships. In the interviews, 14 students were asked about their goals and motives for seeking feedback, the characteristics of their feedback-seeking behaviour and factors influencing that behaviour. Using template analysis, we coded the interview transcripts and iteratively reduced and displayed the data until agreement on the final template was reached. The students described personal and interpersonal factors to explain their reasons for seeking feedback. The factors related to intentions and the characteristics of the feedback provider, and the relationship between the feedback seeker and provider. Motives relating to image and ego, particularly when students thought that feedback might have a positive effect on image and ego, influenced feedback-seeking behaviour and could induce specific behaviours related to students' orientation towards particular sources of feedback, their orientation towards particular topics for and timing of feedback, and the frequency and method of feedback-seeking behaviour. This study shows

  10. Feedback and assessment for clinical placements: achieving the right balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Annette Burgess, Craig Mellis Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: During clinical placements, the provision of feedback forms an integral part of the learning process and enriches students' learning experiences. The purpose of feedback is to improve the learner's knowledge, skills, or behavior. Receipt of accurate feedback can help to narrow the gap between actual and desired performance. Effective and regular feedback has the potential to reinforce good practice and motivate the learner toward the desired outcome. Despite the obvious role of feedback in effective teaching and learning, a common complaint from students is that they do not receive adequate feedback. Unfortunately, skills in giving and receiving feedback are rarely taught to students or clinicians. This study aims to provide an understanding of the role of feedback within the learning process, consider consequences of inadequate or poorly given feedback, consider the barriers to the feedback process, provide practical guidelines for providing feedback, and consider the need for student and faculty development in feedback skills. Keywords: medical students, formative, summative, assessment

  11. Examining clinical performance feedback in Patient-Aligned Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Knox, Melissa K; Haidet, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The move to team-based models of health care represents a fundamental shift in healthcare delivery, including major changes in the roles and relationships among clinical personnel. Audit and feedback of clinical performance has traditionally focused on the provider; however, a team-based model of care may require different approaches. Identify changes in audit and feedback of clinical performance to primary care clinical personnel resulting from implementing team-based care in their clinics. Semi-structured interviews with primary care clinicians, their department heads, and facility leadership at 16 geographically diverse VA Medical Centers, selected purposively by their clinical performance profile. An average of three interviewees per VA medical center, selected from physicians, nurses, and primary care and facility directors who participated in 1-hour interviews. Interviews focused on how clinical performance information is fed back to clinicians, with particular emphasis on external peer-review program measures and changes in feedback associated with team-based care implementation. Interview transcripts were analyzed, using techniques adapted from grounded theory and content analysis. Ownership of clinical performance still rests largely with the provider, despite transitioning to team-based care. A panel-management information tool emerged as the most prominent change to clinical performance feedback dissemination, and existing feedback tools were seen as most effective when monitored by the nurse members of the team. Facilities reported few, if any, appreciable changes to the assessment of clinical performance since transitioning to team-based care. Although new tools have been created to support higher-quality clinical performance feedback to primary care teams, such tools have not necessarily delivered feedback consistent with a team-based approach to health care. Audit and feedback of clinical performance has remained largely unchanged, despite material

  12. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part II: Approved Clinical Instructor and Student Perceptions of and Influences on Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context: Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) are expected to provide feedback to athletic training students (ATSs) during clinical education experiences. Researchers in other fields have found that clinical instructors and students often have different perceptions of actual and ideal feedback and that several factors may influence the feedback exchanges between instructors and students. However, understanding of these issues in athletic training education is minimal. Objective: To investigate the current characteristics and perceptions of and the influences on feedback exchanges between ATSs and ACIs. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: One entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: Four ACIs and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis: Individual, semistructured interviews were conducted with participants and integrated with field notes and observations for analysis. We used the constant comparative approach to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results: Participants described that feedback plays an important role in clinical education and has several purposes related to improving performance. The ACIs and ATSs also discussed several preferred characteristics of feedback. Participants identified 4 main influences on their feedback exchanges, including the ACI, the ATS, personalities, and the learning environment. Conclusions: The ACIs and ATSs had similar perceptions of ideal feedback in addition to the actual feedback that was provided during their clinical education experiences. Most of the preferences for feedback were aligned with recommendations in the literature, suggesting that existing research findings are applicable to athletic training clinical education. Several factors influenced the

  13. Providing rapid feedback to residents on their teaching skills: an educational strategy for contemporary trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Sidlow, Rachel J; Baer, Tamar G; Gershel, Jeffrey C

    2016-03-20

    The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes of contemporary residents toward receiving rapid feedback on their teaching skills from their medical student learners. Participants consisted of 20 residents in their second post-graduate training year. These residents facilitated 44 teaching sessions with medical students within our Resident-as-Teacher program. Structured, written feedback from students was returned to the resident within 3 days following each session. Residents completed a short survey about the utility of the feedback, whether they would make a change to future teaching sessions based on the feedback, and what specifically they might change. The survey utilized a 4-point scale ("Not helpful/likely=1" to "Very helpful/likely=4"), and allowed for one free-text response. Free-text responses were hand-coded and underwent qualitative analysis to identify themes. There were 182 student feedback encounters resulting from 44 teaching sessions. The survey response rate was 73% (32/44). Ninety-four percent of residents rated the rapid feedback as "very helpful," and 91% would "very likely" make a change to subsequent sessions based on student feedback. Residents' proposed changes included modifications to session content and/or their personal teaching style. Residents found that rapid feedback received from medical student learners was highly valuable to them in their roles as teachers. A rapid feedback strategy may facilitate an optimal educational environment for contemporary trainees.

  14. Audit and feedback and clinical practice guideline adherence: making feedback actionable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Best, Richard G; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2006-04-28

    As a strategy for improving clinical practice guideline (CPG) adherence, audit and feedback (A&F) has been found to be variably effective, yet A&F research has not investigated the impact of feedback characteristics on its effectiveness. This paper explores how high performing facilities (HPF) and low performing facilities (LPF) differ in the way they use clinical audit data for feedback purposes. Descriptive, qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposeful sample of six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) with high and low adherence to six CPGs, as measured by external chart review audits. One-hundred and two employees involved with outpatient CPG implementation across the six facilities participated in one-hour semi-structured interviews where they discussed strategies, facilitators and barriers to implementing CPGs. Interviews were analyzed using techniques from the grounded theory method. High performers provided timely, individualized, non-punitive feedback to providers, whereas low performers were more variable in their timeliness and non-punitiveness and relied on more standardized, facility-level reports. The concept of actionable feedback emerged as the core category from the data, around which timeliness, individualization, non-punitiveness, and customizability can be hierarchically ordered. Facilities with a successful record of guideline adherence tend to deliver more timely, individualized and non-punitive feedback to providers about their adherence than facilities with a poor record of guideline adherence. Consistent with findings from organizational research, feedback intervention characteristics may influence the feedback's effectiveness at changing desired behaviors.

  15. A model for educational feedback based on clinical communication skills strategies: beyond the "feedback sandwich".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Felise B; Parish, Sharon J; Reichgott, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Feedback is an essential tool in medical education, and the process is often difficult for both faculty and learner. There are strong analogies between the provision of educational feedback and doctor-patient communication during the clinical encounter. Relationship-building skills used in the clinical setting-Partnership, Empathy, Apology, Respect, Legitimation, Support (PEARLS)-can establish trust with the learner to better manage difficult feedback situations involving personal issues, unprofessional behavior, or a defensive learner. Using the stage of readiness to change (transtheoretical) model, the educator can "diagnose" the learner's stage of readiness and employ focused interventions to encourage desired changes. This approach has been positively received by medical educators in faculty development workshops. A model for provision of educational feedback based on communication skills used in the clinical encounter can be useful in the medical education setting. More robust evaluation of the construct validity is required in actual training program situations.

  16. Feedback as a means to improve clinical competencies: Registrars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The training of novices, in any field, to achieve the optimum state of cognitive, clinical, technical and professional development requires a variety of teaching methodologies, including the process of feedback. Feedback is defined as a process where the desired standard of proficiency in a task has already been ...

  17. Feedback-giving behaviour in performance evaluations during clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Spruijt, Annemarie; Van Beukelen, Peter; Van Der Vleuten, Cees P M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2016-01-01

    Narrative feedback documented in performance evaluations by the teacher, i.e. the clinical supervisor, is generally accepted to be essential for workplace learning. Many studies have examined factors of influence on the usage of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) instruments and provision of feedback, but little is known about how these factors influence teachers' feedback-giving behaviour. In this study, we investigated teachers' use of mini-CEX in performance evaluations to provide narrative feedback in undergraduate clinical training. We designed an exploratory qualitative study using an interpretive approach. Focusing on the usage of mini-CEX instruments in clinical training, we conducted semi-structured interviews to explore teachers' perceptions. Between February and June 2013, we conducted interviews with 14 clinicians participated as teachers during undergraduate clinical clerkships. Informed by concepts from the literature, we coded interview transcripts and iteratively reduced and displayed data using template analysis. We identified three main themes of interrelated factors that influenced teachers' practice with regard to mini-CEX instruments: teacher-related factors; teacher-student interaction-related factors, and teacher-context interaction-related factors. Four issues (direct observation, relationship between teacher and student, verbal versus written feedback, formative versus summative purposes) that are pertinent to workplace-based performance evaluations were presented to clarify how different factors interact with each other and influence teachers' feedback-giving behaviour. Embedding performance observation in clinical practice and establishing trustworthy teacher-student relationships in more longitudinal clinical clerkships were considered important in creating a learning environment that supports and facilitates the feedback exchange. Teachers' feedback-giving behaviour within the clinical context results from the interaction

  18. Motivated or Paralyzed? Individuals' Beliefs about Intelligence Influence Performance Outcome of Expecting Rapid Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Zhang, Jie; Vance, Kaleigh

    2013-01-01

    The current research examines whether and how beliefs about intelligence moderate the effects of expecting rapid feedback on exam performance. Thirty-six undergraduates participated in a field experiment with two between-subjects independent variables: anticipated feedback proximity and beliefs about intelligence. The results show that expecting…

  19. [Feedback in relation to training of practical clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.S.; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    into feedback in relation to clinical skills training is currently limited. Theories on motor learning can serve as the basis for designing research in this domain, especially the importance of including retention tests when measuring permanent learning outcomes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10/27......Feedback has been identified as an essential component of motor learning. However, feedback principles derived from motor learning theories cannot uncritically be applied to clinical skills training because this knowledge is based primarily on the study of very simple motor skills. Research...

  20. Contributions of Different Cloud Types to Feedbacks and Rapid Adjustments in CMIP5*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Mark D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Klein, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Taylor, Karl E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Andrews, Timothy [Met Office Hadley Center, Exeter (United Kingdom); Webb, Mark J. [Met Office Hadley Center, Exeter (United Kingdom); Gregory, Jonathan M. [Univ. of Reading, Exeter (United Kingdom). National Center for Atmospheric Science; Forster, Piers M. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    When using five climate model simulations of the response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2, the authors perform the first simultaneous model intercomparison of cloud feedbacks and rapid radiative adjustments with cloud masking effects removed, partitioned among changes in cloud types and gross cloud properties. After CO2 quadrupling, clouds exhibit a rapid reduction in fractional coverage, cloud-top pressure, and optical depth, with each contributing equally to a 1.1 W m-2 net cloud radiative adjustment, primarily from shortwave radiation. Rapid reductions in midlevel clouds and optically thick clouds are important in reducing planetary albedo in every model. As the planet warms, clouds become fewer, higher, and thicker, and global mean net cloud feedback is positive in all but one model and results primarily from increased trapping of longwave radiation. As was true for earlier models, high cloud changes are the largest contributor to intermodel spread in longwave and shortwave cloud feedbacks, but low cloud changes are the largest contributor to the mean and spread in net cloud feedback. The importance of the negative optical depth feedback relative to the amount feedback at high latitudes is even more marked than in earlier models. Furthermore, the authors show that the negative longwave cloud adjustment inferred in previous studies is primarily caused by a 1.3 W m-2 cloud masking of CO2 forcing. Properly accounting for cloud masking increases net cloud feedback by 0.3 W m-2 K-1, whereas accounting for rapid adjustments reduces by 0.14 W m-2 K-1 the ensemble mean net cloud feedback through a combination of smaller positive cloud amount and altitude feedbacks and larger negative optical depth feedbacks.

  1. Direct observation and focused feedback for clinical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Kundra, Shaveta; Gupta, Piyush

    2014-09-01

    Direct observation of the medical trainee by an expert assessor and providing authentic feedback is considered an important tool for development of clinical and procedural skills. Mini-clinical evaluation exercise and Direct Observation of Procedural Skills are two important tools to observe the trainee during a clinical encounter or during a procedure, make an expert standardized (though subjective) observation, and use it to provide developmental feedback. Both can be easily integrated into routine work of clinical departments, and both provide a reliable assessment if 6-8 such encounters are used.

  2. Audit and feedback and clinical practice guideline adherence: Making feedback actionable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Richard G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a strategy for improving clinical practice guideline (CPG adherence, audit and feedback (A&F has been found to be variably effective, yet A&F research has not investigated the impact of feedback characteristics on its effectiveness. This paper explores how high performing facilities (HPF and low performing facilities (LPF differ in the way they use clinical audit data for feedback purposes. Method Descriptive, qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposeful sample of six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs with high and low adherence to six CPGs, as measured by external chart review audits. One-hundred and two employees involved with outpatient CPG implementation across the six facilities participated in one-hour semi-structured interviews where they discussed strategies, facilitators and barriers to implementing CPGs. Interviews were analyzed using techniques from the grounded theory method. Results High performers provided timely, individualized, non-punitive feedback to providers, whereas low performers were more variable in their timeliness and non-punitiveness and relied on more standardized, facility-level reports. The concept of actionable feedback emerged as the core category from the data, around which timeliness, individualization, non-punitiveness, and customizability can be hierarchically ordered. Conclusion Facilities with a successful record of guideline adherence tend to deliver more timely, individualized and non-punitive feedback to providers about their adherence than facilities with a poor record of guideline adherence. Consistent with findings from organizational research, feedback intervention characteristics may influence the feedback's effectiveness at changing desired behaviors.

  3. Learner-centred feedback using remote assessment of clinical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Kneebone; Fernando Bello; Debra Nestel; Neville Mooney; Andrew Codling; Faranak Yadollahi; Tanya Tierney; David Wilcockson; Ara Darzi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the Imperial College Feedback and Assessment System (ICFAS) and explores its feasibility in supporting the learning of practical clinical procedures. ICFAS is an innovative combination of existing technologies which brings together video recording, networked mobile computers (laptop and handheld) and content management software. The aim is to observe, record, assess and provide feedback on multiple simulated encounters. We have developed ICFAS within the framework of our Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI) (Kneebone et al. 2006a,b), providing a technology-based 'feedback space' for maximizing educational value.

  4. Feedback-giving behaviour in performance evaluations during clinical clerkships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, Harold G. J.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.; Spruijt, Annemarie; Van Beukelen, Peter; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Teunissen, Pim W.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Narrative feedback documented in performance evaluations by the teacher, i.e. the clinical supervisor, is generally accepted to be essential for workplace learning. Many studies have examined factors of influence on the usage of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) instruments and

  5. Computer-supported feedback message tailoring: theory-informed adaptation of clinical audit and feedback for learning and behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Brehaut, Jamie C; Hochheiser, Harry; Douglas, Gerald P; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-21

    Evidence shows that clinical audit and feedback can significantly improve compliance with desired practice, but it is unclear when and how it is effective. Audit and feedback is likely to be more effective when feedback messages can influence barriers to behavior change, but barriers to change differ across individual health-care providers, stemming from differences in providers' individual characteristics. The purpose of this article is to invite debate and direct research attention towards a novel audit and feedback component that could enable interventions to adapt to barriers to behavior change for individual health-care providers: computer-supported tailoring of feedback messages. We argue that, by leveraging available clinical data, theory-informed knowledge about behavior change, and the knowledge of clinical supervisors or peers who deliver feedback messages, a software application that supports feedback message tailoring could improve feedback message relevance for barriers to behavior change, thereby increasing the effectiveness of audit and feedback interventions. We describe a prototype system that supports the provision of tailored feedback messages by generating a menu of graphical and textual messages with associated descriptions of targeted barriers to behavior change. Supervisors could use the menu to select messages based on their awareness of each feedback recipient's specific barriers to behavior change. We anticipate that such a system, if designed appropriately, could guide supervisors towards giving more effective feedback for health-care providers. A foundation of evidence and knowledge in related health research domains supports the development of feedback message tailoring systems for clinical audit and feedback. Creating and evaluating computer-supported feedback tailoring tools is a promising approach to improving the effectiveness of clinical audit and feedback.

  6. Students' motivation toward feedback-seeking in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Lubberta H; Favier, Robert P; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Bok, Harold G J

    2017-09-01

    In medical education, students are increasingly regarded as active seekers of feedback rather than passive recipients. Previous research showed that in the intentions of students to seek feedback, a learning and performance goal can be distinguished. In this study, we investigated the intentions (defined as level and orientation of motivation) of different performing students (low, average, and high performing students) to seek feedback in the clinical workplace using Self-Determination Theory. We conducted a quantitative study with students in their clinical clerkships and grouped them based on their performance. The level of motivation was measured by the number of Mini-CEXs each student collected. The orientation of motivation was measured by conducting the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. We found that high performing students were more motivated and demonstrated higher self-determination compared to low performing students.

  7. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  8. Rapid change in articulatory lip movement induced by preceding auditory feedback during production of bilabial plosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Takemi; Gomi, Hiroaki; Kashino, Makio

    2010-11-08

    There has been plentiful evidence of kinesthetically induced rapid compensation for unanticipated perturbation in speech articulatory movements. However, the role of auditory information in stabilizing articulation has been little studied except for the control of voice fundamental frequency, voice amplitude and vowel formant frequencies. Although the influence of auditory information on the articulatory control process is evident in unintended speech errors caused by delayed auditory feedback, the direct and immediate effect of auditory alteration on the movements of articulators has not been clarified. This work examined whether temporal changes in the auditory feedback of bilabial plosives immediately affects the subsequent lip movement. We conducted experiments with an auditory feedback alteration system that enabled us to replace or block speech sounds in real time. Participants were asked to produce the syllable /pa/ repeatedly at a constant rate. During the repetition, normal auditory feedback was interrupted, and one of three pre-recorded syllables /pa/, /Φa/, or /pi/, spoken by the same participant, was presented once at a different timing from the anticipated production onset, while no feedback was presented for subsequent repetitions. Comparisons of the labial distance trajectories under altered and normal feedback conditions indicated that the movement quickened during the short period immediately after the alteration onset, when /pa/ was presented 50 ms before the expected timing. Such change was not significant under other feedback conditions we tested. The earlier articulation rapidly induced by the progressive auditory input suggests that a compensatory mechanism helps to maintain a constant speech rate by detecting errors between the internally predicted and actually provided auditory information associated with self movement. The timing- and context-dependent effects of feedback alteration suggest that the sensory error detection works in a

  9. Rapid change in articulatory lip movement induced by preceding auditory feedback during production of bilabial plosives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemi Mochida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been plentiful evidence of kinesthetically induced rapid compensation for unanticipated perturbation in speech articulatory movements. However, the role of auditory information in stabilizing articulation has been little studied except for the control of voice fundamental frequency, voice amplitude and vowel formant frequencies. Although the influence of auditory information on the articulatory control process is evident in unintended speech errors caused by delayed auditory feedback, the direct and immediate effect of auditory alteration on the movements of articulators has not been clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined whether temporal changes in the auditory feedback of bilabial plosives immediately affects the subsequent lip movement. We conducted experiments with an auditory feedback alteration system that enabled us to replace or block speech sounds in real time. Participants were asked to produce the syllable /pa/ repeatedly at a constant rate. During the repetition, normal auditory feedback was interrupted, and one of three pre-recorded syllables /pa/, /Φa/, or /pi/, spoken by the same participant, was presented once at a different timing from the anticipated production onset, while no feedback was presented for subsequent repetitions. Comparisons of the labial distance trajectories under altered and normal feedback conditions indicated that the movement quickened during the short period immediately after the alteration onset, when /pa/ was presented 50 ms before the expected timing. Such change was not significant under other feedback conditions we tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The earlier articulation rapidly induced by the progressive auditory input suggests that a compensatory mechanism helps to maintain a constant speech rate by detecting errors between the internally predicted and actually provided auditory information associated with self movement. The timing- and context

  10. Ecological Pleiotropy Suppresses the Dynamic Feedback Generated by a Rapidly Changing Trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, John P

    2017-05-01

    Population dynamics may carry a signature of an ecology-evolution-ecology feedback, known as eco-evolutionary dynamics, when functionally important traits change. Given current theory, the absence of a feedback from a trait with strong links to species interactions should not occur. In a previous study with the Didinium-Paramecium predator-prey system, however, rapid and large-magnitude changes in predator cell volume occurred without any noticeable effect on the population dynamics. Here I resolve this theory-data conflict by showing that ecological pleiotropy-when a trait has more than one functional effect on an ecological process-suppresses shifts in dynamics that would arise, given the links between cell volume and the species interaction. Whether eco-evolutionary dynamics arise, therefore, depends not just on the ecology-evolution feedback but on the net effect that a trait has on different parts of the underlying interaction.

  11. The influence of a preceptor-student 'Daily Feedback Tool' on clinical feedback practices in nursing education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louise; Molloy, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    Feedback in clinical education is essential for the development of competent nurses. When the process is enacted well, it offers measured performance against standards required by the nursing health profession, promoting learning and behavioural change. Despite this, health literature describes numerous barriers to effective feedback processes. A qualitative descriptive design was used to determine whether the introduction of a Daily Feedback Tool addressing some of the barriers to effective feedback, influenced nursing students and clinical supervisors (preceptors) experiences in nursing clinical education. A total of eight semi-structured focus groups related to student and preceptors reported experiences were completed comprising of preceptor and student groups independently. The data was analysed using aspects of grounded theory including purposive sampling and system analysis informing the subsequent stages of data collection. Participants reported that the introduction of the Daily Feedback Tool overcame some of the reported barriers, particularly relating to the frequency of feedback occasions, and the traditionally didactic, teacher-led feedback conversations. The Daily Feedback Tool was reported to influence the development of trusting preceptor-student relationships which gave the learner agency to seek feedback promoting learning and overall performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Student Satisfaction on Getting Feedback in Clinical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahmady

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the factors that are involved in medical education, undoubtedly feedback is a special place. Feedback is a link between assessment and learning. Student satisfaction has an important indicator in the quality of learning and teaching. Learning is also associated with the satisfaction of students from the courses. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback in clinical education. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on all of the seventh term nursing students in the faculty of Nursing and Midwifery in Arak and shazand cities. In the first semester in 93-94, they were trained post-CCU ward. The participants were selected through the census procedure. The students in both groups (intervention and control were selected randomly in subgroups of 7 and 8 participants. In each group, the students were trained for 4 weeks in the morning shift. To determine the effects of these two methods, after completion of each of the training courses, all of the students completed the questionnaires and the results were compared. Results: The results showed that the intervention and the control groups were similar in terms of demographic characteristics (gender, indigenous and student work experience and there was no statistically significant difference. Therefore, the mean of overall student satisfaction scores in the intervention group was higher than the control group. In all of the levels, the intervention group had more satisfaction compared to the control one. Statistical test showed a significant difference between the two groups (P <0/003. Conclusion: Generally, it can be said that the immediate and planned feedbacks during the training were offered to students and it could lead the way clinical training in the correct direction. So, the student satisfaction was increased with this process.

  13. Rapidly progressive periodontitis. A distinct clinical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, R C; Altman, L C; Ebersole, J L; Vandesteen, G E; Dahlberg, W H; Williams, B L; Osterberg, S K

    1983-04-01

    We report radiographic, clinical, historical, and laboratory observations on seven patients selected to illustrate the features and characteristics of rapidly progressive periodontitis, with the aim of establishing this disease as a distinct clinical entity. This form of periodontitis is seen most commonly in young adults in their twenties, but it can occur in postpubertal individuals up to approximately 35 years of age. During the active phase, the gingival tissues are extremely inflamed and there is hemorrhage, proliferation of the marginal gingiva, and exudation. Destruction is very rapid, with loss of much of the alveolar bone occurring within a few weeks or months. This phase may be accompanied by general malaise, weight loss, and depression, although these symptoms are not seen in all patients. The disease may progress, without remission, to tooth loss, or alternatively, it may subside and become quiescent with or without therapy. The quiescent phase is characterized by the presence of clinically normal gingiva that may be tightly adapted to the roots of teeth with very advanced bone loss and deep periodontal pockets. The quiescent phase may be permanent, it may persist for an indefinite period, or the disease activity may return. Most patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis have serum antibodies specific for various species of Bacteroides, Actinobacillus, or both, and manifest defects in either neutrophil or monocyte chemotaxis. Affected patients generally respond favorably to treatment by scaling and open or closed curettage, especially when accompanied by standard doses of antibiotics for conventional time periods. A small minority of patients do not respond to any treatment, including antibiotics, and the disease progresses inexorably to tooth loss even in the presence of aggressive periodontal therapy and maintenance. At the present time it is not possible to distinguish prior to treatment which individuals will respond to therapy and which will

  14. Rapid Integration of Artificial Sensory Feedback during Operant Conditioning of Motor Cortex Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Mario; Galiñanes, Gregorio L; Huber, Daniel

    2017-02-22

    Neuronal motor commands, whether generating real or neuroprosthetic movements, are shaped by ongoing sensory feedback from the displacement being produced. Here we asked if cortical stimulation could provide artificial feedback during operant conditioning of cortical neurons. Simultaneous two-photon imaging and real-time optogenetic stimulation were used to train mice to activate a single neuron in motor cortex (M1), while continuous feedback of its activity level was provided by proportionally stimulating somatosensory cortex. This artificial signal was necessary to rapidly learn to increase the conditioned activity, detect correct performance, and maintain the learned behavior. Population imaging in M1 revealed that learning-related activity changes are observed in the conditioned cell only, which highlights the functional potential of individual neurons in the neocortex. Our findings demonstrate the capacity of animals to use an artificially induced cortical channel in a behaviorally relevant way and reveal the remarkable speed and specificity at which this can occur. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Feedback as a means to improve clinical competencies: Consultants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, only half of the consultants believed they were proficient at giving feedback. Conclusion. Consultants need to develop the art of giving feedback through appropriate training so that they are more comfortable and proficient with the various aspects of feedback, leading to a positive effect on enhancing registrar ...

  17. Assessment of semantic knowledge: use of feedback and clinical interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, E D

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of semantic knowledge is particularly challenging for clinicians working with children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Vocabulary often reflects individual experiences, home language, and familiarity with school curriculum. Research demonstrates that children from nonmainstream backgrounds often score poorly on vocabulary tests yet may possess knowledge that is not evident in the kinds of tests that they take. Thus, a single word vocabulary test may not adequately capture the scope of such children's semantic knowledge. It is important that, before a diagnosis of language impairment is made, clinicians gain insight into children's semantic knowledge. This article describes the use of two procedures, feedback and the clinical interview, that can be utilized to probe children's language abilities.

  18. Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Samantha E; Snodgrass, Suzanne H; Rivett, Darren A; Russell, Trevor

    2016-09-01

    The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. The role of feedback in clinical education: Principles, strategies, and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahimi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feedback is an inseparable and integral part of learning. It promotes students' learning towards achieving goals. In the training of health professions, little feedback or a paucity of feedback can be observed. Giving correct feedback is another important matter that must be taken into account. Therefore, the aim of this study was to present the principles of feedback, its effective characteristics, the strategies, and models of feedback. Methods: In order to identify the relevant articles, online databases as Elsevier, Google Scholar, SID, and Magiran were searched using keywords such as feedback, clinical evaluation, clinical education, and feedback models were used. About Persian articles, the year of 1385, and Latin articles the year of 2000 have been considered as a base year. Totally, 49 articles were met the review potentiality. 34 articles were identified as relevant ones and included in the study as well as 15 papers were excluded due to being irrelevant. Results: Feedback must be considered as one of the most important tenets of clinical education like an agent for reflection and improvement. Feedback will be considered effective when it is intended as a certain period in education and its principles and characteristics will be considered and presented with appropriate strategies and models. If feedback is provided in an appropriate manner and with suitable information, the performance of the learner can be improved. Conclusion: Constructive and meaningful feedback is an essential part of teaching and learning for students to get instrumental information. Thus, teachers and clinical instructors must receive adequate training on feedback. Familiarity with models and strategies of feedback can pave the way towards providing effective and constructive feedback.

  20. Optimal estimation and scheduling in aquifer management using the rapid feedback control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanidehno, Hojat; Kokkinaki, Amalia; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Darve, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Management of water resources systems often involves a large number of parameters, as in the case of large, spatially heterogeneous aquifers, and a large number of "noisy" observations, as in the case of pressure observation in wells. Optimizing the operation of such systems requires both searching among many possible solutions and utilizing new information as it becomes available. However, the computational cost of this task increases rapidly with the size of the problem to the extent that textbook optimization methods are practically impossible to apply. In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient technique as a practical alternative for optimally operating large-scale dynamical systems. The proposed method, which we term Rapid Feedback Controller (RFC), provides a practical approach for combined monitoring, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, and optimal control for linear and nonlinear systems with a quadratic cost function. For illustration, we consider the case of a weakly nonlinear uncertain dynamical system with a quadratic objective function, specifically a two-dimensional heterogeneous aquifer management problem. To validate our method, we compare our results with the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method, which is the basic approach for feedback control. We show that the computational cost of the RFC scales only linearly with the number of unknowns, a great improvement compared to the basic LQG control with a computational cost that scales quadratically. We demonstrate that the RFC method can obtain the optimal control values at a greatly reduced computational cost compared to the conventional LQG algorithm with small and controllable losses in the accuracy of the state and parameter estimation.

  1. Quality of written narrative feedback and reflection in a modified mini-clinical evaluation exercise: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Research has shown that narrative feedback, (self) reflections and a plan to undertake and evaluate improvements are key factors for effective feedback on clinical performance. We investigated the quantity of narrative comments comprising feedback (by trainers),

  2. Home telemonitoring and remote feedback between clinic visits for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Cates, Christopher J

    2016-08-03

    Asthma is a chronic disease that causes reversible narrowing of the airways due to bronchoconstriction, inflammation and mucus production. Asthma continues to be associated with significant avoidable morbidity and mortality. Self management facilitated by a healthcare professional is important to keep symptoms controlled and to prevent exacerbations.Telephone and Internet technologies can now be used by patients to measure lung function and asthma symptoms at home. Patients can then share this information electronically with their healthcare provider, who can provide feedback between clinic visits. Technology can be used in this manner to improve health outcomes and prevent the need for emergency treatment for people with asthma and other long-term health conditions. To assess the efficacy and safety of home telemonitoring with healthcare professional feedback between clinic visits, compared with usual care. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Specialised Register (CAGR) up to May 2016. We also searched www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal and reference lists of other reviews, and we contacted trial authors to ask for additional information. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults or children with asthma in which any form of technology was used to measure and share asthma monitoring data with a healthcare provider between clinic visits, compared with other monitoring or usual care. We excluded trials in which technologies were used for monitoring with no input from a doctor or nurse. We included studies reported as full-text articles, those published as abstracts only and unpublished data. Two review authors screened the search and independently extracted risk of bias and numerical data, resolving disagreements by consensus.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios (ORs) while using study participants as the unit of analysis, and continuous data as mean differences (MDs) while

  3. Comparison of audio vs. written feedback on clinical assignments of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgault, Annette M; Mundy, Cynthia; Joshua, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study explored using audio recordings as method of feedback for weekly clinical assignments of nursing students. Feedback that provides students with insight into their performance is an essential component of nursing education. Audio methods have been used to communicate feedback on written assignments in other disciplines, but this method has not been reported in the nursing literature. A survey and VARK questionnaire were completed by eight nursing students. Each student had randomly received written and audio feedback during an eight-week period. There were no differences between written and audio methods. Students perceived audio as the most personal, easy to understand, and positive method. Only one student expressed a preference for written feedback.There was no difference in instructor time. Audio feedback is an innovative method of feedback for clinical assignments of 'Net Generation' nursing students.

  4. Students' motivation toward feedback-seeking in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.H. de; Favier, R.P.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Bok, H.G.

    2017-01-01

    In medical education, students are increasingly regarded as active seekers of feedback rather than passive recipients. Previous research showed that in the intentions of students to seek feedback, a learning and performance goal can be distinguished. In this study, we investigated the intentions

  5. Medical student perspective: working toward specific and actionable clinical clerkship feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Haley A; Derman, Peter B; Clement, R Carter

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on the wards is an important component of medical student education. Medical schools have incorporated formalized feedback mechanisms such as clinical encounter cards and standardized patient encounters into clinical curricula. However, the system could be further improved as medical students frequently feel uncomfortable requesting feedback, and are often dissatisfied with the quality of the feedback they receive. This article explores the shortcomings of the existing medical student feedback system and examines the relevant literature in an effort to shed light on areas in which the system can be enhanced. The discussion focuses on resident-provided feedback but is broadly applicable to delivering feedback in general. A review of the organizational psychology and business administration literature on fostering effective feedback was performed. These insights were then applied to the setting of medical education. Providing effective feedback requires training and forethought. Feedback itself should be specific and actionable. Utilizing these strategies will help medical students and educators get the most out of existing feedback systems.

  6. Feedback in the nonshifting context of the midwifery clinical education in Indonesia: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheny, Esti; Claramita, Mora; Rahayu, Gandes R; Kumara, Amitya

    2016-01-01

    Clinical education in some countries applies a hospital-based learning approach where each student rotates to one division to another division (call of shifting). However, for clinical midwifery education in Indonesia each student remains in a community midwifery clinic (call of nonshifting). Because of the differences in the shifting system used, the question of "How is feedback in the nonshifting context of the clinical midwifery education being given?" needs to be explored. This was a mixed methods study and was carried out in a School of Midwifery in Indonesia during 2014 and 2015. We explored the supervisors' and students' perception on the feedback delivery. Students' perceptions were collected through focus group discussions whereas supervisors' perceptions were recorded through interviews. The quality of feedback was observed using a checklist. Qualitative data were analyzed using Atlas Ti and quantitative data were analyzed using a descriptive statistic method. From the qualitative data, students and supervisors perceived their feedback as "more intensive." They reported authenticity in the monitoring and feedback from the day-to-day delivery of patient care with their supervisors. Students and supervisors also described their feedback as "more integrated." The feedback process stimulated students to value history taking, physical examination, and midwifery care. On the other hand, quantitative data from observations presented that "intensive and integrated feedback" were not supported by the quality of the feedback based on literature of the theory of facilitating learning (the mean was 4.67 on a scale of 0-9). The nonshifting clinical midwifery education can be a better alternative for facilitating the process of providing integrated and intensive feedback. To improve the quality of the feedback, training on providing feedback in a nonshifting context is fundamental in Indonesia.

  7. Feedback in the nonshifting context of the midwifery clinical education in Indonesia: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheny, Esti; Claramita, Mora; Rahayu, Gandes R.; Kumara, Amitya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical education in some countries applies a hospital-based learning approach where each student rotates to one division to another division (call of shifting). However, for clinical midwifery education in Indonesia each student remains in a community midwifery clinic (call of nonshifting). Because of the differences in the shifting system used, the question of “How is feedback in the nonshifting context of the clinical midwifery education being given?” needs to be explored. Materials and Methods: This was a mixed methods study and was carried out in a School of Midwifery in Indonesia during 2014 and 2015. We explored the supervisors’ and students’ perception on the feedback delivery. Students’ perceptions were collected through focus group discussions whereas supervisors’ perceptions were recorded through interviews. The quality of feedback was observed using a checklist. Qualitative data were analyzed using Atlas Ti and quantitative data were analyzed using a descriptive statistic method. Results: From the qualitative data, students and supervisors perceived their feedback as “more intensive.” They reported authenticity in the monitoring and feedback from the day-to-day delivery of patient care with their supervisors. Students and supervisors also described their feedback as “more integrated.” The feedback process stimulated students to value history taking, physical examination, and midwifery care. On the other hand, quantitative data from observations presented that “intensive and integrated feedback” were not supported by the quality of the feedback based on literature of the theory of facilitating learning (the mean was 4.67 on a scale of 0–9). Conclusions: The nonshifting clinical midwifery education can be a better alternative for facilitating the process of providing integrated and intensive feedback. To improve the quality of the feedback, training on providing feedback in a nonshifting context is fundamental in

  8. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  9. [Rapid maxillary expansion: clinical and radiographic principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Pinto, C C; Henriques, J F

    1990-01-01

    The midpalatine suture disjunction as an auxiliary means in the treatment of malocclusions with horizontal craneal base deficiencies has become a routine procedure in the orthodontic clinic. Therefore, for it to become an adequate therapeutical procedure for our patients it is of upmost importance we make a radiographic examinative so that we may juntify our diagnosis in that refers to facial skeletal disharmonies, specially in horizontal maxilary discrepancies.

  10. Microfluidic Immunoassays as Rapid Saliva-Based Clinical Diagnostics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amy E. Herr; Anson V. Hatch; Daniel J. Throckmorton; Huu M. Tran; James S. Brennan; William V. Giannobile; Anup K. Singh

    2007-01-01

    .... Here we report on a clinical POC diagnostic that enables rapid quantitation of an oral disease biomarker in human saliva by using a monolithic disposable cartridge designed to operate in a compact analytical instrument...

  11. Barriers to using eHealth data for clinical performance feedback in Malawi: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Manjomo, Ronald; Gadabu, Oliver J; Kam, Matthew; Simwaka, Bertha N; Zickmund, Susan L; Chimbwandira, Frank; Douglas, Gerald P; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-10-01

    Sub-optimal performance of healthcare providers in low-income countries is a critical and persistent global problem. The use of electronic health information technology (eHealth) in these settings is creating large-scale opportunities to automate performance measurement and provision of feedback to individual healthcare providers, to support clinical learning and behavior change. An electronic medical record system (EMR) deployed in 66 antiretroviral therapy clinics in Malawi collects data that supervisors use to provide quarterly, clinic-level performance feedback. Understanding barriers to provision of eHealth-based performance feedback for individual healthcare providers in this setting could present a relatively low-cost opportunity to significantly improve the quality of care. The aims of this study were to identify and describe barriers to using EMR data for individualized audit and feedback for healthcare providers in Malawi and to consider how to design technology to overcome these barriers. We conducted a qualitative study using interviews, observations, and informant feedback in eight public hospitals in Malawi where an EMR system is used. We interviewed 32 healthcare providers and conducted seven hours of observation of system use. We identified four key barriers to the use of EMR data for clinical performance feedback: provider rotations, disruptions to care processes, user acceptance of eHealth, and performance indicator lifespan. Each of these factors varied across sites and affected the quality of EMR data that could be used for the purpose of generating performance feedback for individual healthcare providers. Using routinely collected eHealth data to generate individualized performance feedback shows potential at large-scale for improving clinical performance in low-resource settings. However, technology used for this purpose must accommodate ongoing changes in barriers to eHealth data use. Understanding the clinical setting as a complex adaptive

  12. Learning outcomes using video in supervision and peer feedback during clinical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    -evaluated learning outcome especially on key skills. Learning outcomes of peer-feedback were positive on all evaluated domains. Results will be presented during the session. Conclusion The learning outcomes using video during peer-feedback and supervision are mostly favourable. Students have generally welcomed video......Objective New technology and learning principles were introduced in a clinical skills training laboratory (iLab). The intension was to move from apprenticeship to active learning principles including peer feedback and supervision using video. The objective of this study was to evaluate student...... learning outcomes in a manual skills training subject using video during feedback and supervision. Methods The iLab classroom was designed to fit four principles of teaching using video. Two of these principles were (a) group work using peer-feedback on videos produced by the students and, (b) video...

  13. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  14. The Efficacy of Standardized Patient Feedback in Clinical Teaching: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Doyle Howley, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of oral feedback from standardized patients on medical students’ overall perceptions of an educational exercise. We chose a mixed-methods approach to better understand the following research questions: Does satisfaction with the standardized patient exercise differ among those students who receive oral feedback and those who do not? What is the quality of oral feedback provided by standardized patients? Procedures. In order to address the first question, a basic randomized design comparing treatment (or those receiving SP feedback to control (those not receiving SP feedback was conducted. To address the second question, students in the treatment group were surveyed about their impressions of the quality of the feedback provided to them by their SP. One hundred and thirty six first year medical students were divided into treatment and control groups and interviewed one standardized patient during a single 20-minute encounter. Standardized patients were trained to simulate one of two outpatient cases and provide feedback using standard training materials. Both treatment and control groups completed a rating scale and questionnaire regarding their satisfaction with the encounter and students in the treatment group responded to additional questions regarding the quality of the SP feedback. Results. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA revealed significant differences among control and treatment groups on the seven combined dependent variables, Wilks’ =.890, F(7, 127=2.25, p<.034, ?2=.110. Students reported that the quality of SP feedback was very strong and additional qualitative analysis revealed further evidence to support the efficacy of providing oral SP feedback in a formative pre-clinical educational activity.

  15. Guidelines : the do's, don'ts and don't knows of feedback for clinical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefroy, Janet; Watling, Chris; Teunissen, Pim W; Brand, Paul

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The guidelines offered in this paper aim to amalgamate the literature on formative feedback into practical Do's, Don'ts and Don't Knows for individual clinical supervisors and for the institutions that support clinical learning. METHODS: The authors built consensus by an iterative

  16. Depression screening with patient-targeted feedback in cardiology: DEPSCREEN-INFO randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Bernd; Blankenberg, Stefan; Wegscheider, Karl; König, Hans-Helmut; Walter, Dirk; Murray, Alexandra M; Gierk, Benjamin; Kohlmann, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    International guidelines advocate depression screening in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and other chronic illnesses, but evidence is lacking. To test the differential efficacy of written patient-targeted feedback v. no written patient feedback after depression screening. Patients with CHD or hypertension from three cardiology settings were randomised and screened for depression (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01879111). Compared with the control group, where only cardiologists received written feedback, in the intervention group both cardiologists and patients received written feedback regarding depression status. Depression severity was measured 1 month (primary outcome) and 6 months after screening. The control group (n = 220) and the patient-feedback group (n = 155) did not differ in depression severity 1 month after screening. Six months after screening, the patient-feedback group showed significantly greater improvements in depression severity and was twice as likely to seek information about depression compared with the control group. Patient-targeted feedback in addition to screening has a significant but small effect on depression severity after 6 months and may encourage patients to take an active role in the self-management of depression. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  17. Restoring the Architecture: A Rapid Clinical Perspective on Bone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Restoring the Architecture: A Rapid Clinical Perspective on Bone-Mineral Density and Osteoporosis. 23. The page number in the footer is not for bibliographic referencing www.tandfonline.com/oemd. 23. • Vitamin D: Vital for calcium and phosphate absorption. Speculated to exert direct effects on bone, but the relevance of.

  18. Restoring the Architecture: A Rapid Clinical Perspective on Bone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition that contributes to the risk of fracture in both women and men. The current paper will provide a rapid clinical overview of the condition and the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches applied in its treatment. We close with a summary of novel treatment strategies ...

  19. Under graduate student feedback on teaching and evaluation method in clinical pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Deo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Any teaching and evaluation method can be considered as effective once they are judged by students. Objective This study was designed to obtain feedback on teaching and evaluation methods in the subject of clinical pharmacology among under graduate students Methods Feedback on teaching and evaluation method was taken from undergraduate students of 2009 batch and various approaches to teaching and evaluation are identified. To know the effect of these novel approaches of teaching and evaluation, student feedback was taken from subsequent batch 2010 and 2011 using a written validated questionnaire covering various aspects of teaching and evaluation methods. Results Under graduate students were satisfied with all teaching methods like lecture and pharmacological exercises. They showed preference for tutorials, short answer questions and revision classes where as they were not satisfied with seminar method of learning. All students felt that there should be more time for clinical pharmacology and pharmacological problem based exercises.. The pass percentage of the subsequent batch in university examinations improved from 75 % to 90%. Conclusion Based upon the student’s feedback, incorporation of suggestion obtained from the students resulted in improvement in performance of the students. Hence, it is very essential to take regular feedback from the students to synchronize teaching and evaluation method of the students. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-3, 31-34 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i3.10220

  20. The effect of electronic monitoring feedback on medication adherence and clinical outcomes: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuckelum, M. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Houterman, A.E.J.; Dulmen, S. van; Bent, B.J.F. van den

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to assess the efficacy of Electronic Monitoring Feedback (EMF) as an intervention to improve medication adherence (i.e. dose- or full adherence) and clinical outcomes in adult patients. Methods: A systematic search was performed in Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Web of

  1. Design of a clinical competency committee to maximize formative feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Donato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the next phase in the roll-out of Next Accreditation System, US residency programs are to develop Clinical Competency Committees (CCCs to formally implement outcome-based medical education objectives in the resident assessment process. However, any changes to an assessment system must consider balancing formative and summative tensions, flexibility and standardization tensions, fairness and transparency to learners, and administrative burden for faculty. Objectives/Methods: In this article, one program discusses the approach one internal medicine residency took to create a developmental model CCC. In this model, a learner's mentor presents the argument for competence to the CCC, while a second reviewer presents challenges to that argument to the rest of the committee members. The CCC members provide other insights and make recommendations. The mentor presents the final committee recommendations to that resident, who then works with the mentor to develop a plan for future action. Results: CCC second reviewers spent an average of 30.4 min (SD: 11.4 preparing for each resident's discussion, a duty performed 5–7 times every 6 months. Faculty development was associated with an increase in the number of action-oriented comments in the meeting minutes (3.2–4.1 comments per resident, p=0.001. CCC members and mentors gave higher Likert-type ratings than residents for fairness (4.8 vs. 4.0 and learning prioritization (4.7 vs. 4.2, but similar ratings for transparency (4.0 vs. 4.2. Conclusion: Developmental model CCCs may be feasible for residency programs, but faculty development may be necessary.

  2. The medical educator, the discourse analyst, and the phonetician: a collaborative feedback methodology for clinical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Stevens, Mary; Flynn, Eleanor

    2011-05-01

    Frameworks for clinical communication assist educators in making explicit the principles of good communication and providing feedback to medical trainees. However, existing frameworks rarely take into account the roles of culture and language in communication, which can be important for international medical graduates (IMGs) whose first language is not English. This article describes the collaboration by a medical educator, a discourse analyst, and a phonetician to develop a communication and language feedback methodology to assist IMG trainees at a Victorian hospital in Australia with developing their doctor-patient communication skills. The Communication and Language Feedback (CaLF) methodology incorporates a written tool and video recording of role-plays of doctor-patient interactions in a classroom setting or in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) practice session with a simulated patient. IMG trainees receive verbal feedback from their hospital-based medical clinical educator, the simulated patient, and linguists. The CaLF tool was informed by a model of language in context, observation of IMG communication training, and process evaluation by IMG participants during January to August 2009. The authors provided participants with a feedback package containing their practice video (which included verbal feedback) and the completed CaLF tool.The CaLF methodology provides a tool for medical educators and language practitioners to work collaboratively with IMGs to enhance communication and language skills. The ongoing interdisciplinary collaboration also provides much-needed applied research opportunities in intercultural health communication, an area the authors believe cannot be adequately addressed from the perspective of one discipline alone. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  3. A rapid feedback signal is not always necessary for termination of a drinking bout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, T R; Yang-Preyer, H; Geyer, J; Norris, M L

    1999-04-01

    When a pig is deprived of drinking water, a deficit of body water develops that is corrected when the pig drinks to satiation. If food is available during the deprivation, the stimulus to drinking is plasma hyperosmolality. Because of the delay in correction of plasma hyperosmolality as ingested water is slowly absorbed, it has been thought that a rapid inhibitory signal from the digestive tract is necessary to prevent overdrinking. This concept was tested by measuring changes in plasma osmolality before and during drinking after such deprivation and also after infusion of hypertonic saline. As drinking began, there was a rapid fall of plasma osmolality to levels insufficient to drive drinking by the time drinking ended. This fall of plasma hyperosmolality to subthreshold levels while the pig is drinking seems to make a rapid inhibitory control signal from the digestive tract unnecessary to terminate the drinking bout under these conditions.

  4. Collaborative and Bidirectional Feedback Between Students and Clinical Preceptors: Promoting Effective Communication Skills on Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kara; Chou, Calvin L

    2016-11-01

    Current literature on feedback suggests that clinical preceptors lead feedback conversations that are primarily unidirectional, from preceptor to student. While this approach may promote clinical competency, it does not actively develop students' competency in facilitating feedback discussions and providing feedback across power differentials (ie, from student to preceptor). This latter competency warrants particular attention given its fundamental role in effective health care team communication and its related influence on patient safety. Reframing the feedback process as collaborative and bidirectional, where both preceptors and students provide and receive feedback, maximizes opportunities for role modeling and skills practice in the context of a supportive relationship, thereby enhancing team preparedness. We describe an initiative to introduce these fundamental skills of collaborative, bidirectional feedback in the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  5. Utilizing measure-based feedback in control-mastery theory: A clinical error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, John; Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie

    2016-09-01

    Clinical errors and ruptures are an inevitable part of clinical practice. Often times, therapists are unaware that a clinical error or rupture has occurred, leaving no space for repair, and potentially leading to patient dropout and/or less effective treatment. One way to overcome our blind spots is by frequently and systematically collecting measure-based feedback from the patient. Patient feedback measures that focus on the process of psychotherapy such as the Patient's Experience of Attunement and Responsiveness scale (PEAR) can be used in conjunction with treatment outcome measures such as the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ-45.2) to monitor the patient's therapeutic experience and progress. The regular use of these types of measures can aid clinicians in the identification of clinical errors and the associated patient deterioration that might otherwise go unnoticed and unaddressed. The current case study describes an instance of clinical error that occurred during the 2-year treatment of a highly traumatized young woman. The clinical error was identified using measure-based feedback and subsequently understood and addressed from the theoretical standpoint of the control-mastery theory of psychotherapy. An alternative hypothetical response is also presented and explained using control-mastery theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. The association of positive and negative feedback with clinical performance, self-evaluation and practice contribution of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Shiyovich, Arthur; Nusbaum, Lika; Raizer, Haya

    2013-10-01

    Providing consistent and high-quality feedback is a crucial component of clinical instruction. Such feedback can improve the students' ability to reflect themselves more accurately. However, giving feedback, especially negative is intricate. To evaluate the level of feedback provided to nursing students during clinical practice and investigate their association with related outcomes, such us clinical performance, self-evaluation of achievements and contribution of the practice to the professional skills. Cross-sectional study. 124 third-year nursing students during their "Emergency Nursing" (EN) clinical practice were instructed, criticized and graded by three teachers from the university staff. Following their clinical practice the students filled-out a questionnaire, in which they evaluated the feedback provided by their teachers, the contribution of the practice to their professional skills and their personal performance. Additionally, the teachers' grades of students' achievements were collected. Accuracy of students' self-evaluation was calculated as the arithmetical difference between the students' grades and the teachers' grades. The mean grades of positive and negative feedback were 74.5/100 and 70.7/100, respectively. Higher-quality positive feedback was associated with higher teachers' grade (p=0.027) and with "very high" evaluation of the contribution of the practice (p=0.022). Higher-quality positive feedback was associated with student's over-self-evaluation (p=0.02), whereas higher-quality negative feedback was associated with more accurate self-evaluation (p=0.015). High-quality positive feedback is associated with higher grades, higher contribution of the clinical practice to the student and over-self-evaluation whereas high-quality negative feedback is related to an accurate self evaluation of the students' performance. Teachers should pay more attention to administering high-quality positive and negative feedback. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Clinical Clerkship Education Improves With Implementing a System of Internal Program Evaluation Using Medical Students' Feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Sadeghi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality of clinical education for medical students has always been a concern in academic medicine. This concern has increased in today’s time-squeeze while faculty members have to fulfill their complementary roles as a teacher, researcher, and practitioner. One of the strategies for program evaluation is obtaining trainees’ feedbacks since they are the main customers of educational programs; however, there are debates about the efficacy of student feedback as a reliable source for reforms. We gathered Likert scores on a 16-item questionnaire from 2,771 medical students participating in all clerkship programs in a multidisciplinary teaching hospital. An expert panel consisting of 8 attending physicians established content validity of the questionnaire while a high Cronbach’s Alpha (0.93 proved its reliability. Summary reports of these feedbacks were presented to heads of departments, clerkship program directors, and hospital administrators, at the end of each semester. Analysis of variance was used for comparing hospital scores across different time periods and different departments. Significant changes (P<0.001 were observed in mean scores between different semesters (partial η2=0.090, different departments (partial η2=0.149 as well as the interaction term between departments and semesters (partial η2=0.111. A significant improvement in mean clinical education score is noticeable after three semesters from the beginning of the survey. Periodic, systematic trainee’s feedback to program directors can lead to an improved educational performance in teaching hospitals.

  8. Feedback versus no feedback to improve patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Waaddegaard, Mette; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    Background: A high rate of dropout in the treatment of eating disorders calls for ways to improve treatment attendance. Research indicates that continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance reduces the number of dropouts and increases patient outcome. There are, however......, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Objective: The current randomized clinical trial aims to investigate the impact......: Standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention using the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), or the control group: Standard treatment only. The primary outcome is rate of attendance. Secondary outcome is severity of eating disorder...

  9. FAIR_OSCE – Feedback structure for assessment of interactive roleplay in Objective Structured Clinical Exams

    OpenAIRE

    Brem, Beate; Richter, Cornelia Sabine; Schnabel, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Since the quality of patient portrayal of standardized patients (SPs) during an Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) has a major impact on the reliability and validity of the exam, quality control should be initiated. Literature about quality control of SPs’ performance focuses on feedback [1, 2] or completion of checklists [3, 4]. Since we did not find a published instrument meeting our needs for the assessment of patient portrayal, we developed such an instrument af...

  10. Documenting clinical performance problems among medical students: feedback for learner remediation and curriculum enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavis, Brian E; Wagner, Dianne P; Henry, Rebecca C; Carravallah, Laura; Gold, Jon; Maurer, Joel; Mohmand, Asad; Osuch, Janet; Roskos, Steven; Saxe, Andrew; Sousa, Aron; Prins, Vince Winkler

    2013-07-22

    We operationalized the taxonomy developed by Hauer and colleagues describing common clinical performance problems. Faculty raters pilot tested the resulting worksheet by observing recordings of problematic simulated clinical encounters involving third-year medical students. This approach provided a framework for structured feedback to guide learner improvement and curricular enhancement. Eighty-two problematic clinical encounters from M3 students who failed their clinical competency examination were independently rated by paired clinical faculty members to identify common problems related to the medical interview, physical examination, and professionalism. Eleven out of 26 target performance problems were present in 25% or more encounters. Overall, 37% had unsatisfactory medical interviews, with 'inadequate history to rule out other diagnoses' most prevalent (60%). Seventy percent failed because of physical examination deficiencies, with missing elements (69%) and inadequate data gathering (69%) most common. One-third of the students did not introduce themselves to their patients. Among students failing based on standardized patient (SP) ratings, 93% also failed to demonstrate competency based on the faculty ratings. Our review form allowed clinical faculty to validate pass/fail decisions based on standardized patient ratings. Detailed information about performance problems contributes to learner feedback and curricular enhancement to guide remediation planning and faculty development.

  11. Documenting clinical performance problems among medical students: feedback for learner remediation and curriculum enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Mavis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We operationalized the taxonomy developed by Hauer and colleagues describing common clinical performance problems. Faculty raters pilot tested the resulting worksheet by observing recordings of problematic simulated clinical encounters involving third-year medical students. This approach provided a framework for structured feedback to guide learner improvement and curricular enhancement. Methods: Eighty-two problematic clinical encounters from M3 students who failed their clinical competency examination were independently rated by paired clinical faculty members to identify common problems related to the medical interview, physical examination, and professionalism. Results: Eleven out of 26 target performance problems were present in 25% or more encounters. Overall, 37% had unsatisfactory medical interviews, with ‘inadequate history to rule out other diagnoses’ most prevalent (60%. Seventy percent failed because of physical examination deficiencies, with missing elements (69% and inadequate data gathering (69% most common. One-third of the students did not introduce themselves to their patients. Among students failing based on standardized patient (SP ratings, 93% also failed to demonstrate competency based on the faculty ratings. Conclusions: Our review form allowed clinical faculty to validate pass/fail decisions based on standardized patient ratings. Detailed information about performance problems contributes to learner feedback and curricular enhancement to guide remediation planning and faculty development.

  12. Evaluating an audit and feedback intervention for reducing antibiotic prescribing behaviour in general dental practice (the RAPiD trial): a partial factorial cluster randomised trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prescribing in dentistry accounts for 9% of total antibiotic prescriptions in Scottish primary care. The Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme (SDCEP) published guidance in April 2008 (2nd edition, August 2011) for Drug Prescribing in Dentistry, which aims to assist dentists to make evidence-based antibiotic prescribing decisions. However, wide variation in prescribing persists and the overall use of antibiotics is increasing. Methods RAPiD is a 12-month partial factorial cluster randomised trial conducted in NHS General Dental Practices across Scotland. Its aim is to compare the effectiveness of individualised audit and feedback (A&F) strategies for the translation into practice of SDCEP recommendations on antibiotic prescribing. The trial uses routinely collected electronic healthcare data in five aspects of its design in order to: identify the study population; apply eligibility criteria; carry out stratified randomisation; generate the trial intervention; analyse trial outcomes. Eligibility was determined on contract status and a minimum level of recent NHS treatment provision. All eligible dental practices in Scotland were simultaneously randomised at baseline either to current audit practice or to an intervention group. Randomisation was stratified by single-handed/multi-handed practices. General dental practitioners (GDPs) working at intervention practices will receive individualised graphical representations of their antibiotic prescribing rate from the previous 14 months at baseline and an update at six months. GDPs could not be blinded to their practice allocation. Intervention practices were further randomised using a factorial design to receive feedback with or without: a health board comparator; a supplementary text-based intervention; additional feedback at nine months. The primary outcome is the total antibiotic prescribing rate per 100 courses of treatment over the year following delivery of the baseline

  13. Rapid clinical deterioration in an individual with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Julia; Schwartz, Alison; McDougle, Christopher J; Skotko, Brian G

    2016-07-01

    A small percentage of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome experience a rapid and unexplained deterioration in cognitive, adaptive, and behavioral functioning. Currently, there is no standardized work-up available to evaluate these patients or treat them. Their decline typically involves intellectual deterioration, a loss of skills of daily living, and prominent behavioral changes. Certain cases follow significant life events such as completion of secondary school with friends who proceed on to college or employment beyond the individual with DS. Others develop this condition seemingly unprovoked. Increased attention in the medical community to clinical deterioration in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome could provide a framework for improved diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. This report presents a young adult male with Down syndrome who experienced severe and unexplained clinical deterioration, highlighting specific challenges in the systematic evaluation and treatment of these patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance may reduce the number of dropouts and increase patient outcome. There are, however, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders, showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Accordingly the current randomized clinical trial, initiated in September 2012 at the outpatient clinic for eating disorders at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre, aims to investigate the impact of continuous feedback on attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy. Methods/design The hypothesis is that continuous feedback to both patient and therapist on treatment progress and alliance will increase attendance and treatment outcome. The trial is set up using a randomized design with a minimum of 128 patients allocated to either an experimental or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or an eating disorder not otherwise specified, according to the DSM-IV. In the experimental group feedback to the participants, based on the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), is actively added to standard treatment. The ORS assesses areas of life functioning known to change as a result of therapeutic intervention. The GSRS assesses key dimensions of effective therapeutic relationships. In the control group, the patients fill out the Outcome Rating Scale only, and feedback is not provided. The primary outcome is the rate of attendance to treatment sessions. The secondary outcome is the severity of eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory outcomes are the level of psychological and social functioning, and suicide or self

  15. Feedback versus no feedback in improving patient outcome in group psychotherapy for eating disorders (F-EAT): protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Poulsen, Stig; Waaddegaard, Mette; Lindschou, Jane; Lau, Marianne

    2014-04-23

    Continuous feedback on patient improvement and the therapeutic alliance may reduce the number of dropouts and increase patient outcome. There are, however, only three published randomized trials on the effect of feedback on the treatment of eating disorders, showing inconclusive results, and there are no randomized trials on the effect of feedback in group therapy. Accordingly the current randomized clinical trial, initiated in September 2012 at the outpatient clinic for eating disorders at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre, aims to investigate the impact of continuous feedback on attendance and outcome in group psychotherapy. The hypothesis is that continuous feedback to both patient and therapist on treatment progress and alliance will increase attendance and treatment outcome. The trial is set up using a randomized design with a minimum of 128 patients allocated to either an experimental or control group at a ratio of 1:1. The experimental group will receive standard treatment (systemic and narrative group psychotherapy) with feedback intervention, whereas the control group will receive standard treatment only. The participants are diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or an eating disorder not otherwise specified, according to the DSM-IV. In the experimental group feedback to the participants, based on the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Group Session Rating Scale (GSRS), is actively added to standard treatment. The ORS assesses areas of life functioning known to change as a result of therapeutic intervention. The GSRS assesses key dimensions of effective therapeutic relationships. In the control group, the patients fill out the Outcome Rating Scale only, and feedback is not provided.The primary outcome is the rate of attendance to treatment sessions. The secondary outcome is the severity of eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory outcomes are the level of psychological and social functioning, and suicide or self-harm. This is measured with the

  16. Clinical pathway using rapid rehydration for children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phin, S J; McCaskill, M E; Browne, G J; Lam, L T

    2003-07-01

    To determine in the Emergency Department (ED) the efficacy of a clinical pathway using rapid rehydration for children moderately dehydrated as a result of acute gastroenteritis. This was a prospective study using historical controls, set in the ED of the Children's Hospital at Westmead, NSW, Australia. Subjects were aged from 6 months to 16 years presenting with vomiting and diarrhoea for Pharma, Lane Cove, NSW, Australia) via nasogastric tube at the same rate. There were 145 children in the prospective intervention group and 170 in the historical control group. The outcome measures were admission rate, percentage of patients discharged from the ED in 8 h or less, rate of re-presentations within 48 h requiring admission, and rate of procedures with intravenous cannula or nasogastric tube. In the moderately dehydrated children, significant reductions were observed in the admission rate and the number discharged in 8 h or less in the intervention group compared with the control group, with no significant difference in the rate of re-presentation and the rate of procedures. In the moderately dehydrated children in the intervention group, the admission rate was 29 of 52 (55.8%) compared with the controls 26 of 27 (96.3%) (P < 0.001) and the number discharged in 8 h or less was 23 of 52 (44.2%) compared with 1 of 27 (3.7%) in the controls (P < 0.01). The clinical pathway utilizing rapid rehydration in children moderately dehydrated from gastroenteritis is effective in reducing admission rates and lengths of stay in the ED.

  17. Investigating the role of feedback and motivation in clinical reaction time assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T; Chandran, Srikrishna; Richardson, James K

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the influence of performance feedback and motivation during 2 tests of simple visuomotor reaction time (RT). Cross-sectional, observational study. Outpatient academic physiatry clinic. Thirty-one healthy adults (mean [SD], 54 ± 15 years). Participants completed a clinical test of RT (RT(clin)) and a computerized test of RT with and without performance feedback (RT(compFB) and RT(compNoFB), respectively) in randomly assigned order. They then ranked their degree of motivation during each test. RT(clin) measured the time required to catch a suspended vertical shaft by hand closure after release of the shaft by the examiner. RT(compFB) and RT(compNoFB) both measured the time required to press a computer key in response to a visual cue displayed on a computer monitor. Performance feedback (visual display of the previous trial and summary results) was provided for RT(compFB), but not for RT(compNoFB). Means and standard deviations of RT(clin), RT(compFB), and RT(compNoFB) and participants' self-reported motivation on a 5-point Likert scale for each test. There were significant differences in both the means and standard deviations of RT(clin), RT(compFB), and RT(compNoFB) (F(2,60) = 81.66, P motivation between RT(clin) and RT(compFB), both of which were reported to be more motivating than RT(compNoFB). The stronger correlation between RT(clin) and RT(compFB) as well as the higher reported motivation during RT(clin) and RT(compFB) testing suggest that performance feedback is a positive motivating factor that is inherent to RT(clin) testing. RT(clin) is a simple, inexpensive technique for measuring RT and appears to be an intrinsically motivating task. This motivation may promote faster, more consistent RT performance compared with currently available computerized programs, which do not typically provide performance feedback. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence: a report of an interrupted time series trial of feedback in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kimberly D; Sales, Anne E; Baylon, Melba Andrea B; Schalm, Corinne; Miklavcic, John J

    2017-05-18

    There is substantial evidence about the effectiveness of audit with feedback, but none that we know have been conducted in home care settings. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence - Home Care (DICE-HC) project was to evaluate the effects of an audit and feedback delivered to care providers on home care client outcomes. The objective of this paper is to report the effects of feedback on four specific quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospital visits. A 10-month audit with feedback intervention study was conducted with care providers in seven home care offices in Alberta, Canada, which involved delivery of four quarterly feedback reports consisting of data derived from the Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care (RAI-HC). The primary evaluation employed an interrupted time series design using segmented regression analysis to assess the effects of feedback reporting on the four quality indicators: pain, falls, delirium, and hospitalization. Changes in level and trend of the quality indicators were measured before, during, and after the implementation of feedback reports. Pressure ulcer reporting was analyzed as a comparator condition not included in the feedback report. Care providers were surveyed on responses to feedback reporting which informed a process evaluation. At initiation of feedback report implementation, the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls significantly increased. Though the percentage of clients reporting pain and falls tended to increase and reporting of delirium and hospital visits tended to decrease relative to the pre-intervention period, there was no significant effect of feedback reporting on quality indicators during the 10-month intervention. The percentage of clients reporting falls, delirium, and hospital visits significantly increased in the 6-month period following feedback reporting relative to the intervention period. About 50% of the care providers that read and understand

  19. Improved real-life adherence of 6-monthly denosumab injections due to positive feedback based on rapid 6-month BMD increase and good safety profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, J D; Farahmand, P

    2014-05-01

    Almost 50 % of osteoporosis (OP) patients discontinue bisphosphonate (BP) therapy within 1-2 years after the start of their treatment. Denosumab's longer dosing interval with its administration every 6 months (Q6M) as a subcutaneous (sc) injection might result in a better real-life treatment adherence and persistence than weekly or monthly oral BP treatment regimen. The objectives of this open, investigator-initiated, prospective, observational, single-center study were to evaluate adherence with denosumab 60 mg sc every 6 months (Q6M) (Prolia(®)) injections in osteoporotic patients in a routine clinical care setting and to describe whether positive feedback to OP patients based on measured bone mineral density (BMD) increases and good safety profile have an impact on patients' real-life adherence. Results indicate that the rarity of adverse events and reduced dosage frequency together with the consistency of rapid and highly significant increases in BMD already after 6 months of denosumab therapy used as a positive reinforcement during doctor-patient interactions had a significant, positive impact on osteoporotic patient's adherence to continue with the 6-monthly sc denosumab injections.

  20. Clinical Pathway and Monthly Feedback Improve Adherence to Antibiotic Guideline Recommendations for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Almatar

    Full Text Available Compliance with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP guidelines remains poor despite a substantial body of evidence indicating that guideline-concordant care improves patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of a general educational and a targeted emergency department intervention on improving physicians' concordance with CAP guidelines.Two distinct interventions were implemented over specific time periods. The first intervention was educational, focusing on the development of local CAP guidelines and their dissemination through hospital-wide educational programmes. The second intervention was a targeted one for the emergency department, where a clinical pathway for the initial management of CAP patients was introduced, followed by monthly feedback to the emergency department (ED physicians about concordance rates with the guidelines. Data on the concordance rate to CAP guidelines was collected from a retrospective chart review.A total of 398 eligible patient records were reviewed to measure concordance to CAP guidelines over the study period. Concordance rates during the baseline and educational intervention periods were similar (28.1% vs. 31.2%; p > 0.05. Significantly more patients were treated in accordance with the CAP guidelines after the ED focused intervention when compared to the baseline (61.5% vs. 28.1%; p < 0.05 or educational period (61.5% vs. 31.2%; p < 0.05.A targeted intervention with a CAP clinical pathway and monthly feedback was a successful strategy to increase adherence to empirical antibiotic recommendations in CAP guidelines.

  1. Essential processes for cognitive behavioral clinical supervision: Agenda setting, problem-solving, and formative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jorden A; Ballantyne, Elena C; Scallion, Laura M

    2015-06-01

    Clinical supervision should be a proactive and considered endeavor, not a reactive one. To that end, supervisors should choose supervision processes that are driven by theory, best available research, and clinical experience. These processes should be aimed at helping trainees develop as clinicians. We highlight 3 supervision processes we believe should be used at each supervision meeting: agenda setting, encouraging trainee problem-solving, and formative feedback. Although these are primarily cognitive-behavioral skills, they can be helpful in combination with other supervision models. We provide example dialogue from supervision exchanges, and discuss theoretical and research support for these processes. Using these processes not only encourages trainee development but also models for them how to use the same processes and approaches with clients. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Clinical and physiological consequences of rapid tryptophan depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P; Landolt, H P; Seifritz, E; Clark, C; Bhatti, T; Kelsoe, J; Rapaport, M; Gillin, J C

    2000-12-01

    We review here the rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) methodology and its controversial association with depressive relapse. RTD has been used over the past decade to deplete serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine, or 5-HT) in humans and to probe the role of the central serotonin system in a variety of psychiatric conditions. Its current popularity was stimulated by reports that RTD reversed the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) in remitted patients with a history of depression but not in patients treated with antidepressants which promote catecholaminergic rather than serotonergic neurotransmission (such as tricyclic antidepressants or buproprion). However, RTD has inconsistent effects in terms of full clinical relapse in depressed patients. Pooling the data from all published reports, patients who are either unmedicated and/or fully remitted are much less likely to experience relapse (7 of 61, or approximately 9%) than patients who are recently medicated and partially remitted (63 of 133, or approximately 47%; although, the numbers here may reflect patient overlap between reports). Recently remitted patients who have been treated with non-pharmacological therapies such as total sleep deprivation, electroconvulsive therapy, or bright light therapy also do not commonly show full clinical relapse with RTD. We briefly review RTD effects in other psychiatric disorders, many of which are treated with SSRIs. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that RTD affects central serotonergic neurotransmission. Nevertheless, many questions remain about the ability of RTD to reverse the beneficial effects of SSRIs or MAOIs, or to induce symptoms in unmedicated symptomatic or asymptomatic patients.

  3. Facilitating the Feedback Process on a Clinical Clerkship Using a Smartphone Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aditya; Generalla, Jenilee; Thompson, Britta; Haidet, Paul

    2017-04-18

    This pilot study evaluated the effects of a smartphone-triggered method of feedback delivery on students' perceptions of the feedback process. An interactive electronic feedback form was made available to students through a smartphone app. Students were asked to evaluate various aspects of the feedback process. Responses from a previous year served as control. In the first three quarters of academic year 2014-2015 (pre-implementation), only 65% of responders reported receiving oral feedback and 40% reported receiving written feedback. During the pilot phase (transition), these increased to 80% for both forms. Following full implementation in academic year 2015-2016 (post-implementation), 97% reported receiving oral feedback, and 92% reported receiving written feedback. A statistically significant difference was noted pre- to post-implementation for both oral and written feedback (p performance; 69% indicated the feedback method as better compared to other methods. Students acknowledged the facilitation of conversation with supervisors and the convenience of receiving feedback, as well as the promptness with which feedback was provided. The use of a drop-down menu was thought to limit the scope of conversation. These data point to the effectiveness of this method to cue supervisors to provide feedback to students.

  4. Clinical Feedback About Empirically Supported Treatments for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nicholas C; Newman, Michelle G; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been derived principally from randomized controlled trials. As such, evidence about the treatment of OCD has unilaterally flowed from researchers to clinicians. Despite often having decades of experience treating OCD, clinicians' feedback on their clinical observations in using these treatments has not been solicited. The current study contacted clinicians for their clinical observations on empirically supported treatments for OCD to identify commonly used cognitive-behavioral techniques and their limitations in their practices. One hundred eighty-one psychotherapists completed an online survey. The average participant practiced psychotherapy for 15 years, worked in private practice, held a doctorate, and treated an average of 25 clients with OCD in their lifetime. In regard to the most common techniques, behavioral strategies involving exposure to a feared outcome and prevention of a compulsive ritual were the most frequent group of interventions, followed by techniques that attempted to identify and challenge irrational thoughts. However, the majority of participants also reported incorporating mindfulness or acceptance-based methods. Based on therapists' reports, the most common barriers to the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral interventions included limited premorbid functioning, chaotic lifestyles, controlling and critical families, OCD symptom severity, OCD symptom chronicity, and comorbidities. This study provides insight into common practices and limitations in clinical practice to inform future clinically relevant treatment research. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Rapid Response Team Activations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei Won Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background To ensure patient safety and improvements in the quality of hospital care, rapid response teams (RRTs have been implemented in many countries, including Korea. The goal of an RRT is early identification and response to clinical deterioration in patients. However, there are differences in RRT systems among hospitals and limited data are available. Methods In Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the St. Mary’s Advanced Life Support Team was implemented in June 2013. We retrospectively reviewed the RRT activation records of 287 cases from June 2013 to December 2016. Results The median response time and median modified early warning score were 8.6 minutes (interquartile range, 5.6 to 11.6 minutes and 5.0 points (interquartile range, 4.0 to 7.0 points, respectively. Residents (35.8% and nurses (59.1% were the main activators of the RRT. Interestingly, postoperative patients account for a large percentage of the RRT activation cases (69.3%. The survival rate was 83.6% and survival was mainly associated with malignancy, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II score, and the time from admission to RRT activation. RRT activation with screening showed a better outcome compared to activation via a phone call in terms of the intensive care unit admission rate and length of hospital stay after RRT activation. Conclusions Malignancy was the most important factor related to survival. In addition, RRT activation with patient screening showed a better outcome compared to activation via a phone call. Further studies are needed to determine the effective screening criteria and improve the quality of the RRT system.

  6. An autoethnographic exploration of the use of goal oriented feedback to enhance brief clinical teaching encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Laura; Bourgeois-Law, Gisele; Ajjawi, Rola; Regehr, Glenn

    2017-03-01

    Supervision in the outpatient context is increasingly in the form of single day interactions between students and preceptors. This creates difficulties for effective feedback, which often depends on a strong relationship of trust between preceptor and student. Building on feedback theories focusing on the relational and dialogic aspects of feedback, this study explored the use of goal-oriented feedback in brief encounters with learners. This study used autoethnography to explore one preceptor's feedback interactions over an eight-month period both in the ambulatory setting and on the wards. Data included written narrative reflections on feedback interactions with twenty-three learners informed by discussions with colleagues and repeated reading of feedback literature. Thematic and narrative analyses of data were performed iteratively. Data analysis emphasized four recurrent themes. (1) Goal discussions were most effective when initiated early and integrated throughout the learning experience. (2) Both learner and preceptor goals were multiple and varied, and feedback needed to reflect this complexity. (3) Negotiation or co-construction of goals was important when considering the focus of feedback discussions in order to create safer, more effective interactions. (4) Goal oriented interactions offer potential benefits to the learner and preceptor. Goal oriented feedback promotes dialogue as it requires both preceptor and learner to acknowledge and negotiate learning goals throughout their interaction. In doing so, feedback becomes an explicit component of the preceptor-learner relationship. This enhances feedback interactions even in relatively brief encounters, and may begin an early educational alliance that can be elaborated with longer interactions.

  7. Clinical study of student learning using mastery style versus immediate feedback online activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Schroeder, Noah; Stelzer, Timothy

    2015-06-01

    This paper is part of a series of studies to improve the efficacy of online physics homework activities by integrating narrated animated solutions with mastery inspired exercises. In a clinical study using first- and second-year university students, the mastery group attempted question sets in four levels, with animated solutions between each attempt, until mastery was achieved on each level. This combined elements of formative assessment, the worked example effect, and mastery learning. The homework group attempted questions with immediate feedback and unlimited tries. The two groups took a similar amount of time to complete the activity. The mastery group significantly outperformed the homework group on a free response post-test that required students to show their work in solving near and far transfer problems.

  8. Real-time feedback on nonverbal clinical communication. Theoretical framework and clinician acceptance of ambient visual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Patel, R A; Czerwinski, M; Pratt, W; Roseway, A; Chandrasekaran, N; Back, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the focus theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Effective nonverbal communication between patients and clinicians fosters both the delivery of empathic patient-centered care and positive patient outcomes. Although nonverbal skill training is a recognized need, few efforts to enhance patient-clinician communication provide visual feedback on nonverbal aspects of the clinical encounter. We describe a novel approach that uses social signal processing technology (SSP) to capture nonverbal cues in real time and to display ambient visual feedback on control and affiliation--two primary, yet distinct dimensions of interpersonal nonverbal communication. To examine the design and clinician acceptance of ambient visual feedback on nonverbal communication, we 1) formulated a model of relational communication to ground SSP and 2) conducted a formative user study using mixed methods to explore the design of visual feedback. Based on a model of relational communication, we reviewed interpersonal communication research to map nonverbal cues to signals of affiliation and control evidenced in patient-clinician interaction. Corresponding with our formulation of this theoretical framework, we designed ambient real-time visualizations that reflect variations of affiliation and control. To explore clinicians' acceptance of this visual feedback, we conducted a lab study using the Wizard-of-Oz technique to simulate system use with 16 healthcare professionals. We followed up with seven of those participants through interviews to iterate on the design with a revised visualization that addressed emergent design considerations. Ambient visual feedback on non- verbal communication provides a theoretically grounded and acceptable way to provide clinicians with awareness of their nonverbal communication style. We provide implications for the design of such visual feedback that encourages empathic patient

  9. Does feedback matter? Practice-based learning for medical students after a multi-institutional clinical performance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Hauer, Karen E; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Wilkes, Michael; Gesundheit, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Achieving competence in 'practice-based learning' implies that doctors can accurately self- assess their clinical skills to identify behaviours that need improvement. This study examines the impact of receiving feedback via performance benchmarks on medical students' self-assessment after a clinical performance examination (CPX). The authors developed a practice-based learning exercise at 3 institutions following a required 8-station CPX for medical students at the end of Year 3. Standardised patients (SPs) scored students after each station using checklists developed by experts. Students assessed their own performance immediately after the CPX (Phase 1). One month later, students watched their videotaped performance and reassessed (Phase 2). Some students received performance benchmarks (their scores, plus normative class data) before the video review. Pearson's correlations between self-ratings and SP ratings were calculated for overall performance and specific skill areas (history taking, physical examination, doctor-patient communication) for Phase 1 and Phase 2. The 2 correlations were then compared for each student group (i.e. those who received and those who did not receive feedback). A total of 280 students completed both study phases. Mean CPX scores ranged from 51% to 71% of items correct overall and for each skill area. Phase 1 self-assessment correlated weakly with SP ratings of student performance (r = 0.01-0.16). Without feedback, Phase 2 correlations remained weak (r = 0.13-0.18; n = 109). With feedback, Phase 2 correlations improved significantly (r = 0.26-0.47; n = 171). Low-performing students showed the greatest improvement after receiving feedback. The accuracy of student self-assessment was poor after a CPX, but improved significantly with performance feedback (scores and benchmarks). Videotape review alone (without feedback) did not improve self-assessment accuracy. Practice-based learning exercises that incorporate feedback to medical

  10. Shortwave radiative forcing, rapid adjustment, and feedback to the surface by sulfate geoengineering: analysis of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G4 scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, Hiroki; Abe, Manabu; Watanabe, Shingo; Sekiya, Takashi; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John C.; Cole, Jason N. S.; Kravitz, Ben

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the forcing, rapid adjustment, and feedback of net shortwave radiation at the surface in the G4 experiment of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project by analysing outputs from six participating models. G4 involves injection of 5 Tg yr-1 of SO2, a sulfate aerosol precursor, into the lower stratosphere from year 2020 to 2069 against a background scenario of RCP4.5. A single-layer atmospheric model for shortwave radiative transfer is used to estimate the direct forcing of solar radiation management (SRM), and rapid adjustment and feedbacks from changes in the water vapour amount, cloud amount, and surface albedo (compared with RCP4.5). The analysis shows that the globally and temporally averaged SRM forcing ranges from -3.6 to -1.6 W m-2, depending on the model. The sum of the rapid adjustments and feedback effects due to changes in the water vapour and cloud amounts increase the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface by approximately 0.4 to 1.5 W m-2 and hence weaken the effect of SRM by around 50 %. The surface albedo changes decrease the net shortwave radiation at the surface; it is locally strong (˜ -4 W m-2) in snow and sea ice melting regions, but minor for the global average. The analyses show that the results of the G4 experiment, which simulates sulfate geoengineering, include large inter-model variability both in the direct SRM forcing and the shortwave rapid adjustment from change in the cloud amount, and imply a high uncertainty in modelled processes of sulfate aerosols and clouds.

  11. The dynamic feedbacks between channel changes in the Colorado River Basin and the rapid invasion of Tamarisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    The resiliency and sensitivity of western rivers to future climate change may be partly anticipated by the response of these rivers to past perturbations in stream flow and sediment supply. Predictions of earlier spring runoff and reduced peak flows of snowmelt-dominated streams mimic hydrologic changes caused by the closure and operation of large dams built within the past century. In the Colorado River Basin, channels have narrowed between 5 and 26% following large dam construction, but the correlation between flow reduction and channel narrowing is confounded by changes in bank strength caused by the rapid spread of the non-native riparian shrub, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). Thus, predictions of future changes in channel form and analysis of past changes related to dams must distinguish between channel narrowing caused by direct changes in flow, and caused by the indirect effects wherein changes in flow regime allow expansion of non-native riparian vegetation that in turn leads to accelerated channel narrowing. Our research evaluates the geomorphic controls on tamarisk colonization, the role of tamarisk in accelerating the narrowing process, and the dynamic feedbacks between channel changes on western rivers and the invasion of non-native riparian species. The transformation of formerly active bars and channel margins into stable inset floodplain surfaces is the dominant process by which these channels have narrowed, as determined by detailed alluvial stratigraphy and dendrogeomorphology. We recreated the 3-dimensional bar surface present at the time of tamarisk establishment by excavating an extensive network of trenches. In doing this, we evaluated the hydraulic environment within which tamarisk established. We also characterized the hydrodynamic roughness of aging tamarisk stands from ground-based LiDAR scans to evaluate the role of tamarisk in the promotion of floodplain formation. Our study sites are representative of the predominant geomorphic organization of

  12. Rapid cycling bipolar disorder: clinical characteristics and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coryell, William

    2005-01-01

    Approximately one of six patients who seek treatment for bipolar disorder present with a rapid cycling pattern. In comparison with other patients who have bipolar disorder, these individuals experience more affective morbidity in both the immediate and distant future and are more likely to experience recurrences despite treatment with lithium or anticonvulsants. Particular care should be given to distinguishing rapid cycling bipolar disorder from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children or adolescents and from borderline personality disorder in adults. Perhaps four of five cases of rapid cycling resolve within a year, but the pattern may persist for many years in the remaining patients. As with bipolar disorder in general, depressive symptoms produce the most morbidity over time. Controlled studies have not established that antidepressants provoke switching or rapid cycling, but neither have they been shown consistently to have benefits in bipolar illness. Successful management will often require a sequence of trials with mood stabilizer drugs, beginning with lithium in treatment-naive patients. Efforts to minimise adverse effects, and the recognition that full benefits may not be apparent for several months, will make the premature abandonment of a potentially helpful treatment less likely. Placebo-controlled studies so far provide the most support for the use of lithium and lamotrigine as prophylactic agents. The combination of lithium and carbamazepine, valproate or lamotrigine for maintenance has some support from controlled studies, as does the adjunctive use of olanzapine.

  13. Medical students' perception of objective structured clinical examination: a feedback for process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Yusuf, Ayodeji S; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman O; Babalola, Olasunkanmi M; Adeyeye, Ademola A; Popoola, Ademola A; Adeniran, James O

    2014-01-01

    Medical educators have always been desirous of the best methods for formative and summative evaluation of trainees. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an approach for student assessment in which aspects of clinical competence are evaluated in a comprehensive, consistent, and structured manner with close attention to the objectivity of the process. Though popular in most medical schools globally, its use in Nigeria medical schools appears limited. This study was conceived to explore students' perception about the acceptability of OSCE process and to provide feedback to be used to improve the assessment technique. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on final-year medical students, who participated in the final MBBS surgery examination in June 2011. A 19-item self-administered structured questionnaire was employed to obtain relevant data on demographics of respondents and questions evaluating the OSCE stations in terms of the quality of instructions and organization, learning opportunities, authenticity and transparency of the process, and usefulness of the OSCE as an assessment instrument compared with other formats. Students' responses were based on a 5-point Likert scales ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 15 (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, IL). The study took place at the University of Ilorin, College of Health Science. A total of 187 final-year medical students were enrolled in to the survey. Of 187 eligible students, 151 completed the self-administered questionnaire representing 80.7% response rate. A total of 61 (40.4%) students felt that it was easy to understand written instructions at the OSCE stations. In total, 106 (70.2%) students felt that the time allocated to each station was adequate. A total of 89 (58.9%) students agreed that the OSCE accurately measured their knowledge and skill, and 85 (56.3%) reported that OSCE enhanced their communication skill. Of the respondents, 80 (53

  14. Dismantling Motivational Interviewing and Feedback for College Drinkers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Scott T.; Vader, Amanda M.; Harris, T. Robert; Field, Craig A.; Jouriles, Ernest N.

    2009-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a counseling style that has been shown to reduce heavy drinking among college students. To date, all studies of MI among college students have used a format that includes a feedback profile delivered in an MI style. This study was a dismantling trial of MI and feedback among heavy-drinking college students. After…

  15. An Autoethnographic Exploration of the Use of Goal Oriented Feedback to Enhance Brief Clinical Teaching Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Laura; Bourgeois-Law, Gisele; Ajjawi, Rola; Regehr, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Supervision in the outpatient context is increasingly in the form of single day interactions between students and preceptors. This creates difficulties for effective feedback, which often depends on a strong relationship of trust between preceptor and student. Building on feedback theories focusing on the relational and dialogic aspects of…

  16. Clinical course of acute atrial fibrillation treated with rapid digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, P; Bassan, M M; Jarchovsky, J; Iusim, S; Plavnick, L

    1983-02-01

    Forty-seven episodes of acute atrial fibrillation (AF) in 45 patients were examined prospectively to determine the course of the disorder treated with rapid digitalization. Patients received 1.5 mg of digoxin intravenously over 12 hours. In 40 of the 47 attacks, reversion to sinus rhythm occurred with no additional therapy at 1 to 96 hours (median 4 hours) after beginning digoxin. In thirty-two patients, conversion occurred within 8 hours; only one patient showed important ventricular slowing before conversion. Thus, if digoxin facilitates conversion, it does not do so by slowing the ventricular response. Of the 11 patients still in AF at 16 hours, conversion subsequently occurred in only four who were receiving digoxin alone. We conclude that the prognosis for quick reversion to sinus rhythm in patients with acute AF treated with rapid digitalization alone is excellent. If reversion does not occur by 16 to 24 hours, additional measures to restore sinus rhythm are indicated.

  17. Rapid-Response Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Anastasio, Noelle C.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Fink, Latham H.; Wing, Victoria C.; Mathias, Charles W.; Lane, Scott D; Schutz, Christian; Swann, Alan C.; Lejuez, C.W.; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F. Gerard; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity in the context of these conditions is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response-impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Expert...

  18. Rapidly fluctuating anosmia: A clinical sign for unilateral smell impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoias, Simona; Friedrich, Hergen; Caversaccio, Marco D; Landis, Basile N

    2016-02-01

    Reports about fluctuating olfactory deficits are rare, as are reports of unilateral olfactory loss. We present a case of unilateral anosmia with contralateral normosmia, presenting as rapidly fluctuating anosmia. The olfactory fluctuation occurred in sync with the average nasal cycle duration. Examination after nasal decongestion, formal smell testing, and imaging revealed unilateral, left-sided anosmia of sinonasal cause, with right-sided normosmia. We hypothesize that the nasal cycle induced transient anosmia when blocking the normosmic side. Fluctuating olfactory deficits might hide a unilateral olfactory loss and require additional unilateral testing and thorough workup. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Theory-based and evidence-based design of audit and feedback programmes: examples from two clinical intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Kell, Harrison J; Petersen, Laura A; Campbell, Bryan A; Trautner, Barbara W

    2017-04-01

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a common intervention used to change healthcare provider behaviour and, thus, improve healthcare quality. Although A&F can be effective its effectiveness varies, often due to the details of how A&F interventions are implemented. Some have suggested that a suitable conceptual framework is needed to organise the elements of A&F and also explain any observed differences in effectiveness. Through two examples from applied research studies, this article demonstrates how a suitable explanatory theory (in this case Kluger & DeNisi's Feedback Intervention Theory (FIT)) can be systematically applied to design better feedback interventions in healthcare settings. Case 1: this study's objective was to reduce inappropriate diagnosis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) in inpatient wards. Learning to identify the correct clinical course of action from the case details was central to this study; consequently, the feedback intervention featured feedback elements that FIT predicts would best activate learning processes (framing feedback in terms of group performance and providing of correct solution information). We designed a highly personalised, interactive, one-on-one intervention with healthcare providers to improve their capacity to distinguish between CAUTI and asymptomatic bacteruria (ASB) and treat ASB appropriately. Case 2: Simplicity and scalability drove this study's intervention design, employing elements that FIT predicted positively impacted effectiveness yet still facilitated deployment and scalability (eg, delivered via computer, delivered in writing). We designed a web-based, report-style feedback intervention to help primary care physicians improve their care of patients with hypertension. Both studies exhibited significant improvements in their desired outcome and in both cases interventions were received positively by feedback recipients. A&F has been a popular, yet inconsistently implemented and variably

  20. Guideline implementation in clinical practice: Use of statistical process control charts as visual feedback devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A Al-Hussein

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: A process of audits in the context of statistical process control is necessary for any improvement in the implementation of guidelines in primary care. Statistical process control charts are an effective means of visual feedback to the care providers.

  1. Utility of routine data sources for feedback on the quality of cancer care: an assessment based on clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baade Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Not all cancer patients receive state-of-the-art care and providing regular feedback to clinicians might reduce this problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of various data sources in providing feedback on the quality of cancer care. Methods Published clinical practice guidelines were used to obtain a list of processes-of-care of interest to clinicians. These were assigned to one of four data categories according to their availability and the marginal cost of using them for feedback. Results Only 8 (3% of 243 processes-of-care could be measured using population-based registry or administrative inpatient data (lowest cost. A further 119 (49% could be measured using a core clinical registry, which contains information on important prognostic factors (e.g., clinical stage, physiological reserve, hormone-receptor status. Another 88 (36% required an expanded clinical registry or medical record review; mainly because they concerned long-term management of disease progression (recurrences and metastases and 28 (11.5% required patient interview or audio-taping of consultations because they involved information sharing between clinician and patient. Conclusion The advantages of population-based cancer registries and administrative inpatient data are wide coverage and low cost. The disadvantage is that they currently contain information on only a few processes-of-care. In most jurisdictions, clinical cancer registries, which can be used to report on many more processes-of-care, do not cover smaller hospitals. If we are to provide feedback about all patients, not just those in larger academic hospitals with the most developed data systems, then we need to develop sustainable population-based data systems that capture information on prognostic factors at the time of initial diagnosis and information on management of disease progression.

  2. Cerebellum of the Premature Infant: Rapidly Developing, Vulnerable, Clinically Important

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Brain abnormality in surviving premature infants is associated with an enormous amount of neurodevelopmental disability, manifested principally by cognitive, behavioral, attentional, and socialization deficits, most commonly with only relatively modest motor deficits. The most recognized contributing neuropathology is cerebral white matter injury. The thesis of this review is that acquired cerebellar abnormality is a relatively less recognized but likely important cause of neurodevelopmental disability in small premature infants. The cerebellar disease may be primarily destructive (eg, hemorrhage, infarction) or primarily underdevelopment. The latter appears to be especially common and relates to a particular vulnerability of the cerebellum of the small premature infant. Central to this vulnerability are the extraordinarily rapid and complex developmental events occurring in the cerebellum. The disturbance of development can be caused either by direct adverse effects on the cerebellum, especially the distinctive transient external granular layer, or by indirect remote trans-synaptic effects. This review describes the fascinating details of cerebellar development, with an emphasis on events in the premature period, the major types of cerebellar abnormality acquired during the premature period, their likely mechanisms of occurrence, and new insights into the relation of cerebellar disease in early life to subsequent cognitive/behavioral/attentional/socialization deficits. PMID:19745085

  3. Cultural competency in medical education: demographic differences associated with medical student communication styles and clinical clerkship feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katherine B; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N; Lau, Steven K M; Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B

    2009-02-01

    We tested the significance of associations among students' demographics, communication styles, and feedback received during clerkships. US medical students who completed at least one required clinical clerkship were invited between April and July 2006 to complete an anonymous, online survey inquiring about demographics, communication styles (assertiveness and reticence), feedback (positive and negative), and clerkship grades. The effects of self-identified race/ethnicity, gender, and generation (immigrant, first- or second-generation American) and their 2-way interactions on assertiveness, reticence, total positive and total negative feedback comments were tested using factorial analysis of covariance, controlling for age, clerkship grades, and mother's and father's education; pairwise comparisons used simple contrasts. Two-sided P values women; 57% white). Men reported more assertiveness than women (P = .001). Reticence (P differed by race/ethnicity; in pairwise contrasts, black, East Asian, and Native American/ Alaskan students reported greater reticence than white students (P differences in students' communication styles and feedback they received highlight a need for cultural competency training to improve medical student-teacher interactions, analogous to training currently advocated to improve physician-patient interactions.

  4. Case of Rapid Progression of Hemiatrophy on the Face: A New Clinical Entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Nomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of diseases, including lupus profundus, morphea, lipodystrophy, and Parry-Romberg syndrome, may manifest progressive hemifacial atrophy. These diseases usually progress slowly and rapid progression of atrophy is extremely rare. We report a case of elderly-onset rapid progression of hemifacial atrophy only in three weeks. Our case did not meet variable differential diagnoses. We discuss the clinical character of the patient against the past of literature and suppose it may be a new clinical entity.

  5. Boom and bust: rapid feedback responses between insect outbreak dynamics and canopy leaf area impacted by rainfall and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherlenda, Andrew N; Esveld, Jessica L; Hall, Aidan A G; Duursma, Remko A; Riegler, Markus

    2016-11-01

    Frequency and severity of insect outbreaks in forest ecosystems are predicted to increase with climate change. How this will impact canopy leaf area in future climates is rarely tested. Here, we document function of insect outbreaks that fortuitously and rapidly occurred in an ecosystem under free-air CO2 enrichment. Over the first 2 years of CO2 fumigation of a naturally established mature Eucalyptus woodland, we continuously assessed population responses of three sap-feeding insect species of the psyllid genera Cardiaspina, Glycaspis and Spondyliaspis for up to ten consecutive generations. Concurrently, we quantified changes in the canopy leaf area index (LAI). Large and rapid shifts in psyllid community composition were recorded between species with either flush (Glycaspis) or senescence-inducing (Cardiaspina, Spondyliaspis) feeding strategies. Within the second year, two psyllid species experienced significant and rapid population build-up resulting in two consecutive outbreaks: first, rainfall stimulated Eucalyptus leaf production increasing LAI, which supported population growth of flush-feeding Glycaspis without impacting LAI. Glycaspis numbers then crashed and were followed by the outbreak of senescence-feeding Cardiaspina fiscella that led to significant defoliation and reduction in LAI. For all three psyllid species, the abundance of lerps, protective coverings excreted by the sessile nymphs, decreased at e[CO2 ]. Higher lerp weight at e[CO2 ] for Glycaspis but not the other psyllid species provided evidence for compensatory feeding by the flush feeder but not the two senescence feeders. Our study demonstrates that rainfall drives leaf phenology, facilitating the rapid boom-and-bust succession of psyllid species, eventually leading to significant defoliation due to the second but not the first outbreaking psyllid species. In contrast, e[CO2 ] may impact psyllid abundance and feeding behaviour, with psyllid species-specific outcomes for defoliation

  6. Student Views on the Use of 2 Styles of Video-Enhanced Feedback Compared to Standard Lecture Feedback During Clinical Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Craig; Phillips, Alex W; Searle, Roger; Stansby, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role in the learning process. However, often this may be delivered in an unstructured fashion that can detract from its potential benefit. Further, students may have different preferences in how feedback should be delivered, which may be influenced by which method they feel will lead to the most effective learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate student views on 3 different modes of feedback particularly in relation to the benefit each conferred. Undergraduate medical students participating in a surgical suturing study were asked to give feedback using a semi-structured questionnaire. Discrete questions using a Likert scale and open responses were solicited. Students received either standard lecture feedback (SLF), individualized video feedback (IVF), or enhanced unsupervised video feedback (UVF). Students had a strong preference for IVF over UVF or SLF. These responses correlated with their perception of how much each type of feedback improved their performance. However, there was no statistical difference in suturing skill improvement between IVF and UVF, which were both significantly better than SLF. Students have a strong preference for IVF. This relates to a perception that this will lead to the greatest level of skill improvement. However, an equal effect in improvement can be achieved by using less resource-demanding UVF. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National Clinical Database feedback implementation for quality improvement of cancer treatment in Japan: from good to great through transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Miyata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Hideki; Wakabayashi, Go; Konno, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Shuichi; Sugihara, Kenichi; Mori, Masaki; Satomi, Susumu; Kokudo, Norihiro; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The National Clinical Database (NCD) of Japan was established in April, 2010 with ten surgical subspecialty societies on the platform of the Japan Surgical Society. Registrations began in 2011 and over 4,000,000 cases from more than 4100 facilities were registered over a 3-year period. The gastroenterological section of the NCD collaborates with the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, which shares a similar goal of developing a standardized surgical database for surgical quality improvement, with similar variables for risk adjustment. Risk models of mortality for eight procedures; namely, esophagectomy, partial/total gastrectomy, right hemicolectomy, low anterior resection, hepatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and surgery for acute diffuse peritonitis, have been established, and feedback reports to participants will be implemented. The outcome measures of this study were 30-day mortality and operative mortality. In this review, we examine the eight risk models, compare the procedural outcomes, outline the feedback reporting, and discuss the future evolution of the NCD.

  8. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols. PMID:22475724

  9. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  10. The effects of augmented visual feedback during balance training in Parkinson's disease: study design of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Maarten R C; van Wegen, Erwin E H; de Goede, Cees J T; Burgers-Bots, Ingrid A L; Beek, Peter J; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Kwakkel, Gert

    2013-10-04

    Patients with Parkinson's disease often suffer from reduced mobility due to impaired postural control. Balance exercises form an integral part of rehabilitative therapy but the effectiveness of existing interventions is limited. Recent technological advances allow for providing enhanced visual feedback in the context of computer games, which provide an attractive alternative to conventional therapy. The objective of this randomized clinical trial is to investigate whether a training program capitalizing on virtual-reality-based visual feedback is more effective than an equally-dosed conventional training in improving standing balance performance in patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease will participate in a five-week balance training program comprising ten treatment sessions of 60 minutes each. Participants will be randomly allocated to (1) an experimental group that will receive balance training using augmented visual feedback, or (2) a control group that will receive balance training in accordance with current physical therapy guidelines for Parkinson's disease patients. Training sessions consist of task-specific exercises that are organized as a series of workstations. Assessments will take place before training, at six weeks, and at twelve weeks follow-up. The functional reach test will serve as the primary outcome measure supplemented by comprehensive assessments of functional balance, posturography, and electroencephalography. We hypothesize that balance training based on visual feedback will show greater improvements on standing balance performance than conventional balance training. In addition, we expect that learning new control strategies will be visible in the co-registered posturographic recordings but also through changes in functional connectivity.

  11. Strategies for effective feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education...

  12. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Dynamic diagnostic relationism: a new diagnostic paradigm for complex rapidly changing clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Lawrence A

    2014-01-01

    Decades of large, apparently well-designed clinical trials have failed to generate reproducible results in the investigation of many complex rapidly evolving and changing conditions such as sepsis. One possibility for the failure is that 20th century threshold science may be too simplistic to apply to complex rapidly changing conditions, especially those with unknown times of onset. There is an acute need to reconsider the fundamental validity of the application of simple threshold science in the study of complex rapidly evolving and changing conditions. In this letter, four potential axioms are presented which define a new science which assesses the probability of disease as a function of motion images of all the available clinical data.

  14. Evaluation of the clinical utility of a rapid blood test for human leptospirosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eapen, C. K.; Sugathan, Sheela; Kuriakose, Mariamma; Abdoel, Theresia; Smits, Henk L.

    2002-01-01

    A rapid assay device for the detection of Leptospira-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies was applied on whole blood samples collected from a group of consecutive patients admitted with clinical suspicion of leptospirosis to a district hospital in Kerala, India. The hospital is located in an

  15. Clinical data extraction and feedback in general practice: a case study from Australian primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2010-09-01

    Conclusion While data extraction programs provide GPs with useful tools for examining their clinical databases and identifying clinical practice issues which could be improved, external support, such as that provided by divisions, is helpful. Technical barriers, such as the failure of extraction tools to recognise some data and the failure to comprehensively enter data, are impediments, but in spite of these considerable interest exists in the use of clinical data to improve practice.

  16. Unravelling the complexities of nursing students' feedback on the clinical learning environment: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Everett, Bronwyn; Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hutchinson, Marie; Jackson, Debra; Mannix, Judy; Peters, Kath; Weaver, Roslyn

    2015-01-01

    Clinical placement is an essential part of nursing education, and students' experiences on clinical placement can affect the quality of their learning. Understanding nursing students' positive and negative perceptions of clinical placement experience is therefore important. To describe nursing students' satisfaction with their clinical placement experiences and identify any variations in satisfaction based on demographic characteristics. Mixed methods - online survey with qualitative items. Four universities in Australia. Students (n=213) enrolled in an undergraduate nursing degree. Between 2010 and 2012, students completed online surveys following their clinical placement experiences. The surveys included demographic questions and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI-19), a 19-item tool measuring students' satisfaction with clinical placement. The surveys included two open-ended questions asking students to share their most satisfying and challenging experiences whilst on placement. Descriptive statistics and thematic analyses were undertaken. Of the 213 participants, those in health-related employment and those with English as an additional language (EAL) were less satisfied with the clinical facility and with clinical facilitator support respectively, as indicated by the CLEI-19 subscale scores. Qualitative findings showed students were positive about the opportunity to make a difference and be involved in nursing, and negative about clinical facilitator support. Nevertheless, those who were most critical in their written comments about their placement were those who only spoke English at home. Although the study found overall satisfaction with clinical placement, the lower satisfaction reported by students in health-related employment, and the mixed findings regarding language spoken and satisfaction, warrant further attention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 'I wish someone watched me interview:' medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Heather; Rosenbaum, Marcy; Axelson, Rick

    2016-11-09

    Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students' communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Eliciting students' perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  18. ‘I wish someone watched me interview:’ medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Schopper

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students’ communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. Methods A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. Results The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Conclusions Eliciting students’ perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  19. Prospective, multi-centre clinic-based evaluation of four rapid diagnostic tests for syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabey, D; Peeling, R W; Ballard, R; Benzaken, A S; Galbán, E; Changalucha, J; Everett, D; Balira, R; Fitzgerald, D; Joseph, P; Nerette, S; Li, J; Zheng, H

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate prospectively four rapid, point-of-care serological tests for syphilis in prenatal or high risk populations in four countries. Tests were performed on consecutive clinic attenders, using whole blood in the clinic, and whole blood and serum in the laboratory. The sensitivity and specificity of each test was evaluated, using a standard treponemal test (Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA) or fluorescent treponemal antibody, absorbed (FTA-ABS) as gold standard. Non-treponemal tests (rapid plasma reagin (RPR) or venereal diseases research laboratory (VDRL) tests) were also performed on all subjects at three sites. The specificity of each rapid test was >95% at each site. Sensitivities varied from 64-100% and, in most cases, were lower when whole blood was used rather than serum. Rapid serological tests for syphilis are an acceptable alternative to conventional laboratory tests. Since they do not require equipment or electricity, they could increase coverage of syphilis screening, and enable treatment to be given at the first clinic visit.

  20. Surgical Trainee Feedback-Seeking Behavior in the Context of Workplace-Based Assessment in Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Anne; Patel, Abhilasha; Fallis, Simon; Rusius, Victoria; Mylvaganam, Seni; Royle, T James; Almond, Max; Markham, Deborah H; Pawlikowska, Teresa R B

    2017-06-01

    To investigate surgical trainee feedback-seeking behaviors-directly asking for feedback (inquiry) and observing and responding to situational clues (monitoring)-in the context of workplace-based assessment (WBA). A hypothetical model of trainee feedback-seeking behavior was developed using existing literature. A questionnaire, incorporating previously validated instruments from organizational psychology, was distributed to general surgical trainees at 23 U.K. hospitals in 2012-2013. Statistical modeling techniques compared the data with 12 predetermined hypothetical relationships between feedback-seeking behaviors and predictive variables (goal orientation, supervisory style) through mediating variables (perceptions of personal benefits and costs of feedback) to develop a final model. Of 235 trainees invited, 178 (76%) responded. Trainees completed 48 WBAs/year on average, and 73% reported receiving feedback via WBA. The final model was of good fit (chi-square/degree of freedom ratio = 1.620, comparative fit index = 0.953, root mean square error of approximation = 0.059). Modeled data showed trainees who perceive personal benefits to feedback use both feedback inquiry and monitoring to engage in feedback interactions. Trainees who seek feedback engage in using WBA. Trainees' goal orientations and perceptions of trainers' supervisory styles as supportive and instrumental are associated with perceived benefits and costs to feedback. Trainees actively engage in seeking feedback and using WBA. Their perceptions of feedback benefits and costs and supervisory style play a role in their feedback-seeking behavior. Encouraging trainees to actively seek feedback by providing specific training and creating a supportive environment for feedback interactions could positively affect their ability to seek feedback.

  1. Integration of routine rapid HIV screening in an urban family planning clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criniti, Shannon M; Aaron, Erika; Hilley, Amy; Wolf, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Family planning centers can play an important role in HIV screening, education, and risk-reduction counseling for women who are sexually active. This article describes how 1 urban Title X-funded family planning clinic transitioned from using a designated HIV counselor for targeted testing to a model that uses clinic staff to provide integrated, routine, nontargeted, rapid HIV testing as standard of care. Representative clinic staff members developed an integrated testing model that would work within the existing clinic flow. Education sessions were provided to all staff, signs promoting routine HIV testing were posted, and patient and clinician information materials were developed. A review of HIV testing documentation in medical charts was performed after the new model of routine, nontargeted, rapid HIV testing was integrated, to determine any changes in patient testing rates. A survey was given to all staff members 6 months after the transition to full integration of HIV testing to evaluate the systems change process. Two years after the transition, the rate of patients with an HIV test in the medical chart within the last 12 months increased 25.5%. The testing acceptance rate increased 17%. Sixteen HIV seropositive individuals were identified and linked into medical care. All surveyed clinic staff agreed that offering routine HIV screening to all patients is very important, and 78% rated the integration efforts as successful. Integrating routine HIV screening into a family planning clinic can be critical to identifying new HIV infections in women. This initiative demonstrated that routine, nontargeted, rapid HIV screening can be offered successfully as a standard of care in a high-volume, urban, reproductive health care setting. This description and evaluation of the process of changing the model of HIV testing in a clinic setting is useful for clinicians who are interested in expanding routine HIV testing in their clinics. © 2011 by the American College of

  2. Guideline implementation in clinical practice: use of statistical process control charts as visual feedback devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussein, Fahad A

    2009-01-01

    To use statistical control charts in a series of audits to improve the acceptance and consistant use of guidelines, and reduce the variations in prescription processing in primary health care. A series of audits were done at the main satellite of King Saud Housing Family and Community Medicine Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, where three general practitioners and six pharmacists provide outpatient care to about 3000 residents. Audits were carried out every fortnight to calculate the proportion of prescriptions that did not conform to the given guidelines of prescribing and dispensing. Simple random samples of thirty were chosen from a sampling frame of all prescriptions given in the two previous weeks. Thirty six audits were carried out from September 2004 to February 2006. P-charts were constructed around a parametric specification of non-conformities not exceeding 25%. Of the 1081 prescriptions, the most frequent non-conformity was failure to write generic names (35.5%), followed by the failure to record patient's weight (16.4%), pharmacist's name (14.3%), duration of therapy (9.1%), and the use of inappropriate abbreviations (6.0%). Initially, 100% of prescriptions did not conform to the guidelines, but within a period of three months, this came down to 40%. A process of audits in the context of statistical process control is necessary for any improvement in the implementation of guidelines in primary care. Statistical process control charts are an effective means of visual feedback to the care providers.

  3. A clinical student exchange program organized by cardiothoracic department: feedback of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirilomis, Theodor; Schoendube, Friedrich A

    2013-03-29

    The development of a student exchange program was an essential part of the cooperation between the Medical Schools of the University of Goettingen (Germany) and the University of Thrace in Alexandroupolis (Greece). The student exchange program started in 2008 and was performed once a year. The experiences of this program and the feedback of participants are presented. Although organized by the Dept. of Thoracic, Cardiac, and Vascular Surgery, the approach of the program was multidisciplinary. Participants also attended Continuous Medical Education activities primary addressed to physicians. At the end of the program, the participants evaluated the program anonymously. The educational units were rated via a 4-grade system. Additionally, it was possible to comment both positive and negative aspects of the program. Twenty-nine educational units were evaluated. The practical teaching units yielded a better result than the classical teaching units (93% of practical units were evaluated as "very good" vs. 74% of lectures/seminars). The Continuous Medical Education activities were evaluated less favorable (only 61% were evaluated as "very good"). The student exchange program enhanced effective teaching and learning. Courses supporting practical medical skills were extremely positive evaluated. Continuous Medical Education activities are not suitable for students and therefore, we do not include such an event anymore. Additionally, the program created an excellent forum for contact and communication between the students of the two universities.

  4. The impact of expert- and peer feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students - a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Felix; Schmalz, Gerhard; Haak, Rainer; Rockenbauch, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of peer- and expert feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students. All students of the first clinical treatment course (n=46) were randomly assigned into two groups. For three times a medical-dental interview/consultation of each student with a real patient was videotaped. After every consultation the videos were assessed either by a person experienced in communication (expert group) or by a fellow student (peer group), giving the students feedback regarding their chairside performed communication skills. Before and after the feedback-interventions all students conducted an interview with simulated patients, which was rated using a validated global rating and analyzed statistically. Global ratings mean scores after feedback-intervention were significantly improved (p0.05). During this study students improved their communication skills in dentist-patient interactions. The communication experience of the feedback provider seems not to have any impact on the communication skills in undergraduate dental students. The clinical courses in dentistry offer the opportunity to implement peer-feedback interventions in real treatment situation as part of communication training to longitudinally improve communication skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical usefulness of augmented reality using infrared camera based real-time feedback on gait function in cerebral palsy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of real-time feedback using infrared camera recognition technology-based augmented reality in gait training for children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] Two subjects with cerebral palsy were recruited. [Methods] In this study, augmented reality based real-time feedback training was conducted for the subjects in two 30-minute sessions per week for four weeks. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were used to measure the effect of augmented reality-based real-time feedback training. [Results] Velocity, cadence, bilateral step and stride length, and functional ambulation improved after the intervention in both cases. [Conclusion] Although additional follow-up studies of the augmented reality based real-time feedback training are required, the results of this study demonstrate that it improved the gait ability of two children with cerebral palsy. These findings suggest a variety of applications of conservative therapeutic methods which require future clinical trials.

  6. Clinical data extraction and feedback in general practice: a case study from Australian primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Peter; Saunders, Mary; Stanger, Leslie; Speak, Michele; Russo, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Quality improvement in general practice has increasingly focused on the analysis of its clinical databases to guide its improvement strategies. However, general practitioners (GPs) need to be motivated to extract and review their clinical data, and they need skills to do so. This study examines the initial experience of 15 practices in undertaking clinical data extraction and management and the support they were given by their local division of general practice. To explore the uptake of data extraction tools in general practice and understand how divisions of general practice can assist with their uptake. This study was conducted within a single division of general practice within the south-eastern suburbs of metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Self-selected practices were offered a data extraction program ('tool') free of charge, with ongoing division support. Practice representatives, either GPs, practice nurses or other practice staff members, were given instructions on how to extract data using the data extraction tool. This was followed by discussion with division staff regarding which clinical areas might be focused on. Division staff systematically recorded information about the experience of the practices and collated their clinical data. Fifteen practices, representing 69 GPs, participated. The practices chose from the following areas to work on as quality improvement activities: improving data entry; inactivating patient files for those who no longer attended the practice; correcting demographic information; diabetes and coronary heart disease management. The recording of data, according to the extraction tool, was found to be incomplete. For example, one-third of the patients who had HbA1cs recorded were on target, i.e. taking aspirin and one-third were not on a statin. Nearly half the patients who had attended their practice in the previous 30 months did not have smoking status recorded. While data extraction programs provide GPs with useful tools for

  7. Design and Fabrication of a Novel Stimulus-Feedback Anticorrosion Coating Featured by Rapid Self-Healing Functionality for the Protection of Magnesium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, ChenDi; Xu, JianHua; Tong, Ling; Gong, GuangCai; Jiang, Wei; Fu, Jiajun

    2017-06-21

    Corrosion potential stimulus-responsive smart nanocontainers (CP-SNCs) are designed and synthesized based on the installation of the supramolecular assemblies (bipyridinium ⊂ water-soluble pillar[5]arenes) onto the exterior surface of magnetic nanovehicles (Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 ), linked by disulfide linkers. The supramolecular assemblies with high binding affinity as gatekeepers effectively block the encapsulated organic corrosion inhibitor, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ), within the mesopores of Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 . When the corrosion potential of the magnesium alloy (-1.5 V vs SHE) is exerted, 8-HQ is released instantly because of the cleavage of disulfide linkers and the removal of the supramolecular assemblies. CP-SNCs were incorporated into the hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel coating to construct a corrosion potential stimulus-feedback anticorrosion coating (CP-SFAC) that was then deposited on the magnesium alloy, AZ31B. With the aid of a magnetic field, CP-SNCs were gathered in the proximity of the surface of AZ31B. CP-SFAC showed a satisfactory anticorrosion performance, more importantly, through the evaluation of microzone electrochemical techniques. CP-SFAC presented the rapid self-healing functionality when the localized corrosion occurred. Shortening the distance between CP-SNCs and the surface of AZ31B enhances the availability of the incorporated CP-SNCs and makes most of the CP-SNCs to timely respond to the corrosion potential stimulus and facilitates the formation of a compact molecular protective film before the corrosion products pile up. The characteristics of fast response time and quick self-healing rate meet the requirements of the magnesium alloy for self-healing in local regions.

  8. Clinical Study of Student Learning Using Mastery Style versus Immediate Feedback Online Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Schroeder, Noah; Stelzer, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of a series of studies to improve the efficacy of online physics homework activities by integrating narrated animated solutions with mastery inspired exercises. In a clinical study using first- and second-year university students, the mastery group attempted question sets in four levels, with animated solutions between each…

  9. Analytical and clinical sensitivity of the 3M rapid detection influenza A+B assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Suzanne E; Mayer, Christine; Mayer, Marie C; Menegus, Marilyn A

    2008-11-01

    The performance of the 3M rapid detection influenza A+B (3M flu) assay was compared to the performance of other immunochromatographic assays. The clinical and analytical performance of the 3M flu assay was superior to that of BinaxNOW and Directigen EZ assays and equivalent to that of the QuickVue assay. The 3M flu assay offers an objective output and direct linkage to laboratory information systems.

  10. Analytical and Clinical Sensitivity of the 3M Rapid Detection Influenza A+B Assay ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Suzanne E.; Mayer, Christine; Mayer, Marie C.; Menegus, Marilyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of the 3M rapid detection influenza A+B (3M flu) assay was compared to the performance of other immunochromatographic assays. The clinical and analytical performance of the 3M flu assay was superior to that of BinaxNOW and Directigen EZ assays and equivalent to that of the QuickVue assay. The 3M flu assay offers an objective output and direct linkage to laboratory information systems. PMID:18832133

  11. Rapid whole genome sequencing for the detection and characterization of microorganisms directly from clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Saputra, Dhany; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is becoming available as a routine tool for clinical microbiology. If applied directly on clinical samples this could further reduce diagnostic time and thereby improve control and treatment. A major bottle-neck is the availability of fast and reliable bioinformatics...... microbiology, WGS of isolated bacteria and by directly sequencing on pellets from the urine. A rapid method for analyzing the sequence data was developed. Bacteria were cultivated from 19 samples, but only in pure culture from 17. WGS improved the identification of the cultivated bacteria and almost complete...

  12. Professional Development Needs of Novice Nursing Clinical Teachers: A Rapid Evidence Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Farah; Boschma, Geertje; Clauson, Marion

    2016-02-26

    The current nursing profession is challenged with a decreasing supply of competent clinical teachers due to several factors consequently impacting the quality of nursing education. To meet this demand, academic nursing programs are resorting to hiring expert nurses who may have little or no teaching experience. They need support during their transition from practice to teaching. Using the systematic approach of a Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA), scholarly literature was reviewed to identify existing professional development needs for novice clinical teachers as well as supportive strategies to aid the transition of experienced nurses into teaching practice. The REA included 29 relevant studies. Findings revealed three main professional development needs for novice clinical teachers and key supportive strategies. Based on these findings recommendations for best practices to support and prepare novice clinical teachers are presented.

  13. A randomised trial of the influence of racial stereotype bias on examiners' scores, feedback and recollections in undergraduate clinical exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Peter; Woolf, Katherine; Benbow, Emyr; Davies, Ben; Boohan, Mairhead; Eva, Kevin

    2017-10-25

    Asian medical students and doctors receive lower scores on average than their white counterparts in examinations in the UK and internationally (a phenomenon known as "differential attainment"). This could be due to examiner bias or to social, psychological or cultural influences on learning or performance. We investigated whether students' scores or feedback show influence of ethnicity-related bias; whether examiners unconsciously bring to mind (activate) stereotypes when judging Asian students' performance; whether activation depends on the stereotypicality of students' performances; and whether stereotypes influence examiner memories of performances. This is a randomised, double-blinded, controlled, Internet-based trial. We created near-identical videos of medical student performances on a simulated Objective Structured Clinical Exam using British Asian and white British actors. Examiners were randomly assigned to watch performances from white and Asian students that were either consistent or inconsistent with a previously described stereotype of Asian students' performance. We compared the two examiner groups in terms of the following: the scores and feedback they gave white and Asian students; how much the Asian stereotype was activated in their minds (response times to Asian-stereotypical vs neutral words in a lexical decision task); and whether the stereotype influenced memories of student performances (recognition rates for real vs invented stereotype-consistent vs stereotype-inconsistent phrases from one of the videos). Examiners responded to Asian-stereotypical words (716 ms, 95% confidence interval (CI) 702-731 ms) faster than neutral words (769 ms, 95% CI 753-786 ms, p < 0.001), suggesting Asian stereotypes were activated (or at least active) in examiners' minds. This occurred regardless of whether examiners observed stereotype-consistent or stereotype-inconsistent performances. Despite this stereotype activation, student ethnicity had no

  14. Toward rapid learning in cancer treatment selection: An analytical engine for practice-based clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Samuel G; Levy, Mia; Reddy, Sunil; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-04-01

    Wide-scale adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) has created an unprecedented opportunity for the implementation of Rapid Learning Systems (RLSs) that leverage primary clinical data for real-time decision support. In cancer, where large variations among patient features leave gaps in traditional forms of medical evidence, the potential impact of a RLS is particularly promising. We developed the Melanoma Rapid Learning Utility (MRLU), a component of the RLS, providing an analytical engine and user interface that enables physicians to gain clinical insights by rapidly identifying and analyzing cohorts of patients similar to their own. A new approach for clinical decision support in Melanoma was developed and implemented, in which patient-centered cohorts are generated from practice-based evidence and used to power on-the-fly stratified survival analyses. A database to underlie the system was generated from clinical, pharmaceutical, and molecular data from 237 patients with metastatic melanoma from two academic medical centers. The system was assessed in two ways: (1) ability to rediscover known knowledge and (2) potential clinical utility and usability through a user study of 13 practicing oncologists. The MRLU enables physician-driven cohort selection and stratified survival analysis. The system successfully identified several known clinical trends in melanoma, including frequency of BRAF mutations, survival rate of patients with BRAF mutant tumors in response to BRAF inhibitor therapy, and sex-based trends in prevalence and survival. Surveyed physician users expressed great interest in using such on-the-fly evidence systems in practice (mean response from relevant survey questions 4.54/5.0), and generally found the MRLU in particular to be both useful (mean score 4.2/5.0) and useable (4.42/5.0). The MRLU is an RLS analytical engine and user interface for Melanoma treatment planning that presents design principles useful in building RLSs. Further research is

  15. Evaluation of dengue NS1 antigen rapid tests and ELISA kits using clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhamoy Pal

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV infection can improve clinical outcomes by ensuring close follow-up, initiating appropriate supportive therapies and raising awareness to the potential of hemorrhage or shock. Non-structural glycoprotein-1 (NS1 has proven to be a useful biomarker for early diagnosis of dengue. A number of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs targeting NS1 antigen (Ag are now commercially available. Here we evaluated these tests using a well-characterized panel of clinical samples to determine their effectiveness for early diagnosis.Retrospective samples from South America were used to evaluate the following tests: (i "Dengue NS1 Ag STRIP" and (ii "Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag ELISA" (Bio-Rad, France, (iii "Dengue NS1 Detect Rapid Test (1st Generation" and (iv "DENV Detect NS1 ELISA" (InBios International, United States, (v "Panbio Dengue Early Rapid (1st generation" (vi "Panbio Dengue Early ELISA (2nd generation" and (vii "SD Bioline Dengue NS1 Ag Rapid Test" (Alere, United States. Overall, the sensitivity of the RDTs ranged from 71.9%-79.1% while the sensitivity of the ELISAs varied between 85.6-95.9%, using virus isolation as the reference method. Most tests had lower sensitivity for DENV-4 relative to the other three serotypes, were less sensitive in detecting secondary infections, and appeared to be most sensitive on Day 3-4 post symptom onset. The specificity of all evaluated tests ranged from 95%-100%.ELISAs had greater overall sensitivity than RDTs. In conjunction with other parameters, the performance data can help determine which dengue diagnostics should be used during the first few days of illness, when the patients are most likely to present to a clinic seeking care.

  16. Conventional rapid latex agglutination in estimation of von Willebrand factor: method revisited and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Marianor; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Hussin, Che Maraina Che

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF : Ag) levels is usually performed in a specialised laboratory which limits its application in routine clinical practice. So far, no commercial rapid test kit is available for VWF : Ag estimation. This paper discusses the technical aspect of latex agglutination method which was established to suit the purpose of estimating von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in the plasma sample. The latex agglutination test can be performed qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Reproducibility, stability, linearity, limit of detection, interference, and method comparison studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of this test. Semiquantitative latex agglutination test was strongly correlated with the reference immunoturbidimetric assay (Spearman's rho = 0.946, P agglutination test and the reference assay. Using the scoring system for the rapid latex test, no agglutination is with 0% VWF : Ag (control negative), 1+ reaction is equivalent to 150% VWF : Ag (when comparing with immunoturbidimetric assay). The findings from evaluation studies suggest that latex agglutination method is suitable to be used as a rapid test kit for the estimation of VWF : Ag levels in various clinical conditions associated with high levels and low levels of VWF : Ag.

  17. Rapid diagnostic testing for community-acquired pneumonia: can innovative technology for clinical microbiology be exploited?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Victor L; Stout, Janet E

    2009-12-01

    Two nonsynchronous events have affected the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP): spiraling empiricism for CAP and the "golden era" of clinical microbiology. The development of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to widespread empiric use without ascertaining the etiology of the infecting microbe. Unfortunately, this approach clashes with the second event, which is the advent of molecular-based microbiology that can identify the causative pathogen rapidly at the point of care. The urinary antigen is a most effective rapid test that has allowed targeted therapy for Legionnaire disease at the point of care. The high specificity (> 90%) allows the clinician to administer appropriate anti-Legionella therapy based on a single rapid test; however, its low sensitivity (76%) means that a notable number of cases of Legionnaire disease will go undiagnosed if other tests, especially culture, are not performed. Further, culture for Legionella is not readily available. If a culture is not performed, epidemiologic identification of the source of the bacterium cannot be ascertained by molecular fingerprinting of the patient and the putative source strain. We recommend resurrection of the basic principles of infectious disease, which are to identify the microbial etiology of the infection and to use narrow, targeted antimicrobial therapy. To reduce antimicrobial overuse with subsequent antimicrobial resistance, these basic principles must be applied in concert with traditional and newer tests in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  18. Rapid whole-genome sequencing for detection and characterization of microorganisms directly from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Henrik; Saputra, Dhany; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Svendsen, Christina Aaby; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is becoming available as a routine tool for clinical microbiology. If applied directly on clinical samples, this could further reduce diagnostic times and thereby improve control and treatment. A major bottleneck is the availability of fast and reliable bioinformatic tools. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of WGS directly on clinical samples and to develop easy-to-use bioinformatic tools for the analysis of sequencing data. Thirty-five random urine samples from patients with suspected urinary tract infections were examined using conventional microbiology, WGS of isolated bacteria, and direct sequencing on pellets from the urine samples. A rapid method for analyzing the sequence data was developed. Bacteria were cultivated from 19 samples but in pure cultures from only 17 samples. WGS improved the identification of the cultivated bacteria, and almost complete agreement was observed between phenotypic and predicted antimicrobial susceptibilities. Complete agreement was observed between species identification, multilocus sequence typing, and phylogenetic relationships for Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis isolates when the results of WGS of cultured isolates and urine samples were directly compared. Sequencing directly from the urine enabled bacterial identification in polymicrobial samples. Additional putative pathogenic strains were observed in some culture-negative samples. WGS directly on clinical samples can provide clinically relevant information and drastically reduce diagnostic times. This may prove very useful, but the need for data analysis is still a hurdle to clinical implementation. To overcome this problem, a publicly available bioinformatic tool was developed in this study.

  19. Mechanical properties of contact lenses: The contribution of measurement techniques and clinical feedback to 50 years of materials development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamra, Tarnveer Singh; Tighe, Brian J

    2017-04-01

    This review summarises the way in which mechanical property measurements combined with clinical perception have influenced the last half century of materials evolution in contact lens development. Literature concerning the use of in-vitro testing in assessment of the mechanical behaviour of contact lenses, and the mutual deformation of the lens material and ocular tissue was examined. Tensile measurements of historic and available hydrogel lenses have been collected, in addition to manufacturer-generated figures for the moduli of commercial silicone hydrogel lenses. The three conventional modes of mechanical property testing; compression, tension and shear each represent different perspective in understanding the mutual interaction of the cornea and the contact lens. Tensile testing provides a measure of modulus, together with tensile strength and elongation to break, which all relate to handling and durability. Studies under compression also measure modulus and in particular indicate elastic response to eyelid load. Studies under shear conditions enable dynamic mechanical behaviour of the material to be assessed and the elastic and viscous components of modulus to be determined. These different methods of measurement have contributed to the interpretation of lens behaviour in the ocular environment. An amalgamated frequency distribution of tensile moduli for historic and currently available contact lens materials reveals the modal range to be 0.3-0.6MPa. Mechanical property measurements of lens materials have enabled calibration of an important aspect of their ocular interaction. This together with clinical feedback has influenced development of new lens materials and assisted clinical rationalisation of in-eye behaviour of different lenses. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experience from two decades of the Cambridge Rapid Access Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinte, Laura T; Fiddes, Barnaby D; Donaghy, Alastair; Whyte, Adam; Allen, Chris; Sawcer, Stephen J; Adam, Robert J; Stacpoole, Sybil R L

    2015-10-01

    We report on the evolution of the rapid access neurology clinic (established in 1995) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Annualised attendance data demonstrate an ever increasing demand, with primary headache disorders now accounting for more than 40% of referrals. Secondary causes of headache (including intracranial tumours, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, carotid or vertebral artery dissection and subdural haematomas) remain infrequent. In all such cases, there were additional diagnostic clues. The number of patients referred with problems related to chronic neurological diseases has fallen considerably, reflecting the roles of specialist nurses and clinics. Imaging investigation of choice shifted from computerised tomography scan (45 to 16%) towards magnetic resonance imaging (17 to 47%). Management is increasingly on an outpatient basis, often without the need for a follow-up appointment. The experience presented here should inform further development of rapid access neurology clinics across the UK and suggests the need for acute headache services, in line with those for transient ischaemic attack and first seizure. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid, reliable, and reproducible molecular sub-grouping of clinical medulloblastoma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Shih, David J H; Remke, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Kool, Marcel; Hawkins, Cynthia; Eberhart, Charles G; Dubuc, Adrian; Guettouche, Toumy; Cardentey, Yoslayma; Bouffet, Eric; Pomeroy, Scott L; Marra, Marco; Malkin, David; Rutka, James T; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of medulloblastoma likely encompasses several distinct entities, with recent evidence for the existence of at least four unique molecular subgroups that exhibit distinct genetic, transcriptional, demographic, and clinical features. Assignment of molecular subgroup through routine profiling of high-quality RNA on expression microarrays is likely impractical in the clinical setting. The planning and execution of medulloblastoma clinical trials that stratify by subgroup, or which are targeted to a specific subgroup requires technologies that can be economically, rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly applied to formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens. In the current study, we have developed an assay that accurately measures the expression level of 22 medulloblastoma subgroup-specific signature genes (CodeSet) using nanoString nCounter Technology. Comparison of the nanoString assay with Affymetrix expression array data on a training series of 101 medulloblastomas of known subgroup demonstrated a high concordance (Pearson correlation r = 0.86). The assay was validated on a second set of 130 non-overlapping medulloblastomas of known subgroup, correctly assigning 98% (127/130) of tumors to the appropriate subgroup. Reproducibility was demonstrated by repeating the assay in three independent laboratories in Canada, the United States, and Switzerland. Finally, the nanoString assay could confidently predict subgroup in 88% of recent FFPE cases, of which 100% had accurate subgroup assignment. We present an assay based on nanoString technology that is capable of rapidly, reliably, and reproducibly assigning clinical FFPE medulloblastoma samples to their molecular subgroup, and which is highly suited for future medulloblastoma clinical trials.

  2. Diagnostic performance of rapid diagnostic tests versus blood smears for malaria in US clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, William M; Cartwright, Charles P; Olson, Douglas A; Juni, Billie Anne; Taylor, Charlotte M; Bowers, Susan H; Hanson, Kevan L; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Boulware, David R

    2009-09-15

    Approximately 4 million US travelers to developing countries are ill enough to seek health care, with 1500 malaria cases reported in the United States annually. The diagnosis of malaria is frequently delayed because of the time required to prepare malaria blood films and lack of technical expertise. An easy, reliable rapid diagnostic test (RDT) with high sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV), particularly for Plasmodium falciparum, would be clinically useful. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of a RDT approved by the US Food and Drug Administration compared with traditional thick and thin blood smears for malaria diagnosis. This prospective study tested 852 consecutive blood samples that underwent thick and thin smears and blinded malaria RDTs at 3 hospital laboratories during 2003-2006. Polymerase chain reaction verified positive test results and discordant results. Malaria was noted in 95 (11%) of the 852 samples. The RDT had superior performance than the standard Giemsa thick blood smear (p = .003). The RDT's sensitivity for all malaria was 97% (92 of 95 samples), compared with 85% (81 of 95) for the blood smear, and the RDT had a superior NPV of 99.6%, compared with 98.2% for the blood smear (p = .001). The P. falciparum performance was excellent, with 100% rapid test sensitivity, compared with only 88% (65 of 74) by blood smear (p = .003). This operational study demonstrates that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved RDT for malaria is superior to a single set of blood smears performed under routine US clinical laboratory conditions. The most valuable clinical role of the RDT is in the rapid diagnosis or the exclusion of P. falciparum malaria, which is particularly useful in outpatient settings when evaluating febrile travelers.

  3. Survey and Rapid detection of Bordetella pertussis in clinical samples targeting the BP485 in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eLiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis is an important human respiratory pathogen. Here, we describe a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for the rapid detection of B. pertussis in clinical samples based on a visual test. The LAMP assay detected the BP485 target sequence within 60 min with a detection limit of 1.3 pg/µl, a 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 31 non-pertussis respiratory pathogens tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the primers for B. pertussis. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 105 sputum and nasopharyngeal samples collected from the patients with suspected respiratory infections in China, a total of 12 Bordetella pertussis isolates were identified from 33 positive samples detected by LAMP-based surveillance targeting BP485. Strikingly, a 4.5 months old baby and her mother were found to be infected with B. pertussis at the same time. All isolates belonged to different B. pertussis multilocus sequence typing (MLST groups with different alleles of the virulence-related genes including 4 alleles of ptxA, 6 of prn, 4 of tcfA, 2 of fim2 and 3 of fim3. The diversity of B. pertussis carrying toxin genes in clinical strains indicates a rapid and continuing evolution of B. pertussis. This combined with its high prevalence will make it difficult to control. In conclusion, we have developed a visual detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for rapid B. pertussis detection, especially in situations where resources are poor and in point-of-care tests.

  4. Rapid full-field OCT assessment of clinical tissue specimens (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalimier, Eugénie; Harms, Fabrice; Brossollet, Charles; Benoit, Emilie; Martins, Franck; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    FFOCT (Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography) is a novel optical technology that gives access to very high resolution tomography images of biological tissues within minutes, non-invasively. This makes it an attractive tool to bridge the gap between medical imaging modalities (MRI, ultrasound, CT) used for cancer lesion identification or targeting and histological diagnosis. Clinical tissue specimens, such as surgical cancer margins or biopsies, can potentially be assessed rapidly, by the clinician, in the aim to help him decide on the course of action. A fast FFOCT prototype was built, that provides 1cm2 images with 1 µm resolution in 1 minute, and can accommodate samples up to 50mm diameter. Specific work was carried out to implement a large sample holder, high-speed image acquisition system, optimized scanning, and accelerated GPU tiles stitching. Results obtained on breast, urology, and digestive tissues show the efficiency of the technique for the detection of cancer on clinical tissue specimens, and reinforce the clinical relevance of the technique. The technical and clinical results show that the fast FFOCT system can successfully be used for a fast assessment of cancer excision margins or biopsies providing a very valuable tool in the clinical environment.

  5. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  6. Combining Electrochemical Sensors with Miniaturized Sample Preparation for Rapid Detection in Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natinan Bunyakul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players—best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy: Opportunities and challenges in the rapidly evolving clinical landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emens, Leisha A; Ascierto, Paolo A; Darcy, Phillip K; Demaria, Sandra; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Redmond, William L; Seliger, Barbara; Marincola, Francesco M

    2017-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is now established as a powerful way to treat cancer. The recent clinical success of immune checkpoint blockade (antagonists of CTLA-4, PD-1 and PD-L1) highlights both the universal power of treating the immune system across tumour types and the unique features of cancer immunotherapy. Immune-related adverse events, atypical clinical response patterns, durable responses, and clear overall survival benefit distinguish cancer immunotherapy from cytotoxic cancer therapy. Combination immunotherapies that transform non-responders to responders are under rapid development. Current challenges facing the field include incorporating immunotherapy into adjuvant and neoadjuvant cancer therapy, refining dose, schedule and duration of treatment and developing novel surrogate endpoints that accurately capture overall survival benefit early in treatment. As the field rapidly evolves, we must prioritise the development of biomarkers to guide the use of immunotherapies in the most appropriate patients. Immunotherapy is already transforming cancer from a death sentence to a chronic disease for some patients. By making smart, evidence-based decisions in developing next generation immunotherapies, cancer should become an imminently treatable, curable and even preventable disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multisite Clinical Evaluation of a Rapid Test for Entamoeba histolytica in Stool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans P.; Hanbury, Blake; Siddique, Abdullah; Samie, Amidou; Haque, Rashidul; Herbein, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Rapid point-of-care detection of enteric protozoa in diarrheal stool is desirable in clinical and research settings to efficiently determine the etiology of diarrhea. We analyzed the ability of the third-generation E. histolytica Quik Chek assay developed by Techlab to detect amebic antigens in fecal samples collected from independent study populations in South Africa and Bangladesh. We compared the performance of this recently released rapid test to that of the commercially available ProSpecT Entamoeba histolytica microplate assay from Remel and the E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from Techlab, using real-time and nested-PCR for Entamoeba species to resolve any discrepant results. After discrepant resolution, The E. histolytica Quik Chek assay exhibited sensitivity and specificity compared to the E. histolytica II ELISA of 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.9% to 99.8%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%), respectively. Compared to the ProSpecT microplate assay, the E. histolytica Quik Chek (Quik Chek) assay exhibited 97.0% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.5% to 99.4%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 99.0% to 100%). Our results indicate that the Quik Chek is a robust assay for the specific detection of E. histolytica trophozoites in unfixed frozen clinical stool samples. PMID:25428152

  9. Economic impact of rapid diagnostic methods in Clinical Microbiology: Price of the test or overall clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantón, Rafael; Gómez G de la Pedrosa, Elia

    2017-12-01

    The need to reduce the time it takes to establish a microbiological diagnosis and the emergence of new molecular microbiology and proteomic technologies has fuelled the development of rapid and point-of-care techniques, as well as the so-called point-of-care laboratories. These laboratories are responsible for conducting both techniques partially to response to the outsourcing of the conventional hospital laboratories. Their introduction has not always been accompanied with economic studies that address their cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit and cost-utility, but rather tend to be limited to the unit price of the test. The latter, influenced by the purchase procedure, does not usually have a regulated reference value in the same way that medicines do. The cost-effectiveness studies that have recently been conducted on mass spectrometry in the diagnosis of bacteraemia and the use of antimicrobials have had the greatest clinical impact and may act as a model for future economic studies on rapid and point-of-care tests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute gouty arthritis and rapidly progressive renal failure as manifestation of multiple myeloma: clinical case description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Gudym

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a clinical case of multiple myeloma in 78-year-old man, its clinical onset was as an acute attack of gout. The patient was admitted to hospital due to the development of the first acute attack of gout. The attack was characterized by polyarthricular joint lesion of the upper and lower extremities, pronounced inflammatory reaction, insufficient response to the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and a high level of hyperuricemia. The serum uric acid concentration ranged from 636 to 712 μmol/l. The study of the synovial fluid of the inflamed knee joint made it possible to reveal uric acid crystals and to confirm the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis. Simultaneously, the patient had significant renal impairment: creatinine was 574 μmol/l, urea — 39.9 mmol/l, glomerular filtration rate according to CKD-EPI — 8 ml/min. The daily proteinuria was 1.8 g. A retrospective assessment of laboratory parameters allowed to reveal completely normal indicators of renal function 6 months ago. Considering the development of acute gouty arthritis, its polyarticular nature, persistent course, rapid involvement of new joints, high uric acid levels during an acute attack exceeding 600 μmol/l (10 mg/dL, rapid development of renal failure within 6 months until the terminal stage, it was suggested the secondary nature of gout on the background of kidney damage by another pathological process. Further clinical, laboratory and instrumental studies allowed verifying multiple myeloma with renal damage. Bence Jones protein in the urine was not detected, there was also no evidence of hyperproteinemia. However, pain in the spine, ribs and chest was the basis for carrying out an X-ray study of the bones of the skeleton. Changes in the skeleton typical for multiple myeloma have been identified. Myelogram showed a high content of plasma cells (21.1 %, electrophoresis of blood proteins showed a high M-gradient (30.42 %, and a cytochemical

  11. Interface design recommendations for computerised clinical audit and feedback: Hybrid usability evidence from a research-led system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain

    2016-10-01

    Audit and Feedback (A&F) is a widely used quality improvement technique that measures clinicians' clinical performance and reports it back to them. Computerised A&F (e-A&F) system interfaces may consist of four key components: (1) Summaries of clinical performance; (2) Patient lists; (3) Patient-level data; (4) Recommended actions. There is a lack of evidence regarding how to best design e-A&F interfaces; establishing such evidence is key to maximising usability, and in turn improving patient safety. To evaluate the usability of a novel theoretically-informed and research-led e-A&F system for primary care (the Performance Improvement plaN GeneratoR: PINGR). (1) Describe PINGR's design, rationale and theoretical basis; (2) Identify usability issues with PINGR; (3) Understand how these issues may interfere with the cognitive goals of end-users; (4) Translate the issues into recommendations for the user-centred design of e-A&F systems. Eight experienced health system evaluators performed a usability inspection using an innovative hybrid approach consisting of five stages: (1) Development of representative user tasks, Goals, and Actions; (2) Combining Heuristic Evaluation and Cognitive Walkthrough methods into a single protocol to identify usability issues; (3) Consolidation of issues; (4) Severity rating of consolidated issues; (5) Analysis of issues according to usability heuristics, interface components, and Goal-Action structure. A final list of 47 issues were categorised into 8 heuristic themes. The most error-prone heuristics were 'Consistency and standards' (13 usability issues; 28% of the total) and 'Match between system and real world' (n=10, 21%). The recommended actions component of the PINGR interface had the most usability issues (n=21, 45%), followed by patient-level data (n=5, 11%), patient lists (n=4, 9%), and summaries of clinical performance (n=4, 9%). The most error-prone Actions across all user Goals were: (1) Patient selection from a list; (2) Data

  12. A Brief, Web-based Personalized Feedback Selective Intervention for College Student Marijuana Use: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Christine M.; Neighbors, Clayton; Kilmer, Jason R; Larimer, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite clear need, brief web-based interventions for marijuana using college students have not been evaluated in the literature. The current study was designed to evaluate a brief, web-based personalized feedback intervention for at-risk marijuana users transitioning to college. All entering first-year students were invited to complete a brief questionnaire. Participants meeting criteria completed a baseline assessment (N = 341) and were randomly assigned to web-based personalized feedback o...

  13. Rapid clinical assessment to facilitate the triage of adults with falciparum malaria, a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Hanson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most adults dying from falciparum malaria will die within 48 hours of their hospitalisation. An essential component of early supportive care is the rapid identification of patients at greatest risk. In resource-poor settings, where most patients with falciparum malaria are managed, decisions regarding patient care must frequently be made using clinical evaluation alone. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 4 studies of 1801 adults with severe falciparum malaria to determine whether the presence of simple clinical findings might assist patient triage. RESULTS: If present on admission, shock, oligo-anuria, hypo- or hyperglycaemia, an increased respiratory rate, a decreased Glasgow Coma Score and an absence of fever were independently predictive of death. The variables were used to construct a simple clinical algorithm. When applied to the 1801 patients, this algorithm's positive predictive value for survival to 48 hours was 99.4 (95% confidence interval (CI 97.8-99.9 and for survival to discharge 96.9% (95% CI 94.3-98.5. In the 712 patients receiving artesunate, the algorithm's positive predictive value for survival to 48 hours was 100% (95% CI 97.3-100 and to discharge was 98.5% (95% CI 94.8-99.8. CONCLUSIONS: Simple clinical findings are closely linked to the pathophysiology of severe falciparum malaria in adults. A basic algorithm employing these indices can facilitate the triage of patients in settings where intensive care services are limited. Patients classified as low-risk by this algorithm can be safely managed initially on a general ward whilst awaiting senior clinical review and laboratory data.

  14. Rapid Clinical Assessment to Facilitate the Triage of Adults with Falciparum Malaria, a Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Josh; Lee, Sue J.; Mohanty, Sanjib; Faiz, M. Abul; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Price, Ric N.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Yunus, Emran Bin; Mishra, Saroj K.; Tjitra, Emiliana; Rahman, Ridwanur; Nosten, Francois; Htut, Ye; Maude, Richard J.; Thi Hong Chau, Tran; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Hien, Tran Tinh; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most adults dying from falciparum malaria will die within 48 hours of their hospitalisation. An essential component of early supportive care is the rapid identification of patients at greatest risk. In resource-poor settings, where most patients with falciparum malaria are managed, decisions regarding patient care must frequently be made using clinical evaluation alone. Methods We retrospectively analysed 4 studies of 1801 adults with severe falciparum malaria to determine whether the presence of simple clinical findings might assist patient triage. Results If present on admission, shock, oligo-anuria, hypo- or hyperglycaemia, an increased respiratory rate, a decreased Glasgow Coma Score and an absence of fever were independently predictive of death. The variables were used to construct a simple clinical algorithm. When applied to the 1801 patients, this algorithm’s positive predictive value for survival to 48 hours was 99.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 97.8–99.9) and for survival to discharge 96.9% (95% CI 94.3–98.5). In the 712 patients receiving artesunate, the algorithm’s positive predictive value for survival to 48 hours was 100% (95% CI 97.3–100) and to discharge was 98.5% (95% CI 94.8–99.8). Conclusions Simple clinical findings are closely linked to the pathophysiology of severe falciparum malaria in adults. A basic algorithm employing these indices can facilitate the triage of patients in settings where intensive care services are limited. Patients classified as low-risk by this algorithm can be safely managed initially on a general ward whilst awaiting senior clinical review and laboratory data. PMID:24489828

  15. Rapid Ganciclovir Susceptibility Assay Using Flow Cytometry for Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan L.; Notka, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Weinberg, Adriana; Shapiro, Howard M.; Reichelderfer, Patricia S.; Crumpacker, Clyde S.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative, and objective determination of the susceptibilities of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates to ganciclovir has been assessed by an assay that uses a fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibody to an HCMV immediate-early antigen and flow cytometry. Analysis of the ganciclovir susceptibilities of 25 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates by flow cytometry demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ganciclovir for 19 of the isolates were between 1.14 and 6.66 μM, with a mean of 4.32 μM (±1.93) (sensitive; IC50 less than 7 μM), the IC50s for 2 isolates were 8.48 and 9.79 μM (partially resistant), and the IC50s for 4 isolates were greater than 96 μM (resistant). Comparative analysis of the drug susceptibilities of these clinical isolates by the plaque reduction assay gave IC50s of less than 6 μM, with a mean of 2.88 μM (±1.40) for the 19 drug-sensitive isolates, IC50s of 6 to 8 μM for the partially resistant isolates, and IC50s of greater than 12 μM for the four resistant clinical isolates. Comparison of the IC50s for the drug-susceptible and partially resistant clinical isolates obtained by the flow cytometry assay with the IC50s obtained by the plaque reduction assay showed an acceptable correlation (r2 = 0.473; P = 0.001), suggesting that the flow cytometry assay could substitute for the more labor-intensive, subjective, and time-consuming plaque reduction assay. PMID:9736557

  16. Quality controls in cellular immunotherapies: rapid assessment of clinical grade dendritic cells by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-02-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers.

  17. A rapid evidence-based service by librarians provided information to answer primary care clinical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jessie; Hogg, William; Rader, Tamara; Salzwedel, Doug; Worster, Danielle; Cogo, Elise; Rowan, Margo

    2010-03-01

    A librarian consultation service was offered to 88 primary care clinicians during office hours. This included a streamlined evidence-based process to answer questions in fewer than 20 min. This included a contact centre accessed through a Web-based platform and using hand-held devices and computers with Web access. Librarians were given technical training in evidence-based medicine, including how to summarise evidence. To describe the process and lessons learned from developing and operating a rapid response librarian consultation service for primary care clinicians. Evaluation included librarian interviews and a clinician exit satisfaction survey. Clinicians were positive about its impact on their clinical practice and decision making. The project revealed some important 'lessons learned' in the clinical use of hand-held devices, knowledge translation and training for clinicians and librarians. The Just-in-Time Librarian Consultation Service showed that it was possible to provide evidence-based answers to clinical questions in 15 min or less. The project overcame a number of barriers using innovative solutions. There are many opportunities to build on this experience for future joint projects of librarians and healthcare providers.

  18. Overcoming challenges to initiating cell therapy clinical trials in rapidly developing countries: India as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sowmya; Rao, Mahendra; Keating, Armand; Srivastava, Alok

    2013-08-01

    Increasingly, a number of rapidly developing countries, including India, China, Brazil, and others, are becoming global hot spots for the development of regenerative medicine applications, including stem cell-based therapies. Identifying and overcoming regulatory and translational research challenges and promoting scientific and ethical clinical trials with cells will help curb the growth of stem cell tourism for unproven therapies. It will also enable academic investigators, local regulators, and national and international biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies to accelerate stem cell-based clinical research that could lead to effective innovative treatments in these regions. Using India as a model system and obtaining input from regulators, clinicians, academics, and industry representatives across the stem cell field in India, we reviewed the role of key agencies and processes involved in this field. We have identified areas that need attention and here provide solutions from other established and functioning models in the world to streamline and unify the regulatory and ethics approval processes for cell-based therapies. We also make recommendations to check the growth and functioning of clinics offering unproven treatments. Addressing these issues will remove considerable hurdles to both local and international investigators, accelerate the pace of research and development, and create a quality environment for reliable products to emerge. By doing so, these countries would have taken one important step to move to the forefront of stem cell-based therapeutics.

  19. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  20. Clinical management of rapidly growing mycobacterial cutaneous infections in patients after mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Guihot, Amelie; Deforges, Lionel; Carbonne, Anne; Bricaire, François; Caumes, Eric

    2009-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are expressing an interest in mesotherapy as a method of reducing body fat. Cutaneous infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria are a common complication of such procedures. We followed up patients who had developed cutaneous infections after undergoing mesotherapy during the period October 2006-January 2007. Sixteen patients were infected after mesotherapy injections performed by the same physician. All patients presented with painful, erythematous, draining subcutaneous nodules at the injection sites. All patients were treated with surgical drainage. Microbiological examination was performed on specimens that were obtained before and during the surgical procedure. Direct examination of skin smears demonstrated acid-fast bacilli in 25% of the specimens that were obtained before the procedure and 37% of the specimens obtained during the procedure; culture results were positive in 75% of the patients. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 11 patients, and Mycobacterium frederiksbergense was identified in 2 patients. Fourteen patients were treated with antibiotics, 6 received triple therapy as first-line treatment (tigecycline, tobramycin, and clarithromycin), and 8 received dual therapy (clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin). The mean duration of treatment was 14 weeks (range, 1-24 weeks). All of the patients except 1 were fully recovered 2 years after the onset of infection, with the mean time to healing estimated at 6.2 months (range, 1-15 months). This series of rapidly growing mycobacterial cutaneous infections highlights the difficulties in treating such infections and suggests that in vitro susceptibility to antibiotics does not accurately predict their clinical efficacy.

  1. Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Toledano-Sierra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  2. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  3. An Extended Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST Scheme for Rapid Direct Typing of Leptospira from Clinical Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Weiss

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid typing of Leptospira is currently impaired by requiring time consuming culture of leptospires. The objective of this study was to develop an assay that provides multilocus sequence typing (MLST data direct from patient specimens while minimising costs for subsequent sequencing.An existing PCR based MLST scheme was modified by designing nested primers including anchors for facilitated subsequent sequencing. The assay was applied to various specimen types from patients diagnosed with leptospirosis between 2014 and 2015 in the United Kingdom (UK and the Lao Peoples Democratic Republic (Lao PDR. Of 44 clinical samples (23 serum, 6 whole blood, 3 buffy coat, 12 urine PCR positive for pathogenic Leptospira spp. at least one allele was amplified in 22 samples (50% and used for phylogenetic inference. Full allelic profiles were obtained from ten specimens, representing all sample types (23%. No nonspecific amplicons were observed in any of the samples. Of twelve PCR positive urine specimens three gave full allelic profiles (25% and two a partial profile. Phylogenetic analysis allowed for species assignment. The predominant species detected was L. interrogans (10/14 and 7/8 from UK and Lao PDR, respectively. All other species were detected in samples from only one country (Lao PDR: L. borgpetersenii [1/8]; UK: L. kirschneri [1/14], L. santarosai [1/14], L. weilii [2/14].Typing information of pathogenic Leptospira spp. was obtained directly from a variety of clinical samples using a modified MLST assay. This assay negates the need for time-consuming culture of Leptospira prior to typing and will be of use both in surveillance, as single alleles enable species determination, and outbreaks for the rapid identification of clusters.

  4. Clinical usefulness of multiplex PCR lateral flow in MRSA detection: a novel, rapid genetic testing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihonyanagi, Shin; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Okada, Kiyomi; Uozumi, Toshiki; Kazuyama, Yukumasa; Yamaguchi, Tokiko; Nakazaki, Nobuhiko; Sakurai, Keizou; Hirata, Yasuyoshi; Munekata, Shinichi; Ohtani, Shinichi; Takemoto, Tsuyoshi; Bandoh, Yuki; Akahoshi, Tohru

    2012-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with exogenous cassette DNA containing the methicillin-resistant gene mecA (SCCmec) poses a problem as a drug-resistant bacterium responsible for hospital- and community-acquired infections. The frequency of MRSA detection has recently been increasing rapidly in Japan, and SCCmec has also been classified more diversely into types I-V. A rapid test is essential for early diagnosis and treatment of MRSA infections, but detection by conventional methods requires at least two days. The newly developed multiplex PCR lateral flow method allows specific amplification of femA to detect S. aureus, mecA to detect SCCmec, and kdpC to detect SCCmec type II; moreover, PCR products can be evaluated visually in about 3 h. In the present study, we developed a PCR lateral flow method for MRSA using this method and investigated its clinical usefulness in the detection of MRSA. The results showed a diagnostic concordance rate of 91.7% for MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus between bacteriological examination and PCR lateral flow, and a high level of specificity in PCR lateral flow. In addition, a higher detection rate for S. aureus using the same sample was observed for PCR lateral flow (70.2%) than for bacteriological tests (48.6%). The above results show that PCR lateral flow for MRSA detection has high sensitivity, specificity, and speed, and its clinical application as a method for early diagnosis of MRSA infections appears to be feasible.

  5. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Arthur J; Forte, Sophie S; Bhatti, Nasir A; Gelda, Steven E

    2016-03-09

    Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema and facilitate a full recovery without neurological complications.

  6. An Audit and Feedback Intervention for Reducing Antibiotic Prescribing in General Dental Practice: The RAPiD Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Elouafkaoui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of antibiotics dispensed in UK community pharmacies. Despite clear clinical guidance, dentists often prescribe antibiotics inappropriately. This cluster-randomised controlled trial used routinely collected National Health Service (NHS dental prescribing and treatment claim data to compare the impact of individualised audit and feedback (A&F interventions on dentists' antibiotic prescribing rates.All 795 antibiotic prescribing NHS general dental practices in Scotland were included. Practices were randomised to the control (practices = 163; dentists = 567 or A&F intervention group (practices = 632; dentists = 1,999. A&F intervention practices were allocated to one of two A&F groups: (1 individualised graphical A&F comprising a line graph plotting an individual dentist's monthly antibiotic prescribing rate (practices = 316; dentists = 1,001; or (2 individualised graphical A&F plus a written behaviour change message synthesising and reiterating national guidance recommendations for dental antibiotic prescribing (practices = 316; dentists = 998. Intervention practices were also simultaneously randomised to receive A&F: (i with or without a health board comparator comprising the addition of a line to the graphical A&F plotting the monthly antibiotic prescribing rate of all dentists in the health board; and (ii delivered at 0 and 6 mo or at 0, 6, and 9 mo, giving a total of eight intervention groups. The primary outcome, measured by the trial statistician who was blinded to allocation, was the total number of antibiotic items dispensed per 100 NHS treatment claims over the 12 mo post-delivery of the baseline A&F. Primary outcome data was available for 152 control practices (dentists = 438 and 609 intervention practices (dentists = 1,550. At baseline, the number of antibiotic items prescribed per 100 NHS treatment claims was 8.3 in the control group and 8.5 in the intervention group. At follow-up, antibiotic

  7. Comparison of two commercial rapid in-clinic serological tests for detection of antibodies against Leishmania spp. in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Labrini V; Petanides, Theodoros A; Chatzis, Manolis K; Kasabalis, Dimitrios; Apostolidis, Kosmas N; Saridomichelakis, Manolis N

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies against Leishmania spp. are detected in most dogs with clinical signs of leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum. Accurate, rapid in-clinic serological tests may permit immediate confirmation of the diagnosis and implementation of therapeutic measures. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 2 commercial, rapid in-clinic serological tests for the detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies in sera of dogs, the Snap Canine Leishmania Antibody Test kit (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, Maine) and the ImmunoRun Antibody Detection kit (Biogal Galed Labs, Kibbutz Galed, Israel), using indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) as the reference method. A total of 109 sera collected from 65 seropositive and 44 seronegative dogs were used. The sensitivities of the Snap and ImmunoRun kits were 89.23% (95% confidence interval: 79.05-95.54%) and 86.15% (95% confidence interval: 75.33-93.45%), respectively, and the specificity of both tests was 100%. A good agreement between each of the rapid in-clinic serological tests and IFAT and between the 2 rapid in-clinic serological tests was witnessed. Both rapid in-clinic serological tests showed an adequate diagnostic accuracy and can be used for the fast detection of antibodies against L. infantum in dogs.

  8. Identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration: a rapid review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, F; Giampieri, S; Graham, T; Grocott, P

    2017-04-02

    To identify the clinical empirical evidence for identifying, managing and preventing skin maceration in human subjects. A rapid review of the current literature was undertaken between 5 September and 19 September 2016 using the electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, PUBMED and Cochrane, with the key words: skin macerat*, wound macerat*, moisture associated skin damage, wound exudate and hyper-hydration of skin, Results: Of 526 papers found using an electronic database search, four were identified as fitting the search parameters, and a further two were retrieved from a manual search of reference lists. There were three themes that emerged: how to identify and measure maceration, how to manage and reduce maceration once it has already occurred, and how to prevent skin maceration. Hyper-hydration can reach greater skin depths than previously thought, thus engendering more extensive damage potential, which in turn can impact on treatments and healing time. Realistically, the deeper the hyper-hydration issue, the more extensive the damage and it will take longer to recover-a problem compounded if the hyper-hydration is due to incontinence and skin is also exposed to urine and/or faeces. In relation to wound management, the authors advocate the removal of moisture away from the wound or skin, either through superabsorbent dressings, or by allowing the excess moisture to evaporate through semi-permeable dressings to reduce maceration, enhance patient comfort and encourage healing. However, we found no evidence regarding the limits of hydration of the dermis and epidermis and thereby the optimal conditions for managing exuding wounds and promoting skin health. Each of the six papers in this review calls for further research to help identify, treat and prevent maceration. Maceration causes patients' discomfort and pain as well as prolonging healing time and deserves more focused research. This rapid review highlights how limited the clinical empirical research is on

  9. Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 (IVCF-20): rapid recognition of frail older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Edgar Nunes; do Carmo, Juliana Alves; de Moraes, Flávia Lanna; Azevedo, Raquel Souza; Machado, Carla Jorge; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate the adequacy of the Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20, a rapid triage instrument to test vulnerability in Brazilian older adults, for the use in primary health care. METHODS The study included convenience sample of 397 patients aged older than or equal to 60 years attended at Centro de Referência para o Idoso (Reference Center for Older Adults) and of 52 older adults the same age attended at the community. The results of the questionnaire, consisting of 20 questions, were compared with those of the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, considered a reference for identifying frail older adults. Spearman’s correlation was evaluated in the Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 with the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment; the validity was verified by the area under the ROC curve; reliability was estimated by the percentage of agreement among evaluators and by the kappa coefficient, both with quadratic weighted. The cut-off point was obtained based on the higher accuracy criterion. Cronbach’s alpha, a measure of internal consistency, was estimated. RESULTS The Spearman’s correlation coefficient was high and positive for both groups (0.792 for older adults attended at the Reference Center and 0.305 for older adults from the community [p < 0.001]). The area under the ROC curve for older adults attended at the Reference Center was substantial (0.903). The cut-off point obtained was six, and older adults with scores in Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 above that value had strong possibility of being frail. For older adults from the community, the quadratic weighted agreement among evaluators was 99.5%, and the global quadratic weighted kappa coefficient was 0.94. Cronbach’s alpha was high for older adults attended at the Reference Center (0.861) and those attended at the community (0.740). CONCLUSIONS The Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 questionnaire, in the sample examined, turned out to be positively

  10. Syndrome of rapid onset end stage renal disease in incident Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. C. Onuigbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, a full understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD-end stage renal disease (ESRD progression remains elusive. The common consensus is a predictable, linear, progressive and time-dependent decline of CKD to ESRD. Acute kidney injury (AKI on CKD is usually assumed to be transient, with recovery as the expected outcome. AKI-ESRD association in current nephrology literature is blamed on the so-called "residual confounding." We had previously described a relationship between AKI events and rapid onset yet irreversible ESRD happening in a continuum in a high-risk CKD cohort. However, the contribution of the syndrome of rapid onset-ESRD (SORO-ESRD to incident United States ESRD population remained conjectural. In this retrospective analysis, we analyzed serum creatinine trajectories of the last 100 consecutive ESRD patients in 4 Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis units to determine the incidence of SORO-ESRD. Excluding 9 patients, 31 (34% patients, including two renal transplant recipients, had SORO-ESRD: 18 males and 13 females age 72 (range 50-92 years. Precipitating AKI followed pneumonia (8, acutely decompensated heart failure (7, pyelonephritis (4, post-operative (5, sepsis (3, contrast-induced nephropathy (2, and others (2. Time to dialysis was shortest following surgical procedures. Concurrent renin angiotensin aldosterone system blockade was higher with SORO-ESRD - 23% versus 5%, P = 0.0113. In conclusion, SORO-ESRD is not uncommon among the incident general US ESRD population. The implications for ESRD care planning, AV-fistula-first programs, general CKD care and any associations with renal ageing/senescence warrant further study.

  11. Rapid screening for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical elephant trunk wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Roberta J; Linke, Lyndsey M; Isaza, Ramiro; Salman, Mo D

    2017-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can infect and be transmitted between elephants and humans. In elephants, the 'gold standard' reference test for detection of tuberculosis is culture, which takes a minimum of eight weeks for results and has limited sensitivity. A screening test that is rapid, easily implemented, and accurate is needed to aid in diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants. Ninety-nine clinical trunk wash samples obtained from 33 elephants were utilized to validate three molecular extraction techniques followed by a polymerase chain reaction for detection of M. tuberculosis. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated compared to culture. Kappa coefficients were determined between molecular results and various culture categories and serological test results. An internal amplification control was developed and assessed to monitor for PCR inhibition. One molecular test (the Column method) outperformed the other two, with diagnostic sensitivity and kappa agreement estimates of 100% (CI 57-100) and 0.46 (CI 0.2-0.74), respectively, compared to culture alone. The percentage of molecular-positive/culture-negative samples was 8.4% overall. The molecular extraction technique followed by PCR provides a much-needed rapid screening tool for detection of tuberculosis in elephants. Immediate procedures can be implemented to further assess PCR-positive animals and provide personnel biosecurity. While a positive result is not a definitive test for elephant tuberculosis, the molecular test results can be used to support current diagnostic procedures applied by veterinarians for treatment decisions to prevent the spread of tuberculosis in elephants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How feedback can foster professional growth of teachers in the clinical workplace : A review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Stalmeijer, Renee E.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Jaarsma, Debbie A. D. C.

    Student ratings of teaching have received much attention in both higher and medical education research. Paramount has been the attention to the robustness of the instruments used to capture these ratings as a source of feedback for teachers. However evidence is scarce with regard to what happens

  13. Evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching in postgraduate medical education: validation of an assessment instrument incorporating the CanMEDS roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluit, Cornelia; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Grol, Richard; Ham, Marieke; Feskens, Remco; Laan, Roland; Wensing, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Providing clinical teachers in postgraduate medical education with feedback about their teaching skills is a powerful tool to improve clinical teaching. A systematic review showed that available instruments do not comprehensively cover all domains of clinical teaching. We developed and empirically test a comprehensive instrument for assessing clinical teachers in the setting of workplace learning and linked to the CanMEDS roles. In a Delphi study, the content validity of a preliminary instrument with 88 items was studied, leading to the construction of the EFFECT (evaluation and feedback for effective clinical teaching) instrument. The response process was explored in a pilot test and focus group research with 18 residents of 6 different disciplines. A confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) and reliability analyses were performed on 407 evaluations of 117 supervisors, collected in 3 medical disciplines (paediatrics, pulmonary diseases and surgery) of 6 departments in 4 different hospitals. CFA yielded an 11 factor model with a good to excellent fit and internal consistencies ranged from 0.740 to 0.940 per domain; 7 items could be deleted. The model of workplace learning showed to be a useful framework for developing EFFECT, which incorporates the CanMEDS competencies and proved to be valid and reliable.

  14. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  15. Rapid response predicts 12-month post-treatment outcomes in binge-eating disorder: theoretical and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, C. M.; White, M. A.; Wilson, G. T.; Gueorguieva, R.; Masheb, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined rapid response in obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) in a clinical trial testing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and behavioral weight loss (BWL). Method Altogether, 90 participants were randomly assigned to CBT or BWL. Assessments were performed at baseline, throughout and post-treatment and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Rapid response, defined as ≥70% reduction in binge eating by week four, was determined by receiver operating characteristic curves and used to predict outcomes. Results Rapid response characterized 57% of participants (67% of CBT, 47% of BWL) and was unrelated to most baseline variables. Rapid response predicted greater improvements across outcomes but had different prognostic significance and distinct time courses for CBT versus BWL. Patients receiving CBT did comparably well regardless of rapid response in terms of reduced binge eating and eating disorder psychopathology but did not achieve weight loss. Among patients receiving BWL, those without rapid response failed to improve further. However, those with rapid response were significantly more likely to achieve binge-eating remission (62% v. 13%) and greater reductions in binge-eating frequency, eating disorder psychopathology and weight loss. Conclusions Rapid response to treatment in BED has prognostic significance through 12-month follow-up, provides evidence for treatment specificity and has clinical implications for stepped-care treatment models for BED. Rapid responders who receive BWL benefit in terms of both binge eating and short-term weight loss. Collectively, these findings suggest that BWL might be a candidate for initial intervention in stepped-care models with an evaluation of progress after 1 month to identify non-rapid responders who could be advised to consider a switch to a specialized treatment. PMID:21923964

  16. Virtual slide telepathology enables an innovative telehealth rapid breast care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ana Maria; Graham, Anna R; Barker, Gail P; Richter, Lynne C; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Lian, Fangru; Grasso, Lauren L; Miller, Ashley; Kreykes, Lindsay N; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Bhattacharyya, Achyut K; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2009-11-01

    An innovative telemedicine-enabled rapid breast care service is described that bundles telemammography, telepathology, and teleoncology services into a single day process. The service is called the UltraClinics Process. Since the core services are at four different physical locations a challenge has been to obtain STAT second opinion readouts on newly diagnosed breast cancer cases. In order to provide same day QA re-review of breast surgical pathology cases, a DMetrix DX-40 ultrarapid virtual slide scanner (DMetrix, Inc., Tucson, AZ) was installed at the participating laboratory. Glass slides of breast cancer and breast hyperplasia cases were scanned the same day the slides were produced by the University Physicians Healthcare Hospital histology laboratory. Virtual slide telepathology was used for STAT quality assurance readouts at University Medical Center, 6 miles away. There was complete concurrence with the primary diagnosis in 139 (90.3%) of cases. There were 4 (2.3%) major discrepancies, which would have resulted in a different therapy and 3 (1.9%) minor discrepancies. Three cases (1.9%) were deferred for immunohistochemistry. In 2 cases (1.3%), the case was deferred for examination of the glass slides by the reviewing pathologists at University Medical Center. We conclude that the virtual slide telepathology QA program found a small number of significant diagnostic discrepancies. The virtual slide telepathology program service increased the job satisfaction of subspecialty pathologists without special training in breast pathology, assigned to cover the general surgical pathology service at a small satellite university hospital.

  17. Outcomes of patients presenting to a dedicated rapid access lung cancer clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunican, E

    2012-02-01

    We examined the outcomes of the first 500 patients referred to a dedicated Rapid Access Lung Cancer Clinic. A total of 206 patients (41.2%) were diagnosed with a thoracic malignancy; 179 had primary lung cancer and 27 had secondary or other thoracic cancers. Pulmonary nodules requiring ongoing surveillance were found in a further 79 patients (15.8%). Of those patients found to have primary lung cancer, 24 (13.4%) had Small Cell and 145 (81%) had Non Small Cell Lung Cancer. In patients with Non small cell tumours, 26 (21.1%) were stage 1, 14 (11.4%) stage II, 37 (30.1%) stage III and 46 (37.4%) stage IV at diagnosis. For the 129 patients (72%) in whom the thoracic MDT recommended active treatment, primary therapy was surgical resection in 44 (24.6%), combined chemoradiation in 31 patients (17.3%), chemotherapy alone in 39 (21.8%) and radiation in 15 (8.4%).

  18. A Rapid Access Clinic to improve delivery of ambulatory care to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, James C; De Silva, Madhawa; Diwakarla, Chandra; Yip, Desmond

    2017-06-01

    Cancer patients may find it challenging to access timely advice and care. We evaluated the improvement in delivering ambulatory care in establishing a Rapid Assessment Clinic (RAC) in a cancer center. Patients receiving chemotherapy who presented for assessment at the RAC from September 2013 to June 2014 were included for review. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, presenting complaints, time to assessment, total time spent at the RAC and assessment outcome were extracted. Similar data for cancer patients presented to the emergency department (ED) but were appropriate for RAC assessment from February 2012 to August 2012 were reviewed for comparison. For patients with febrile neutropenia, time to empirical antibiotic therapy was also reviewed and analyzed. Comparing to ED presentation (n = 152), patients reviewed at the RAC (n = 217) had a shorter waiting time to medical review (28.5 vs 40 min, P = 0.12), shorter total time spent for review (3.1 vs 9.7 hrs, P care, resulting in a lower rate of hospital admission and inpatient length of stay for cancer patients. There was, however, no difference in the management of febrile neutropenia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. STAAR: a randomised controlled trial of electronic adherence monitoring with reminder alarms and feedback to improve clinical outcomes for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert W; Elphick, Heather E; Rigby, Alan S; Daw, William J; King, David A; Smith, Laurie J; Everard, Mark L

    2017-04-01

    Suboptimal adherence to inhaled steroids is common in children with asthma and is associated with poor disease control, reduced quality of life and even death. Previous studies using feedback of electronically monitored adherence data have demonstrated improved adherence, but have not demonstrated a significant impact on clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether introduction of this approach into routine practice would result in improved clinical outcomes. Children with asthma aged 6-16 years were randomised to the active intervention consisting of electronic adherence monitoring with daily reminder alarms together with feedback in the clinic regarding their inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use or to the usual care arm with adherence monitoring alone. All children had poorly controlled asthma at baseline, taking ICS and long-acting β-agonists. Subjects were seen in routine clinics every 3 months for 1 year. The primary outcome was the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score. Secondary outcomes included adherence and markers of asthma morbidity. 77 of 90 children completed the study (39 interventions, 38 controls). Adherence in the intervention group was 70% vs 49% in the control group (p≤0.001). There was no significant difference in the change in ACQ, but children in the intervention group required significantly fewer courses of oral steroids (p=0.008) and fewer hospital admissions (p≤0.001). The results indicate that electronic adherence monitoring with feedback is likely to be of significant benefit in the routine management of poorly controlled asthmatic subjects. NCT02451709; pre-result. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: Rapid molecular detection with MTBDRplus® assay in clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Macedo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the greatest concern of tuberculosis control programmes is the appearance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Rapid determination of drug resistance in clinical samples, with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC, is the prerequisite for initiating effective chemotherapy, ensuring successful treatment of the patient and preventing further spread of drugresistant isolates.The aim of our study was to determine the sensitivity of the new MTBDRplus® assay in comparison to culture, identification and classic DST, directly from smear-positive clinical specimens.A total of 68 smear-positive sputum specimens were processed by both the classical mycobacteriological methods and the molecular assay, MTBDRplus®.MTBDRplus® assay allowed an accurate identification of MTC species by detection of the specific band in all samples, from which we also isolated and identified MTC strains by culture methods. In the samples from which we isolated susceptible strains (63.2%, wild type patterns were found using MTBDRplus® assay. The samples from which we isolated resistant strains (36.8% showed specific mutations associated with the correspondent resistant phenotype.Our study indicated that this assay allows rapid detection of resistance, always in agreement with classic methods. Resumo: Uma das principais problematicas no controlo da tuberculose e o aparecimento de casos de tuberculose multirresistente (TB-MR e tuberculose extensivamente resistente (TB-XDR. A deteccao precoce da resistencia a farmacos, directamente a partir de amostras respiratorias, e essencial para que se assegure o tratamento atempado, adequado e eficaz da tuberculose, bem como para prevenir a disseminacao destes casos de especial gravidade.O nosso objectivo foi avaliar a sensibilidade e comparar os resultados obtidos com um metodo de genetica molecular disponivel comercialmente – MTBDRplus® – e o isolamento

  1. Mycobacterium iranicum sp. nov., a rapidly growing scotochromogenic species isolated from clinical specimens on three different continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shojaei, H.; Daley, C.; Gitti, Z.; Hashemi, A.; Heidarieh, P.; Moore, E.R.; Naser, A.D.; Russo, C.; Ingen, J. van; Tortoli, E.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a novel, rapidly growing, scotochromogenic mycobacterial species is reported. Eight independent strains were isolated from clinical specimens from six different countries of the world, two in Iran, two in Italy and one in each of following countries: Greece, The

  2. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  3. Evaluation of rapid alternative methods for drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mengatto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to compare the performance of a commercial method (MGIT and four inexpensive drug susceptibility methods: nitrate reductase assay (NRA, microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, MTT test, and broth microdilution method (BMM. A total of 64 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were studied. The Lowenstein-Jensen proportion method (PM was used as gold standard. MGIT, NRA, MODS, and MTT results were available on an average of less than 10 days, whereas BMM results could be reported in about 20 days. Most of the evaluated tests showed excellent performance for isoniazid and rifampicin, with sensitivity and specificity values > 90%. With most of the assays, sensitivity for ethambutol was low (62-87% whereas for streptomycin, sensitivity values ranged from 84 to 100%; NRA-discrepancies were associated with cultures with a low proportion of EMB-resistant organisms while most discrepancies with quantitative tests (MMT and BMM were seen with isolates whose minimal inhibitory concentrations fell close the cutoff. MGIT is reliable but still expensive. NRA is the most inexpensive and easiest method to perform without changing the organization of the routine PM laboratory performance. While MODS, MTT, and BMM, have the disadvantage from the point of view of biosafety, they offer the possibility of detecting partial resistant strains. This study shows a very good level of agreement of the four low-cost methods compared to the PM for rapid detection of isoniazid, rifampicin and streptomycin resistance (Kappa values > 0.8; more standardization is needed for ethambutol.

  4. Clinical review criteria and medical emergency teams: evaluating a two-tier rapid response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Gordon; Fossum, Mariann; Barratt, Macey; Bucknall, Tracey

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of patients fulfilling clinical review criteria (CRC), to determine activation rates for CRC assessments, to compare baseline characteristics and outcomes of patients who fulfilled CRC with patients who did not, and to identify the documented nursing actions in response to CRC values. A cross-sectional study using a retrospective medical record audit, in a universityaffiliated, tertiary referral hospital with a two-tier rapid response system in Melbourne, Australia. We used a convenience sample of hospital inpatients on general medical, surgical and specialist service wards admitted during a 24-hour period in 2013. Medical emergency team (MET) or code blue activation, unplanned intensive care unit admissions, hospital length of stay and inhospital mortality. For patients who fulfilled CRC or MET criteria during the 24- hour period, the specific criteria fulfilled, escalation treatments and outcomes were collected. Of the sample (N = 422), 81 patients (19%) fulfilled CRC on 109 occasions. From 109 CRC events, 66 patients (81%) had at least one observation fulfilling CRC, and 15 patients (18%) met CRC on multiple occasions. The documented escalation rate was 58 of 109 events (53%). The number of patients who fulfilled CRC and subsequent MET call activation criteria within 24 hours was significantly greater than the number who did not meet CRC (P CRC during the study period; these patients were about four times more likely to also fulfil MET call criteria. Contrary to hospital policy, escalation was not documented for about half the patients meeting CRC values. Despite the clarity of escalation procedures on the graphic observation chart, escalation remains an ongoing problem. Further research is needed on the impact on patient outcomes over time and to understand factors influencing staff response.

  5. Rapid application design of an electronic clinical skills portfolio for undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Tim; Lee, Catherine; Stopford, Adam; Hosie, Liam; Maredia, Neil; Rector, Alan

    2005-04-01

    The aim was to find how to use information and communication technology to present the clinical skills content of an undergraduate medical curriculum. Rapid application design was used to develop the product, and technical action research was used to evaluate the development process. A clinician-educator, two medical students, two computing science masters students, two other project workers, and a hospital education informatics lead, formed a design team. A sample of stakeholders took part in requirements planning workshops and continued to advise the team throughout the project. A university hospital had many features that favoured fast, inexpensive, and successful system development: a clearly defined and readily accessible user group; location of the development process close to end-users; fast, informal communication; leadership by highly motivated and senior end-users; devolved authority and lack of any rigidly imposed management structure; cooperation of clinicians because the project drew on their clinical expertise to achieve scholastic goals; a culture of learning and involvement of highly motivated students. A detailed specification was developed through storyboarding, use case diagramming, and evolutionary prototyping. A very usable working product was developed within weeks. "SkillsBase" is a database web application using Microsoft Active Server Pages, served from a Microsoft Windows 2000 Server operating system running Internet Information Server 5.0. Graphing functionality is provided by the KavaChart applet. It presents the skills curriculum, provides a password-protected portfolio function, and offers training materials. The curriculum can be presented in several different ways to help students reflect on their objectives and progress towards achieving them. The reflective portfolio function is entirely private to each student user and allows them to document their progress in attaining skills, as judged by self, peer and tutor assessment, and

  6. Maintenance diets following rapid weight loss in obstructive sleep apnea: a pilot 1-year clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayanan, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Hoyos, Camilla M; Phillips, Craig L; Serinel, Yasmina; Wong, Keith K H; Yee, Brendon J; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2017-06-30

    Very low energy diets (VLED) appear to be the most efficacious dietary-based obesity reduction treatments in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, effective weight loss maintenance strategies remain untested in this condition. Our study aimed to assess the feasibility, tolerability and efficacy of two common maintenance diets during a 10-month follow-up period after rapid weight loss using a 2-month VLED. In this two-arm, single-centre, open-label pilot trial, obese adult OSA patients received a 2-month VLED before being allocated to either the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating diet (AGHE) or a low glycaemic index high-protein diet (LGHP). Outcomes were measured at 0, 2 and 12 months. We recruited 44 patients [113.1 ± 19.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 37.2 ± 5.6 kg m(-2) , 49.3 ± 9.2 years, 12 females]. Twenty-four patients were on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or mandibular advancement splint (MAS) therapy for OSA. Forty-two patients completed the VLED. The primary outcome of waist circumference was reduced by 10.6 cm at 2 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.2-12.1], and patients lost 12.9 kg in total weight (95% CI: 11.2-14.6). There were small but statistically significant regains in waist circumference between 2 and 12 months [AGHE = 3.5 cm (1.3-5.6) and LGHP = 2.8 cm (0.6-5.0]. Other outcomes followed a similar pattern of change. After weight loss with a 2-month VLED in obese patients with OSA, a structured weight loss maintenance programme incorporating commonly used diets was feasible, tolerable and efficacious for 10 months. This programme may be deployed easily within sleep clinics; however, future research should first test its translation within general clinical practice. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  7. Surgical assessment clinic - One stop emergency out-patient clinic for rapid assessment, reduced admissions and improved acute surgical service: A quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A.W. Macano

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: By providing suitable guidance for referring practitioners we have optimised our clinic use significantly and improved our acute ambulatory surgical care. We have reduced admissions, provided rapid treatment and have established a service that helps address the ever increasing demand on acute services within the NHS.

  8. Clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome of suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, T A; Chidester, R M; Chrisman, C L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics, management and long-term outcome in dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Medical records and video recordings of 14 dogs with suspected rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder were reviewed and the owners were contacted via telephone or email for further information. Clinical signs included episodes of violent limb movements, howling, barking, growling, chewing, or biting during sleep. Episodes occurred at night and during daytime naps. The age at onset ranged from 8 weeks to 7·5 years with a median of 6 years but 64% of dogs were one year or less. There was no apparent sex or breed predisposition. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder events were reduced in severity and frequency in 78% of the dogs treated with 40 mg/kg/day oral potassium bromide. One dog was euthanized within 3 months of the onset of signs because of their severity. The duration of the disorder in the 13 surviving dogs ranged from 1·5 to 9 years. None of the dogs spontaneously recovered. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is suspected to occur in dogs, as it does in human beings. It causes concern to the owners and disrupts the home environment. Unlike human beings, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder of dogs often has a juvenile onset. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  9. Electroencephalogy (EEG) Feedback in Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision- Making The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful...feedback when training rapid decision-making. More specifically, EEG will allow us to provide online feedback about the neural decision processes...Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) Feedback In Decision-Making Report Title The goal of this project is to investigate whether Electroencephalogy ( EEG ) can provide useful

  10. A brief, web-based personalized feedback selective intervention for college student marijuana use: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine M; Neighbors, Clayton; Kilmer, Jason R; Larimer, Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Despite clear need, brief web-based interventions for marijuana-using college students have not been evaluated in the literature. The current study was designed to evaluate a brief, web-based personalized feedback intervention for at-risk marijuana users transitioning to college. All entering first-year students were invited to complete a brief questionnaire. Participants meeting criteria completed a baseline assessment (N = 341) and were randomly assigned to web-based personalized feedback or assessment-only control conditions. Participants completed 3-month (95.0%) and 6-month (94.4%) follow-up assessments. Results indicated that although there was no overall intervention effect, moderator analyses found promising effects for those with a family history of drug problems and, to a smaller extent, students who were higher in contemplation of changing marijuana use at baseline. Implications of these findings for selective intervention of college marijuana use and web-based interventions in general are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Preclinical and clinical performance of the Efoora test, a rapid test for detection of human immunodeficiency virus-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Max Q; Mundy, Linda M; Amsterdam, Daniel; Barrett, J Tom; Bigg, Dan; Bruckner, David; Hanna, Bruce; Prince, Harry; Purington, Timothy; Hanna, Todd; Hewitt, Ross; Kalinka, Carolyn; Koppes, Thomas; Maxwell, Sarz; Moe, Ardis; Doymaz, Mehmet; Poulter, Melinda; Saber-Tehrani, Maryam; Simard, Lorenzo; Wilkins-Carmody, Donna; Vidaver, John; Berger, Cheryl; Davis, Alan H; Alzona, Mortimer T

    2005-05-01

    Barriers to effective diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be reduced with simple, reliable, and rapid detection methods. Our objective was to determine the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of a new rapid, lateral-flow immunochromatographic HIV-1 antibody detection device. Preclinical studies were performed using seroconversion, cross-reaction, and interference panels, archived clinical specimens, and fresh whole blood. In a multicenter, prospective clinical trial, a four-sample matrix of capillary (fingerstick) whole-blood specimens and venous whole blood, plasma, and serum was tested for HIV-1 antibodies with the Efoora HIV rapid test (Efoora Inc., Buffalo Grove, IL) and compared with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Abbott Laboratories) licensed by the Food and Drug Administration. Western blot and nucleic acid test supplemental assays were employed to adjudicate discordant samples. Preclinical testing of seroconversion panels showed that antibodies were often detected earlier by the rapid test than by a reference EIA. No significant interference or cross-reactions were observed. Testing of 4,984 archived specimens yielded a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 99.7%. A prospective multicenter clinical study with 2,954 adult volunteers demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for the Efoora HIV rapid test of 99.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99.3 and 99.98%) and 99.0% (95% CI, 98.5 and 99.4%), respectively. Reactive rapid HIV-1 antibody detection was confirmed in 99.6% of those with a known HIV infection (n = 939), 5.2% of those in the high-risk group (n = 1,003), and 0.1% of those in the low-risk group (n = 1,012). For 21 (0.71%) patients, there was discordance between the results of the rapid test and the confirmatory EIA/Western blot tests. We conclude that the Efoora HIV rapid test is a simple, rapid assay for detection of HIV-1 antibodies, with high sensitivity and specificity compared to a standardized

  12. Development and implementation of an objective structured clinical examination to provide formative feedback on communication and interpersonal skills in geriatric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia; Chao, Serena; Russell, Matthew; Levine, Sharon; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-09-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication and interpersonal skills, one of the American Council for Graduate Medical Education-designated core competencies, is an important but difficult task in the training of physicians. Assessment of trainees offers an opportunity to provide explicit feedback on their skills and encourages learning. This article describes a pilot study in which clinician-educators affiliated with the geriatrics training programs at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University Medical Center designed and piloted a novel Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the communication and interpersonal skills of medical, dental, and geriatric psychiatry fellows. The OSCE consisted of three stations where geriatricians and standardized patients evaluated candidates using specifically designed checklists and an abbreviated version of the Master Interview Rating Scale. Communication skills were assessed through performance of specific "real life" clinical tasks, such as obtaining a medical history, explaining a diagnosis and prognosis, giving therapeutic instructions, and counseling. Interpersonal skills were assessed through the effect of the communication between doctor and standardized patient on fostering trust, relieving anxiety, and establishing a therapeutic relationship. This pilot study demonstrated that the OSCE format of assessment provides a valid means of evaluating the communication and interpersonal skills of interdisciplinary geriatric trainees and provides a valuable forum for formative assessment and feedback. Given that geriatricians and non geriatricians involved in elder care both need communication and interpersonal skills, this novel OSCE can be used for assessment of these skills in trainees in diverse healthcare subspecialties.

  13. Rapid, accurate, and comparative differentiation of clinically and industrially relevant microorganisms via multiple vibrational spectroscopic fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Subaihi, Abdu; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-08-15

    Despite the fact that various microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses, etc.) have been linked with infectious diseases, their crucial role towards sustaining life on Earth is undeniable. The huge biodiversity, combined with the wide range of biochemical capabilities of these organisms, have always been the driving force behind their large number of current, and, as of yet, undiscovered future applications. The presence of such diversity could be said to expedite the need for the development of rapid, accurate and sensitive techniques which allow for the detection, differentiation, identification and classification of such organisms. In this study, we employed Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies, as molecular whole-organism fingerprinting techniques, combined with multivariate statistical analysis approaches for the classification of a range of industrial, environmental or clinically relevant bacteria (P. aeruginosa, P. putida, E. coli, E. faecium, S. lividans, B. subtilis, B. cereus) and yeast (S. cerevisiae). Principal components-discriminant function analysis (PC-DFA) scores plots of the spectral data collected from all three techniques allowed for the clear differentiation of all the samples down to sub-species level. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models generated using the SERS spectral data displayed lower accuracy (74.9%) when compared to those obtained from conventional Raman (97.8%) and FT-IR (96.2%) analyses. In addition, whilst background fluorescence was detected in Raman spectra for S. cerevisiae, this fluorescence was quenched when applying SERS to the same species, and conversely SERS appeared to introduce strong fluorescence when analysing P. putida. It is also worth noting that FT-IR analysis provided spectral data of high quality and reproducibility for the whole sample set, suggesting its applicability to a wider range of samples, and perhaps the

  14. Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 (IVCF-20): rapid recognition of frail older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar Nunes de; Carmo, Juliana Alves do; Moraes, Flávia Lanna de; Azevedo, Raquel Souza; Machado, Carla Jorge; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero

    2016-12-22

    To evaluate the adequacy of the Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20, a rapid triage instrument to test vulnerability in Brazilian older adults, for the use in primary health care. The study included convenience sample of 397 patients aged older than or equal to 60 years attended at Centro de Referência para o Idoso (Reference Center for Older Adults) and of 52 older adults the same age attended at the community. The results of the questionnaire, consisting of 20 questions, were compared with those of the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, considered a reference for identifying frail older adults. Spearman's correlation was evaluated in the Clinical-Functional Vulnerability Index-20 with the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment; the validity was verified by the area under the ROC curve; reliability was estimated by the percentage of agreement among evaluators and by the kappa coefficient, both with quadratic weighted. The cut-off point was obtained based on the higher accuracy criterion. Cronbach's alpha, a measure of internal consistency, was estimated. The Spearman's correlation coefficient was high and positive for both groups (0.792 for older adults attended at the Reference Center and 0.305 for older adults from the community [p idosos brasileiros, para utilização pela atenção básica. O estudo incluiu amostra de conveniência de 397 pacientes com idade maior ou igual a 60 anos atendidos em um Centro de Referência para o Idoso e de 52 idosos da mesma idade atendidos na comunidade. Os resultados do questionário, constituído por 20 perguntas, foram comparados com aqueles da Avaliação Geriátrica Ampla, considerada referência para identificação do idoso frágil. Foi avaliada a correlação de Spearman do Índice de Vulnerabilidade Clínico-Funcional-20 com a Avaliação Geriátrica Ampla; a validade foi verificada pela área sob a curva ROC; a confiabilidade foi estimada pelo percentual de concordância entre avaliadores e coeficiente kappa

  15. Offering effective feedback to trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Morkos

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback on performance is an integral part of clinical training. It allows the trainee to critically reflect on their development, as well as enable the teacher to chart progress and detect areas for development. In order to provide effective feedback, we need to take into account the performance itself, but also the setting where feedback is offered, and the expected outcomes of the encounter. As ever, negative feedback remains more difficult to give and receive, and as such requires a greater degree of delicacy to produce a positive result.

  16. Nursing students' evaluation of a new feedback and reflection tool for use in high-fidelity simulation - Formative assessment of clinical skills. A descriptive quantitative research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Elisabeth; Plathe, Hilde Syvertsen; Eide, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    Clinical skills training is an important part of nurses' education programmes. Clinical skills are complex. A common understanding of what characterizes clinical skills and learning outcomes needs to be established. The aim of the study was to develop and evaluate a new reflection and feedback tool for formative assessment. The study has a descriptive quantitative design. 129 students participated who were at the end of the first year of a Bachelor degree in nursing. After highfidelity simulation, data were collected using a questionnaire with 19 closed-ended and 2 open-ended questions. The tool stimulated peer assessment, and enabled students to be more thorough in what to assess as an observer in clinical skills. The tool provided a structure for selfassessment and made visible items that are important to be aware of in clinical skills. This article adds to simulation literature and provides a tool that is useful in enhancing peer learning, which is essential for nurses in practice. The tool has potential for enabling students to learn about reflection and developing skills for guiding others in practice after they have graduated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modified-casted Appliance for Surgically-assisted Rapid Palatal Expansion: A Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Batra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse maxilla-mandibular discrepancies are a major component of several malocclusions. Surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SARPE is a common treatment modality for older patients in the correction of a maxillary transverse deficiency. In such cases, retention of the appliance plays an important role and this becomes a problem in patients having enamel hypoplasia. Therefore, the design was modified of a tooth-borne rapid maxillary expansion appliance with provision for miniscrew skeletal anchorage in a Class II malocclusion case having anterior open bite with bilateral posterior crossbite and enamel hypoplasia.

  18. A rapid MALDI-TOF MS identification database at genospecies level for clinical and environmental Aeromonas strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Benagli

    Full Text Available The genus Aeromonas has undergone a number of taxonomic and nomenclature revisions over the past 20 years, and new (subspecies and biogroups are continuously described. Standard identification methods such as biochemical characterization have deficiencies and do not allow clarification of the taxonomic position. This report describes the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS identification database for a rapid identification of clinical and environmental Aeromonas isolates.

  19. Rapid Detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus isolates in clinical samples using real time polymerase chain reaction assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Abdul Wajid, Muhammad Wasim, Tahir Yaqub, Shafqat F Rehmani, Tasra Bibi, Nadia Mukhtar, Javed Muhammad, Umar Bacha, Suliman Qadir Afridi, Muhammad Nauman Zahid, Zia u ddin, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Kamran Abbas & Muneer Ahmad ### Abstract In the present protocol we describe the real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for the rapid detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isoaltes in clinical samples. Fusion gene and matrix gene...

  20. Rapid detection of human parechoviruses in clinical samples by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benschop, Kimberley; Molenkamp, Richard; van der Ham, Alwin; Wolthers, Katja; Beld, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) have been associated with severe conditions such as neonatal sepsis and meningitis in young children. Rapid identification of an infectious agent in such serious conditions in these patients is essential for adequate decision making regarding treatment and

  1. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E

    2015-01-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope s...

  2. Survey and rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples targeting the rcsA gene in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong eDong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a wide-spread nosocomial pathogen. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for the detection of K. pneumoniae in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment. In this study, we first described a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for the rapid detection of capsular polysaccharide synthesis regulating gene rcsA from K. pneumoniae in clinical samples by using two methods including real-time turbidity monitoring and fluorescence detection to assess the reaction. Then dissemination of K. pneumoniae strains was investigated from ICU patients in three top hospitals in Beijing, China. The results showed that the detection limit of the LAMP method was 0.115 pg/µl DNA within 60 min under isothermal conditions (61°C, a 100-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 30 non- K. pneumoniae strains tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the LAMP reaction. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 110 clinical sputum samples collected from ICU patients with clinically suspected multi-resistant infections in China, a total of 32 K. pneumoniae isolates were identified for LAMP-based surveillance of rcsA. All isolates belonged to nine different K. pneumoniae multilocus sequence typing (MLST groups. Strikingly, of the 32 K. pneumoniae strains, 18 contained the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC-encoding gene blaKPC-2 and had high resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Moreover, K. pneumoniae WJ-64 was discovered to contain blaKPC-2 and blaNDM-1 genes simultaneously in the isolate. Our data showed the high prevalence of blaKPC-2 among K. pneumoniae and co-occurrence of many resistant genes in the clinical strains signal a rapid and continuing evolution of K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, we have developed a rapid and sensitive visual K. pneumoniae detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for clinical screening

  3. Rapid 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing of polymicrobial clinical samples for diagnosis of complex bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Salipante

    Full Text Available Classifying individual bacterial species comprising complex, polymicrobial patient specimens remains a challenge for culture-based and molecular microbiology techniques in common clinical use. We therefore adapted practices from metagenomics research to rapidly catalog the bacterial composition of clinical specimens directly from patients, without need for prior culture. We have combined a semiconductor deep sequencing protocol that produces reads spanning 16S ribosomal RNA gene variable regions 1 and 2 (∼360 bp with a de-noising pipeline that significantly improves the fraction of error-free sequences. The resulting sequences can be used to perform accurate genus- or species-level taxonomic assignment. We explore the microbial composition of challenging, heterogeneous clinical specimens by deep sequencing, culture-based strain typing, and Sanger sequencing of bulk PCR product. We report that deep sequencing can catalog bacterial species in mixed specimens from which usable data cannot be obtained by conventional clinical methods. Deep sequencing a collection of sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF patients reveals well-described CF pathogens in specimens where they were not detected by standard clinical culture methods, especially for low-prevalence or fastidious bacteria. We also found that sputa submitted for CF diagnostic workup can be divided into a limited number of groups based on the phylogenetic composition of the airway microbiota, suggesting that metagenomic profiling may prove useful as a clinical diagnostic strategy in the future. The described method is sufficiently rapid (theoretically compatible with same-day turnaround times and inexpensive for routine clinical use.

  4. Evaluation of a novel immunochromatographic device for rapid and accurate clinical detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, K; Takayama, S; Saito, A; Inoue, E; Nakayama, Y; Ogata, Y; Shirakawa, S; Nagano, T; Gomi, K; Morozumi, T; Akiishi, K; Watanabe, K; Yoshie, H

    2015-10-01

    An important goal for the improved diagnosis and management of infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, is the development of rapid and accurate technologies for the decentralized detection of bacterial pathogens. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to evaluate the clinical use of a novel immunochromatographic device with monoclonal antibodies for the rapid point-of-care detection and semi-quantification of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque. Sixty-three patients with chronic periodontitis and 28 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological examinations. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of P. gingivalis using a novel immunochromatography based device DK13-PG-001, designed to detect the 40k-outer membrane protein of P. gingivalis, and compared with a PCR-Invader method. In the periodontitis group, a significant strong positive correlation in detection results was found between the test device score and the PCR-Invader method (Spearman rank correlation, r=0.737, pgingivalis, whereas 76% (n=48) of periodontitis subjects were tested positive. There was a significant positive correlation between device scores for P. gingivalis and periodontal parameters including probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (r=0.317 and 0.281, respectively, pgingivalis in subgingival plaque. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) UMIN000011943. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional polymorphisms of circadian positive feedback regulation genes and clinical outcome of Chinese patients with resected colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; He, Xianli; Liu, Hanqiang; Zhu, Yong; Jin, Tianbo; Chen, Chao; Qu, Falin; Li, Yunming; Bao, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhinan; Xing, Jinliang

    2012-02-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that circadian genes play a role in the development and progression of many cancers. This study aims to assess the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in circadian genes on recurrence and survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Nine functional SNPs in 3 genes (CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1) on the circadian positive feedback loop were selected and genotyped using the Sequenom iPLEX genotyping system in a cohort of 411 resected Chinese CRC patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier curve were used for the prognosis analysis. The authors identified 2 SNPs in the CLOCK gene to be significantly associated with CRC overall survival. SNP rs3749474 exhibited a significant association with survival of CRC patients in the additive model (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.81; P = .003). In addition, patients carrying the heterozygous variant of rs1801260 had significantly increased overall survival compared with those carrying homozygous wild-type genotype (HR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11-0.88; P = .03). Findings from functional assay provided further biological support for these significant associations. Stratified analysis found no modifying effect of chemotherapy on the prognostic significance of both SNPs. Moreover, we observed cumulative effects of these 2 SNPs on CRC overall survival (P for trend = .01). Compared with patients carrying no unfavorable genotypes, those carrying 2 unfavorable genotypes had a 2.92-fold increased risk of death (P = .03). The results suggest for the first time that CLOCK gene polymorphisms may serve as an independent prognostic marker for CRC patients. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  6. Remission of classic rapid cycling bipolar disorder with levothyroxine augmentation therapy in a male patient having clinical hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen PH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pao-Huan Chen, Yu-Jui Huang Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: The literature suggests that patients with bipolar disorder, particularly females, have greater vulnerability to rapid cycling features. Levothyroxine therapy might be potentially useful to attenuate mood instability in this patient group. In contrast, reports on male patients remain limited and controversial. Herein, we report a 32-year-old male patient who had bipolar 1 disorder for 12 years who developed a breakthrough rapid cycling course and first-onset clinical hypothyroidism at the age of 31 years during lithium therapy. After levothyroxine augmentation therapy was introduced, the patient had remission from the rapid cycling illness course along with normalization of serum levels of free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone in the subsequent year. This observation suggested that investigation of both levothyroxine pharmacology and thyroid pathology in male patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder might be of much value. Keywords: mood disorder, therapy, thyroid hormone

  7. Clinical application of a rapid microbiological test based on capillary zone electrophoresis to assess local skin infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeliga Jacek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basic clinical problem associated with infection treatment is the fact that classic, commonly and routinely used isolation and identification methods are based on long-term processes of a phenotypic analysis of microorganisms. Consequently sometimes, especially in small centres, rapid implementation of antibacterial treatment becomes delayed. The work presents the initial results of rapid microbiological identification based on an original method of capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE. The study involved the analysis of 78 biological samples from post-operative wounds and trophic ulcers. Results The attempt was made to identify individual bacterial species based on characteristic features of electropherograms achieved. Finally, G(+ cocci type bacteria and different G(- rods were identified with sensitivity of 88.1% and specificity of 100%. Conclusions Based on the clinical trials using an electrophoretic technique in the field of microbiological diagnostics of infected exudate from a post-operative wound it can be concluded that it is a rapid and relatively sensitive method for initial identification of infectious pathogens.

  8. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Arthur J; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures ? coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate anti...

  9. Rapid differentiation between clinically relevant mycobacteria in microscopy positive clinical specimens and mycobacterial isolates by line probe assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Lundgren, Bettina H; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2002-01-01

    The Inno LiPA Mycobacteria assay, based on PCR amplification of the 16-23S rRNA spacer region of Mycobacterium species, has been designed for identification of mycobacteria grown in culture media and discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansas...... mycobacteria in microscopy positive clinical specimens and isolates within 6 h in the same procedural run.......The Inno LiPA Mycobacteria assay, based on PCR amplification of the 16-23S rRNA spacer region of Mycobacterium species, has been designed for identification of mycobacteria grown in culture media and discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii......, M. gordonae, M. xenopi, scrofulaceum and M. chelonae group including M. abscessus. In order to evaluate the system as a fast diagnostic tool, the assay was for the first time used directly on 14 microscopy positive clinical specimens and 71 isolates and the results were compared to those...

  10. Improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a CPR feedback device and refresher simulations (CPR CARES Study): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Brown, Linda L; Duff, Jonathan P; Davidson, Jennifer; Overly, Frank; Tofil, Nancy M; Peterson, Dawn T; White, Marjorie L; Bhanji, Farhan; Bank, Ilana; Gottesman, Ronald; Adler, Mark; Zhong, John; Grant, Vincent; Grant, David J; Sudikoff, Stephanie N; Marohn, Kimberly; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Kessler, David O; Wong, Hubert; Robertson, Nicola; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duval-Arnould, Jordan M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2015-02-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) affects hemodynamics, survival, and neurological outcomes following pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Most health care professionals fail to perform CPR within established American Heart Association guidelines. To determine whether "just-in-time" (JIT) CPR training with visual feedback (VisF) before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA improves the quality of chest compressions (CCs) during simulated CPA. Prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 factorial-design trial with explicit methods (July 1, 2012, to April 15, 2014) at 10 International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, & Education (INSPIRE) institutions running a standardized simulated CPA scenario, including 324 CPR-certified health care professionals assigned to 3-person resuscitation teams (108 teams). Each team was randomized to 1 of 4 permutations, including JIT training vs no JIT training before CPA and real-time VisF vs no real-time VisF during simulated CPA. The proportion of CCs with depth exceeding 50 mm, the proportion of CPR time with a CC rate of 100 to 120 per minute, and CC fraction (percentage CPR time) during simulated CPA. The quality of CPR was poor in the control group, with 12.7% (95% CI, 5.2%-20.1%) mean depth compliance and 27.1% (95% CI, 14.2%-40.1%) mean rate compliance. JIT training compared with no JIT training improved depth compliance by 19.9% (95% CI, 11.1%-28.7%; P 89.0%) in all groups. Combining both interventions showed the highest compliance with American Heart Association guidelines but was not significantly better than either intervention in isolation. The quality of CPR provided by health care professionals is poor. Using novel and practical technology, JIT training before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA, alone or in combination, improves compliance with American Heart Association guidelines for CPR that are associated with better outcomes. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075450.

  11. [BREV: a rapid clinical scale for cognitive function evaluation in preschool and school-age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, C; Vol, S; Livet, M O; Motte, J; Vallée, L; Gillet, P; Marquet, T

    2002-02-01

    BREV, standing for the French "Batterie Rapide d'Evaluation des Fonctions Cognitive", is a rapid test to screen children with disorders of higher functions and to define the patterns of these disorders. We describe here two phases of the validation procedure. The first phase consisted in measuring the internal validity of the scale by testing 500 normal school children free of disability. The validation process provided appropriate values for each of the 18 subtests assessing cognitive functions (oral language, non-verbal abilities, attention and memory, education and memory, educational achievment) in ten age groups from 4 to 8 years. All subtests with the same content for any revealed values which increased significantly with age. Inter-reliability was tested by retesting 70 children. The second phase of validation, comparing BREV results and those from a large classical neuropsychological battery, tested specificity and sensitivity. Each of the BREV subtests were correlated with the similar subtest of the classical battery. Correlations between verbal and non-verbal scores and verbal and performance intellectual quotient (Weschler scale) were very significant. Sensitivity and specificity of BREV were above 75p.100;. This confirms the reliability of this battery for children, with good sensitivity and specificity. BREV is a reliable test, with carefully established norms, appropriate for preschool and school-age children.

  12. SU-E-T-23: A Developing Australian Network for Datamining and Modelling Routine Radiotherapy Clinical Data and Radiomics Information for Rapid Learning and Clinical Decision Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney (Australia); Holloway, L [Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bailey, M; Carolan, M; Miller, A [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Barakat, S; Field, M [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Delaney, G; Vinod, S [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Dekker, A [Maastro Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lustberg, T; Soest, J van; Walsh, S [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Large amounts of routine radiotherapy (RT) data are available, which can potentially add clinical evidence to support better decisions. A developing collaborative Australian network, with a leading European partner, aims to validate, implement and extend European predictive models (PMs) for Australian practice and assess their impact on future patient decisions. Wider objectives include: developing multi-institutional rapid learning, using distributed learning approaches; and assessing and incorporating radiomics information into PMs. Methods: Two initial standalone pilots were conducted; one on NSCLC, the other on larynx, patient datasets in two different centres. Open-source rapid learning systems were installed, for data extraction and mining to collect relevant clinical parameters from the centres’ databases. The European DSSs were learned (“training cohort”) and validated against local data sets (“clinical cohort”). Further NSCLC studies are underway in three more centres to pilot a wider distributed learning network. Initial radiomics work is underway. Results: For the NSCLC pilot, 159/419 patient datasets were identified meeting the PM criteria, and hence eligible for inclusion in the curative clinical cohort (for the larynx pilot, 109/125). Some missing data were imputed using Bayesian methods. For both, the European PMs successfully predicted prognosis groups, but with some differences in practice reflected. For example, the PM-predicted good prognosis NSCLC group was differentiated from a combined medium/poor prognosis group (2YOS 69% vs. 27%, p<0.001). Stage was less discriminatory in identifying prognostic groups. In the good prognosis group two-year overall survival was 65% in curatively and 18% in palliatively treated patients. Conclusion: The technical infrastructure and basic European PMs support prognosis prediction for these Australian patient groups, showing promise for supporting future personalized treatment decisions

  13. Implementation and evaluation by formal assessments and term end student feedback of a new methodology of clinical teaching in surgery in small group sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, K Veena L; Kumar, M V

    2008-12-01

    The existing clinical teaching in small group sessions is focused on the patient's disease. The main dual limitation is that not only does the clinical skill testing become secondary but there is also a slackening of student involvement as only 1 student is evaluated during the entire session. A new methodology of small group teaching being experimented shifted the focus to testing students' clinical skills with emphasise on team participation by daily evaluation of the entire team. The procedure involved was that the group underwent training sessions where the clinical skills were taught demonstrated and practiced on simulated patients (hear-see-do module). Later the entire small group, as a team, examined the patient and each student was evaluated for 1 of 5 specific tasks--history taking, general examination, systemic examination, discussion and case write-up. Out of 170 students, 69 students (study) and 101 students (control) were randomly chosen and trained according to the new and existing methods respectively. Senior faculty (who were blinded as to which method of teaching the student underwent) evaluated all the students. The marks obtained at 2 examinations were tabulated and compared for tests of significance using t-test. The difference in the marks obtained showed a statistically significant improvement in the study group indicating that the new module was an effective methodology of teaching. The teaching effectiveness was evaluated by student feedback regarding improvement in knowledge, clinical and communication skills and positive attitudes on a 5-point Likert scale. Psychometric analysis was very positively indicative of the success of the module.

  14. HIV Rapid Testing in Substance Abuse Treatment: Implementation Following a Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, L. F.; Korte, J. E.; Holmes, B. E.; Gooden, L.; Matheson, T.; Feaster, D. J.; Leff, J. A.; Wilson, L.; Metsch, L. R.; Schackman, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration has promoted HIV testing and counseling as an evidence-based practice. Nevertheless, adoption of HIV testing in substance abuse treatment programs has been slow. This article describes the experience of a substance abuse treatment agency where, following participation in a clinical trial,…

  15. Development of a novel, simple and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deak, R.; Bodia, L.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Maraz, A.

    2004-01-01

    Identification of clinical yeast isolates causing candidiasis is routinely performed by commercial yeast identification systems based on biochemical, morphological and physiological tests. These systems require 3-5 days and the proportion of identifications that are incorrect is high. Our novel and

  16. A Case of Sarcoidosis with Interstitial Lung Disease Mimicking Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis and Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a patient with sarcoidosis who developed edematous erythema and interstitial lung disease. At the initial visit, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD was suspected because he had progressive dyspnea but no muscle weakness. The presence of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 autoantibodies was immediately assessed to facilitate a precise diagnosis, with negative results. Thereafter, skin and transbronchial lung biopsies revealed noncaseating granuloma with Langhans giant cells in both specimens, leading to a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this case, clinical features of skin and lung were unable to distinguish DM (including CADM from sarcoidosis, but the lack of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 antibody was useful for differentiating CADM with RP-ILD mimicking sarcoidosis from bona fide sarcoidosis.

  17. A Case of Sarcoidosis with Interstitial Lung Disease Mimicking Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis and Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Shinichi; Sasaki, Noriko; Chinen, Naofumi; Honda, Kiri; Saito, Eiko; Wakabayashi, Takayuki; Yamada, Chiho; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a patient with sarcoidosis who developed edematous erythema and interstitial lung disease. At the initial visit, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) was suspected because he had progressive dyspnea but no muscle weakness. The presence of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 autoantibodies was immediately assessed to facilitate a precise diagnosis, with negative results. Thereafter, skin and transbronchial lung biopsies revealed noncaseating granuloma with Langhans giant cells in both specimens, leading to a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this case, clinical features of skin and lung were unable to distinguish DM (including CADM) from sarcoidosis, but the lack of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 antibody was useful for differentiating CADM with RP-ILD mimicking sarcoidosis from bona fide sarcoidosis. PMID:25431723

  18. The role of rapid testing and clinical decision in the diagnosis of human influenza A H1N1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A; Siddiqui, Amna R; Mandil, Ahmed M; Torchyan, Armen A; Tayel, Salwa A; Shaikh, Shaffi A; Habib, Hanan A; Al-Khattaf, Abdulaziz S

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the role of the rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) and clinical decision in the diagnosis of H1N1. In November 2009, 290 suspected influenza patients were examined for H1N1 during an outbreak in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Nasopharyngeal swabs were analyzed using Directigen EZ Flu A+B kit. Monoclonal anti-human influenza A/B and reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used. Positive and negative controls were used in each run of specimens. Validity indices were calculated for RIDT and clinical diagnostic criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of RIDT were 40.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-48.5), and 94.5% (95% CI: 88.6-97.6). The sensitivity of clinical decision was 66.3% (95% CI: 58.4-73.4), and the specificity was 65.4% (95% CI: 56.3-73.4). The sensitivity of clinical decision was higher in early presenters (79.2%; 95% CI: 57.3-92.1). The RIDT sensitivity was higher in younger patients (48.4%; 95% CI: 35.7-61.3). The positive predictive value (PPV) was 90.4% (95% CI: 80.7-95.7) for RIDT, and 71.1% (95% CI: 63.1-78.0) for clinical decision. The PPV for RIDT was greater for older (94.7%; 95% CI: 80.9-99.1) and late (90.7%; 95% CI: 76.9-97.0) presenters. The adjusted odds ratio for clinical decision was significant for cough, headache, and fatigue. The RIDT can be useful in epidemics and high prevalence areas, whereas clinical decision, and RT-PCR complement the diagnosis of H1N1 in any setting.

  19. Mycobacterium celeriflavum sp. nov., a rapidly growing scotochromogenic bacterium isolated from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Borroni, Emanuele; Heidarieh, Parvin; Koksalan, Orhan Kaya; Cabibbe, Andrea Maurizio; Hashemzadeh, Mohamad; Mariottini, Alessandro; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Cittaro, Davide; Feizabadi, Mohamad Mehdi; Lazarevic, Dejan; Yaghmaei, Farhad; Molinari, Gian Lorenzo; Camaggi, Anna; Tortoli, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Six strains of a rapidly growing scotochromogenic mycobacterium were isolated from pulmonary specimens of independent patients. Biochemical and cultural tests were not suitable for their identification. The mycolic acid pattern analysed by HPLC was different from that of any other mycobacterium. Genotypic characterization, targeting seven housekeeping genes, revealed the presence of microheterogeneity in all of them. Different species were more closely related to the test strains in various regions: the type strain of Mycobacterium moriokaense showed 99.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, and 91.5-96.5 % similarity for the remaining six regions. The whole genome sequences of the proposed type strain and that of M. moriokaense presented an average nucleotide identity (ANI) of 82.9 %. Phylogenetic analysis produced poorly robust trees in most genes with the exception of rpoB and sodA where Mycobacterium flavescens and Mycobacterium novocastrense were the closest species. This phylogenetic relatedness was confirmed by the tree inferred from five concatenated genes, which was very robust. The polyphasic characterization of the test strains, supported by the ANI value, demonstrates that they belong to a previously unreported species, for which the name Mycobacterium celeriflavum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AFPC-000207(T) ( = DSM 46765(T) = JCM 18439(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  20. Melanin binding study of clinical drugs with cassette dosing and rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Laura; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ruponen, Marika; Kidron, Heidi; Del Amo, Eva M; Reinisalo, Mika; Urtti, Arto

    2017-11-15

    Melanin pigment is a negatively charged polymer found in pigmented human tissues. In the eye, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are heavily pigmented. Several drug molecules are known to bind to melanin, but larger sets of drugs have not been compared often in similar test conditions. In this study, we introduce a powerful tool for screening of melanin binding. The binding of a set of 34 compounds to isolated porcine RPE melanin was determined by cassette (n-in-one) dosing in rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts and the binding was quantitated with LC-MS/MS analytics. The compounds represented large variety in melanin binding (from 8.6%, ganciclovir) to over 95% bound (ampicillin and ciprofloxacin). The data provides information on melanin binding of small molecular weight compounds that are used for ocular (e.g. brinzolamide, ganciclovir) and systemic (e.g. tizanidine, indomethacin) therapy. Interestingly, competition among compounds was seen for melanin binding and the binding did not show any correlation with plasma protein binding. These results increase the understanding of melanin binding of ocular drugs and can be further exploited to predict pharmacokinetics in the eye. Pigment binding provides an interesting option for improved drug distribution to retina and choroid that are difficult target tissues in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Multitarget Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Bordetella Species in Clinical Specimens ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatti, Kathleen M.; Sparks, Kansas N.; Boney, Kathryn O.; Tondella, Maria Lucia

    2011-01-01

    A novel multitarget real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the rapid identification of Bordetella pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. holmesii was developed using multicopy insertion sequences (ISs) in combination with the pertussis toxin subunit S1 (ptxS1) singleplex assay. The RT-PCR targets for the multiplex assay include IS481, commonly found in B. pertussis and B. holmesii; IS1001 of B. parapertussis; and the IS1001-like sequence of B. holmesii. Overall, 402 Bordetella species and 66 non-Bordetella species isolates were tested in the multitarget assay. Cross-reactivity was found only with 5 B. bronchiseptica isolates, which were positive with IS1001 of B. parapertussis. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) of the multiplex assay was similar to the LLOD of each target in an individual assay format, which was approximately 1 genomic equivalent per reaction for all targets. A total of 197 human clinical specimens obtained during cough-illness outbreak investigations were used to evaluate the multitarget RT-PCR assay. The multiplex assay results from 87 clinical specimens were compared to the individual RT-PCR assay and culture results. The multitarget assay is useful as a diagnostic tool to confirm B. pertussis infections and to rapidly identify other Bordetella species. In conclusion, the use of this multitarget RT-PCR approach increases specificity, while it decreases the amount of time, reagents, and specimen necessary for RT-PCRs used for accurate diagnosis of pertussis-like illness. PMID:21940464

  2. Effect of low-level laser therapy after rapid maxillary expansion: a clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Valentin Javier; Arnabat, J; Comesaña, Rafael; Kasem, Khaled; Ustrell, Josep Maria; Pasetto, Stefano; Segura, Oscar Pozuelo; ManzanaresCéspedes, Maria Cristina; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of the mid palatal suture, after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). A single-operator, randomized single-blind placebo-controlled study was performed at the Orthodontic Department at the Dental Hospital of Bellvitge. Barcelona University, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. Thirty-nine children (range 6-12 years old), completed RME and were randomized to receive active LLLT (n = 20) or placebo (n = 19). The laser parameters and dose were 660 nm, 100 mW, CW, InGaAlP laser, illuminated area 0.26 cm(2), 332 mW/cm(2), 60 s to four points along midpalatal suture, and 30 s to a point each side of the suture. A total of seven applications were made on days 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 70 of the retention phase RME. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was carried out on the day of the first laser treatment, and at day 75, a second CBCT scan was performed. Two radiologists synchronized the slices of two scans to be assessed. P = 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. At day 75 of the suture, the irradiated patients presented a greater percentage of approximate zones in the anterior (p = 0.008) and posterior (p = 0.001) superior suture-and less approximation in the posterior superior suture (p = 0.040)-than the placebo group. LLLT appears to stimulate the repair process during retention phase after RME.

  3. Slow versus rapid maxillary expansion in bilateral cleft lip and palate: a CBCT randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Araci Malagodi; Ozawa, Terumi Okada; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Janson, Guilherme; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Ioshida, Marilia Sayako Yatabe; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this "two-arm parallel" trial was to compare the orthopedic, dental, and alveolar bone plate changes of slow (SME) and rapid (RME) maxillary expansions in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). Forty-six patients with BCLP and maxillary arch constriction in the late mixed dentition were randomly and equally allocated into two groups. Computer-generated randomization was used. Allocation was concealed with sequentially, numbered, sealed, opaque envelopes. The SME and RME groups comprised patients treated with quad-helix and Haas/Hyrax-type expanders, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams were performed before expansion and 4 to 6 months post-expansion. Nasal cavity width, maxillary width, alveolar crest width, arch width, palatal cleft width, inclination of posterior teeth, alveolar crest level, and buccal and lingual bone plate thickness were assessed. Blinding was applicable for outcome assessment only. Interphase and intergroup comparisons were performed using paired t tests and t tests, respectively (p Palatal cleft width had a significant increase in both groups. Significant buccal inclination of posterior teeth was only observed for RME. Additionally, both expansion procedures promoted a slight reduction of the alveolar crest level and the buccal bone plate thickness. No difference was found between the orthopedic, dental, and alveolar bone plate changes of SME and RME in children with BCLP. Both appliances produced significant skeletal transverse gains with negligible periodontal bone changes. Treatment time for SME, however, was longer than the observed for RME. SME and RME can be similarly indicated to correct maxillary arch constriction in patients with BCLP in the mixed dentition.

  4. Asymmetric rapid maxillary expansion in true unilateral crossbite malocclusion: a prospective controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the short-term effects of the asymmetric rapid maxillary (ARME) appliance on the vertical, sagittal, and transverse planes in patients with true unilateral posterior crossbite. Subjects were divided into two groups. The treatment group was comprised of 21 patients with unilateral posterior crossbite (mean age  =  13.3 ± 2.1 years). Members of this group were treated with the ARME appliance. The control group was comprised of 17 patients with Angle Class I who were kept under observation (mean age  =  12.3 ± 0.8 years). Lateral and frontal cephalograms were taken before the expansion (T1), immediately after expansion (T2), and at postexpansion retention (T3) in the treatment group and at preobservation (T1) and postobservation (T2) in the control group. A total of 34 measurements were assessed on cephalograms. For statistical analysis, the Wilcoxon test and analysis of covariance were used. The ARME appliance produced significant increases in nasal, maxillary base, upper arch, and lower arch dimensions (P ARME appliance created asymmetric increments in the transversal dimensions of the nose, maxilla, and upper arch in the short term. Asymmetric expansion therapy for subjects with unilateral maxillary deficiency may provide satisfactory outcomes in adolescents, with the exception of mandibular arch expansion. The triangular pattern of expansion caused clockwise rotation of the mandible and the occlusal plane and produced significant alterations in the vertical facial dimensions, whereas it created no displacement in maxilla in the sagittal plane.

  5. Preliminary Clinical Application of Removable Partial Denture Frameworks Fabricated Using Computer-Aided Design and Rapid Prototyping Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongqiang; Ning, Jing; Li, Man; Niu, Li; Yang, Jian; Sun, Yuchun; Zhou, Yongsheng

    The aim of this study was to explore the application of computer-aided design and rapid prototyping (CAD/RP) for removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks and evaluate the fitness of the technique for clinical application. Three-dimensional (3D) images of dentition defects were obtained using a lab scanner. The RPD frameworks were designed using commercial dental software and manufactured using selective laser melting (SLM). A total of 15 cases of RPD prostheses were selected, wherein each patient received two types of RPD frameworks, prepared by CAD/RP and investment casting. Primary evaluation of the CAD/RP framework was performed by visual inspection. The gap between the occlusal rest and the relevant rest seat was then replaced using silicone, and the specimens were observed and measured. Paired t test was used to compare the average thickness and distributed thickness between the CAD/RP and investment casting frameworks. Analysis of variance test was used to compare the difference in thickness among different zones. The RPD framework was designed and directly manufactured using the SLM technique. CAD/RP frameworks may meet the clinical requirements with satisfactory retention and stability and no undesired rotation. Although the average gap between the occlusal rest and the corresponding rest seat of the CAD/RP frameworks was slightly larger than that of the investment casting frameworks (P < .05), it was acceptable for clinical application. RPD frameworks can be designed and fabricated directly using digital techniques with acceptable results in clinical application.

  6. A rapid two-step algorithm detects and identifies clinical macrolide and beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuedong; Nie, Shuping; Xia, Chengjing; Huang, Lie; He, Ying; Wu, Runxiang; Zhang, Li

    2014-07-01

    Aiming to identify macrolide and beta-lactam resistance in clinical bacterial isolates rapidly and accurately, a two-step algorithm was developed based on detection of eight antibiotic resistance genes. Targeting at genes linked to bacterial macrolide (msrA, ermA, ermB, and ermC) and beta-lactam (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-9) antibiotic resistances, this method includes a multiplex real-time PCR, a melting temperature profile analysis as well as a liquid bead microarray assay. Liquid bead microarray assay is applied only when indistinguishable Tm profile is observed. The clinical validity of this method was assessed on clinical bacterial isolates. Among the total 580 isolates that were determined by our diagnostic method, 75% of them were identified by the multiplex real-time PCR with melting temperature analysis alone, while the remaining 25% required both multiplex real-time PCR with melting temperature analysis and liquid bead microarray assay for identification. Compared with the traditional phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility test, an overall agreement of 81.2% (kappa=0.614, 95% CI=0.550-0.679) was observed, with a sensitivity and specificity of 87.7% and 73% respectively. Besides, the average test turnaround time is 3.9h, which is much shorter in comparison with more than 24h for the traditional phenotypic tests. Having the advantages of the shorter operating time and comparable high sensitivity and specificity with the traditional phenotypic test, our two-step algorithm provides an efficient tool for rapid determination of macrolide and beta-lactam antibiotic resistances in clinical bacterial isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Barriers to health care in rural Mozambique: a rapid ethnographic assessment of planned mobile health clinics for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, Amee; Lederer, Philip; Zilversmit, Leah; Gudo, Paula Samo; Ramiro, Isaias; Cumba, Luisa; Mahagaja, Epifanio; Jobarteh, Kebba

    2015-03-01

    In Mozambique, 1.6 million people are living with HIV, and over 60% of the population lives in rural areas lacking access to health services. Mobile health clinics, implemented in 2013 in 2 provinces, are beginning to offer antiretroviral therapy (ART) and basic primary care services. Prior to introduction of the mobile health clinics in the communities, we performed a rapid ethnographic assessment to understand barriers to accessing HIV care and treatment services and acceptability and potential use of the mobile health clinics as an alternative means of service delivery. We conducted assessments in Gaza province in January 2013 and in Zambezia Province in April-May 2013 in districts where mobile health clinic implementation was planned. Community leaders served as key informants, and chain-referral sampling was used to recruit participants. Interviews were conducted with community leaders, health care providers, traditional healers, national health system patients, and traditional healer patients. Interviewees were asked about barriers to health services and about mobile health clinic acceptance. In-depth interviews were conducted with 117 participants (Gaza province, n = 57; Zambezia Province, n = 60). Barriers to accessing health services included transportation and distance-related issues (reliability, cost, and travel time). Participants reported concurrent use of traditional and national health systems. The decision to use a particular health system depended on illness type, service distance, and lack of confidence in the national health system. Overall, participants were receptive to using mobile health clinics for their health care and ability to increase access to ART. Hesitations concerning mobile health clinics included potentially long wait times due to high patient loads. Participants emphasized the importance of regular and published visit schedules and inclusion of community members in planning mobile health clinic services. Mobile health clinics

  8. Non-invasive method for rapid bedside estimation of inotropy: theory and preliminary clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B E; Madigan, V M

    2013-10-01

    There are numerous techniques which attempt to quantify inotropy (or myocardial contractility). None has yet found general acceptance in anaesthesia and critical care as a practical method. We report a novel approach to the determination of inotropy as a bedside procedure which could identify low inotropy states in patients with clinical heart failure. We estimated the potential and kinetic energy delivered by the left ventricle using continuous-wave Doppler ultrasound (ultrasonic cardiac output monitor, Uscom, Sydney, Australia) and data available at the point of care. A formula to calculate effective inotropy [Smith-Madigan inotropy index (SMII)] was tested against historical haemodynamic data for 250 control subjects (ASA I patients from preoperative clinic) and 83 patients with acute left ventricular failure (LVF) of New York Heart Association Grade 4 (LVF group). The ratio of potential to kinetic energy (PKR) was investigated as a measure of arterial impedance. Significant differences were found between the control and LVF groups for cardiac index, mean (range)=3.37 (2.84-5.32) vs 1.84 (1.43-2.26) litre min(-1) m(-2); stroke volume index (SVI), 49.2 (39-55) vs 34.3 (23-37) ml m(-2); systemic vascular resistance, 893 (644-1242) vs 1960 (1744-4048) dyn s cm(-5); SMII, 1.78 (1.35-2.24) vs 0.73 (0.43-0.97) W m(-2); and PKR, 29:1 (24-35:1) vs 124:1 (96-174:1), Pcalculated for SMII and PKR as mean (+/-1.96) standard deviations, yielding 1.6-2.2 W m(-2) for SMII, and 25-34:1 for PKR. The method clearly identified the two clinical groups with no overlap of data points. The discriminant power of SMII and PKR may offer valuable diagnostic methods and monitoring tools in anaesthesia and critical care. This is the first report of normal ranges for SMII and PKR.

  9. Rapid Identification of Microorganisms by FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel Improves Clinical Management in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Stephen T J; Drew, Richard J; Hardiman, Fiona; Pizer, Barry; Riordan, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Blood cultures are a common investigation for children admitted to hospital. In routine practice, it takes at least 24 hours to identify an organism as a contaminant or clinically significant. FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel (FA-BCIP) is a multiplex polymerase chain reaction that can detect 24 pathogens within 1 hour. We assessed whether results from FA-BCIP lead to changes in clinical management in a tertiary referral paediatric hospital. We prospectively studied children having blood cultures taken at our tertiary children's hospital. Blood cultures were monitored and organisms identified using standard methods. FA-BCIP was performed when growth was initially detected in first positive blood cultures per episode, between January 1 and June 30, 2014. Assessment of whether the FA-BCIP result altered clinical management was made, specifically focused on antimicrobial stewardship and length of stay. FA-BCIP was done on 117 positive blood cultures; 74 (63%) grew clinically significant organisms, 43 (37%) grew contaminants. FA-BCIP results were judged to alter clinical management in 63 of the 117 episodes (54%). Antimicrobials were started/altered in 23 (19%) episodes and de-escalated/withheld/stopped in 29 (25%) episodes. Ten children were discharged from hospital earlier, which saved a cumulative total of 14 bed days. Rapid identification of microorganisms in pediatric blood cultures by FA-BCIP, led to changes in clinical management for half of the episodes. This improved antimicrobial stewardship and allowed early discharge from hospital for 10% of children. Future studies should focus on how best to use this technology in a cost-effective manner.

  10. Streptococcus A in paediatric accident and emergency: are rapid streptococcal tests and clinical examination of any help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Limbergen, J; Kalima, P; Taheri, S; Beattie, T F

    2006-01-01

    Rapid streptococcal tests (RSTs) for streptococcal pharyngitis have made diagnosis at once simpler and more complicated. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all RSTs be confirmed by a follow up throat culture unless local validation has proved the RST to be equally sensitive. To evaluate (a) RST as a single diagnostic tool, compared with RST with or without throat culture; (b) clinical diagnosis and the relative contribution of different symptoms. The study included 213 patients with clinical signs of pharyngitis. Throat swabs were analysed using Quickvue+ Strep A Test; negative RSTs were backed up by throat culture. Thirteen clinical features commonly associated with strep throat were analysed using backward stepwise logistic regression. Positive results (RST or throat culture) were obtained in 33 patients; RST correctly identified 21. Eleven samples were false negative on RST. At a strep throat prevalence of 15.9%, sensitivity of RST was 65.6% (95% CI 46.8% to 81.4%) and specificity 99.4% (96.7% to 99.9%). Sensitivity of clinical diagnosis alone was 57% (34% to 78%) and specificity 71% (61% to 80%). Clinically, only history of sore throat, rash, and pyrexia contributed to the diagnosis of strep throat (pstrep throat. However, the low sensitivity of RST does not support its use as a single diagnostic tool. The sensitivity in the present study is markedly different from that reported by the manufacturer. Clinical examination is of limited value in the diagnosis of strep throat. It is important to audit the performance of new diagnostic tests, previously validated in different settings.

  11. Reproducibility of rapid short echo time CSI at 3 tesla for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauter, Sofie; Sima, Diana M; Luts, Jan; ter Beek, Leon; Ribbens, Annemie; Peeters, Ronald R; Osorio Garcia, Maria I; Li, Yuquan; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Gool, Stefaan W; Van Huffel, Sabine; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2013-02-01

    To validate the reproducibility of a chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition protocol with parallel imaging, using automated repositioning software. Ten volunteers were imaged three times on two different 3 Tesla (T) MRI scanners, receiving anatomical imaging and two identical CSI measurements, using automated repositioning software for consistent repositioning of the CSI grid. Offcenter parameters of the CSI plane were analyzed. Coefficients of variation (CoV), Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLB), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and coefficients of repeatability (CoR) for immediate repetition and between scanners were calculated for N-acetylaspartate, total choline, creatine, myo-inositol (Myo) and glutamine+glutamate (Glx). Proportions of variance reflecting the effect of voxel location, volunteer, repetition, time instance and scanner were calculated from an analysis of variance analysis. The offcenter vector and angulations of the CSI grid differed less than 1 mm and 2° between all measurements. The mean CoV and CRLB were less than 30% for all metabolites, except for Myo. The variance due to voxel location in the volume of interest and the error represent the largest contributions in variability. The ICC is the lowest for Myo and Glx. CoR for immediate repetition and between scanners display values between 22 and 83%. We propose a CSI protocol with acceptable reproducibility, applicable in clinical routine. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A combination of four cell types for rapid detection of enteroviruses in clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, R; Menegus, M A

    1986-07-01

    Isolation in cell culture is currently the most sensitive and reliable way to demonstrate enterovirus (EV) in clinical specimens. During July-October 1982 and 1983, we studied the impact of adding two new cell lines, Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGM) and human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD), to the more traditional cell combination used for EV isolation, human embryonic lung (HEL) and primary cynomolgus monkey kidney (CMK) cells; 2,558 specimens were studied: 632 fecal, 677 respiratory, 537 CSF, and 712 blood. An EV was isolated from 417 (16%); of these, 77 (18%) were positive only in BGM or RD; 35% (146/417) of the specimens were positive in BGM, RD, or both, at least one day earlier than in the traditional cells. BGM cells were helpful in isolation of group B coxsackieviruses (CB): 99% of 121 positive specimens were detected in BGM vs 73% in CMK and 23% in HEL; 72% of the CB isolates were detected by day 2 in BGM vs 48% in CMK and 0% in HEL. RD cells were helpful in the isolation of echoviruses: 59% of the 189 positive specimens were detected in RD vs 67% in HEL and 58% in CMK. RD was the only positive cell type in 28/189 (15%) positive specimens; 31% of the echovirus isolates were detected by day 2 in RD, vs 20% in HEL and 19% in CMK. Using the cell types described, we provided the clinician with results in 42% of the EV-positive specimens by day 2 after inoculation and in 61% by day 4.

  13. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  14. Rapid detection of Orthopoxvirus by semi-nested PCR directly from clinical specimens: a useful alternative for routine laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; da Silva-Fernandes, André Tavares; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Alves, Pedro Augusto; Campos, Rafael Kroon; Siqueira, Larissa; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2010-04-01

    Orthopoxvirus (OPV) has been associated with worldwide exanthematic outbreaks, which have resulted in serious economic losses as well as impact on public health. Although the current classical and molecular methods are useful for the diagnosis of OPV, they are largely inaccessible to unsophisticated clinical laboratories. The major reason for the inaccessibility is that they require both virus isolation and DNA manipulation. In this report, a rapid, sensitive and low-cost semi-nested PCR method is described for the detection of OPV DNA directly from clinical specimens. A set of primers was designed to amplify the conserved OPV vgf gene. The most useful thermal and chemical conditions were selected and minimum non-inhibitory dilutions were determined. More than 100 Brazilian Vaccinia virus (VACV) field clinical specimens were tested using this semi-nested PCR in order to confirm its applicability. Cowpox virus was also detected by PCR from the ear scabs of scarified Balb/c mice. In addition, the method was highly sensitive for the detection of VACV DNA in murine blood and excreta, which are among the suggested reservoirs of OPV. Together, these data suggest that semi-nested PCR can be used for initial screening for OPV and as a routine diagnostic laboratory method. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Rapid clinical induction of bupropion hydroxylation by metamizole in healthy Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Tan, Zhi-Rong; Hu, Dong-Li; Wang, Dan; Fan, Lan; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of metamizole on bupropion hydroxylation related to different CYP2B6 genotype groups in healthy volunteers. Sixteen healthy male volunteers (6 CYP2B6*1/*1, 6 CYP2B6*1/*6 and 4 CYP2B6*6/*6) received orally administered bupropion alone and during daily treatment with metamizole 1500 mg day(-1) (500 mg tablet taken three times daily) for 4 days. Serial blood samples were obtained up to 48 h after each bupropion dose. After metamizole treatment relative to bupropion alone, the geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence interval (CI) of the AUC(0,∞) ratio of 4-hydroxybupropion over bupropion were 1.99 (1.57, 2.55) for the CYP2B6*1/*1 group, 2.15 (1.53, 3.05) for the CYP2B6*1/*6 group and 1.86 (1.36, 2.57) for the CYP2B6*6/*6 group. The GMRs and 90% CI of bupropion were 0.695 (0.622, 0.774) for AUC(0,∞) and 0.400 (0.353, 0.449) for C(max) , respectively. The corresponding values for 4-hydroxybupropion were 1.43 (1.28, 1.53) and 2.63 (2.07, 2.92). The t(1/2) value was significantly increased for bupropion and decreased for 4-hydroxybupropion. The t(max) values of bupropion and 4-hydroxybupropion were both significantly decreased. The mean percentage changes in pharmacokinetic parameters among the CYP2B6 genotype groups were not significantly different. Oral administration of metamizole for 4 days significantly altered the pharmacokinetics of both bupropion and its active metabolite, 4-hydroxybupropion, and significantly increased the CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylation in all of the subjects. Cautions should be taken when metamizole is co-administered with CYP2B6 substrate drugs. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Exploring Occupational Therapy Students' Meaning of Feedback during Fieldwork Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathgeber, Karen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that students' confidence and performance improve after they receive feedback from clinical supervisors regarding the delivery of quality patient care. Multiple studies of feedback have focused on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if or how students internalized feedback to promote…

  17. The answer of the Bacteriology Laboratory to new clinical needs. Rapid sepsis diagnotics at the Novara hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselina Kroumova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Faster microbiological responses are increasingly necessary in modern medicine and the Laboratory of Microbiology must be equipped in this sense. New instrumentation and, above all, a new approach by the Clinical Microbiologist that puts a focus on the real needs of the patient before the microbiological may allow for significantly improving the TAT of these diagnostics. The use of both new methodologies, new tools and revisited old technologies may mean less these days as it was obtained at the Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology of Novara, where the combined use of molecular biology techniques, and mass spectrometry techniques rapid growth have allowed for more than 36 hours to shorten the response time by positivization of blood cultures. Such an approach allows an important support to the clinician with obvious benefits for the patient.

  18. Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Trichosporon asahii in Experimental and Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Liao, Yong; Li, Haitao; Lu, Xuelian; Han, Xiufeng; Tian, Yanli; Chen, Shanshan; Yang, Rongya

    2015-01-01

    Invasive trichosporonosis is a deep mycosis found mainly in immunocompromised hosts, and the major pathogen is Trichosporon asahii. We detected the species-specific intergenic spacers (IGS) of rRNA gene of T. asahii using a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay in 15 isolates with 3 different visualization methods, including SYBR green detection, gel electrophoresis, and turbidimetric methods. The LAMP assay displayed superior rapidity to other traditional methods in the detection time; that is, only 1 h was needed for detection and identification of the pathogen DNA. Furthermore, the detection limit of the LAMP assay was more sensitive than the PCR assay. We also successfully detect the presence of T. asahii in samples from experimentally infected mice and samples from patients with invasive trichosporonosis caused by T. asahii, suggesting that this method may become useful in clinical applications in the near future. PMID:25692144

  19. Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov., a rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species isolated from human clinical respiratory and blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto Enrique; Greninger, Alexander L; Ladutko, Lynn; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Jakubiec, Wesley; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Wallace, Richard J; Simmon, Keith E; Dunn, Bruce E; Jackoway, Gary; Vora, Surabhi B; Quinn, Kevin K; Qin, Xuan; Campbell, Sheldon

    2017-11-01

    A previously undescribed, rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium (represented by strains PB739 T and GK) was isolated from two clinical sources - the sputum of a 76-year-old patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of tuberculosis exposure and Mycobacterium avium complex isolated years prior; and the blood of a 15-year-old male with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia status post bone marrow transplant. The isolates grew as dark orange colonies at 25-37 °C after 5 days, sharing features in common with other closely related species. Analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence (1492 bp) of strain PB739 T demonstrated that the isolate shared 98.8 % relatedness with Mycobacterium wolinskyi. Partial 429 bp hsp65 and 744 bp rpoB region V sequence analyses revealed that the sequences of the novel isolate shared 94.8 and 92.1 % similarity with those of Mycobacterium neoaurum and Mycobacterium aurum, respectively. Biochemical profiling, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, HPLC/gas-liquid chromatography analyses and multilocus sequence typing support the taxonomic status of these isolates (PB739 T and GK) as representatives of a novel species. Both isolates were susceptible to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended antimicrobials for susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria including amikacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, doxycycline/minocycline, imipenem, linezolid, clarithromycin and trimethropin/sulfamethoxazole. Both isolates PB739 T and GK showed intermediate susceptibility to cefoxitin. We propose the name Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov. for this novel species and have deposited the type strain in the DSMZ and CIP culture collections. The type strain is PB739 T (=DSM 104744 T =CIP 111318 T ).

  20. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center. Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic activity linked to abnormal behaviors. Patients were 80% men with median age at IRBD diagnosis of 68 y (range, 50-85 y). In addition to the already known clinical picture of IRBD, other important features were apparent: 44% of the patients were not aware of their dream-enactment behaviors and 70% reported good sleep quality. In most of these cases bed partners were essential to convince patients to seek medical help. In 11% IRBD was elicited only after specific questioning when patients consulted for other reasons. Seven percent did not recall unpleasant dreams. Leaving the bed occurred occasionally in 24% of subjects in whom dementia with Lewy bodies often developed eventually. For the correct diagnosis of IRBD, video-polysomnography had to be repeated in 16% because of insufficient REM sleep or electromyographic artifacts from coexistent apneas. Some subjects with comorbid obstructive sleep apnea reported partial improvement of RBD symptoms following continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD. We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight frequent features that were not reported or not sufficiently emphasized in previous publications. Physicians should be aware of

  1. Technical Note: Clinical translation of the Rapid-Steady-State-T1 MRI method for direct cerebral blood volume quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Tropres, Irene; Sarraf, Michel G; Chechin, David; Zaccaria, Affif; Grand, Sylvie; Le Bas, Jean-François; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2015-11-01

    In preclinical studies, the Rapid-Steady-State-T1 (RSST1) MRI method has advantages over conventional MRI methods for blood volume fraction (BVf) mapping, since after contrast agent administration, the BVf is directly quantifiable from the signal amplitude corresponding to the vascular equilibrium magnetization. This study focuses on its clinical implementation and feasibility. Following sequence implementation on clinical Philips Achieva scanners, the RSST1-method is assessed at 1.5 and 3 T in the follow-up examination of neurooncological patients receiving 0.1-0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DOTA to determine the threshold dose needed for cerebral BVf quantification. Confounding effects on BVf quantification such as transendothelial water exchange, transverse relaxation, and contrast agent extravasation are evaluated. For a dose≥0.13 mmol/kg at 1.5 T and ≥0.16 mmol/kg at 3 T, the RSST1-signal time course in macrovessels and brain tissue with Gd-DOTA impermeable vasculature reaches a steady state at maximum amplitude for about 8 s. In macrovessels, a BVf of 100% was obtained validating cerebral microvascular BVf quantification (3.5%-4.5% in gray matter and 1.5%-2.0% in white matter). In tumor tissue, a continuously increasing signal is detected, necessitating signal modeling for tumor BVf calculation. Using approved doses of Gd-DOTA, the steady state RSST1-signal in brain tissue is reached during the first pass and corresponds to the BVf. The first-pass duration is sufficient to allow accurate BVf quantification. The RSST1-method is appropriate for serial clinical studies since it allows fast and straightforward BVf quantification without arterial input function determination. This quantitative MRI method is particularly useful to assess the efficacy of antiangiogenic agents.

  2. Quantitative assessment of isolated rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia without clinical REM sleep behavior disorder: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Ehrmann, Laura; Gabelia, David; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Inoue, Yuichi; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia (RWA) is observed in some patients without a clinical history of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). It remains unknown whether these patients meet the refined quantitative electromyographic (EMG) criteria supporting a clinical RBD diagnosis. We quantitatively evaluated EMG activity and investigated its overnight distribution in patients with isolated qualitative RWA. Fifty participants with an incidental polysomnographic finding of RWA (isolated qualitative RWA) were included. Tonic, phasic, and 'any' EMG activity during REM sleep on PSG were quantified retrospectively. Referring to the quantitative cut-off values for a polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD, 7/50 (14%) and 6/50 (12%) of the patients showed phasic and 'any' EMG activity in the mentalis muscle above the respective cut-off values. No patient was above the cut-off value for tonic EMG activity or phasic EMG activity in the anterior tibialis muscles. Patients with RWA above the cut-off value showed higher amounts of RWA during later REM sleep periods. This is the first study showing that some subjects with incidental RWA meet the refined quantitative EMG criteria for a diagnosis of RBD. Future longitudinal studies must investigate whether this subgroup with isolated qualitative RWA is at an increased risk of developing fully expressed RBD and/or neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Designing and comparison study of rapid detection methods of resistance to injectable drugs in clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Salehi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, some molecular methods were designed for rapid detection of resistance to kanamycin and amikacin.Materials and methods: Among 120 clinical isolates of mycobacterium tuberculosis, 70 strains were selected for evaluation of possible mutations. A PCR-RFLP method was designed for detection of wild type (using enzyme ajii and mutant from (BstFNI enzyme of the isolates. Furthermore, allele specific method (as PCR was designed for detection mutations in codons 1401 and 1402 gene rrs. Some selected isolates were sequenced.Results: In PCR-RFLP method, among the 70 strains examined by BstFNI enzyme, could detect 17 mutant strains among 24 phenotypicaly resistant and 44 non-mutant isolates from 46 susceptible isolates. The sensitivity of this method was %70.83 and specificity was %95.65 on the other hand, 12 mutant from 20 resistant strains and 29 non-mutant strains from 32 susceptible strains were detected by AjiI enzyme. The sensitivity and specificity of this method was 60 and %90.62, respectively. In MAS PCR, 3 mutants from 6 resistant strains and 12 non-mutants from 17 resistant strains were detected. The sensitivity of this method was 50 and specificity was 70.58. Results of sequencing method confirmed the results of molecular methods.Discussion and conclusion: PCR-RFLP method by BstFNI enzyme was the best method for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to second-line injectable drugs and was recommended for routine use.

  4. Performance of a Rapid and Simple HIV Testing Algorithm in a Multicenter Phase III Microbicide Clinical Trial▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-01-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In the event of discordant results between the Determine HIV-1/2 and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 tests, the third assay (Uni-Gold HIV) determined the final outcome. When the final outcome was positive, a second specimen was collected and tested with the same algorithm, only if a positive result was obtained with this sample the participant was informed of her positive serostatus. A total of 5,734 postenrollment specimens obtained from 1,398 women were tested. Forty-six women tested positive according to the testing algorithm performed on the first collected specimen. Confirmatory testing results obtained at the ITM confirmed that 42 women were truly infected. Two of four initial false positives tested negative upon analysis of a second blood specimen. The other two tested false positive twice using specimens collected the same day. A high percentage of specimens reactive with the Determine HIV-1/2 assay was only observed at the study site in Kampala. This result did not appear to be associated with pregnancy or malaria infection. We conclude that HIV testing algorithms, including only R/S assays, are suitable for use in clinical trials, provided that adequate quality assurance procedures are in place. PMID:21752945

  5. Performance of a rapid and simple HIV testing algorithm in a multicenter phase III microbicide clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-09-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In the event of discordant results between the Determine HIV-1/2 and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 tests, the third assay (Uni-Gold HIV) determined the final outcome. When the final outcome was positive, a second specimen was collected and tested with the same algorithm, only if a positive result was obtained with this sample the participant was informed of her positive serostatus. A total of 5,734 postenrollment specimens obtained from 1,398 women were tested. Forty-six women tested positive according to the testing algorithm performed on the first collected specimen. Confirmatory testing results obtained at the ITM confirmed that 42 women were truly infected. Two of four initial false positives tested negative upon analysis of a second blood specimen. The other two tested false positive twice using specimens collected the same day. A high percentage of specimens reactive with the Determine HIV-1/2 assay was only observed at the study site in Kampala. This result did not appear to be associated with pregnancy or malaria infection. We conclude that HIV testing algorithms, including only R/S assays, are suitable for use in clinical trials, provided that adequate quality assurance procedures are in place.

  6. Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1A-Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Rapid Weight Gain as Early Clinical Signs: A Clinical Review of 10 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayemba-Kay's, Simon; Tripon, Cedric; Heron, Anne; Hindmarsh, Peter

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical signs and symptoms that would help clinicians to consider pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type 1A as a diagnosis in a child. A retrospective review of the medical records of children diagnosed by erythrocyte Gsα activity and/or GNAS1 gene study and followed-up for PHP type 1A. Clinical and biochemical parameters along with epidemiological data were extracted and analyzed. Weight gain during infancy and early childhood was calculated as change in weight standard deviation score (SDS), using the French growth reference values. An upward gain in weight ≥0.67 SDS during these periods was considered indicative of overweight and/or obesity. Ten cases of PHP type 1A were identified (mean age 41.1 months, range from 4 to 156 months). In children aged ≤2 years, the commonest clinical features were round lunar face, obesity (70%), and subcutaneous ossifications (60%). In older children, brachydactyly was present in 60% of cases. Seizures occurred in older children (3 cases). Short stature was common at all ages. Subclinical hypothyroidism was present in 70%, increased parathormone (PTH) in 83%, and hyperphosphatemia in 50%. Only one case presented with hypocalcemia. Erythrocyte Gsα activity tested in seven children was reduced; GNAS1 gene testing was performed in 9 children. Maternal transmission was the most common (six patients). In three other cases, the mutations were de novo, c.585delGACT in exon 8 (case 2) and c.344C>TP115L in exon 5 (cases 6&7). Based on our results, PHP type 1A should be considered in toddlers presenting with round face, rapid weight gain, subcutaneous ossifications, and subclinical hypothyroidism. In older children, moderate mental retardation, brachydactyly, afebrile seizures, short stature, and thyroid-stimulating hormone resistance are the most suggestive features.

  7. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  8. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  9. Skriftlig feedback i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools.......The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools....

  10. The performance of matrices in daily clinical practice to predict rapid radiologic progression in patients with early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, D; Vanderschueren, G; Meyfroidt, S; Joly, J; Van der Elst, K; Westhovens, R; Verschueren, P

    2014-04-01

    To compare in daily clinical practice the reliability of matrices that forecast rapid radiologic progression (RRP) at year one, at year two, and over 2 years in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Overall, 74 early RA patients with X-rays of hands and feet at baseline, year one, and year two were included. Initial DMARD combination therapy with steroids (ICTS) or DMARD monotherapy (IMT) was initiated according to patients' RA severity, based on rheumatologist opinion. The images were scored via the modified Sharp/van der Heijde (SvH) method. A total Sharp score progression of equal or higher than five per year was considered RRP. Six matrices were tested: ASPIRE CRP/ESR matrices, the BEST matrix, two SWEFOT matrices, and the ESPOIR matrix. Patients were placed in each of them yielding a RRP probability. The performance was tested by Area Under the Curve analysis reflecting the predictive value. Four patients developed RRP in year one, five in year two, and four over 2 years. With regard to face validity, the predicted probability did not correspond to the risk in reality: the one ICTS patient who developed RRP over 2 years was always found in the lowest RRP categories of all matrices. The ASPIRE CRP matrix yielded at least a moderate predicting value for the three time points. The other matrices showed moderate to no predicting value. The performance of all matrices was disappointing and it is impossible to fully rely on the existing matrices in daily clinical practice. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The use of rapid dengue diagnostic tests in a routine clinical setting in a dengue-endemic area of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyda Osorio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is insufficient evidence of the usefulness of dengue diagnostic tests under routine conditions. We sought to analyse how physicians are using dengue diagnostics to inform research and development. Subjects attending 14 health institutions in an endemic area of Colombia with either a clinical diagnosis of dengue or for whom a dengue test was ordered were included in the study. Patterns of test-use are described herein. Factors associated with the ordering of dengue diagnostic tests were identified using contingency tables, nonparametric tests and logistic regression. A total of 778 subjects were diagnosed with dengue by the treating physician, of whom 386 (49.5% were tested for dengue. Another 491 dengue tests were ordered in subjects whose primary diagnosis was not dengue. Severe dengue classification [odds ratio (OR 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.1-4.5], emergency consultation (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5 and month of the year (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.7-5.5 were independently associated with ordering of dengue tests. Dengue tests were used both to rule in and rule out diagnosis. The latter use is not justified by the sensitivity of current rapid dengue diagnostic tests. Ordering of dengue tests appear to depend on a combination of factors, including physician and institutional preferences, as well as other patient and epidemiological factors.

  12. Performance of rapid diagnostic tests for imported malaria in clinical practice: results of a national multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Houzé

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of four rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs for imported malaria, and particularly Plasmodium falciparum infection, using thick and thin blood smears as the gold standard. All the tests are designed to detect at least one protein specific to P. falciparum (Plasmodium histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2 or Plasmodium LDH (PfLDH and one pan-Plasmodium protein (aldolase or Plasmodium LDH (pLDH. 1,311 consecutive patients presenting to 9 French hospitals with suspected malaria were included in this prospective study between April 2006 and September 2008. Blood smears revealed malaria parasites in 374 cases (29%. For the diagnosis of P. falciparum infection, the three tests detecting PfHRP2 showed high and similar sensitivity (96%, positive predictive value (PPV (90% and negative predictive value (NPV (98%. The PfLDH test showed lower sensitivity (83% and NPV (80%, despite good PPV (98%. For the diagnosis of non-falciparum species, the PPV and NPV of tests targeting pLDH or aldolase were 94-99% and 52-64%, respectively. PfHRP2-based RDTs are thus an acceptable alternative to routine microscopy for diagnosing P. falciparum malaria. However, as malaria may be misdiagnosed with RDTs, all negative results must be confirmed by the reference diagnostic method when clinical, biological or other factors are highly suggestive of malaria.

  13. Performance of rapid diagnostic tests for imported malaria in clinical practice: results of a national multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Sandrine; Boutron, Isabelle; Marmorat, Anne; Dalichampt, Marie; Choquet, Christophe; Poilane, Isabelle; Godineau, Nadine; Le Guern, Anne-Sophie; Thellier, Marc; Broutier, Hélène; Fenneteau, Odile; Millet, Pascal; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Hubert, Véronique; Houzé, Pascal; Tubach, Florence; Le Bras, Jacques; Matheron, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    We compared the performance of four rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for imported malaria, and particularly Plasmodium falciparum infection, using thick and thin blood smears as the gold standard. All the tests are designed to detect at least one protein specific to P. falciparum (Plasmodium histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) or Plasmodium LDH (PfLDH)) and one pan-Plasmodium protein (aldolase or Plasmodium LDH (pLDH)). 1,311 consecutive patients presenting to 9 French hospitals with suspected malaria were included in this prospective study between April 2006 and September 2008. Blood smears revealed malaria parasites in 374 cases (29%). For the diagnosis of P. falciparum infection, the three tests detecting PfHRP2 showed high and similar sensitivity (96%), positive predictive value (PPV) (90%) and negative predictive value (NPV) (98%). The PfLDH test showed lower sensitivity (83%) and NPV (80%), despite good PPV (98%). For the diagnosis of non-falciparum species, the PPV and NPV of tests targeting pLDH or aldolase were 94-99% and 52-64%, respectively. PfHRP2-based RDTs are thus an acceptable alternative to routine microscopy for diagnosing P. falciparum malaria. However, as malaria may be misdiagnosed with RDTs, all negative results must be confirmed by the reference diagnostic method when clinical, biological or other factors are highly suggestive of malaria.

  14. The use of high-resolution melting analysis for rapid spa typing on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan Hon-Kwan; Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; She, Kevin Kin-Kwan; Yan, Mei-Kum; Yau, Miranda Chong-Yee; Kwan, Grace See-Wai; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-02-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been endemic in Hong Kong for three decades. This study evaluated the practical use of high-resolution melting (HRM) real-time PCR analysis on MRSA staphylococcal Protein A (spa) typing on local MRSA isolates. Among 55 clinical MRSA isolates collected in 2011, 12 different spa types were observed by the conventional PCR-sequencing method including the locally predominant spa type t1081 and two locally predominant community acquired MRSA spa types t019 and t437. By using the HRM method, it could differentiate all 12 spa genotypes by distinct melting curves and HRM difference plot analysis. These two methods demonstrated 100% concordance whereas the HRM method required only 3h of turnaround time and one-fifth of reagent cost compared to the conventional method. Our study confirmed that the cost effective and rapid HRM typing approach is practically useful for MRSA community transmission monitoring and nosocomial outbreak control in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Ziningi; Drain, Paul K; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P

    2017-01-01

    Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and counselling in rural KZN, South Africa from August 2015 to October 2016. All the participating clinics were purposively selected from the province-wide survey of diagnostic services. We completed an on-site monitoring checklist, adopted from the WHO guidelines for assuring accuracy and reliability of HIV rapid tests, to assess the quality management system for HIV rapid testing at each clinic. To determine clinic's compliance to WHO quality standards for HIV rapid testing the following quality measure was used, a 3-point scale (high, moderate and poor). A high score was defined as a percentage rating of 90 to 100%, moderate was defined as a percentage rating of 70 to 90%, and poor was defined as a percentage rating of less than 70%. Clinic audit scores were summarized and compared. We employed Pearson pair wise correlation coefficient to determine correlations between clinics audit scores and clinic and clinics characteristics. Linear regression model was computed to estimate statistical significance of the correlates. Correlations were reported as significant at p ≤0.05. Nine out of 11 audited rural PHC clinics are located outside 20Km of the nearest town and hospital. Majority (18.2%) of the audited rural PHC clinics reported that HIV rapid test was performed by HIV lay counsellors. Overall, ten clinics were rated moderate, in terms of their compliance to the stipulated WHO guidelines. Audit results showed that rural PHC clinics' average rating score for compliance to the WHO guidelines ranged between 64.4% (CI

  16. Design and implementation of a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of routine opt-out rapid human immunodeficiency virus screening in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukoos, Jason S; Hopkins, Emily; Byyny, Richard L; Conroy, Amy A; Silverman, Morgan; Eisert, Sheri; Thrun, Mark; Wilson, Michael; Boyett, Brian; Heffelfinger, James D

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released revised recommendations for performing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in health care settings, including implementing routine rapid HIV screening, the use of an integrated opt-out consent, and limited prevention counseling. Emergency departments (EDs) have been a primary focus of these efforts. These revised CDC recommendations were primarily based on feasibility studies and have not been evaluated through the application of rigorous research methods. This article describes the design and implementation of a large prospective controlled clinical trial to evaluate the CDC's recommendations in an ED setting. From April 15, 2007, through April 15, 2009, a prospective quasi-experimental equivalent time-samples clinical trial was performed to compare the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of routine (nontargeted) opt-out rapid HIV screening (intervention) to physician-directed diagnostic rapid HIV testing (control) in a high-volume urban ED. In addition, three nested observational studies were performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and patient and staff acceptance of the two rapid HIV testing methods. This article describes the rationale, methodologies, and study design features of this program evaluation clinical trial. It also provides details regarding the integration of the principal clinical trial and its nested observational studies. Such ED-based trials are rare, but serve to provide valid comparisons between testing approaches. Investigators should consider similar methodology when performing future ED-based health services research.

  17. The Feedback Tango: An Integrative Review and Analysis of the Content of the Teacher-Learner Feedback Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Varaklis, Kalli; Hayes, Victoria; Trowbridge, Robert; Kemp, Heather; McKelvy, Dina

    2017-10-03

    To conduct an integrative review and analysis of the literature on the content of feedback to learners in medical education. Following completion of a scoping review in 2016, the authors analyzed a subset of articles published through 2015 describing the analysis of feedback exchange content in various contexts: audiotapes, clinical examination, feedback cards, multisource feedback, videotapes, and written feedback. Two reviewers extracted data from these articles and identified common themes. Of the 51 included articles, about half (49%) were published since 2011. Most involved medical students (43%) or residents (43%). A leniency bias was noted in many (37%), as there was frequently reluctance to provide constructive feedback. More than one-quarter (29%) indicated the feedback was low in quality (e.g., too general, limited amount, no action plans). Some (16%) indicated faculty dominated conversations, did not use feedback forms appropriately, or provided inadequate feedback, even after training. Multiple feedback tools were used, with some articles (14%) describing varying degrees of use, completion, or legibility. Some articles (14%) noted the impact of the gender of the feedback provider or learner. The findings reveal that the exchange of feedback is troubled by low-quality feedback, leniency bias, faculty deficient in feedback competencies, challenges with multiple feedback tools, and gender impacts. Using the tango dance form as a metaphor for this dynamic partnership, the authors recommend ways to improve feedback for teachers and learners willing to partner with each other and engage in the complexities of the feedback exchange.

  18. Improving Class II malocclusion as a side-effect of rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Susan S; McNamara, James A; Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the dentoalveolar and skeletal effects induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) therapy in mixed dentition patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion compared with a matched untreated Class II Division 1 control group. The treatment sample consisted of cephalometric records of 50 patients with Class II malocclusion (19 boys, 31 girls) treated with an RME protocol including an acrylic splint expander. Some patients also had a removable mandibular Schwarz appliance or maxillary incisor bracketing as part of their treatment protocol. Postexpansion, the patients were stabilized with a removable maintenance plate or a transpalatal arch. The mean age at the start of treatment of the RME group was 8.8 years (T1), with a prephase 2 treatment cephalogram (T2) taken 4.0 years later. The control sample, derived from the records of 3 longitudinal growth studies, consisted of the cephalometric records of 50 Class II subjects (28 boys, 22 girls). The mean age of initial observation for the control group was 8.9 years, and the mean interval of observation was 4.1 years. All subjects in both groups were prepubertal at T1 and showed comparable prevalence rates for prepubertal or postpubertal stages at T2. Independent-sample Student t tests were used to examine between-group differences. Class II patients treated with the described bonded RME protocol showed statistically significant increases in mandibular length and advancement of pogonion relative to nasion perpendicular. The acrylic splint RME had significant effects on the anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla and the mandible, as shown by the improvements toward Class I in the maxillomandibular differential value, the Wits appraisal value, and the ANB angle. Patients treated with the bonded RME showed the greatest effects of therapy at the occlusal level, specifically highly significant improvement of Class II molar relationship and decrease in

  19. Rapid identification of bacteria and candida using pna-fish from blood and peritoneal fluid cultures: a retrospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Dana M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH is a rapid and established method for identification of Candida sp., Gram positive, and Gram negative bacteria from positive blood cultures. This study reports clinical experience in the evaluation of 103 positive blood cultures and 17 positive peritoneal fluid cultures from 120 patients using PNA-FISH. Our study provides evidence as to potential pharmaceutical cost savings based on rapid pathogen identification, in addition to the novel application of PNA-FISH to peritoneal fluid specimens. Methods Identification accuracy and elapsed time to identification of Gram positives, Gram negatives, and Candida sp., isolated from blood and peritoneal fluid cultures were assessed using PNA-FISH (AdvanDx, as compared to standard culture methods. Patient charts were reviewed to extrapolate potential pharmaceutical cost savings due to adjustment of antimicrobial or antifungal therapy, based on identification by PNA-FISH. Results In blood cultures, time to identification by standard culture methods for bacteria and Candida sp., averaged 83.6 hours (95% CI 56.7 to 110.5. Identification by PNA-FISH averaged 11.2 hours (95% CI 4.8 to 17.6. Overall PNA-FISH identification accuracy was 98.8% (83/84, 95% CI 93.5% to 99.9% as compared to culture. In peritoneal fluid, identification of bacteria by culture averaged 87.4 hours (95% CI −92.4 to 267.1. Identification by PNA-FISH averaged 16.4 hours (95% CI −57.3 to 90.0. Overall PNA-FISH identification accuracy was 100% (13/13, 95% CI 75.3% to 100%. For Candida sp., pharmaceutical cost savings based on PNA-FISH identification could be $377.74/day. For coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS, discontinuation of vancomycin could result in savings of $20.00/day. Conclusions In this retrospective study, excellent accuracy of PNA-FISH in blood and peritoneal fluids with reduced time to identification was observed, as compared to

  20. Using wireless technology in clinical practice: does feedback of daily walking activity improve walking outcomes of individuals receiving rehabilitation post-stroke? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Wong, Jennifer S; Bayley, Mark; Biasin, Lou; Brooks, Dina; Brunton, Karen; Howe, Jo-Anne; Inness, Elizabeth L; Jones, Simon; Lymburner, Jackie; Mileris, Ramona; McIlroy, William E

    2013-07-18

    Regaining independent ambulation is the top priority for individuals recovering from stroke. Thus, physical rehabilitation post-stroke should focus on improving walking function and endurance. However, the amount of walking completed by individuals with stroke attending rehabilitation is far below that required for independent community ambulation. There has been increased interest in accelerometer-based monitoring of walking post-stroke. Walking monitoring could be integrated within the goal-setting process for those with ambulation goals in rehabilitation. The feedback from these devices can be downloaded to a computer to produce reports. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of accelerometer-based feedback of daily walking activity during rehabilitation on the frequency and duration of walking post-stroke. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: feedback or no feedback. Participants will wear accelerometers daily during in- and out-patient rehabilitation and, for participants in the feedback group, the participants' treating physiotherapist will receive regular reports of walking activity. The primary outcome measures are the amount of daily walking completed, as measured using the accelerometers, and spatio-temporal characteristics of walking (e.g. walking speed). We will also examine goal attainment, satisfaction with progress towards goals, stroke self-efficacy, and community-integration. Increased walking activity during rehabilitation is expected to improve walking function and community re-integration following discharge. In addition, a focus on altering walking behaviour within the rehabilitation setting may lead to altered behaviour and increased activity patterns after discharge. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01521234.

  1. Unfulfilled promise, untapped potential: feedback at the crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher J

    2014-08-01

    Feedback should be a key support for optimizing on-the-job learning in clinical medicine. Often, however, feedback fails to live up to its potential to productively direct and shape learning. In this article, two key influences on how and why feedback becomes meaningful are examined: the individual learner's perception of and response to feedback and the learning culture within which feedback is exchanged. Feedback must compete for learners' attention with a range of other learning cues that are available in clinical settings and must survive a learner's judgment of its credibility in order to become influential. These judgments, in turn, occur within a specific context--a distinct learning culture--that both shapes learners' definitions of credibility and facilitates or constrains the exchange of good feedback. By highlighting these important blind spots in the process by which feedback becomes meaningful, concrete and necessary steps toward a robust feedback culture within medical education are revealed.

  2. The Effect of Communication Skills Training by Video Feedback Method on Clinical Skills of Interns of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Compared to Didactic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managheb, S. E.; Zamani, A.; Shams, B.; Farajzadegan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective communication is essential to the practice of high-quality medicine. There are methodological challenges in communication skills training. This study was performed in order to assess the educational benefits of communication skills training by video feedback method versus traditional formats such as lectures on clinical…

  3. C-MAC videolaryngoscope compared with direct laryngoscopy for rapid sequence intubation in an emergency department: A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulser, Simon; Ubmann, Dirk; Schlaepfer, Martin; Brueesch, Martin; Goliasch, Georg; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Airway management in the emergency room can be challenging when patients suffer from life-threatening conditions. Mental stress, ignorance of the patient's medical history, potential cervical injury or immobilisation and the presence of vomit and/or blood may also contribute to a difficult airway. Videolaryngoscopes have been introduced into clinical practice to visualise the airway and ultimately increase the success rate of airway management. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the C-MAC videolaryngoscope improves first-attempt intubation success rate compared with direct laryngoscopy in patients undergoing emergency rapid sequence intubation in the emergency room setting. A randomised clinical trial. Emergency Department of the University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. With approval of the local ethics committee, we prospectively enrolled 150 patients between 18 and 99 years of age requiring emergency rapid sequence intubation in the emergency room of the University Hospital Zurich. Patients were randomised (1 : 1) to undergo tracheal intubation using the C-MAC videolaryngoscope or by direct laryngoscopy. Owing to ethical considerations, patients who had sustained maxillo-facial trauma, immobilised cervical spine, known difficult airway or ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation were excluded from our study. All intubations were performed by one of three very experienced anaesthesia consultants. First-attempt success rate served as our primary outcome parameter. Secondary outcome parameters were time to intubation; total number of intubation attempts; Cormack and Lehane score; inadvertent oesophageal intubation; ease of intubation; complications including violations of the teeth, injury/bleeding of the larynx/pharynx and aspiration/regurgitation of gastric contents; necessity of using further alternative airway devices for successful intubation; maximum decrease of oxygen saturation and technical problems with the device. A total of 150

  4. Evaluation of the rapid and slow maxillary expansion using cone-beam computed tomography: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana da S. Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the dental, dentoalveolar, and skeletal changes occurring right after the rapid maxillary expansion (RME and slow maxillary expansion (SME treatment using Haas-type expander. METHODS: All subjects performed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT before installation of expanders (T1 and right after screw stabilization (T2. Patients who did not follow the research parameters were excluded. The final sample resulted in 21 patients in RME group (mean age of 8.43 years and 16 patients in SME group (mean age of 8.70 years. Based on the skewness and kurtosis statistics, the variables were judged to be normally distributed and paired t-test and student t-test were performed at significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Intermolar angle changed significantly due to treatment and RME showed greater buccal tipping than SME. RME showed significant changes in other four measurements due to treatment: maxilla moved forward and mandible showed backward rotation and, at transversal level both skeletal and dentoalveolar showed significant changes due to maxillary expansion. SME showed significant dentoalveolar changes due to maxillary expansion. CONCLUSIONS: Only intermolar angle showed significant difference between the two modalities of maxillary expansion with greater buccal tipping for RME. Also, RME produced skeletal maxillary expansion and SME did not. Both maxillary expansion modalities were efficient to promote transversal gain at dentoalveolar level. Sagittal and vertical measurements did not show differences between groups, but RME promoted a forward movement of the maxilla and backward rotation of the mandible.

  5. A rapid evidence assessment of immersive virtual reality as an adjunct therapy in acute pain management in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernie; Taverner, Tarnia; Masinde, Wendy; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Negraeff, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Immersive virtual reality (IVR) therapy has been explored as an adjunct therapy for the management of acute pain among children and adults for several conditions. Therapeutic approaches have traditionally involved medication and physiotherapy but such approaches are limited over time by their cost and side effects. This review seeks to critically evaluate the evidence for and against IVR as an adjunctive therapy for acute clinical pain applications. A rapid evidence assessment (REA) strategy was used. CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science, IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and the Cochrane Library databases were screened in from December 2012 to March 2013 to identify studies exploring IVR therapies as an intervention to assist in the management of pain. Main outcome measures were for acute pain and functional impairment. Seventeen research studies were included in total including 5 RCTs, 6 randomized crossover studies, 2 case series studies, and 4 single-patient case studies. This included a total of 337 patients. Of these studies only 4 had a low risk of bias. There was strong overall evidence for immediate and short-term pain reduction, whereas moderate evidence was found for short-term effects on physical function. Little evidence exists for longer-term benefits. IVR was not associated with any serious adverse events. This review found moderate evidence for the reduction of pain and functional impairment after IVR in patients with acute pain. Further high-quality studies are required for the conclusive judgment of its effectiveness in acute pain, to establish potential benefits for chronic pain, and for safety.

  6. Clinical and virologic factors associated with reduced sensitivity of rapid influenza diagnostic tests in hospitalized elderly patients and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Martin C W; Lee, Nelson; Ngai, Karry L K; Leung, Ting F; Chan, Paul K S

    2014-02-01

    Rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) are commonly used by clinicians to guide patient management. Data on sensitivities among hospitalized patients are limited. Here, we evaluated the clinical and virologic factors affecting the sensitivities of 2 commercially available RIDTs (BinaxNOW Influenza A&B and QuickVue Influenza A+B) on nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens collected from elderly patients and young children hospitalized for influenza. Influenza cases and age-matched negative controls were prospectively enrolled during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Hong Kong. NPA specimens were collected at presentation before antiviral treatment. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) results were used as references for the sensitivity analyses. One hundred patients (57 influenza cases and 43 controls) were studied. Both RIDTs had 100% specificities. The sensitivities of the BinaxNOW Influenza A&B and QuickVue Influenza A+B tests were 70% and 82%, respectively. For both tests, the sensitivities were lower in cases with presentation times beyond 2 days of illness onset than for those within this time (50 to 71% versus 85 to 91%, respectively). There were trends toward lower sensitivities for influenza B than for influenza A (66 to 81% versus 76 to 84%, respectively), among young children than among the elderly patients (63 to 78% versus 80 to 88%, respectively), and among cases with pneumonia than those without pneumonia (75% versus 82 to 94%, respectively). The sensitivities of the RIDTs decreased with reduced NPA viral RNA levels (5.6 to 15.0% reduction per 1-log decrease), which declined progressively after illness onset (Spearman's rho, -0.47 [P < 0.05] and -0.66 [P < 0.001] for influenza A and B, respectively). Collectively, late presentation, a low NPA viral load, and probably lower respiratory manifestation are factors associated with reduced sensitivities of RIDTs for diagnosing influenza in hospitalized patients. A negative RIDT result should be

  7. Rapid and sustainable detoxication of airborne pollutants by broccoli sprout beverage: results of a randomized clinical trial in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Patricia A; Chen, Jian-Guo; Zarth, Adam T; Ng, Derek K; Wang, Jin-Bing; Kensler, Kevin H; Jacobson, Lisa P; Muñoz, Alvaro; Johnson, Jamie L; Groopman, John D; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Tao-Yang; Qian, Geng-Sun; Carmella, Steven G; Hecht, Stephen S; Kensler, Thomas W

    2014-08-01

    Broccoli sprouts are a convenient and rich source of the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, which can generate the chemopreventive agent, sulforaphane, an inducer of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and other cytoprotective enzymes. A broccoli sprout-derived beverage providing daily doses of 600 μmol glucoraphanin and 40 μmol sulforaphane was evaluated for magnitude and duration of pharmacodynamic action in a 12-week randomized clinical trial. Two hundred and ninety-one study participants were recruited from the rural He-He Township, Qidong, in the Yangtze River delta region of China, an area characterized by exposures to substantial levels of airborne pollutants. Exposure to air pollution has been associated with lung cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases. Urinary excretion of the mercapturic acids of the pollutants, benzene, acrolein, and crotonaldehyde, were measured before and during the intervention using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Rapid and sustained, statistically significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in the levels of excretion of the glutathione-derived conjugates of benzene (61%), acrolein (23%), but not crotonaldehyde, were found in those receiving broccoli sprout beverage compared with placebo. Excretion of the benzene-derived mercapturic acid was higher in participants who were GSTT1-positive than in the null genotype, irrespective of study arm assignment. Measures of sulforaphane metabolites in urine indicated that bioavailability did not decline over the 12-week daily dosing period. Thus, intervention with broccoli sprouts enhances the detoxication of some airborne pollutants and may provide a frugal means to attenuate their associated long-term health risks. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  9. Influence of feedback schedule in motor performance and learning of a lumbar multifidus muscle task using rehabilitative ultrasound imaging: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Wendy J; Heiss, Deborah Givens; Basso, D Michele

    2008-02-01

    Low back pain (LBP) may be associated with inadequate multifidus muscle function. Varying the frequency and timing of feedback may enhance acquisition and retention of multifidus muscle recruitment during exercise. Subjects without LBP (n=30) were randomly assigned to a constant (CON) or variable (VAR) feedback group. Twenty-eight subjects (mean age=28 years, SD=8.0; mean body mass index=24 kg/m(2), SD=0.70) completed training, and 23 completed retention testing. Eight training sessions over 4 weeks included multifidus muscle exercise with rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) feedback. Retention was assessed at 1 week and >or=1 month. At the start, both groups had similar performances of multifidus muscle recruitment (Fisher exact test, P=.26). Early in training, the CON group had good success (mean=80%) that was maintained at session 8 (mean=84%), with no difference between sessions 1 and 8 (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-9%, 42%). The VAR group gradually increased success (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.002, 95% CI=17%, 59%) between sessions 1 and 8. Both groups sustained their session 8 success when tested for short-term retention at 1 week (CON group: Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.79; VAR group: Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.36). At the long-term retention test, the VAR group outperformed the CON group (Wilcoxon score test, P=.04), indicating superior motor learning. Variable feedback provided by RUSI resulted in greater success in lumbar multifidus muscle recruitment up to 3 to 4 months after training.

  10. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  11. Rapid identification of Salmonella using Hektoen enteric agar and 16s ribosomal DNA probe-gold nanoparticle immunochromatography assay in clinical faecal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C-Y; Liu, C-C; Tseng, Y-T; Tsai, K-C; Hsieh, M-A; Chan, W-T; Liu, H-L; Lee, H-C; Hou, S-Y

    2014-04-01

    A rapid identification of Salmonella, one of the most common foodborne pathogens worldwide, in clinical patients can enable better rational managements and prevent further outbreaks. The traditional immunochromatography using antibody-gold nanoparticles (Ab-AuNPs), such as the home pregnancy test, has been used for the Salmonella detection. In this study, we developed a new and rapid method using DNA probe-AuNPs for the detection of 16s ribosomal DNA of Salmonella. To evaluate the proposed method in clinical specimens, we performed a clinical test by identifying 159 stool samples on Hektoen agar containing black or crystalloid colonies using the method and the VITEK 2 system for confirmation. Eighty of the isolates were correctly identified as Salmonella to achieve 100% sensitivity. Seventy-five samples were correctly identified as non-Salmonella spp., but four were incorrectly identified as Salmonella. The specificity was 94·93%. The assay time is about 30 min after the DNA purification. The time-consuming and labour-intense biochemical tests can be replaced. We demonstrated that this assay is a rapid, convenient and cost-effective tool for Salmonella identification of clinical faecal samples, which is worth for further promotion and clinical use. This is the first application of using 16s ribosomal DNA probe-Au-NPs and immunochromatography on clinical samples. This is the first application of using 16s ribosomal DNA probe-gold nanoparticles and immunochromatography method on clinical samples with sensitivity 100% and specificity 94·93%. The assay time is about 30 min after the DNA purification. We find this assay a rapid, convenient, sensitive and inexpensive tool for Salmonella identification of clinical faecal samples, which is worth further promotion and clinical use and can replace the traditional time-consuming and labour-intense biochemical tests. The potential benefit of this approach is to develop a rapid point-of-care test that provides results while

  12. Rapid identification of Mycobacterium avium clinical isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Su, Chih-Cheng; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Jia, Ju-Hsin; Wu, Ting-Shu; Han, Chau-Chung; Tsai, Wen-Cherng; Lu, Jang-Jih; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    Rapid and accurate discrimination of Mycobacterium avium from other mycobacteria is essential for appropriate therapeutic management and timely intervention for infection control. However, routine clinical identification methods for M. avium are both time consuming and labor intensive. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to identify specific cellular protein pattern for rapid identification of M. avium isolates. A total of 40 clinically relevant Mycobacterium strains comprising 13 distinct species were enrolled for the MALDI-TOF MS identification. A 10-minute extraction-free examination procedure was set up to obtain mass spectral fingerprints from whole bacterial cells. The characteristic mass spectral peak patterns in the m/z (mass/charge ratio) range of 5-20 kDa can be obtained within 10 minutes. The species-specific mass spectra for M. avium is identified and can be differentiated from as Mycobacterium strains. This technique shortens and simplifies the identification procedure of MALDI-TOF MS and may further extend the mycobacterial MALDI-TOF MS database. Simplicity and rapidity of identification procedures make MALDI-TOF MS an attractive platform in routine identification of mycobacteria. MALDI-TOF MS is applicable for rapid discrimination of M. avium from other Mycobacterium species, and shows its potential for clinical application. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Rapid development of sensitive, high-throughput, quantitative and highly selective mass spectrometric targeted immunoassays for clinically important proteins in human plasma and serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krastins, Bryan; Prakash, Amol; Sarracino, David A.; Nedelkov, Dobrin; Niederkofler, Eric E.; Kiernan, Urban A.; Nelson, Randall; Vogelsang, Maryann S.; Vadali, Gouri; Garces, Alejandra; Sutton, Jennifer N.; Peterman, Scott; Byram, Gregory; Darbouret, Bruno; Pérusse, Joëlle R.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Coulombe, Benoit; Gobom, Johan; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Blennow, Kaj; Kulasingam, Vathany; Couchman, Lewis; Moniz, Caje; Lopez, Mary F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop high-throughput, quantitative and highly selective mass spectrometric, targeted immunoassays for clinically important proteins in human plasma or serum. Design and methods The described method coupled mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA), a previously developed technique for immunoenrichment on a monolithic microcolumn activated with an anti-protein antibody and fixed in a pipette tip, to selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection and accurate quantification of targeted peptides, including clinically relevant sequence or truncated variants. Results In this report, we demonstrate the rapid development of MSIA-SRM assays for sixteen different target proteins spanning seven different clinically important areas (including neurological, Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, endocrine function, cancer and other diseases) and ranging in concentration from pg/mL to mg/mL. The reported MSIA-SRM assays demonstrated high sensitivity (within published clinical ranges), precision, robustness and high-throughput as well as specific detection of clinically relevant isoforms for many of the target proteins. Most of the assays were tested with bona-fide clinical samples. In addition, positive correlations, (R2 0.67–0.87, depending on the target peptide), were demonstrated for MSIA-SRM assay data with clinical analyzer measurements of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) in clinical sample cohorts. Conclusions We have presented a practical and scalable method for rapid development and deployment of MS-based SRM assays for clinically relevant proteins and measured levels of the target analytes in bona fide clinical samples. The method permits the specific quantification of individual protein isoforms and addresses the difficult problem of protein heterogeneity in clinical proteomics applications. PMID:23313081

  14. Multicountry Prospective Clinical Evaluation of Two Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays and Two Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Diagnosing Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Allison L.; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M.; Long, Kanya C.; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C.; Halsey, Eric S.; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G.; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Jasper, Louis E.; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks. PMID:25588659

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J; Darton, Thomas C; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1-6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a lower limit of detection equal to 0.3 CFU

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day.Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A.An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1-6.9 CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood, but utilized only half the volume of specimens.The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a lower limit of detection

  17. Multicountry prospective clinical evaluation of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and two rapid diagnostic tests for diagnosing dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Subhamoy; Dauner, Allison L; Valks, Andrea; Forshey, Brett M; Long, Kanya C; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Sierra, Gloria; Picos, Victor; Talmage, Sara; Morrison, Amy C; Halsey, Eric S; Comach, Guillermo; Yasuda, Chadwick; Loeffelholz, Michael; Jarman, Richard G; Fernandez, Stefan; An, Ung Sam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Jasper, Louis E; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated four dengue diagnostic devices from Alere, including the SD Bioline Dengue Duo (nonstructural [NS] 1 Ag and IgG/IgM), the Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette (IgM/IgG) rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and the Panbio dengue IgM and IgG capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in a prospective, controlled, multicenter study in Peru, Venezuela, Cambodia, and the United States, using samples from 1,021 febrile individuals. Archived, well-characterized samples from an additional 135 febrile individuals from Thailand were also used. Reference testing was performed on all samples using an algorithm involving virus isolation, in-house IgM and IgG capture ELISAs, and plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) to determine the infection status of the individual. The primary endpoints were the clinical sensitivities and specificities of these devices. The SD Bioline Dengue Duo had an overall sensitivity of 87.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.1 to 90.2%) and specificity of 86.8% (95% CI, 83.9 to 89.3%) during the first 14 days post-symptom onset (p.s.o.). The Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette demonstrated a sensitivity of 92.1% (87.8 to 95.2%) and specificity of 62.2% (54.5 to 69.5%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. The Panbio IgM capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 87.6% (82.7 to 91.4%) and specificity of 88.1% (82.2 to 92.6%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. Finally, the Panbio IgG capture ELISA had a sensitivity of 69.6% (62.1 to 76.4%) and a specificity of 88.4% (82.6 to 92.8%) during days 4 to 14 p.s.o. for identification of secondary dengue infections. This multicountry prospective study resulted in reliable real-world performance data that will facilitate data-driven laboratory test choices for managing patient care during dengue outbreaks. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a

  19. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Sandro; DellaValle, Nives; Mittone, Luigi; Soraperra, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  20. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  1. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  2. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkes, Miriam; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigi, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days

  3. Smartphone-Based Visual Feedback Trunk Control Training Using a Gyroscope and Mirroring Technology for Stroke Patients: Single-blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Doo Chul; Song, Chang Ho

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training (SPVFTCT) for improving balance and trunk performance in stroke patients. Twenty-four patients who had experienced a stroke more than 6 months previously and could sit and walk independently participated in the study. The participants were allocated to a SPVFTCT (n = 12) or to a control group (n = 12). Both groups completed five 80-minute sessions per week of conventional rehabilitation for 4 weeks. The SPVFTCT group additionally received three 20-minute sessions per week of SPVFTCT for 4 weeks. The outcome was assessed using static balance assessment, the modified functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the trunk impairment scale. Feasibility of SPVFTCT was evaluated by retention, adherence, acceptability, and safety. The static balance assessment, modified functional reach test, timed up and go test, and trunk impairment scale scores in the SPVFTCT group improved significantly compared to those in the control group (P performance in stroke patients. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand the role of trunk control in postural stability and functional improvement; (2) Describe the benefits of smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training (SPVFTCT); and (3)Discuss the feasibility of incorporating smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training in stroke rehabilitation. Advanced : The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their

  4. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Jones, Kathy; Hopkins, Mark; Moorcroft, Jay; Lalloo, David G; Chawla, Anu

    2011-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo), a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), Line Immuno Assay (LIA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab) prevalence was 1.8% (17/953). Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag) reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12%) were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  5. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Taegtmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo, a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA, Line Immuno Assay (LIA and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab prevalence was 1.8% (17/953. Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12% were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. CONCLUSION: These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  6. Performance of a Rapid and Simple HIV Testing Algorithm in a Multicenter Phase III Microbicide Clinical Trial▿

    OpenAIRE

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-01-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In...

  7. Rapid detection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin from clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus strains by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Vink, Cornelis; Driessen, Christel; Bes, Michèle; London, Nancy; Etienne, Jerome; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2004-01-01

    To allow rapid identification of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains, a real-time PCR assay for detection of PVL was developed. This assay is convenient, since it can be applied directly on bacterial suspensions and does not require previous DNA purification.

  8. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  9. Efficiency of a clinical prediction model for selective rapid testing in children with pharyngitis: A prospective, multicenter study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Jérémie F; Cohen, Robert; Bidet, Philippe; Elbez, Annie; Levy, Corinne; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Chalumeau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    .... Materials and methods In this multicenter, prospective, cross-sectional study, French primary care physicians collected clinical data and double throat swabs from 676 consecutive children with pharyngitis...

  10. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  11. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  12. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  13. [Benefit of the rapid test determine HIV1/2 in the clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in Ibn Rochd hospital of Casablanca, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouladlahsen, A; Bensghir, R; Karkouri, M; Elharti, E; Oumzil, H; Himmich, H; Elfilali, K M; Chakib, A

    2012-08-01

    In Morocco, diagnosis of HIV infection remains late, which seriously compromises the timely management of HIV infection in the era of HAART therapies. Rapid test represents a good opportunity to improve the access to early screening of HIV. The objective of this study is to report the experience of the infectious diseases unit of the Ibn Rochd University hospital center of Casablanca, in the use of the rapid test in clinical screening of HIV. This retrospective study reports data relevant to the use of the rapid test Determine VIH-1/2, Abbott Diagnostics, since its introduction in the infectious diseases unit in April 2006 up to December 2009. The test was performed for patients from the infectious diseases unit and patients hospitalized in different units of the Ibn Rochd University hospital center, after their consent. Test was ordered systematically by clinicians in case of any suspected symptom related to HIV and immunodepression. Positive samples were confirmed by Western Blot test, at the National Reference Laboratory for HIV, within the Institut National d'Hygiène in Rabat. Between 2006 and 2009, 1105 rapid tests were performed, among which 16.3% were positive. All results were provided to patients and none were lost to follow-up. The main reasons for the prescription of an HIV test were tuberculosis (26.3%) and chronic diarrhea (9.9%) for inpatients. For outpatients, the main symptoms were sexually transmissible infections (16.7%) and weight loss (15.7%). Results of the tests allowed us to adapt the treatment in case of suspicion of pneumocystosis (12 cases) and toxoplasmosis (seven cases). The introduction of the rapid test for HIV clinical screening in the hospital facilities improved considerably the access to diagnosis and consequently allowed a timely management of HIV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Reverse technology transfer; obtaining feedback from managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.B. Carey; J.M. Calhoun; B. Dick; K. O' Halloran; L.S. Young; R.E. Bigley; S. Chan; C.A. Harrington; J.P. Hayes; J. Marzluff

    1999-01-01

    Forestry policy, planning, and practice have changed rapidly with implementation of ecosystem management by federal, state, tribal, and private organizations. Implementation entails new concepts, terminology, and management approaches. Yet there seems to have been little organized effort to obtain feedback from on-the-ground managers on the practicality of implementing...

  15. Feedback in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-04-01

    The positive effect of feedback has long been recognized in surgical education. Surgical educators convey feedback to improve the performance of the surgical trainees. We aimed to review the scientific classification and application of feedback in surgical education, and to propose possible future directions for research. A literature search was performed using Pubmed, OVID, CINAHL, Web of science, EMBASE, ERIC database and Google Scholar. The following search terms were used: 'feedback', 'feedback in medical education', 'feedback in medical training' and 'feedback in surgery'. The search was limited to articles in English. From 1157 citations, 12 books and 43 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. Feedback comes in a variety of types and is an essential tool for learning and developing performance in surgical education. Different methods of feedback application are evolving and future work needs to concentrate on the value of each method as well as the role of new technologies in surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  17. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  18. Direct susceptibility testing by disk diffusion on clinical samples : a rapid and accurate tool for antibiotic stewardship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coorevits, L.; Boelens, J.; Claeys, G.

    We compared the accuracy of direct susceptibility testing (DST) with conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), both using disk diffusion, on clinical samples. A total of 123 clinical samples (respiratory tract samples, urine, vaginal and abdominal abscess discharges, bile fluid and a

  19. Three-dimensional assessment of buccal alveolar bone after rapid and slow maxillary expansion: a clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Mauricio; Andriani, Juliana da Silva Pereira; Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Locks, Arno; Correa, Marcio; Correa, Letícia Ruhland

    2013-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to analyze and compare the immediate effects of rapid and slow maxillary expansion protocols, accomplished by Haas-type palatal expanders activated in different frequencies of activation on the positioning of the maxillary first permanent molars and on the buccal alveolar bones of these teeth with cone-beam computerized tomography. The sample consisted of 33 children (18 girls, 15 boys; mean age, 9 years) randomly distributed into 2 groups: rapid maxillary expansion (n = 17) and slow maxillary expansion (n = 16). Patients in the rapid maxillary expansion group received 2 turns of activation (0.4 mm) per day, and those in the slow maxillary expansion group received 2 turns of activation (0.4 mm) per week until 8 mm of expansion was achieved in both groups. Cone-beam computerized tomography images were taken before treatment and after stabilization of the jackscrews. Data were gathered through a standardized analysis of cone-beam computerized tomography images. Intragroup statistical analysis was accomplished with the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test, and intergroup statistical analysis was accomplished with analysis of variance. Linear relationships, among all variables, were determined by Spearman correlation. Both protocols caused buccal displacement of the maxillary first permanent molars, which had more bodily displacement in the slow maxillary expansion group, whereas more inclination was observed in the rapid maxillary expansion group. Vertical and horizontal bone losses were found in both groups; however, the slow maxillary expansion group had major bone loss. Periodontal modifications in both groups should be carefully considered because of the reduction of spatial resolution in the cone-beam computerized tomography examinations after stabilization of the jackscrews. Modifications in the frequency of activation of the palatal expander might influence the dental and periodontal effects of palatal expansion. Copyright © 2013

  20. Clinical follow-up data and the rate of development of precocious and rapidly progressive puberty in patients with premature thelarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Dilek; Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2018-01-26

    We aimed to evaluate the clinical follow-up data of patients with premature thelarche and determine the rate of development of precocious and early puberty in these patients. The charts of 158 girls with premature thelarche who were followed-up in our pediatric endocrinology polyclinic were reviewed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the age at onset: group 1 (0-1 month) (n=12), group 2 (1-24 months) (n=40) and group 3 (2-8 years) (n=106). At admission, the mean height standard deviation score (SDS), body weight (BW)-SDS, body mass index (BMI) and BMI-SDS were significantly higher in group 3 than in group 1 and group 2. At admission, 8.8% of the patients were obese and 24% of the patients were overweight. The majority of patients who were obese and overweight were in group 3. At the end of the follow-up, thelarche regressed in 24.7%, persisted in 32.9%, progressed in 25.9% and had a cyclic pattern in 16.5% of the patients. Precocious or rapidly progressive puberty developed in 47 of the 158 patients (29.7%). The mean age at progression to early or rapidly progressive puberty was 98.1±17.6 months. A total of 89.3% of the patients who progressed to early or rapidly progressive puberty were in group 3. Precocious or rapidly progressive puberty developed in 29.7% of subjects with premature thelarche. As patients who developed rapidly progressive puberty had a higher BW-SDS and BMI-SDS than those who did not, it is suggested that the increase in weight could stimulate rapidly progressive puberty in cases with premature thelarche.

  1. Experimental evidence that parasites drive eco-evolutionary feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Franziska S; Anaya-Rojas, Jaime M; Matthews, Blake; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2017-04-04

    Host resistance to parasites is a rapidly evolving trait that can influence how hosts modify ecosystems. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks may develop if the ecosystem effects of host resistance influence selection on subsequent host generations. In a mesocosm experiment, using a recently diverged (eco-evolutionary feedbacks.

  2. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis-Arkes, Miriam H E; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Job; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigl, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days (wound swab). Therefore, there is an urgent need for an easy-to-use diagnostic tool for fast detection of wound infection, especially in chronic wounds. This study determined the diagnostic properties of the enzymes myeloperoxidase, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), lysozyme and cathepsin-G in detecting wound infection when compared to wound swabs. Both chronic and acute wounds of 81 patients were assessed through clinical judgment, enzyme analysis and wound swab. Three promising enzyme models for detecting wound infection were identified. A positive test was defined as: at least one enzyme positive after 30 minutes (model 1), lysozyme and HNE positive after 30 minutes (model 2), myeloperoxidase positive after 5 minutes, and HNE or lysozyme positive after 30 minutes (model 3). All models were significant (p≤0.001). There was no correlation between clinical judgment and wound swab, indicating the need for novel diagnostic systems. Enzyme analysis is fast, easy to use and superior to clinical judgment when compared to wound swabs. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. How we give personalised audio feedback after summative OSCEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher J; Molyneux, Adrian J; Blackwell, Sara; Wass, Valerie J

    2015-04-01

    Students often receive little feedback after summative objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) to enable them to improve their performance. Electronic audio feedback has shown promise in other educational areas. We investigated the feasibility of electronic audio feedback in OSCEs. An electronic OSCE system was designed, comprising (1) an application for iPads allowing examiners to mark in the key consultation skill domains, provide "tick-box" feedback identifying strengths and difficulties, and record voice feedback; (2) a feedback website giving students the opportunity to view/listen in multiple ways to the feedback. Acceptability of the audio feedback was investigated, using focus groups with students and questionnaires with both examiners and students. 87 (95%) students accessed the examiners' audio comments; 83 (90%) found the comments useful and 63 (68%) reported changing the way they perform a skill as a result of the audio feedback. They valued its highly personalised, relevant nature and found it much more useful than written feedback. Eighty-nine per cent of examiners gave audio feedback to all students on their stations. Although many found the method easy, lack of time was a factor. Electronic audio feedback provides timely, personalised feedback to students after a summative OSCE provided enough time is allocated to the process.

  4. The challenge of rapid diagnosis in oncology: Diagnostic accuracy and cost analysis of a large-scale one-stop breast clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaloge, Suzette; Bonastre, Julia; Borget, Isabelle; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Fontenay, Rachel; Boinon, Diane; Saghatchian, Mahasti; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Mazouni, Chafika; Rivera, Sofia; Uzan, Catherine; André, Fabrice; Dromain, Clarisse; Boyer, Bruno; Pistilli, Barbara; Azoulay, Sandy; Rimareix, Françoise; Bayou, El-Hadi; Sarfati, Benjamin; Caron, Hélène; Ghouadni, Amal; Leymarie, Nicolas; Canale, Sandra; Mons, Muriel; Arfi-Rouche, Julia; Arnedos, Monica; Suciu, Voichita; Vielh, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne

    2016-10-01

    Rapid diagnosis is a key issue in modern oncology, for which one-stop breast clinics are a model. We aimed to assess the diagnosis accuracy and procedure costs of a large-scale one-stop breast clinic. A total of 10,602 individuals with suspect breast lesions attended the Gustave Roussy's regional one-stop breast clinic between 2004 and 2012. The multidisciplinary clinic uses multimodal imaging together with ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration for masses and ultrasonography-guided and stereotactic biopsies as needed. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by comparing one-stop diagnosis to the consolidated diagnosis obtained after surgery or biopsy or long-term monitoring. The medical cost per patient of the care pathway was assessed from patient-level data collected prospectively. Sixty-nine percent of the patients had masses, while 31% had micro-calcifications or other non-mass lesions. In 75% of the cases (87% of masses), an exact diagnosis could be given on the same day. In the base-case analysis (i.e. considering only benign and malignant lesions at one-stop and at consolidated diagnoses), the sensitivity of the one-stop clinic was 98.4%, specificity 99.8%, positive and negative predictive values 99.7% and 99.0%. In the sensitivity analysis (reclassification of suspect, atypical and undetermined lesions), diagnostic sensitivity varied from 90.3% to 98.5% and specificity varied from 94.3% to 99.8%. The mean medical cost per patient of one-stop diagnostic procedure was €420. One-stop breast clinic can provide timely and cost-efficient delivery of highly accurate diagnoses and serve as models of care for multiple settings, including rapid screening-linked diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feedback in Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamel, Vivian

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches to language teaching, the audio-lingual and the cognitive code methods, are examined with respect to how they deal with feedback in the classroom situation. Audio-lingual theorists either ignore completely the need for feedback in the classroom or deal with it only in terms of its reinforcing attributes.…

  6. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  7. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  8. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  9. Fast mouse PK (Fast PK): a rapid screening method to increase pharmacokinetic throughput in pre-clinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jitendar; Madishetti, Sreedhar; Vachaspati, Prakash R

    2012-09-29

    We describe a rapid screening methodology for performing pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in mice called Fast PK. In this Fast PK method, two mice were used per compound and four blood samples were collected from each mouse. The sampling times were staggered (sparse sampling) between the two mice, thus yielding complete PK profile in singlicate across eight time points. The plasma PK parameters from Fast PK were comparable to that obtained from conventional PK methods. This method has been used to rapidly screen compounds in the early stages of drug discovery and about 600 compounds have been profiled in the last 3 years, which has resulted in reduction in the usage of mice by 800 per year in compliance with the 3R principles of animal ethics. In addition, this Fast PK method can also help in evaluating the PK parameters from the same set of animals used in safety/toxicology/efficacy studies without the need for satellite groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preventive medical care in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory: a follow-up study of the impact of clinical guidelines, computerised recall and reminder systems, and audit and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Damin

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to improve delivery of preventive medical services have been shown to be effective in North America and the UK. However, there are few studies of the extent to which the impact of such interventions has been sustained, or of the impact of such interventions in disadvantaged populations or remote settings. This paper describes the trends in delivery of preventive medical services following a multifaceted intervention in remote community health centres in the Northern Territory of Australia. Methods The intervention comprised the development and dissemination of best practice guidelines supported by an electronic client register, recall and reminder systems and associated staff training, and audit and feedback. Clinical records in seven community health centres were audited at regular intervals against best practice guidelines over a period of three years, with feedback of audit findings to health centre staff and management. Results Levels of service delivery varied between services and between communities. There was an initial improvement in service levels for most services following the intervention, but improvements were in general not fully sustained over the three year period. Conclusions Improvements in service delivery are consistent with the international experience, although baseline and follow-up levels are in many cases higher than reported for comparable studies in North America and the UK. Sustainability of improvements may be achieved by institutionalisation of relevant work practices and enhanced health centre capacity.

  12. Who wants feedback? An investigation of the variables influencing residents' feedback-seeking behavior in relation to night shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Pim W; Stapel, Diederik A; van der Vleuten, Cees; Scherpbier, Albert; Boor, Klarke; Scheele, Fedde

    2009-07-01

    The literature on feedback in clinical medical education has predominantly treated trainees as passive recipients. Past research has focused on how clinical supervisors can use feedback to improve a trainee's performance. On the basis of research in social and organizational psychology, the authors reconceptualized residents as active seekers of feedback. They investigated what individual and situational variables influence residents' feedback-seeking behavior on night shifts. Early in 2008, the authors sent obstetrics-gynecology residents in the Netherlands--both those in their first two years of graduate training and those gaining experience between undergraduate and graduate training--a questionnaire that assessed four predictor variables (learning and performance goal orientation, and instrumental and supportive leadership), two mediator variables (perceived feedback benefits and costs), and two outcome variables (frequency of feedback inquiry and monitoring). They used structural equation modeling software to test a hypothesized model of relationships between variables. The response rate was 76.5%. Results showed that residents who perceive more feedback benefits report a higher frequency of feedback inquiry and monitoring. More perceived feedback costs result mainly in more feedback monitoring. Residents with a higher learning goal orientation perceive more feedback benefits and fewer costs. Residents with a higher performance goal orientation perceive more feedback costs. Supportive physicians lead residents to perceive more feedback benefits and fewer costs. This study showed that some residents actively seek feedback. Residents' feedback-seeking behavior partially depends on attending physicians' supervisory style. Residents' goal orientations influence their perceptions of the benefits and costs of feedback-seeking.

  13. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  14. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  15. SU-F-P-30: Clinical Assessment of Auto Beam-Hold Triggered by Fiducial Localization During Prostate RapidArc Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, P; Chen, Q [Flower Hospital, Sylvania, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical efficacy of auto beam hold during prostate RapidArc delivery, triggered by fiducial localization on kV imaging with a Varian True Beam. Methods: Prostate patients with four gold fiducials were candidates in this study. Daily setup was accomplished by aligning to fiducials using orthogonal kV imaging. During RapidArc delivery, a kV image was automatically acquired with a momentary beam hold every 60 degrees of gantry rotation. The position of each fiducial was identified by a search algorithm and compared to a predetermined 1.4 cm diameter target area. Treatment continued if all the fiducials were within the target area. If any fiducial was outside the target area the beam hold was not released, and the operators determined if the patient needed re-alignment using the daily setup method. Results: Four patients were initially selected. For three patients, the auto beam hold performed seamlessly. In one instance, the system correctly identified misaligned fiducials, stopped treatment, and the patient was re-positioned. The fourth patient had a prosthetic hip which sometimes blocked the fiducials and caused the fiducial search algorithm to fail. The auto beam hold was disabled for this patient and the therapists manually monitored the fiducial positions during treatment. Average delivery time for a 2-arc fraction was increased by 59 seconds. Phantom studies indicated the dose discrepancy related to multiple beam holds is <0.1%. For a plan with 43 fractions, the additional imaging increased dose by an estimated 68 cGy. Conclusion: Automated intrafraction kV imaging can effectively perform auto beam holds due to patient movement, with the exception of prosthetic hip patients. The additional imaging dose and delivery time are clinically acceptable. It may be a cost-effective alternative to Calypso in RapidArc prostate patient delivery. Further study is warranted to explore its feasibility under various clinical conditions.

  16. Predictors of a Rapid Decline of Renal Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Referred to a Nephrology Outpatient Clinic: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vigil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Predicting the progression of kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease is difficult. The aim of this study was to assess the predictors of rapid kidney decline in a cohort of patients referred to a single outpatient nephrology clinic. Design. Longitudinal, prospective cohort study with a median follow-up of 3.39 years. Methods. Data were obtained from 306 patients with chronic renal failure based on serum creatinine-estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcreat 4 mL/min/1.73 m2. We recorded nonfatal cardiovascular events at baseline and during follow-up in addition to biochemical parameters. Results. The mean loss in renal function was 1.22 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year. The mean age was 75 ± 8.8 years old, and the mean baseline eGFRcreat was 42 ± 14 mL/min/1.73 m2. Almost one-fourth of the sample (23.3% [63 patients] suffered a rapid decline in renal function. In a logistic regression model with rapid decline as the outcome, baseline characteristics, lower serum albumin (OR: 0.313, 95% CI: 0.114–0.859, previous cardiovascular disease (OR: 1.903 95% CI: 1.028–3.523, and higher proteinuria (g/24 h (OR: 1.817 CI 95%: 1.213–2.723 were the main predictors of rapid kidney decline. On multivariate analysis, including baseline and follow-up data, we obtained similar adjusted associations of rapid kidney decline with baseline serum albumin and proteinuria. The follow-up time was also shorter in the group with rapid rates of decline in renal function. Conclusion. Renal function remained stable in the majority of our population. Previous cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular incidents, lower serum albumin, and higher proteinuria at baseline were the main predictors of rapid kidney decline in our population.

  17. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Casal

    Full Text Available Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  18. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work.......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...

  19. Feedback - fra et elevperspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Benedikte Vilslev; Pedersen, Bent Sortkær

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hattie og Timperley, 2007). Andre studier er dog inde på at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende og nogle viser endda at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i...... forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). I forsøget på at forklare hvordan og hvorfor feedback virker (forskelligt), er der undersøgt flere dimensioner og forhold omkring feedback (se bl.a. Black og Wiliam, 1998; Hattie og Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). Dog er der få studier der undersøger...... hvordan feedback opleves fra et elevperspektiv (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013). Samtidig er der i feedbacklitteraturen en mangel på kvalitative studier, der kommer tæt på fænomenet feedback, som det viser sig i klasserummet (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013) i naturlige omgivelser (Black og Wiliam, 1998), og hvordan...

  20. Fear of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Jay M; Strober, Myra H

    2003-04-01

    Nobody likes performance reviews. Subordinates are terrified they'll hear nothing but criticism. Bosses think their direct reports will respond to even the mildest criticism with anger or tears. The result? Everyone keeps quiet. That's unfortunate, because most people need help figuring out how to improve their performance and advance their careers. This fear of feedback doesn't come into play just during annual reviews. At least half the executives with whom the authors have worked never ask for feedback. Many expect the worst: heated arguments, even threats of dismissal. So rather than seek feedback, people try to guess what their bosses are thinking. Fears and assumptions about feedback often manifest themselves in psychologically maladaptive behaviors such as procrastination, denial, brooding, jealousy, and self-sabotage. But there's hope, say the authors. Those who learn adaptive techniques can free themselves from destructive responses. They'll be able to deal with feedback better if they acknowledge negative emotions, reframe fear and criticism constructively, develop realistic goals, create support systems, and reward themselves for achievements along the way. Once you've begun to alter your maladaptive behaviors, you can begin seeking regular feedback from your boss. The authors take you through four steps for doing just that: self-assessment, external assessment, absorbing the feedback, and taking action toward change. Organizations profit when employees ask for feedback and deal well with criticism. Once people begin to know how they are doing relative to management's priorities, their work becomes better aligned with organizational goals. What's more, they begin to transform a feedback-averse environment into a more honest and open one, in turn improving performance throughout the organization.

  1. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    mapping is a technology in which a genome is linearized on a surface and digested with specific restriction enzymes , giving an arrangement of the genome... enzyme . Finally, we demonstrated that optical restriction maps were successfully obtained and the correct organism identified within a clinical matrix...is a technology in which a genome is linearized on a surface and digested with specific restriction enzymes , giving an arrangement of the genome

  2. Clinical impact of a commercially available multiplex PCR system for rapid detection of pathogens in patients with presumed sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde Hans-Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely identification of pathogens is crucial to minimize mortality in patients with severe infections. Detection of bacterial and fungal pathogens in blood by nucleic acid amplification promises to yield results faster than blood cultures (BC. We analyzed the clinical impact of a commercially available multiplex PCR system in patients with suspected sepsis. Methods Blood samples from patients with presumed sepsis were cultured with the Bactec 9240™ system (Becton Dickinson, Heidelberg, Germany and aliquots subjected to analysis with the LightCycler® SeptiFast® (SF Test (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany at a tertiary care centre. For samples with PCR-detected pathogens, the actual impact on clinical management was determined by chart review. Furthermore a comparison between the time to a positive blood culture result and the SF result, based on a fictive assumption that it was done either on a once or twice daily basis, was made. Results Of 101 blood samples from 77 patients, 63 (62% yielded concordant negative results, 14 (13% concordant positive and 9 (9% were BC positive only. In 14 (13% samples pathogens were detected by SF only, resulting in adjustment of antibiotic therapy in 5 patients (7,7% of patients. In 3 samples a treatment adjustment would have been made earlier resulting in a total of 8 adjustments in all 101 samples (8%. Conclusion The addition of multiplex PCR to conventional blood cultures had a relevant impact on clinical management for a subset of patients with presumed sepsis.

  3. Continuous curricular feedback: a formative evaluation approach to curricular improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Stanley; Morrison, Gail

    2014-02-01

    Curriculum evaluations are used to plan future revisions and other improvements in curriculum design. Most models are summative and occur at the end of a course, so improvements in instruction may be delayed. In this article, the authors describe the formative curriculum evaluation model adopted at the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In their model, representative student feedback is gathered in real time and used to modify courses and improve instruction. The central features of their continuous feedback model include developing a small cadre of preclinical and clinical student evaluators who are trained to obtain classwide input regarding all aspects of the curriculum, including teacher effectiveness, and meet regularly (weekly or monthly) with relevant faculty and administrators. The authors show how this curriculum evaluation approach maximizes student involvement in course development and provides opportunities for rapid improvements in course content and instruction as well as for the identification of barriers to effective clinical and preclinical educational experiences.

  4. Multicenter evaluation of the RAPIDEC® CARBA NP test for rapid screening of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Gram-negative nonfermenters from clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Marco; Antonelli, Alberto; Giani, Tommaso; Spanu, Teresa; Liotti, Flora Marzia; Fontana, Carla; Mirandola, Walter; Gargiulo, Raffaele; Barozzi, Agostino; Mauri, Carola; Principe, Luigi; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2017-07-01

    The rapid diagnosis of carbapenemase-producing (CP) bacteria is essential for the management of therapy and infection control. In this study, RAPIDEC® CARBA NP (RCNP) was evaluated for the rapid screening of CP Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii complex, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical specimens collected at five Italian hospitals. Firstly, each site tested 20 well-characterized strains in a blinded fashion. Secondly, each center prospectively tested 25 isolates from blood cultures processed with a rapid workflow (6h after subculture) and 25 isolates from other specimens processed after an overnight culture. The presence of carbapenemases was confirmed by multiplex real-timePCRs targeting carbapenemase genes. RCNP presented an overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 70%, 94%, 82%, and 89%, respectively, with a higher performance in detection of CP Enterobacteriaceae and a poorer performance in detection of CP A. baumannii complex. With isolates from blood cultures, RCNP could significantly reduce the time required for identification of CP Enterobacteriaceae (less than 9h since the positivization of blood cultures). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Optic neuritis and rapidly progressive necrotizing retinitis as the initial signs of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a case report with clinical and histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Tuncer, Samuray; Kir, Nur; Karacorlu, Murat; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) presenting first with optic neuritis and rapidly progressive necrotizing retinitis at the posterior pole. We reviewed the clinical, laboratory, photographic, angiographic, and histopathologic records of a patient with SSPE. A 15-year-old girl was referred after rapid loss of vision due to optic neuritis and macular necrosis in the right eye. She had a history of cardiac valve surgery, but had no systemic symptoms and extensive work-up was unrewarding. Contralateral involvement with rapidly progressive optic neuritis and macular necrotizing retinitis prompted retinochoroidal biopsy of the right eye, which revealed necrosis of inner retinal layers and perivascular lymphoplasmocytic infiltration with intact choroid and outer retina without any findings of inclusion bodies, microorganisms, or atypical cells. The diagnosis was based on histopathologic findings consistent with SSPE, and detection of elevated measles antibody titers in cerebrospinal fluid and serum. It was further confirmed by development of typical electroencephalography pattern at 6 months and neurological symptoms at 4-year follow-up. Clinicians need to be aware that optic neuritis and necrotizing retinitis at the posterior pole may be the presenting features of SSPE.

  6. Feasibility of implementing rapid oral fluid HIV testing in an urban University Dental Clinic: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million individuals in the U.S. are infected with HIV; approximately 20% of whom do not know they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV infection results in earlier access to treatment and reductions in HIV transmission. In 2006, the CDC recommended that health care providers offer routine HIV screening to all adolescent and adult patients, regardless of community seroprevalence or patient lifestyle. Dental providers are uniquely positioned to implement these recommendations using rapid oral fluid HIV screening technology. However, thus far, uptake into dental practice has been very limited. Methods The study utilized a qualitative descriptive approach with convenience samples of dental faculty and students. Six in-depth one-on-one interviews were conducted with dental faculty and three focus groups were conducted with fifteen dental students. Results Results were fairly consistent and indicated relatively high levels of acceptability. Barriers and facilitators of oral fluid HIV screening were identified in four primary areas: scope of practice/practice enhancement, skills/knowledge/training, patient service/patient reactions and logistical issues. Conclusions Oral fluid HIV screening was described as having benefits for patients, dental practitioners and the public good. Many of the barriers to implementation that were identified in the study could be addressed through training and interdisciplinary collaborations.

  7. Rapid detection of herpes simplex virus in clinical specimens with human embryonic lung fibroblast and primary rabbit kidney cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callihan, D R; Menegus, M A

    1984-04-01

    The performance of a culture system for isolation of herpes simplex virus, consisting of one tube each of human embryonic lung fibroblasts and primary rabbit kidney cells, was evaluated. Cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C on a roller drum and observed daily for characteristic cytopathic effect for 5 days. During 1982, a positive isolation rate of 28.1% was seen among 3,154 specimens submitted. Cultures from genital sources were positive more frequently from males (43.8%) than from females (25.5%). Oral lesion cultures were positive as often from males (34.6%) as from females (38.4%). Although detection of herpes simplex virus occurred significantly earlier in rabbit kidney cells on days 1 and 2 of incubation, by day 3 the number of positive cultures was nearly the same in both cell types. By day 4 of incubation, 99.5% of the positive cultures were detected. These results demonstrate that cell culture can be a rapid and sensitive method for detecting herpes simplex virus.

  8. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  9. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  10. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  11. Clinical evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for rapid detection of Neisseria meningitidis in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DoKyung Lee

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis (Nm is a leading causative agent of bacterial meningitis in humans. Traditionally, meningococcal meningitis has been diagnosed by bacterial culture. However, isolation of bacteria from patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is time consuming and sometimes yields negative results. Recently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based diagnostic methods of detecting Nm have been considered the gold standard because of their superior sensitivity and specificity compared with culture. In this study, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method and evaluated its ability to detect Nm in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.We developed a meningococcal LAMP assay (Nm LAMP that targets the ctrA gene. The primer specificity was validated using 16 strains of N. meningitidis (serogroup A, B, C, D, 29-E, W-135, X, Y, and Z and 19 non-N. meningitidis species. Within 60 min, the Nm LAMP detected down to ten copies per reaction with sensitivity 1000-fold more than that of conventional PCR. The LAMP assays were evaluated using a set of 1574 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis collected between 1998 and 2002 in Vietnam, China, and Korea. The LAMP method was shown to be more sensitive than PCR methods for CSF samples (31 CSF samples were positive by LAMP vs. 25 by PCR. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than that of the PCR method. In a comparative analysis of the PCR and LAMP assays, the clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the LAMP assay were 100%, 99.6%, 80.6%, and 100%, respectively.Compared to PCR, LAMP detected Nm with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This sensitive and specific LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of rapid tests for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in hospitalized patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polisena Julie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are often resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics. The research objectives of this systematic review were to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of polymerase chain reaction (PCR versus chromogenic agar for MRSA screening, and PCR versus no screening for several clinical outcomes, including MRSA colonization and infection rates. Methods An electronic literature search was conducted on studies evaluating polymerase chain reaction techniques and methicillin (also spelled meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus that were published from 1993 onwards using Medline, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, BIOSIS Previews, and EMBASE. Due to the presence of heterogeneity in the selected studies, the clinical findings of individual studies were described. Results Nine studies that compared screening for MRSA using PCR versus screening using chromogenic agar in a hospital setting, and two studies that compared screening using PCR with no or targeted screening were identified. Some studies found lower MRSA colonization and acquisition, infection, and transmission rates in screening with PCR versus screening with chromogenic agar, and the turnaround time for screening test results was lower for PCR. One study reported a lower number of unnecessary isolation days with screening using PCR versus screening with chromogenic agar, but the proportion of patients isolated was similar between both groups. The turnaround time for test results and number of isolation days were lower for PCR versus chromogenic agar for MRSA screening. Conclusions The use of PCR for MRSA screening demonstrated a lower turnaround time and number of isolation days compared with chromogenic agar. Given the mixed quality and number of studies (11 studies, gaps remain in the published literature and the evidence remains insufficient. In addition to screening, factors such as the number of contacts

  13. Clinical validation and assessment of a modular fluorescent imaging system and algorithm for rapid detection and quantification of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelino, Keith; Shah, Pratik; Edlund, David A; Mohit, Mrinal; Yauney, Gregory

    2017-12-28

    Significant numbers of adults and children have untreated plaque due to poor oral hygiene and consequently suffer from associate dental and systemic diseases. A handheld device equipped with 405 nm light-emitting diodes was constructed to examine the prevalence of red fluorescence signatures associated with dental plaque. This device was used for in vivo imaging of all four incisors and all four canines of twenty-eight consenting human subjects. The same areas were further imaged under white light illumination with a commercial image-processing based plaque-imaging device, and evaluated by a hygienist and dentist. A custom computer vision algorithm using pixel information was developed to calculate plaque coverage ratios ranging from 0 (no plaque) to 1 (complete plaque coverage) for images captured by both devices. The algorithm calculated red fluorescence-based plaque coverage ratios ranging from 0.011 to 0.211 for the subjects imaged. Clinical assessment and statistical analyses of associated plaque ratios of the 405 nm device images indicated high sensitivity and specificity in detecting dental plaque by the experimental device compared to the commercial reference device. The low-cost and open source 405 nm device and the associated computer vision algorithm successfully captured red fluorescence signatures associated with dental plaque and demonstrated comparable performance to a commercially available device. Therefore, a proof of concept validation was provided for the construction and application of a sensitive cost-effective plaque-detecting device. A miniaturized mobile adaptable version of the device was also provided, together with and a step-by-step guide for device assembly and webhost the associated software, to facilitate open-source access to a cost-effective at-home, in-clinic oral care technology. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03379337, December 19 2017. Retrospectively registered.

  14. Role of Clinical Presentations and Routine CSF Analysis in the Rapid Diagnosis of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Cases of Negative Gram Stained Smears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Rabab; El-Kholy, Badawy; Yosry, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Bacterial meningitis is a lethal, disabling endemic disease needing prompt antibiotic management. Gram stained smears is rapid accurate method for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. In cases of negative gram stained smears diagnosis is delayed till culture results. We aim to assess the role of clinical presentations and routine CSF analysis in the cost-effective rapid diagnosis of negative gram stained smears bacterial meningitis. Methods. Cross sectional study including 623 acute meningitis patients divided into two groups: bacterial meningitis and nonbacterial meningitis groups. The clinical presentations, systemic inflammatory parameters, and CSF analysis were evaluated and compared in both groups. Results. Altered conscious level, localizing neurological signs, Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs together with peripheral leucocytosis (>10.000/mm3), high CRP (>6) together with high CSF protein (>50 gl/dL), CSF neutrophilic count (≥50% of total CSF leucocytic count), and low CSF glucose level (bacterial meningitis patients. From the significant CSF analysis variables CSF protein carried the higher accuracy of diagnosis 78% with sensitivity 88% and specificity 72%. Conclusions. High CSF protein (>50 mg/dL) together with plasma inflammatory markers and CSF cytochemical parameters can diagnose bacterial meningitis in gram stain negative smear till culture results. PMID:24803939

  15. Rapid identification of clinical mycobacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, A; Kurapati, S; Samantaray, J C; Myneedu, V P; Verma, A; Srinivasan, A; Ahmad, H; Behera, D; Singh, U B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is often plagued with ambiguity. It is a time consuming process requiring 4-8 weeks after culture positivity, thereby delaying therapeutic intervention. For a successful treatment and disease management, timely diagnosis is imperative. We evaluated a rapid, proteomic based technique for identification of clinical mycobacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Freshly grown mycobacterial isolates were used. Acetonitrile/trifluoroacetic acid extraction procedure was carried out, following which cinnamic acid charged plates were subjected to identification by MALDI-TOF MS. A comparative analysis of 42 clinical mycobacterial isolates using the MALDI-TOF MS and conventional techniques was carried out. Among these, 97.61% were found to corroborate with the standard methods at genus level and 85.36% were accurate till the species level. One out of 42 was not in accord with the conventional assays because MALDI-TOF MS established it as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (log (score)>2.0) and conventional methods established it to be non-tuberculous Mycobacterium. MALDI-TOF MS was found to be an accurate, rapid, cost effective and robust system for identification of mycobacterial species. This innovative approach holds promise for early therapeutic intervention leading to better patient care.

  16. Rapid Generation of Multiple Loci-Engineered Marker-free Poxvirus and Characterization of a Clinical-Grade Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Sheng Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant poxviruses, utilized as vaccine vectors and oncolytic viruses, often require manipulation at multiple genetic loci in the viral genome. It is essential for viral vectors to possess no adventitious mutations and no (antibiotic selection marker in the final product for human patients in order to comply with the guidance from the regulatory agencies. Rintoul et al. have previously developed a selectable and excisable marker (SEM system for the rapid generation of recombinant vaccinia virus. In the current study, we describe an improved methodology for rapid creation and selection of recombinant poxviruses with multiple genetic manipulations solely based on expression of a fluorescent protein and with no requirement for drug selection that can lead to cellular stress and the risk of adventitious mutations throughout the viral genome. Using this improved procedure combined with the SEM system, we have constructed multiple marker-free oncolytic poxviruses expressing different cytokines and other therapeutic genes. The high fidelity of inserted DNA sequences validates the utility of this improved procedure for generation of therapeutic viruses for human patients. We have created an oncolytic poxvirus expressing human chemokine CCL5, designated as vvDD-A34R-hCCL5, with manipulations at two genetic loci in a single virus. Finally, we have produced and purified this virus in clinical grade for its use in a phase I clinical trial and presented data on initial in vitro characterization of the virus.

  17. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of a Combined Task Clarification, Goal Setting, Feedback, and Performance Contingent Consequence Intervention Package on Telephone Customer Service in a Medical Clinic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowiak, Julie M.; Madden, Gregory J.; Mathews, Ramona

    2006-01-01

    Appointment coordinators at a mid-western medical clinic were to provide exceptional telephone customer service. This included using a standard greeting, speaking in an appropriate tone of voice during the conversation, and using a standard closing to end the call. An analysis suggested performance deficiencies resulted from weak antecedents, poor…

  19. Clinical evaluation of β-tubulin real-time PCR for rapid diagnosis of dermatophytosis, a comparison with mycological methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedi, Marjan; Mirhendi, Hossein; Zomorodian, Kamiar; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kharazi, Mahboobeh; Ghasemi, Zeinab; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Makimura, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    Following our previous report on evaluation of the beta tubulin real-time PCR for detection of dermatophytosis, this study aimed to compare the real-time PCR assay with conventional methods for the clinical assessment of its diagnostic performance. Samples from a total of 853 patients with suspected dermatophyte lesions were subjected to direct examination (all samples), culture (499 samples) and real-time PCR (all samples). Fungal DNA was extracted directly from clinical samples using a conical steel bullet, followed by purification with a commercial kit and subjected to the Taq-Man probe-based real-time PCR. The study showed that among the 499 specimens for which all three methods were used, 156 (31.2%), 128 (25.6%) and 205 (41.0%) were found to be positive by direct microscopy, culture and real-time PCR respectively. Real-time PCR significantly increased the detection rate of dermatophytes compared with microscopy (288 vs 229) with 87% concordance between the two methods. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the real-time PCR was 87.5%, 85%, 66.5% and 95.2% respectively. Although real-time PCR performed better on skin than on nail samples, it should not yet fully replace conventional diagnosis. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy Type IV (FINNISH with Rapid Clinical Progression in an Iranian Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Babaei-Ghazani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP type IV (FINNISH is a rare clinical entity with challenging neuropathy and cosmetic deficits. Amyloidosis can affect peripheral sensory, motor, or autonomic nerves. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils and treatment approaches for neuropathy are challenging. Involvement of cranial nerves and atrophy in facial muscles is a real concern in daily life of such patients. Currently, diagnosis of neuropathy can be made by electrodiagnostic studies and diagnosis of amyloidosis can be made by genetic testing or by detection of amyloid deposition in abdominal fat pad, rectal, or nerve biopsies. It is preferable to consider FAP as one of the differential diagnosis of a case presented with multiple cranial nerves symptoms. The authors present a case of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP type IV with severe involvement of multiple cranial nerves, peripheral limb neuropathy, and orthostatic hypotension.

  1. Rapid communication: first clinical experience with Doli S 220F-XP extracorporeal lithotripter for urinary lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heretis, John; Daskalopoulos, George; Delibaltidis, Odisseas; Kalivianakis, Dimitrios; Papadimitriou, Vaios; Sofras, Frank

    2006-07-01

    To assess the initial results of the Dornier Doli S 220F-XP extracorporeal lithotripter for the management of solitary urinary calculi. We prospectively examined the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) in the first 140 patients with solitary renal and ureteral lithiasis treated by one urologist with the new power Doli S lithotripter. Ninety-one patients (group A) had renal stones, and 49 patients (group B) had ureteral stones. Data were collected with respect to stone size, location, and fragmentation. In group A, clinical success was documented in 77 patients (84%) at 1 month after lithotripsy. Three months after lithotripsy, 69 patients (75.2%) were stone free and 8 (8.8%) had fragments pain during lithotripsy. The majority (91%) mentioned that they were satisfied with this treatment modality for urinary lithiasis (mean visual analog scale satisfaction score 8). The Doli S 220 F-XP is a safe and effective device for managing calculi throughout the urinary tract.

  2. The Impact of Feedback on the Different Time Courses of Multisensory Temporal Recalibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. De Niear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to rapidly adjust perceptual representations confers a fundamental advantage when confronted with a constantly changing world. Unexplored is how feedback regarding sensory judgments (top-down factors interacts with sensory statistics (bottom-up factors to drive long- and short-term recalibration of multisensory perceptual representations. Here, we examined the time course of both cumulative and rapid temporal perceptual recalibration for individuals completing an audiovisual simultaneity judgment task in which they were provided with varying degrees of feedback. We find that in the presence of feedback (as opposed to simple sensory exposure temporal recalibration is more robust. Additionally, differential time courses are seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration dependent upon the nature of the feedback provided. Whereas cumulative recalibration effects relied more heavily on feedback that informs (i.e., negative feedback rather than confirms (i.e., positive feedback the judgment, rapid recalibration shows the opposite tendency. Furthermore, differential effects on rapid and cumulative recalibration were seen when the reliability of feedback was altered. Collectively, our findings illustrate that feedback signals promote and sustain audiovisual recalibration over the course of cumulative learning and enhance rapid trial-to-trial learning. Furthermore, given the differential effects seen for cumulative and rapid recalibration, these processes may function via distinct mechanisms.

  3. Economic and clinical effects of evaluating rapid viral response to peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin for the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, John B; Davis, Gary L; McHutchison, John G; Manns, Michael P; Albrecht, Janice K

    2003-11-01

    Evaluation of 12-wk viral response to initial antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C has been recommended to minimize antiviral-associated morbidity and costs. The aim of this study was to examine the economic and clinical effects of evaluating rapid viral response during antiviral therapy for treatment naive chronic hepatitis C patients. We applied viral response and drug dosage from an international randomized clinical trial of ribavirin plus peginterferon alfa-2b or ribavirin plus interferon alfa-2b to a previously published computer cohort simulation to project lifelong clinical and economic outcomes. Natural history and economic estimates were based on published literature, expert panel estimates, and actual variable and reimbursement cost data. The assessment of 12-wk rapid viral response reduced antiviral treatment duration by 40-44% and antiviral costs by 44-45% (savings of $15,116-16,268 for peginterferon plus ribavirin and $8300 for interferon plus ribavirin) compared to full 48-wk dosing. With the 12-wk evaluation, the marginal cost-effectiveness of peginterferon plus ribavirin versus interferon plus ribavirin was $13,600-22,800 compared with $14,600-25,000 per discounted quality adjusted life-year gained with the 24-wk evaluation. For genotype 1, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing for peginterferon plus ribavirin remaining preferred and cost-effective compared with interferon plus ribavirin. For genotype 2 or 3, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing yielded similar results to those of 24-wk treatment. Assessment of 12-wk viral response in genotype 1, hepatitis C infected patients should reduce peginterferon plus ribavirin morbidity and costs and improve its cost-effectiveness; however, for genotype 2 and 3, hepatitis C infected patients, 12-wk testing and 24-wk treatment have similar outcomes. Decisions regarding continuation of antiviral treatment should also consider the variability in the accuracy of quantitative viral assays as

  4. Evaluation of a density-based rapid diagnostic test for sickle cell disease in a clinical setting in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A Kumar

    Full Text Available Although simple and low-cost interventions for sickle cell disease (SCD exist in many developing countries, child mortality associated with SCD remains high, in part, because of the lack of access to diagnostic tests for SCD. A density-based test using aqueous multiphase systems (SCD-AMPS is a candidate for a low-cost, point-of-care diagnostic for SCD. In this paper, the field evaluation of SCD-AMPS in a large (n = 505 case-control study in Zambia is described. Of the two variations of the SCD-AMPS used, the best system (SCD-AMPS-2 demonstrated a sensitivity of 86% (82-90% and a specificity of 60% (53-67%. Subsequent analysis identified potential sources of false positives that include clotting, variation between batches of SCD-AMPS, and shipping conditions. Importantly, SCD-AMPS-2 was 84% (62-94% sensitive in detecting SCD in children between 6 months and 1 year old. In addition to an evaluation of performance, an assessment of end-user operability was done with health workers in rural clinics in Zambia. These health workers rated the SCD-AMPS tests to be as simple to use as lateral flow tests for malaria and HIV.

  5. [The rapid specific characterization of clinical isolates of the genus Mycobacterium by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuende, J I; Jaime, M L; Gómez, M T; Del Campo, F; Alba, A; Pérez de Diego, I J

    1995-02-18

    Typing at species level of Mycobacterium is usually performed by microbiological and biochemical methods that require a long time and/or sufficient amount of bacteria. Molecular biology can avoid these problems using different techniques. A colony growth of the following mycobacteria has been analyzed: M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. gordonae, M. phlei, M. aurum, M. fortuitum, M. flavescens, M. marinum, M. xenopi, M. nonchromogenicum, M. terrae and M. chelonei. Strains were grown in Löwenstein-Jensen medium. DNA was obtained by proteolytic digestion and fenol extraction. The 16S rRNA gen was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the amplification was digested by HaeIII, HpaII, RsaI and AluI restriction enzymes. Restriction fragment patterns were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and UV transillumination. The combination of the patterns obtained with HpaII and RsaI was sufficient to generate 13 different combined ones. The patterns of M. intracellulare and M. avium were the same. PCR and restriction enzyme analysis is an useful method for typing at species level of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

  6. Development of a symmetric echo planar imaging framework for clinical translation of rapid dynamic hyperpolarized 13 C imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E Z

    2017-02-01

    To develop symmetric echo planar imaging (EPI) and a reference scan framework for hyperpolarized 13 C metabolic imaging. Symmetric, ramp-sampled EPI with partial Fourier reconstruction was implemented on a 3T scanner. The framework for acquiring a reference scan on the 1 H channel and applied to 13 C data was described and validated in both phantoms and in vivo metabolism of [1-13 C]pyruvate. Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI provided a substantial increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the phantom experiments. The reference scan acquired on the 1 H channel yielded 13 C phantom images that varied in mean signal intensity Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI with spectral-spatial excitation of a single metabolite provides a fast, robust, and clinically efficacious approach to acquire hyperpolarized 13 C dynamic molecular imaging data. The gains of this efficient sampling, combined with partial Fourier methods, enables large matrix sizes required for human studies. Magn Reson Med 77:826-832, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Rapid Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Platform for Molecular Screening and Clinical Genotyping in Subjects with Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Shang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are among the most common autosomal-recessive disorders worldwide. A comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS test would greatly facilitate screening and diagnosis of these disorders. An NGS panel targeting the coding regions of hemoglobin genes and four modifier genes was designed. We validated the assay by using 2522 subjects affected with hemoglobinopathies and applied it to carrier testing in a cohort of 10,111 couples who were also screened through traditional methods. In the clinical genotyping analysis of 1182 β-thalassemia subjects, we identified a group of additional variants that can be used for accurate diagnosis. In the molecular screening analysis of the 10,111 couples, we detected 4180 individuals in total who carried 4840 mutant alleles, and identified 186 couples at risk of having affected offspring. 12.1% of the pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants identified by our NGS assay, which were undetectable by traditional methods. Compared with the traditional methods, our assay identified an additional at-risk 35 couples. We describe a comprehensive NGS-based test that offers advantages over the traditional screening/molecular testing methods. To our knowledge, this is among the first large-scale population study to systematically evaluate the application of an NGS technique in carrier screening and molecular diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect as a mechanism of effectiveness underlying the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis patients: regulation of the altered inflammatory and stress feedback response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, E.; Gálvez, I.; Hinchado, M. D.; Guerrero, J.; Martín-Cordero, L.; Torres-Piles, S.

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate whether an anti-inflammatory effect together with an improvement of the regulation of the interaction between the inflammatory and stress responses underlies the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study evaluated the effects of a 10-day cycle of pelotherapy at the spa centre `El Raposo' (Spain) in a group of 21 OA patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. Clinical assessments included pain intensity using a visual analog scale; pain, stiffness and physical function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index; and health-related quality of life using the EuroQol-5D questionnaire. Serum inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β) were evaluated using the Bio-Plex® Luminex® system. Circulating neuroendocrine-stress biomarkers, such as cortisol and extracellular 72 kDa heat shock protein (eHsp72), were measured by ELISA. After the cycle of mud therapy, OA patients improved the knee flexion angle and OA-related pain, stiffness and physical function, and they reported a better health-related quality of life. Serum concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6 and TGF-β, as well as eHsp72, were markedly decreased. Besides, systemic levels of cortisol increased significantly. These results confirm that the clinical benefits of mud therapy may well be mediated, at least in part, by its systemic anti-inflammatory effects and neuroendocrine-immune regulation in OA patients. Thus, mud therapy could be an effective alternative treatment in the management of OA.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect as a mechanism of effectiveness underlying the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis patients: regulation of the altered inflammatory and stress feedback response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, E.; Gálvez, I.; Hinchado, M. D.; Guerrero, J.; Martín-Cordero, L.; Torres-Piles, S.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate whether an anti-inflammatory effect together with an improvement of the regulation of the interaction between the inflammatory and stress responses underlies the clinical benefits of pelotherapy in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study evaluated the effects of a 10-day cycle of pelotherapy at the spa centre `El Raposo' (Spain) in a group of 21 OA patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. Clinical assessments included pain intensity using a visual analog scale; pain, stiffness and physical function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index; and health-related quality of life using the EuroQol-5D questionnaire. Serum inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β) were evaluated using the Bio-Plex® Luminex® system. Circulating neuroendocrine-stress biomarkers, such as cortisol and extracellular 72 kDa heat shock protein (eHsp72), were measured by ELISA. After the cycle of mud therapy, OA patients improved the knee flexion angle and OA-related pain, stiffness and physical function, and they reported a better health-related quality of life. Serum concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6 and TGF-β, as well as eHsp72, were markedly decreased. Besides, systemic levels of cortisol increased significantly. These results confirm that the clinical benefits of mud therapy may well be mediated, at least in part, by its systemic anti-inflammatory effects and neuroendocrine-immune regulation in OA patients. Thus, mud therapy could be an effective alternative treatment in the management of OA.

  10. A rapid and systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of orlistat in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, S; Riemsma, R; Shirran, L; Mather, L; ter Riet, G

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in developed societies is increasing. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of co-morbidity, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Following the withdrawal of fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine, interest has focused on a novel anti-obesity drug orlistat. To systematically assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of orlistat in the management of obesity. METHODS - SEARCH STRATEGY: Nineteen electronic databases were searched from inception to June 2000. Additionally, Internet searches were carried out, bibliographies of retrieved articles were examined and submissions were received from the manufacturer of orlistat. METHODS - INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effectiveness of orlistat used for weight loss or maintenance of weight loss in overweight or obese patients were eligible for inclusion. Primary outcome measures were changes in body weight, fat content or fat distribution. Secondary outcomes were changes in obesity-related risk-factor profiles, such as lipid levels, indicators of glycaemic control and blood pressure. Studies recruiting people with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were excluded. METHODS - PROCESS OF STUDY SELECTION: Assessment of titles and abstracts was performed independently by two reviewers. If either reviewer considered a reference to be relevant, the full paper was retrieved. Full papers were assessed against the review selection criteria by two independent reviewers, and disagreements were resolved through discussion. METHODS - DATA EXTRACTION: Data were extracted by one reviewer into structured summary tables and checked by a second reviewer. Any disagreements about data were resolved by discussion. METHODS - QUALITY ASSESSMENT: Each included trial was assessed against a comprehensive checklist for methodological quality. Quality assessment was performed independently by two reviewers with disagreements

  11. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. Rapid and sustained clearance of circulating lymphoma cells after chemotherapy plus rituximab: clinical significance of quantitative t(14;18) PCR monitoring in advanced stage follicular lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Carsten; Schüler, Frank; Kiefer, Thomas; Schwenke, Cornelia; Haas, Antje; Niederwieser, Dietger; Neser, Sabine; Assmann, Michael; Srock, Stefanie; Rohrberg, Robert; Dachselt, Klaus; Leithäuser, Malte; Rabkin, Charles S; Herold, Michael; Dölken, Gottfried

    2008-05-01

    This study of first-line treatment in advanced-stage follicular lymphoma patients analysed the effects of MCP (mitoxantrone, chlorambucil and prednisolone) chemotherapy alone or in combination with rituximab (R-MCP) on circulating lymphoma cells (CLC) and assessed the prognostic value of a quantitative monitoring of CLC. CLC numbers were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the t(14;18)-translocation or by allele-specific PCR for rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain genes. We analysed blood samples from 43 patients treated in a randomized trial comparing eight cycles of MCP versus R-MCP. Clearance of CLC at the end of therapy was achieved in 21/25 patients (84%) treated with R-MCP compared with 0/18 after MCP alone (P or = 2 log CLC reduction was associated with a favourable clinical response (P = 0.0004) and prolonged event-free survival (P = 0.02). In R-MCP patients, stable CLC numbers or consistently PCR-negative blood samples were associated with a continuing clinical remission whereas in two patients a relapse was preceded by a > or = 2 log CLC increase. This study demonstrated that R-MCP led to a rapid and sustained eradication of CLC and a > or = 2 log CLC reduction was associated with a superior quality and duration of the clinical response.

  13. Feedback in the OSCE: What Do Residents Remember?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Mihok, Marika; Pugh, Debra; Touchie, Claire; Halman, Samantha; Wood, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The move to competency-based education has heightened the importance of direct observation of clinical skills and effective feedback. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used for assessment and affords an opportunity for both direct observation and feedback to occur simultaneously. For feedback to be effective, it should include direct observation, assessment of performance, provision of feedback, reflection, decision making, and use of feedback for learning and change. If one of the goals of feedback is to engage students to think about their performance (i.e., reflection), it would seem imperative that they can recall this feedback both immediately and into the future. This study explores recall of feedback in the context of an OSCE. Specifically, the purpose of this study was to (a) determine the amount and the accuracy of feedback that trainees remember immediately after an OSCE, as well as 1 month later, and (b) assess whether prompting immediate recall improved delayed recall. Internal medicine residents received 2 minutes of verbal feedback from physician examiners in the context of an OSCE. The feedback was audio-recorded and later transcribed. Residents were randomly allocated to the immediate recall group (immediate-RG; n = 10) or the delayed recall group (delayed-RG; n = 8). The immediate-RG completed a questionnaire prompting recall of feedback received immediately after the OSCE, and then again 1 month later. The delayed-RG completed a questionnaire only 1 month after the OSCE. The total number and accuracy of feedback points provided by examiners were compared to the points recalled by residents. Results comparing recall at 1 month between the immediate-RG and the delayed-RG were also studied. Physician examiners provided considerably more feedback points (M = 16.3) than the residents recalled immediately after the OSCE (M = 2.61, p feedback points recalled upon completion of the OSCE (2.61) compared to 1 month later (M = 1

  14. Rapid Detection ofStaphylococcus aureusand Related Species Isolated from Food, Environment, Cosmetics, a Medical Device, and Clinical Samples Using the VITEK MS Microbial Identification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Banerjee, Pratik; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Miranda, Nancy; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus spp. is considered as one of the most common human-pathogenic bacteria, causing illnesses ranging from nonthreatening skin infections to lethal diseases, including sepsis, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and food poisoning. The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains has increased morbidity and mortality and resulted in a major healthcare burden worldwide. Single and multilocus sequence typing have been extensively used in the identification of Staphylococcus species. Nevertheless, these assays are relatively time-consuming and require high-quality DNA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight has been used recently for the rapid identification of several bacterial species. In this study, we have examined 47 Staphylococcus isolates recovered from food, environment, clinical samples, cosmetic products, and a medical device and 3 American Type Culture Collection Staphylococcus reference isolates using bioMérieux VITEK MS and VITEK 2 systems to determine isolate identity. Sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was performed to confirm and compare the species identification data generated by VITEK 2 and VITEK MS systems. Although the VITEK 2 system could not identify one of the isolates, VITEK MS identified all 50 Staphylococcus spp. isolates tested. Results of this study clearly suggest that VITEK MS can be used in the rapid identification of Staphylococcus isolates of public health importance.

  15. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: rapid detection of resistance to rifampin and high or low levels of isoniazid in clinical specimens and isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijdea, R.; Stegger, M.; Sosnovskaja, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new improved multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) hybridisation assay to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The assay, developed to detect rifampin (rpoB) and isoniazid (katG) gene mutations causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance......, was recently extended to include inhA gene mutations that code for low-level isoniazid resistance. Interpretable results were obtained in 115 isolates and in all smear-positive clinical specimens. Rifampin resistance was correctly identified in all specimens and in 20 of 21 (95%) multidrug-resistant isolates...... compared to BACTEC 460TB. Isoniazid resistance correlated in 18 of 22 (82%) specimens, in 31 of 31 (100%) high-level and 24 of 28 (86%) low-level isoniazid-resistant isolates. The assay was rapid, easy to perform and directly applicable in smear-positive specimens. We predict that the assay may be a useful...

  16. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of the ROCHE Septifast PCR system for the rapid detection of blood pathogens in neonatal sepsis-A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Julia; Paula, Helga; Mayr, Michaela; Kasper, David; Assadian, Ojan; Berger, Angelika; Rittenschober-Böhm, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis remains a major challenge in neonatology. Most molecular-based methods are not customized for neonatal requirements. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of a modified multiplex PCR protocol for the detection of neonatal sepsis using small blood volumes. 212 episodes of suspected neonatal late onset sepsis were analyzed prospectively using the Roche SeptiFast® MGRADE PCR with a modified DNA extraction protocol and software-handling tool. Results were compared to blood culture, laboratory biomarkers and clinical signs of sepsis. Of 212 episodes, 85 (40.1%) were categorized as "not infected". Among these episodes, 1 was false positive by blood culture (1.2%) and 23 were false positive by PCR (27.1%). Of 51 (24.1%) episodes diagnosed as "culture proven sepsis", the same pathogen was detected by blood culture and PCR in 39 episodes (76.5%). In 8 episodes, more pathogens were detected by PCR compared to blood culture, and in 4 episodes the pathogen detected by blood culture was not found by PCR. One of these episodes was caused by Bacillus cereus, a pathogen not included in the PCR panel. In 76/212 (35.8%) episodes, clinical sepsis was diagnosed. Among these, PCR yielded positive results in 39.5% of episodes (30/76 episodes). For culture-positive sepsis, PCR showed a sensitivity of 90.2% (95%CI 86.2-94.2%) and a specificity of 72.9% (95%CI 67.0-79.0%). The Roche SeptiFast® MGRADE PCR using a modified DNA extraction protocol showed acceptable results for rapid detection of neonatal sepsis in addition to conventional blood culture. The benefit of rapid pathogen detection has to be balanced against the considerable risk of contamination, loss of information on antibiotic sensitivity pattern and increased costs.

  18. Performance of a PCR assay for the rapid identification of the Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 epidemic clone in Latin American clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, S A; Rapoport, M; Piergrossi, N; Faccone, D; Pasteran, F; De Belder, D; ReLAVRA-Group; Petroni, A; Corso, A

    2016-10-01

    The worldwide dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 demands a rapid PCR-based typing method to detect unique genes of the ST258 clone. This study evaluates a PCR developed by Adler et al. (2014) for the detection of ST258 in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates centered on the identification of the pilv-I and prp genes. We tested 143 clinical isolates from Argentina (n=109), Chile (n=1), Colombia (n=1), Costa Rica (n=2), Ecuador (n=5), El Salvador (n=2), Nicaragua (n=5), Panamá (n=2), Paraguay (n=2), Perú (n=3) and Trinidad and Tobago (n=11) recovered from 2006 to 2015. blaKPC, pilv-l and prp genes were detected by PCR and sequenced by standard procedures. ST258 and non-ST258 were defined by PFGE and/or MLST. Isolates were grouped according to PFGE patterns: 58 were compatible with ST258 (group 1) and 85 with non-ST258 (group 2). MLST study was done on an arbitrary selection of isolates. The pilv-l gene was present only in ST258 isolates, regardless of the presence of the blaKPC gene. Results for the prp gene were variable. Its presence did not define ST258. The pilv-I PCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%, respectively, for the detection of ST258 in the isolates under investigation. Given our findings, the pilv-I PCR could replace more time and resource consuming methods, allowing for more rapid detection of the circulating high risk K. pneumoniae clone ST258 in Latin American (LA) countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic implications when employing heavy pre- and post-exercise rapid-acting insulin reductions to prevent hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients: a randomised clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Campbell

    Full Text Available To examine the metabolic, gluco-regulatory-hormonal and inflammatory cytokine responses to large reductions in rapid-acting insulin dose administered prandially before and after intensive running exercise in male type 1 diabetes patients.This was a single centre, randomised, controlled open label study. Following preliminary testing, 8 male patients (24±2 years, HbA1c 7.7±0.4%/61±4 mmol.l-1 treated with insulin's glargine and aspart, or lispro attended the laboratory on two mornings at ∼08:00 h and consumed a standardised breakfast carbohydrate bolus (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 380±10 kcal and self-administered a 75% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose 60 minutes before 45 minutes of intensive treadmill running at 73.1±0.9% VO2peak. At 60 minutes post-exercise, patients ingested a meal (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 660±21 kcal and administered either a Full or 50% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose. Blood glucose and lactate, serum insulin, cortisol, non-esterified-fatty-acids, β-Hydroxybutyrate, and plasma glucagon, adrenaline, noradrenaline, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured for 180 minutes post-meal.All participants were analysed. All glycaemic, metabolic, hormonal, and cytokine responses were similar between conditions up to 60 minutes following exercise. Following the post-exercise meal, serum insulin concentrations were lower under 50% (p<0.05 resulting in 75% of patients experiencing hyperglycaemia (blood glucose ≥8.0 mmol.l-1; 50% n = 6, Full n = 3. β-Hydroxybutyrate concentrations decreased similarly, such that at 180 minutes post-meal concentrations were lower than rest under Full and 50%. IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations remained similar to fasting levels under 50% but declined under Full. Under 50% IL-6 concentrations were inversely related with serum insulin concentrations (r = -0.484, p = 0.017.Heavily reducing rapid-acting insulin dose with a carbohydrate bolus before, and a meal after intensive

  20. Field evaluation and impact on clinical management of a rapid diagnostic kit that detects dengue NS1, IgM and IgG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Claire Andries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue diagnosis is complex and until recently only specialized laboratories were able to definitively confirm dengue infection. Rapid tests are now available commercially making biological diagnosis possible in the field. The aim of this study was to evaluate a combined dengue rapid test for the detection of NS1 and IgM/IgG antibodies. The evaluation was made prospectively in the field conditions and included the study of the impact of its use as a point-of-care test for case management as well as retrospectively against a panel of well-characterized samples in a reference laboratory. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the prospective study, 157 patients hospitalized for a suspicion of dengue were enrolled. In the hospital laboratories, the overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the NS1/IgM/IgG combination tests were 85.7%, 83.9%, 95.6% and 59.1% respectively, whereas they were 94,4%, 90.0%, 97.5% and 77.1% respectively in the national reference laboratory at Institut Pasteur in Cambodia. These results demonstrate that optimal performances require adequate training and quality assurance. The retrospective study showed that the sensitivity of the combined kit did not vary significantly between the serotypes and was not affected by the immune status or by the interval of time between onset of fever and sample collection. The analysis of the medical records indicates that the physicians did not take into consideration the results obtained with the rapid test including for care management and use of antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: In the context of our prospective field study, we demonstrated that if the SD Bioline Dengue Duo kit is correctly used, a positive result highly suggests a dengue case but a negative result doesn't rule out a dengue infection. Nevertheless, Cambodian pediatricians in their daily practice relied on their clinical diagnosis and thus the false negative results obtained did not directly impact on

  1. What stops hospital clinical staff from following protocols? An analysis of the incidence and factors behind the failure of bedside clinical staff to activate the rapid response system in a multi-campus Australian metropolitan healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Bill; Marshall, Stuart; Buist, Michael David; Finnigan, Monica; Kitto, Simon; Hore, Tonina; Sturgess, Tamica; Wilson, Stuart; Ramsay, Wayne

    2012-07-01

    To explore the causes of failure to activate the rapid response system (RRS). The organisation has a recognised incidence of staff failing to act when confronted with a deteriorating patient and leading to adverse outcomes. A multi-method study using the following: a point prevalence survey to determine the incidence of abnormal simple bedside observations and activation of the rapid response team by clinical staff; a prospective audit of all patients experiencing a cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission or death over an 8-week period; structured interviews of staff to explore cognitive and sociocultural barriers to activating the RRS. Southern Health is a comprehensive healthcare network with 570 adult in-patient beds across four metropolitan teaching hospitals in the south-eastern sector of Melbourne. Frequency of physiological instability and outcomes within the in-patient hospital population. Qualitative data from staff interviews were thematically coded. The incidence of physiological instability in the acute adult population was 4.04%. Nearly half of these patients (42%) did not receive an appropriate clinical response from the staff, despite most (69.2%) recognising their patient met physiological criteria for activating the RRS, and being 'quite', or 'very' concerned about their patient (75.8%). Structured interviews with 91 staff members identified predominantly sociocultural reasons for failure to activate the RRS. Despite an organisational commitment to the RRS, clinical staff act on local cultural rules within the clinical environment that are usually not explicit. Better understanding of these informal rules may lead to more appropriate activation of the RRS.

  2. In-office rapid volumetric ablation of uterine fibroids under ultrasound imaging guidance: Preclinical and early clinical experience with the Mirabilis transabdominal HIFU treatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, José G. Garza; León, Ivan Hernandez; Sáenz, Lorena Castillo; Aguirre, Juan M. Aguilar; Lagos, Joel J. Islas; Parsons, Jessica E.; Darlington, Gregory P.; Lau, Michael P. H.

    2017-03-01

    Mirabilis Medica, Inc. (Bothell, WA, USA) has developed a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system for producing rapid transabdominal volumetric ablation of uterine fibroids in an office-based setting. The Mirabilis HIFU Treatment System utilizes integrated ultrasound imaging guidance and short treatment times under 15 minutes. Treatment with the Mirabilis system is generally well tolerated using only oral analgesia without anesthesia or sedation. This paper summarizes certain technical aspects of the Mirabilis HIFU technology, the preclinical development process, and the results of the first in-human clinical study using the Mirabilis system. During preclinical studies, an in vivo transcutaneous porcine lower extremity model was used in a total of 180 adult swine to develop the HIFU treatment regimen parameters. Additionally, 108 excised human uteri with fibroids obtained from scheduled hysterectomies were treated in an ex vivo experimental setup and evaluated. These preclinical activities resulted in a HIFU treatment technique referred to as Mirabilis Shell Ablation, which enables rapid volumetric fibroid ablation by directing the HIFU energy to the outer perimeter of the target volume (the `shell') without insonating its core. This method results in efficient fibroid treatment through a synergistic combination of direct tissue ablation, cooperative heating effects, and indirect ischemic necrosis in the interior of the volume. After refining this technique and performing safety testing in the in vivo porcine model, a clinical pilot study was conducted to assess the initial safety and performance of the Mirabilis HIFU Treatment System for transabdominal treatment of uterine fibroids in eligible women who were scheduled to undergo hysterectomy following treatment with the device. A total of 37 women meeting certain eligibility criteria were treated at two clinical sites in Mexico. Twenty-nine (29) of these 37 women received only prophylactic sublingual

  3. Contours of a causal feedback mechanism between adaptive personality and psychosocial function in patients with personality disorders: a secondary analysis from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klungsøyr, Ole; Antonsen, Bjørnar; Wilberg, Theresa

    2017-06-05

    Patients with personality disorders commonly exhibit impairment in psychosocial function that persists over time even with diagnostic remission. Further causal knowledge may help to identify and assess factors with a potential to alleviate this impairment. Psychosocial function is associated with personality functioning which describes personality disorder severity in DSM-5 (section III) and which can reportedly be improved by therapy. The reciprocal association between personality functioning and psychosocial function was assessed, in 113 patients with different personality disorders, in a secondary longitudinal analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial, over six years. Personality functioning was represented by three domains of the Severity Indices of Personality Problems: Relational Capacity, Identity Integration, and Self-control. Psychosocial function was measured by Global Assessment of Functioning. The marginal structural model was used for estimation of causal effects of the three personality functioning domains on psychosocial function, and vice versa. The attractiveness of this model lies in the ability to assess an effect of a time - varying exposure on an outcome, while adjusting for time - varying confounding. Strong causal effects were found. A hypothetical intervention to increase Relational Capacity by one standard deviation, both at one and two time-points prior to assessment of psychosocial function, would increase psychosocial function by 3.5 standard deviations (95% CI: 2.0, 4.96). Significant effects of Identity Integration and Self-control on psychosocial function, and from psychosocial function on all three domains of personality functioning, although weaker, were also found. This study indicates that persistent impairment in psychosocial function can be addressed through a causal pathway of personality functioning, with interventions of at least 18 months duration.

  4. The need for faculty training programs in effective feedback provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Wahbi A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Al Wahbi1,2 1King Saud University for Health Sciences, 2King Abdulaziz Medical City, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: An important aspect of professional teaching practice is a practitioner's ability to critically evaluate the performances of subordinates for whom he or she is responsible. This is a common practice within social sciences as well as for professionals from applied specialties. The literature on professional clinical expertise identifies reflective practice as perfect when they are thoroughly accepted by practitioners. In health-related professions, critical reflection in the form of feedback that serves as the bridge between theory and practice is endorsed. The aims and objectives of this study were directed toward the application of a mixed methodology approach in order to evaluate the requirements for a feedback training program and to detect the present feedback provision skills of clinical mentors in practice. The quantitative analysis measured the effectiveness of clinical teachers' feedback in order to understand whether their understanding of and skills for giving feedback to promote students were adequate. On the other hand, the qualitative methods explored self-perceptions of feedback skills and efficacy in enabling students to improve their clinical practice. Effective feedback from faculty and the learner provides a useful and meaningful experience for absorbing knowledge and critical thinking into clinical practice. Nonadherence and limited expertise of mentors in giving feedback are the main themes of this study, and were evaluated and acknowledged through systematic analysis. Keywords: clinical mentors, feedback mechanism, feedback proficiency 

  5. Clinical correlates of patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder and a recent history of substance use disorder: a subtype comparison from baseline data of 2 randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Keming; Verduin, Marcia L; Kemp, David E; Tolliver, Bryan K; Ganocy, Stephen J; Elhaj, Omar; Bilali, Sarah; Brady, Kathleen T; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2008-07-01

    To compare clinical variables in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I or II disorder and a recent history of substance use disorder (SUD). Cross-sectional data from 2 studies of patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder or rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder and a recent history of SUD were used to retrospectively assess the differences in clinical variables between the subtypes. The studies were conducted from November 1997 to February 2007 at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. Extensive clinical interview and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were used to ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder, SUDs, and other Axis I disorders and to collect clinical variables. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI), Global Assessment Scale (GAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were used to measure the severity of impairment at the initial assessment. One-way analysis of variance or chi(2) was used for significance tests. A Bonferroni adjustment was applied for multiple comparisons. Of 245 patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder, N = 191; rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder, N = 54) and a recent history of SUD, the demographics were similar. A significantly higher rate of panic disorder was observed in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder than in those with rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder (odds ratio = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.66 to 8.32, p = .008). A significantly higher psychiatric composite score on the ASI was also found in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar I disorder than in those with rapid-cycling bipolar II disorder even after Bonferroni adjustment (p = .0007). There were no significant differences between the subtypes in the rates of previous hospitalization or suicide attempt, early childhood verbal, physical, or sexual abuse, lifetime substance abuse or dependence, the number of

  6. Digital Clinical Communication for Families and Caregivers of Children or Young People With Short- or Long-Term Conditions: Rapid Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoiry, Xavier; Sturt, Jackie; Phelps, Emma Elizabeth; Walker, Clare-Louise; Court, Rachel; Taggart, Frances; Sutcliffe, Paul; Griffiths, Frances; Atherton, Helen

    2018-01-05

    The communication relationship between parents of children or young people with health conditions and health professionals is an important part of treatment, but it is unclear how far the use of digital clinical communication tools may affect this relationship. The objective of our study was to describe, assess the feasibility of, and explore the impact of digital clinical communication between families or caregivers and health professionals. We searched the literature using 5 electronic databases. We considered all types of study design published in the English language from January 2009 to August 2015. The population of interest included families and caregivers of children and young people aged less than 26 years with any type of health condition. The intervention was any technology permitting 2-way communication. We included 31 articles. The main designs were randomized controlled trials (RCTs; n=10), cross-sectional studies (n=9), pre- and postintervention uncontrolled (pre/post) studies (n=7), and qualitative interview studies (n=2); 6 had mixed-methods designs. In the majority of cases, we considered the quality rating to be fair. Many different types of health condition were represented. A breadth of digital communication tools were included: videoconferencing or videoconsultation (n=14), and Web messaging or emails (n=12). Health care professionals were mainly therapists or cognitive behavioral therapists (n=10), physicians (n=8), and nurses (n=6). Studies were very heterogeneous in terms of outcomes. Interventions were mainly evaluated using satisfaction or acceptance, or outcomes relating to feasibility. Clinical outcomes were rarely used. The RCTs showed that digital clinical communication had no impact in comparison with standard care. Uncontrolled pre/post studies showed good rates of satisfaction or acceptance. Some economic studies suggested that digital clinical communication may save costs. This rapid review showed an emerging body of literature on

  7. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we

  8. Giving Students Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Some of the special challenges associated with evaluation and grading in the large class are discussed. Suggestions for evaluation methods include seeking clarity, reducing the stress of test administration, giving feedback, guarding against errors in record keeping, and returning exams efficiently and with respect. (MLW)

  9. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  10. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...

  11. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Jørgen; Qvortrup, Ane; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2017-01-01

    Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter...

  12. Novel Reduced-Feedback Wireless Communication Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shaqfeh, Mohammad Obaidah

    2011-11-20

    Modern communication systems apply channel-aware adaptive transmission techniques and dynamic resource allocation in order to exploit the peak conditions of the fading wireless links and to enable significant performance gains. However, conveying the channel state information among the users’ mobile terminals into the access points of the network consumes a significant portion of the scarce air-link resources and depletes the battery resources of the mobile terminals rapidly. Despite its evident drawbacks, the channel information feedback cannot be eliminated in modern wireless networks because blind communication technologies cannot support the ever-increasing transmission rates and high quality of experience demands of current ubiquitous services. Developing new transmission technologies with reduced-feedback requirements is sought. Network operators will benefit from releasing the bandwidth resources reserved for the feedback communications and the clients will enjoy the extended battery life of their mobile devices. The main technical challenge is to preserve the prospected transmission rates over the network despite decreasing the channel information feedback significantly. This is a noteworthy research theme especially that there is no mature theory for feedback communication in the existing literature despite the growing number of publications about the topic in the last few years. More research efforts are needed to characterize the trade-off between the achievable rate and the required channel information and to design new reduced-feedback schemes that can be flexibly controlled based on the operator preferences. Such schemes can be then introduced into the standardization bodies for consideration in next generation broadband systems. We have recently contributed to this field and published several journal and conference papers. We are the pioneers to propose a novel reduced-feedback opportunistic scheduling scheme that combines many desired features

  13. A rapid, low-cost, and microfluidic chip-based system for parallel identification of multiple pathogens related to clinical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Qin; Xie, Lan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Xu, Hui; Ma, Li; Luo, Xianbo; Xin, Juan; Zhou, Xinying; Jin, Xiangyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-25

    An air-insulated microfluidic chip was designed for the automatic centrifugal distribution of samples to 24-test cells, enabling the parallel identification of multiple clinical pneumonia-related pathogens in 1.45-μL reactions without cross-contamination in 45 min. A portable nucleic acid analyzer that integrates mechanical, confocal optical, electronic, and software functions was also developed to collect fluorescence data in a Ø3 mm imaging field near the optical diffraction limit for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid amplification in real time. This microfluidic chip-based portable nucleic acid analyzer could detect low abundance nucleic acids present at as few as 10 copies. In a blinded experiment, specific identification of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus was achieved with 229 clinical patient sputum samples. The total coincidence rate of our system and traditional RT-PCR with an ABI 7500 was 99.56%. Four samples accounting for the 0.44% inconformity were retested by gene sequencing, revealing that our system reported the correct results. This novel microfluidic chip-based detection system is cost-effective, rapid, sensitive, specific, and has a relatively high throughput for parallel identification, which is especially suitable for resource-limited facilities/areas and point-of-care testing.

  14. Short-term skeletal and dental changes following bone-borne versus tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion: a randomized clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Mohammad; Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Heidari, Ali

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the short-term (post-retention) skeletal and dental changes following bone-borne and tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this randomized clinical study, 30 patients with transverse maxillary deficiency underwent either tooth-borne (n = 15) or bone-borne (n = 15) SARME. Before treatment and immediately after the consolidation period, CBCT was obtained and the nasal floor width, interdental root distance, palatal bone width and interdental cusp distance were measured at first premolar and first molar regions of maxilla. Twenty eight patients completed the study protocol. In both tooth-borne (n = 13) and bone-borne (n = 15) groups the highest degree of expansion occurred in the dental arch, followed by palatal bone, and nasal floor (V-shaped widening in coronal dimension). The amount and pattern of expansion was comparable between anterior and posterior maxillary regions in each group (parallel posteroanterior expansion) and between the two groups. Dental and skeletal effects of tooth-borne and bone-borne devices were comparable. The overall complication rate was negligible. Selection of an expansion device should be based on each individual patient's requirements. Future long-term clinical trial studies to evaluate the stability and relapse of these two techniques are recommended. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Defining quality student feedback in distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, B

    1997-07-01

    The quality of student feedback is of critical importance in distance learning. Students studying such courses may be geographically far removed from tutors, and limited contact opportunities necessitate a sharp and accurate focus upon aspects of study which link theory, research, clinical practice and written assessment closely together. An understanding of quality feedback begins with an appreciation of the role of distance learning course tutors and the education models which can usefully guide them. Quality also relies upon a close evaluation of support to students as courses are planned, launched and then monitored through course boards or their equivalent.

  16. Getting beyond "Good job": how to give effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Joseph; Dell, Michael; Sharkey, Angela

    2011-02-01

    This article is the fourth in a series by the Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) reviewing the critical attributes and skills of superb clinical teachers. The previous article in this series reviewed the vital importance of direct observation of students.(1) The purpose of this article is to describe how to use the information gained from the direct observation, namely the role of feedback. Although too often used interchangeably, encouragement, evaluation, and feedback are quite distinct. Encouragement (eg, "good job!") is supportive but does nothing to improve the learner's skills. Evaluation is summative and is the final judgment of the learner's performance. Feedback, however, is designed to improve future performance. This article focuses on feedback-what it is, why it is important, some of the barriers to effective feedback, and how to give helpful feedback.

  17. Feedback-controlled stimulation enhances human paralyzed muscle performance

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, Richard K.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Cole, Keith R.

    2006-01-01

    Chronically paralyzed muscle requires extensive training before it can deliver a therapeutic dose of repetitive stress to the musculoskeletal system. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation, under feedback control, may subvert the effects of fatigue, yielding more rapid and extensive adaptations to training. The purposes of this investigation were to 1) compare the effectiveness of torque feedback-controlled (FDBCK) electrical stimulation with classic open-loop constant-frequency (CONST) stimula...

  18. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid identification of micro-organisms in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattal, C; Oberoi, J K; Goel, N; Raveendran, R; Khanna, S

    2017-05-01

    The study evaluates the utility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Vitek MS for identification of microorganisms in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory. From May 2013 to April 2014, microbial isolates recovered from various clinical samples were identified by Vitek MS. In case of failure to identify by Vitek MS, the isolate was identified using the Vitek 2 system (bioMerieux, France) and serotyping wherever applicable or otherwise by nucleic acid-mediated methods. All the moulds were identified by Lactophenol blue mounts, and mycobacterial isolates were identified by molecular identification systems including AccuProbe (bioMerieux, France) or GenoType Mycobacterium CM (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Out of the 12,003 isolates, the Vitek MS gave a good overall ID at the genus and or species level up to 97.7% for bacterial isolates, 92.8% for yeasts and 80% for filamentous fungi. Of the 26 mycobacteria tested, only 42.3% could be identified using the Saramis RUO (Research Use Only) database. VITEK MS could not identify 34 of the 35 yeast isolates identified as C. haemulonii by Vitek 2. Subsequently, 17 of these isolates were identified as Candida auris (not present in the Vitek MS database) by 18S rRNA sequencing. Using these strains, an in-house superspectrum of C. auris was created in the VITEK MS database. Use of MALDI-TOF MS allows a rapid identification of aerobic bacteria and yeasts in clinical practice. However, improved sample extraction protocols and database upgrades with inclusion of locally representative strains is required, especially for moulds.

  19. A Rapid Bedside Screen to Predict Unplanned Hospitalization and Death in Outpatients With Cirrhosis: A Prospective Evaluation of the Clinical Frailty Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Puneeta; Tangri, Navdeep; Thomas, Lesley; Zenith, Laura; Shaikh, Tahira; Carbonneau, Michelle; Ma, Mang; Bailey, Robert J; Jayakumar, Saumya; Burak, Kelly W; Abraldes, Juan G; Brisebois, Amanda; Ferguson, Thomas; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2016-12-01

    Screening tools to determine which outpatients with cirrhosis are at highest risk for unplanned hospitalization are lacking. Frailty is a novel prognostic factor but conventional screening for frailty is time consuming. We evaluated the ability of a 1 min bedside screen (Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS)) to predict unplanned hospitalization or death in outpatients with cirrhosis and compared the CFS with two conventional frailty measures (Fried Frailty Criteria (FFC) and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)). We prospectively enrolled consecutive outpatients from three tertiary care liver clinics. Frailty was defined by CFS >4. The primary outcome was the composite of unplanned hospitalization or death within 6 months of study entry. A total of 300 outpatients were enrolled (mean age 57 years, 35% female, 81% white, 66% hepatitis C or alcohol-related liver disease, mean Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score 12, 28% with ascites). Overall, 54 (18%) outpatients were frail and 91 (30%) patients had an unplanned hospitalization or death within 6 months. CFS >4 was independently associated with increased rates of unplanned hospitalization or death (57% frail vs. 24% not frail, adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-7.5; P=0.0008) and there was a dose response (adjusted odds ratio 1.9 per 1-unit increase in CFS, 95% CI: 1.4-2.6; P4 had a greater discrimination (c-statistic=0.84) than models using FFC or SPPB. Frailty is strongly and independently associated with an increased risk of unplanned hospitalization or death in outpatients with cirrhosis. The CFS is a rapid screen that could be easily adopted in liver clinics to identify those at highest risk of adverse events.

  20. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  1. Peer feedback as an aid to learning--what do we want? Feedback. When do we want it? Now!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Annie; Abbott, Stephen; Lothian, Doug; Hall, Angela; Westwood, Olwyn M R

    2011-01-01

    With 360° appraisals integral to professional life, learning how to give constructive feedback is an essential generic skill. To use a formative objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for skills acquisition and development in giving feedback, whilst facilitating awareness of the importance of communication skills in clinical practice. Medical and nursing students took part in a formative OSCE. Using actors as simulated patients, a three-station OSCE circuit was repeated three times so that students could rotate through the roles as 'candidate', 'examiner' and 'observer'. As 'candidates', they received immediate feedback on their consultation from the 'examiner'/'observer'. The events were evaluated using a questionnaire and focus groups. Students immensely valued this learning event for considering expectations for a performance (91-100%). Concerns around giving peers feedback were acknowledged, and they were divided on preference for feedback from peers or tutors (48% versus 52%). But training in providing feedback and criteria for assessment were considered helpful, as was instruction by faculty to give corrective feedback to peers. Peer observation and professional accountability for giving constructive feedback enhanced awareness of their skills education and training needs. It also opened the dialogue for identifying opportunities for peer assessment and feedback to support work-based education and skills development.

  2. Effect of dexamethasone on detection of herpes simplex virus in clinical specimens by conventional cell culture and rapid 24-well plate centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G L; Mills, R D

    1988-06-01

    During a 4-month period, two methods for rapid detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) were examined: (i) pretreatment of A549 cells with dexamethasone for conventional tissue culture (277 specimens) and (ii) 24-well plate centrifugation using A549 cells with and without dexamethasone pretreatment and staining with serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (Syva Co., Palo Alto, Calif.) after incubation for 16 to 18 h (153 specimens). By conventional tube cell culture, both with and without dexamethasone, HSV was identified in 88 of 277 (32%) specimens. Significantly more specimens were positive for HSV at 24 h (46 versus 27 specimens) and at 48 h (a total of 72 versus 59 specimens) (P less than 0.0001) in dexamethasone-treated A549 cells. Of the 153 specimens tested by conventional culture and 24-well plate centrifugation, HSV was detected in 44 (29%) by conventional culture, and by 24-well plate centrifugation with and without dexamethasone, HSV was detected in 32 (21%) and 30 (20%) specimens, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 24-well plate centrifugation with A549 cells for detection of HSV were 73 (71% without dexamethasone), 100, 100, and 90%, respectively. In conventional tube cell culture, pretreatment of A549 cells with dexamethasone results in more rapid detection of HSV. Centrifugal inoculation of dexamethasone-treated and untreated A549 cells in 24-well plates and staining with monoclonal antibodies after incubation for 16 to 18 h is an insensitive means to detect HSV in clinical specimens and should not replace conventional tube cell culture.

  3. Feedback: Focusing Attention on Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Margaret; Handley, Karen; Millar, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Within many higher education systems there is a search for means to increase levels of student satisfaction with assessment feedback. This article suggests that the search is under way in the wrong place by concentrating on feedback as a product rather than looking more widely to feedback as a long-term dialogic process in which all parties are…

  4. Det ved vi om Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Vibeke; Bærenholdt, Jørgen

    Præsentation af forskningsviden om feedback i forskellige personkonstellationer i undervisningen: Feedback fra lærer til elev, fra elever til lærer, fra elev til elev og elevens eget arbejde med feedback til sig selv. De præsenterede forskningsresultater er udvalgt dels inden for en kognitivistisk...

  5. A Journey towards Sustainable Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Allyson; Young, Charlotte; Davey, Tamzyn; Fitzgerald, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Meeting students' expectations associated with the provision of feedback is a perennial challenge for tertiary education. Efforts to provide comprehensive, timely feedback within our own first year undergraduate public health courses have not always met students' expectations. In response, we sought to develop peer feedback activities to support…

  6. How to Give Professional Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  7. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  8. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  9. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity) in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  10. Early event-driven (EED) RTCP feedback for rapid IDMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montagud, M.; Boronat, F.; Stokking, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Inter-Destination Media Synchronization (IDMS) is essential in the emerging media consumption paradigm, which is radically evolving from passive and isolated services towards dynamic and interactive group shared experiences. This paper concentrates on improving a standardized RTP/RTCP-based solution

  11. Evaluation of Two Lyophilized Molecular Assays to Rapidly Detect Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Directly from Clinical Samples in Field Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, E L A; Armson, B; Madi, M; Kasanga, C J; Kandusi, S; Sallu, R; Chepkwony, E; Siddle, A; Martin, P; Wood, J; Mioulet, V; King, D P; Lembo, T; Cleaveland, S; Fowler, V L

    2017-06-01

    Accurate, timely diagnosis is essential for the control, monitoring and eradication of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). Clinical samples from suspect cases are normally tested at reference laboratories. However, transport of samples to these centralized facilities can be a lengthy process that can impose delays on critical decision making. These concerns have motivated work to evaluate simple-to-use technologies, including molecular-based diagnostic platforms, that can be deployed closer to suspect cases of FMD. In this context, FMD virus (FMDV)-specific reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) and real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays, compatible with simple sample preparation methods and in situ visualization, have been developed which share equivalent analytical sensitivity with laboratory-based rRT-PCR. However, the lack of robust 'ready-to-use kits' that utilize stabilized reagents limits the deployment of these tests into field settings. To address this gap, this study describes the performance of lyophilized rRT-PCR and RT-LAMP assays to detect FMDV. Both of these assays are compatible with the use of fluorescence to monitor amplification in real-time, and for the RT-LAMP assays end point detection could also be achieved using molecular lateral flow devices. Lyophilization of reagents did not adversely affect the performance of the assays. Importantly, when these assays were deployed into challenging laboratory and field settings within East Africa they proved to be reliable in their ability to detect FMDV in a range of clinical samples from acutely infected as well as convalescent cattle. These data support the use of highly sensitive molecular assays into field settings for simple and rapid detection of FMDV. © 2015 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Tool for Rapid & Easy Identification of High Risk Diabetic Foot: Validation & Clinical Pilot of the Simplified 60 Second Diabetic Foot Screening Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gail Woodbury

    Full Text Available Most diabetic foot amputations are caused by ulcers on the skin of the foot i.e. diabetic foot ulcers. Early identification of patients at high risk for diabetic foot ulcers is crucial. The 'Simplified 60-Second Diabetic Foot Screening Tool' has been designed to rapidly detect high risk diabetic feet, allowing for timely identification and referral of patients needing treatment. This study aimed to determine the clinical performance and inter-rater reliability of 'Simplified 60 Second Diabetic Foot Screening Tool' in order to evaluate its applicability for routine screening.The tool was independently tested by n=12 assessors with n=18 Guyanese patients with diabetes. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by calculating Cronbach's alpha for each of the assessment items. A minimum value of 0.60 was considered acceptable. Reliability scores of the screening tool assessment items were: 'monofilament test' 0.98; 'active ulcer' 0.97; 'previous amputation' 0.97; 'previous ulcer' 0.97; 'fixed ankle' 0.91; 'deformity' 0.87; 'callus' 0.87; 'absent pulses' 0.87; 'fixed toe' 0.80; 'blisters' 0.77; 'ingrown nail' 0.72; and 'fissures' 0.55. The item 'stiffness in the toe or ankle' was removed as it was observed in only 1.3% of patients. The item 'fissures' was also removed due to low inter-rater reliability. Clinical performance was assessed via a pilot study utilizing the screening tool on n=1,266 patients in an acute care setting in Georgetown, Guyana. In total, 48% of patients either had existing diabetic foot ulcers or were found to be at high risk for developing ulcers.Clinicians in low and middle income countries such as Guyana can use the Simplified 60-Second Diabetic Screening Tool to facilitate early detection and appropriate treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Implementation of this screening tool has the potential to decrease diabetes related disability and mortality.

  13. Clinical and dosimetric evaluation of RapidArc versus standard sliding window IMRT in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet, Stephanie; Lambrecht, Maarten; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Nuyts, Sandra [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-08-29

    Several planning studies have already proven the substantial dosimetric advantages of RapidArc (RA) over standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared RapidArc and standard sliding window IMRT (swIMRT) in locally advanced head and neck cancer, looking both at dosimetrics as well as toxicity and outcome. CT datasets of 78 patients treated with swIMRT and 79 patients treated with RA were included. To compare the resulting dose distributions, the dose-volume parameters were evaluated for the planning target volumes (PTVs), clinical target volumes (CTVs), and organs at risk (OARs), and the number of MU were calculated. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0. PTV coverage with the 95 % isodose was slightly better for RA. Dose distribution has proven to be significantly more homogenous with RA and led to a reduction of 62 % in MU with better OAR sparing. As for toxicity, more grade 3 mucositis and dysphagia was observed for swIMRT, though we observed more grade 3 dermatitis for RA. In our retrospective analysis, RA had better target coverage and better sparing of the OAR. Overall, the grade of acute toxicity was lower for RA than for swIMRT for the same types of tumor locations, except for the grade of dermatitis. (orig.) [German] Mehrere Studien haben die dosimetrische Ueberlegenheit der RapidArc (RA) gegenueber der intensitaetsmodulierten Standard-Radiotherapie (IMRT) bereits gezeigt. In unserer Studie verglichen wir retrospektiv die RapidArc und die dynamische (''standard sliding window'') IMRT (swIMRT) bei lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen sowohl hinsichtlich dosimetrischer Daten als auchEffektivitaet und Toxizitaet. Die CT-Datenanalysen von 78 Patienten, die mit swIMRT behandelt wurden, und von 79 Patienten, welche RA erhalten hatten, wurden in die Studie aufgenommen. Um die darauf resultierenden applizierten Dosen vergleichen zu koennen, wurden die Dosis-Volumen-Parameter fuer

  14. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  15. A Measurement Feedback System (MFS) Is Necessary to Improve Mental Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickman, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The importance of measurement feedback system (MFS) for the improvement of mental health services for youths is discussed. As feedback obtained from clients and families is subject to distortions, a standardized MFS including clinical processes, contexts, outcomes, and feedback to clinicians and supervisors is necessary for improvement in quality…

  16. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  17. Driver feedback mobile APP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriguera Marti, F.; Miralles Miquel, E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper faces the human factor in driving and its consequences for road safety. It presents the concepts behind the development of a smartphone app capable of evaluating drivers’ performance. The app provides feedback to the driver in terms of a grade (between 0 and 10) depending on the aggressiveness and risks taken while driving. These are computed from the cumulative probability distribution function of the jerks (i.e. the time derivative of acceleration), which are measured using the smartphones’ accelerometer. Different driving contexts (e.g. urban, freeway, congestion, etc.) are identified applying cluster analysis to the measurements, and treated independently. Using regression analysis, the aggressiveness indicator is related to the drivers' safety records and to the probability of having an accident, through the standard DBQ - Driving Behavior Questionnaire. Results from a very limited pilot test show a strong correlation between the 99th percentile of the jerk measurements and the DBQ results. A linear model is fitted. This allows quantifying the safe driving behavior only from smartphone measurements. Finally, this indicator is translated into a normalized grade and feedback to the driver. This feedback will challenge the driver to train and to improve his performance. The phone will be blocked while driving and will incorporate mechanisms to prevent bad practices, like competition in aggressive driving. The app is intended to contribute to the improvement of road safety, one of the major public health problems, by tackling the human factor which is the trigger of the vast majority of traffic accidents. Making explicit and quantifying risky behaviors is the first step towards a safer driving. (Author)

  18. The use of real-time ultrasound feedback in teaching abdominal hollowing exercises to healthy subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, Sharon M; Westervelt, Karen C

    2005-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To determine if supplementing typical clinical instruction with real-time ultrasound feedback facilitates performance and retention of the abdominal hollowing exercise (AHE...

  19. Specific-detection of clinical samples, systematic functional investigations, and transcriptome analysis reveals that splice variant MUC4/Y contributes to the malignant progression of pancreatic cancer by triggering malignancy-related positive feedback loops signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tang, Jie; Liang, Wen-Biao; Zhu, Rong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Bin; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Li, Zheng; Gao, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Kui-Rong; Miao, Yi; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2014-11-04

    MUC4 plays important roles in the malignant progression of human pancreatic cancer. But the huge length of MUC4 gene fragment restricts its functional and mechanism research. As one of its splice variants, MUC4/Y with coding sequence is most similar to that of the full-length MUC4 (FL-MUC4), together with alternative splicing of the MUC4 transcript has been observed in pancreatic carcinomas but not in normal pancreas. So we speculated that MUC4/Y might be involved in malignant progression similarly to FL-MUC4, and as a research model of MUC4 in pancreatic cancer. The conjecture was confirmed in the present study. MUC4/Y expression was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using gene-specific probe in the clinic samples. The effects of MUC4/Y were observed by serial in vitro and in vivo experiments based on stable over-expressed cell model. The underlying mechanisms were investigated by sequence-based transcriptome analysis and verified by qRT-PCR, Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The detection of clinical samples indicates that MUC4/Y is significantly positive-correlated with tumor invasion and distant metastases. Based on stable forced-expressed pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell model, functional studies show that MUC4/Y enhances malignant activity in vitro and in vivo, including proliferation under low-nutritional-pressure, resistance to apoptosis, motility, invasiveness, angiogenesis, and distant metastasis. Mechanism studies indicate the novel finding that MUC4/Y triggers malignancy-related positive feedback loops for concomitantly up-regulating the expression of survival factors to resist adverse microenvironment and increasing the expression of an array of cytokines and adhesion molecules to affect the tumor milieu. In light of the enormity of the potential regulatory circuitry in cancer afforded by MUC4 and/or MUC4/Y, repressing MUC4 transcription, inhibiting post

  20. Biotic and Biogeochemical Feedbacks to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Harte, J.

    2002-12-01

    , observational, or modeling, can adequately capture the complex factors that govern species distributions over relevant spatial and temporal scales, careful integration of these methods can yield needed insights. The potential for large, rapid, or unexpected feedbacks of biogeochemistry and energy balance to climate change make this a worthwhile challenge.

  1. Medical Student Perceptions of Learner-Initiated Feedback Using a Mobile Web Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Robertson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Feedback, especially timely, specific, and actionable feedback, frequently does not occur. Efforts to better understand methods to improve the effectiveness of feedback are an important area of educational research. This study represents preliminary work as part of a plan to investigate the perceptions of a student-driven system to request feedback from faculty using a mobile device and Web-based application. We hypothesize that medical students will perceive learner-initiated, timely feedback to be an essential component of clinical education. Furthermore, we predict that students will recognize the use of a mobile device and Web application to be an advantageous and effective method when requesting feedback from supervising physicians. Focus group data from 18 students enrolled in a 4-week anesthesia clerkship revealed the following themes: (1 students often have to solicit feedback, (2 timely feedback is perceived as being advantageous, (3 feedback from faculty is perceived to be more effective, (4 requesting feedback from faculty physicians poses challenges, (5 the decision to request feedback may be influenced by the student’s clinical performance, and (6 using a mobile device and Web application may not guarantee timely feedback. Students perceived using a mobile Web-based application to initiate feedback from supervising physicians to be a valuable method of assessment. However, challenges and barriers were identified.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiviral treatment in the management of seasonal influenza A: point-of-care rapid test versus clinical judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nshimyumukiza, Léon; Douville, Xavier; Fournier, Diane; Duplantie, Julie; Daher, Rana K; Charlebois, Isabelle; Longtin, Jean; Papenburg, Jesse; Guay, Maryse; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G; Boudreau, Denis; Gagné, Christian; Rousseau, François; Reinharz, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    A point-of-care rapid test (POCRT) may help early and targeted use of antiviral drugs for the management of influenza A infection. (i) To determine whether antiviral treatment based on a POCRT for influenza A is cost-effective and, (ii) to determine the thresholds of key test parameters (sensitivity, specificity and cost) at which a POCRT based-strategy appears to be cost effective. An hybrid « susceptible, infected, recovered (SIR) » compartmental transmission and Markov decision analytic model was used to simulate the cost-effectiveness of antiviral treatment based on a POCRT for influenza A in the social perspective. Data input parameters used were retrieved from peer-review published studies and government databases. The outcome considered was the incremental cost per life-year saved for one seasonal influenza season. In the base-case analysis, the antiviral treatment based on POCRT saves 2 lives/100,000 person-years and costs $7600 less than the empirical antiviral treatment based on clinical judgment alone, which demonstrates that the POCRT-based strategy is dominant. In one and two way-sensitivity analyses, results were sensitive to the POCRT accuracy and cost, to the vaccination coverage as well as to the prevalence of influenza A. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the POCRT strategy is cost-effective in 66% of cases, for a commonly accepted threshold of $50,000 per life-year saved. The influenza antiviral treatment based on POCRT could be cost-effective in specific conditions of performance, price and disease prevalence. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Rightful Demise of the Sh*t Sandwich: Providing Effective Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ian Andrew

    2015-11-01

    As a trainee cognitive therapist in the early 1990s, I was taught the Sh*t Sandwich by my supervisor. I continued to use this technique for many years without seeing the need to extend my repertoire of feedback strategies. This article describes a number of other feedback techniques, raising awareness of the processes underpinning feedback, and facilitating reflection on feedback methods. This review examines feedback and the methods of feedback used to improve clinical competence. Evidence informs us that the use of good feedback has a significant effect on learners' outcomes (Milne, 2009). However, despite recognition of its importance, many supervisors fail to give adequate feedback and utilize methods that are sub-optimal. One such problematic method is the notorious "Sh*t Sandwich" (SS), which attempts to hide criticism within a cushion of two positive statements. This paper looks at various models of giving negative and positive feedback, suggesting that our repertoire of feedback methods may require expanding. The review suggests that feedback is a complex process and methods that place an emphasis on the learner as an active participant in the learning process (i.e. interactive approaches) should be encouraged. The paper suggests that negative feedback should generally be avoided in favour of constructive support, accompanied by specific, descriptive, balanced feedback, with new learning being consolidated by role play. Generally, feedback should be given about the task rather than the person, but when it is personalized it should relate to effort rather than ability.

  4. Haptic Feedback Compared with Visual Feedback for BCI

    OpenAIRE

    Kauhanen, L.; Palomäki, T; Jylänki, P.; Aloise, F; Nuttin, Marnix; Millán, José del R.

    2006-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). Here we compare visual and haptic feedback in a short experiment. By imagining left and right hand movements, six subjects tried to control a BCI with the help of either visual or haptic feedback every 1s. Alpha band EEG signals from C3 and C4 were classified. The classifier was updated after each prediction using correct class information. Thus feedback could be given throughout the experiment. Subjects g...

  5. Multisource feedback in professionalism for anesthesia residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Ricardo; Kimatian, Stephen; Castro, Pilar; Dhumak, Vipul; Honar, Hooman; Mascha, Edward J; Sessler, Daniel I

    2016-11-01

    To assess professionalism in anesthesiology residents, it is important to obtain evaluations from people with whom they interact on daily basis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a Multisource feedback (MSF) on resident's professional behavior and to assess the effect of faculty feedback on resident performance. This study was a two-group randomized clinical trial. Residents were recruited from Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital. Participants included twenty eight residents doing a two-month rotation in Pediatric Anesthesia. Multisource feedback questionnaires were developed and then validated using face and content validity. Residents were randomly assigned to a feedback group or a control group. Both groups received the MSF evaluation. Only the group assigned to feedback had a 'coaching meeting' every month creating strategies for improvement. MSF questionnaires were validated using a face validation and expert content validity. The effect of MSF on a professionalism questionnaire was assessed using analysis of covariance and linear mixed effects regression models. Observed test-retest agreement was greater than 0.90 for all items, with more than half of kappa statistics greater than 0.50. Cronbach's alpha was 0.71.The MSF increased the self-assessment score with an estimated effect of 0.21 (95% CI 0.06, 0.37), P=.015. There was no detected effect on patient family evaluation, with mean difference (CI) in change from baseline of 0.03 (-0.15, 0.21), P=.77, faculty evaluation, 0.21 (-0.02, 0.44), P=.08, or coworker evaluation 0.13 (-0.11, 0.37). Our new multi-source feedback questionnaire to assess professionalism had good reliability and internal consistency. Using our validated questionnaire we assessed the effect of a monthly feedback to improve professionalism in anesthesia residents. While we did see improvement in anesthesiology residents' self-assessment, we did not see a similar effect on patient family, faculty or coworker

  6. GIVING AND RECEIVING CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ірина Олійник

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article scrutinizes the notion of feedback applicable in classrooms where team teaching is provided. The experience of giving and receiving feedback has been a good practice in cooperation between a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer and a Ukrainian counterpart. Giving and receiving feedback is an effective means of classroom observation that provides better insight into the process of teaching a foreign language. The article discusses the stages of feedback and explicates the notion of sharing experience between two teachers working simultaneously in the same classroom. The guidelines for giving and receiving feedback have been provided as well as the most commonly used vocabulary items have been listed. It has been proved that mutual feedback leads to improving teaching methods and using various teaching styles and techniques.

  7. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  8. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart coaches, a growing group of product-service systems within the domain of persuasive technology. Despite decades of research on persuasive systems, challenges remain for designers of feedback systems...

  9. Evaluating the veterinary clinical teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, T.B.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Providing clinical teachers with student feedback is an important part of faculty development. The current literature provides a range of instruments developed to generate student rating feedback. However, these instruments often lack a theoretical framework and evidence concerning

  10. Phenotypic variation in bacteria : The role of feedback regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Wiep; Kuipers, O.P.; Veening, J.W.

    To survive in rapidly changing environmental conditions, bacteria have evolved a diverse set of regulatory pathways that govern various adaptive responses. Recent research has reinforced the notion that bacteria use feedback-based circuitry to generate population heterogeneity in natural situations.

  11. Seasonal contributions to climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, GPO Box 1289K, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2003-05-01

    Heading Abstract. This study addresses the question: how do the contributions to feedbacks in a climate model vary over the seasonal cycle? To answer this the feedbacks are evaluated from an equilibrium doubled CO{sub 2} experiment performed using the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) General Circulation Model. Monthly means of the top-of-atmosphere radiative perturbations (which together comprise the annual climate feedbacks) are extracted to produce a mean annual cycle. It is found that the radiative contributions to the total longwave (LW) feedback are fairly constant throughout the year. Those to the total shortwave (SW) feedback, on the other hand, vary by a factor of three, from a maximum in July to a minimum in November. Of the LW feedbacks, contributions to the lapse rate shows greatest seasonal variation, while those to water vapour and cloud feedbacks vary by relatively small amounts throughout the year. Contributions to the lapse rate feedback as a function of surface type and latitude reveal conflicting positive and negative radiative perturbations, which vary most strongly at high latitudes. Of the SW feedbacks, contributions to both albedo and cloud show large seasonal variations. Radiative perturbations contributing to albedo feedback vary in strength with snow and sea-ice retreat which occurs at different latitudes and in different months. They are shown to be highly sensitive to the amount of incident solar radiation in a given month. SW radiative perturbations due to cloud changes vary in sign between opposite seasons. Contributions to the seasonal variations of the cloud component feedbacks, which make up the total cloud feedback, are also examined. In the LW, the feedback is dominated by the total cloud water term. Radiative perturbations due to this component show relatively little variation throughout the year. In the SW, the main source of seasonal variation occurs for contributions to the cloud amount feedback: radiative

  12. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  13. Hvad siger forskningen om feedback?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så feedb...... feedbacken indledes med let fordøjeligt positiv feedback, derefter kommer den negative – og noget sværere fordøjelige – feedback, og til sidst afrundes feedbacken med en god udgangsreplik, nemlig den positive feedback.......”Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så...

  14. Feedback strategies for wireless communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Berna

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the different strategies regarding the feedback information for wireless communication systems. The text analyzes the impact of quantization and correlation of channel state information (CSI) on the system performance. The authors show the effect of the reduced and limited feedback information and gives an overview about the feedback strategies in the standards. This volume presents theoretical analysis as well as practical algorithms for the required feedback information at the base stations to perform adaptive resource allocation efficiently and mitigate interference coming from other cells.

  15. BLACK HOLE FORAGING: FEEDBACK DRIVES FEEDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnen, Walter; King, Andrew, E-mail: wd11@leicester.ac.uk, E-mail: ark@astro.le.ac.uk [Theoretical Astrophysics Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    We suggest a new picture of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in galaxy centers. Momentum-driven feedback from an accreting hole gives significant orbital energy, but little angular momentum to the surrounding gas. Once central accretion drops, the feedback weakens and swept-up gas falls back toward the SMBH on near-parabolic orbits. These intersect near the black hole with partially opposed specific angular momenta, causing further infall and ultimately the formation of a small-scale accretion disk. The feeding rates into the disk typically exceed Eddington by factors of a few, growing the hole on the Salpeter timescale and stimulating further feedback. Natural consequences of this picture include (1) the formation and maintenance of a roughly toroidal distribution of obscuring matter near the hole; (2) random orientations of successive accretion disk episodes; (3) the possibility of rapid SMBH growth; (4) tidal disruption of stars and close binaries formed from infalling gas, resulting in visible flares and ejection of hypervelocity stars; (5) super-solar abundances of the matter accreting on to the SMBH; and (6) a lower central dark-matter density, and hence annihilation signal, than adiabatic SMBH growth implies. We also suggest a simple subgrid recipe for implementing this process in numerical simulations.

  16. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M.; Kikutani, E. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  17. FEEDBACK AND LOGISTICS CONTROLLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehesne Berek Szilvia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The following things led to that the feedback, the supervision and improvement of the processes have become more pronounced: continuous rise in the importance of logistics; increase in complexity of its content; its activity becoming more complex. These activities are necessary for the optimum information supply. The intensification of market competition requires the corporations to possess exact and up-to-date information about their activities. Complexity of the logistics system presumes a parallel application of an effective feedback, supervision and management system simultaneously with the given logistics system. The indispensability of logistics is also proved by the fact that it can be found sporadically (in the form of logistics departments or in a complex way in case of each organization. The logistical approach means a huge support in the management since it contains the complexity, the handling as a unit in order to ensure a harmony of the different corporate departments and part activities. In addition to the professional application of a logistics system, there is an opportunity to coordinate the relations inside an organization as well as between the organizations and to handle them as a unit. The sine qua non of the success of logistical processes is a harmony of the devices applied. The controlling system is a device for feeding back the processes of a corporate system. By means of the checkpoints intercalated into the processes, the logistics controlling provides information for the leadership which contributes even more to the complex approach of logistics system. By dint of the logistics controlling, the monitoring and coordination of every logistical part activity become possible with the help of information supply ensured by the logistics controlling. The logistics controlling reviews, assesses and coordinates; these activities have an effect on the cost and income management. Its reason is to be searched in the built

  18. Feedback matters current feedback practices in the EFL classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reitbauer, Margit; Mercer, Sarah; Schumm-Fauster, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This varied collection of papers is concerned with feedback in the language learning context. With its blend of theoretical overviews, action research-based empirical studies and practical implications, this will be a valuable resource for all academics and practitioners concerned with generating feedback that matters.

  19. What higher education students do with teacher feedback: Feedback ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing pedagogy research has constantly maintained that feedback is 'an essential component of virtually every model of the writing process' (Hall, 1990: 43) as it motivates writers to improve their next draft. Feedback during the writing process improves not only student attitude to writing but writing performance if students ...

  20. Effective feedback strategies for teaching in pediatric and adolescent gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Paritosh; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-08-01

    The clinical setting of pediatric and adolescent gynecology poses complex tasks for the physician with its numerous procedures and the communication demands of interacting with an adolescent and/or guardian. Needless to say, teaching within this setting is highly demanding. Regardless of the level of learner or the professional role (e.g., nurse, medical student, resident, physician assistant) represented, clinical teaching requires that the instructor provide feedback in ways that benefit the student. Recent research on feedback suggests a more complex understanding of feedback than in the past. This article highlights key research and its implication for effective feedback by presenting a three part framework; know your learner, understand what is to be learned, and plan for improvement. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feedback in formative OSCEs: comparison between direct observation and video-based formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noëlle Junod Perron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland, have the opportunity to practice clinical skills with simulated patients during formative sessions in preparation for clerkships. These sessions are given in two formats: 1 direct observation of an encounter followed by verbal feedback (direct feedback and 2 subsequent review of the videotaped encounter by both student and supervisor (video-based feedback. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether content and process of feedback differed between both formats. Methods: In 2013, all second- and third-year medical students and clinical supervisors involved in formative sessions were asked to take part in the study. A sample of audiotaped feedback sessions involving supervisors who gave feedback in both formats were analyzed (content and process of the feedback using a 21-item feedback scale. Results: Forty-eight audiotaped feedback sessions involving 12 supervisors were analyzed (2 direct and 2 video-based sessions per supervisor. When adjusted for the length of feedback, there were significant differences in terms of content and process between both formats; the number of communication skills and clinical reasoning items addressed were higher in the video-based format (11.29 vs. 7.71, p=0.002 and 3.71 vs. 2.04, p=0.010, respectively. Supervisors engaged students more actively during the video-based sessions than during direct feedback sessions (self-assessment: 4.00 vs. 3.17, p=0.007; active problem-solving: 3.92 vs. 3.42, p=0.009. Students made similar observations and tended to consider that the video feedback was more useful for improving some clinical skills. Conclusion: Video-based feedback facilitates discussion of clinical reasoning, communication, and professionalism issues while at the same time actively engaging students. Different time and conceptual frameworks may explain observed differences. The choice of feedback format should depend on

  2. Students' satisfaction with general practitioners' feedback to their reflective writing: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Alexander; Steiner, Claudia; Grossman, Paul; Langewitz, Wolf; Tschudi, Peter; Kiessling, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Reflective Writing (RW) is increasingly being implemented in medical education. Feedback to students' reflective writing (RW) is essential, but resources for individualized feedback often lack. We aimed to determine whether general practitioners (GPs) teaching students clinical skills could also provide feedback to RW and whether an instruction letter specific to RW feedback increases students' satisfaction. GPs were randomized to the two study arms using block randomization. GPs in both groups received an instruction letter on giving students feedback on clinical skills. Additionally, intervention group GPs received specific instructions on providing feedback to students' RW. Students completed satisfaction questionnaires on feedback received on clinical skills and RW. T-tests were employed for all statistical analysis to compare groups. Eighty-three out of 134 physicians participated: 38 were randomized to the control, 45 to the intervention group. Students were very satisfied with the feedback on RW and clinical skills regardless of tutors' group allocation. A specific instruction letter had no additional effect on students' satisfaction. Based on student satisfaction, GPs who give students feedback on clinical skills are also well suited to provide feedback on RW. This approach can facilitate the introduction of mandatory RW into the regular medical curriculum.

  3. Seasonal performance of a malaria rapid diagnosis test at community health clinics in a malaria-hyperendemic region of Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Diarra Amidou; Nébié Issa; Tiono Alfred; Sanon Souleymane; Soulama Issiaka; Ouédraogo Alphonse; Gansané Adama; Yaro Jean B; Ouédraogo Espérance; Traoré Alfred S; Sirima Sodiomon B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Backgound Treatment of confirmed malaria patients with Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) at remote areas is the goal of many anti-malaria programs. Introduction of effective and affordable malaria Rapid Diagnosis Test (RDT) in remote areas could be an alternative tool for malaria case management. This study aimed to assess performance of the OptiMAL dipstick for rapid malaria diagnosis in children under five. Methods Malaria symptomatic and asymptomatic children were recrui...

  4. Effects of Pterygomaxillary Separation on Skeletal and Dental Changes After Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion: A Single-Center, Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro-Bezerra, Marcelo; Tavares, Rodrygo Nunes; de Medeiros, José Rômulo; Nogueira, Alexandre Simões; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Studart Soares, Eduardo Costa

    2017-08-31

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is a procedure routinely performed to correct transverse maxillary deformities and can be performed with or without pterygomaxillary disjunction (PD). The aim of the present study was to measure the effect of the amount of expansion and stability of SARME with or without PD. We designed and implemented a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. The patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: group 1, SARME without PD; and group 2, SARME with PD. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were performed at 3 points: baseline (T0), after maxillary expansion (T1), and at the end of the retention period (T2). Dental and bone expansion and dental inclination at the maxillary canine and first molar regions were assessed. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate the differences between the 2 groups at the 3 evaluation periods (T0, T1, and T2), using a level of significance of P patients underwent maxillary surgical expansion (group 1, n = 12; and group 2, n = 12). Both techniques promoted a significant transverse dental expansion in the first molar at T2 (with PD, 5.4 mm; vs without PD, 6.4 mm; change, -6.18 mm to 1.48 mm). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. The tipping molars at T2 remained at a higher level in the SARME, no PD group than in the SARME, PD group (with PD, 2.3°; vs no PD, 4.6° for 3 teeth; change, -12.72° to 5.57°; and with PD, 1.6° vs without PD, 3.6° for 14 teeth; change, -9.96° to 9.83°). SARME with and without PD is a reliable method for obtaining maxillary expansion, with slight differences in the patterns of skeletal and dental alterations. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of an Abbreviated Cardiac Enzyme Protocol to Aid Rapid Discharge of Patients with Cocaine-associated Chest Pain in the Clinical Decision Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem W. Guirgis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2007 there were 64,000 visits to the emergency department (ED for possible myocardial infarction (MI related to cocaine use. Prior studies have demonstrated that low- to intermediate-risk patients with cocaine-associated chest pain can be safely discharged after 9-12 hours of observation. The goal of this study was to determine the safety of an 8-hour protocol for ruling out MI in patients who presented with cocaine-associated chest pain. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of patients treated with an 8-hour cocaine chest pain protocol between May 1, 2011 and November 30, 2012 who were sent to the clinical decision unit (CDU for observation. The protocol included serial cardiac biomarker testing with Troponin-T, CK-MB (including delta CK-MB, and total CK at 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after presentation with cardiac monitoring for the observation period. Patients were followed up for adverse cardiac events or death within 30 days of discharge. Results: There were 111 admissions to the CDU for cocaine chest pain during the study period. One patient had a delta CK-MB of 1.6 ng/ml, but had negative Troponin-T at all time points. No patient had a positive Troponin-T or CK-MB at 0, 2, 4 or 8 hours, and there were no MIs or deaths within 30 days of discharge. Most patients were discharged home (103 and there were 8 inpatient admissions from the CDU. Of the admitted patients, 2 had additional stress tests that were negative, 1 had additional cardiac biomarkers that were negative, and all 8 patients were discharged home. The estimated risk of missing MI using our protocol is, with 99% confidence, less than 5.1% and with 95% confidence, less than 3.6% (99% CI, 0-5.1%; 95% CI, 0-3.6%. Conclusion: Application of an abbreviated cardiac enzyme protocol resulted in the safe and rapid discharge of patients presenting to the ED with cocaine-associated chest pain. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:180–183.

  6. Debriefing and Feedback in the Current Healthcare Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, simulation-based learning and postsimulation debriefing have become a mainstay of clinical education in healthcare. With origins in both the military and aviation industries, debriefing in particular has been used across multiple nursing and medicine disciplines to promote team training and reflective learning. Self-reflection and improvement in practice are at the core of effective debriefing. Feedback and simulation experts have continued to develop more effective debriefing strategies. Several models are described in the literature, and healthcare educators now have a variety of resources at their disposal. Many of these debriefing techniques offer thoughtful guidance for providing constructive, real-time clinical feedback to students. Incorporating reflective feedback strategies in clinical learning promotes meaningful learning. This, in turn, will only strengthen the capabilities of students and better prepare them for the complexities they will face in clinical practice.

  7. Feedback on household electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    consumption, we evaluate the effects of giving households detailed feedback about their electricity consumption on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. Twenty Danish households participated in the study over a 5-month period. A new feedback system was developed in a user-involved innovation process...

  8. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  9. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Linda Keuvelaar - van den Bergh

    2013-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to enhance student learning. In 2006, the Dutch Inspectorate of Education concluded from classroom observations that it is difficult for Dutch teachers to give their students good feedback in order to stimulate students' learning process

  10. Videoer om feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Nexø

    2017-01-01

    I denne video bliver du introduceret til en måde at praktisere og rammesætte klyngevejledning på i bachelorundervisning. Klyngefeedbackformen til de studerende er valgt, da de studerende lærer meget af både at give og om modtage feedback fra medstuderende. Fokus på feedback ligger derfor primært i...

  11. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  12. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    . The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner takes-all tournament. We find that the principal should not provide any information on relative  performance, regardless of the pay scheme used, since feedback does not improve performance. Indeed, we do not find evidence of positive peer...... effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback about relative performance...

  13. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  14. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  15. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  16. Understanding feedback: A learning theory perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review’s scope also includes feedback in class- rooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory

  17. Self-controlled concurrent feedback and the education of attention towards perceptual invariants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Michaël; Camachon, Cyril; Fernandez, Laure; Jacobs, David M; Montagne, Gilles

    2009-08-01

    The present study investigates the effects of different types of concurrent feedback on the acquisition of perceptual-motor skills. Twenty participants walked through virtual corridors in which rhythmically opening and closing sliding doors were placed. The participants aimed to adjust their walking speed so as to cross the doors when the doors were close to their maximal aperture width. The highest level of performance was achieved by learners who practiced the task with unambiguous self-controlled concurrent feedback, which is to say, by learners who could request that feedback at wish. Practice with imposed rather than self-controlled feedback and practice without concurrent feedback were shown to be less effective. Finally, the way in which the self-controlled concurrent feedback was presented was also found to be of paramount importance; if the feedback is ambiguous, it may even prevent participants from learning the task. Clearly, unambiguous self-controlled feedback can give rise to higher levels of performance than other feedback conditions (compared to imposed schedule) but, depending on the way it is presented, the feedback can also prevent the participants from learning the task. In the discussion it is argued that unambiguous self-controlled concurrent feedback allows learners to more rapidly educate their attention towards more useful perceptual invariants and to calibrate the relation between perceptual invariants and action parameters.

  18. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  19. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  20. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  1. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  2. Progress monitoring and feedback in psychiatric care reduces depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Elizabeth A; Hooke, Geoff R; Page, Andrew C

    2010-12-01

    To date, the monitoring of patient progress using standardized assessments has been neglected in hospital-based psychiatric care. Findings in outpatient psychotherapy have demonstrated clinically significant benefits for providing feedback to the sizeable minority of patients who were otherwise unlikely to experience positive outcome (Lambert, 2007). However, a similar system for presenting feedback on patient progress has not yet been assessed for group therapy within psychiatric inpatient settings. The current study aimed to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a feedback system suitable for use in psychiatric services. In a nonrandomized trial, 1308 consecutive inpatients and day patients, whose diagnoses were primarily depressive and anxiety disorders, completed the World Health Organization's Wellbeing Index (WHO-5) routinely during a ten-day cognitive behavioral therapy group. The first cohort (n=461) received treatment as usual. The second cohort (n=439) completed monitoring measures without feedback, and for patients in the third cohort (n=408), feedback on progress was provided to both clinicians and patients midway through the treatment period. Feedback was effective in reducing depressive symptoms (F(1,649)=6.29, p.05). The current findings may be generalized to patient samples that exhibit largely depressive disorders, however rigorous follow-up is warranted. Similar to outpatient settings, feedback appears to be beneficial for improving symptom outcomes but further time may be required for wellbeing to be affected. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Relational interaction in occupational therapy: Conversation analysis of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiste, Elina

    2018-01-01

    The therapeutic relationship is an important factor for good therapy outcomes. The primary mediator of a beneficial therapy relationship is clinician-client interaction. However, few studies identify the observable interactional attributes of good quality relational interactions, e.g. offering the client positive feedback. The present paper aims to expand current understanding of relational interaction by analyzing the real-time interactional practices therapists use for offering positive feedback, an important value in occupational therapy. The analysis is based on the conversation analysis of 15 video-recorded occupational therapy encounters in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Two types of positive feedback were identified. In aligning feedback, therapists encouraged and complimented clients' positive perspectives on their own achievements in adopting certain behaviour, encouraging and supporting their progress. In redirecting feedback, therapists shifted the perspective from clients' negative experiences to their positive experiences. This shift was interactionally successful if they laid the foundation for the shift in perspective and attuned their expressions to the clients' emotional states. Occupational therapists routinely provide their clients with positive feedback. Awareness of the interactional attributes related to positive feedback is critically important for successful relational interaction.

  4. Optimal allocation of reviewers for peer feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak; Jørgensen, Rasmus Malthe

    2017-01-01

    feedback. In this paper we present a novel way to intelligently allocate reviewers for peer feedback. We train a statistical model to infer the quality of feedback based on a dataset of feedback quality evaluations. This dataset contains more than 20,000 reviews where the receiver of the feedback has......Peer feedback is the act of letting students give feedback to each other on submitted work. There are multiple reasons to use peer feedback, including students getting more feedback, time saving for teachers and increased learning by letting students reflect on work by others. In order for peer...... indicated the quality of the feedback. Using this model together with historical data we calculate the feedback-giving skill of each student and uses that as input to an allocation algorithm that assigns submissions to reviewers, in order to optimize the feedback quality for all students. We test...

  5. Building a rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Lisa; Garolis, Salomeja; Wallace-Scroggs, Allyson; Stenstrom, Judy; Maunder, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The use of rapid response teams is a relatively new approach for decreasing or eliminating codes in acute care hospitals. Based on the principles of a code team for cardiac and/or respiratory arrest in non-critical care units, the rapid response teams have specially trained nursing, respiratory, and medical personnel to respond to calls from general care units to assess and manage decompensating or rapidly changing patients before their conditions escalate to a full code situation. This article describes the processes used to develop a rapid response team, clinical indicators for triggering a rapid response team call, topics addressed in an educational program for the rapid response team members, and methods for evaluating effectiveness of the rapid response team.

  6. Effectiveness of patient feedback as an educational intervention to improve medical student consultation (PTA Feedback Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Michelle Mei Yee; Roberts, Noel; Martin, Jenepher

    2014-09-17

    Oral feedback from clinical educators is the traditional teaching method for improving clinical consultation skills in medical students. New approaches are needed to enhance this teaching model. Multisource feedback is a commonly used assessment method for learning among practising clinicians, but this assessment has not been explored rigorously in medical student education. This study seeks to evaluate if additional feedback on patient satisfaction improves medical student performance. The Patient Teaching Associate (PTA) Feedback Study is a single site randomized controlled, double-blinded trial with two parallel groups.An after-hours general practitioner clinic in Victoria, Australia, is adapted as a teaching clinic during the day. Medical students from two universities in their first clinical year participate in six simulated clinical consultations with ambulatory patient volunteers living with chronic illness. Eligible students will be randomized in equal proportions to receive patient satisfaction score feedback with the usual multisource feedback and the usual multisource feedback alone as control. Block randomization will be performed. We will assess patient satisfaction and consultation performance outcomes at baseline and after one semester and will compare any change in mean scores at the last session from that at baseline. We will model data using regression analysis to determine any differences between intervention and control groups. Full ethical approval has been obtained for the study. This trial will comply with CONSORT guidelines and we will disseminate data at conferences and in peer-reviewed journals. This is the first proposed trial to determine whether consumer feedback enhances the use of multisource feedback in medical student education, and to assess the value of multisource feedback in teaching and learning about the management of ambulatory patients living with chronic conditions. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR

  7. On tropospheric adjustment to forcing and climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R.A.; McAvaney, B.J. [Bureau of Meteorology, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, GPO Box 1289, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    Motivated by findings that major components of so-called cloud 'feedbacks' are best understood as rapid responses to CO{sub 2} forcing (Gregory and Webb in J Clim 21:58-71, 2008), the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative effects from forcing, and the subsequent responses to global surface temperature changes from all 'atmospheric feedbacks' (water vapour, lapse rate, surface albedo, 'surface temperature' and cloud) are examined in detail in a General Circulation Model. Two approaches are used: applying regressions to experiments as they approach equilibrium, and equilibrium experiments forced separately by CO{sub 2} and patterned sea surface temperature perturbations alone. Results are analysed using the partial radiative perturbation ('PRP') technique. In common with Gregory and Webb (J Clim 21:58-71, 2008) a strong positive addition to 'forcing' is found in the short wave (SW) from clouds. There is little evidence, however, of significant global scale rapid responses from long wave (LW) cloud, nor from surface albedo, SW water vapour or 'surface temperature'. These responses may be well understood to first order as classical 'feedbacks' - i.e. as a function of global mean temperature alone and linearly related to it. Linear regression provides some evidence of a small rapid negative response in the LW from water vapour, related largely to decreased relative humidity (RH), but the response here, too, is dwarfed by subsequent response to warming. The large rapid SW cloud response is related to cloud fraction changes - and not optical properties - resulting from small cloud decreases ranging from the tropical mid troposphere to the mid latitude lower troposphere, in turn associated with decreased lower tropospheric RH. These regions correspond with levels of enhanced heating rates and increased temperatures from the CO{sub 2} increase. The pattern of SW cloud fraction response to SST changes differs

  8. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  9. 'Playing the game': How do surgical trainees seek feedback using workplace-based assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Anne; Patel, Abhilasha; Rusius, Victoria; Royle, T James; Markham, Deborah H; Pawlikowska, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Although trainees and trainers find feedback interactions beneficial, difficulties in giving and receiving feedback are reported. Few studies have explored what drives trainees to seek feedback. This study explores how workplace-based assessments (WBAs) influence the ways surgical trainees seek feedback and feedback interactions. Utilising a template analysis approach, we conducted 10 focus groups with 42 surgical trainees from four regions across the UK. Data were independently coded by three researchers, incorporating three a priori themes identified from a previous quantitative study. Further themes emerged from exploration of these data. The final template, agreed by the three researchers, was applied to all focus group transcripts. The themes were linked in a diagrammatical form to allow critical exploration of the data. Trainees' perceptions of the purpose of WBA for learning or an assessment of learning, and their relationship with their trainer impacted upon how trainees chose to use WBA. Perceiving WBA as a test led trainees to 'play the game': seek positive and avoid negative feedback through WBA. Perceiving WBA as a chance to learn led trainees to seek negative feedback. Some trainees sought negative feedback outside WBA. Negative feedback was more important for changing practice compared with positive feedback, which enabled trainees to 'look good' but had less of an effect on changing clinical practice. The timing of feedback relative to WBA was also important, with immediate feedback being more beneficial for learning; however, delayed feedback was still sought using WBA. Trainees' perceptions of the purpose of WBA and their relationship with their trainer informed when they chose to seek feedback. Trainees who perceived WBA as a test were led to 'play the game' by seeking positive and avoiding negative feedback. Outside of WBA, trainees sought negative feedback, which was most important for change in practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The

  10. Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in primary care. The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family practice. Methods Research subject group: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England. Design: Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Interventions: Practices will be randomised to either: (i Computer-generated feedback; or (ii Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support. Primary outcome measures: The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention: - with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers - aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. Secondary outcome measures; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management. Economic analysis: An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS, comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback. Qualitative analysis: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove

  11. Full Static Output Feedback Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle G. Yannakoudakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a constructive solution to the problem of full output feedback equivalence, of linear, minimal, time-invariant systems. The equivalence relation on the set of systems is transformed to another on the set of invertible block Bezout/Hankel matrices using the isotropy subgroups of the full state feedback group and the full output injection group. The transformation achieving equivalence is calculated solving linear systems of equations. We give a polynomial version of the results proving that two systems are full output feedback equivalent, if and only if they have the same family of generalized Bezoutians. We present a new set of output feedback invariant polynomials that generalize the breakaway polynomial of scalar systems.

  12. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  13. NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2017 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  14. Student perceptions of assessment and feedback in longitudinal integrated clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Joanna; Konkin, Jill; Suddards, Carol; Dobson, Sarah; Pratt, Dan

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate how the learning environment and the student-preceptor relationship influence student experiences of being assessed and receiving feedback on performance. Thus, we examined how long-term clinical clerkship placements influence students' experiences of and views about assessment and feedback. We took a constructivist grounded approach, using authentic assessment and communities of practice as sensitising concepts. We recruited and interviewed 13 students studying in longitudinal integrated clerkships across two medical schools and six settings, using a semi-structured interview framework. We used an iterative coding process to code the data and arrive at a coding framework and themes. Students valued the unstructured assessment and informal feedback that arose from clinical supervision, and the sense of progress derived from their increasing responsibility for patients and acceptance into the health care community. Three themes emerged from the data. Firstly, students characterised their assessment and feedback as integrated, developmental and longitudinal. They reported authenticity in the monitoring and feedback that arose from the day-to-day delivery of patient care with their preceptors. Secondly, students described supportive and caring relationships and a sense of safety. These enabled them to reflect on their strengths and weaknesses and to interpret critical feedback as supportive. Students developed similar relationships across the health care team. Thirdly, the long-term placement provided for multiple indicators of progress for students. Patient outcomes were perceived as representing direct feedback about students' development as doctors. Taking increasing responsibility for patients over time is an indicator to students of their increasing competence and contributes to the developing of a doctor identity. Clerkship students studying for extended periods in one environment with one preceptor perceive assessment and

  15. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  16. Mass production of individual feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, David

    2006-01-01

    Learning to program is intrinsically difficult. In addition there is a trend towards increased student diversity and larger class sizes. Student diversity increases the need for individual attention for each student, while increased class sizes decreases the amount of time a lecturer has to provide this attention. This thesis investigates an approach to help provide each student with detailed individual feedback. This feedback is important where individual attention is lacking. We used tw...

  17. Recognition of boundary feedback systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A system that has been the object of intense research is outlined. In view of that and recent progress of the theory of pseudodifferential boundary operator calculus, the author describes some features that could prove to be interesting in connection with the problems of boundary feedback...... stabilizability. It is shown that it is possible to use the calculus to consider more general feedback systems in a variational setup....

  18. Application of real time polymerase chain reaction targeting kex 1 gene & its comparison with the conventional methods for rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Revathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: As there are no standard laboratory techniques for the rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in India, this study was undertaken to evaluate and establish an optimal and rapid technique for the detection of P. jirovecii by comparing three different techniques - staining technique, application of a real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR targeting kex 1 gene and application of nested PCR targeting mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU gene for rapid detection of P. jirovecii in HIV positive patients. Methods: One hundred and fifty sputum specimens from HIV positive (n = 75 and HIV negative (n = 75 patients were subjected to three different techniques -KOH/Calcoflour and Grocott methanamine silver staining (GMS, RT-PCR targeting kex1 gene, PCR targeting mtLSU region followed by DNA sequencing and BLAST analysis. Results: Among the 75 HIV positive patients, P. jirovecii was detected in 19 (25.33% patients by the staining techniques, and in 23 (30.65% patients each by PCR targeting mtLSU region and by RT- PCR targeting kex1 gene of P. jirovecii. PCR based DNA sequencing targeting mtLSU region revealed 97-100 per cent sequence homology with P. jirovecii sequences in GenBank. Interpretation & conclusions: Of the three techniques for detection of P. jirovecii evaluated in this study, false negativity was found to be more in staining technique and it also required high technical expertise to interpret the result. Both nested PCR and RT-PCR were reliable and equally sensitive, in rapid detection of P. jirovecii, but RT-PCR technique also generated the copy numbers for knowing the severity of infection.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Rapid Diagnostic Test Kit Using the Polysaccharide as a Genus-Specific Diagnostic Antigen for Leptospirosis in Korea, Bulgaria, and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Park, Sungman; Kim, Seung Han; Christova, Iva; Jacob, Paulina; Vanasco, Norma B; Kang, Yeon-Mi; Woo, Ye-Ju; Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Young-Jin; Cho, Min-Kee; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease that is caused by many serovars which are more than 200 in the world, is an emerging worldwide disease. Accurate and rapid diagnostic tests for leptospirosis are a critical step to diagnose the disease. There are some commercial kits available for diagnosis of leptospirosis, but the obscurity of a species- or genus-specific antigen of pathogenic Leptospira interrogans causes the reduced sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the polysaccharide derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc was prepared, and the antigenicity was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit using the polysaccharide as a diagnostic antigen was evaluated in Korea, Bulgaria and Argentina. The sensitivity was 93.9%, 100%, and 81.0% and the specificity was 97.9%, 100%, and 95.4% in Korea (which is a rare region occurring with 2 serovars mostly), Bulgaria (epidemic region with 3 serovars chiefly) and Argentina (endemic region with 19 serovars mainly) respectively. These results indicate that this RDT is applicable for global diagnosis of leptospirosis. This rapid and effective diagnosis will be helpful for diagnosis and manage of leptospirosis to use and the polysaccharide of Leptospira may be called as genus specific antigen for diagnosis.

  20. Survey of Digital Feedback Systems in High Current Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2003-06-06

    In the last decade demand for brightness in synchrotron light sources and luminosity in circular colliders led to construction of multiple high current storage rings. Many of these new machines require feedback systems to achieve design stored beam currents. In the same time frame the rapid advances in the technology of digital signal processing allowed the implementation of these complex feedback systems. In this paper I concentrate on three applications of feedback to storage rings: orbit control in light sources, coupled-bunch instability control, and low-level RF control. Each of these applications is challenging in areas of processing bandwidth, algorithm complexity, and control of time-varying beam and system dynamics. I will review existing implementations as well as comment on promising future directions.

  1. Understanding responses to feedback: the potential and limitations of regulatory focus theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; Driessen, Erik; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Vanstone, Meredith; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory posits the existence of two systems of self-regulation underlying human motivation: promotion focus, which is concerned with aspirations and accomplishments, and prevention focus, which is concerned with obligations and responsibilities. It has been proposed that regulatory focus theory may help to explain learners' variable responses to feedback, predicting that positive feedback is motivating under promotion focus, whereas negative feedback is motivating under prevention focus. We aimed to explore this link between regulatory focus theory and response to feedback using data collected in a naturalistic setting. In a constructivist grounded theory study, we interviewed 22 early-career academic doctors about experiences they perceived as influential in their learning. Although feedback emerged as important, responses to feedback were highly variable. To better understand how feedback becomes (or fails to become) influential, we used the theoretical framework of regulatory focus to re-examine all descriptions of experiences of receiving and responding to feedback. Feedback could be influential or non-influential, regardless of its sign (positive or negative). In circumstances in which the individual's regulatory focus was readily determined, such as in choosing a career (promotion) or preparing for a high-stakes examination (prevention), the apparent influence of feedback was consistent with the prediction of regulatory focus theory. However, we encountered many challenges in applying regulatory focus theory to real feedback scenarios, including the frequent presence of a mixed regulatory focus, the potential for regulatory focus to change over time, and the competing influences of other factors, such as the perceived credibility of the source or content of the feedback. Regulatory focus theory offers a useful, if limited, construct for exploring learners' responses to feedback in the clinical setting. The insights and predictions it offers

  2. Patient and Partner Feedback Reports to Improve Statin Medication Adherence: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok; Huseman, Tiffany L; Canamucio, Anne; Marcus, Steven C; Asch, David A; Volpp, Kevin; Long, Judith A

    2017-03-01

    Simple nudges such as reminders and feedback reports to either a patient or a partner may facilitate improved medication adherence. To test the impact of a pill bottle used to monitor adherence, deliver a daily alarm, and generate weekly medication adherence feedback reports on statin adherence. Three-month, three-arm randomized clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02480530). One hundred and twenty-six veterans with known coronary artery disease and poor adherence (medication possession ratio medication adherence feedback report; and (3) a partner feedback group (n = 54) that received an alarm and a weekly feedback report that was shared with a friend, family member, or a peer. The intervention continued for 3 months, and participants were followed for an additional 3 months after the intervention period. Adherence as measured by pill bottle. Secondary outcomes included change in LDL (mg/dl), patient activation, and social support. During the 3-month intervention period, medication adherence was higher in both feedback arms than in the control arm (individual feedback group 89 %, partner feedback group 86 %, control group 67 %; p medication adherence between either of the feedback groups and the control (individual feedback 60 %, partner feedback 52 %, control group 54 %; p = 0.75 and 0.97). Daily alarms combined with individual or partner feedback reports improved statin medication adherence. While neither an individual feedback nor partner feedback strategy created a sustainable medication adherence habit, the intervention itself is relatively easy to implement and low cost.

  3. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  4. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  5. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    . Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  6. Feedback Revolution: What Gets in the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback in writing has in recent years attracted the attention of an increasing number of writing researchers. While much feedback research focuses on the act of feedback per se, little attention has been paid to the issue of teacher readiness to implement change in feedback. Using data gathered from Hong Kong secondary teachers attending a…

  7. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  8. Sustainable feedback: students’ and tutors’ perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Feedback has been shown to substantially influence students’ learning. However, not everything characterized as feedback is effective. Sustainable feedback places students in an active role in which they generate and use feedback from peers, self or others and aims at developing lifelong learning

  9. Functional imaging of cortical feedback projections to the olfactory bulb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eRothermel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Processing of sensory information is substantially shaped by centrifugal, or feedback, projections from higher cortical areas, yet the functional properties of these projections are poorly characterized. Here, we used genetically-encoded calcium sensors (GCaMPs to functionally image activation of centrifugal projections targeting the olfactory bulb (OB. The OB receives massive centrifugal input from cortical areas but there has been as yet no characterization of their activity in vivo. We focused on projections to the OB from the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON, a major source of cortical feedback to the OB. We expressed GCaMP selectively in AON projection neurons using a mouse line expressing Cre recombinase (Cre in these neurons and Cre-dependent viral vectors injected into AON, allowing us to image GCaMP fluorescence signals from their axon terminals in the OB. Electrical stimulation of AON evoked large fluorescence signals that could be imaged from the dorsal OB surface in vivo. Surprisingly, odorants also evoked large signals that were transient and coupled to odorant inhalation both in the anesthetized and awake mouse, suggesting that feedback from AON to the OB is rapid and robust across different brain states. The strength of AON feedback signals increased during wakefulness, suggesting a state-dependent modulation of cortical feedback to the OB. Two-photon GCaMP imaging revealed that different odorants activated different subsets of centrifugal AON axons and could elicit both excitation and suppression in different axons, indicating a surprising richness in the representation of odor information by cortical feedback to the OB. Finally, we found that activating neuromodulatory centers such as basal forebrain drove AON inputs to the OB independent of odorant stimulation. Our results point to the AON as a multifunctional cortical area that provides ongoing feedback to the OB and also serves as a descending relay for other neuromodul