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Sample records for rapid b-cell recovery

  1. B-cell recovery after stem cell transplantation of Artemis-deficient SCID requires elimination of autologous bone marrow precursor-B-cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, M. van der; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; Brons, P.P.T.; Barendregt, B.H.; Tol, M. van; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Dongen, J.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) are commonly fatal early in life. Adequate diagnosis and rapid institution of treatment, such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), is essential. Several studies demonstrated that reconstitution of B-cell function after SCT is better in B-positive

  2. B-Cell Depletion Salvage Therapy in Rapidly Progressive Dermatomyositis Related Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Khaled; Palomino, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Glucocorticoids are the initial standard treatment. However, many patients fail to respond and continue to progress despite treatment with high dose glucocorticoids. The efficacy of rituximab has been suggested in case reports and case series of refractory antisynthetase (AS) syndrome, but data on patients without auto-antibodies or with rapidly progressive ILD are scarce. We report a case of rapidly progressive dermatomyositis (DM) associated ILD treated successfully with B-cell depletion therapy.

  3. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 is necessary for normal B cell development and recovery of lymphoid progenitors after chemotherapeutic challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Gerstein, Rachel M.; Linehan, Erin K.; Cloherty, Erin K.; Evan-Browning, Eric; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Schrader, Carol E.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development involves rapid cellular proliferation, gene rearrangements, selection, and differentiation, and it provides a powerful model to study DNA repair processes in vivo. Analysis of the contribution of the base excision repair pathway in lymphocyte development has been lacking primarily

  4. The kinetics of early T and B cell immune recovery after bone marrow transplantation in RAG-2-deficient SCID patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atar Lev

    Full Text Available The kinetics of T and B cell immune recovery after bone marrow transplantation (BMT is affected by many pre- and post-transplant factors. Because of the profoundly depleted baseline T and B cell immunity in recombination activating gene 2 (RAG-2-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID patients, some of these factors are eliminated, and the immune recovery after BMT can then be clearly assessed. This process was followed in ten SCID patients in parallel to their associated transplant-related complications. Early peripheral presence of T and B cells was observed in 8 and 4 patients, respectively. The latter correlated with pre-transplant conditioning therapy. Cells from these patients carried mainly signal joint DNA episomes, indicative of newly derived B and T cells. They were present before the normalization of the T cell receptor (TCR and the B cell receptor (BCR repertoire. Early presentation of the ordered TCR gene rearrangements after BMT occurred simultaneously, but this pattern was heterogeneous over time, suggesting different and individual thymic recovery processes. Our findings early after transplant could suggest the long-term patients' clinical outcome. Early peripheral presence of newly produced B and T lymphocytes from their production and maturation sites after BMT suggests donor stem cell origin rather than peripheral expansion, and is indicative of successful outcome. Peripheral detection of TCR excision circles and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles in RAG-2-deficient SCID post-BMT are early markers of T and B cell reconstitution, and can be used to monitor outcome and tailor specific therapy for patients undergoing BMT.

  5. Rapid Recovery of Damaged Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Holly P.; Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent reports on the state of the global environment provide evidence that humankind is inflicting great damage to the very ecosystems that support human livelihoods. The reports further predict that ecosystems will take centuries to recover from damages if they recover at all. Accordingly, there is despair that we are passing on a legacy of irreparable damage to future generations which is entirely inconsistent with principles of sustainability. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the prediction of irreparable harm using a synthesis of recovery times compiled from 240 independent studies reported in the scientific literature. We provide startling evidence that most ecosystems globally can, given human will, recover from very major perturbations on timescales of decades to half-centuries. Significance/Conclusions Accordingly, we find much hope that humankind can transition to more sustainable use of ecosystems. PMID:19471645

  6. Early recovery of circulating immature B cells in B-lymphoblastic leukemia patients after CD19 targeted CAR T cell therapy: A pitfall for minimal residual disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Salem, Dalia; McCoy, Catharine S; Lee, Daniel; Shah, Nirali N; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Yuan, Constance M

    2017-09-09

    CD19-targeted chimeric-antigen receptor-modified T-cells (CAR-T) are promising in the treatment of refractory B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) is critical to distinguish B-ALL MRD from regenerating, non-neoplastic B-cell populations. FCM was performed on samples from 9 patients with B-ALL treated with CAR-T. All 9 patients showed response to CAR-T. Additionally, FCM revealed circulating CD10 + B cells, potentially mimicking MRD. Circulating CD10+ B-cells were detected in blood from 3 days to 3 months after CAR-T, comprising 73% (median) of B-cells (52-83%, 95%CI). They expressed CD19, CD10, CD20, bright CD9, CD22, CD24, moderate CD38 and dim CD58, but were CD34 (-), with bright CD45 and polyclonal surface light chain immunoglobulin (sIg) expression. A similar CD10 + B-cell subpopulation was detected by marrow FCM, amidst abundant B-cell precursors. These circulating CD10 + B-cells are compatible with immature B-cells, and are a reflection of B-cell recovery within the marrow. They are immunophenotypically distinguishable from residual B-ALL. Expression of light chain sIg and key surface antigens characterizing regenerating B-cell precursors can distinguish immature B-cells from B-ALL MRD and prevent misdiagnosis. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. Somatically Hypermutated Plasmodium-Specific IgM(+) Memory B Cells Are Rapid, Plastic, Early Responders upon Malaria Rechallenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Portugal, Silvia; Keitany, Gladys J; Kim, Karen S; Holder, Anthony; Crompton, Peter D; Rawlings, David J; Pepper, Marion

    2016-08-16

    Humoral immunity consists of pre-existing antibodies expressed by long-lived plasma cells and rapidly reactive memory B cells (MBC). Recent studies of MBC development and function after protein immunization have uncovered significant MBC heterogeneity. To clarify functional roles for distinct MBC subsets during malaria infection, we generated tetramers that identify Plasmodium-specific MBCs in both humans and mice. Long-lived murine Plasmodium-specific MBCs consisted of three populations: somatically hypermutated immunoglobulin M(+) (IgM(+)) and IgG(+) MBC subsets and an unmutated IgD(+) MBC population. Rechallenge experiments revealed that high affinity, somatically hypermutated Plasmodium-specific IgM(+) MBCs proliferated and gave rise to antibody-secreting cells that dominated the early secondary response to parasite rechallenge. IgM(+) MBCs also gave rise to T cell-dependent IgM(+) and IgG(+)B220(+)CD138(+) plasmablasts or T cell-independent B220(-)CD138(+) IgM(+) plasma cells. Thus, even in competition with IgG(+) MBCs, IgM(+) MBCs are rapid, plastic, early responders to a secondary Plasmodium rechallenge and should be targeted by vaccine strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid and spontaneous recovery in autistic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sitholey, Prabhat; Agarwal, Vivek; Pargaonkar, Amol

    2009-01-01

    Recovery in autistic disorder is rare. There are few reports of recovery from autistic disorder after a few years of therapeutic intervention. We report here a case of autistic disorder who recovered spontaneously without any intervention in 13 days.

  9. What caused the rapid recovery of the Carrington storm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Ebihara, Yusuke; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2015-05-01

    The geomagnetic storm during the Carrington event, which occurred on 2 September 1859, displayed extremely rapid recovery. The geomagnetic field increased by approximately 650 nT/h at Bombay, India, and by >300 nT/h in 1-h averaged data. Although the rapid recovery is considered due to a sudden increase in the magnetopause current, a sudden decrease of the ring current, or/and a sudden enhancement of the ionospheric currents, this study focuses on the ring current decay. The Carrington rapid recovery had a time constant (approximately 1 h) comparable to the storm development (i.e., decrease in the geomagnetic field), indicating that energy loss from the ring current region is predominantly controlled by E × B convection transport which is responsible for energy input during the storm main phase. This feature has led us to a hypothesis that the flow-out of dense ring current ions and injections of tenuous plasma sheet ions caused the rapid decay of the ring current and in turn the storm rapid recovery. This study examines whether the Carrington rapid recovery can be explained by the flow-out effect. We extend the empirical Burton's model to a model that takes into consideration a sudden change in solar wind density which is correlated with plasma sheet density. We first apply the extended Burton's model to previously observed four intense magnetic storms (Dst minimum solar wind data are available. Using the best fit parameters found by forward modeling, the extended model estimates the recovery of the Carrington storm. The estimate indicates that a solar wind structure with a density bump by approximately 100 cm-3 (and southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) of 65 nT and solar wind speed of 1,500 km/s) can cause the rapid recovery under a continuous southward IMF condition. We conclude that the flow-out effect plays a significant role in producing the rapid recovery of the Carrington storm.

  10. Rapid Recovery Gene Downregulation during Excess-Light Stress and Recovery in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Peter A; Ganguly, Diep R; Smith, Aaron B; Murray, Kevin D; Estavillo, Gonzalo M; Searle, Iain; Ford, Ethan; Bogdanović, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Borevitz, Justin O; Eichten, Steven R; Pogson, Barry J

    2017-08-01

    Stress recovery may prove to be a promising approach to increase plant performance and, theoretically, mRNA instability may facilitate faster recovery. Transcriptome (RNA-seq, qPCR, sRNA-seq, and PARE) and methylome profiling during repeated excess-light stress and recovery was performed at intervals as short as 3 min. We demonstrate that 87% of the stress-upregulated mRNAs analyzed exhibit very rapid recovery. For instance, HSP101 abundance declined 2-fold every 5.1 min. We term this phenomenon rapid recovery gene downregulation (RRGD), whereby mRNA abundance rapidly decreases promoting transcriptome resetting. Decay constants (k) were modeled using two strategies, linear and nonlinear least squares regressions, with the latter accounting for both transcription and degradation. This revealed extremely short half-lives ranging from 2.7 to 60.0 min for 222 genes. Ribosome footprinting using degradome data demonstrated RRGD loci undergo cotranslational decay and identified changes in the ribosome stalling index during stress and recovery. However, small RNAs and 5'-3' RNA decay were not essential for recovery of the transcripts examined, nor were any of the six excess light-associated methylome changes. We observed recovery-specific gene expression networks upon return to favorable conditions and six transcriptional memory types. In summary, rapid transcriptome resetting is reported in the context of active recovery and cellular memory. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid recovery from sevoflurane and desflurane with hypercapnia and hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Derek J; Gopalakrishnan, Nishant A; Orr, Joseph A; White, Julia L; Westenskow, Dwayne R

    2007-07-01

    Hypercapnia with hyperventilation shortens the time between turning off the vaporizer (1 MAC) and when patients open their eyes after isoflurane anesthesia by 62%. In the present study we tested whether a proportional shortening occurs with sevoflurane and desflurane. Consistent with a proportional shortening, we found that hypercapnia with hyperventilation decreased recovery times by 52% for sevoflurane and 64% for desflurane (when compared with normal ventilation with normocapnia). Concurrent hyperventilation to rapidly remove the anesthetic from the lungs and rebreathing to induce hypercapnia can significantly shorten recovery times and produce the same proportionate decrease for anesthetics that differ in solubility.

  12. Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 17 -2 9 Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery: Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu re s...Deployable Saw Technology Evaluation Haley P. Bell and Jay Rowland Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development...evaluation of selected saw technologies , tools, and methodologies for improving the efficiency of sawing around damaged pavement associated with crater

  13. Nursing role on rapid recovery programmes fast-track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano-Jiménez, Alfonso; Romero-Saldaña, Manuel; Molina-Recio, Guillermo

    2017-07-27

    Rapid recovery (RR) or fast-track programmes are aimed at reducing surgical stress, leading to a reduction in nurse workload, costs and hospital stay, greater patient empowerment, early post-surgical recovery and reduced morbidity and mortality. These new protocols require the coordinated participation of a multidisciplinary team. Based on an integrative review of the literature, this paper aims to define the concept of a RR or fast track programme and show the existing evidence on the implementation of these programmes in nursing. The benefits and low incidence of damage of RR programmes in nursing justify their implementation. The programmes require greater support and diffusion in order to develop, as well as more research to increase the evidence on the effectiveness and efficiency of the protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. A Rapid Method to Characterize Mouse IgG Antibodies and Isolate Native Antigen Binding IgG B Cell Hybridomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haolin Liu

    Full Text Available B cell hybridomas are an important source of monoclonal antibodies. In this paper, we developed a high-throughput method to characterize mouse IgG antibodies using surface plasmon resonance technology. This assay rapidly determines their sub-isotypes, whether they bind native antigen and their approximate affinities for the antigen using only 50 μl of hybridoma cell culture supernatant. Moreover, we found that mouse hybridomas secreting IgG antibodies also have membrane form IgG expression without Igα. Based on this surface IgG, we used flow cytometry to isolate rare γ2a isotype switched variants from a γ2b antibody secreting hybridoma cell line. Also, we used fluorescent antigen to single cell sort antigen binding hybridoma cells from bulk mixture of fused hybridoma cells instead of the traditional multi-microwell plate screening and limiting dilution sub-cloning thus saving time and labor. The IgG monoclonal antibodies specific for the native antigen identified with these methods are suitable for in vivo therapeutic uses, but also for sandwich ELISA assays, histology, flow cytometry, immune precipitation and x-ray crystallography.

  15. Human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  16. Avian B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masteller, E L; Pharr, G T; Funk, P E; Thompson, C B

    1997-01-01

    Development of B cells in chickens proceeds via a series of discrete developmental stages that includes the maturation of committed B cell progenitors in the specialized microenvironment of the bursa of Fabricius. The bursa has been shown to be required for the amplification of the B cell pool and selects for cells with productive immunoglobulin rearrangement events. Other events regulating chicken B cell development such as lymphocyte trafficking and apoptosis are just beginning to be elucidated. Within the bursa, the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes of B cell progenitors are diversified by a process of intrachromosomal gene conversion, where blocks of sequence information are transferred from pseudo-V regions to the recombined variable regions of the immunoglobulin genes. Recently gene conversion has been determined to play a role in the diversification of the immune repertoire in other species. In this review we focus on the current understanding and recent advances of B cell development in the chicken.

  17. Rapid de novo generation of antigen specific human B cells with expression of Blimp-1 and AID by in vitro immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xu; Tong, Yue; Tian, Hong; Ning, Hongyu; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2017-03-01

    In vitro immunization with antigens and cytokines triggers specific human B-cell response in short periods and is therefore superior to conventional in vivo immunization for antibody development. However, this new technology is limited by low efficiency, poor reproducibility, and requirement of pre-immunized lymphocytes. In this study, we demonstrate a novel method for de novo inducing antigen-specific human B cells in vitro. Unlike previous in vitro immunization of unfractionated PBMCs, we firstly optimized the conditions for inducing monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to efficiently capture, process, and present antigens. Instead of using the conventional method to activate Th2 cells for in vitro immunization, we succeeded to differentiate naïve CD4+ T cells into T follicular helper (Tfh) cells using antigen-sensitized DCs and cytokine cocktail. We discovered the differentiated T cells expressed ICOS, PD-1, BCL-6, and IL-21 at high levels. After 12 days of T-B co-culture, we observed induced T cells efficiently promoted naïve B cells to differentiate into plasmablasts secreting antigen-specific antibodies, with expression of Blimp-1 and AID related to affinity maturation and class switching. Thus, we established a new co-culture system with naïve lymphocyte populations for de novo acquisition of specifically in vitro immunized B cells potentially for development of therapeutic antibodies, which also provides novel insights into understanding the complex interactions among immune cells in lymph nodes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of MYC in B Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Korać

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available B cell lymphomas mainly arise from different developmental stages of B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissue. There are a number of signaling pathways that affect the initiation and development of B cell lymphomagenesis. The functions of several key proteins that represent branching points of signaling networks are changed because of their aberrant expression, degradation, and/or accumulation, and those events determine the fate of the affected B cells. One of the most influential transcription factors, commonly associated with unfavorable prognosis for patients with B cell lymphoma, is nuclear phosphoprotein MYC. During B cell lymphomagenesis, oncogenic MYC variant is deregulated through various mechanisms, such as gene translocation, gene amplification, and epigenetic deregulation of its expression. Owing to alterations of downstream signaling cascades, MYC-overexpressing neoplastic B cells proliferate rapidly, avoid apoptosis, and become unresponsive to most conventional treatments. This review will summarize the roles of MYC in B cell development and oncogenesis, as well as its significance for current B cell lymphoma classification. We compared communication networks within transformed B cells in different lymphomas affected by overexpressed MYC and conducted a meta-analysis concerning the association of MYC with tumor prognosis in different patient populations.

  19. Role of MYC in B Cell Lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korać, Petra; Dotlić, Snježana; Matulić, Maja; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Dominis, Mara

    2017-04-04

    B cell lymphomas mainly arise from different developmental stages of B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissue. There are a number of signaling pathways that affect the initiation and development of B cell lymphomagenesis. The functions of several key proteins that represent branching points of signaling networks are changed because of their aberrant expression, degradation, and/or accumulation, and those events determine the fate of the affected B cells. One of the most influential transcription factors, commonly associated with unfavorable prognosis for patients with B cell lymphoma, is nuclear phosphoprotein MYC. During B cell lymphomagenesis, oncogenic MYC variant is deregulated through various mechanisms, such as gene translocation, gene amplification, and epigenetic deregulation of its expression. Owing to alterations of downstream signaling cascades, MYC-overexpressing neoplastic B cells proliferate rapidly, avoid apoptosis, and become unresponsive to most conventional treatments. This review will summarize the roles of MYC in B cell development and oncogenesis, as well as its significance for current B cell lymphoma classification. We compared communication networks within transformed B cells in different lymphomas affected by overexpressed MYC and conducted a meta-analysis concerning the association of MYC with tumor prognosis in different patient populations.

  20. B cell phenotypes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis relapsing after rituximab: expression of B cell-activating factor-binding receptors on B cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, E; De La Torre, I; Leandro, M J; Cambridge, G

    2017-12-01

    Serum levels of B cell-activating factor (BAFF) rise following rituximab (RTX) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Initiation of naive B cell return to the periphery and autoreactive B cell expansion leading to relapse after RTX may therefore be linked to interactions between BAFF and BAFF-binding receptors (BBR). Relationships between serum BAFF and BBR expression [(BAFFR, calcium signal modulating cyclophilic ligand interactor (TACI) and B cell maturation antigen (BCMA)] were determined on B cell subsets, defined using immunoglobulin (Ig)D/CD38. Twenty pre-RTX and 18 RA patients relapsing after B cell depletion were included. Results were analysed with respect to timing of relapse up to 7 months after peripheral B cell return (≥ 5 B cells/μl) and to serum BAFF levels. After B cell return, B cell populations from relapsing patients had significantly lower BAFFR + expression compared to HC and pre-RTX patients. The percentage of BAFFR + B cells increased with time after B cell return and was correlated inversely with serum BAFF levels. BAFFR expression remained reduced. The percentage of TACI + memory B cells were lower in RA patients after RTX compared with healthy controls (HC). BCMA expression (% and expression) did not differ between patients and HC. Relapse following B cell return appeared largely independent of the percentage of BAFFR + or percentage of BCMA + B cells or serum BAFF levels. The lower percentage of TACI + memory B cells may reduce inhibitory signalling for B cell differentiation. In patients relapsing at longer periods after B cell return, recovery of the B cell pool was more complete, suggesting that selection or expansion of autoreactive B cells may be needed to precipitate relapse. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Rapid recovery from aphasia after infarction of Wernicke’s area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melodie Yen

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of connected speech samples and language testing following infarction of Wernicke’s area revealed rapid improvements in almost all speech/language measures, spanning phonological, syntactic and semantic domains. The greatest changes occurred early, with recovery slowing over time, and the data were well fit by logarithmic recovery curves. Despite the importance of Wernicke’s area, the rapidity and extent of recovery observed suggest that other brain regions can be rapidly recruited to support many of the functions of Wernicke’s area (Weiller et al., 1995.

  2. Memory management and compiler support for rapid recovery from failures in computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the use of memory management and compiler technology to support rapid recovery from failures in computer systems. The techniques described include cache coherence protocols for user transparent checkpointing in multiprocessor systems, compiler-based checkpoint placement, compiler-based code modification for multiple instruction retry, and forward recovery in distributed systems utilizing optimistic execution.

  3. The RAPID protocol enhances patient recovery after both laparoscopic and open colorectal resections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lloyd, G M

    2010-06-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs can accelerate recovery and shorten the hospital stay after colorectal resections. The RAPID (remove, ambulate, postoperative analgesia, introduce diet) protocol is a simplified ERAS program that consists of a simplified, user-friendly single-page pro forma schedule. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the RAPID protocol on patients undergoing both laparoscopic and open colorectal resections in two specialized colorectal units.

  4. Rapid recovery programmes for hip and knee arthroplasty. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molko, S; Combalia, A

    Fast-track surgery, or enhanced recovery, has appeared in the last 20 years or so as a combination of the optimisation of clinical protocols and organisational processes, pursuing the reduction in surgical stress with the aim of reducing peri-operative comorbidities, convalescence time, and functional recovery, resulting in a reduction in admission time. After a review of the European literature available on this subject, this article attempts to present an update. It highlights its interest and origins, basically being set out as a response to the question: 'Why is this patient in Hospital today?' It also attempts to summarise the essence of such programmes: the search for immediate post-surgical mobilisation, being supported in a multidisciplinary approach. This includes a multimodal intervention and analgesia, a limitation in the use of opiates, and the active participation by the patients in their own recovery. Furthermore, mention is made of the initiatives by European State organisation as a boost to enhanced recovery programmes in their respective countries, as is the case in Denmark, France, and the United Kingdom. The clinical outcomes published up to September 2015 have been reviewed. A subsequent decrease in mean hospital stay is observed in 11 studies, achieving patient satisfaction, low complication rates, a reduction in the transfusion rates, and with no apparent increase in re-admissions. Mention is also made of the financial consequences, and how to implement these protocols. As a conclusion, an analysis is made of the future challenges fast-track surgery, such as the possibility of moving towards outpatient surgery, or the obtaining of a surgery 'with no risk or pain' in general, for which there are other still open lines of work. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. A Rapid-Response Humoral Vaccine Platform Exploiting Pre-Existing Non-Cognate Populations of Anti-Vaccine or Anti-Viral CD4+ T Helper Cells to Confirm B Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Thomas; Jakeman, Phillip G; Carlisle, Robert C; Klenerman, Paul; Seymour, Leonard W; Cawood, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The need for CD4+ T cell responses to arise de novo following vaccination can limit the speed of B cell responses. Populations of pre-existing vaccine-induced or anti-viral CD4+ T cells recognising distinct antigens could be exploited to overcome this limitation. We hypothesise that liposomal vaccine particles encapsulating epitopes that are recognised, after processing and B cell MHCII presentation, by pre-existing CD4+ T cells will exploit this pre-existing T cell help and result in improved antibody responses to distinct target antigens displayed on the particle surface. Liposomal vaccine particles were engineered to display the malaria circumsporozoite (CSP) antigen on their surface, with helper CD4+ epitopes from distinct vaccine or viral antigens contained within the particle core, ensuring the B cell response is raised but focused against CSP. In vivo vaccination studies were then conducted in C57Bl/6 mice as models of either vaccine-induced pre-existing CD4+ T cell immunity (using ovalbumin-OVA) or virus-induced pre-existing CD4+ T cell immunity (murine cytomegalovirus-MCMV). Following the establishment of pre-existing by vaccination (OVA in the adjuvant TiterMax® Gold) or infection with MCMV, mice were administered CSP-coated liposomal vaccines containing the relevant OVA or MCMV core CD4+ T cell epitopes. In mice with pre-existing anti-OVA CD4+ T cell immunity, these vaccine particles elicited rapid, high-titre, isotype-switched CSP-specific antibody responses-consistent with the involvement of anti-OVA T helper cells in confirming activation of anti-CSP B cells. Responses were further improved by entrapping TLR9 agonists, combining humoral vaccination signals 'one', 'two' and 'three' within one particle. Herpes viruses can establish chronic infection and elicit significant, persistent cellular immune responses. We then demonstrate that this principle can be extended to re-purpose pre-existing anti-MCMV immunity to enhance anti-CSP vaccine responses

  6. Rapidly induced, T-cell independent xenoantibody production is mediated by marginal zone B cells and requires help from NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengqiao; Yan, Yehong; Lin, Yuan; Bullens, Dominique M; Rutgeerts, Omer; Goebels, Jozef; Segers, Constant; Boon, Louis; Kasran, Ahmad; De Vos, Rita; Dewolf-Peeters, Christiane; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D

    2007-12-01

    Xenoantibody production directed at a wide variety of T lymphocyte-dependent and T lymphocyte-independent xenoantigens remains the major immunologic obstacle for successful xenotransplantation. The B lymphocyte subpopulations and their helper factors, involved in T-cell-independent xenoantibody production are only partially understood, and their identification will contribute to the clinical applicability of xenotransplantation. Here we show, using models involving T-cell-deficient athymic recipient mice, that rapidly induced, T-cell-independent xenoantibody production is mediated by marginal zone B lymphocytes and requires help from natural killer (NK) cells. This collaboration neither required NK-cell-mediated IFN-gamma production, nor NK-cell-mediated cytolytic killing of xenogeneic target cells. The T-cell-independent IgM xenoantibody response could be partially suppressed by CD40L blockade.

  7. A comparison of test statistics for the recovery of rapid growth-based enumeration tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; IJzerman-Boon, Pieta C.

    This paper considers five test statistics for comparing the recovery of a rapid growth-based enumeration test with respect to the compendial microbiological method using a specific nonserial dilution experiment. The finite sample distributions of these test statistics are unknown, because they are

  8. The chicken B-cell receptor complex and its role in avian B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, C E; Demaries, S L; Pike, K A; Friedman, J E; Ratcliffe, M J

    2000-06-01

    The bursa of Fabricius is critical to normal B-lymphocyte development in birds. During embryonic life, B-cell precursors migrate to the bursal rudiment and those which have undergone productive V(D)J recombination colonize lymphoid follicles and undergo immunoglobulin V gene diversification by gene conversion. The chicken surface IgM complex appears structurally and functionally equivalent to its mammalian counterpart, with homologs to CD79a and CD79b. Expression of a truncated Igmu chain is sufficient to drive the early stages of B-cell development in the embryo bursa. Bursal cells expressing the truncated mu receptor complex proliferate in bursal follicles, and those which contain V gene rearrangements undergo V gene diversification by gene conversion. The bursa is a gut-associated organ and antigen is focused to bursal lymphoid follicles after hatch. While expression of the truncated mu chain is sufficient to support B-cell development in the embryo, B cells expressing this receptor are rapidly eliminated after hatch. We suggest the possibility that B-cell development in the bursa after hatch is driven by encounter with antigen leading to redistribution of B cells within the lymphoid follicle, B-cell proliferation and V gene repertoire development by gene conversion.

  9. Rapid Recovery from Paraplegia in a Patient with Foix-Alajouanine Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Haji, Faizal A; Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Steven, David A; Boulton, Melfort R

    2017-01-01

    Foix-Alajouanine syndrome is defined as acute neurologic deterioration in the setting of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula. This case report on a young patient with an unusual clinical onset of Foix-Alajouanine syndrome coincidentally occurring after his outpatient clinic appointment illustrates how prompt surgical treatment can result in rapid recovery of neurologic function despite preoperative paraplegia. Venous hypertension with subsequent rapid resolution after surgical treatment is the pathophysiological mechanism underlying a dural arteriovenous fistula, in contrast to historical views suggesting that these lesions result from irreversible venous thrombosis, resulting in necrotic myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Recovery Phenomenon During Annealing of an As-Rapidly Solidified Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhigang; Mao, Shuaiying; Lin, Yaojun; Zhang, Yaqi; Wang, Limin

    2017-06-01

    It has been well documented that recovery occurring in metals/alloys produced via solid-state quenching involves only annihilation of supersaturated vacancies. Interestingly, in the present study, we observed completely different mechanisms underlying recovery during annealing of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (7075 Al) alloy processed via liquid-state quenching, i.e., rapid solidification (specifically melt spinning herein). The as-melt-spun alloy consists of refined grains containing tangled dislocations inside the grains. Following annealing at 393 K (120 °C) for 24 hours, refined grain structure was still retained and grain sizes essentially remained unchanged, but subgrains separated by dense dislocation walls were generated at grain interiors, with a much lower density of dislocations at subgrain interiors than that in the as-melt-spun 7075 Al alloy and dislocation arrays inside some subgrains. The microstructural evolution suggests the absence of recrystallization and the occurrence of recovery primarily via the annihilation and rearrangement of dislocations and the formation of subgrains. Based on the stored energy in dislocations in, and the annealing temperature of, the as-melt-spun 7075 Al alloy, the recovery phenomenon was analyzed and discussed in detail.

  11. Arterial Injury and Endothelial Repair: Rapid Recovery of Function after Mechanical Injury in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Tilling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Previous studies suggest a protracted course of recovery after mechanical endothelial injury; confounders may include degree of injury and concomitant endothelial dysfunction. We sought to define the time course of endothelial function recovery using flow-mediated dilation (FMD, after ischaemia-reperfusion (IR and mechanical injury in patients and healthy volunteers. The contribution of circulating CD133+/CD34+/VEGFR2+ “endothelial progenitor” (EPC or repair cells to endothelial repair was also examined. Methods. 28 healthy volunteers aged 18–35 years underwent transient forearm ischaemia induced by cuff inflation around the proximal biceps and radial artery mechanical injury induced by inserting a wire through a cannula. A more severe mechanical injury was induced using an arterial sheath and catheter inserted into the radial artery of 18 patients undergoing angiography. Results. IR and mechanical injury produced immediate impairment of FMD (from 6.5 ± 1.2% to 2.9 ± 2.2% and from 7.4 ± 2.3% to 1.5 ± 1.6% for IR and injury, resp., each P<0.001 but recovered within 6 hours and 2 days, respectively. FMD took up to 4 months to recover in patients. Circulating EPC did not change significantly during the injury/recovery period in all subjects. Conclusions. Recovery of endothelial function after IR and mechanical injury is rapid and not associated with a change in circulating EPC.

  12. Rapid Recovery of CD3+CD8+ T Cells on Day 90 Predicts Superior Survival after Unmanipulated Haploidentical Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Deng-Mei; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Chang, Ying-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is significantly associated with lower infection, relapse and possibly secondary malignancy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peripheral lymphocyte subsets, especially CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery, in predicting transplant outcomes, including the overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) rates after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation (HBMT). Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 214 HBMT recipients with hematological malignancies. The peripheral lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ helper T cells, CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and CD19+ B cells) were analyzed by flow cytometry at days 30, 60, 90, 180, 270 and 360 after HBMT. The CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery at day 90 (CD3+CD8+-90) was correlated with bacterial infection (P = 0.001), NRM (P = 0.001), leukemia-free survival (LFS, P = 0.005), and OS (P = 0.001) at a cutoff value of 375 cells/μL CD3+CD8+ T cells. The incidence of bacterial infection in patients with the CD3+CD8+-90 at ≥375 cells/μL was significantly lower than that of cases with the CD3+CD8+-90 at CD3+CD8+ T cells at day 90 after HBMT was strongly associated with a lower incidence of NRM (HR = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.15-0.60; P = 0.000) and superior LFS (HR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32-0.82; P = 0.005) and OS (HR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.23-0.63; P = 0.000). The results suggest that the rapid recovery of CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells at day 90 following HBMT could predict superior transplant outcomes.

  13. Subsets of CD34+ cells and rapid hematopoietic recovery after peripheral-blood stem-cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dercksen, M. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Dirkson, M. K.; Schaasberg, W. P.; Baars, J. W.; van der Wall, E.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I. C.; Pinedo, H. M.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    To study whether there is a relationship between transplanted cell dose and rate of hematopoietic recovery after peripheral-blood stem-cell (PBSC) transplantation, and to obtain an indication whether specific subsets of CD34+ cell populations contribute to rapid recovery of neutrophils or platelets.

  14. Nanofiber Ion-Exchange Membranes for the Rapid Uptake and Recovery of Heavy Metals from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithinart Chitpong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the performance of polyelectrolyte-modified nanofiber membranes was undertaken to determine their efficacy in the rapid uptake and recovery of heavy metals from impaired waters. The membranes were prepared by grafting poly(acrylic acid (PAA and poly(itaconic acid (PIA to cellulose nanofiber mats. Performance measurements quantified the dynamic ion-exchange capacity for cadmium (Cd, productivity, and recovery of Cd(II from the membranes by regeneration. The dynamic binding capacities of Cd(II on both types of nanofiber membrane were independent of the linear flow velocity, with a residence time of as low as 2 s. Analysis of breakthrough curves indicated that the mass flow rate increased rapidly at constant applied pressure after membranes approached equilibrium load capacity for Cd(II, apparently due to a collapse of the polymer chains on the membrane surface, leading to an increased porosity. This mechanism is supported by hydrodynamic radius (Rh measurements for PAA and PIA obtained from dynamic light scattering, which show that Rh values decrease upon Cd(II binding. Volumetric productivity was high for the nanofiber membranes, and reached 0.55 mg Cd/g/min. The use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as regeneration reagent was effective in fully recovering Cd(II from the membranes. Ion-exchange capacities were constant over five cycles of binding-regeneration.

  15. Nanofiber Ion-Exchange Membranes for the Rapid Uptake and Recovery of Heavy Metals from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitpong, Nithinart; Husson, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    An evaluation of the performance of polyelectrolyte-modified nanofiber membranes was undertaken to determine their efficacy in the rapid uptake and recovery of heavy metals from impaired waters. The membranes were prepared by grafting poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(itaconic acid) (PIA) to cellulose nanofiber mats. Performance measurements quantified the dynamic ion-exchange capacity for cadmium (Cd), productivity, and recovery of Cd(II) from the membranes by regeneration. The dynamic binding capacities of Cd(II) on both types of nanofiber membrane were independent of the linear flow velocity, with a residence time of as low as 2 s. Analysis of breakthrough curves indicated that the mass flow rate increased rapidly at constant applied pressure after membranes approached equilibrium load capacity for Cd(II), apparently due to a collapse of the polymer chains on the membrane surface, leading to an increased porosity. This mechanism is supported by hydrodynamic radius (Rh) measurements for PAA and PIA obtained from dynamic light scattering, which show that Rh values decrease upon Cd(II) binding. Volumetric productivity was high for the nanofiber membranes, and reached 0.55 mg Cd/g/min. The use of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as regeneration reagent was effective in fully recovering Cd(II) from the membranes. Ion-exchange capacities were constant over five cycles of binding-regeneration. PMID:27999394

  16. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  17. Rapid Recovery of CD3+CD8+ T Cells on Day 90 Predicts Superior Survival after Unmanipulated Haploidentical Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng-Mei Tian

    Full Text Available Rapid immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is significantly associated with lower infection, relapse and possibly secondary malignancy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peripheral lymphocyte subsets, especially CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery, in predicting transplant outcomes, including the overall survival (OS and non-relapse mortality (NRM rates after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation (HBMT.Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 214 HBMT recipients with hematological malignancies. The peripheral lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ helper T cells, CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and CD19+ B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry at days 30, 60, 90, 180, 270 and 360 after HBMT.The CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery at day 90 (CD3+CD8+-90 was correlated with bacterial infection (P = 0.001, NRM (P = 0.001, leukemia-free survival (LFS, P = 0.005, and OS (P = 0.001 at a cutoff value of 375 cells/μL CD3+CD8+ T cells. The incidence of bacterial infection in patients with the CD3+CD8+-90 at ≥375 cells/μL was significantly lower than that of cases with the CD3+CD8+-90 at <375 cells/μL after HBMT (14.6% versus 41.6%, P<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed the rapid recovery of CD3+CD8+ T cells at day 90 after HBMT was strongly associated with a lower incidence of NRM (HR = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.15-0.60; P = 0.000 and superior LFS (HR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32-0.82; P = 0.005 and OS (HR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.23-0.63; P = 0.000.The results suggest that the rapid recovery of CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells at day 90 following HBMT could predict superior transplant outcomes.

  18. Severe extinction and rapid recovery of mammals across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary, and the effects of rarity on patterns of extinction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longrich, N R; Scriberas, J; Wills, M A

    2016-08-01

    The end-Cretaceous mass extinction ranks among the most severe extinctions of all time; however, patterns of extinction and recovery remain incompletely understood. In particular, it is unclear how severe the extinction was, how rapid the recovery was and how sampling biases might affect our understanding of these processes. To better understand terrestrial extinction and recovery and how sampling influences these patterns, we collected data on the occurrence and abundance of fossil mammals to examine mammalian diversity across the K-Pg boundary in North America. Our data show that the extinction was more severe and the recovery more rapid than previously thought. Extinction rates are markedly higher than previously estimated: of 59 species, four survived (93% species extinction, 86% of genera). Survival is correlated with geographic range size and abundance, with widespread, common species tending to survive. This creates a sampling artefact in which rare species are both more vulnerable to extinction and less likely to be recovered, such that the fossil record is inherently biased towards the survivors. The recovery was remarkably rapid. Within 300 000 years, local diversity recovered and regional diversity rose to twice Cretaceous levels, driven by increased endemicity; morphological disparity increased above levels observed in the Cretaceous. The speed of the recovery tends to be obscured by sampling effects; faunas show increased endemicity, such that a rapid, regional increase in diversity and disparity is not seen in geographically restricted studies. Sampling biases that operate against rare taxa appear to obscure the severity of extinction and the pace of recovery across the K-Pg boundary, and similar biases may operate during other extinction events. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Regulatory functions of innate-like B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Innate-like B cells (ILBs) are heterogeneous populations of unconventional B cells with innate sensing and responding properties. ILBs in mice are composed of B1 cells, marginal zone (MZ) B cells and other related B cells. ILBs maintain natural IgM levels at steady state, and after innate activation, they can rapidly acquire immune regulatory activities through the secretion of natural IgM and IL-10. Thus, ILBs constitute an important source of IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs), which have been shown to play critical roles in autoimmunity, inflammation and infection. The present review highlights the latest advances in the field of ILBs and focuses on their regulatory functions. Understanding the regulatory activities of ILBs and their underlying mechanisms could open new avenues in manipulating their functions in inflammatory, infectious and other relevant diseases. PMID:23396472

  20. Rapid Recovery from Acute Liver Failure Secondary to Pancreatoduodenectomy-Related Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Nirei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of liver failure secondary to pancreatoduodenectomy and rapid recovery following treatment. A 68-year-old woman with cancer on the ampulla of Vater underwent surgery for pancreatoduodenectomy. The patient developed liver failure 3 months postsurgically. She was hospitalized after presenting with jaundice, hypoalbuminemia and decreased serum zinc. Computed tomography (CT of the abdomen showed a reduction in CT attenuation values postoperatively. We suspected fatty liver due to impaired absorption caused by pancreatoduodenectomy. We initiated treatment with branched-chain amino acids and a zinc formulation orally. Trace elements were administered intravenously. Two months after treatment, there was a noticeable improvement in CT findings. The patient’s jaundice and hypoalbuminemia prompted a liver biopsy, which led to a diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  1. A passerine spreads its tail to facilitate a rapid recovery of its body posture during hovering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian-Yuan; Ting, Shang-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Hung; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a passerine exploits tail spreading to intercept the downward flow induced by its wings to facilitate the recovery of its posture. The periodic spreading of its tail by the White-eye bird exhibits a phase correlation with both wingstroke motion and body oscillation during hovering flight. During a downstroke, a White-eye's body undergoes a remarkable pitch-down motion, with the tail undergoing an upward swing. This pitch-down motion becomes appropriately suppressed at the end of the downstroke; the bird's body posture then recovers gradually to its original status. Employing digital particle-image velocimetry, we show that the strong downward flow induced by downstroking the wings serves as an external jet flow impinging upon the tail, providing a depressing force on the tail to counteract the pitch-down motion of the bird's body. Spreading of the tail enhances a rapid recovery of the body posture because increased forces are experienced. The maximum force experienced by a spread tail is approximately 2.6 times that of a non-spread tail. PMID:22258552

  2. A passerine spreads its tail to facilitate a rapid recovery of its body posture during hovering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian-Yuan; Ting, Shang-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Hung; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2012-07-07

    We demonstrate experimentally that a passerine exploits tail spreading to intercept the downward flow induced by its wings to facilitate the recovery of its posture. The periodic spreading of its tail by the White-eye bird exhibits a phase correlation with both wingstroke motion and body oscillation during hovering flight. During a downstroke, a White-eye's body undergoes a remarkable pitch-down motion, with the tail undergoing an upward swing. This pitch-down motion becomes appropriately suppressed at the end of the downstroke; the bird's body posture then recovers gradually to its original status. Employing digital particle-image velocimetry, we show that the strong downward flow induced by downstroking the wings serves as an external jet flow impinging upon the tail, providing a depressing force on the tail to counteract the pitch-down motion of the bird's body. Spreading of the tail enhances a rapid recovery of the body posture because increased forces are experienced. The maximum force experienced by a spread tail is approximately 2.6 times that of a non-spread tail.

  3. Cigarette smoke-induced effects on bone marrow B-cell subsets and CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratios are reversed by smoking cessation: influence of bone mass on immune cell response to and recovery from smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusby, Jenny S; Kassmeier, Michele D; Palmer, Victoria L; Perry, Greg A; Anderson, Dirk K; Hackfort, Bryan T; Alvarez, Gwen K; Cullen, Diane M; Akhter, Mohammed P; Swanson, Patrick C

    2010-08-01

    Cigarette smoking adversely affects the immune system, and is a risk factor for developing osteoporosis. How smoking contributes to osteoporosis is unclear, but since lymphocytes help maintain bone homeostasis and lymphocyte depletion results in bone loss, one potential mechanism for how smoke exposure promotes osteoporosis is by reducing bone marrow lymphocytes. Since the risk for developing osteoporosis is reportedly greater in smokers with polymorphisms in LRP5, a gene involved in canonical Wnt signaling that regulates bone metabolism, smoking-induced effects on lymphocytes may be influenced by Lrp5 functionality. To test these possibilities, we examined how the duration and cessation of cigarette smoke exposure affects lymphocyte distribution and function in normal mice and mice predisposed to low or high bone mass due to disruption or mutation of Lrp5. We find that, independent of genotype, mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 3-12 weeks showed a significant reduction in bone marrow B220(+)CD43(-) B cells and splenic transitional T1 B cells, and exhibited a splenic CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio that was skewed toward CD8(+) T cells. Smoke exposure had little or no effect on other lymphocyte subsets or on lymphocyte function ex vivo. Interestingly, these differences were no longer apparent after 6 weeks without smoke exposure, except in mice with high bone mass where bone marrow B220(+)CD43(-) B cells failed to fully recover. These data provide the first evidence that smoke exposure reduces bone marrow B cells, providing a plausible mechanism for how smoking contributes to osteoporosis.

  4. The Recovery of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Is Rapid in Subclinical Cushing Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyung Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn subclinical Cushing syndrome (SC, it is assumed that glucocorticoid production is insufficient to cause a clinically recognizable syndrome. Differences in hormonal levels or recovery time of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis after adrenalectomy between patients with overt Cushing syndrome (OC and SC remain unknown.MethodsThirty-six patients (10 with OC and 26 with SC with adrenal Cushing syndrome who underwent adrenalectomy from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were treated with glucocorticoid after adrenalectomy and were reevaluated every 1 to 6 months using a rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH stimulation test.ResultsLevels of basal 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC, serum cortisol after an overnight dexamethasone suppression test (DST, and serum cortisol and 24-hour UFC after low-dose DST and high-dose DST were all significantly lower in patients with SC compared with OC. Basal ACTH levels showed significantly higher in patients with SC compared with OC. The probability of recovering adrenal function during follow-up differed significantly between patients with OC and SC (P=0.001, with significant correlations with the degree of preoperative cortisol excess. Patients with OC required a longer duration of glucocorticoid replacement to recover a normal ACTH stimulation test compared with patients with SC (median 17.0 months vs. 4.0 months, P<0.001.ConclusionThe HPA axis recovery time after adrenalectomy in patients with SC is rapid and is dependent on the degree of cortisol excess. More precise definition of SC is necessary to achieve a better management of patients and to avoid the risk of under- or over-treatment of SC patients.

  5. The Recovery of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Is Rapid in Subclinical Cushing Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Yoon, Jee Hee; Jeong, Yun Ah; Kang, Ho Cheol

    2016-12-01

    In subclinical Cushing syndrome (SC), it is assumed that glucocorticoid production is insufficient to cause a clinically recognizable syndrome. Differences in hormonal levels or recovery time of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis after adrenalectomy between patients with overt Cushing syndrome (OC) and SC remain unknown. Thirty-six patients (10 with OC and 26 with SC) with adrenal Cushing syndrome who underwent adrenalectomy from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were treated with glucocorticoid after adrenalectomy and were reevaluated every 1 to 6 months using a rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Levels of basal 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC), serum cortisol after an overnight dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and serum cortisol and 24-hour UFC after low-dose DST and high-dose DST were all significantly lower in patients with SC compared with OC. Basal ACTH levels showed significantly higher in patients with SC compared with OC. The probability of recovering adrenal function during follow-up differed significantly between patients with OC and SC (P=0.001), with significant correlations with the degree of preoperative cortisol excess. Patients with OC required a longer duration of glucocorticoid replacement to recover a normal ACTH stimulation test compared with patients with SC (median 17.0 months vs. 4.0 months, P<0.001). The HPA axis recovery time after adrenalectomy in patients with SC is rapid and is dependent on the degree of cortisol excess. More precise definition of SC is necessary to achieve a better management of patients and to avoid the risk of under- or over-treatment of SC patients.

  6. Rapid Recovery of an Urban Remnant Reptile Community following Summer Wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert A; Doherty, Tim S

    2015-01-01

    Reptiles in urban remnants are threatened with extinction by increased fire frequency, habitat fragmentation caused by urban development, and competition and predation from exotic species. Understanding how urban reptiles respond to and recover from such disturbances is key to their conservation. We monitored the recovery of an urban reptile community for five years following a summer wildfire at Kings Park in Perth, Western Australia, using pitfall trapping at five burnt and five unburnt sites. The reptile community recovered rapidly following the fire. Unburnt sites initially had higher species richness and total abundance, but burnt sites rapidly converged, recording a similar total abundance to unburnt areas within two years, and a similar richness within three years. The leaf-litter inhabiting skink Hemiergis quadrilineata was strongly associated with longer unburnt sites and may be responding to the loss of leaf litter following the fire. Six rarely-captured species were also strongly associated with unburnt areas and were rarely or never recorded at burnt sites, whereas two other rarely-captured species were associated with burnt sites. We also found that one lizard species, Ctenotus fallens, had a smaller average body length in burnt sites compared to unburnt sites for four out of the five years of monitoring. Our study indicates that fire management that homogenises large areas of habitat through frequent burning may threaten some species due to their preference for longer unburnt habitat. Careful management of fire may be needed to maximise habitat suitability within the urban landscape.

  7. Rapid Recovery of an Urban Remnant Reptile Community following Summer Wildfire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Davis

    Full Text Available Reptiles in urban remnants are threatened with extinction by increased fire frequency, habitat fragmentation caused by urban development, and competition and predation from exotic species. Understanding how urban reptiles respond to and recover from such disturbances is key to their conservation. We monitored the recovery of an urban reptile community for five years following a summer wildfire at Kings Park in Perth, Western Australia, using pitfall trapping at five burnt and five unburnt sites. The reptile community recovered rapidly following the fire. Unburnt sites initially had higher species richness and total abundance, but burnt sites rapidly converged, recording a similar total abundance to unburnt areas within two years, and a similar richness within three years. The leaf-litter inhabiting skink Hemiergis quadrilineata was strongly associated with longer unburnt sites and may be responding to the loss of leaf litter following the fire. Six rarely-captured species were also strongly associated with unburnt areas and were rarely or never recorded at burnt sites, whereas two other rarely-captured species were associated with burnt sites. We also found that one lizard species, Ctenotus fallens, had a smaller average body length in burnt sites compared to unburnt sites for four out of the five years of monitoring. Our study indicates that fire management that homogenises large areas of habitat through frequent burning may threaten some species due to their preference for longer unburnt habitat. Careful management of fire may be needed to maximise habitat suitability within the urban landscape.

  8. Insulation recovery time after fault arc interruption for rapid auto-reclosing on UHV (1000kV class) transmission lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shoji; Inaba, Tsuginori; Ozaki, Yuzo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The insulation recovery time after arc interruption must be known in order to select an adequate reclosing dead time of rapid auto-reclosing on transmission lines. The flashover probability of the insulation recovery voltage obtained from the insulation recovery tests using full size insulator assemblies was calculated. The insulation recovery time at the fault point for rapid auto-reclosing on UHV(1000kV class) transmission lines was estimated.

  9. Improved Savitzky-Golay-method-based fluorescence subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we propose an improved subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra that can substantially reduce the computation time. This algorithm is based on an improved Savitzky-Golay (SG) iterative smoothing method, which involves two key novel approaches: (a) the use of the Gauss-Seidel method and (b) the introduction of a relaxation factor into the iterative procedure. By applying a novel successive relaxation (SG-SR) iterative method to the relaxation factor, additional improvement in the convergence speed over the standard Savitzky-Golay procedure is realized. The proposed improved algorithm (the RIA-SG-SR algorithm), which uses SG-SR-based iteration instead of Savitzky-Golay iteration, has been optimized and validated with a mathematically simulated Raman spectrum, as well as experimentally measured Raman spectra from non-biological and biological samples. The method results in a significant reduction in computing cost while yielding consistent rejection of fluorescence and noise for spectra with low signal-to-fluorescence ratios and varied baselines. In the simulation, RIA-SG-SR achieved 1 order of magnitude improvement in iteration number and 2 orders of magnitude improvement in computation time compared with the range-independent background-subtraction algorithm (RIA). Furthermore the computation time of the experimentally measured raw Raman spectrum processing from skin tissue decreased from 6.72 to 0.094 s. In general, the processing of the SG-SR method can be conducted within dozens of milliseconds, which can provide a real-time procedure in practical situations.

  10. Regulatory T Cell Dysfunction Acquiesces to BTLA+ Regulatory B Cells Subsequent Oral Intervention of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte, Eduardo; Jun, SangMu; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Golden, Sara; Jackiw, Larissa; Hoffman, Carol; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced during autoimmunity often become quiescent and unable to resolve disease, suggesting inadequate activation. Resolution of established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be achieved with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) fused to reovirus protein σ1 (MOG-pσ1) which activates Tregs, restoring protection, but requiring other regulatory cells to revitalize them. B cells have a dichotomous role in both the pathogenesis and recovery from EAE. While inflammatory B cells contribute to EAE’s pathogenesis, treatment of EAE mice with MOG-pσ1, but not OVA-pσ1, resulted in an influx of IL-10-producing B220+CD5+ B regulatory cells (Bregs) enabling Tregs to recover their inhibitory activity, and in turn, leading to the rapid amelioration of EAE. These findings implicate direct interactions between Bregs and Tregs to facilitate this recovery. Adoptive transfer of B220+CD5− B cells from MOG-pσ1-treated EAE or Bregs from PBS-treated EAE mice did not resolve disease while the adoptive transfer of MOG-pσ1-induced B220+CD5+ Bregs greatly ameliorated EAE. MOG-pσ1-, but not OVA-pσ1-induced IL-10-producing Bregs, expressed elevated levels of BTLA relative to CD5− B cells, as opposed to Tregs or effector T (Teff) cells, whose BTLA expression was not affected. These induced Bregs restored EAE Treg function in a BTLA-dependent manner. BTLA−/− mice showed more pronounced EAE with fewer Tregs but, upon adoptive transfer of MOG-pσ1-induced BTLA+ Bregs, BTLA−/− mice were protected against EAE. Hence, this evidence shows the importance of BTLA in activating Tregs to facilitate recovery from EAE. PMID:27194787

  11. Rapid demise and recovery of plant ecosystems across the end-Permian extinction event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochuli, Peter A.; Hermann, Elke; Vigran, Jorunn Os; Bucher, Hugo; Weissert, Helmut

    2010-12-01

    The end-Permian extinction event was the most pronounced biotic and ecological crisis in the history of the Earth. It is assumed that over 80% of marine genera disappeared, and that this event had a major impact on the evolution of marine organisms. The impact of this event on terrestrial biota is poorly known and a matter of controversial discussions. In contrast to the fundamental changes in marine fauna most major groups of plants range from the Late Palaeozoic into the Mesozoic. Consequently the impact of the end-Permian extinction event on the evolution of plants was often regarded as minor. However, major changes in the composition of the plant communities have been documented and a number of catastrophic scenarios have been envisioned — including the almost total destruction of plant ecosystems. Based on expanded sections from the Southern Barents Sea (Northern Norway) we trace mid-latitudinal terrestrial ecosystems across the Permo-Triassic transition with a time resolution in the order of 10 kyr, based on a high resolution C org-isotope stratigraphy. Our results show that the floral turnovers are linked with major changes in the C-isotope record and hence with global carbon cycling. The palynological records document the successive steps in the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. After gradual changes during the latest Permian, plant ecosystems suffered from a major environmental perturbation leading to a rapid turnover from gymnosperm dominated ecosystems to assemblages dominated by lycopods. The dominance of the lycopods, expressed in a spore-spike, represents a relatively short-lived event in the order of 10 kyr. This perturbation of the terrestrial ecosystems preceded the globally recognized negative δ 13C org isotope spike by up to 100 kyr. It coincides with a first end-Permian negative shift of the C-isotope curve and was probably induced by a first major perturbation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, related to the onset of the volcanic

  12. Inflammation Causes Resistance to Anti-CD20-Mediated B Cell Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, L H; Parker, C E; Cherala, G; Koguchi, Y; Waisman, A; Slifka, M K; Oberbarnscheidt, M H; Obhrai, J S; Yeung, M Y; Riella, L V

    2016-11-01

    B cells play a central role in antibody-mediated rejection and certain autoimmune diseases. However, B cell-targeted therapy such as anti-CD20 B cell-depleting antibody (aCD20) has yielded mixed results in improving outcomes. In this study, we investigated whether an accelerated B cell reconstitution leading to aCD20 depletion resistance could account for these discrepancies. Using a transplantation model, we found that antigen-independent inflammation, likely through toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, was sufficient to mitigate B cell depletion. Secondary lymphoid organs had a quicker recovery of B cells when compared to peripheral blood. Inflammation altered the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of aCD20 therapy by shortening drug half-life and accelerating the reconstitution of the peripheral B cell pool by bone marrow-derived B cell precursors. IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulin) coadministration also shortened aCD20 drug half-life and led to accelerated B cell recovery. Repeated aCD20 dosing restored B cell depletion and delayed allograft rejection, especially B cell-dependent, antibody-independent allograft rejection. These data demonstrate the importance of further clinical studies of the PK/PD of monoclonal antibody treatment in inflammatory conditions. The data also highlight the disconnect between B cell depletion on peripheral blood compared to secondary lymphoid organs, the deleterious effect of IVIG when given with aCD20 and the relevance of redosing of aCD20 for effective B cell depletion in alloimmunity. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. [Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  15. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  16. Dataset of transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Garruss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via B cell receptors (BCR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs result in activation of B cells with distinct physiological outcomes, but transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that drive activation and distinguish these pathways remain unknown. At early time points after BCR and TLR ligand exposure, 0.5 and 2 h, RNA-seq was performed allowing observations on rapid transcriptional changes. At 2 h, ChIP-seq was performed to allow observations on important regulatory mechanisms potentially driving transcriptional change. The dataset includes RNA-seq, ChIP-seq of control (Input, RNA Pol II, H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and a separate RNA-seq for miRNA expression, which can be found at Gene Expression Omnibus Dataset GSE61608. Here, we provide details on the experimental and analysis methods used to obtain and analyze this dataset and to examine the transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation.

  17. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  18. Post-bleaching coral community change on southern Maldivian reefs: is there potential for rapid recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C. T.; Morgan, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Given the severity of the 2016 global bleaching event, there are major questions about how quickly reef communities will recover. Here, we explore the ecological and physical structural changes that occurred across five atoll interior reefs in the southern Maldives using data collected at 6 and 12 months post-bleaching. Following initial severe coral mortality, further minor coral mortality had occurred by 12 months post-bleaching, and coral cover is now low (individuals m-2), well below those measured 9-12 months following the 1998 bleaching event, and below recovery thresholds identified on other Indian Ocean reefs. Our findings suggest that the physical structure of these reefs will need to decline further before effective recruitment and recovery can begin.

  19. Sphagnum abundance and photosynthetic capacity show rapid short-term recovery following managed burning

    OpenAIRE

    Grau-Andrés, Roger; Gray, Alan; Davies, G. Matt

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prescribed burning in peatlands is controversial due to concerns over damage to their ecological functioning, particularly regarding their key genus Sphagnum. However, empirical evidence is scarce.\\ud \\ud Aims: The aim of the article is to quantify Sphagnum recovery following prescribed burns.\\ud \\ud Methods: We completed nine fires at a raised bog in Scotland, achieving a range of fire severities by simulating drought in some plots. We measured Sphagnum cover and chlorophyll fluo...

  20. DNA methyltransferase 1 and DNA methylation patterning contribute to germinal center B-cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaknovich, Rita; Cerchietti, Leandro; Tsikitas, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of germinal center (GC) B cells includes the unique ability to tolerate rapid proliferation and the mutagenic actions of activation induced cytosine deaminase (AICDA). Given the importance of epigenetic patterning in determining cellular phenotypes, we examined DNA methylation...... and the role of DNA methyltransferases in the formation of GCs. DNA methylation profiling revealed a marked shift in DNA methylation patterning in GC B cells versus resting/naive B cells. This shift included significant differential methylation of 235 genes, with concordant inverse changes in gene expression...... affecting most notably genes of the NFkB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. GC B cells were predominantly hypomethylated compared with naive B cells and AICDA binding sites were highly overrepresented among hypomethylated loci. GC B cells also exhibited greater DNA methylation heterogeneity than naive B...

  1. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  2. B-Cell Metabolic Remodeling and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Grusdat, Melanie; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    of the current state of the art and describe the main metabolic features of B cells during normal development and oncogenesis, with emphasis on the major B-cell transcriptional and metabolic regulators, including myelocytomatosis virus oncogene cellular homolog (Myc) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α)....

  3. Dynamic mechanical analysis for rapid assessment of the time-dependent recovery behavior of shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azra, Charly; Plummer, Christopher J. G.; Månson, Jan-Anders E.

    2013-07-01

    Thermally activated shape memory polymers (SMPs) recover from a secondary shape induced by mechanical deformation to a primary equilibrium shape when they are heated to their actuation temperature. In certain applications, for example in the biomedical field, it may be necessary to control the rate of shape recovery under isothermal conditions, which requires knowledge of the time-dependent response of the SMP. In the present work, the time dependence of isothermal shape recovery has been investigated for polyurethane-based SMPs with two different molecular architectures. The results are discussed in terms of a linear thermo-viscoelastic model for the time and temperature dependence of the shape memory response at small strains, using data from single constant frequency dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) temperature sweeps. This approach is based on the establishment of an approximate relationship between the storage modulus, the loss modulus and the shift factor, aT(t), usually derived from time-temperature superposition of isothermal data obtained at different temperatures. The DMA data are thus shown to provide an approximate measure of the relaxation and retardation time spectra, which may in turn be used to predict the shape memory response to a simple programming-isothermal shape recovery sequence. This procedure is argued to permit rapid quantitative comparison of the shape memory performance of different materials, with minimal experimental characterization, and is hence potentially a useful tool for designing materials for specific applications.

  4. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  5. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  6. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heizmann, Beate [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Sellars, MacLean [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Macias-Garcia, Alejandra [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chan, Susan, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Kastner, Philippe, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  7. Lis1 Regulates Germinal Center B Cell Antigen Acquisition and Affinity Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Cai, Zhenming; Zhang, Le; Yin, Yuye; Chen, Xufeng; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Yang; Zhai, Sulan; Long, Xuehui; Liu, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2017-06-01

    The germinal center (GC) is the site where activated B cells undergo rapid expansions, somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation. Affinity maturation is a process of Ag-driven selection. The amount of Ag acquired and displayed by GC B cells determines whether it can be positively selected, and therefore Ag acquisition has to be tightly regulated to ensure the efficient affinity maturation. Cell expansion provides sufficient quantity of GC B cells and Abs, whereas affinity maturation improves the quality of Abs. In this study, we found that Lis1 is a cell-intrinsic regulator of Ag acquisition capability of GC B cells. Lack of Lis1 resulted in redistribution of polymerized actin and accumulation of F-actin at uropod; larger amounts of Ags were acquired and displayed by GC B cells, which presumably reduced the selection stringency. Affinity maturation was thus compromised in Lis1-deficient mice. Consistently, overexpression of Lis1 in GC B cells led to less Ag acquisition and display. Additionally, Lis1 is required for GC B cell expansion, and Lis1 deficiency blocked the cell cycle at the mitotic phase and GC B cells were prone to apoptosis. Overall, we suggest that Lis1 is required for GC B cell expansion, affinity maturation, and maintaining functional intact GC response, thus ensuring both the quantity and quality of Ab response. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Phylogeny of B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Pasquier, L

    1993-04-01

    All vertebrates with jaws (Gnathostomata) have B cells. With the exception of some B cells in cartilaginous fish that express germ-line joined Ig genes, all B cells, irrespective of the organization of their Ig genes (which varies among vertebrates), rearrange the Ig-gene segments somatically. Somatic diversification occurs in all species during rearrangement (junctional diversity) and later by somatic mutation of gene conversion. Somatic mutants are poorly selected in species that lack germinal centers, which may explain the differences in antibody repertoire among vertebrates. The early (larval or neonate) B-cell repertoire is restricted in all species so far studied because of a lack of N-region diversity and in some cases because of a special usage of the D segments of the heavy chain genes.

  9. Quantitative ultrastructural changes induced by sucrose administration in the pancreatic B cells of normal hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camihort, G; Del Zotto, H; Gómez Dumm, C L; Gagliardino, J J

    2000-04-01

    We have previously reported that young male Syrian hamsters receiving a sucrose-rich diet presented increased B-cell replication rate and size. The aim of the present study was to analyze, under the same experimental conditions, the ultrastructural changes in B cells. For this purpose, young male Syrian hamsters were fed with a commercial diet and 10% sucrose in their drinking water (S group) while the control group (C) received the same diet and tap water, for 5 weeks. Samples of the pancreas removed after that period were processed for the immunohistochemical identification of B cells as well as for measuring several ultrastructural parameters. S hamsters showed higher serum insulin levels, while similar serum glucose values were obtained in animals from both groups. The B cells from S group exhibited lesser number of dense secretory granules at expenses of an increase of the pale ones, increased number of both exocytosis profiles and fusion-granule images, as well as enlargement of the intercellular space and mitochondrial area. Marked expansions of this space, limited by junctional complexes, were observed between adjacent B cells. These results would indicate that sucrose administration to normal hamsters not only increases the pancreatic B-cell mass but also induces measurable subcellular changes in the individual B-cell characteristic of an enhanced secretory activity. The present model would represent a useful tool for testing strategies in preventing the damage or promoting the recovery of the pancreatic B cells.

  10. Rapid realist review of the evidence: achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff. Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific intervention (GetREAL). Rapid realist review methodology was used to generate and prioritize programme theories. ASSIA, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and grey literature searches were performed in September 2014-March 2015 with no date restrictions. Stakeholders suggested further documents. GetREAL project documentation was consulted. Programme theory development took place iteratively with literature identification. Stakeholders validated and prioritized emerging programme theories and the prioritized theories were refined using literature case studies. Fifty-one relevant documents fed into 49 programme theories articulating seven mechanisms for lasting change. Prioritized mechanisms were: staff receptiveness to change; and staff feeling encouraged, motivated and supported by colleagues and management to change. Seven programme theories were prioritized and refined using data from four case studies. Lasting change can be facilitated by collaborative action planning, regular collaborative meetings, appointing a change agent, explicit management endorsement and prioritization and modifying organizational structures. Conversely, a challenging organizational climate, or a prevalence of 'change fatigue', may block change. Pre-intervention exploration may help identify any potential barriers to embedding recovery in the organizational culture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warntjes, Marcel J B; Kihlberg, Johan; Engvall, Jan

    2010-08-17

    In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold.

  12. Rapid recovery of serratus anterior muscle function after microneurolysis of long thoracic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melcher Sonya E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the long thoracic nerve is a common cause of winging scapula. When the serratus anterior muscle is unable to function, patients often lose the ability to raise their arm overhead on the affected side. Methods Serratus anterior function was restored through decompression, neurolysis, and tetanic electrical stimulation of the long thoracic nerve. This included partial release of constricting middle scalene fibers and microneurolysis of epineurium and perineurium of the long thoracic nerve under magnification. Abduction angle was measured on the day before and the day following surgery. Results In this retrospective study of 13 neurolysis procedures of the long thoracic nerve, abduction is improved by 10% or greater within one day of surgery. The average improvement was 59° (p Conclusion In a notable number of cases, decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve leads to rapid improvements in winging scapula and the associated limitations on shoulder movement. The duration of the injury and the speed of improvement lead us to conclude that axonal channel defects can potentially exist that do not lead to Wallerian degeneration and yet cause a clear decrease in function.

  13. Comparison of recoveries from anesthesia of horses placed on a rapidly inflating-deflating air pillow or the floor of a padded stall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Miller, Wendy M; Hodgson, David S; McMurphy, Rose M; Chapman, Phillip L

    2006-09-01

    To compare recoveries from anesthesia of horses placed on a conventional padded stall floor or on a specially designed air pillow. Prospective study. 409 horses (> 1 year old) that were anesthetized for surgical procedures during a 37-month period. By random allocation, horses were allowed to recover from anesthesia in either a foammat-padded recovery stall or an identical recovery stall equipped with a rapidly inflating-deflating air pillow. All recoveries were videotaped for subsequent analysis by an independent evaluator. Times to first movement, first attempt to attain sternal recumbency, attainment of sternal recumbency, first attempt to stand, and successful standing were recorded. The numbers of attempts before achieving sternal recumbency and standing were counted, and scores for quality of standing and overall recovery were assigned. Recovery-related variables were compared between groups. Compared with horses allowed to recover in a conventional manner, horses that recovered from anesthesia on the air pillow had a significantly longer rest period before attempting to attain sternal recumbency and rise to standing. Once the pillow was deflated, horses were able to stand after significantly fewer attempts and the quality of their standing was significantly better. Between the 2 groups of horses, there was no significant difference in overall recovery quality scores. The air pillow and padded floor systems were equally safe. Results suggested that use of a rapidly inflating-deflating air pillow promotes a longer period of recumbency and a better quality of standing after anesthesia in horses.

  14. Targeting Vaccine-Induced Extrafollicular Pathway of B Cell Differentiation Improves Rabies Postexposure Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Shannon L; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P; Meuwissen, Samantha; Plummer, Joseph R; McGettigan, James P

    2017-04-15

    Vaccine-induced B cells differentiate along two pathways. The follicular pathway gives rise to germinal centers (GCs) that can take weeks to fully develop. The extrafollicular pathway gives rise to short-lived plasma cells (PCs) that can rapidly secrete protective antibodies within days of vaccination. Rabies virus (RABV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) requires rapid vaccine-induced humoral immunity for protection. Therefore, we hypothesized that targeting extrafollicular B cell responses for activation would improve the speed and magnitude of RABV PEP. To test this hypothesis, we constructed, recovered, and characterized a recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing murine B cell activating factor (BAFF) (rRABV-mBAFF). BAFF is an ideal molecule to improve early pathways of B cell activation, as it links innate and adaptive immunity, promoting potent B cell responses. Indeed, rRABV-mBAFF induced a faster, higher antibody response in mice and enhanced survivorship in PEP settings compared to rRABV. Interestingly, rRABV-mBAFF and rRABV induced equivalent numbers of GC B cells, suggesting that rRABV-mBAFF augmented the extrafollicular B cell pathway. To confirm that rRABV-mBAFF modulated the extrafollicular pathway, we used a signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP)-deficient mouse model. In response to antigen, SAP-deficient mice form extrafollicular B cell responses but do not generate GCs. rRABV-mBAFF induced similar anti-RABV antibody responses in SAP-deficient and wild-type mice, demonstrating that BAFF modulated immunity through the extrafollicular and not the GC B cell pathway. Collectively, strategies that manipulate pathways of B cell activation may facilitate the development of a single-dose RABV vaccine that replaces current complicated and costly RABV PEP. IMPORTANCE Effective RABV PEP is currently resource- and cost-prohibitive in regions of the world where RABV is most prevalent. In order to diminish the requirements for

  15. Inflammatory monocytes hinder antiviral B cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Kuka, Mirela; Di Lucia, Pietro; de Oya, Nereida Jimenez; De Giovanni, Marco; Fioravanti, Jessica; Cristofani, Claudia; Maganuco, Carmela G; Fallet, Benedict; Ganzer, Lucia; Sironi, Laura; Mainetti, Marta; Ostuni, Renato; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Philip D; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2016-10-21

    Antibodies are critical for protection against viral infections. However, several viruses, such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), avoid the induction of early protective antibody responses by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we analyzed the spatiotemporal dynamics of B cell activation to show that, upon subcutaneous infection, LCMV-specific B cells readily relocate to the interfollicular and T cell areas of the draining lymph node where they extensively interact with CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes. These myeloid cells were recruited to lymph nodes draining LCMV infection sites in a type I interferon-, CCR2-dependent fashion and they suppressed antiviral B cell responses by virtue of their ability to produce nitric oxide. Depletion of inflammatory monocytes, inhibition of their lymph node recruitment or impairment of their nitric oxide-producing ability enhanced LCMV-specific B cell survival and led to robust neutralizing antibody production. In conclusion, our results identify inflammatory monocytes as critical gatekeepers that prevent antiviral B cell responses and suggest that certain viruses take advantage of these cells to prolong their persistence within the host.

  16. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  17. B-cell lymphoma, thiamine deficiency, and lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Umair; Sharma, Anuj; Nijjar, Sonny; Sitaraman, Karthikeyan

    2017-01-01

    Type B lactic acidosis is found in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion, can be associated with malignancies, and can be caused by thiamine deficiency. We present a patient who presented with an abdominal mass that biopsy disclosed to be a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Because thiamine deficiency is a rare cause of lactic acidosis in cancer, the patient was treated with intravenous thiamine with rapid normalization of the lactic acid level. The level prior to treatment was low. The case emphasizes a rare cause of lactic acidosis.

  18. Rapid changes in key ruminal microbial populations during the induction of and recovery from diet-induced milk fat depression in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, D E; Preston, S H; Risser, J M; Harvatine, K J

    2015-08-14

    The ruminant provides a powerful model for understanding the temporal dynamics of gastrointestinal microbial communities. Diet-induced milk fat depression (MFD) in the dairy cow is caused by rumen-derived bioactive fatty acids, and is commonly attributed to the changes in the microbial population. The aim of the present study was to determine the changes occurring in nine ruminal bacterial taxa with well-characterised functions, and abundance of total fungi, ciliate protozoa and bacteria during the induction of and recovery from MFD. Interactions between treatment and time were observed for ten of the twelve populations. The total number of both fungi and ciliate protozoa decreased rapidly (days 4 and 8, respectively) by more than 90% during the induction period and increased during the recovery period. The abundance of Streptococcus bovis (amylolytic) peaked at 350% of control levels on day 4 of induction and rapidly decreased during the recovery period. The abundance of Prevotella bryantii (amylolytic) decreased by 66% from day 8 to 20 of the induction period and increased to the control levels on day 12 of the recovery period. The abundance of Megasphaera elsdenii and Selenomonas ruminantium (lactate-utilising bacteria) increased progressively until day 12 of induction (>170%) and decreased during the recovery period. The abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes (fibrolytic) decreased by 97% on day 4 of induction and increased progressively to an equal extent during the recovery period, although smaller changes were observed for other fibrolytic bacteria. The abundance of the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens/Pseudobutyrivibrio group decreased progressively during the induction period and increased during the recovery period, whereas the abundance of Butyrivibrio hungatei was not affected by treatment. Responsive taxa were modified rapidly, with the majority of changes occurring within 8 d and their time course was similar to the time course of the induction of MFD

  19. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe's success as a human pathogen.

  20. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. The origin of marginal zone B cells in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, PM; de Boer, NK; Deenen, GJ; Nieuwenhuis, P; Kroese, FGM

    The marginal zone is a unique compartment that is only found in the spleen. Rat marginal zone B cells (MZ-B) can be distinguished from other B cells, e.g. recirculating follicular B cells (RF-B), by several phenotypic characteristics. Typically MZ-B cells are surface (s)IgM(hi), sIgD(lo) and

  2. Imaging the Interactions Between B Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia C; Bolger-Munro, Madison; Gold, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    In vivo, B cells are often activated by antigens that are displayed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Binding of membrane-associated antigens to the B cell receptor (BCR) causes rapid cytoskeleton-dependent changes in the spatial organization of the BCR and other B cell membrane proteins, leading to the formation of an immune synapse. This process has been modeled using antigens attached to artificial planar lipid bilayers or to plasma membrane sheets. As a more physiological system for studying B cell-APC interactions, we have expressed model antigens in easily transfected adherent cell lines such as Cos-7 cells. The model antigens that we have used are a transmembrane form of a single-chain anti-Igκ antibody and a transmembrane form of hen egg lysozyme that is fused to a fluorescent protein. This has allowed us to study multiple aspects of B cell immune synapse formation including cytoskeletal reorganization, BCR microcluster coalescence, BCR-mediated antigen gathering, and BCR signaling. Here, we provide protocols for expressing these model antigens on the surface of Cos-7 cells, transfecting B cells with siRNAs or with plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins, using fixed cell and live cell fluorescence microscopy to image B cell-APC interactions, and quantifying APC-induced changes in BCR spatial organization and signaling.

  3. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    OpenAIRE

    TAFALLA, carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present,...

  4. Rise and fall of a wolf population: genetic diversity and structure during recovery, rapid expansion and drastic decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, E; Ruokonen, M; Kojola, I; Aspi, J

    2012-11-01

    The grey wolves (Canis lupus) of Finland have had a varied history, with a period of rapid population expansion after the mid-1990s followed by a decline with a current census size of about 140 wolves. Here, we investigate the impact of unstable population size and connectivity on genetic diversity and structure in a long-term genetic study of 298 Finnish wolves born in 1995-2009 and genotyped for 17 microsatellite loci. During the initial recovery and prior to population expansion, genetic diversity was high (1995-1997: LD-N(e)  = 67.2; H(o)  = 0.749; H(e)  = 0.709) despite a small census size and low number of breeders (N(c)  < 100; N(b)  < 10) likely reflecting the status of the Russian source population. Surprisingly, observed heterozygosity decreased significantly during the study period (t = -2.643, P = 0.021) despite population expansion, likely a result of an increase in inbreeding (F(IS)  = 0.108 in 2007-2009) owing to a low degree of connectivity with adjacent Russian wolf population (m = 0.016-0.090; F(ST)  = 0.086, P < 0.001) and population crash after 2006. However, population growth had a temporary positive impact on N(e) and number of family lines. This study shows that even strong population growth alone might not be adequate to retain genetic diversity, especially when accompanied with low amount of subsequent gene flow and population decline. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases.

  6. IgH isotype-specific B cell receptor expression influences B cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Pei; Granato, Alessandra; Zuo, Teng; Chaudhary, Neha; Zuiani, Adam; Han, Seung Seok; Donthula, Rakesh; Shrestha, Akritee; Sen, Debattama; Magee, Jennifer M; Gallagher, Michael P; van der Poel, Cees E; Carroll, Michael C; Wesemann, Duane R

    2017-10-03

    Ig heavy chain (IgH) isotypes (e.g., IgM, IgG, and IgE) are generated as secreted/soluble antibodies (sIg) or as membrane-bound (mIg) B cell receptors (BCRs) through alternative RNA splicing. IgH isotype dictates soluble antibody function, but how mIg isotype influences B cell behavior is not well defined. We examined IgH isotype-specific BCR function by analyzing naturally switched B cells from wild-type mice, as well as by engineering polyclonal Ighγ1/γ1 and Ighε/ε mice, which initially produce IgG1 or IgE from their respective native genomic configurations. We found that B cells from wild-type mice, as well as Ighγ1/γ1 and Ighε/ε mice, produce transcripts that generate IgM, IgG1, and IgE in an alternative splice form bias hierarchy, regardless of cell stage. In this regard, we found that mIgμ > mIgγ1 > mIgε, and that these BCR expression differences influence respective developmental fitness. Restrained B cell development from Ighγ1/γ1 and Ighε/ε mice was proportional to sIg/mIg ratios and was rescued by enforced expression of the respective mIgs. In addition, artificially enhancing BCR signal strength permitted IgE+ memory B cells-which essentially do not exist under normal conditions-to provide long-lived memory function, suggesting that quantitative BCR signal weakness contributes to restraint of IgE B cell responses. Our results indicate that IgH isotype-specific mIg/BCR dosage may play a larger role in B cell fate than previously anticipated.

  7. Primary Hepatosplenic Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Morales-Polanco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma. It usually begins in the lymph nodes; up to 40% may have an extranodal presentation. According to a definition of primary extranodal lymphoma with presentation only in extranodal sites, there are reports of large B-cell lymphomas limited to liver or spleen as separate entities, and to date there have been only three documented cases of primary hepatosplenic presentation. This paper reports a fourth case. Due to a review of the literature and the clinical course of the case reported, we conclude that primary hepatosplenic large B-cell lymphoma has been found predominantly in females older than 60 years. The patients reported had <2 months of evolution prior to diagnosis, prominent B symptoms, splenomegaly in three and hepatomegaly in two, none with lymph node involvement. All had thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function tests; three had anemia and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, two with hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. Because of the previously mentioned data, it can be stated that primary hepatosplenic lymphoma is an uncommon and aggressive form of disease that requires immediate recognition and treatment.

  8. Rapid Recovery of Chironomidae (Diptera) in Little Mill Creek (Kansas, U.S.A.) After the Decommissioning of a Waste Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, R. W.; Ferrington, L. C.

    2005-05-01

    In June 1995 the Lenexa Waste Water Treatment Plant was decommissioned, providing an opportunity to study recovery of Chironomidae community structure in Little Mill Creek. Using pupal exuviae, weekly changes in the species richness and composition of Chironomidae emerging upstream and downstream of the effluent outfall was evaluated from two weeks before decommissioning to eight weeks post-decommissioning. Chironomidae emergence was clearly different between upstream and downstream sites both before and shortly after effluent input ceased. Before decommissioning, sites immediately downstream of the effluent had low species richness and were dominated by Chironomus riparius (Meigen) and other tolerant taxa, with some recovery at sites farther downstream. Two weeks after decommissioning, only sites immediately downstream of the former effluent were clearly impacted, but effects were reduced compared to pre-recovery collections. At five weeks post-decommissioning, species richness was only slightly lower at the sites immediately downstream of the former effluent and the composition of common species (i.e., >5% of relative abundance) was similar between upstream and downstream sites. Rapid recovery of chironomid emergence below the sewage effluent likely resulted from both colonization of drifting larvae from upstream sources and adult dispersal and oviposition, indicating rapid responses in emergence as water quality conditions improved.

  9. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki; Wei, Chungwen; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Anolik, Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Memory B cells are more heterogeneous than previously thought. Given that B cells play powerful antibody-independent effector functions, it seems reasonable to assume division of labor between distinct memory B cells subpopulations in both protective and pathogenic immune responses. Here we review the information emerging regarding the heterogeneity of human memory B cells. A better understanding of this topic should greatly improve our ability to target specific B cell subsets either in vaccine responses or in autoimmune diseases and organ rejection among other pathological conditions where B cells play central pathogenic roles.

  10. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S.; Klein, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:25656706

  11. Rapid realist review of the evidence : achieving lasting change when mental health rehabilitation staff undertake recovery-oriented training

    OpenAIRE

    Gee, Melanie; Bhanbhro, Sadiq; Cook, Sarah; Killaspy, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To identify the factors contributing to lasting change in practice following a recovery-based training intervention for inpatient mental health rehabilitation staff.\\ud \\ud Background: Staff training may help nurses and other staff groups in inpatient mental health rehabilitative settings to increase their recovery-oriented practice. There are no published reviews on the effectiveness of such training and few long-term evaluations. This review informed a realist evaluation of a specific ...

  12. Transiently antigen primed B cells can generate multiple subsets of memory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson S Turner

    Full Text Available Memory B cells are long-lived cells that generate a more vigorous response upon recognition of antigen (Ag and T cell help than naïve B cells and ensure maintenance of durable humoral immunity. Functionally distinct subsets of murine memory B cells have been identified based on isotype switching of BCRs and surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 and co-inhibitory molecule PD-L2. Memory B cells in a subpopulation with low surface expression of CD80 and PD-L2 are predominantly non-isotype switched and can be efficiently recruited into germinal centers (GCs in secondary responses. In contrast, a CD80 and PD-L2 positive subset arises predominantly from GCs and can quickly differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells (PCs. Here we demonstrate that single transient acquisition of Ag by B cells may be sufficient for their long-term participation in GC responses and for development of various memory B cell subsets including CD80 and PD-L2 positive effector-like memory cells that rapidly differentiate into class-switched PCs during recall responses.

  13. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VA Learning University (VALU) SimLearn Libraries (VALNET) VA Software Documentation Library (VDL) About VHA Learn about VHA Forms & ... B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who develop chronic B-cell leukemias ...

  14. Identification of IFN-γ-producing innate B cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yan Bao Xingguang Liu Chaofeng Han Sheng Xu Bin Xie Qian Zhang Yan Gu Jin Hou Li Qian Cheng Qian Huanxing Han Xuetao Cao

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells play important roles in the humoral immune response and the regulation of adaptive immunity, B cell subpopulations with unique phenotypes, particularly those with non-classical immune...

  15. The molecular biology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, Mareike; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of malignant lymphoma. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this entity. Gene expression profiling has identified three molecular DLBCL subtypes, termed germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the biology o...

  16. Negative signaling in B cells: SHIP Grbs Shc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridandapani, S; Kelley, T; Cooney, D; Pradhan, M; Coggeshall, K M

    1997-09-01

    Negative signaling in B cells is initiated by co-crosslinking of the antigen receptor and the Fcy receptor, resulting in cessation of B-cell signaling events and, in turn, inhibiting B-cell proliferation and antibody secretion. Here, a competitive role is proposed for SHIP in blocking the interaction of Shc with the Grb2-Sos complex of proteins that lead to Ras activation in B cells.

  17. B cell lymphoma and myeloma in murine Gaucher's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, E. V.; Wang, S. Z.; Archer, J.; Dekker, N. [=Nick; Aerts, J. M. F. G.; Karlsson, S.; Cox, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma and B cell lymphoma are leading causes of death in Gaucher's disease but the nature of the stimulus driving the often noted clonal expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting B cells and cognate lymphoid malignancy is unknown. We investigated the long-term development of B cell

  18. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Frenkel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/- retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/- and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/- C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136 but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144 prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei

  19. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Khan MD, FACP

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH

  20. Evaluation of a rapid method for recovery of norovirus and hepatitis A virus from oysters and blue mussels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhrbrand, Katrine; Myrmel, Mette; Maunula, Leena

    2010-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks caused by noroviruses (NoVs) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are often linked to consumption of contaminated shellfish. The objective of this study was to identify an appropriate virus recovery method for real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR detection and subsequently to evalu......Foodborne outbreaks caused by noroviruses (NoVs) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are often linked to consumption of contaminated shellfish. The objective of this study was to identify an appropriate virus recovery method for real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR detection and subsequently...

  1. Rapid Neurological Recovery Following Partial Surgical Resection of Spinal Glioblastoma Multiforme in a Pediatric Patient Presenting With Complete Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Gabriel N; Grannan, Benjamin L; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shankar, Ganesh M; Dewitt, John C; Puthenpura, Vidya; Koffie, Robert M; Macdonald, Shannon M; Ebb, David H; Frosch, Matthew P; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme is a rare entity with a poor prognosis often presenting with lower extremity weakness or paralysis. Previous literature suggests that aggressive surgical resection may provide overall survival benefit; however, there is limited concurrent analysis demonstrating neurological recovery following surgical resection. We report the case of a 9-year-old boy who presented with complete paraplegia and regained the ability to ambulate independently following subtotal surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. The case demonstrates the balance between meaningful neurological recovery and overall survival when deciding on the extent of resection in cases of pediatric spinal glioblastoma multiforme.

  2. Gas exchange recovery following natural drought is rapid unless limited by loss of leaf hydraulic conductance: evidence from an evergreen woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Robert P; Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M; Mitchell, Patrick J

    2017-09-01

    Drought can cause major damage to plant communities, but species damage thresholds and postdrought recovery of forest productivity are not yet predictable. We used an El Niño drought event as a natural experiment to test whether postdrought recovery of gas exchange could be predicted by properties of the water transport system, or if metabolism, primarily high abscisic acid concentration, might delay recovery. We monitored detailed physiological responses, including shoot sapflow, leaf gas exchange, leaf water potential and foliar abscisic acid (ABA), during drought and through the subsequent rehydration period for a sample of eight canopy and understory species. Severe drought caused major declines in leaf water potential, elevated foliar ABA concentrations and reduced stomatal conductance and assimilation rates in our eight sample species. Leaf water potential surpassed levels associated with incipient loss of leaf hydraulic conductance in four species. Following heavy rainfall gas exchange in all species, except those trees predicted to have suffered hydraulic impairment, recovered to prestressed rates within 1 d. Recovery of plant gas exchange was rapid and could be predicted by the hydraulic safety margin, providing strong support for leaf vulnerability to water deficit as an index of damage under natural drought conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81.

  4. Generation of stable monoclonal antibody-producing B cell receptor-positive human memory B cells by genetic programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Diehl, Sean A.; Yasuda, Etsuko; Bakker, Arjen Q.; van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Lukens, Michaël; van Bleek, Grada M.; Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N.; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.; Mei, Henrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Spits, Hergen; Beaumont, Tim

    The B cell lymphoma-6 (Bcl-6) and Bcl-xL proteins are expressed in germinal center B cells and enable them to endure the proliferative and mutagenic environment of the germinal center. By introducing these genes into peripheral blood memory B cells and culturing these cells with two factors produced

  5. Regulators of B-cell activity in SLE : a better target for treatment than B-cell depletion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolff, S.; Abdulahad, W. H.; Bijl, M.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    B cells, being a source of characteristic antinuclear autoantibodies, play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Evidences indicate that alterations in B-cell regulation are responsible for B-cell hyperactivity as seen in SLE. T cells, soluble factors, and even B

  6. Induced unilateral vocal fold paralysis and recovery rapidly modulate brain areas related to phonatory behavior: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashwini; Jiang, Yang; Stemple, Joseph C; Archer, Sanford M; Andreatta, Richard D

    2011-03-01

    Peripheral and behavioral effects of voice disorders are well documented in the literature; yet, there is little information regarding the central neural biomarkers and mechanisms underlying these disorders. Understanding the details of brain function changes in disordered voice production is a critical factor for developing better treatment strategies that result in more robust patient outcomes. To examine a model of induced unilateral vocal fold paralysis (iUVFP) to demonstrate and characterize the form of activity changes within central mappings of the larynx to the induced paralysis. The induced paralysis model allowed the participant to serve as his or her own control when comparing baseline results of normal voice with results during the paralysis and subsequent recovery. Prospective, case-study design. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine central laryngeal representations during three time points: pre-iUVFP, during iUVFP, and postrecovery from iUVFP. iUVFP was induced using a lidocaine with epinephrine nerve block unilaterally. Percent changes in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activity served as the dependent variable. Results indicated an overall reduced activity level in sensorimotor, subcortical, and cerebellar regions during paralysis. Recovery from paralysis led to augmented responses, particularly in sensory, association, and cerebellar zones. The decrease in activity during iUVFP and the significantly increased activity during the recovery phase likely represent immediate neuroplastic events occurring within minutes of nerve blockade. Recovery-related changes in the BOLD response are hypothesized to be associated with a recalibration of the system after return of normal laryngeal function. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of a rapid method for recovery of norovirus and hepatitis A virus from oysters and blue mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrbrand, Katrine; Myrmel, Mette; Maunula, Leena; Vainio, Kirsti; Trebbien, Ramona; Nørrung, Birgit; Schultz, Anna Charlotte

    2010-10-01

    Foodborne outbreaks caused by noroviruses (NoVs) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are often linked to consumption of contaminated shellfish. The objective of this study was to identify an appropriate virus recovery method for real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR detection and subsequently to evaluate this method on shellfish bioaccumulated with virus in a collaborative study. Five methods were compared for recovery of NoV GII.7 and feline calicivirus from spiked digestive tissue of oysters and mussels. A method based on proteinase K digestion followed by NucliSENS miniMAG extraction was found to be the most efficient with a 50% limit of detection (LOD(50)) of 62 and 12 RT-PCR U/1.5 g digestive tissue for NoV GII.7 in oysters and mussels, respectively. Evaluation of the method in four laboratories found the percentage of sensitivity, based on low/high levels of virus bioaccumulated in oysters, to be 33/80 for NoV GI.3b, 13/92 for NoV GII.4 and 50/42 for HAV. A specificity of 100% was found for all three viruses in non-bioaccumulated oysters. As process control Mengovirus (vMC(0)) showed an average recovery of 1.8% from oysters and 1.2% from mussels. The study demonstrates that this recovery method can be useful for harmonized data generation and routine viral analyses of shellfish. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Thymic irradiation inhibits the rapid recovery of TH1 but not TH2-like functions of CD4+ T cells after total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, H.; Adkins, B.; Strober, S. (Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA (United States))

    1991-10-15

    Four to six weeks after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), there is a selective deficit in the CD4+ T cells which secrete IL-2, proliferate in the MLR, and induce GVHD (Th1-like functions). A similar deficit in CD4+ T cells which secrete IL-4 and help antibody responses (Th2-like functions) is not observed. In the present study, shielding of the thymus with lead during TLI increased the Th1-like functions of CD4+ cells. Mice without thymus shields showed a marked selective reduction in the medullary stromal cells identified with the monoclonal antibody, MD1, and the severe reduction was prevented with thymus shields. Thus, shielding the thymus prevents the depletion of thymic medullary stromal cells and allows for a rapid recovery of Th1-like functions in the mouse spleen after TLI. Th2-like functions recover rapidly after TLI whether or not the thymus is irradiated.

  9. Atypical chemokine receptor 4 shapes activated B cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Bastow, Cameron R; McKenzie, Duncan R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Babb, Rachelle; Norton, Todd S; Zotos, Dimitra; Rodda, Lauren B; Hermes, Jana R; Bourne, Katherine; Gilchrist, Derek S; Nibbs, Robert J; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Vinuesa, Carola G; Tarlinton, David M; Brink, Robert; Hill, Geoffrey R; Cyster, Jason G; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2018-01-31

    Activated B cells can initially differentiate into three functionally distinct fates-early plasmablasts (PBs), germinal center (GC) B cells, or early memory B cells-by mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we identify atypical chemokine receptor 4 (ACKR4), a decoy receptor that binds and degrades CCR7 ligands CCL19/CCL21, as a regulator of early activated B cell differentiation. By restricting initial access to splenic interfollicular zones (IFZs), ACKR4 limits the early proliferation of activated B cells, reducing the numbers available for subsequent differentiation. Consequently, ACKR4 deficiency enhanced early PB and GC B cell responses in a CCL19/CCL21-dependent and B cell-intrinsic manner. Conversely, aberrant localization of ACKR4-deficient activated B cells to the IFZ was associated with their preferential commitment to the early PB linage. Our results reveal a regulatory mechanism of B cell trafficking via an atypical chemokine receptor that shapes activated B cell fate. © 2018 Kara et al.

  10. Human memory B cells isolated from blood and tonsils are functionally distinctive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M Eugenia; Billordo, Luis Ariel; Baz, Plácida; Fainboim, Leonardo; Arana, Eloisa

    2014-11-01

    Human B-cell studies in vitro have routinely used B lymphocytes purified from spleen, blood or tonsils irrespective of potential differences in their immunological traits. In this study, we compared the functional responses of total (CD19(+)) and memory B cells (Bmem; CD19(+)/CD27(+)) isolated from blood and tonsils to different stimuli. Peripheral B cells showed enhanced survival and proliferation compared with their tonsillar equivalents when stimulated for 10 days. Stimulated B cells from both tissues secreted significantly greater amounts of cytokines than unstimulated controls demonstrating their functional responsiveness. Analysis of CD27 expression over time indicated that the conditions that promoted survival and proliferation of peripheral Bmem, caused massive tonsillar Bmem death. Purified tonsillar Bmem failed to expand but rapidly differentiated in antibody secreting cells and subsequently underwent apoptosis. In contrast, circulating Bmem showed delayed activation and differentiation, but exhibited a longer lifespan and active proliferation. In addition, short-term stimulation of tonsillar Bmem resulted in the production of more immunoglobulin G (IgG) than their peripheral counterparts. At later time points, however, IgG production from the different B cells was reversed. Our findings imply that the tissue located and peripheral Bmem have distinct behaviors, indicating organ dependent functional responses that should not be generalizable to all Bmem. This work provides a greater understanding of how Bmem location is coupled to specialized roles of B lymphocytes.

  11. Obinutuzumab for B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Carolyn J; Stewart, Douglas A

    2014-08-01

    We analyse data for the use of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CD20(+) lymphoproliferative disorders with a focus on chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Targeted therapy against CD20 with the mAb rituximab led to significant improvements in survival for patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is the current mainstay of treatment for CD20(+) malignancies. Despite this, many patients relapse or become refractory after rituximab-containing therapies, so efforts have been made to develop better anti-CD20 mAbs. Obinutuzumab recently demonstrated superiority over rituximab in the only published Phase III study comparing the two antibodies. Obinutuzumab is a humanised, anti-CD20 mAb being compared to rituximab in several Phase III studies. An overview of obinutuzumab, its mechanisms of action and results of Phase I-III studies are presented. The demonstration of superiority of obinutuzumab over rituximab in the CLL11 Phase III study is potentially practice-changing. Obinutuzumab has also proven safe and efficacious in CD20(+) NHL in Phase I/II studies and results of Phase III studies in NHL are eagerly awaited. The potential implications of improved outcomes for CLL and NHL with the introduction of this more potent anti-CD20 antibody are tremendous given the impressive results obtained after the introduction of rituximab over a decade ago.

  12. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  13. State-specific effects of sevoflurane anesthesia on sleep homeostasis: selective recovery of slow wave but not rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dinesh; Lipinski, William J; Walker, Amanda J; Turner, Ashley M; Mashour, George A

    2011-02-01

    Prolonged propofol administration does not result in signs of sleep deprivation, and propofol anesthesia appears to satisfy the homeostatic need for both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. In the current study, the effects of sevoflurane on recovery from total sleep deprivation were investigated. Ten male rats were instrumented for electrophysiologic recordings under three conditions: (1) 36-h ad libitum sleep; (2) 12-h sleep deprivation followed by 24-h ad libitum sleep; and (3) 12-h sleep deprivation, followed by 6-h sevoflurane exposure, followed by 18-h ad libitum sleep. The percentage of waking, NREM sleep, and REM sleep, as well as NREM sleep δ power, were calculated and compared for all three conditions. Total sleep deprivation resulted in significantly increased NREM and REM sleep for 12-h postdeprivation. Sevoflurane exposure after deprivation eliminated the homeostatic increase in NREM sleep and produced a significant decrease in the NREM sleep δ power during the postanesthetic period, indicating a complete recovery from the effects of deprivation. However, sevoflurane did not affect the time course of REM sleep recovery, which required 12 h after deprivation and anesthetic exposure. Unlike propofol, sevoflurane anesthesia has differential effects on NREM and REM sleep homeostasis. These data confirm the previous hypothesis that inhalational agents do not satisfy the homeostatic need for REM sleep, and that the relationship between sleep and anesthesia is likely to be agent and state specific.

  14. The rapid recovery of 5-HT cell firing induced by the antidepressant vortioxetine involves 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Pehrson, Alan L; Etiévant, Adeline; Ebert, Bjarke; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2013-06-01

    The therapeutic effect of current antidepressant drugs appears after several weeks of treatment and a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. Here, we report the effects of the multi-modal antidepressant vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), a 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist, 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, on rat 5-HT neurotransmission. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the dorsal raphe nucleus of anaesthetized rats, we assessed the acute and subchronic effects of vortioxetine and/or the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR57227 or the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist flesinoxan, on 5-HT neuronal firing activity. Using ex-vivo autoradiography, we correlated SERT occupancy and presumed 5-HT firing activity. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, was used as comparator. Importantly, the recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing was achieved after 1 d with vortioxetine and 14 d with fluoxetine. SR57227 delayed this recovery. In contrast, vortioxetine failed to alter the reducing action of 3 d treatment of flesinoxan. Acute dosing of vortioxetine inhibited neuronal firing activity more potently than fluoxetine. SR57227 prevented the suppressant effect of vortioxetine, but not of fluoxetine. In contrast, flesinoxan failed to modify the suppressant effect of vortioxetine acutely administered. Differently to fluoxetine, vortioxetine suppressed neuronal firing without saturating occupancy at the SERT. Vortioxetine produced a markedly faster recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing than fluoxetine. This is at least partly due to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism of vortioxetine in association with its reduced SERT occupancy.

  15. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    Spinal compression injury targeted to the neonatal upper lumbar spinal cord, the region of highest hindlimb locomotor rhythmogenicity, leads to an initial paralysis of the hindlimbs. Behavioural recovery is evident within a few days and approaches normal function within about 3 weeks. Fictive locomotion in the isolated injured spinal cord cannot be elicited by a neurochemical cocktail containing NMDA, dopamine and serotonin 1 day post-injury, but can 3 days post-injury as readily as in the uninjured spinal cord. Low frequency coordinated rhythmic activity can be elicited in the isolated uninjured spinal cord by NMDA + dopamine (without serotonin), but not in the isolated injured spinal cord. In both the injured and uninjured spinal cord, eliciting bona fide fictive locomotion requires the additional presence of serotonin. Following incomplete compression injury in the thoracic spinal cord of neonatal mice 1 day after birth (P1), we previously reported that virtually normal hindlimb locomotor function is recovered within about 3 weeks despite substantial permanent thoracic tissue loss. Here, we asked whether similar recovery occurs following lumbar injury that impacts more directly on the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). As in thoracic injuries, lumbar injuries caused about 90% neuronal loss at the injury site and increased serotonergic innervation below the injury. Motor recovery was slower after lumbar than thoracic injury, but virtually normal function was attained by P25 in both cases. Locomotor CPG status was tested by eliciting fictive locomotion in isolated spinal cords using a widely used neurochemical cocktail (NMDA, dopamine, serotonin). No fictive locomotion could be elicited 1 day post-injury, but could within 3 days post-injury as readily as in age-matched uninjured control spinal cords. Burst patterning and coordination were largely similar in injured and control spinal cords but there were differences. Notably, in both groups there

  16. Dissecting teleost B cell differentiation using transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwollo, Patty

    2011-09-01

    B cell developmental pathways in teleost fishes are poorly understood. In the absence of serological reagents, an alternative approach to dissecting teleost B cell development is to use transcription factors that are differentially expressed during B cell development. This review discusses the structure and function of six transcription factors that play essential roles during teleost B cell development: Ikaros, E2A, EBF, Pax5, Blimp1, and XbpI. Research on alternative splicing of both the Ikaros and Pax5 genes in rainbow trout is presented, including their functional significance. An application is discussed that should aid in elucidating teleost B cell development and activation, by using transcription factors as developmental markers in flow cytometric analysis. Possible future studies in teleost B cell development are suggested in the context of gene regulation. Lastly, broader impacts and practical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of the B cell response to Leishmania infection after anti-CD20 B cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenstedt, Marie M; Boggiatto, Paola M; Jones, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-CD20 depletion therapies targeting B cells are commonly used in malignant B cell disease and autoimmune diseases. There are concerns about the ability of B cells to respond to infectious diseases acquired either before or after B cell depletion. There is evidence that the B cell response to existing or acquired viral infections is compromised during treatment, as well as the antibody response to vaccination. Our laboratory has an experimental system using co-infection of C3H mice with both Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis that suggests that the B cell response is important to healing infected mice. We tested if anti-CD20 treatment would completely restrict the B cell response to these intracellular pathogens. Infected mice that received anti-CD20 B cell depletion therapy had a significant decrease in CD19(+) cells within their lymph nodes and spleens. However, splenic B cells were detected in depleted mice and an antigen-specific antibody response was produced. These results indicate that an antigen-specific B cell response towards intracellular pathogens can be generated during anti-CD20 depletion therapy.

  18. B-cell lymphopoiesis is regulated by cathepsin L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Noel Badano

    Full Text Available Cathepsin L (CTSL is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine peptidase with diverse and highly specific functions. The involvement of CTSL in thymic CD4+ T-cell positive selection has been well documented. Using CTSL(nkt/nkt mice that lack CTSL activity, we have previously demonstrated that the absence of CTSL activity affects the homeostasis of the T-cell pool by decreasing CD4+ cell thymic production and increasing CD8+ thymocyte production. Herein we investigated the influence of CTSL activity on the homeostasis of peripheral B-cell populations and bone marrow (BM B-cell maturation. B-cell numbers were increased in lymph nodes (LN, spleen and blood from CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Increases in splenic B-cell numbers were restricted to transitional T1 and T2 cells and to the marginal zone (MZ cell subpopulation. No alterations in the proliferative or apoptosis levels were detected in peripheral B-cell populations from CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. In the BM, the percentage and the absolute number of pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B, immature and mature B cells were not altered. However, in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that BM B-cell production was markedly increased in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Besides, BM B-cell emigration to the spleen was increased in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Colony-forming unit pre-B (CFU pre-B assays in the presence of BM stromal cells (SC and reciprocal BM chimeras revealed that both BM B-cell precursors and SC would contribute to sustain the increased B-cell hematopoiesis in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Overall, our data clearly demonstrate that CTSL negatively regulates BM B-cell production and output therefore influencing the homeostasis of peripheral B cells.

  19. B-cell subpopulations in children: National reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchamp, Marie; Sterlin, Delphine; Diabate, Aminata; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Monnier, Delphine; Malcus, Christophe; Labalette, Myriam; Picard, Capucine

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral B-lymphocytes undergo a series of changes during the first few years of life. Encounters with foreign antigens lead to maturation and differentiation. Several primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) affecting B-cell development are associated with abnormalities in the composition and/or differentiation of B-cell compartments. The most recent international classifications of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) and common variable immunodeficiencies (CVID) have highlighted the importance of B-cell immunophenotyping and age-specific reference intervals for diagnostic purposes. We established national reference values for memory B-cell subpopulations, on the basis of CD27 and surface IgD expression in the peripheral blood of 242 healthy children. We report here the absolute counts and percentages of naive, switched and non-switched memory B-cells for seven age groups, from neonates to adults. We found that the naive B-cells percentage declined between the ages of 6 months and 8 years, after which it remained stable at about 70-80%. Memory B-cells are already present at birth and their numbers increase throughout childhood, stabilizing between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The definition of reference intervals for pediatric B-cell levels should facilitate the screening and diagnosis of various B-cell immunodeficiencies. This multicenter study, providing national reference values, should thus facilitate immunological diagnosis in children.

  20. Granzyme B producing B-cells in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiqiao; Zeng, Ye; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Lindemann, Monika; Brinkhoff, Alexandra; Schedlowski, Manfred; Xu, Shilei; Sun, Ming; Guberina, Hana; Kirchhof, Julia; Kribben, Andreas; Witzke, Oliver; Wilde, Benjamin

    2017-11-01

    A separate subset of Granzyme B (GrB) producing B-cells regulating T-cell mediated immunity has been identified. In the present study, we investigated the role of GrB(+) B-cells in renal transplant patients (RTX). 12 healthy controls (HC) and 26 RTX patients were enrolled. In addition, 19 healthy volunteers treated with cyclosporine A (CsA) were enrolled. GrB(+) B-cells were determined via flow cytometry. RTX Patients showed a diminished fraction of GrB(+) B-cells as compared to HC. CsA treatment of healthy volunteers had no impact on the development of GrB(+) B-cells. RTX patients with a history of allograft rejection showed an increased frequency of GrB(+) B-cells. RTX patients with at least one episode of CMV viremia tended to have lower GrB(+) B-cells as compared to patients without viremic episodes. We demonstrate that treatment with CsA does not impair the development of GrB(+) B-cells. GrB(+) B-cells may have a dual role in renal transplantation as regulatory cells to maintain allospecific tolerance and as effector cells enhancing viral control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  2. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma genotyping on the liquid biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Diop, Fary; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Monti, Sara; Zanni, Manuela; Rasi, Silvia; Deambrogi, Clara; Spina, Valeria; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Favini, Chiara; Serra, Roberto; Ramponi, Antonio; Boldorini, Renzo; Foà, Robin; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2017-04-06

    Accessible and real-time genotyping for diagnostic, prognostic, or treatment purposes is increasingly impelling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is shed into the blood by tumor cells undergoing apoptosis and can be used as source of tumor DNA for the identification of DLBCL mutations, clonal evolution, and genetic mechanisms of resistance. In this study, we aimed at tracking the basal DLBCL genetic profile and its modification upon treatment using plasma cfDNA. Ultra-deep targeted next generation sequencing of pretreatment plasma cfDNA from DLBCL patients correctly discovered DLBCL-associated mutations that were represented in >20% of the alleles of the tumor biopsy with >90% sensitivity and ∼100% specificity. Plasma cfDNA genotyping also allowed for the recovery of mutations that were undetectable in the tissue biopsy, conceivably because, due to spatial tumor heterogeneity, they were restricted to clones that were anatomically distant from the biopsy site. Longitudinal analysis of plasma samples collected under rituximab-cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-vincristine-prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy showed a rapid clearance of DLBCL mutations from cfDNA among responding patients. Conversely, among patients who were resistant to R-CHOP, basal DLBCL mutations did not disappear from cfDNA. In addition, among treatment-resistant patients, new mutations were acquired in cfDNA that marked resistant clones selected during the clonal evolution. These results demonstrate that cfDNA genotyping of DLBCL is as accurate as genotyping of the diagnostic biopsy to detect clonally represented somatic tumor mutations and is a real-time and noninvasive approach to tracking clonal evolution and the emergence of treatment-resistant clones. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in intact and permeabilized Cockayne syndrome group B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajee, A S; May, A; Dianov, G L; Friedberg, E C; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-29

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is characterized by increased photosensitivity, growth retardation, and neurological and skeletal abnormalities. The recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells after exposure to UV radiation. Gene-specific repair studies have shown a defect in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes in CS cells from genetic complementation groups A and B (CS-A and CS-B). We have analyzed transcription in vivo in intact and permeabilized CS-B cells. Uridine pulse labeling in intact CS-B fibroblasts and lymphoblasts shows a reduction of approximately 50% compared with various normal cells and with cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A. In permeabilized CS-B cells transcription in chromatin isolated under physiological conditions is reduced to about 50% of that in normal chromatin and there is a marked reduction in fluorescence intensity in transcription sites in interphase nuclei. Transcription in CS-B cells is sensitive to alpha-amanitin, suggesting that it is RNA polymerase II-dependent. The reduced transcription in CS-B cells is complemented in chromatin by the addition of normal cell extract, and in intact cells by transfection with the CSB gene. CS-B may be a primary transcription deficiency.

  4. Complete inactivation of photosynthetic activity during desiccation and rapid recovery by rehydration in the aerial microalga Trentepohlia jolithus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Liu, J

    2016-11-01

    Aerial microalgae are more exposed to harsh and rapidly changing environmental conditions, including desiccation and radiation. Under high light, aerial algae in the desiccated state would be highly subject to photodamage. Therefore, aerial algae need effective protective mechanisms to dissipate excess excitation energy. In this study, the changes in photosynthetic behaviors during desiccation and after rehydration in Trentepohlia jolithus were confirmed using chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transient, allowing determination of the photoprotection mechanisms of this aerial alga. The filaments of T. jolithus cells at 25% relative air humidity (RH) are significantly shrunken compared with those at 100% and 87% RH, decreasing the surface area for light absorption. At 25% RH, the shape and intensity of the OJIP transient disappeared, but recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. Compared with 100% RH, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (φPo ), phenomenological energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/CSm) and active PSII reaction centers (RCs) at 25% RH decreased significantly, the specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) increased significantly, but the specific energy fluxes for trapping (TRo/RC) at 25% RH did not change. These parameters at 25% RH recovered rapidly to the level at 100% RH after 5 s of rehydration. These results suggest that the efficiency of PSII light absorption and activities of PSII RCs were reversibly down-regulated in desiccated T. jolithus, which may be a special adaptive mechanism for the survivability of aerial microalgae in habitats with rapidly changing water availability. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. ZBTB32 restricts the duration of memory B cell recall responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jash, Arijita; Wang, Yinan; Weisel, Florian J.; Scharer, Christopher D.; Boss, Jeremy M.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2016-01-01

    Memory B cell responses are more rapid and of greater magnitude than are primary antibody responses. The mechanisms by which these secondary responses are eventually attenuated remain unknown. We demonstrate that the transcription factor ZBTB32 limits the rapidity and duration of antibody recall responses. ZBTB32 is highly expressed by mouse and human memory B cells, but not by their naïve counterparts. Zbtb32−/− mice mount normal primary antibody responses to T-dependent antigens. However, Zbtb32−/− memory B cell-mediated recall responses occur more rapidly and persist longer than do control responses. Microarray analyses demonstrate that Zbtb32−/− secondary bone marrow plasma cells display elevated expression of genes that promote cell cycle progression and mitochondrial function relative to wild-type controls. BrdU labeling and adoptive transfer experiments confirm more rapid production and a cell-intrinsic survival advantage of Zbtb32−/− secondary plasma cells relative to wild-type counterparts. ZBTB32 is therefore a novel negative regulator of antibody recall responses. PMID:27357154

  6. Pro-B cells propagated in stromal cell-free cultures reconstitute functional B-cell compartments in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muenchow, Lilly; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Albertí-Servera, Llucia; Capoferri, Giuseppina; Doelz, Marianne; Rolink, Hannie; Bosco, Nabil; Ceredig, Rhodri; Rolink, Antonius G

    2017-02-01

    Up to now long-term in vitro growth of pro-B cells was thought to require stromal cells. However, here we show that fetal liver (FL) and bone marrow (BM) derived pro-B cells can be propagated long-term in stromal cell-free cultures supplemented with IL-7, stem cell factor and FLT3 ligand. Within a week, most cells expressed surface CD19, CD79A, λ5, and VpreB antigens and had rearranged immunoglobulin D-J heavy chain genes. Both FL and BM pro-B cells reconstituted the B-cell compartments of immuno-incompetent Rag2-deficient mice, with FL pro-B cells generating follicular, marginal zone (MZB) and B1a B cells, and BM pro-B cells giving rise mainly to MZB cells. Reconstituted Rag2-deficient mice generated significant levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to a type II T-independent antigen; mice reconstituted with FL pro-B cells generated surprisingly high IgG1 titers. Finally, we show for the first time that mice reconstituted with mixtures of pro-B and pro-T cells propagated in stromal cell-free in vitro cultures mounted a T-cell-dependent antibody response. This novel stromal cell-free culture system facilitates our understanding of B-cell development and might be applied clinically. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, a lymphoma type with several characteristics unique among diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, T F; Leithäuser, F; Möller, P

    2001-01-01

    Mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is a locally highly aggressive tumor with a rather unique pattern of clinical, morphologic, imunologic, and genetic features distinct from other diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Characterization of this disease has been hampered by the relatively low incidence of this lymphoma type. Although recent studies on larger numbers of cases have allowed new insights into biology and clinics of this lymphoma type, the histogenesis of mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is not yet fully understood. This review will list morphologic, immunlogic, and genetic properties of mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and discuss recent data regarding the biology of this lymphoma type.

  8. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  9. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  10. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  11. A Novel VHH Antibody Targeting the B Cell-Activating Factor for B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To construct an immune alpaca phage display library, in order to obtain a single domain anti-BAFF (B cell-activating factor antibody. Methods: Using phage display technology, we constructed an immune alpaca phage display library, selected anti-BAFF single domain antibodies (sdAbs, cloned three anti-BAFF single-domain antibody genes into expression vector pSJF2, and expressed them efficiently in Escherichia coli. The affinity of different anti-BAFF sdAbs were measured by Bio layer interferometry. The in vitro biological function of three sdAbs was investigated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: We obtained three anti-BAFF single domain antibodies (anti-BAFF64, anti-BAFF52 and anti-BAFFG3, which were produced in high yield in Escherichia coli and inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro. Conclusion: The selected anti-BAFF antibodies could be candidates for B-cell lymphoma therapies.

  12. Thymic B cells and central T cell tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger eKlein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Central T cell tolerance is believed to be mainly induced by thymic dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells. The thymus also harbors substantial numbers of B cells. These may arise though intrathymic B lymphopoiesis or immigration from the bloodstream. Importantly, and in contrast to resting ‘mainstream’ B cells in the periphery, thymic B cells display elevated levels of MHC class II and constitutively express CD80. Arguably their most unexpected feature is the expression of Aire. These unique features of thymic B cells result from a licensing process that involves cross-talk with CD4 single-positive T cells and CD40 signaling. Together, these recent findings suggest that B cells play a more prominent role as thymic APCs than previously appreciated.

  13. The Deadly Dance of B Cells with Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Barrios, Sasha; Charpentier, Tania; Stäger, Simona

    2017-10-28

    B cells are notorious actors for the host's protection against several infectious diseases. So much so that early vaccinology seated its principles upon their long-term protective antibody secretion capabilities. Indeed, there are many examples of acute infectious diseases that are combated by functional humoral responses. However, some chronic infectious diseases actively induce immune deregulations that often lead to defective, if not deleterious, humoral immune responses. In this review we summarize how Leishmania and Trypanosoma spp. directly manipulate B cell responses to induce polyclonal B cell activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, low-specificity antibodies, limited B cell survival, and regulatory B cells, contributing therefore to immunopathology and the establishment of persistent infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... erythematosus, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome. For some anti-B cell agents, clinical benefits have been convincingly demonstrated, while other B cell-targeted therapies failed to improve outcomes when added to standard...... and functions in rheumatic disorders. Future studies should also evaluate how to maintain disease control by means of conventional and/or biologic immunosuppressants after remission-induction with anti-B cell antibodies....

  15. Rapid Recovery Double Cross-Linking Hydrogel with Stable Mechanical Properties and High Resilience Triggered by Visible Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longxiang; Qiu, Jianhui; Sakai, Eiichi; Ito, Kazushi

    2017-04-19

    The designed tough hydrogels, depending on energy dissipation mechanism, possess excellent biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness, and outstanding mechanical properties. However, the application of hydrogels is greatly limited in actuators and sensors for the lack of instantaneous recovery and resilience. In this work, we synthesized a double cross-linking poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel via a simple, one-pot, visible-light-trigger polymerization, with carboxymethyl cellulose as initiator and the first cross-linker, N,N'-methylene bis(acrylamide) (MBA) as the second cross-linker. The tensile strength and elastic modulus are in the range of 724-352 kPa and 115-307 kPa, respectively, depending on the MBA content. The swelling ratio of hydrogels dramatically decreased with increasing the MBA content. DMA results indicate that the internal friction between molecules within the hydrogel decreases with the increase of MBA content. Cyclic tensile tests show that after the structure stabilizes, the resilience, maximum stress, and residual strain of Gel-2 maintains over 93% (95% for successive cyclic tensile test), 115 kPa and less than 3%, respectively, at a strain of 125%. The values of resilience and residual strain are almost constant in both successive and intermittent cyclic tensile tests. Moreover, the swollen hydrogel has higher resilience and lower residual strain than the same hydrogel in the as-prepared state.

  16. Application of carbon nanoparticles accelerates the rapid recovery of parathyroid function during thyroid carcinoma surgery with central lymph node dissection: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Du, Zhi-Peng; Qiu, Nian-Cun; Liu, Miao-E; Liu, Sheng; Jiang, Dao-Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of carbon nanoparticles in identifying lymph nodes and promoting parathyroid gland function recovery after thyroid carcinoma surgery along with central lymph node dissection. A total of 231 patients who underwent thyroid carcinoma surgery combined with central lymph node dissection were divided into two groups: the CN group (intraoperative carbon nanoparticles injections) and the control group (no injection). Datas were collected respectively on the pre-operative, 1st, 7th and 30th postoperative days and monthly thereafter. While the pathological results (e.g. amount of incidental removed parathyroid glands and lymph nodes dissected), complications (e.g. rates of vocal cord paralysis, the neuromuscular symptoms, hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism), as well as follow-up outcomes of the serum Ca2+ and PTH levels were gathered and measured to be included in. In regard to the results of the pathological tests, the control group had a relatively higher incidence of incidental parathyroidectomy when compared to the CN group (P  0.05). Carbon nanoparticles play a key role in accurately identifying lymph nodes, reducing mistaken excision of parathyroid glands, accelerating rapid recovery of parathyroid function during thyroid carcinoma surgery with central lymph node dissection, without increasing the probability of postoperative complications. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Plasmodium falciparum-specific human memory B cell compartment expands gradually with repeated malaria infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta E Weiss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf malaria is only acquired after years of repeated infections and wanes rapidly without ongoing parasite exposure. Antibodies are central to malaria immunity, yet little is known about the B-cell biology that underlies the inefficient acquisition of Pf-specific humoral immunity. This year-long prospective study in Mali of 185 individuals aged 2 to 25 years shows that Pf-specific memory B-cells and antibodies are acquired gradually in a stepwise fashion over years of repeated Pf exposure. Both Pf-specific memory B cells and antibody titers increased after acute malaria and then, after six months of decreased Pf exposure, contracted to a point slightly higher than pre-infection levels. This inefficient, stepwise expansion of both the Pf-specific memory B-cell and long-lived antibody compartments depends on Pf exposure rather than age, based on the comparator response to tetanus vaccination that was efficient and stable. These observations lend new insights into the cellular basis of the delayed acquisition of malaria immunity.

  18. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The adaptor molecule Act1 regulates BAFF responsiveness and self-reactive B cell selection during transitional B cell maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltiay, Natalia V.; Lu, Yi; Allman, David; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-01-01

    The transitional stage is a key check-point for elimination of autoreactive B cells in the periphery. This selection process requires fine regulation of signals received through B-cell receptor (BCR) and B cell activating factor receptor (BAFFR). We previously identified the adaptor molecule Act1 as a negative regulator of BAFF-mediated signaling. Deficiency of Act1 in mice results in peripheral B cell hyperplasia and development of autoimmunity. In this study we demonstrate that Act1 plays a critical role in the regulation of transitional B cell survival and maturation. We found that the ratio of late-transitional (T2) to early-transitional (T1) cells was increased in spleens from Act1-deficient mice. Moreover, BAFF stimulation induced better T1 cell survival and promoted more efficient maturation of T1 cells into T2 cells ex vivo in the absence of Act1. BAFF stimulation induced higher levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl2-member Mc1-l in Act1-deficient T1 than that in wild-type control cells, suggesting that Mcl1 might be one of the key effector molecules for BAFF-mediated survival in the Act1-deficient transitional B cells. Importantly, co-stimulation with BAFF was able to rescue Act1-deficient T1 cells from BCR-induced apoptosis more effectively than Act1-suffienct T1 B cells. Finally, by using double transgenic HEL mice, we demonstrated that Act1 deficiency can promote the maturation of HEL-specific autoreactive B cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the transitional stage is a critical point of action for Act1 in the elimination of autoreactive B cells and in the regulation of peripheral B cell homeostasis. PMID:20543113

  20. Recovery trajectories of kelp forest animals are rapid yet spatially variable across a network of temperate marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselle, Jennifer E.; Rassweiler, Andrew; Hamilton, Scott L.; Warner, Robert R.

    2015-09-01

    Oceans currently face a variety of threats, requiring ecosystem-based approaches to management such as networks of marine protected areas (MPAs). We evaluated changes in fish biomass on temperate rocky reefs over the decade following implementation of a network of MPAs in the northern Channel Islands, California. We found that the biomass of targeted (i.e. fished) species has increased consistently inside all MPAs in the network, with an effect of geography on the strength of the response. More interesting, biomass of targeted fish species also increased outside MPAs, although only 27% as rapidly as in the protected areas, indicating that redistribution of fishing effort has not severely affected unprotected populations. Whether the increase outside of MPAs is due to changes in fishing pressure, fisheries management actions, adult spillover, favorable environmental conditions, or a combination of all four remains unknown. We evaluated methods of controlling for biogeographic or environmental variation across networks of protected areas and found similar performance of models incorporating empirical sea surface temperature versus a simple geographic blocking term based on assemblage structure. The patterns observed are promising indicators of the success of this network, but more work is needed to understand how ecological and physical contexts affect MPA performance.

  1. Recovery trajectories of kelp forest animals are rapid yet spatially variable across a network of temperate marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselle, Jennifer E; Rassweiler, Andrew; Hamilton, Scott L; Warner, Robert R

    2015-09-16

    Oceans currently face a variety of threats, requiring ecosystem-based approaches to management such as networks of marine protected areas (MPAs). We evaluated changes in fish biomass on temperate rocky reefs over the decade following implementation of a network of MPAs in the northern Channel Islands, California. We found that the biomass of targeted (i.e. fished) species has increased consistently inside all MPAs in the network, with an effect of geography on the strength of the response. More interesting, biomass of targeted fish species also increased outside MPAs, although only 27% as rapidly as in the protected areas, indicating that redistribution of fishing effort has not severely affected unprotected populations. Whether the increase outside of MPAs is due to changes in fishing pressure, fisheries management actions, adult spillover, favorable environmental conditions, or a combination of all four remains unknown. We evaluated methods of controlling for biogeographic or environmental variation across networks of protected areas and found similar performance of models incorporating empirical sea surface temperature versus a simple geographic blocking term based on assemblage structure. The patterns observed are promising indicators of the success of this network, but more work is needed to understand how ecological and physical contexts affect MPA performance.

  2. Rapid recovery of stem increment in Norway spruce at reduced SO2 levels in the Harz Mountains, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Markus; Zimmermann, Jorma; Jacob, Mascha; Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Bade, Claudia; Ahrends, Bernd; Leuschner, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Tree-ring width of Picea abies was studied along an altitudinal gradient in the Harz Mountains, Germany, in an area heavily affected by SO(2)-related forest decline in the second half of the 20th century. Spruce trees of exposed high-elevation forests had earlier been shown to have reduced radial growth at high atmospheric SO(2) levels. After the recent reduction of the SO(2) load due to clean air acts, we tested the hypothesis that stem growth recovered rapidly from the SO(2) impact. Our results from two formerly damaged high-elevation spruce stands support this hypothesis suggesting that the former SO(2)-related spruce decline was primarily due to foliar damage and not to soil acidification, as the deacidification of the (still acidic) soil would cause a slow growth response. Increasing temperatures and deposited N accumulated in the topsoil are likely additional growth-promoting factors of spruce at high elevations after the shortfall of SO(2) pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploiting human memory B cell heterogeneity for improved vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Noel T; Henry Dunand, Carole J; Wilson, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    The major goal in vaccination is establishment of long-term, prophylactic humoral memory to a pathogen. Two major components to long-lived humoral memory are plasma cells for the production of specific immunoglobulin and memory B cells that survey for their specific antigen in the periphery for later affinity maturation, proliferation, and differentiation. The study of human B cell memory has been aided by the discovery of a general marker for B cell memory, expression of CD27; however, new data suggests the existence of CD27⁻ memory B cells as well. These recently described non-canonical memory populations have increasingly pointed to the heterogeneity of the memory compartment. The novel B memory subsets in humans appear to have unique origins, localization, and functions compared to what was considered to be a "classical" memory B cell. In this article, we review the known B cell memory subsets, the establishment of B cell memory in vaccination and infection, and how understanding these newly described subsets can inform vaccine design and disease treatment.

  4. Exploiting human memory B cell heterogeneity for improved vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Thomas Pauli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major goal in vaccination is establishment of long-term, prophylactic humoral memory to a pathogen. Two major components to long-lived humoral memory are plasma cells for the production of specific immunoglobulin and memory B cells that survey for their specific antigen in the periphery for later affinity maturation, proliferation, and differentiation. The study of human B cell memory has been aided by the discovery of a general marker for B cell memory, expression of CD27; however, new data suggests the existence of CD27- memory B cells as well. These recently described non-canonical memory populations have increasingly pointed to the heterogeneity of the memory compartment. The novel B memory subsets in humans appear to have unique origins, localization, and functions compared to what was considered to be a classical memory B cell. In this article, we review the known B cell memory subsets, the establishment of B cell memory in vaccination and infection, and how understanding these newly described subsets can inform vaccine design and disease treatment.

  5. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Sindhava, Vishal; Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction.

  6. The Relationship Between B-Cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  7. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases and mucosal immune homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, XIAOXIAO; BRAUN, JONATHAN; WEI, BO

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to physiological immunity through organogenesis of secondary lymphoid organs, presentation of antigen to T cells, production of antibodies, and secretion of cytokines. Their role in several autoimmune diseases, mainly as producers of pathogenic antibodies, is also well known. However, certain subsets of B cells are emerging as the important regulatory cell populations in both mouse and human. The regulatory functions of B cells have been demonstrated in a variety of mouse models of autoimmune diseases including collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), experiment autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID), diabetes, contact hypersensitivity (CHS), and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Accumulating evidence from both mouse and human studies confirms the existence of regulatory B cells, and is beginning to define their mechanisms of action. In this article, we first review the history of B cells with regulatory function in autoimmune diseases, and summarize the current understanding about the characterizations of such B-cell subsets. We then discuss the possible regulatory mechanisms of B cells, and specifically define the role of regulatory B cells in immune homeostasis in the intestine. PMID:20701454

  8. Hypovitaminosis D upscales B-cell immunoreactivity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jürgen; Schwarz, Alexander; Korporal-Kuhnke, Mirjam; Faller, Simon; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte

    2016-05-15

    While vitamin D is increasingly recognized as a potential immune regulator of MS disease activity, its impact on B lymphocytes, however, remains ill-defined. We assessed the impact of vitamin D on B-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion ex vivo and screened for effects of hypovitaminosis D and vitamin D supplementation on the compartmentalized distribution of B-cell subtypes in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with relapsing remitting MS (n=95) and various neurologic and healthy controls (n=57). B cells from MS patients with 25(OH)D serum levels vitamin D or when retesting B cells from MS patients after prolonged supplementation with vitamin D. Hypovitaminosis D was detectable in the serum of 40/95 MS patients, correlated with decreased vitamin D concentrations in CSF and with higher disease activity, and was paralleled by intrathecal accumulation of CD27(+) B-cell subtypes and plasma cells. B-cell immunoreactivity is attenuated by vitamin D. Our finding that vitamin D deficiency affects the intrathecal compartment and coincides with increased frequencies of effector B-cell subtypes in the CSF suggests that hypovitaminosis D might contribute to augmenting disease activity in the target organ and supports a potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation in MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Targeting B cells in multiple sclerosis. Current concepts and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, T; Büdingen, H-C; Dalakas, M C; Kieseier, B C; Hartung, H-P

    2009-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the CNS and a leading cause of lasting neurological disability in younger adults. In the last decade our knowledge of its immunopathogenesis expanded vastly. It is now widely appreciated that B cells are key players in the autoreactive immune network. They exert far more functions than merely being the precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. B cells act as efficient antigen-presenting cells and may stimulate an autoreactive immune response through secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. It is thus only logical to test therapeutic strategies targeting B cells in MS. Rituximab is a depleting chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against CD20 and expressed on developing, naïve, and memory B cells but not stem or plasma cells. Several smaller studies have been conducted that led to a placebo controlled, double blind phase II study on efficacy which was reported recently. The results are very promising, meeting not only the primary endpoint of reduction of the surrogate MRI marker of contrast-enhancing lesions but also showing a reduction in clinical relapse rate of patients treated with rituximab. This review discusses the role of autoreactive B cells in the context of MS, analyzes the B-cell-depleting treatment studies reported, and provides information on planned and future B-cell-directed therapeutic strategies in MS.

  10. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism whereby small resting (high buoyant density) murine B cells are induced to express interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and to respond to IL-2 was addressed by staining with anti-IL-2R alpha and -IL-2R beta monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and using receptor-specific cDNA probes. Resting B c......-5 and LPS for B-cell responses shows a requirement for complementary stimuli such as would be provided by cytokines, and either cellular interaction or antigen recognition in regulation of B-cell responsiveness to IL-2....

  12. B cell development in the bone marrow is regulated by homeostatic feedback exerted by mature B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitit eShahaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow (BM is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse-anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin-V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment.

  13. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  14. Antibodies, immunoglobulin genes and the bursa of Fabricius in chicken B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Michael J H

    2006-01-01

    The bursa of Fabricius is critical for the normal development of B lymphocytes in birds. It is productively colonized during embryonic life by a limited number of B cell precursors that have undergone the immunoglobulin gene rearrangements required for expression of cell surface immunoglobulin. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement occurs in the absence of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and generates minimal antibody diversity. In addition, observations that immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable gene rearrangement occur at the same time and that allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin expression is regulated at the level of variable region gene rearrangement provide a striking contrast to rodent and primate models of immunoglobulin gene assembly. Following productive colonization of the bursa, developing B cells undergo rapid proliferation and the immunoglobulin V region genes that generate the specificity of the B cell surface immunoglobulin receptor undergo diversification. Immunoglobulin diversity in birds is generated by somatic gene conversion events in which sequences derived from upstream families of pseudogenes replace homologous sequences in unique and functionally rearranged immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable region genes. This mechanism is distinct from and much more efficient than mechanisms of antibody diversification seen in rodents and primates. While the bursal microenvironment is not required for immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression, it is essential for the generation of antibody diversity by gene conversion. Following hatch, gut derived antigens are taken up by the bursa. While bursal development prior to hatch occurs in the absence of exogenous antigen, chicken B cell development after hatch may therefore be influenced by the presence of environmental antigen. This review focuses on the differences between B cell development in the chicken as compared to rodent and primate models.

  15. Longitudinal dynamics of the HIV-specific B cell response during intermittent treatment of primary HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godelieve J de Bree

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibodies develop in natural HIV-1 infection. Their development often takes several years and may rely on chronic virus exposure. At the same time recent studies show that treatment early in infection may provide opportunities for immune preservation. However, it is unknown how intermittent treatment in early infection affects development of the humoral immune response over time. We investigate the effect of cART in early HIV infection on the properties of the memory B cell compartment following 6 months of cART or in the absence of treatment. The patients included participated in the Primo-SHM trial where patients with an early HIV-1 infection were randomized to no treatment or treatment for 24 or 60 weeks.Primo-SHM trial patients selected for the present study were untreated (n = 23 or treated for 24 weeks (n = 24. Here we investigate memory B cell properties at viral set-point and at a late time point (respectively median 54 and 73 weeks before (re-initiation of treatment.At viral set-point, the memory B cell compartment in treated patients demonstrated significantly lower fractions of antigen-primed, activated, memory B cells (p = 0.006. In contrast to untreated patients, in treated patients the humoral HIV-specific response reached a set point over time. At a transcriptional level, sets of genes that showed enhanced expression in memory B cells at viral setpoint in untreated patients, conversely showed rapid increase of expression of the same genes in treated patients at the late time point.These data suggest that, although the memory B cell compartment is phenotypically preserved until viral setpoint after treatment interruption, the development of the HIV-specific antibody response may benefit from exposure to HIV. The effect of viral exposure on B cell properties is also reflected by longitudinal changes in transcriptional profile in memory B cells over time in early treated patients.

  16. gp49B-mediated negative regulation of antibody production by memory and marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Saori; Haniuda, Kei; Nojima, Takuya; Takai, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2014-07-15

    The rapid Ab responses observed after primary and secondary immunizations are mainly derived from marginal zone (MZ) and memory B cells, respectively, but it is largely unknown how these responses are negatively regulated. Several inhibitory receptors have been identified and their roles have been studied, but mainly on follicular B cells and much less so on MZ B, and never on memory B cells. gp49B is an Ig superfamily member that contains two ITIMs in its cytoplasmic tail, and it has been shown to negatively regulate mast cell, macrophage, and NK cell responses. In this study, we demonstrate that gp49B is preferentially expressed on memory and MZ B cells. We show that gp49B(-/-) mice produce more IgM after a primary immunization and more IgM and IgG1 after a secondary immunization than gp49B(+/+) mice in T cell-dependent immune responses. Memory and MZ B cells from gp49B(-/-) mice also produce more Abs upon in vitro stimulation with CD40 than those from gp49B(+/+) mice. The in vitro IgM production by MZ B cells from gp49B(+/+), but not gp49B(-/-), mice is suppressed by interaction with a putative gp49B ligand, the integrin αvβ3 heterodimer. In addition, gp49B(-/-) mice exhibited exaggerated IgE production in the memory recall response. These results suggest that plasma cell development from memory and MZ B cells, as well as subsequent Ab production, are suppressed via gp49B. In memory B cells, this suppression also prevents excessive IgE production, thus curtailing allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Characterization of the B-cell immune response elicited in BALB/c mice challenged with Neospora caninum tachyzoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luzia; Marques, Andreia; Meireles, Carla Sofia; Seabra, Ana Rita; Rodrigues, Diana; Madureira, Pedro; Faustino, Augusto M R; Silva, Carolina; Ribeiro, Adília; Ferreira, Paula; Correia da Costa, José Manuel; Canada, Nuno; Vilanova, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Activation of B cells occurring in hosts infected with protozoan parasites has been implicated either in protective or parasite-evasion immune-mediated mechanisms. Intraperitoneal inoculation of Neospora caninum tachyzoites into BALB/c mice induces an acute response characterized by a rapid increase in the numbers of CD69-expressing peritoneal and splenic B cells. This early B-cell stimulatory effect preceded an increase in the numbers of total and immunoglobulin-secreting splenic B cells and a rise in serum levels of N. caninum-specific immunoglobulins, predominantly of the immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and IgM isotypes. Increased numbers of B cells expressing the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were also observed in the N. caninum-infected mice. The B-cell stimulatory effect observed in mice challenged with N. caninum tachyzoites was reduced in mice challenged with γ-irradiated parasites. Contrasting with the peripheral B-cell expansion, a depletion of B-lineage cells was observed in the bone-marrow of the N. caninum-infected mice. Intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with diverse N. caninum antigenic preparations although inducing the production of parasite-specific antibodies nevertheless impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression and caused lethal susceptibility to infection in mice inoculated with a non-lethal parasitic inoculum. This increased susceptibility to N. caninum was not observed in naïve mice passively transferred with anti-N. caninum antibodies. Taken together, these results show that N. caninum induces in BALB/c mice a parasite-specific, non-polyclonal, B-cell response, reinforce previous observations made by others showing that immunization with N. caninum whole structural antigens increases susceptibility to murine neosporosis and further stress the role of IFN-γ in the host protective immune mechanisms against this parasite. PMID:16108816

  18. The role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Gong, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Zhen; Wu, Gaojue; Tang, Xuejun; Peng, Xiaobin; Tang, Shuan; Meng, Miao; Feng, Hui

    2017-04-01

    The past decade has provided striking insights into a newly identified subset of B cells known as regulatory B cells (Bregs). In addition to producing antibody, Bregs also regulate diseases via cytokine production and antigen presentation. This subset of B cells has protective and potentially therapeutic effects. However, the particularity of Bregs has caused some difficulties in conducting research on their roles. Notably, human B10 cells, which are Bregs that produce interleukin 10, share phenotypic characteristics with other previously defined B cell subsets, and currently, there is no known surface phenotype that is unique to B10 cells. An online search was performed in the PubMed and Web of Science databases for articles published providing evidences on the role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases. Abundant evidence has demonstrated that Bregs play a regulatory role in inflammatory, autoimmune, and tumor diseases, and regulatory B cells play different roles in different diseases, but future work needs to determine the mechanisms by which Bregs are activated and how these cells affect their target cells.

  19. Ups and Downs of Poised RNA Polymerase II in B-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Dao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide analyses have uncovered a high accumulation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II at the 5' end of genes. This elevated Pol II presence at promoters, referred to here as Poll II poising, is mainly (but not exclusively attributed to temporal pausing of transcription during early elongation which, in turn, has been proposed to be a regulatory step for processes that need to be activated "on demand". Yet, the full genome-wide regulatory role of Pol II poising is yet to be delineated. To elucidate the role of Pol II poising in B cell activation, we compared Pol II profiles in resting and activated B cells. We found that while Pol II poised genes generally overlap functionally among different B cell states and correspond to the functional groups previously identified for other cell types, non-poised genes are B cell state specific. Focusing on the changes in transcription activity upon B cell activation, we found that the majority of such changes were from poised to non-poised state. The genes showing this type of transition were functionally enriched in translation, RNA processing and mRNA metabolic process. Interestingly, we also observed a transition from non-poised to poised state. Within this set of genes we identified several Immediate Early Genes (IEG, which were highly expressed in resting B cell and shifted from non-poised to poised state after B cell activation. Thus Pol II poising does not only mark genes for rapid expression in the future, but it is also associated with genes that are silenced after a burst of their expression. Finally, we performed comparative analysis of the presence of G4 motifs in the context of poised versus non-poised but active genes. Interestingly we observed a differential enrichment of these motifs upstream versus downstream of TSS depending on poising status. The enrichment of G4 sequence motifs upstream of TSS of non-poised active genes suggests a potential role of quadruplexes in expression

  20. Feasibility of full and rapid neuromuscular blockade recovery with sugammadex in myasthenia gravis patients undergoing surgery – a series of 117 cases

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    Vymazal T

    2015-10-01

    first 48 hours, and no pneumonia diagnosed on clinical basis within 120 hours, postoperatively in all 117 patients.Conclusion: In this cohort of MG patients undergoing surgery using rocuronium and sugammadex, we did not observe any signs of postoperative residual curarization and respiratory depression. The neuromuscular blockade recovery was reliable, predictable, and rapid. Keywords: neuromuscular blockade recovery, myasthenia gravis, general anesthesia, sugammadex 

  1. Primary B-cell Lymphoma of the Thyroid Featuring the Different Ultrasonographic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Na; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Dong Hoon [Kangbuk Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    We review here 3 cases of primary thyroid lymphoma that we experienced during the past 5 years (age range: 39-55, all of the patients were female). The clinical and various ultrasonographic characteristics together with the other imaging modalities of primary thyroid lymphomas are described. The clinical features at presentation for one patient were a goiter with rapid growth and this was accompanied by compressive symptoms. The tumors of the other 2 patients were incidentally found during screening thyroid ultrasound exams. The pathologic studies of 2 cases showed a diffuse B-cell lymphoma with associated Hashimoto's thyroiditis and one case was a B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type. An extra-thyroid extension was shown in one case. The treatments included surgery alone for two cases, and chemotherapy and radiation therapy for one case. A US exam of thyroid lymphoma can show various morphological features, and US-CNB is helpful for diagnosing thyroid lymphoma.

  2. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  3. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool.

  4. Efficacy of B cell depletion therapy for murine joint arthritis flare is associated with increased lymphatic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Ju, Yawen; Bouta, Echoe M; Xing, Lianping; Wood, Ronald W; Kuzin, Igor; Bottaro, Andrea; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Schwarz, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    B cell depletion therapy ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Arthritis flare in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-transgenic mice is associated with efferent lymph node (LN) "collapse," triggered by B cell translocation into lymphatic spaces and decreased lymphatic drainage. The aim of this study was to examine whether the efficacy of B cell depletion therapy is associated with restoration of lymphatic drainage due to removal of obstructing nodal B cells. We used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, indocyanine green near-infrared imaging, and intravital immunofluorescence imaging to longitudinally assess synovitis, lymphatic flow, and cell migration in lymphatic vessels in TNF-transgenic mice. We conducted tests to determine whether the efficacy of B cell depletion therapy is associated with restoration of lymphatic draining and cell egress from arthritic joints. Unlike active lymphatics to normal and prearthritic knees, afferent lymphatic vessels to collapsed LNs in inflamed knees do not pulse. Intravital immunofluorescence imaging demonstrated that CD11b+ monocyte/macrophages in lymphatic vessels afferent to expanding LNs travel at high velocity (mean±SD 186±37 μm/second), while these cells are stationary in lymphatic vessels afferent to collapsed popliteal LNs. B cell depletion therapy for arthritis flares in TNF-transgenic mice significantly decreased knee synovium volume (by 50% from the baseline level) and significantly increased lymphatic clearance compared with placebo (Plymphatic drainage restored macrophage egress from inflamed joints without recovery of the lymphatic pulse. These results support a novel mechanism in which B cell depletion therapy for joint arthritis flares lessens inflammation by increasing lymphatic drainage and subsequent migration of cells and cytokines from the synovial space. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Direct visualization of endogenous Salmonella-specific B cells reveals a marked delay in clonal expansion and germinal center development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanton, Minelva R; Lee, Seung-Joo; Atif, Shaikh M; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Taylor, Justin J; Bäumler, Andreas J; Way, Sing Sing; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells and B cells are both essential for acquired immunity to Salmonella infection. It is well established that Salmonella inhibit host CD4(+) T-cell responses, but a corresponding inhibitory effect on B cells is less well defined. Here, we utilize an Ag tetramer and pull-down enrichment strategy to directly visualize OVA-specific B cells in mice, as they respond to infection with Salmonella-OVA. Surprisingly, OVA-specific B-cell expansion and germinal center formation was not detected until bacteria were cleared from the host. Furthermore, Salmonella infection also actively inhibited both B- and T-cell responses to the same coinjected Ag but this did not require the presence of iNOS. The Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) locus has been shown to be responsible for inhibition of Salmonella-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses, and an examination of SPI2-deficient bacteria demonstrated a recovery in B-cell expansion in infected mice. Together, these data suggest that Salmonella can simultaneously inhibit host B- and T-cell responses using SPI2-dependent mechanisms. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Single Sustained Inflation followed by Ventilation Leads to Rapid Cardiorespiratory Recovery but Causes Cerebral Vascular Leakage in Asphyxiated Near-Term Lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina S Sobotka

    Full Text Available A sustained inflation (SI rapidly restores cardiac function in asphyxic, bradycardic newborns but its effects on cerebral haemodynamics and brain injury are unknown. We determined the effect of different SI strategies on carotid blood flow (CaBF and cerebral vascular integrity in asphyxiated near-term lambs.Lambs were instrumented and delivered at 139 ± 2 d gestation and asphyxia was induced by delaying ventilation onset. Lambs were randomised to receive 5 consecutive 3 s SI (multiple SI; n = 6, a single 30 s SI (single SI; n = 6 or conventional ventilation (no SI; n = 6. Ventilation continued for 30 min in all lambs while CaBF and respiratory function parameters were recorded. Brains were assessed for gross histopathology and vascular leakage.CaBF increased more rapidly and to a greater extent during a single SI (p = 0.01, which then decreased below both other groups by 10 min, due to a higher cerebral oxygen delivery (p = 0.01. Blood brain barrier disruption was increased in single SI lambs as indicated by increased numbers of blood vessel profiles with plasma protein extravasation (p = 0.001 in the cerebral cortex. There were no differences in CaBF or cerebral oxygen delivery between the multiple SI and no SI lambs.Ventilation with an initial single 30 s SI improves circulatory recovery, but is associated with greater disruption of blood brain barrier function, which may exacerbate brain injury suffered by asphyxiated newborns. This injury may occur as a direct result of the initial SI or to the higher tidal volumes delivered during subsequent ventilation.

  7. A field guide for rapid assessment of post-wildfire recovery potential in sagebrush and pinon-juniper ecosystems in the Great Basin: Evaluating resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses and predicting vegetation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard F. Miller; Jeanne C. Chambers; Mike Pellant

    2015-01-01

    This field guide provides a framework for rapidly evaluating post-fire resilience to disturbance, or recovery potential, and resistance to invasive annual grasses, and for determining the need and suitability of the burned area for seeding. The framework identifies six primary components that largely determine resilience to disturbance, resistance to invasive grasses,...

  8. Activation and proliferation signals in mouse B cells. VII. Calcium ionophores are non-mitogenic polyclonal B-cell activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, G G; Bijsterbosch, M K; Holman, M

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ionophores cause polyclonal proliferation of lymphocytes from man, rabbit and pig, but are not mitogenic for mouse T or B lymphocytes. We show here that two Ca2+ ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin) nonetheless activate a substantial proportion of mouse B lymphocytes at concentrations which effectively inhibit DNA synthesis induced by conventional mitogens, such as anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Activation of B cells was detected by (i) increased expression of Ia antigen after 24 hr culture with ionophores, and (ii) the accelerated onset of DNA synthesis in B cells primed with ionophores for 24 hr, washed and then rechallenged with anti-Ig. Unlike anti-Ig, the ionophores did not induce either the breakdown of inositol phospholipids, or RNA synthesis in B cells. Finally, activation of B cells by ionophores is highly susceptible to inhibition by cyclosporine. These results therefore suggest that elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induced by these ionophores is sufficient to cause B cells to leave Go, but not to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Clearly, additional signals are required for B cells to progress further into cycle and eventually become committed to DNA synthesis. PMID:2414214

  9. The role of B-cells in immunity against adult Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Malky, Mohamed A; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Al-Harthi, Saeed A; El-Beshbishi, Samar N; Ohta, Nobu

    2013-05-24

    Strongyloides venezuelensis has been used as a tool and model for strongyloidiasis research. Elimination of S. venezuelensis adult worms from mice has been particularly associated with proliferation and activation of intestinal mast cells and eosinophils. To date, the role of B-cells in the protective mechanism against adult Strongyloides infection in experimental animals has not been reported in the literature. Therefore, the present study was carried to investigate the role of B-lymphocytes in immunity against adult S. venezuelensis infection using mice with a targeted deletion of the JH locus. JHD knockout mice with its wild-type Balb/c mice were infected by intra-duodenal implantation of adult S. venezuelensis. Fecal egg count, intestinal worm recovery, mucosal mast cells and eosinophils were counted. At day 11 post infection, parasites in wild-type mice stopped egg laying, while in JHD knockout mice parasites continued to excrete eggs until the end of the observation period, day 107. The higher number of parasite eggs expelled in the feces of JHD knockout infected mice was a consequence of higher worm burdens, which established in the small intestine of these animals. On the other hand worm fecundity was comparable in both groups of mice. Both B-cell-deficient mice and wild-type mice, showed an influx of mucosal mast cells and eosinophils. The absolute numbers in JHD knockout mice were lower than those seen in wild-type mice at day 11, but not to a level of significance. JHD knockout mice could not recover from infection despite the recruitment of both types of cells. Our findings highlight a role of B cells in mucosal immunity against invasion of adult S. venezuelensis and in its expulsion. Therefore, we conclude that B-cells together with mucosal mast cells and eosinophils, contribute to immunity against adult S. venezuelensis by mechanism(s) to be investigated.

  10. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3(+) anti-CD28-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid assessment of myocardial infarct size in rodents using multi-slice inversion recovery late gadolinium enhancement CMR at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausenloy Derek J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial infarction (MI can be readily assessed using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Inversion recovery (IR sequences provide the highest contrast between enhanced infarct areas and healthy myocardium. Applying such methods to small animals is challenging due to rapid respiratory and cardiac rates relative to T1 relaxation. Methods Here we present a fast and robust protocol for assessing LGE in small animals using a multi-slice IR gradient echo sequence for efficient assessment of LGE. An additional Look-Locker sequence was used to assess the optimum inversion point on an individual basis and to determine most appropriate gating points for both rat and mouse. The technique was applied to two preclinical scenarios: i an acute (2 hour reperfused model of MI in rats and ii mice 2 days following non-reperfused MI. Results LGE images from all animals revealed clear areas of enhancement allowing for easy volume segmentation. Typical inversion times required to null healthy myocardium in rats were between 300-450 ms equivalent to 2-3 R-waves and ~330 ms in mice, typically 3 R-waves following inversion. Data from rats was also validated against triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and revealed close agreement for infarct size. Conclusion The LGE protocol presented provides a reliable method for acquiring images of high contrast and quality without excessive scan times, enabling higher throughput in experimental studies requiring reliable assessment of MI.

  13. Perinatal immunotoxicity of benzene toward mouse B cell development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierda, D.; King, A.; Luebke, R.; Reasor, M.; Smialowicz, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Benzene is widely used by chemical industries and exposure to benzene has been shown experimentally to be immunotoxic in adult animals. The present study addressed whether exposure of fetuses in utero to benzene compromises the development of fetal B lymphopoiesis and whether B-lymphocyte development recovers postnatally. Pregnant BALB/C dams were given intraperitoneal injections of benzene (100 mg/kg, twice daily) from day 12.5 of gestation through day 19.5 of gestation. Phenotypic analysis revealed that fetal liver cell suspensions from embryos exposed in utero contained fewer pre-B cells and B cells than corresponding controls. Fetal liver cell cultures established from these embryos also produced fewer B cells. In contrast, pre-B cells were elevated in the livers of 8-day-old neonates that had been exposed to benzene in utero. Moreover, responsiveness to the B-cell mitogen, LPS, was significantly decreased in spleen cell cultures derived from these neonates. The results indicate that in utero exposure to high concentrations of benzene alters fetal B lymphopoiesis and may compromise immune responsiveness postnatally.

  14. Regulation of germinal center B-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Garcia-Ibanez, Laura; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2016-03-01

    Germinal centers (GC) are the main sites where antigen-activated B-cell clones expand and undergo immunoglobulin gene hypermutation and selection. Iterations of this process will lead to affinity maturation, replicating Darwinian evolution on the cellular level. GC B-cell selection can lead to four different outcomes: further expansion and evolution, apoptosis (non-selection), or output from the GC with differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells. T-helper cells in GC have been shown to have a central role in regulating B-cell selection by sensing the density of major histocompatibility complex (MHC):peptide antigen complexes. Antigen is provided on follicular dendritic cells in the form of immune complex. Antibody on these immune complexes regulates antigen accessibility by shielding antigen from B-cell receptor access. Replacement of antibody on immune complexes by antibody generated from GC-derived plasma cell output will gradually reduce the availability of antigen. This antibody feedback can lead to a situation where a slow rise in selection stringency caused by a changing environment leads to directional evolution toward higher affinity antibody. © 2016 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. B cells: from early development to regulating allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samitas, Konstantinos; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2010-06-01

    B lymphocytes are characterized by a unique and highly specialized developmental pathway that is responsible for their vast phenotypic and function diversity. B cell development is strictly regulated to ensure sufficient specific humoral immunity while at the same time avoiding any errors that would compromise B cell functionality. The generation and maintenance of mature B cells from the constant flux of bone marrow progenitors is a complex process that is generally poorly understood, although great progress has been made in recent years. B cells have for long been considered mainly as antibody-producing cells and therefore believed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, primarily through their ability to produce IgE antibodies. However, recent findings have revealed new aspects of their role in immune responses that place them again under the spotlight as important immune regulators, independent of antibody production. This review focuses on the developmental processes responsible for the numerous phenotypes and functions of the B-lymphocyte pool and the different aspects of effector B cell functionality in the context of allergy.

  16. Th1 and Th2 help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1995-01-01

    Sustained interaction with Th1 cells has been shown to induce IL-2 responsiveness by murine B cells. This is equivalently dependent on CD40, CD54/ICAM-1 and MHC II ligation, and co-cross-linking of CD54 and MHC II in the presence of IL-5 up-regulates a functional IL-2R on B cells. We now show...... that IL-5 (125 U/ml) synergizes with Th1 cells to induce B cell responses to IL-2, that are maintained following T-cell removal, e.g. autonomous. Th1 help in the absence of IL-5 resulted in weak or undetectable responses following T cell removal. The mechanism of IL-5 synergy involved persistence of IL-2R...... beta expression following T cell removal, as opposed to enhancement of IL-2R induction or function. The level of contact-induced IL-2R expression on B cells was not itself modified by IL-5. The effects of IL-5 did not overcome the requirement for T contact signals and treatment of B cells with soluble...

  17. Regulatory T Cell Dysfunction Acquiesces to BTLA+ Regulatory B Cells Subsequent Oral Intervention of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Huarte, Eduardo; Jun, SangMu; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Golden, Sara; Jackiw, Larissa; Hoffman, Carol; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced during autoimmunity often become quiescent and unable to resolve disease, suggesting inadequate activation. Resolution of established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be achieved with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) fused to reovirus protein ��1 (MOG-p��1) which activates Tregs, restoring protection, but requiring other regulatory cells to revitalize them. B cells have a dichotomous role in both the pathogenesis and recovery from...

  18. Self-Antigen-Driven Thymic B Cell Class Switching Promotes T Cell Central Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Perera

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available B cells are unique antigen-presenting cells because their antigen presentation machinery is closely tied to the B cell receptor. Autoreactive thymic B cells can efficiently present cognate self-antigens to mediate CD4+ T cell-negative selection. However, the nature of thymocyte-thymic B cell interaction and how this interaction affects the selection of thymic B cell repertoire and, in turn, the T cell repertoire are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that a large percentage of thymic B cells have undergone class switching intrathymically. Thymic B cell class switching requires cognate interaction with specific T cells. Class-switched thymic B cells have a distinct repertoire compared with unswitched thymic B cells or splenic B cells. Particularly, autoreactive B cell specificities preferentially expand in the thymus by undergoing class switching, and these enriched, class-switched autoreactive thymic B cells play an important role in CD4 T cell tolerance.

  19. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  20. Role of amino acids and vitamins in prevention of and rapid recovery from fatigue in the officers and soldiers at high altitude

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    Wen HUANG

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the role of amino acids and vitamins in the prevention of and recovery from the fatigue related to military operation in the officers and soldiers at high altitude. Methods  The participants were 100 officers and soldiers, whose Modified Fatigue Rating Scale (MFIS scores were >21 points. The participants were randomly divided into three groups: capsule, placebo, and granules. Amino acids capsule (8 kinds of essential amino acids and 11 kinds of vitamins were contained, placebo, or amino acid-fructose beverage was given to respective group for 14 days continuously. The 3000-m running performance of the officers and soldiers stationed on a plateau was measured on the first and 14th days. The maximal grip strength of the right hand, fist-making times per minute, and the height reaching by the hand after three-step run-up for the same candidate were observed before and after fatigue loading (3000-m running. The blood levels of lactic acid and urea nitrogen of the candidates were measured after fatigue loading on the first and the 14th days. Results  The 3000-m running performance of officers and soldiers in the capsule and granules groups on the 14th day were better than that of the first day (PP>0.05. The difference between the capsule and the granules groups in grip strength, fist-making times per minute, and hand reaching height on the 14th day were obviously lower than that on the first day (PP>0.05. The blood levels of lactic acid and urea nitrogen in the capsule and granules groups on the 14th day were lower than that on the first day (PP>0.05. Conclusions  Amino acids and vitamins preparations can obviously improve the military performance capacity of officers and soldiers stationed on the plateau. Similarly, they can effectively prevent the lowering of jumping ability and grip strength caused by military fatigue. Therefore, amino acids and vitamins preparations play an important role in the prevention of and rapid

  1. MicroRNAs as B-cell lymphoma biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manterola L

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lorea Manterola,1 Marta Fernandez-Mercado,1 Erika Larrea,1 Ibai Goicoechea,1 María Arestin,1 María Armesto,1 Luiza Hernandez,1 Charles H Lawrie1,2,3 1Oncology Area, Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain; 2Nuffield Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 3Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain Abstract: B-cell lymphomas represent a group of more than 35 recognized mature B-cell neoplasms differentiated largely on the basis of immunohistochemical staining patterns that are often challenging to accurately diagnose. Despite having been only formally recognized just over 10 years ago, microRNAs (miRNAs have become one of the trendiest topics in biology. Dysregulation of miRNAs is a ubiquitous feature of cancer in general, including B-cell lymphomas. Many of the miRNAs aberrantly expressed in B-cell lymphomas also play a crucial regulatory role in normal hematopoietic function. MiRNAs show great potential as novel biomarkers of cancer, as they can differentiate cancers according to diagnosis and developmental stage, even discriminating between cancers that are poorly separated histologically. Furthermore, they can be robustly measured from routinely prepared formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy material and biological fluids such as blood. Here, we consider the identity, function, and biomarker potential of miRNAs in B-cell lymphomas and, most importantly, the hurdles that remain to be overcome if they are really to become part of future clinical practice. Keywords: microRNA, lymphoma, biomarker, B-cell 

  2. Are We Ready To Stratify Treatment for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Using Molecular Hallmarks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Sarah; Hawkes, Eliza A.; Wotherspoon, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The division of the heterogeneous entity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into the ontogenic phenotypes of germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC) is optimally determined by gene expression profiling (GEP), although simpler immunohistochemistry (IHC) algorithms are alternatively being used. The cell-of-origin (COO) classification assists in prognostication and may be predictive of response to therapy. Mounting data suggests that IHC methods of classifying COO may be inaccurate. GEP categorization of COO is superior in defining prognostically and biologically distinct DLBCL subtypes, but current barriers to its widescale use include inaccessibility, cost, and lack of methodological standardization and prospective validation. The poorer prognosis of ABC-DLBCL is frequently associated with constitutive activity in the NF-κB pathway and aberrations in upstream or downstream regulators of this pathway. The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphomagenesis in GCB-DLBCL are arguably less well defined, but C-REL amplification and mutations in BCL-2 and EZH2 are common. New technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, are rapidly revealing novel pathogenic genetic aberrations, and DLBCL treatment strategies are increasingly being designed focusing on distinctive pathogenic drivers within ontogenic phenotypes. This review examines emerging molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents in DLBCL, and discusses whether stratifying therapy for DLBCL using molecular features is merited by current preclinical and clinical evidence. PMID:23086691

  3. Innate B cells: oxymoron or validated concept? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/T4CAVP

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    Carl F Ware

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocytes promote the initial innate interferon response to viral pathogens without the need for antigen receptor activation. B cell dependent IFN production requires the cytokine, lymphotoxin-β. The LTβ pathway is well known to regulate lymphoid organogenesis and homeostasis by differentiating stromal cells and macrophages. However, in response to viral pathogens these same B cell-regulated populations rapidly produce type 1 interferons. Thus, B cells act as innate effector cells via LTβ homeostatic pathways, which serve as innate host barriers to viral pathogens.

  4. A case with pachyonychia congenita and B-cell lymphoma.

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    Vitorino Modesto dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pachyonychia congenital (PC is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized hyperkeratosis affecting the nails and palmoplantar areas, oral leukokeratosis, and cystic lesions. A 39-year-old woman with PC type 1 (Jadassohn-Lewandowsky syndrome and B-cell lymphoma is described. No similar disorders or parental consanguinity were found in her family. Typical features of PC developed since her early childhood and the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma was established seven years ago, without a clear causal relation between these entities. Despite inherent limitations of a single case, this report may contribute to PC understanding.

  5. B-cell activity in children with malaria

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    Korir Jackson C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies implicate deficiency of red blood cell (RBC complement regulatory proteins (CR1 and CD55 in the pathogenesis of malarial anaemia. This study explored the involvement of B cell CD21, which has an analogous role to RBC CR1. Methods In a case control study conducted in Kisumu District hospital, western Kenya, children with severe malaria anaemia (SMA and those with uncomplicated malaria (UM were assessed by flow cytometry for B cells (CD20+ numbers, expression levels of CD21 and deposition of C3dg and by ELISA for soluble CD21 (sCD21. Paired t tests were used to determine statistical significance at a = 0.05. Results Children with SMA had significantly higher lymphocyte count (9,627.7 ± 8786.1 SD vs. 5,507 ± 2436 SD, P = 0.04 in the UM group and the computed geometric mean of mature B-cell numbers based on the absolute lymphocyte count was significantly higher for SMA group: 1,823 (1,126 to 2,982, 95% CI and 826.6 (564 to 1,220, 95% CI] for UM group (P = 0.003. SMA group also had a higher percentage of CD20+ B cells (26.8 ± 9.7SD vs 20.9 ± 9.01 SD in the UM (P = 0.03, indicating considerable polyclonal B-cell activation. The CD21 median flourescence intensity was lower in the SMA (246.4 ± 87.4 SD vs 369 ± 137.7 SD (P 0.0001, probably due to complement mediated shaving of CD21 by fixed tissue macrophages. The CD20+ B cells of SMAs had higher levels of the complement split product C3dg (18.35 ± 10 SD vs 11.5 ± 6.8 S.D, (P = 0.0002, confirming possible role of complement in CD21 removal. Unexpectedly, the SMAs had lower levels of sCD21 (226.5 ± 131.5 SD vs 341.4 ± 137.3 SD in the UM (P Conclusions These results implicate B-cell in pathophysiology of severe malaria that involves increased B-cell proliferation, increased complement deposition and subsequent loss of membrane-bound CD21. The loss of CD21 is not by the classical enzmatic cleavage.

  6. B cell lymphoma and myeloma in murine Gaucher's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, E V; Wang, S Z; Archer, J; Dekker, N; Aerts, J M F G; Karlsson, S; Cox, T M

    2013-09-01

    Multiple myeloma and B cell lymphoma are leading causes of death in Gaucher's disease but the nature of the stimulus driving the often noted clonal expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting B cells and cognate lymphoid malignancy is unknown. We investigated the long-term development of B cell malignancies in an authentic model of non-neuronopathic Gaucher's disease in mice: selective deficiency of β-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells [Gba(tm1Karl/tm1Karl)Tg(Mx1-cre)1Cgn/0, with excision of exons 9-11 of the murine GBA1 gene, is induced by poly[I:C]. Mice with Gaucher's disease showed visceral storage of β-glucosylceramide and greatly elevated plasma β-glucosylsphingosine [median 57.9 (range 19.8-159) nm; n = 39] compared with control mice from the same strain [median 0.56 (range 0.04-1.38) nm; n = 29] (p < 0.0001). Sporadic fatal B cell lymphomas developed in 11 of 21 GD mice (6-24 months) but only two of eight control animals developed tumours by age 24 months. Unexpectedly, most mice with overt lymphoma had absent or few Gaucher cells but local inflammatory macrophages were present. Eleven of 39 of Gaucher mice developed monoclonal gammopathy, but in the control group only one animal of 25 had clonal immunoglobulin abnormalities. Seven of 10 of the B cell lymphomas were found to secrete a monoclonal paraprotein and the lymphomas stained intensely for pan-B cell markers; reactive T lymphocytes were also present in tumour tissue. In the Gaucher mouse strain, it was notable that, as in patients with this disease, CD138(+) plasma cells frequently surrounded splenic macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid. Our strain of mice, with inducible deficiency of β-glucocerebrosidase in haematopoietic cells and a high frequency of sporadic lethal B cell malignancies, faithfully recapitulates human Gaucher's disease: it serves as a tractable model to investigate the putative role of bioactive sphingolipids in the control of B cell proliferation and the pathogenesis

  7. Intravascular large B cell lymphoma masquerading as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

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    James Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is a rare condition with a predilection for central nervous system involvement and is often misdiagnosed. This case report describes a 58-year-old gentleman who presented with paraparesis and subsequent dramatic neurological deterioration initially attributed to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Upon post-mortem examination, the correct diagnosis of intravascular large B cell lymphoma was reached. This condition has a poor prognosis but can be chemotherapy responsive. It is hoped that this case report will raise awareness of a rare and diagnostically challenging illness.

  8. Tracking Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Infection of Germinal Center B Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher M.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    Infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) provides a tractable small animal model to study various aspects of persistent gammaherpesvirus infection. We have previously utilized a transgenic MHV68 that expresses enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) to identify infected cells. While this recombinant MHV68 has been useful for identifying infected cell populations by flow cytometry, it has been suboptimal for identification of infected cells in tissue sections due to the high solubility of EYFP. Efficient detection of EYFP expressed from the MHV68 genome in tissue sections requires fixation of whole organs prior to sectioning, which frequently leads to over-fixation of some cellular antigens precluding their detection. To circumvent this issue, we describe the generation and characterization of a transgenic MHV68 harboring a fusion gene composed of the EYFP coding sequence fused to the histone H2B open reading frame. Because the H2bYFP fusion protein is tightly bound in nucleosomes in the nucleus it does not freely diffuse out of unfixed tissue sections, and thus eliminates the need for tissue fixation. We have used the MHV68-H2bYFP recombinant virus to assess the location and distribution of virus infected B cells in germinal centers during the peak of MHV68 latency in vivo. These analyses show that the physical location of distinct populations of infected germinal center B cells correlates well with their surface phenotype. Furthermore, analysis of the distribution of virus infection within germinal center B cell populations revealed that ca. 70% of MHV68 infected GC B cells are rapidly dividing centroblasts, while ca. 20% have a clear centrocyte phenotype. Finally, we have shown that marking of infected cells with MHV68-H2bYFP is extended long after the onset of latency – which should facilitate studies to track MHV68 latently infected cells at late times post-infection. PMID:22427999

  9. Lymphoadenopathy during lyme borreliosis is caused by spirochete migration-induced specific B cell activation.

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    Stefan S Tunev

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphadenopathy is a hallmark of acute infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, a tick-borne spirochete and causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, but the underlying causes and the functional consequences of this lymph node enlargement have not been revealed. The present study demonstrates that extracellular, live spirochetes accumulate in the cortical areas of lymph nodes following infection of mice with either host-adapted, or tick-borne B. burgdorferi and that they, but not inactivated spirochetes, drive the lymphadenopathy. The ensuing lymph node response is characterized by strong, rapid extrafollicular B cell proliferation and differentiation to plasma cells, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis, while germinal center reactions were not consistently observed. The extrafollicular nature of this B cell response and its strongly IgM-skewed isotype profile bear the hallmarks of a T-independent response. The induced B cell response does appear, however, to be largely antigen-specific. Use of a cocktail of recombinant, in vivo-expressed B. burgdorferi-antigens revealed the robust induction of borrelia-specific antibody-secreting cells by ELISPOT. Furthermore, nearly a quarter of hybridomas generated from regional lymph nodes during acute infection showed reactivity against a small number of recombinant Borrelia-antigens. Finally, neither the quality nor the magnitude of the B cell responses was altered in mice lacking the Toll-like receptor adaptor molecule MyD88. Together, these findings suggest a novel evasion strategy for B. burgdorferi: subversion of the quality of a strongly induced, potentially protective borrelia-specific antibody response via B. burdorferi's accumulation in lymph nodes.

  10. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is

  11. Rapid improvement in beliefs, mood, and performance following an experimental success experience in an analogue test of recovery-oriented cognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, P M; Perivoliotis, D; Luther, L; Bredemeier, K; Beck, A T

    2017-06-22

    Negative symptoms significantly contribute to disability and lack of community participation for low functioning individuals with schizophrenia. Cognitive therapy has been shown to improve negative symptoms and functional outcome in this population. Elucidation of the mechanisms of the therapy would lead to a better understanding of negative symptoms and the development of more effective interventions to promote recovery. The objective of this study was to determine (1) whether guided success at a card-sorting task will produce improvement in defeatist beliefs, positive beliefs about the self, mood, and card-sorting performance, and (2) whether these changes in beliefs and mood predict improvements in unguided card-sorting. Individuals with schizophrenia having prominent negative symptoms and impaired neurocognitive performance (N = 35) were randomized to guided success (n = 19) or a control (n = 16) condition. Controlling for baseline performance, the experimental group performed significantly better, endorsed defeatist beliefs to a lesser degree, reported greater positive self-concept, and reported better mood than the control condition immediately after the experimental session. A composite index of change in defeatist beliefs, self-concept, and mood was significantly correlated with improvements in card-sorting. This analogue study supports the rationale of cognitive therapy and provides a general therapeutic model in which experiential interventions that produce success have a significant immediate effect on a behavioral task, mediated by changes in beliefs and mood. The rapid improvement is a promising indicator of the responsiveness of this population, often regarded as recalcitrant, to cognitively-targeted behavioral interventions.

  12. B-cell Function Gene Mutations in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Hui-Juan; Huang, Yao-Hui; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Yang; Cheng, Shu; Huang, Jin-Yan; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In addition to clinical and immunophenotypic characteristics, recurrent gene mutations have recently been identified in patients with DLBCL using next-generation sequencing technologies. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical relevance of B-cell function gene mutations in DLBCL. Clinical analysis was performed on 680 Chinese DLBCL patients (146 non-CR and 534 CR cases) treated with six cycles of 21-day R-CHOP (Rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), alone or followed by two additional doses of rituximab consolidation on patients' own intention. Somatic mutations of B-cell function genes were further screened on 275 (71 non-CR and 204 CR) cases with available tumor samples by targeted sequencing, including genes involved in B-cell receptors (BCRs) pathway (CARD11, LYN, CD79A, and CD79B), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) pathway (MYD88), and tumor necrotic factor receptor (TNFR) pathway (TRAF2 and TNFAIP3). B-cell function gene mutations occurred in 44.0% (121/275) of DLBCL patients. The TLRs and TNFR related gene mutations were more frequently observed in non-CR patients (p=0.019 and p=0.032, respectively). BCRs related gene mutations, as well as revised IPI (R-IPI) and double BCL-2/MYC expression, were independently related to short progression-free survival in DLBCL after CR. The adverse prognostic effect of BCRs related gene mutations could be overcome by two additional doses of rituximab consolidation. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of DLBCL and identify a significant role of B-cell function gene mutations on lymphoma progression and response to rituximab in DLBCL. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytotoxic lymphocytes in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; de Grooth, B.G.; Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Greve, Jan

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence of cytotoxic lymphocyte subpopulations (i.e., CD 16+, CD57+ and cytotoxic CD 8+) was studied in the peripheral blood of 18 B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. The absolute numbers of CD 57+, CD 16+ and cytotoxic CD 8+ lymphocytes were increased in the peripheral

  14. Prognostic significance of metallothionein in B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Borup, Rehannah; Borregaard, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated metallothionein (MT) I and II mRNA and protein in B-cell lymphomas with particular reference to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The mRNA profiling was performed on Affymetrix arrays and showed up-regulated MT mRNA in 15 of 48 DLBCLs, including 12 of 23 activated B......-cell (ABC) and 3 of 9 type-3 lesions. In contrast, MT mRNA was low to undetectable in 16 germinal center B-cell (GCB)-type DLBCLs. Only 1 of 15 patients with up-regulated MT mRNA achieved a sustained remission, suggesting that up-regulated MT mRNA constitutes a significant risk factor for treatment failure....... This was confirmed in 2 independent series, which showed significantly shorter 5-year survival in DLBCL with high versus low MT-IIa levels. By immunohistology, MT was shown to be present in both macrophages and lymphoma cells. The proportion of MT-positive macrophages did not correlate with the survival. In contrast...

  15. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  16. Teriflunomide treatment reduces B cells in patients with MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandoglia, Ilaria; Ivaldi, Federico; Laroni, Alice; Benvenuto, Federica; Solaro, Claudio; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    To study the immunomodulatory effect of teriflunomide on innate and adaptive immune cell populations through a pilot, open-label, observational study in a cohort of patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Blood lymphocytes were isolated from 10 patients with MS before and after 3 or 12 months of treatment. Adaptive and innate immune cell subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry as follows: B cells (memory, regulatory, and mature subsets), T cells (effector and regulatory subsets), and natural killer (NK) cells (CD56dim and CD56bright subsets). Our results show that teriflunomide significantly reduces absolute counts of total CD19+ B cells and mature and regulatory B-cell subsets. T cells were affected to a lesser extent, with a trend in reduction of absolute counts for both T effector CD4+ cells (Th1, Th17 and Th1/17) and T regulatory CD8+ and CD4+ cells. Teriflunomide had no detectable effect on NK-cell numbers. In our small cohort, teriflunomide treatment affects mainly and significantly on B-cell numbers, while having a milder effect on T-cell numbers. Larger cohorts are necessary to confirm these findings and understand the effect of teriflunomide on the functionality of these cells.

  17. New Insights into Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

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    Christina Kalpadakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL is a premalignant condition characterized by the presence of less than 5000/μL circulating clonal B cells in otherwise healthy individuals. Three subcategories have been identified according to the immunophenotypic features: CLL-like, CD5(+ atypical, and CD5(− MBL. CLL-like MBL is by far the most frequent and best studied category and further divided in low-count [LC] and high-count [HC] MBL, based on a cutoff value of 500/μL clonal B cells. LC-MBL typically remains stable and probably does not represent a truly premalignant condition, but rather an age-related immune senescence. On the other hand, HC-MBL is closely related to CLL-Rai0, bearing similar immunogenetic profile, and is associated with an annual risk of progression to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1.1%. Currently there are no reproducible factors for evaluating the risk of progression to CLL. CD5(− MBL is characterized by an immunophenotype consistent with marginal zone origin and displays many similarities with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL, mainly the splenic MZL. The cutoff value of 5000/μL clonal B cells cannot probably be applied in CD5(− MBL, requiring a new definition to describe those cases.

  18. An analysis of B-cell epitope discontinuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Ganesh N; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2012-07-01

    Although it is widely acknowledged that most B-cell epitopes are discontinuous, the degree of discontinuity is poorly understood. For example, given that an antigen having a single epitope that has been chopped into peptides of a specific length, what is the likelihood that one of the peptides will span all the residues belonging to that epitope? Or, alternatively, what is the largest proportion of the epitope's residues that any peptide is likely to contain? These and similar questions are of direct relevance both to computational methods that aim to predict the location of epitopes from sequence (linear B-cell epitope prediction methods) and window-based experimental methods that aim to locate epitopes by assessing the strength of antibody binding to synthetic peptides on a chip. In this paper we present an analysis of the degree of B-cell epitope discontinuity, both in terms of the structural epitopes defined by a set of antigen-antibody complexes in the Protein Data Bank, and with respect to the distribution of key residues that form functional epitopes. We show that, taking a strict definition of discontinuity, all the epitopes in our data set are discontinuous. More significantly, we provide explicit guidance about the choice of peptide length when using window-based B-cell epitope prediction and mapping techniques based on a detailed analysis of the likely effectiveness of different lengths. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. B-cell Development and Primary Antibody Deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. van Zelm (Menno)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractB lymphocytes are generated throughout life from hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow, and contribute to the immune system by the production of antigen-specific antibodies (immunoglobulins; Ig). Two distinct phase of B-cell development can be distinguished: 1) antigen-independent

  20. Comparison of murine B-cell proliferative response to bacterial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Comparison of murine B-cell proliferative response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and DNP derivative of. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. ANILA PRABHU and R Κ SAXENA. School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India. MS received 21 July 1993; revised 29 October 1993. Abstract.

  1. Lymphoma classification update: B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Manli; Bennani, N Nora; Feldman, Andrew L

    2017-05-01

    Lymphomas are classified based on the normal counterpart, or cell of origin, from which they arise. Because lymphocytes have physiologic immune functions that vary both by lineage and by stage of differentiation, the classification of lymphomas arising from these normal lymphoid populations is complex. Recent genomic data have contributed additional complexity. Areas covered: Lymphoma classification follows the World Health Organization (WHO) system, which reflects international consensus and is based on pathological, genetic, and clinical factors. A 2016 revision to the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms recently was reported. The present review focuses on B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, the most common group of lymphomas, and summarizes recent changes most relevant to hematologists and other clinicians who care for lymphoma patients. Expert commentary: Lymphoma classification is a continually evolving field that needs to be responsive to new clinical, pathological, and molecular understanding of lymphoid neoplasia. Among the entities covered in this review, the 2016 revision of the WHO classification particularly impact the subclassification and genetic stratification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and high-grade B-cell lymphomas, and reflect evolving criteria and nomenclature for indolent B-cell lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella eFranquesa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research on T cell immunosuppression therapies has attracted most of the attention in clinical transplantation. However, B cells and humoral immune responses are increasingly acknowledged as crucial mediators of chronic allograft rejection. Indeed, humoral immune responses can lead to renal allograft rejection even in patients whose cell-mediated immune responses are well controlled. On the other hand, newly studied B cell subsets with regulatory effects have been linked to tolerance achievement in transplantation. Better understanding of the regulatory and effector B cell responses may therefore lead to new therapeutic approaches.Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC are arising as a potent therapeutic tool in transplantation due to their regenerative and immunomodulatory properties. The research on MSCs has mainly focused on their effects on T cells and although data regarding the modulatory effects of MSCs on alloantigen-specific humoral response in humans is scarce, it has been demonstrated that MSCs significantly affect B cell functioning. In the present review we will analyze and discuss the results in this field.

  3. CD20(+) B Cell Depletion Alters T Cell Homing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kap, Yolanda S.; van Driel, Nikki; Laman, Jon D.; Tak, Paul P.; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2014-01-01

    Depleting mAbs against the pan B cell marker CD20 are remarkably effective in the treatment of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. The primary objective of this study was to find a mechanistic explanation for the remarkable clinical effect of

  4. Profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Lene Dissing; Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Hansen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a frequent lymphoma subtype with a heterogeneous behavior and a variable response to conventional chemotherapy. This clinical diversity is believed to reflect differences in the molecular pathways leading to lymphomagenesis. In this study, we have analyzed...

  5. Antigen receptor function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; Schijndel, G. M.; Pakker, N. G.; van Oers, R. H.; van Lier, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Functional studies revealed that two groups of B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) can be distinguished based on their capacity to mount a proliferative response following B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) cross-linking. The molecular basis for the functional distinction between these B-CLL groups

  6. Emergency splenectomy for trauma in the setting of splenomegaly, axillary lymphadenopathy, and incidental B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo J. Oviedo, MD, FACS

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: An emergency splenectomy is an appropriate operative intervention for a grade V splenic laceration with hemoperitoneum, splenomegaly, and axillary lymphadenopathy regardless of the potential for a neoplastic process such as B-cell CLL. Post-splenectomy vaccinations and oncologic follow-up for systemic chemotherapy should be facilitated after recovery.

  7. Characterization of Regulatory B Cells in Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Lundy, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of regulatory B cells is IL-10 production, hence their designation as IL-10+ B cells. Little is known about the ability of self-antigens to induce IL-10+ B cells in Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or other autoimmune disease. Here we pulsed purified B cells from 12 HT...

  8. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Refaeli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL, whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics.

  9. Assessment of CD37 B-cell antigen and cell-of-origin significantly improves risk prediction in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Li, Ling; Byrd, John C

    2016-01-01

    CD37 (tetraspanin TSPAN26) is a B-cell surface antigen widely expressed on mature B cells. CD37 is involved in immune regulation and tumor suppression but its function has not been fully elucidated. We assessed CD37 expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and investigated its...

  10. Memory B-cell reconstitution following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an EBV-associated transformation event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David M.; Tierney, Rose; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Croudace, Jo; Inman, Charlotte; Abbotts, Ben; Nagra, Sandeep; Fox, Christopher P.; Chaganti, Sridhar; Craddock, Charles F.; Moss, Paul; Rickinson, Alan B.; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) provides a unique opportunity to track Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the context of the reconstituting B-cell system. Although many allo-HSCT recipients maintain low or undetectable levels of EBV DNA posttransplant, a significant proportion exhibit elevated and rapidly increasing EBV loads which, if left untreated, may lead to potentially fatal EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. Intriguingly, this high-level EBV reactivation typically arises in the first 3 months posttransplant, at a time when the peripheral blood contains low numbers of CD27+ memory cells which are the site of EBV persistence in healthy immunocompetent donors. To investigate this apparent paradox, we prospectively monitored EBV levels and B-cell reconstitution in a cohort of allo-HSCT patients for up to 12 months posttransplant. In patients with low or undetectable levels of EBV, the circulating B-cell pool consisted predominantly of transitional and naive cells, with a marked deficiency of CD27+ memory cells which lasted >12 months. However, among patients with high EBV loads, there was a significant increase in both the proportion and number of CD27+ memory B cells. Analysis of sorted CD27+ memory B cells from these patients revealed that this population was preferentially infected with EBV, expressed EBV latent transcripts associated with B-cell growth transformation, had a plasmablastic phenotype, and frequently expressed the proliferation marker Ki-67. These findings suggest that high-level EBV reactivation following allo-HSCT may drive the expansion of latently infected CD27+ B lymphoblasts in the peripheral blood. PMID:26450987

  11. A human B cell methylome at 100−base pair resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Tibor A.; Wu, Xiwei; Zhong, Xueyan; Riggs, Arthur D.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2009-01-01

    Using a methylated-DNA enrichment technique (methylated CpG island recovery assay, MIRA) in combination with whole-genome tiling arrays, we have characterized by MIRA-chip the entire B cell “methylome” of an individual human at 100-bp resolution. We find that at the chromosome level high CpG methylation density is correlated with subtelomeric regions and Giemsa-light bands (R bands). The majority of the most highly methylated regions that could be identified on the tiling arrays were associated with genes. Approximately 10% of all promoters in B cells were found to be methylated, and this methylation correlates with low gene expression. Notably, apparent exceptions to this correlation were the result of transcription from previously unidentified, unmethylated transcription start sites, suggesting that methylation may control alternate promoter usage. Methylation of intragenic (gene body) sequences was found to correlate with increased, not decreased, transcription, and a methylated region near the 3′ end was found in approximately 12% of all genes. The majority of broad regions (10–44 kb) of high methylation were at segmental duplications. Our data provide a valuable resource for the analysis of CpG methylation patterns in a differentiated human cell type and provide new clues regarding the function of mammalian DNA methylation. PMID:19139413

  12. Expansion of Activated Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Impact of B Cell Depletion Therapy, and Biomarkers of Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana G Adlowitz

    Full Text Available Although B cell depletion therapy (BCDT is effective in a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, both mechanisms and biomarkers of response are poorly defined. Here we characterized abnormalities in B cell populations in RA and the impact of BCDT in order to elucidate B cell roles in the disease and response biomarkers. In active RA patients both CD27+IgD- switched memory (SM and CD27-IgD- double negative memory (DN peripheral blood B cells contained significantly higher fractions of CD95+ and CD21- activated cells compared to healthy controls. After BCD the predominant B cell populations were memory, and residual memory B cells displayed a high fraction of CD21- and CD95+ compared to pre-depletion indicating some resistance of these activated populations to anti-CD20. The residual memory populations also expressed more Ki-67 compared to pre-treatment, suggesting homeostatic proliferation in the B cell depleted state. Biomarkers of clinical response included lower CD95+ activated memory B cells at depletion time points and a higher ratio of transitional B cells to memory at reconstitution. B cell function in terms of cytokine secretion was dependent on B cell subset and changed with BCD. Thus, SM B cells produced pro-inflammatory (TNF over regulatory (IL10 cytokines as compared to naïve/transitional. Notably, B cell TNF production decreased after BCDT and reconstitution compared to untreated RA. Our results support the hypothesis that the clinical and immunological outcome of BCDT depends on the relative balance of protective and pathogenic B cell subsets established after B cell depletion and repopulation.

  13. Trafficking of B cell antigen in lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Degn, Søren Egedal; Pitcher, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    ). The experimental demonstration by Nossal & Lederberg ( 3 ) that B lymphocytes bear receptors for a single antigen raised the central question of where B lymphocytes encounter antigen. This question has remained mostly unanswered until recently. Advances in techniques such as multiphoton intravital microscopy ( 4......The clonal selection theory first proposed by Macfarlane Burnet is a cornerstone of immunology ( 1 ). At the time, it revolutionized the thinking of immunologists because it provided a simple explanation for lymphocyte specificity, immunological memory, and elimination of self-reactive clones ( 2......, 5 ) have provided new insights into the trafficking of B cells and their antigen. In this review, we summarize these advances in the context of our current view of B cell circulation and activation....

  14. Epigenetic Impact on EBV Associated B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatadru Ghosh Roy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications leading to either transcriptional repression or activation, play an indispensable role in the development of human cancers. Epidemiological study revealed that approximately 20% of all human cancers are associated with tumor viruses. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, the first human tumor virus, demonstrates frequent epigenetic alterations on both viral and host genomes in associated cancers—both of epithelial and lymphoid origin. The cell type-dependent different EBV latent gene expression patterns appear to be determined by the cellular epigenetic machinery and similarly viral oncoproteins recruit epigenetic regulators in order to deregulate the cellular gene expression profile resulting in several human cancers. This review elucidates the epigenetic consequences of EBV–host interactions during development of multiple EBV-induced B-cell lymphomas, which may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic interventions against EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas by alteration of reversible patho-epigenetic markings.

  15. Cutaneous B cell lymphomas: Report of two interesting cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Gurumurthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous B cell lymphomas can arise primarily from the skin or may occur due to secondary spread from nodal lymphomas. Primary lymphomas are confined to the skin without systemic spread and they differ from secondary lymphomas in their clinical behavior, treatment and prognosis. Cutaneous lymphomas being relatively rare, lack of precise definition and understanding of their clinical behavior diseases leads to pitfalls in the diagnosis. We report two cases of cutaneous B cell lymphomas who presented with fever of unknown origin initially and later found to have skin lesions. Hence, skin can be a potential diagnostic clue in the evaluation of patients with fever of unknown origin. The distinctions between the primary and the secondary lymphomas become important in choosing the treatment and assessing the prognosis.

  16. Infiltrating regulatory B cells control neuroinflammation following viral brain infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutnal, Manohar B; Hu, Shuxian; Schachtele, Scott J; Lokensgard, James R

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the existence of a subset of B lymphocytes, regulatory B cells (Bregs), which modulate immune function. In this study, in vivo and in vitro experiments were undertaken to elucidate the role of these Bregs in controlling neuroinflammation following viral brain infection. We used multicolor flow cytometry to phenotype lymphocyte subpopulations infiltrating the brain, along with in vitro cocultures to assess their anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory roles. This distinctive subset of CD19(+)CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells was found to infiltrate the brains of chronically infected animals, reaching highest levels at the latest time point tested (30 d postinfection). B cell-deficient Jh(-/-) mice were found to develop exacerbated neuroimmune responses as measured by enhanced accumulation and/or retention of CD8(+) T cells within the brain, as well as increased levels of microglial activation (MHC class II). Conversely, levels of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells were found to be significantly lower in Jh(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type (Wt) animals. Further experiments showed that in vitro-generated IL-10-secreting Bregs (B10) were able to inhibit cytokine responses from microglia following stimulation with viral Ags. These in vitro-generated B10 cells were also found to promote proliferation of regulatory T cells in coculture studies. Finally, gain-of-function experiments demonstrated that reconstitution of Wt B cells into Jh(-/-) mice restored neuroimmune responses to levels exhibited by infected Wt mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Bregs modulate T lymphocyte as well as microglial cell responses within the infected brain and promote CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cell proliferation in vitro. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    an additional novel pathway in which complement C3 and its receptors enhance humoral immunity through delivery of Ag to the B cell compartment. In this review, we discuss this pathway and highlight several novel exceptions recently found with a model influenza vaccine, such as mannose-binding lectin...... opsonization of influenza and uptake by macrophages, and the capture of virus by dendritic cells residing in the medullary compartment of peripheral lymph nodes....

  18. Lenalidomide in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Chiappella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL are the most frequent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL. The addition of Rituximab to the standard chemotherapy CHOP improved the outcome in this patients, but so far 40% of patients experienced relapse or progressive disease. Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent, had direct tumoricidal and antiangiogenetic actions on tumor cells and was able to modulate tumor-cell microenvironment, with the restoration of impaired T-cell activity and the formation of immuno-synapsis. Based on these actions, lenalidomide represented an active drug on aggressive relapsed NHL. In this review, the most relevant clinical trials for the use of lenalidomide in DLBCL were reported. Monotherapy with lenalidomide showed an activity in term of overall response rate, with acceptable hematological and extrahematological toxicities in relapsed/refractory aggressive NHL. The role of lenalidomide as salvage therapy in both cell of origin patterns in DLBCL (germinal center B-cell/activated B-cell was reported in preliminary data. Preliminary data regarding the role of lenalidomide in addition to chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP in first line clinical trials were discussed; data of safety, feasibility and efficacy were promising.

  19. Management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubuschok, Boris; Held, Gerhard; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma. While CHOP was the standard combination chemotherapy for 25 years, the incorporation of the CD20 antibody rituximab at the beginning of this century has considerably improved the outcome of all patients with DLBCL: Depending on the prognostic subgroup, only half to one-third of the patients die of their DLBCL compared to pre-rituximab era. Treatment is usually tailored according to the individual risk profile of a DLBCL patient according to the International Prognostic Index (IPI). Assignment of DLBCL according to the gene expression profile into DLBLC originating from a germinal center B cell (GC type) or from an activated B cell (ABC type) has provided novel insights into the pathogenesis of the respective DLBCL, identified molecules which are indispensable for the survival of the lymphoma cells and provided targets for novel "targeted therapies" drugs. Incorporating these new drugs into combination immunochemotherapy or substituting single drugs in the R-CHOP combination will result in even higher cure rates of and/or less toxicity for patients with DLBCL in the decade to come.

  20. B-cell-depleting Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sanz, Iñaki; Bosch, Xavier; Stone, John H.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a new class of agents (B-cell-depleting therapies) has opened a new era in the therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus, with belimumab being the first drug licensed for use in systemic lupus erythematosus in more than 50 years. Four agents deserve specific mention: rituximab, ocrelizumab, epratuzumab, and belimumab. Controlled trials have shown negative results for rituximab, promising results for epratuzumab, and positive results for belimumab. Despite these negative results, rituximab is the most-used agent in patients who do not respond or are intolerant to standard therapy and those with life-threatening presentations. B-cell-depleting agents should not be used in patients with mild disease and should be tailored according to individual patient characteristics, including ethnicity, organ involvement, and the immunological profile. Forthcoming studies of B-cell-directed strategies, particularly data from investigations of off-label rituximab use and postmarketing studies of belimumab, will provide new insights into the utility of these treatments in the routine management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22444096

  1. Large anaplastic spinal B-cell lymphoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Newman, Shelley J; Moore, Peter F; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B; Casimir, Roslyn H

    2008-12-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of tetraparesis. The neurologic lesion was localized to the cervical spinal segment (C1-C6). A left axillary mass was identified, and the results of fine needle aspiration cytology indicated malignant round cell neoplasia of possible histiocytic origin. The cells were large, had marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, occasional bi- and multinucleation, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Euthanasia was performed due to the poor prognosis associated with severe, progressive neurologic signs and a malignant neoplasm. Postmortem examination revealed spinal cord compression and an extradural mass at the C1-C2 spinal segment, with neoplastic cells in the adjacent vertebral bodies, surrounding skeletal muscle, left axillary lymph node, and bone marrow from the right femur. The initial histologic diagnosis was anaplastic sarcoma, but immunohistochemical results indicated the cells were CD20+ and CD45R+ and CD3-, compatible with a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. CD79a staining was nonspecific and uninterpretable. Weak to moderate CD18 positivity and E-cadherin positivity were also observed. Clonality of the B-cell population could not be demonstrated using PCR testing for antigen receptor gene rearrangement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a feline spinal anaplastic B-cell lymphoma exhibiting bi- and multinucleated cells. The prognostic significance of this cell morphology and immunophenotype is unknown.

  2. A Robust High Throughput Platform to Generate Functional Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Rabbit B Cells from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Stefan; Ros, Francesca; Thorey, Irmgard; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Kaluza, Klaus; Lifke, Valeria; Fischer, Jens André Alexander; Klostermann, Stefan; Endl, Josef; Kopetzki, Erhard; Pashine, Achal; Siewe, Basile; Kaluza, Brigitte; Platzer, Josef; Offner, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i) the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii) an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii) the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv) the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits) yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal. PMID:24503933

  3. High-throughput isolation of immunoglobulin genes from single human B cells and expression as monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Levesque, Marc C.; Nagel, Ashleigh; Dixon, Ashlyn; Zhang, Ruijun; Walter, Emmanuel; Parks, Robert; Whitesides, John; Marshall, Dawn J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xi; Gao, Feng; Munshaw, Supriya; Kepler, Thomas B.; Denny, Thomas; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.

    2009-01-01

    Defining human B cell repertoires to viral pathogens is critical for design of vaccines that induce broadly protective antibodies to infections such as HIV-1 and influenza. Single B cell sorting and cloning of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL) is a powerful technology for defining anti-viral B cell repertoires. However, the Ig-cloning step is time-consuming and prevents high-throughput analysis of the B cell repertoire. Novel linear Ig heavy- and light-chain gene expression cassettes were designed to express Ig VH and VL genes isolated from sorted single B cells as IgG1 antibody without a cloning step. The cassettes contain all essential elements for transcriptional and translational regulation, including CMV promoter, Ig leader sequences, constant region of IgG1 heavy- or Ig light-chain, poly(A) tail and substitutable VH or VL genes. The utility of these Ig gene expression cassettes was established using synthetic VH or VL genes from an anti-HIV-1 gp41 mAb 2F5 as a model system, and validated further using VH and VL genes isolated from cloned EBV-transformed antibody-producing cell lines. Finally, this strategy was successfully used for rapid production of recombinant influenza mAbs from sorted single human plasmablasts after influenza vaccination. These Ig gene expression cassettes constitute a highly efficient strategy for rapid expression of Ig genes for high-throughput screening and analysis without cloning. PMID:19428587

  4. A Brake for B Cell Proliferation: Appropriate responses to metabolic stress are crucial to maintain B cell viability and prevent malignant outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellusova, Julia; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-11-01

    B cell activation is accompanied by metabolic adaptations to meet the increased energetic demands of proliferation. The metabolic composition of the microenvironment is known to change during a germinal center response, in inflamed tissue and to vary significantly between different organs. To sustain cellular homeostasis B cells need to be able to dynamically adapt to changes in their environment. An inability to take up and process available nutrients can result in impaired B cell growth and a diminished humoral immune response. Furthermore, the metabolic microenvironment can affect B cell signaling and provide a means to avoid aberrant proliferation or modulate B cell function. Thus, a better understanding of the intricate interplay between cell signaling and metabolism could provide novel insight into how B cell function is regulated and have implications for the development of vaccines or treatment of autoimmune disorders and B cell derived malignancies. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Diane M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell network profiling (SCNP is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. Methods The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs, 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs, all males]. Results Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt, the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38, and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB. In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. Conclusions SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from

  6. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Mathi, Kavita; Pos, Zoltan; Wang, Ena; Hawtin, Rachael E; Marincola, Francesco M; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-06-06

    Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR) in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout) were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs), 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs), all males]. Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt), the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38), and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB). In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from healthy donors. Understanding race-associated contrasts in immune

  7. TRPM4 expression is associated with activated B cell subtype and poor survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Suet K.; Ch'ng, Ewe S.; Md Salleh, Md Salzihan

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Transient receptor potential channel melastatin 4 (TRPM4) is an ion channel that regulates influx of calcium cations (Ca2+). Recent studies suggest that TRPM4 is an oncoprotein, and its up-regulated transcript level has been reported in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We aimed...... to normal germinal centre B (GCB) cells, were expressed more highly in the activated B cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL) subtype and higher TRPM4 transcripts conferred worse overall survival (OS) in R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL cases (P ... with more aggressive clinical parameters, including higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scores or stage (P

  8. MYC Protein-positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Features an Activated B-Cell Receptor Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ge; Jiang, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Ze-Bing; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-04-01

    Components of the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway represent promising therapeutic targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and other B-cell malignancies. MYC, a transcriptional factor and oncoprotein, is overexpressed in a fraction of DLBCL and indicates poor prognosis and aggressive clinical course when treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). However, BCR signaling status in MYC-positive DLBCL cases and the potential efficacy of BCR signal inhibitors in treating this aggressive disease are unknown. To further elucidate the BCR signaling pathway in MYC-positive DLBCL, we analyzed the levels of BCR-associated genes according to MYC gene status, detected phosphorylated protein with primary DLBCL samples, and estimated the patient survival with MYC expression. In addition, we manipulated MYC gene expression and tested its effects on BCR signaling in vitro. We found that CD19, SYK, and BLK were highly expressed in DLBCL with MYC gene overexpression. MYC-positive DLBCL had higher levels of pSYK and pBLK, but only pSYK level correlated with patient survival. The in vitro studies demonstrated that overexpression of the MYC gene augmented BCR signaling, whereas MYC gene knockdown attenuated BCR signaling. Thus, MYC protein-positive DLBCL features highly activated BCR signaling and may represent a potential candidate for BCR inhibitor therapy.

  9. Type i CD20 antibodies recruit the B cell receptor for complement-dependent lysis of malignant B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelberts, P. J.; Voorhorst, M.; Schuurman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Human IgG1 type I CD20 Abs, such as rituximab and ofatumumab (OFA), efficiently induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of CD20+ B cells by binding of C1 to hexamerized Fc domains. Unexpectedly, we found that type I CD20 Ab F(ab')2 fragments, as well as C1q-binding-deficient IgG mutants......, retained an ability to induce CDC, albeit with lower efficiency than for whole or unmodified IgG. Experiments using human serum depleted of specific complement components demonstrated that the observed lytic activity, which we termed "accessory CDC," remained to be dependent on C1 and the classical pathway....... We hypothesized that CD20 Ab-induced clustering of the IgM or IgG BCR was involved in accessory CDC. Indeed, accessory CDC was consistently observed in B cell lines expressing an IgM BCR and in some cell lines expressing an IgG BCR, but it was absent in BCR- B cell lines. A direct relationship...

  10. Fast, continuous recirculation of germinal center B cell populations enhances robustness of immune response towards varying pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or-Guil, Michal

    2009-03-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microstructures that form in lymphatic tissues during immune responses. There, B cells undergo rapid proliferation and mutation of their B cell receptors (BCRs). Selection of B cells bearing BCRs that bind to the pathogen causing the immune response ultimately leads to BCRs that, when secreted as antibodies, form a new, effective, and pathogen specific antibody repertoire. However, the details of this evolutionary process are poorly understood, since currently available experimental techniques do not allow for direct observation of the prevailing mechanisms [Or-Guil et al., Imm.Rev. 2007]. Based on optimality considerations, we put forward the assumption that GCs are not isolated entities where evolutionary processes occur independently, but interconnected structures which allow for continuous exchange of B cells. We show that this architecture leads to a system whose response is much more robust towards different antigen variants than a set of independently working GCs could ever be. We test this hypothesis by generating our own experimental data (time course of 3-D volume distribution of GCs, analysis of high-throughput BCR sequences), and show that available data is consistent with the outlined hypothesis.

  11. Inactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinguish two calcium currents in mouse pancreatic B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, W.F.; Satin, L.S.; Cook, D.L. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium currents were studied in cultured adult mouse pancreatic B-cells using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. When calcium currents were elicited with 10-sec depolarizing command pulses, the time course of inactivation was well fit by the sum of two exponentials. The more rapidly-inactivating component had a time constant of 75 +/- 5 msec at 0 mV and displayed both calcium influx- and voltage-dependent inactivation, while the more slowly-inactivating component had a time constant of 2750 +/- 280 msec at 0 mV and inactivated primarily via voltage. The fast component was subject to greater steady-state inactivation at holding potentials between -100 and -40 mV and activated at a lower voltage threshold. This component was also significantly reduced by nimodipine (0.5 microM) when a holding potential of -100 mV was used, whereas the slow component was unaffected. In contrast, the slow component was greatly increased by replacing external calcium with barium, while the fast component was unchanged. Cadmium (1-10 microM) displayed a voltage-dependent block of calcium currents consistent with a greater effect on the high-threshold, more-slowly inactivating component. Taken together, the data suggest that cultured mouse B-cells, as with other insulin-secreting cells we have studied, possess at least two distinct calcium currents. The physiological significance of two calcium currents having distinct kinetic and steady-state inactivation characteristics for B-cell burst firing and insulin secretion is discussed.

  12. Continuously expanding CAR NK-92 cells display selective cytotoxicity against B-cell leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelsner, Sarah; Friede, Miriam E; Zhang, Congcong; Wagner, Juliane; Badura, Susanne; Bader, Peter; Ullrich, Evelyn; Ottmann, Oliver G; Klingemann, Hans; Tonn, Torsten; Wels, Winfried S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can rapidly respond to transformed and stressed cells and represent an important effector cell type for adoptive immunotherapy. In addition to donor-derived primary NK cells, continuously expanding cytotoxic cell lines such as NK-92 are being developed for clinical applications. To enhance their therapeutic utility for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, we engineered NK-92 cells by lentiviral gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target CD19 and contain human CD3ζ (CAR 63.z), composite CD28-CD3ζ or CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains (CARs 63.28.z and 63.137.z). Exposure of CD19-positive targets to CAR NK-92 cells resulted in formation of conjugates between NK and cancer cells, NK-cell degranulation and selective cytotoxicity toward established B-cell leukemia and lymphoma cells. Likewise, the CAR NK cells displayed targeted cell killing of primary pre-B-ALL blasts that were resistant to parental NK-92. Although all three CAR NK-92 cell variants were functionally active, NK-92/63.137.z cells were less effective than NK-92/63.z and NK-92/63.28.z in cell killing and cytokine production, pointing to differential effects of the costimulatory CD28 and CD137 domains. In a Raji B-cell lymphoma model in NOD-SCID IL2R γnull mice, treatment with NK-92/63.z cells, but not parental NK-92 cells, inhibited disease progression, indicating that selective cytotoxicity was retained in vivo. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to generate CAR-engineered NK-92 cells with potent and selective antitumor activity. These cells may become clinically useful as a continuously expandable off-the-shelf cell therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of life in 269 patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with rituximab versus observation after autologous stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heutte, Natacha; Haioun, Corinne; Feugier, Pierre; Coiffier, Bertrand; Tilly, Herve; Ferme, Christophe; Gabarre, Jean; Morschhauser, Franck; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Mounier, Nicolas

    2011-07-01

    We aimed to assess quality of life (QoL) following front-line autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) and the QoL relationship with rituximab maintenance, in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Patients were then randomized to either one weekly rituximab injection for 4 weeks, or observation alone. Patients (n = 269) were given the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 questionnaires. Scales for all symptoms exhibited similar temporal patterns, with a marked increase, followed by a plateau after 1 year. The proportion of patients with a clinically significant improvement varied from 6% (constipation) to 56% (fatigue). Age, gender, and previous treatment-induced toxicities were not predictive of variations in QoL. Rituximab significantly reduced pain and symptom severity. Our results for QoL showed that patients experienced rapid recovery after ASCT in all the domains tested. Differences in QoL improvement with time were not connected with rituximab maintenance.

  14. B-cell activation with CD40L or CpG measures the function of B-cell subsets and identifies specific defects in immunodeficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emiliano; Farroni, Chiara; Cascioli, Simona; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Piano Mortari, Eva; Leonardi, Lucia; Scarselli, Alessia; Valentini, Diletta; Cancrini, Caterina; Duse, Marzia; Grimsholm, Ola; Carsetti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Around 65% of primary immunodeficiencies are antibody deficiencies. Functional tests are useful tools to study B-cell functions in vitro. However, no accepted guidelines for performing and evaluating functional tests have been issued yet. Here, we report our experience on the study of B-cell functions in infancy and throughout childhood. We show that T-independent stimulation with CpG measures proliferation and differentiation potential of memory B cells. Switched memory B cells respond better than IgM memory B cells. On the other hand, CD40L, a T-dependent stimulus, does not induce plasma cell differentiation, but causes proliferation of naïve and memory B cells. During childhood, the production of plasmablasts in response to CpG increases with age mirroring the development of memory B cells. The response to CD40L does not change with age. In patients with selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD), we observed that switched memory B cells are reduced due to the absence of IgA memory B cells. In agreement, IgA plasma cells are not generated in response to CpG. Unexpectedly, B cells from SIgAD patients show a reduced proliferative response to CD40L. Our results demonstrate that functional tests are an important tool to assess the functions of the humoral immune system. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Intrinsic Plasma Cell Differentiation Defects in B Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T Cell Anergy Patient B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadhinya Arjunaraja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available B cell Expansion with NF-κB and T cell Anergy (BENTA disease is a novel B cell lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline, gain-of-function mutations in the lymphocyte scaffolding protein CARD11, which drives constitutive NF-κB signaling. Despite dramatic polyclonal expansion of naive and immature B cells, BENTA patients also present with signs of primary immunodeficiency, including markedly reduced percentages of class-switched/memory B cells and poor humoral responses to certain vaccines. Using purified naive B cells from our BENTA patient cohort, here we show that BENTA B cells exhibit intrinsic defects in B cell differentiation. Despite a profound in vitro survival advantage relative to normal donor B cells, BENTA patient B cells were severely impaired in their ability to differentiate into short-lived IgDloCD38hi plasmablasts or CD138+ long-lived plasma cells in response to various stimuli. These defects corresponded with diminished IgG antibody production and correlated with poor induction of specific genes required for plasma cell commitment. These findings provide important mechanistic clues that help explain both B cell lymphocytosis and humoral immunodeficiency in BENTA disease.

  16. Dimethyl fumarate alters B-cell memory and cytokine production in MS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Martin, Kyle A; Calabresi, Peter A; Bhargava, Pavan

    2017-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) treatment on B-cell memory and cytokine production in 18 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained prior to and at 6 months post-DMF initiation. We noted a decline in the absolute B-cell number with DMF treatment, with a preferential depletion of memory B cells and a concurrent increase in naïve B cells. We noted significant reductions in GM-CSF, TNF- α , and IL-6 producing B cells with DMF treatment. These effects on the B-cell compartment may underlie the beneficial effects of DMF in RRMS.

  17. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  18. Genetic lesions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, M.; Zucca, E.; Young, K. H.; Bertoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma in adults, accounting for 35%–40% of all cases. The combination of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab with anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy (R-CHOP, rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) lead to complete remission in most and can cure more than half of patients with DLBCL. The diversity in clinical presentation, as well as the pathologic and biologic heterogeneity, suggests that DLBCL comprises several disease entities that might ultimately benefit from different therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize the current literature focusing on the genetic lesions identified in DLBCL. PMID:25605746

  19. Tumor-infiltrating B cells come into vogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-01-07

    Lymphocyte infiltration into solid tumors has been recognized as a main determinator of positive prognosis. For the most part this is attributed to cytotoxic T cells capable of directly destroying malignant cells. However, when considering the complex composition of the human immune system, recent findings of Nielsen et al on a potentially central role of tumor-infiltrating B cells is not really surprising. In this commentary article, I want to highlight the enormous potential impact of this observation for basic and translational research, prognostic procedures and ultimately for the development of future therapeutic concepts.

  20. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma with Calf Muscle Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bourdeanu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL usually occurs in the lymph nodes, approximately 30–40% of the time it can have an extranodal site of involvement and it can arise in nearly every body site such as intestine, bone, breast, liver, skin, lung, and central nervous system. Muscle involvement of DLBCL is especially uncommon, comprising 0.5% of extranodal NHL. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with extranodal DLBCL of a unique manifestation in the calf muscle, involving predominantly the gastrocnemius muscle. The patient achieved complete response and remained free of local recurrence or metastasis following diagnosis.

  1. Primary Malignant B-cell Lymphoma of the Epididymis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungyo Suh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary epididymal lymphomas are very rare condition, only 6 case report was published. In 4 of them, initial presentation was non-tender, continuous growth of testis. It can be misdiagnosed with epididymitis, 5 of them was treated by antibiotics before surgery. One patients treated by surgery another 5 makes neoadjuvant therapy, 2 of radiotherapy 3 of chemotherapy. Only one man died after treatment. This case is about 54-year male patients, diagnosed by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, who treated by surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy.

  2. CD47 limits antibody dependent phagocytosis against non-malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sandra; Turman, Sean; Lekstrom, Kristen; Wilson, Susan; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of CD47 in protecting malignant B cells from antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Combined treatment of anti-CD47 and -CD20 antibodies synergistically augment elimination of tumor B cells in xenograft mouse models. This has led to the development of novel reagents that can potentially enhance killing of malignant B cells in patients. B cell depleting therapy is also a promising treatment for autoimmune patients. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether or not CD47 protects non-malignant B cells from ADCP. We show that CD47 is expressed on all B cells in mice, with the highest level on plasma cells in bone marrow and spleen. Although its expression is dispensable for B cell development in mice, CD47 on B cells limits antibody mediated phagocytosis. B cell depletion following in vivo anti-CD19 treatment is more efficient in CD47-/- mice than in wild type mice. In vitro, both naïve and activated B cells from CD47-/- mice are more sensitive to ADCP than wild type B cells. Lastly, we show in an ADCP assay that blocking CD47 can enhance anti-CD19 antibody mediated phagocytosis of wild type B cells. These results suggest that in addition to its already demonstrated benefit in cancer, targeting CD47 may be used as an adjunct in combination with B cell depletion antibodies for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  4. Engaging the lysosomal compartment to combat B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronbaek, K.; Jaattela, M.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of rituximab, a type I anti-CD20 mAb, with conventional chemotherapy has significantly improved the outcome of patients with B cell malignancies. Regardless of this success, many patients still relapse with therapy-resistant disease, highlighting the need for the development of m......Abs with higher capacity to induce programmed cell death. The so-called type II anti-CD20 mAbs (e.g., tositumomab) that trigger caspase-independent B cell lymphoma cell death in vitro and show superior efficacy as compared with rituximab in eradicating target cells in mouse models are emerging as the next...... generation of therapeutic anti-CD20 mAbs. In this issue of the JCI, Ivanov and colleagues identify the lysosomal compartment as a target for type II mAbs (see the related article beginning on page 2143). These data encourage the further clinical development of type II mAbs as well as other lysosome...

  5. Unusual cutaneous manifestations of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Jose Antonio; Comfere, Nneka I; Gibson, Lawrence E; Colgan, Michael; Davis, Dawn Marie R; Pittelkow, Mark R; Colgan, Joseph P

    2009-05-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a low-grade lymphoproliferative disorder with characteristic histomorphologic features and an identifiable immunophenotype. The skin can be involved in the context of known disease, but cutaneous signs are rarely the presenting findings. Evaluation of unusual clinical cutaneous presentations of B-CLL. We conducted a retrospective case series analysis of 3 patients with unusual cutaneous clinicopathologic presentations of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, including erythematous plaques, angiomatosis/telangiectasia, and erosive skin changes, respectively, without a previous clinical history of chronic lymphocytic lymphoma. Main outcome measures were clinical cutaneous presentations and histopathologic results in the diagnosis of underlying disease. In the 3 cases, lesion locations were the lower cheek, lower extremity, and penis (groin region). Histomorphologic testing showed mild to dense perivascular and periadnexal lymphoid aggregates throughout the dermis and extending into the panniculus, consistent with B-CLL. The diagnosis was confirmed with immunohistochemical studies that showed coexpression of CD5 and CD20 in the neoplastic lymphocytic infiltrate. None. Cutaneous manifestations are an uncommon presentation of subclinical B-CLL. Cutaneous changes were the presenting features of underlying lymphoma in all 3 cases, highlighting the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for a lymphoproliferative process in cases with unusual or atypical clinicopathologic features. Additional investigations into the behavior of B-CLL in the skin may elucidate further the evolution of cutaneous lesions in this disease.

  6. Bcl-2 antisense therapy in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2005-07-01

    Bcl-2 is an apoptosis regulating protein, overexpression of which is associated with chemotherapy resistant disease, aggressive clinical course, and poor survival in patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Overexpression of Bcl-2 protein results in an aberrant intrinsic apoptotic pathway that confers a protective effect on malignant cells against a death signal (e.g., chemotherapy or radiotherapy). Downregulation of this oncoprotein, thus, represents a possible new way to target clinically aggressive disease. Preclinical studies have shown that this oncoprotein can be effectively decreased by Bcl-2 antisense in malignant lymphoid cells and can reverse chemotherapy resistance, as well as enhance the anti-apoptotic potential of both chemotherapeutic and biologic agents. Ongoing clinical trials are exploring the role of Bcl-2 downregulation with oblimersen (Bcl-2 antisense) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Early results from these studies are promising and support the proof of the principle. As these studies are completed and mature data emerges, the role of Bcl-2 antisense therapy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies will become clearer.

  7. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma: Report of a case in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana M Jaradat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma (DLBCL/BL is a new category of B-cell lymphoma according to the 4 th edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues (2008. The following report presents a case of this rare, newly described entity on the palate of a 59 year-old male.

  8. Primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma belongs to the nongerminal center B-cell-like subgroup: A study of 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abbadi, Mousa A; Hattab, Eyas M; Tarawneh, Musleh S; Amr, Samir S; Orazi, Attilio; Ulbright, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    The most common type of primary testicular lymphoma is diffuse large B-cell type, which has the potential for aggressive clinical behavior. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can be further subclassified into two major prognostic categories: germinal center B-cell-like and nongerminal center B-cell-like. Such distinction is made possible using the immunohistochemical expression of CD10, Bcl-6 and MUM1. The aim of this study was to stratify primary testicular lymphoma of the diffuse large B-cell type according to this scheme. Immunohistochemical stains for CD10, Bcl-6 and MUM1 were performed on 18 cases of primary testicular lymphoma of diffuse large B-cell type. Subclassification was carried out as previously described where CD10 and/or Bcl-6 positivity and negativity for MUM1 were considered indicative of germinal center B-cell-like type and the opposite expression as nongerminal center B-cell-like type. The proliferative activity was determined using immunostaining with the Ki-67 antibody. Of 18 cases, 16 (89%) were found to belong to the nongerminal center B-cell-like type. Two cases (11%) were classified as germinal center B-cell-like type; one had a CD10-positive, Bcl-6-positive and MUM1-negative profile, and the other was CD10 negative, Bcl-6 positive and MUM1 negative. The former occurred in a 38-year-old patient who was human immunodeficiency virus positive. All the cases expressed high proliferative activity (> or =50% Ki-67 labeling). We conclude that most (89%) primary testicular lymphomas of the diffuse large B-cell type belong to the nongerminal center B-cell-like subgroup and have high proliferative activity.

  9. The B-cell receptor controls fitness of MYC-driven lymphoma cells via GSK3β inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varano, Gabriele; Raffel, Simon; Sormani, Martina; Zanardi, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zasada, Christin; Perucho, Laura; Petrocelli, Valentina; Haake, Andrea; Lee, Albert K; Bugatti, Mattia; Paul, Ulrike; Van Anken, Eelco; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Siebert, Reiner; Kempa, Stefan; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Facchetti, Fabio; Rajewsky, Klaus; Casola, Stefano

    2017-06-08

    Similar to resting mature B cells, where the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) controls cellular survival, surface BCR expression is conserved in most mature B-cell lymphomas. The identification of activating BCR mutations and the growth disadvantage upon BCR knockdown of cells of certain lymphoma entities has led to the view that BCR signalling is required for tumour cell survival. Consequently, the BCR signalling machinery has become an established target in the therapy of B-cell malignancies. Here we study the effects of BCR ablation on MYC-driven mouse B-cell lymphomas and compare them with observations in human Burkitt lymphoma. Whereas BCR ablation does not, per se, significantly affect lymphoma growth, BCR-negative (BCR(-)) tumour cells rapidly disappear in the presence of their BCR-expressing (BCR(+)) counterparts in vitro and in vivo. This requires neither cellular contact nor factors released by BCR(+) tumour cells. Instead, BCR loss induces the rewiring of central carbon metabolism, increasing the sensitivity of receptor-less lymphoma cells to nutrient restriction. The BCR attenuates glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activity to support MYC-controlled gene expression. BCR(-) tumour cells exhibit increased GSK3β activity and are rescued from their competitive growth disadvantage by GSK3β inhibition. BCR(-) lymphoma variants that restore competitive fitness normalize GSK3β activity after constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway, commonly through Ras mutations. Similarly, in Burkitt lymphoma, activating RAS mutations may propagate immunoglobulin-crippled tumour cells, which usually represent a minority of the tumour bulk. Thus, while BCR expression enhances lymphoma cell fitness, BCR-targeted therapies may profit from combinations with drugs targeting BCR(-) tumour cells.

  10. Modulation of Igβ is essential for the B cell selection in germinal center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    .... We found that expression levels of Igα and Igβ, which are the essential components of B cell antigen-receptor complex, were differentially regulated in GC B cells and that the expression of Igβ...

  11. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Preservation ® and “ rapid recovery of cellular activity post stress ” pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to Preservation® and “rapid recovery of cellular activity post stress”. The Panel considers that Preservation®, which contains an extract of prickly pear cactus Opuntia ficus-indica, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect is “rapid recovery of cellular activity...... laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013...

  12. Research on B Cell Algorithm for Learning to Rank Method Based on Parallel Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Tian

    Full Text Available For the purposes of information retrieval, users must find highly relevant documents from within a system (and often a quite large one comprised of many individual documents based on input query. Ranking the documents according to their relevance within the system to meet user needs is a challenging endeavor, and a hot research topic-there already exist several rank-learning methods based on machine learning techniques which can generate ranking functions automatically. This paper proposes a parallel B cell algorithm, RankBCA, for rank learning which utilizes a clonal selection mechanism based on biological immunity. The novel algorithm is compared with traditional rank-learning algorithms through experimentation and shown to outperform the others in respect to accuracy, learning time, and convergence rate; taken together, the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm indeed effectively and rapidly identifies optimal ranking functions.

  13. B Cell: T Cell Interactions Occur within Hepatic Granulomas during Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W. J.; Beattie, Lynette; Dalton, Jane E.; Owens, Benjamin M. J.; Maroof, Asher; Coles, Mark C.; Kaye, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic resistance to Leishmania donovani infection in mice is associated with the development of granulomas, in which a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid populations accumulate. Although previous studies have identified B cells in hepatic granulomas and functional studies in B cell-deficient mice have suggested a role for B cells in the control of experimental visceral leishmaniasis, little is known about the behaviour of B cells in the granuloma microenvironment. Here, we first compared the hepatic B cell population in infected mice, where ≈60% of B cells are located within granulomas, with that of naïve mice. In infected mice, there was a small increase in mIgMlomIgD+ mature B2 cells, but no enrichment of B cells with regulatory phenotype or function compared to the naïve hepatic B cell population, as assessed by CD1d and CD5 expression and by IL-10 production. Using 2-photon microscopy to quantify the entire intra-granuloma B cell population, in conjunction with the adoptive transfer of polyclonal and HEL-specific BCR-transgenic B cells isolated from L. donovani-infected mice, we demonstrated that B cells accumulate in granulomas over time in an antigen-independent manner. Intra-vital dynamic imaging was used to demonstrate that within the polyclonal B cell population obtained from L. donovani-infected mice, the frequency of B cells that made multiple long contacts with endogenous T cells was greater than that observed using HEL-specific B cells obtained from the same inflammatory environment. These data indicate, therefore, that a subset of this polyclonal B cell population is capable of making cognate interactions with T cells within this unique environment, and provide the first insights into the dynamics of B cells within an inflammatory site. PMID:22479545

  14. Germinal center B cells regulate their capability to present antigen by modulation of HLA-DO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Kim S; Hake, Sandra B; Tobin, Helen M; Chadburn, Amy; Schattner, Elaine J; Denzin, Lisa K

    2002-04-15

    Peptide acquisition by MHC class II molecules is catalyzed by HLA-DM (DM). In B cells, HLA-DO (DO) inhibits or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. We show here that DO protein levels are modulated during B cell differentiation. Remarkably, germinal center (GC) B cells, which have low levels of DO relative to naive and memory B cells, are shown to have enhanced antigen presentation capabilities. DM protein levels also were somewhat reduced in GC B cells; however, the ratio of DM to DO in GC B cells was substantially increased, resulting in more free DM in GC B cells. We conclude that modulation of DM and DO in distinct stages of B cell differentiation represents a mechanism by which B cells regulate their capacity to function as antigen-presenting cells. Efficient antigen presentation in GC B cells would promote GC B cell-T cell interactions that are essential for B cells to survive positive selection in the GC.

  15. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370350,SRX370344,SRX370342,SRX370348,SRX370340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370344,SRX370340,SRX370342,SRX370348,SRX370350 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX370346,SRX...370340,SRX370344,SRX370350,SRX370342,SRX370348 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX092...416,SRX092414 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...416,SRX092414,SRX370350,SRX092417,SRX092415 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoma, B-Cell SRX37034...349,SRX370351,SRX370345,SRX092415,SRX092417 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell.bed ...

  8. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy restores B cell tolerance in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Francesca; Morbach, Henner; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cassani, Barbara; Glauzy, Salome; Romberg, Neil; Candotti, Fabio; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, and high susceptibility to developing tumors and autoimmunity. Recent evidence suggests that B cells may be key players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in WAS. Here, we assessed whether WAS protein deficiency (WASp deficiency) affects the establishment of B cell tolerance by testing the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells from 4 WAS patients before and after gene therapy (GT). We found that pre-GT WASp-deficient B cells were hyperreactive to B cell receptor stimulation (BCR stimulation). This hyperreactivity correlated with decreased frequency of autoreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells exiting the BM, indicating that the BCR signaling threshold plays a major role in the regulation of central B cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from WAS patients were enriched in self-reactive clones, revealing that peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint dysfunction is associated with impaired suppressive function of WAS regulatory T cells. The introduction of functional WASp by GT corrected the alterations of both central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We conclude that WASp plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of B cell tolerance in humans and that restoration of WASp by GT is able to restore B cell tolerance in WAS patients. PMID:26368308

  9. Monocytes mediate shaving of B-cell-bound anti-CD20 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Jungersen, Mette B; Pedersen, Charlotte D

    2011-01-01

    complex from the B-cell surface. Here, we confirm, that in vitro co-culture of human monocytes and RTX-labelled syngeneic B cells results in reduced expression of CD20/RTX complex on the B cell surface. This shaving mechanism was the result of active protease activity because EDTA and PMSF were able...

  10. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells mm9 Histone Blood Pro-B cells SRX668836,SRX1184113,SRX...9,SRX1143910,SRX1143916,SRX1143902 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Pro-B_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Pro-B_cells mm9 Histone Blood Pro-B cells SRX668836,SRX1184113,SRX...09,SRX759800,SRX1143916,SRX1143902 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Pro-B_cells.bed ...

  12. Enhanced selection of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells following cyclophosphamide treatment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kawabata

    Full Text Available A major goal for the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with cytotoxic therapies is the induction of long-term remission. There is, however, a paucity of information concerning the effects of these therapies on the reconstituting B cell repertoire. Since there is recent evidence suggesting that B cell lymphopenia might attenuate negative selection of autoreactive B cells, we elected to investigate the effects of cyclophosphamide on the selection of the re-emerging B cell repertoire in wild type mice and transgenic mice that express the H chain of an anti-DNA antibody. The reconstituting B cell repertoire in wild type mice contained an increased frequency of DNA-reactive B cells; in heavy chain transgenic mice, the reconstituting repertoire was characterized by an increased frequency of mature, high affinity DNA-reactive B cells and the mice expressed increased levels of serum anti-DNA antibodies. This coincided with a significant increase in serum levels of BAFF. Treatment of transgene-expressing mice with a BAFF blocking agent or with DNase to reduce exposure to autoantigen limited the expansion of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells during B cell reconstitution. These studies suggest that during B cell reconstitution, not only is negative selection of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells impaired by increased BAFF, but also that B cells escaping negative selection are positively selected by autoantigen. There are significant implications for therapy.

  13. Nivolumab With or Without Varlilumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    ALK-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Atypical Burkitt/Burkitt-Like Lymphoma; Burkitt-Like Lymphoma With 11q Aberration; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Activated B-Cell Type; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Germinal Center B-Cell Type; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; EBV-Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; EBV-Positive Mucocutaneous Ulcer; High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma With MYC, BCL2, and BCL6 Rearrangements; Human Herpesvirus-8-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Large B-Cell Lymphoma With IRF4 Rearrangement; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Leg Type; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Skin Ulcer; Small Intestinal High Grade B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  14. Anthropometrics and Prognosis in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Munksgaard, Peter Svenssen; Severinsen, Marianne Tang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The impact of body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) on survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is controversial. Recent studies show superior outcomes for overweight and obese patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 653 R-CHOP(-like)-treated DLBCL patients were...... included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients, baseline clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment information were retrieved from the Danish Lymphoma Registry. Anthropometric measures were obtained from chemotherapy prescription charts. RESULTS: Underweight (BMI ... = 0.037, for women). In multivariate analyses, however, these associations diminished. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that underweight DLBCL patients have worse outcomes following R-CHOP as compared to normal as well as overweight patients....

  15. B Cell Depletion: Rituximab in Glomerular Disease and Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marinaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Selective targeting can be achieved with the use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab. In addition to being a drug for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rituximab is also an FDA-approved treatment for refractory rheumatoid arthritis and, since recently, ANCA vasculitis. It has shown efficacy in many autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss current evidence and the rationale of the use of rituximab in glomerular diseases, including randomized controlled trials. The focus will be on the use of rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy, systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis. The emerging role of rituximab in renal transplantation, where it seems to be important for the desensitization protocols for highly sensitized patients as well as for the preconditioning of ABO-incompatible recipients and the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, will also be addressed.

  16. [Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas: study of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Carrasco, Pablo; Morillo Andújar, Mercedes; Pérez Ruiz, Carmen; de Zulueta Dorado, Teresa; Cabrera Pérez, Rocío; Conejo-Mir, Julián

    2016-09-02

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL) is a very low prevalence neoplasm and constitutes 25% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Our objective was to discover the epidemiological, clinic and histologic characteristics of CBCL in our area. Retrospective descriptive study with patients with histologic diagnosis of CBCL followed up in our department between 2004 and 2015. Twenty-two patients with CBCL were included; 65% were men and 35% were women. Follicle centre lymphoma was the most common subtype (41%). Only 3 cases presented with node involvement and one with bone marrow invasion. Five recurrences were detected and one patient died because of the CBCL. This is one of the first CBCL series in theSpanish population. The incidence, sex, age, subtype distribution, clinical features and immunohistochemical patterns are very similar to those of the other series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Follicular lymphoma, a B cell malignancy addicted to epigenetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfi, Koorosh; Ali, Sara; Heward, James A; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2017-05-04

    While follicular lymphoma (FL) is exquisitely responsive to immuno-chemotherapy, many patients follow a relapsing remitting clinical course driven in part by a common precursor cell (CPC) population. Advances in next generation sequencing have provided valuable insights into the genetic landscape of FL and its clonal evolution in response to therapy, implicating perturbations of epigenetic regulators as a hallmark of the disease. Recurrent mutations of histone modifiers KMT2D, CREBBP, EP300, EZH2, ARIDIA, and linker histones are likely early events arising in the CPC pool, rendering epigenetic based therapies conceptually attractive for treatment of indolent and transformed FL. This review provides a synopsis of the main epigenetic aberrations and the current efforts in development and testing of epigenetic therapies in this B cell malignancy.

  18. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in blood donors in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağcı, Münci; Yegin, Zeynep Arzu; Yenicesu, İdil; Suyanı, Elif; Ulu, Bahar Uncu; İnci, Kamil; Çetin, Zeynep; Yılmaz, Zeynep; Kurşunoğlu, Nevruz; Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur

    2017-06-05

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a precursor state of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with peripheral lymphocytosis below 5 × 10(9)/l. The diagnostic criteria exclude the presence of lymphadenopathy, organomegaly, infections, autoimmune diseases or any sign of a lymphoproliferative disorder. This prospective study was designed in order to evaluate the frequency of MBL in blood donors in Turkey. The diagnosis of MBL was identified by flow cytometry method based on the International Familial CLL Consortium Report. A total of 999 volunteers [median age 34 (18-78) years; male/female: 705/294] were included in the study. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis was demonstrated in 18 cases (1.8%). A total of 16 cases (1.6%) was evaluated as CLL-like MBL, while 2 (0.2%) had a non-CLL-like phenotype. The subjects were divided into three groups according to age, as 60 years. The prevalence of MBL was 1.1% below 40 years, 0.6% between 40 and 60 years and 0.1% in cases over 60 years, without statistical significance (p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the flow cytometry method is essential and may be responsible for the variations in the prevalence of MBL in different populations which can also be attributed to study design, higher detection rates in the elderly and families with genetic predisposition to CLL. Large population-based studies and standardized laboratory methods are needed to determine the potential risk factors of progression to CLL, including molecular markers and genetic profile.

  19. B-cells and their targeting in rheumatoid arthritis--current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Britt; Munthe, Ludvig A; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Sandberg, Anna Klokk; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Alex, Philip; Szodoray, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects primarily the joints and without proper treatment results in their progressive destruction. In addition to T-cells, B-cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disease. The synovial tissue is an active site of B-cell accumulation, plasma cell differentiation and in situ antibody-production in RA. As part of the complex role of B-cells in the joints and synovial membrane of RA patients, B cells secrete chemokines and cytokines and may function as antigen presenting cells. The multifaceted pathogenic function of B-cells identifies them as excellent targets for immunosuppressive therapy. B-cell targeting involves a wide spectrum of molecules, for example the B-cell antigen CD20 that allows specific and effective B-cell depletion. Another target, CD79, expressed by B-cell and plasma cell precursors is an obvious candidate that induces apoptosis as well as inhibition of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation and possibly depletion of ectopic germinal centers (GC). Inhibition of B-cell co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80/86 and ICOS, can lead to diminished B-cell activation. Moreover, anti-chemokine and anti-cytokine therapies can be efficacious in RA by the disruption of B-cell activation and autoantibody production, B-cell synovial migration and ectopic GC formation. Finally, targeting the signal transduction pathways required for proximal BCR signaling has also been found efficacious in early clinical trials in RA. Even so, some B cells inhibit immune responses, these regulatory B cells may play a part in immune regulation in patients and it is unclear what effects B cell depletion strategies have in terms of such B cell subsets. This review discusses current strategies of targeting B-cells as therapeutic candidates in the management of RA. Better insights into the pathogenic role of B-cells provide efficacious opportunities to improve both therapy and prognosis of patients with RA

  20. B-cell exposure to self-antigen induces IL-10 producing B cells as well as IL-6- and TNF-α-producing B-cell subsets in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Anina; Kristensen, Birte; Hansen, Bjarke E

    2012-01-01

    Human B cells are able to secrete IL-10 after stimulation with mitogens, but their ability to produce IL-10 and regulate T-cell responses after stimulation with self-antigens is unclear. We co-cultured thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells from healthy donors with autologous T cells and observed production...... of IL-10 and TGF-β, in addition to TNF-α and IL-6. Pulsing with foreign antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), induced a Th1-response with minimal IL-10 production. After thyroglobulin-pulsing, 1.10±0.50% of B cells and 1.00±0.20% of CD4(+) T cells produced IL-10, compared to 0.29±0.19% of B cells (P=0.01) and 0.......13±0.15% of CD4(+) T cells (P=0.006) following TT-pulsing. Thyroglobulin-stimulated, IL-10-secreting B cells were enriched within CD5(+) and CD24(high) cells. While thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells induced only modest proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, B cells pulsed with TT induced vigorous proliferation. Thus, B...

  1. Dysregulated CXCR4 expression promotes lymphoma cell survival and independently predicts disease progression in germinal center B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Deng, L.; Shen, Q.; Manyam, G.C.; Martinez-Lopez, A.; Zhang, L.; Montes-Moreno, S.; Visco, C.; Tzankov, A.; Yin, L.; Dybkaer, K.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Bhagat, G.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Huh, J.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Zhao, X.; Moller, M.B.; Farnen, J.P.; Winter, J.N.; Piris, M.A.; Pham, L.; Young, K.H.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays an essential role in tumor cell dissemination and disease progression. However, the significance of CXCR4 overexpression in de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is unknown. In 743 patients with de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma

  2. Loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 function contributes to poor prognosis of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Y.; Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Tzankov, A.; Li, X.; Manyam, G.C.; Murty, V.; Bhagat, G.; Zhang, S.; Pasqualucci, L.; Visco, C.; Dybkaer, K.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Huh, J.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Moller, M.B.; Parsons, B.M.; Winter, J.N.; Piris, M.A.; Westin, J.; Fowler, N.; Miranda, R.N.; Ok, C.Y.; Li, Y.; Li, J.; Medeiros, L.J.; Young, K.H.

    2017-01-01

    PRDM1/BLIMP-1, a master regulator of plasma-cell differentiation, is frequently inactivated in activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Little is known about its genetic aberrations and relevant clinical implications. A large series of patients with de novo DLBCL

  3. Loss of Xist RNA from the inactive X during B cell development is restored in a dynamic YY1-dependent two-step process in activated B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrett, Camille M; Sindhava, Vishal; Hodawadekar, Suchita; Myles, Arpita; Liang, Guanxiang; Zhang, Yue; Nandi, Satabdi; Cancro, Michael; Atchison, Michael; Anguera, Montserrat C

    2017-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in female lymphocytes is uniquely regulated, as the inactive X (Xi) chromosome lacks localized Xist RNA and heterochromatin modifications. Epigenetic profiling reveals that Xist RNA is lost from the Xi at the pro-B cell stage and that additional heterochromatic modifications are gradually lost during B cell development. Activation of mature B cells restores Xist RNA and heterochromatin to the Xi in a dynamic two-step process that differs in timing and pattern, depending on the method of B cell stimulation. Finally, we find that DNA binding domain of YY1 is necessary for XCI in activated B cells, as ex-vivo YY1 deletion results in loss of Xi heterochromatin marks and up-regulation of X-linked genes. Ectopic expression of the YY1 zinc finger domain is sufficient to restore Xist RNA localization during B cell activation. Together, our results indicate that Xist RNA localization is critical for maintaining XCI in female lymphocytes, and that chromatin changes on the Xi during B cell development and the dynamic nature of YY1-dependent XCI maintenance in mature B cells predisposes X-linked immunity genes to reactivation.

  4. B cells exposed to enterobacterial components suppress development of experimental colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny

    2012-01-01

    ). RESULTS: We demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to ebx produce large amounts of IL-10 in vitro and express CD1d and CD5 previously known to be associated with regulatory B cells. In SCID mice transplanted with colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells, co-transfer of ebx-B cells significantly suppressed...... development of colitis. Suppression was dependent on B cell-derived IL-10, as co-transfer of IL-10 knockout ebx-B cells failed to suppress colitis. Ebx-B cell-mediated suppression of colitis was associated with a decrease in interferon gamma (IFN-¿)-producing T(H) 1 cells and increased frequencies of Foxp3......-expressing T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to enterobacterial components acquire immunosuppressive functions by which they can suppress development of experimental T cell-mediated colitis in an IL-10-dependent way. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011;)....

  5. Signals from activation of B-cell receptor with anti-IgD can override the stimulatory effects of excess BAFF on mature B cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tue G; Morris, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    The selection and maturation of B-cell clones are critically determined by tonic signals from activated B cell receptors (BCR) and survival signals from BAFF cytokine. These finely tuned and coordinated signals provide a net positive signal that can promote the selection, maturation, proliferation and differentiation of a developing B cell. Stimulation with an anti-IgD antibody can also activate BCR but can lead to depletion and an arrest of mature B-cell development in vivo. It is not known whether survival signals from excess BAFF can override the suppressive effects of treatment with anti-IgD on mature B cells in vivo. Herein, we examined the effects of co-treatment of BAFF and anti-IgD on the mature B-cell compartment and antibody production in vivo by treating mice with either 1mg/kg BAFF or anti-IgD alone or in combination for 3 consecutive days. We found that co-treatment with anti-IgD significantly abrogated these stimulatory effects of BAFF treatment on splenic CD19+ B cells as well as mature CD19+IgD(hi)IgM+ B cells in vivo. Anti-IgD down-regulated the expression of the BCR complex (mIgM, mIgD and CD19) and the BAFF receptor TACI without regard to the presence of BAFF. Anti-IgD treatment also significantly negated BAFF-induced IgM production in vivo. Both BAFF and anti-IgD could individually stimulate IL-10 synthesis in B cells but did not affect one another. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of BCR with an anti-IgD antibody can override the stimulatory effects from excess BAFF on B cell proliferation and antibody production by down-regulating the expression of BCR complex and BAFF receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. B cell follicle-like structures in multiple sclerosis-with focus on the role of B cell activating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morten, Haugen; Frederiksen, Jette L; Vinter, Matilda Degn

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Follicle-like structures (FLS) have recently been found in the subarachnoid space in the leptomeninges in some patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They contain proliferating B lymphocytes, plasma cells......, helper T lymphocytes and a network of follicular dendritic cells. FLS have been shown to correlate with increased cortical demyelination, neuronal loss, meningeal infiltration and central nervous system inflammation, as well as lower age at disease onset and progression to severe disability and death....... In this review, we will discuss the role of FLS in MS pathogenesis and disease course and the possible influence by B cell activating factor (BAFF) and C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13)....

  7. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses in mice requires antigen presentation by CD11c+ cells and not by B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Henningsson

    Full Text Available IgE antibodies, administered to mice together with their specific antigen, enhance antibody and CD4(+ T cell responses to this antigen. The effect is dependent on the low affinity receptor for IgE, CD23, and the receptor must be expressed on B cells. In vitro, IgE-antigen complexes are endocytosed via CD23 on B cells, which subsequently present the antigen to CD4(+ T cells. This mechanism has been suggested to explain also IgE-mediated enhancement of immune responses in vivo. We recently found that CD23(+ B cells capture IgE-antigen complexes in peripheral blood and rapidly transport them to B cell follicles in the spleen. This provides an alternative explanation for the requirement for CD23(+ B cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether B-cell mediated antigen presentation of IgE-antigen complexes explains the enhancing effect of IgE on immune responses in vivo. The ability of spleen cells, taken from mice 1-4 h after immunization with IgE-antigen, to present antigen to specific CD4(+ T cells was analyzed. Antigen presentation was intact when spleens were depleted of CD19(+ cells (i.e., primarily B cells but was severely impaired after depletion of CD11c(+ cells (i.e., primarily dendritic cells. In agreement with this, the ability of IgE to enhance proliferation of CD4(+ T cells was abolished in CD11c-DTR mice conditionally depleted of CD11c(+ cells. Finally, the lack of IgE-mediated enhancemen of CD4(+ T cell responses in CD23(-/- mice could be rescued by transfer of MHC-II-compatible as well as by MHC-II-incompatible CD23(+ B cells. These findings argue against the idea that IgE-mediated enhancement of specific CD4(+ T cell responses in vivo is caused by increased antigen presentation by B cells. A model where CD23(+ B cells act as antigen transporting cells, delivering antigen to CD11c(+ cells for presentation to T cells is consistent with available experimental data.

  8. Impaired long-term maintenance and function of Bordetella pertussis specific B cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Rachel M; Smits, Mieke; Kuipers, Betsy; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline; Poelen, Martien; Boog, Claire J P; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2010-09-14

    Frequent occurrence of whooping cough in vaccinated populations suggests limited duration of vaccine-induced immunological memory. To investigate peculiarities in B cell memory specific for pertussis antigens P.69 pertactin (P.69 Prn), pertussis toxin (Ptx) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), we monitored the induction and maintenance of specific serum IgG, long-lived bone marrow (BM)-derived plasma cell (PC) and splenic memory B cell (B(mem)) populations in a long-term preclinical vaccination model. Groups of BALB/c mice were primed and boosted (day 28) with a combined diphtheria (D), tetanus (T), acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine (DTaP) or whole cell pertussis (P) vaccine (DTP) and the immune status was followed over time. Levels of pertussis specific IgG, induced after primary and booster immunization, peaked at day 98 to decline thereafter. This was not paralleled by a decay, but rather an increase in BM resident specific PC, over time (>1 year). In contrast, splenic B(mem) peaked after booster immunization to decline till background levels. Late recall of immunological memory more than 1 year after primary and booster vaccination, however, did reveal a rapid proliferative response of pre-existing B(mem) but failed to evoke an anamnestic IgG response. A combination of waning P-antigen specific IgG production by PC and poor functions of the B(mem) compartment such as self-maintenance and anamnestic IgG responses could be a hallmark of waning pertussis immunity. A better understanding of the mechanisms of limited immunological memory to pertussis may help to improve current vaccines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. IL-6 contributes to an immune tolerance checkpoint in post germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yi; Wang, Ying-Hua; Diamond, Betty

    2012-02-01

    The generation of a B cell repertoire involves producing and subsequently purging autoreactive B cells. Receptor editing, clonal deletion and anergy are key mechanisms of central B cell tolerance. Somatic mutation of antigen-activated B cells within the germinal center produces a second wave of autoreactivity; but the regulatory mechanisms that operate at this phase of B cell activation are poorly understood. We recently identified a post germinal center tolerance checkpoint, where receptor editing is re-induced to extinguish autoreactivity that is generated by somatic hypermutation. Re-induction of the recombinase genes RAG1 and RAG2 in antigen-activated B cells requires antigen to engage the B cell receptor and IL-7 to signal through the IL-7 receptor. We demonstrate that this process requires IL-6 to upregulate IL-7 receptor expression on post germinal center B cells. Diminishing IL-6 by blocking antibody or haplo-insufficiency leads to reduced expression of the IL-7 receptor and RAG and increased titers of anti-DNA antibodies following immunization with a peptide mimetope of DNA. The dependence on IL-6 to initiate receptor editing is B cell intrinsic. Interestingly, estradiol decreases IL-6 expression thereby increasing the anti-DNA response. Our data reveal a novel regulatory cascade to control post germinal center B cell autoreactivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. B cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: moving to center stage

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    Polverino, Francesca; Seys, Leen J. M.; Bracke, Ken R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory responses in the lungs contribute to the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although research studies focused initially on the contributions of the innate immune system to the pathogenesis of COPD, more recent studies have implicated adaptive immune responses in COPD. In particular, studies have demonstrated increases in B cell counts and increases in the number and size of B cell-rich lymphoid follicles in COPD lungs that correlate directly with COPD severity. There are also increases in lung levels of mediators that promote B cell maturation, activation, and survival in COPD patients. B cell products such as autoantibodies directed against lung cells, components of cells, and extracellular matrix proteins are also present in COPD lungs. These autoantibodies may contribute to lung inflammation and injury in COPD patients, in part, by forming immune complexes that activate complement components. Studies of B cell-deficient mice and human COPD patients have linked B cells most strongly to the emphysema phenotype. However, B cells have protective activities during acute exacerbations of COPD by promoting adaptive immune responses that contribute to host defense against pathogens. This review outlines the evidence that links B cells and B cell-rich lymphoid follicles to the pathogenesis of COPD and the mechanisms involved. It also reviews the potential and limitations of B cells as therapeutic targets to slow the progression of human COPD. PMID:27542809

  11. B cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: moving to center stage.

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    Polverino, Francesca; Seys, Leen J M; Bracke, Ken R; Owen, Caroline A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory responses in the lungs contribute to the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although research studies focused initially on the contributions of the innate immune system to the pathogenesis of COPD, more recent studies have implicated adaptive immune responses in COPD. In particular, studies have demonstrated increases in B cell counts and increases in the number and size of B cell-rich lymphoid follicles in COPD lungs that correlate directly with COPD severity. There are also increases in lung levels of mediators that promote B cell maturation, activation, and survival in COPD patients. B cell products such as autoantibodies directed against lung cells, components of cells, and extracellular matrix proteins are also present in COPD lungs. These autoantibodies may contribute to lung inflammation and injury in COPD patients, in part, by forming immune complexes that activate complement components. Studies of B cell-deficient mice and human COPD patients have linked B cells most strongly to the emphysema phenotype. However, B cells have protective activities during acute exacerbations of COPD by promoting adaptive immune responses that contribute to host defense against pathogens. This review outlines the evidence that links B cells and B cell-rich lymphoid follicles to the pathogenesis of COPD and the mechanisms involved. It also reviews the potential and limitations of B cells as therapeutic targets to slow the progression of human COPD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

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    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  13. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

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    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortisol is associated with low frequency of interleukin 10-producing B cells in patients with atherosclerosis.

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    Huo, Yizhong; Chu, Yan; Guo, Lixin; Liu, Linli; Xia, Xiaojun; Wang, Tierui

    2017-04-01

    It is accepted that inflammation plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis; the pathogenesis is not clear. B-cell-produced interleukin (IL) 10 is an immune regulatory cytokine that can inhibit immune inflammation. This study tests a hypothesis that a psychological stress hormone, cortisol, suppresses IL-10 expression in peripheral B cells of patients with atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis. B cells were isolated from the blood samples to be analyzed for the expression of IL-10 and micro RNA (miR) 98 by real-time polymerase chain reaction. We observed that the frequency of IL-10 + B cell was less in patients with atherosclerosis than healthy controls. The serum cortisol levels were higher in the patients than that in healthy controls. Peripheral B-cell frequency was negatively correlated with the serum cortisol levels. Exposure of B cells to cortisol increased the expression of miR-98 in B cells. Cortisol also inhibited the expression of IL-10 in B cells, in which miR-98 played a critical role. Treating B cells from atherosclerosis patients with anti-miR-98 liposomes reversed the ability of expression of IL-10 in the cells. The expression of IL-10 is suppressed in peripheral B cells, which can be up regulated by anti-miR-98 liposomes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Toll-like receptors regulate B cell cytokine production in patients with diabetes

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    Jagannathan, M.; McDonnell, M.; Liang, Y.; Hasturk, H.; Hetzel, J.; Rubin, D.; Kantarci, A.; Van Dyke, T. E.; Ganley-Leal, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Understanding cellular and molecular events in diabetes mellitus will identify new approaches for therapy. Immune system cells are important modulators of chronic inflammation in diabetes mellitus, but the role of B cells is not adequately studied. The aim of this work was to define the function of B cells in diabetes mellitus patients through focus on B cell responses to pattern recognition receptors. Methods We measured expression and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on peripheral blood B cells from diabetes mellitus patients by flow cytometry and multiplexed cytokine analysis. We similarly analysed B cells from non-diabetic donors and periodontal disease patients as comparative cohorts. Results B cells from diabetes mellitus patients secrete multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, and IL-8 production is significantly elevated in B cells from diabetic patients compared with those from non-diabetic individuals. These data, plus modest elevation of TLR surface expression, suggest B cell IL-8 hyperproduction is a cytokine-specific outcome of altered TLR function in B cells from diabetes mellitus patients. Altered TLR function is further evidenced by demonstration of an unexpected, albeit modest ‘anti-inflammatory’ function for TLR4. Importantly, B cells from diabetes mellitus patients fail to secrete IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine implicated in inflammatory disease resolution, under a variety of TLR-stimulating conditions. Comparative analyses of B cells from patients with a second chronic inflammatory disease, periodontal disease, indicated that some alterations in B cell TLR function associate specifically with diabetes mellitus. Conclusions/interpretation Altered TLR function in B cells from diabetes mellitus patients increases inflammation by two mechanisms: elevation of pro-inflammatory IL-8 and lack of anti-inflammatory/protective IL-10 production. PMID:20383694

  16. Splenectomy Associated Changes in IgM Memory B Cells in an Adult Spleen Registry Cohort

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    Cameron, Paul U.; Jones, Penelope; Gorniak, Malgorzata; Dunster, Kate; Paul, Eldho; Lewin, Sharon; Woolley, Ian; Spelman, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Asplenic patients have a lifelong risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and have been reported to have low numbers of peripheral blood IgM memory B cells. The clinical value of quantitation of memory B cells as an indicator of splenic abnormality or risk of infection has been unclear. To assess changes in B cell sub-populations after splenectomy we studied patients recruited to a spleen registry (n = 591). A subset of 209 adult asplenic or hyposplenic subjects, and normal controls (n = 140) were tested for IgM memory B cells. We also determined a) changes in IgM memory B cells with time after splenectomy using the cross-sectional data from patients on the registry and b) the kinetics of changes in haematological markers associated with splenectomy(n = 45). Total B cells in splenectomy patients did not differ from controls, but memory B cells, IgM memory B cells and switched B cells were significantly (psplenectomy. Changes of asplenia in routine blood films including presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB), occurred early (median 25 days) and splenectomy associated thrombocytosis and lymphocytosis peaked by 50 days. There was a more gradual decrease in IgM memory B cells reaching a stable level within 6 months after splenectomy. IgM memory B cells as proportion of B cells was the best discriminator between splenectomized patients and normal controls and at the optimal cut-off of 4.53, showed a true positive rate of 95% and false positive rate of 20%. In a survey of 152 registry patients stratified by IgM memory B cells around this cut-off there was no association with minor infections and no registry patients experienced OPSI during the study. Despite significant changes after splenectomy, conventional measures of IgM memory cells have limited clinical utility in this population. PMID:21829713

  17. Splenectomy associated changes in IgM memory B cells in an adult spleen registry cohort.

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    Paul U Cameron

    Full Text Available Asplenic patients have a lifelong risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and have been reported to have low numbers of peripheral blood IgM memory B cells. The clinical value of quantitation of memory B cells as an indicator of splenic abnormality or risk of infection has been unclear. To assess changes in B cell sub-populations after splenectomy we studied patients recruited to a spleen registry (n = 591. A subset of 209 adult asplenic or hyposplenic subjects, and normal controls (n = 140 were tested for IgM memory B cells. We also determined a changes in IgM memory B cells with time after splenectomy using the cross-sectional data from patients on the registry and b the kinetics of changes in haematological markers associated with splenectomy(n = 45. Total B cells in splenectomy patients did not differ from controls, but memory B cells, IgM memory B cells and switched B cells were significantly (p<0.001 reduced. The reduction was similar for different indications for splenectomy. Changes of asplenia in routine blood films including presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB, occurred early (median 25 days and splenectomy associated thrombocytosis and lymphocytosis peaked by 50 days. There was a more gradual decrease in IgM memory B cells reaching a stable level within 6 months after splenectomy. IgM memory B cells as proportion of B cells was the best discriminator between splenectomized patients and normal controls and at the optimal cut-off of 4.53, showed a true positive rate of 95% and false positive rate of 20%. In a survey of 152 registry patients stratified by IgM memory B cells around this cut-off there was no association with minor infections and no registry patients experienced OPSI during the study. Despite significant changes after splenectomy, conventional measures of IgM memory cells have limited clinical utility in this population.

  18. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

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    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  19. A Hybrid Mechanism of Action for BCL6 in B Cells Defined by Formation of Functionally Distinct Complexes at Enhancers and Promoters

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    Katerina Hatzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is required for the development of germinal center (GC B cells and diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs. Although BCL6 can recruit multiple corepressors, its transcriptional repression mechanism of action in normal and malignant B cells is unknown. We find that in B cells, BCL6 mostly functions through two independent mechanisms that are collectively essential to GC formation and DLBCL, both mediated through its N-terminal BTB domain. These are (1 the formation of a unique ternary BCOR-SMRT complex at promoters, with each corepressor binding to symmetrical sites on BCL6 homodimers linked to specific epigenetic chromatin features, and (2 the “toggling” of active enhancers to a poised but not erased conformation through SMRT-dependent H3K27 deacetylation, which is mediated by HDAC3 and opposed by p300 histone acetyltransferase. Dynamic toggling of enhancers provides a basis for B cells to undergo rapid transcriptional and phenotypic changes in response to signaling or environmental cues.

  20. A hybrid mechanism of action for BCL6 in B-cells defined by formation of functionally distinct complexes at enhancers and promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzi, Katerina; Jiang, Yanwen; Huang, Chuanxin; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine; Gearhart, Micah D.; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G.; Zumbo, Paul; Kirouac, Kevin; Bhaskara, Srividya; Polo, Jose M.; Kormaksson, Matthias; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Xue, Fengtian; Mason, Christopher E.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Prive, Gilbert G.; Cerchietti, Leandro; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Elemento, Olivier; Melnick, Ari

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is required for development of germinal center (GC) B-cells and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Although BCL6 can recruit multiple corepressors, its transcriptional repression mechanism of action in normal and malignant B-cells is unknown. We find that in B-cells, BCL6 mostly functions through two independent mechanisms that are collectively essential to GC formation and DLBCL, both mediated through its N-terminal BTB domain. These are: i) formation of a unique ternary BCOR-SMRT complex at promoters with each corepressor binding to symmetrical sites on BCL6 homodimers, linked to specific epigenetic chromatin features, and ii) the “toggling” of active enhancers to a poised but not erased conformation through SMRT-dependent H3K27 de-acetylation, which is mediated by HDAC3 and opposed by p300 histone acetyltransferase. Dynamic toggling of enhancers provides a basis for B-cells to undergo rapid transcriptional and phenotypic changes in response to signaling or environmental cues. PMID:23911289

  1. The folliculin-FNIP1 pathway deleted in human Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is required for murine B-cell development.

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    Baba, Masaya; Keller, Jonathan R; Sun, Hong-Wei; Resch, Wolfgang; Kuchen, Stefan; Suh, Hyung Chan; Hasumi, Hisashi; Hasumi, Yukiko; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Gonzalez, Carme Gallego; Hughes, Robert M; Klein, Mara E; Oh, Hyoungbin F; Bible, Paul; Southon, Eileen; Tessarollo, Lino; Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston; Casellas, Rafael

    2012-08-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, and kidney malignancies. Affected individuals carry germ line mutations in folliculin (FLCN), a tumor suppressor gene that becomes biallelically inactivated in kidney tumors by second-hit mutations. Similar to other factors implicated in kidney cancer, FLCN has been shown to modulate activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, its precise in vivo function is largely unknown because germ line deletion of Flcn results in early embryonic lethality in animal models. Here, we describe mice deficient in the newly characterized folliculin-interacting protein 1 (Fnip1). In contrast to Flcn, Fnip1(-/-) mice develop normally, are not susceptible to kidney neoplasia, but display a striking pro-B cell block that is entirely independent of mTOR activity. We show that this developmental arrest results from rapid caspase-induced pre-B cell death, and that a Bcl2 transgene reconstitutes mature B-cell populations, respectively. We also demonstrate that conditional deletion of Flcn recapitulates the pro-B cell arrest of Fnip1(-/-) mice. Our studies thus demonstrate that the FLCN-FNIP complex deregulated in BHD syndrome is absolutely required for B-cell differentiation, and that it functions through both mTOR-dependent and independent pathways.

  2. An unusual case of cutaneous blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with concomitant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay L; Shetty, Shashirekha; Salama, Mohamed E

    2011-05-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is a rare hematologic malignancy characterized by aggressive clinical behavior and frequent cutaneous involvement. We describe a case of a 64-year-old man with a rapidly enlarging subcutaneous forearm mass. Histologic examination of the excisional biopsy specimen revealed a diffuse proliferation of atypical hematolymphoid cells in the dermis extending to the deep subcutaneous soft tissues. Occasional aggregates of small lymphocytes were noted to be distributed within the mass. The tumor cells expressed CD4, CD45, CD56, CD123, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) but not CD3, CD20, or CD34. A diagnosis of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm was rendered. Chromosome analysis revealed a 45 X, -Y karyotype. In addition, flow cytometry identified a small population of monoclonal B cells. A staging bone marrow aspirate and biopsy was performed, which showed normal cytogenetics and no evidence of involvement by blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Flow cytometric evaluation of the bone marrow revealed a CD5-negative, CD10-negative monoclonal B-cell population consistent with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. This is a very unusual example of cutaneous blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with a novel cytogenetic finding and concomitant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Although previously not reported, our case shows that blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm may be associated with lymphoid malignancy. The relationship between the 2 neoplasms, however, is unclear. A high degree of suspicion and bone marrow examination in patients with a new diagnosis of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is required to avoid this potential diagnostic pitfall.

  3. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

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    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  4. Multifocal Extranodal Involvement of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

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    Devrim Cabuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial involvement of extrapulmonary malignant tumors is uncommon and mostly associated with breast, kidney, colon, and rectum carcinomas. A 68-year-old male with a prior diagnosis of colon non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of cough, sputum, and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed right hilar enlargement and opacity at the right middle zone suggestive of a mass lesion. Computed tomography of thorax revealed a right-sided mass lesion extending to thoracic wall with the destruction of the third and the fourth ribs and a right hilar mass lesion. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in order to evaluate endobronchial involvement and showed stenosis with mucosal tumor infiltration in right upper lobe bronchus. The pathological examination of bronchoscopic biopsy specimen reported diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and the patient was accepted as the endobronchial recurrence of sigmoid colon NHL. The patient is still under treatment of R-ICE (rituximab-ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide chemotherapy and partial regression of pulmonary lesions was noted after 3 courses of treatment.

  5. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

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    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  6. Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma during Pregnancy

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    Cesar A. Perez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL rarely presents during pregnancy and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL accounts for approximately 2.5% of patients with NHL. The case of a 22-year-old woman who was diagnosed with Stage IIA PMLBCL during week 13 of her intrauterine pregnancy is described. The staging consisted in computed tomography (CT of the chest and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the abdomen and pelvis. She was managed with R-CHOP regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone for a total of six cycles and, because of the early presentation during the second trimester, she received the entire chemotherapy course during the pregnancy. She delivered a healthy baby at 34 weeks of pregnancy and a 18FDG-PET/CT scan demonstrated complete remission after delivery. After 20 months of follow up she remains with no evidence of disease and her 1-year-old son has shown no developmental delays or physical abnormalities. PMLBCL, although an uncommon subgroup of DLBCL, may present during pregnancy and R-CHOP should be considered as one suitable option in this complex scenario.

  7. Ocrelizumab: a B-cell depleting therapy for multiple sclerosis.

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    Jakimovski, Dejan; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Ramanathan, Murali; Kolb, Channa; Hojnacki, David; Minagar, Alireza; Zivadinov, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disease responsible for early disability in the young working population. In the last two decades, based on retrospective/prospective data, the use of disease-modifying therapies has been shown to slow the rate of disability progression and prolonged the time to conversion into secondary-progressive MS (SPMS). However, despite the availability of several approved therapies, disability progression cannot be halted significantly in all MS patients. Areas covered: This article reviews the immunopathology of the B-cells, and their role in pathogenesis of MS and their attractiveness as a potential therapeutic target in MS. The review focuses on the recently published ocrelizumab phase III trials in terms of its efficacy, safety, and tolerability as well as its future considerations. Expert opinion: B lymphocyte cell depletion therapy offers a compelling and promising new option for MS patients. Nonetheless, there is a need for heightened vigilance and awareness in detecting potential long-term consequences that currently remain unknown.

  8. B Cell Intrinsic Mechanisms Constraining IgE Memory

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    Brice Laffleur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells are key elements of adaptive humoral immunity. Regardless of the immunoglobulin class produced, these cells can ensure long-lasting protection but also long-lasting immunopathology, thus requiring tight regulation of their generation and survival. Among all antibody classes, this is especially true for IgE, which stands as the most potent, and can trigger dramatic inflammatory reactions even when present in minute amounts. IgE responses and memory crucially protect against parasites and toxic components of venoms, conferring selective advantages and explaining their conservation in all mammalian species despite a parallel broad spectrum of IgE-mediated immunopathology. Long-term memory of sensitization and anaphylactic responses to allergens constitute the dark side of IgE responses, which can trigger multiple acute or chronic pathologic manifestations, some punctuated with life-threatening events. This Janus face of the IgE response and memory, both necessary and potentially dangerous, thus obviously deserves the most elaborated self-control schemes.

  9. B cells and their role in the teleost gut.

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    Parra, David; Korytář, Tomáš; Takizawa, Fumio; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-11-01

    Mucosal surfaces are the main route of entry for pathogens in all living organisms. In the case of teleost fish, mucosal surfaces cover the vast majority of the animal. As these surfaces are in constant contact with the environment, fish are perpetually exposed to a vast number of pathogens. Despite the potential prevalence and variety of pathogens, mucosal surfaces are primarily populated by commensal non-pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, a fine balance between these two populations of microorganisms is crucial for animal survival. This equilibrium, controlled by the mucosal immune system, maintains homeostasis at mucosal tissues. Teleost fish possess a diffuse mucosa-associated immune system in the intestine, with B cells being one of the main responders. Immunoglobulins produced by these lymphocytes are a critical line of defense against pathogens and also prevent the entrance of commensal bacteria into the epithelium. In this review we will summarize recent literature regarding the role of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in gut immunity in teleost fish, with specific focus on immunoglobulin isotypes and the microorganisms, pathogenic and non-pathogenic that interact with the immune system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Clinical impact of B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary case series

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    Mella Olav

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. A patient with CFS had unexpected, marked recovery of CFS symptoms lasting for five months during and after cytotoxic chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. We reasoned that the transient CFS recovery was related to methotrexate treatment, which induces immunomodulation in part through B-cell depletion. Methods In a case series, this patient and two additional CFS patients were B-cell depleted by infusion of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. Results All three had improvement of all CFS symptoms. Patients 1 and 2 had major amelioration from 6 weeks after intervention, patient 3 slight improvement from the same time, but then improved markedly from 26 weeks after intervention. The symptomatic effect lasted until weeks 16, 18 and 44, respectively. At relapse, all were retreated with a single (patient 1 or double rituximab infusion (patients 2 and 3. Again, all three had marked symptom improvement, mimicking their first response. After new symptom recurrence, patients 1 and 2 were given weekly oral methotrexate, patient 1 having effect also from this agent. Patients 1 and 2 were again treated for a third rituximab infusion after new relapse, again with a marked clinical benefit. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Conclusion These observations suggest that B-lymphocytes are involved in CFS pathogenesis for a subset of patients. Benefit for all CFS symptoms, the delayed symptom relief following B-cell depletion, the kinetics of relapses, and the effect also from methotrexate treatment, provide suggestive evidence that B-cells play a significant role in the ongoing clinical features, and that CFS may be amenable to therapeutic interventions aimed at modifying B-cell number and function. More systematic investigations of this therapeutic strategy, and of its biological basis, are now needed.

  11. Clinical impact of B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary case series

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    Fluge, Øystein; Mella, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease of unknown aetiology. A patient with CFS had unexpected, marked recovery of CFS symptoms lasting for five months during and after cytotoxic chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. We reasoned that the transient CFS recovery was related to methotrexate treatment, which induces immunomodulation in part through B-cell depletion. Methods In a case series, this patient and two additional CFS patients were B-cell depleted by infusion of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. Results All three had improvement of all CFS symptoms. Patients 1 and 2 had major amelioration from 6 weeks after intervention, patient 3 slight improvement from the same time, but then improved markedly from 26 weeks after intervention. The symptomatic effect lasted until weeks 16, 18 and 44, respectively. At relapse, all were retreated with a single (patient 1) or double rituximab infusion (patients 2 and 3). Again, all three had marked symptom improvement, mimicking their first response. After new symptom recurrence, patients 1 and 2 were given weekly oral methotrexate, patient 1 having effect also from this agent. Patients 1 and 2 were again treated for a third rituximab infusion after new relapse, again with a marked clinical benefit. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Conclusion These observations suggest that B-lymphocytes are involved in CFS pathogenesis for a subset of patients. Benefit for all CFS symptoms, the delayed symptom relief following B-cell depletion, the kinetics of relapses, and the effect also from methotrexate treatment, provide suggestive evidence that B-cells play a significant role in the ongoing clinical features, and that CFS may be amenable to therapeutic interventions aimed at modifying B-cell number and function. More systematic investigations of this therapeutic strategy, and of its biological basis, are now needed. PMID:19566965

  12. Chronic Exposure to Malaria Is Associated with Inhibitory and Activation Markers on Atypical Memory B Cells and Marginal Zone-Like B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Ubillos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In persistent infections that are accompanied by chronic immune activation, such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria, there is an increased frequency of a phenotypically distinct subset of memory B cells lacking the classic memory marker CD27 and showing a reduced capacity to produce antibodies. However, critical knowledge gaps remain on specific B cell changes and immune adaptation in chronic infections. We hypothesized that expansion of atypical memory B cells (aMBCs and reduction of activated peripheral marginal zone (MZ-like B cells in constantly exposed individuals might be accompanied by phenotypic changes that would confer a tolerogenic profile, helping to establish tolerance to infections. To better understand malaria-associated phenotypic abnormalities on B cells, we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 pregnant women living in a malaria-endemic area of Papua Nueva Guinea and 9 Spanish malaria-naïve individuals using four 11-color flow cytometry panels. We assessed the expression of markers of B cell specificity (IgG and IgM, activation (CD40, CD80, CD86, b220, TACI, and CD150, inhibition (PD1, CD95, and CD71, and migration (CCR3, CXCR3, and CD62l. We found higher frequencies of active and resting aMBC and marked reduction of MZ-like B cells, although changes in absolute cell counts could not be assessed. Highly exposed women had higher PD1+-, CD95+-, CD40+-, CD71+-, and CD80+-activated aMBC frequencies than non-exposed subjects. Malaria exposure increased frequencies of b220 and proapoptotic markers PD1 and CD95, and decreased expression of the activation marker TACI on MZ-like B cells. The increased frequencies of inhibitory and apoptotic markers on activated aMBCs and MZ-like B cells in malaria-exposed adults suggest an immune-homeostatic mechanism for maintaining B cell development and function while simultaneously downregulating hyperreactive B cells. This mechanism would keep the B cell

  13. Accumulation of self-reactive naive and memory B cell reveals sequential defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in Sjogren's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Corsiero

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disease characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards nuclear antigens resulting in high affinity circulating autoantibodies. Although peripheral B cell disturbances have been described in SS, with predominance of naïve and reduction of memory B cells, the stage at which errors in B cell tolerance checkpoints accumulate in SS is unknown. Here we determined the frequency of self- and poly-reactive B cells in the circulating naïve and memory compartment of SS patients. Single CD27-IgD+ naïve, CD27+IgD+ memory unswitched and CD27+IgD- memory switched B cells were sorted by FACS from the peripheral blood of 7 SS patients. To detect the frequency of polyreactive and autoreactive clones, paired Ig VH and VL genes were amplified, cloned and expressed as recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs displaying identical specificity of the original B cells. IgVH and VL gene usage and immunoreactivity of SS rmAbs were compared with those obtained from healthy donors (HD. From a total of 353 VH and 293 VL individual sequences, we obtained 114 rmAbs from circulating naïve (n = 66 and memory (n = 48 B cells of SS patients. Analysis of the Ig V gene repertoire did not show significant differences in SS vs. HD B cells. In SS patients, circulating naïve B cells (with germline VH and VL genes displayed a significant accumulation of clones autoreactive against Hep-2 cells compared to HD (43.1% vs. 25%. Moreover, we demonstrated a progressive increase in the frequency of circulating anti-nuclear naïve (9.3%, memory unswitched (22.2% and memory switched (27.3% B cells in SS patients. Overall, these data provide novel evidence supporting the existence of both early and late defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in patients with SS resulting in the accumulation of autoreactive naïve and memory B cells.

  14. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... days after birth, late-onset lymphoid cancer development and premature death. These findings are highly similar to those observed in CLL patients and identify EBI2 as a promoter of B cell malignancies....

  15. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  16. Aggressive B-cell lymphomas: how many categories do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are diverse group of neoplasms that arise at different stages of B-cell development and by various mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. The aggressive B-cell lymphomas include many types, subtypes and variants of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), mantle cell lymphoma and its blastoid variant, and B lymphoblastic lymphoma. Differences in histology, cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities, as well as the relationship with the tumor microenvironment, help define characteristic signatures for these neoplasms, and in turn dictate potential therapeutic targets. Rather than survey the entire spectrum of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, this report aims to identify and characterize important clinically aggressive subtypes of DLBCL, and explore the relationship of DLBCL to BL and the gray zone between them (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL). PMID:23154748

  17. Regulation of B cell functions by Toll-like receptors and complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlitzka, Mariann; Mácsik-Valent, Bernadett; Erdei, Anna

    2016-10-01

    B cell functions triggered by the clonally-rearranged antigen-specific B cell receptor (BCR) are regulated by several germ-line encoded receptors - including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and complement receptors (CRs). Simultaneous or sequential engagement of these structures expressed either on the cell membrane or intracellularly, may fundamentally alter and fine tune activation, antibody and cytokine production of B cells. Here we review the expression and function of TLRs and various C3 fragment binding CRs on B cells, emphasizing their role in different human B cell subsets under physiological and pathological conditions. Studies underlining the importance of the crosstalk between TLRs and CRs in regulating B cell functions are also highlighted. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human b cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors...... were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells....... The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases....

  19. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candid......BACKGROUND: The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment....... A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb...

  20. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  1. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Radwanska

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+ marginal zone (IgM(+MZ B cell population characterized as B220(+IgM(HighIgD(Int CD21(HighCD23(LowCD1d(+CD138(-. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R, indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  2. CD40 Ligand-activated, antigen-specific B cells are comparable to mature dendritic cells in presenting protein antigens and major histocompatibility complex class I- and class II-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Flies, Amanda; Efebera, Yvonne; Sherr, David H

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are increasingly exploited for cell-based immunotherapy. However, limitations in ex vivo DC growth and DC functional heterogeneity have motivated development of complementary antigen-presenting cell sources. Here, the ability of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells to fulfil that role was investigated. We demonstrate for the first time that non-specific or antigen-specific murine B cells can be grown for extended periods of time by stimulation with CD40L. These cells rapidly up-regulate and maintain high levels of co-stimulatory molecules. In a head-to-head comparison with DC, CD40L-expanded B cells were comparable to DC in the presentation of peptides to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. While DC were superior to antigen non-specific CD40L-activated B cells with regard to whole protein (NP-BSA) processing and presentation, CD40L-expanded B cells from NP-BSA-immunized mice were comparable to DC when presenting BSA or NP-BSA to primed primary T cells or when presenting NP linked to an unrelated carrier, CGG, to naïve T cells. Thus, the combination of CD40L activation, which supports B-cell growth and augments intracellular protein processing, and antigen uptake via the B-cell receptor, allows for efficient uptake, processing, and presentation of whole protein antigens in a fashion comparable to that observed with mature DC. Like DC, CD40L-activated B cells efficiently home to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. This system represents a unique tool for studying primary antigen-specific B cells and the results suggest that the outgrowth of large numbers of highly activated B cells represents a viable and practical complement to DC for cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:18067555

  3. Inflammatory Conditions Dictate the Effect of Mesenchymal Stem or Stromal Cells on B Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Franka; Carreras-Planella, Laura; Korevaar, Sander S.; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Borràs, Francesc E.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.; Franquesa, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) makes them a promising tool for treatment of immune disease and organ transplantation. The effects of MSC on B cells are characterized by an abrogation of plasmablast formation and induction of regulatory B cells (Bregs). It is, however, unknown how MSC interact with B cells under inflammatory conditions. In this study, adipose tissue-derived MSC were pretreated with 50 ng/ml IFN-γ for 96 h (MSC–IFN-γ) to simulate inflammatory conditions. Mature B cells were obtained from spleens by CD43− selection. B cells were co-cultured with MSC and stimulated with anti-IgM, anti-CD40, and IL-2; and after 7 days, B cell proliferation, phenotype, Immunoglobulin-G (IgG), and IL-10 production were analyzed. MSC did not inhibit B cell proliferation but increased the percentage of CD38high CD24high B cells (Bregs) and IL-10 production, while MSC–IFN-γ significantly reduced B cell proliferation and inhibited IgG production by B cells in a more potent fashion but did not induce Bregs or IL-10 production. Both MSC and MSC–IFN-γ required proximity to target cells and being metabolically active to exert their effects. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase expression was highly induced in MSC–IFN-γ and was responsible of the anti-proliferative and Breg reduction since addition of tryptophan (TRP) restored MSC properties. Immunological conditions dictate the effect of MSC on B cell function. Under immunological quiescent conditions, MSC stimulate Breg induction; whereas, under inflammatory conditions, MSC inhibit B cell proliferation and maturation through depletion of TRP. This knowledge is useful for customizing MSC therapy for specific purposes by appropriate pretreatment of MSC. PMID:28894451

  4. Activation of B Cells by a Dendritic Cell-Targeted Oral Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Sahay, Bikash; Owen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Tao; Zadeh, Mojgan; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Ge, Jun-wei; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    Production of long-lived, high affinity humoral immunity is an essential characteristic of successful vaccination and requires cognate interactions between T and B cells in germinal centers. Within germinal centers, specialized T follicular helper cells assist B cells and regulate the antibody response by mediating the differentiation of B cells into memory or plasma cells after exposure to T cell-dependent antigens. It is now appreciated that local immune responses are also essential for pro...

  5. B Cells Producing Type I Interferon Modulate Macrophage Polarization in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Alan; Sakwa, Imme; Schierloh, Pablo; Colom, André; Mercier, Ingrid; Tailleux, Ludovic; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Al-Saati, Talal; Lang, Roland; Rehwinkel, Jan; Loxton, Andre G; Kaufmann, Stefan He; Anton-Leberre, Véronique; O'Garra, Anne; Del Carmen Sasiain, Maria; Gicquel, Brigitte; Fillatreau, Simon; Neyrolles, Olivier; Hudrisier, Denis

    2017-11-21

    In addition to their well-known function as antibody-producing cells, B lymphocytes can markedly influence the course of infectious or non-infectious diseases via antibody-independent mechanisms. In tuberculosis, B cells accumulate in lungs, yet their functional contribution to the host response remains poorly understood. To document the role of B cells in tuberculosis in an unbiased manner. We generated the transcriptome of B cells isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected mice, and validated the identified key pathways using in vitro and in vivo assays. The obtained data were substantiated using B cells from pleural effusion of tuberculosis patients. B cells isolated from Mtb-infected mice displayed a STAT1-centered signature, suggesting a role for interferons in B cell response to infection. B cells stimulated in vitro with Mtb produced type I interferon, via a mechanism involving the innate sensor STING, and antagonized by MyD88 signaling. In vivo, B cells expressed type I interferon in the lungs of Mtb-infected mice and, of clinical relevance, in pleural fluid from patients with tuberculosis. Type I interferon expression by B cells induced an altered polarization of macrophages towards a regulatory/anti-inflammatory profile in vitro. In vivo, increased provision of type I interferon by B cells in a murine model of B cell-restricted Myd88-deficiency correlated with an enhanced accumulation of regulatory/anti-inflammatory macrophages in Mtb infected lungs. Type I interferon produced by Mtb-stimulated B cells favors macrophage polarization towards a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phenotype during Mtb infection.

  6. Changes in tonsil B cell phenotypes and EBV receptor expression in children under 5 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlford, Eric M; Baresel, Paul C; Wilmore, Joel R; Mortelliti, Anthony J; Coleman, Carrie B; Rochford, Rosemary

    2017-09-08

    Palatine tonsils are principally B cell organs that are the initial line of defense against many oral pathogens, as well as the site of infection for others. While the size of palatine tonsils changes greatly in the first five years of life, the cellular changes during this period are not well studied. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is a common orally transmitted virus that infects tonsillar B cells. Naïve B cells are thought to be the target of primary infection with EBV in vivo, suggesting that they are targeted by the virus. EBV enters B cells through CD21, but studies of older children and adults have not shown differences in surface CD21 between naïve B cells and other tonsil B cell populations. In this study we used an 11-color flow cytometry panel to detail the changes in B cell subpopulations in human tonsils over the first five years of life from 33 healthy US children. We provide reference ranges for tonsil B cell subpopulations over this age range. We show that the frequency of naïve tonsil B cells decreases over the early years of life, and that naïve B cells expressed higher surface levels of CD21 relative to other tonsil B cell populations. We show that young children have a higher frequency of naïve tonsil B cells, and importantly that these cells express increased surface EBV receptor, suggesting that young children have a larger pool of cells that can be infected by the virus. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  7. Effect of cytokine inhibition on peripheral memory B cells in patients with Rheumatoid arthtritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory autoimmune disease. Enhanced B cell activity has been proposed in the pathogenesis of RA along with different pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), critically involved in chronic inflammation. Biological agents targeting these cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α have considerably advanced treatment of autoimmunity. Enhanced B cell activity, particularly memory B cells gain...

  8. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Klinge Brimnes

    Full Text Available B cells may play both pathogenic and protective roles in T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. These functions relate to the ability of B cells to bind and present antigens. Under serum-free conditions we observed that 3-4% of circulating B cells from healthy donors were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells bound MBP in a complement-dependent manner, and almost half of the B cells became engaged in presentation of MBP85-99. Even though complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35 and CR2 (CD21 both contributed to binding of MBP to B cells, only CR2 was important for the subsequent presentation of MBP85-99. A high proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides. The mechanisms described here refute the general assumption that B-cell presentation of self-antigens requires uptake via specific B-cell receptors, and may be important for maintenance of tolerance as well as for driving T-cell responses in autoimmune diseases.

  9. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Schleich, Eva; Hertzenberg, Deetje; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Kümpfel, Tania; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Berthele, Achim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Weber, Martin S

    2011-10-26

    Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg) and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC) were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM). We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and effectiveness may further advance by selectively targeting pathogenic B-cell

  10. Loss of B cell identity correlates with loss of B cell-specific transcription factors in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Christina B; Zhou, Xiao-ge; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J

    2002-01-01

    In classical Hodgkin lymphoma the malignant Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells characteristically constitute only a small minority of the tumour load. Their origin has been debated for decades, but on the basis of rearrangement and somatic hypermutations of their immunoglubulin (Ig) genes, HRS...... cells are now ascribed to the B-cell lineage. Nevertheless, phenotypically HRS cells have lost their B cell identity: they usually lack common B cell-specific surface markers such as CD19 and CD79a as well as Ig gene transcripts. Here we demonstrate that Ig promoters as well as both intronic and 3......' enhancer sequences are transcriptionally inactive in HRS cell lines. This inactivity correlates with either reduced levels or even a complete lack of several B cell-specific transcription factors required for their expression: Oct-2, OBF-1, PU.1, E47/E12, PAX-5 and EBF. Moreover, we demonstrate that PU.1...

  11. The Fas/CD95 receptor regulates the death of autoreactive B cells and the selection of antigen-specific B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Odile eHUEBER

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell death receptors have crucial roles in the regulation of immune responses. Here we review recent in vivo data confirming that the Fas death receptor (TNFSR6 on B cells is important for the regulation of autoimmunity since the impairment of only Fas function on B cells results in uncontrolled autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Fas plays a role in the elimination of the non-specific and auto-reactive B cells in germinal center, while during the selection of antigen specific B cells different escape signals ensure the resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis. Antigen specific survival such as BCR or MHCII signal or coreceptors (CD19 cooperating with BCR inhibits the formation of death inducing signaling complex. Antigen-specific survival can be reinforced by antigen-independent signals of IL4 or CD40 overproducing the anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family proteins.

  12. Hepatic B cells are readily activated by Toll‐like receptor‐4 ligation and secrete less interleukin‐10 than lymphoid tissue B cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, H; Stolz, D. B; Chalasani, G; Thomson, A. W

    2013-01-01

    ... their secretion of interleukin ( IL )‐10. While the liver is regarded both as an important immune organ and a tolerogenic environment, little is known about the functional biology of hepatic B cells...

  13. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  14. Micro RNA-19a suppresses IL-10 in peripheral B cells from patients with atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong-Qiao; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Kan

    2016-10-01

    The interleukin (IL)-10-production B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis (Asro) with unknown mechanism. Micro RNA (miR)-17-92 cluster has strong immune regulatory activities. This study tests a hypothesis that miR-17-92 cluster suppresses IL-10 expression in B cells of Asro patients. Patients with Asro were recruited into this study. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the patients. B cells were isolated from the blood samples and analyzed to elucidate the role of miR-17-92 in the regulation of IL-10 expression. Peripheral B cells from patients with Asro show lower levels of IL-10 than that from healthy subjects. The IL-10 expression in the B cells is negatively correlated with the expression of miR-19a in the B cells. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 in Asro patients were higher than healthy subjects. Exposure to TNF-α or IFN-γ or IL-4 suppressed IL-10 expression in B cells via increasing the expression of miR-19a in B cells, which could be abolished by Inhibition of miR-19a. TNF-α or IFN-γ or IL-4 suppresses IL-10 in B cells via up regulating miR-19a expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Battaglini, Albane; Hammarström, Clara; Stankovic, Branislava; Aamodt, Henrik; Stjärne, Johan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Øynebråten, Inger; Corthay, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab.

  16. Signaling and Dynamic Actin Responses of B Cells on Topographical Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells become activated upon physical contact with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells. Binding of the B cell receptor with antigen initiates actin-mediated spreading of B cells, signaling cascades and eventually infection fighting antibodies. Lymphocytes, including B cells and T cells, have been shown to be responsive to the physical parameters of the contact surface, such as antigen mobility and substrate stiffness. However the roll of surface topography on lymphocyte function is unknown. Here we investigate the degree to which substrate topography controls actin-mediated spreading and B cell activation using nano-fabricated surfaces and live cell imaging. The model topographical system consists of 600 nanometer tall ridges with spacing varying between 800 nanometers and 5 micrometers. Using TIRF imaging we observe actin dynamics, B cell receptor motion and calcium signaling of B cells as they spread on the ridged substrates. We show that the spacing between ridges had a strong effect on the dynamics of actin and calcium influx on B cells. Our results indicate that B cells are highly sensitive to surface topography during cell spreading and signaling activation.

  17. B-cell exhaustion in HIV infection: the role of immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2014-09-01

    To discuss a component of the pathogenic mechanisms of HIV infection in the context of phenotypic and functional alterations in B cells that are due to persistent viral replication leading to aberrant immune activation and cellular exhaustion. We explore how B-cell exhaustion arises during persistent viremia and how it compares with T-cell exhaustion and similar B-cell alterations in other diseases. HIV-associated B-cell exhaustion was first described in 2008, soon after the demonstration of persistent virus-induced T-cell exhaustion, as well as the identification of a subset B cells in tonsil tissues with immunoregulatory features similar to those observed in T-cell exhaustion. Our understanding of B-cell exhaustion has since expanded in two important areas: the role of inhibitory receptors in the unresponsiveness of exhausted B cells and the increasing evidence that similar B cells are found in other diseases that are associated with aberrant immune activation and inflammation. The phenomenon of B-cell exhaustion is now well established in HIV infection and other diseases characterized by immune activation. Over the coming years, it will be important to understand how cellular exhaustion affects the capacity of the immune system to respond to persisting primary pathogens, as well as to other microbial antigens, whether encountered as secondary infections or following immunization.

  18. B cells promote tumor progression via STAT3 regulated-angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Yang

    Full Text Available The role of B cells in cancer and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further explored. Here, we show that tumor-associated B cells with activated STAT3 contribute to tumor development by promoting tumor angiogenesis. B cells with or without Stat3 have opposite effects on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in both B16 melanoma and Lewis Lung Cancer mouse models. Ex vivo angiogenesis assays show that B cell-mediated tumor angiogenesis is mainly dependent on the induction of pro-angiogenic gene expression, which requires Stat3 signaling in B cells. Furthermore, B cells with activated STAT3 are mainly found in or near tumor vasculature and correlate significantly with overall STAT3 activity in human tumors. Moreover, the density of B cells in human tumor tissues correlates significantly with expression levels of several STAT3-downstream pro-angiogenic genes, as well as the degree of tumor angiogenesis. Together, these findings define a novel role of B cells in promoting tumor progression through angiogenesis and identify STAT3 in B cells as potential therapeutic target for anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  19. The targeted inhibition of mitochondrial Hsp90 overcomes the apoptosis resistance conferred by Bcl-2 in Hep3B cells via necroptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chunlan [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Oh, Joon Seok; Yoo, Seung Hee; Lee, Jee Suk [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Geol [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Science, Institute for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Jungwon University, Chungbuk, 367-805 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yoo Jin; Jang, Min Seok [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeob [Department of Rheumatology, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jun [Department of Toxicology, Hangzhou Normal University School of Public Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310036 China (China); Lee, Sang Hwa [Department of Microbiology and, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Young [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Hyun, E-mail: yhyoo@dau.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Dong-A University College of Medicine and Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Busan, 602-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that a Gamitrinib variant containing triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) binds to mitochondrial Hsp90 and rapidly inhibits its activity, thus inducing the apoptotic pathway in the cells. Accordingly, G-TPP shows a potential as a promising drug for the treatment of cancer. A cell can die from different types of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, necroptosis, and autophagic cell death. In this study, we further investigated the mechanisms and modes of cell death in the G-TPP-treated Hep3B and U937 cell lines. We discovered that G-TPP kills the U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway and the overexpression of Bcl-2 significantly inhibits U937 cell death to G-TPP. We further discovered that G-TPP kills the Hep3B cells by activating necroptosis in combination with the partial activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Importantly, G-TPP overcomes the apoptosis resistance conferred by Bcl-2 in Hep3B cells via necroptosis. We also observed that G-TPP induces compensatory autophagy in the Hep3B cell line. We further found that whereas there is a Bcl-2-Beclin 1 interaction in response to G-TPP, silencing the beclin 1 gene failed to block LC3-II accumulation in the Hep3B cells, indicating that G-TPP triggers Beclin 1-independent protective autophagy in Hep3B cells. Taken together, these data reveal that G-TPP induces cell death through a combination of death pathways, including necroptosis and apoptosis, and overcomes the apoptosis resistance conferred by Bcl-2 in Hep3B cells via necroptosis. These findings are important for the therapeutic exploitation of necroptosis as an alternative cell death program to bypass the resistance to apoptosis. Highlights: ► G-TPP binds to mitochondrial Hsp90. ► G-TPP induces apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cancer cells. ► G-TPP induces combination of death pathways in Hep3B cell. ► G-TPP overcomes the resistance conferred by Bcl-2 in Hep3B cells via necroptosis. ► G-TPP triggers Beclin 1-independent

  20. Combination of poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 enhances activation of B cells in vitro and boosts antibody responses to protein vaccines in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve M Weir

    Full Text Available Vaccines that can rapidly induce strong and robust antibody-mediated immunity could improve protection from certain infectious diseases for which current vaccine formulations are inefficient. For indications such as anthrax and influenza, antibody production in vivo is a correlate of efficacy. Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists are frequently studied for their role as vaccine adjuvants, largely because of their ability to enhance initiation of immune responses to antigens by activating dendritic cells. However, TLRs are also expressed on B cells and may contribute to effective B cell activation and promote differentiation into antigen-specific antibody producing plasma cells in vivo. We sought to discover an adjuvant system that could be used to augment antibody responses to influenza and anthrax vaccines. We first characterized an adjuvant system in vitro which consisted of two TLR ligands, poly I:C (TLR3 and Pam3CSK4 (TLR2, by evaluating its effects on B cell activation. Each agonist enhanced B cell activation through increased expression of surface receptors, cytokine secretion and proliferation. However, when B cells were stimulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in combination, further enhancement to cell activation was observed. Using B cells isolated from knockout mice we confirmed that poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 were signaling through TLR3 and TLR2, respectively. B cells activated with Poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 displayed enhanced capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation and differentiate into antibody-producing plasma cells in vitro. Mice vaccinated with influenza or anthrax antigens formulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in DepoVax™ vaccine platform developed a rapid and strong antigen-specific serum antibody titer that persisted for at least 12 weeks after a single immunization. These results demonstrate that combinations of TLR adjuvants promote more effective B cell activation in vitro and can be used to augment antibody responses

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Therapy for B-cell Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Porter, Michael Kalos, Zhaohui Zheng, Bruce Levine, Carl June

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented data showing that the CART-19 cells expressing the 4-1BB signaling domain can have unprecedented and massive in-vivo expansion, traffic to tumor sites, persist long term in vivo, and induce rapid and potent anti-tumor activity in chemotherapy refractory CLL patients.

  2. IL-15 expression on RA synovial fibroblasts promotes B cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benito-Miguel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib IL-15 expression on B cell survival. METHODS: Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. RESULTS: RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/-8% (p<0.001. IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/-6% (p<0.05. Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. CONCLUSION: IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains.

  3. Efficient Culture of Human Naive and Memory B Cells for Use as APCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuei-Ying; Watanabe, Akiko; Yeh, Chen-Hao; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kuraoka, Masayuki

    2016-11-15

    The ability to culture and expand B cells in vitro has become a useful tool for studying human immunity. A limitation of current methods for human B cell culture is the capacity to support mature B cell proliferation. We developed a culture method to support the efficient activation and proliferation of naive and memory human B cells. This culture supports extensive B cell proliferation, with ∼103-fold increases following 8 d in culture and 106-fold increases when cultures are split and cultured for 8 more days. In culture, a significant fraction of naive B cells undergo isotype switching and differentiate into plasmacytes. Culture-derived (CD) B cells are readily cryopreserved and, when recovered, retain their ability to proliferate and differentiate. Significantly, proliferating CD B cells express high levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86. CD B cells act as APCs and present alloantigens and microbial Ags to T cells. We are able to activate and expand Ag-specific memory B cells; these cultured cells are highly effective in presenting Ag to T cells. We characterized the TCR repertoire of rare Ag-specific CD4+ T cells that proliferated in response to tetanus toxoid (TT) presented by autologous CD B cells. TCR Vβ usage by TT-activated CD4+ T cells differs from resting and unspecifically activated CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we found that TT-specific TCR Vβ usage by CD4+ T cells was substantially different between donors. This culture method provides a platform for studying the BCR and TCR repertoires within a single individual. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. A low-cost multielectrode system for data acquisition enabling real-time closed-loop processing with rapid recovery from stimulation artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Rolston

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available data acquisition systems for multielectrode recording from freely moving animals are expensive, often rely on proprietary software, and do not provide detailed, modifiable circuit schematics. When used in conjunction with electrical stimulation, they are prone to prolonged, saturating stimulation artifacts that prevent the recording of short-latency evoked responses. Yet electrical stimulation is integral to many experimental designs, and critical for emerging brain-computer interfacing and neuroprosthetic applications. To address these issues, we developed an easy-to-use, modifiable, and inexpensive system for multielectrode neural recording and stimulation. Setup costs are less than US$10,000 for 64 channels, an order of magnitude lower than comparable commercial systems. Unlike commercial equipment, the system recovers rapidly from stimulation and allows short-latency action potentials (<1 ms post-stimulus to be detected, facilitating closed-loop applications and exposing neural activity that would otherwise remain hidden. To illustrate this capability, evoked activity from microstimulation of the rodent hippocampus is presented. The system is modular, in banks of 16 channels, and flexible in usage: while primarily designed for in vivo use, it can be combined with commercial preamplifiers to record from in vitro multielectrode arrays. The system’s open-source control software, NeuroRighter, is implemented in C#, with an easy-to-use graphical interface. As C# functions in a managed code environment, which may impact performance, analysis was conducted to ensure comparable speed to C++ for this application. Hardware schematics, layout files, and software are freely available. Since maintaining wired headstage connections with freely moving animals is difficult, we describe a new method of electrode-headstage coupling using neodymium magnets.

  5. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  6. Logical analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, G; Alexe, S; Axelrod, D E; Hammer, P L; Weissmann, D

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study is to re-examine the oligonucleotide microarray dataset of Shipp et al., which contains the intensity levels of 6817 genes of 58 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and 19 with follicular lymphoma (FL), by means of the combinatorics, optimisation, and logic-based methodology of logical analysis of data (LAD). The motivations for this new analysis included the previously demonstrated capabilities of LAD and its expected potential (1) to identify different informative genes than those discovered by conventional statistical methods, (2) to identify combinations of gene expression levels capable of characterizing different types of lymphoma, and (3) to assemble collections of such combinations that if considered jointly are capable of accurately distinguishing different types of lymphoma. The central concept of LAD is a pattern or combinatorial biomarker, a concept that resembles a rule as used in decision tree methods. LAD is able to exhaustively generate the collection of all those patterns which satisfy certain quality constraints, through a systematic combinatorial process guided by clear optimization criteria. Then, based on a set covering approach, LAD aggregates the collection of patterns into classification models. In addition, LAD is able to use the information provided by large collections of patterns in order to extract subsets of variables, which collectively are able to distinguish between different types of disease. For the differential diagnosis of DLBCL versus FL, a model based on eight significant genes is constructed and shown to have a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 100% on the test set. For the prognosis of good versus poor outcome among the DLBCL patients, a model is constructed on another set consisting also of eight significant genes, and shown to have a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 90% on the test set. The genes selected by LAD also work well as a basis for other kinds of statistical

  7. The FOX and the mutants in mature human B cells and DLBCL: The role of FOXP1 in mature human B cell biology and lymphomagenesis & prevalence of oncogenic MyD88 and CD79B mutations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor FOXP1 is prominently expressed in mature B cells and is a potential oncogene in B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas; however, the functions of FOXP1 in mature B cells and B cell lymphomagenesis have not yet been fully explored. In the first part of this thesis, the roles of FOXP1

  8. Serotype-Specific and Age-Dependent Generation of Pneumococcal Polysaccharide-Specific Memory B-Cell and Antibody Responses to Immunization with a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Oh, Sarah; Hamaluba, Mainga; Westcar, Sharon; Beverley, Peter C. L.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines have dramatically reduced the incidence of encapsulated bacterial diseases in toddlers under 2 years of age, but vaccine-induced antibody levels in this age group wane rapidly. We immunized adults and 12-month-old toddlers with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to determine differences in B-cell and antibody responses. The adults and 12-month-old toddlers received a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. The toddlers received a second dose at 14 months of age. The frequencies of diphtheria toxoid and serotype 4, 14, and 23F polysaccharide-specific plasma cells and memory B cells were determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The toddlers had no preexisting polysaccharide-specific memory B cells or serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody but had good diphtheria toxoid-specific memory responses. The frequencies of plasma cells and memory B cells increased by day 7 (P < 0.0001) in the adults and the toddlers following a single dose of conjugate, but the polysaccharide responses were significantly lower in the toddlers than in the adults (P = 0.009 to <0.001). IgM dominated the toddler antibody responses, and class switching to the IgG was serotype dependent. A second dose of vaccine enhanced the antibody and memory B-cell responses in the toddlers but not the ex vivo plasma cell responses. Two doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine are required in toddlers to generate memory B-cell frequencies and antibody class switching for each pneumococcal polysaccharide equivalent to that seen in adults. PMID:18032593

  9. Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma arising from thyroid in a renal recipient with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang; Qu, Lu; Li, Dai-Qiang; Hu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, arising in the mediastinum from putative thymic B-cell origin with distinctive clinical and genetic features. Generally, primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma is believed as only deriving in the mediastinum. The current study presents a rare case of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma which arising from thyroid in a renal recipient with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Moreover, we devoted a discussion ...

  10. UCH-L1 is induced in germinal center B cells and identifies patients with aggressive germinal center diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedekovics, Tibor; Hussain, Sajjad; Feldman, Andrew L; Galardy, Paul J

    2016-03-24

    Gene expression profiling has identified 2 major subclasses of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Cases resembling germinal center (GC) B cells (GCB-DLBCL) generally occur in younger patients, have a distinct molecular pathophysiology, and have improved outcomes compared with those similar to activated post-GC cells (activated B-cell DLBCL). We previously found that the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 is frequently overexpressed in mature B-cell malignancies and is a potent oncogene in mice. The cause for its overexpression in lymphoma, and whether it impacts the outcome of patients with DLBCL is unknown. Here, we show that UCH-L1 reflects GC lineage in lymphoma and is an oncogenic biomarker of aggressive GCB-DLBCL. We find that UCH-L1 is specifically induced in GC B cells in mice and humans, and that its expression correlates highly with the GCB subtype in DLBCL. We also find that UCH-L1 cooperates with BCL6 in a mouse model of GC B-cell lymphoma, but not with the development of multiple myeloma derived from post-GC cells. Despite the typically good outcomes of GCB-DLBCL, increased UCHL1 identifies a subgroup with early relapses independent of MYC expression, suggesting biological diversity in this subset of disease. Consistent with this, forced Uchl1 overexpression had a substantial impact on gene expression in GC B cells including pathways of cell cycle progression, cell death and proliferation, and DNA replication. These data demonstrate a novel role for UCH-L1 outside of the nervous system and suggest its potential use as a biomarker and therapeutic target in DLBCL. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Innate Immune B Cell Activation by Leishmania donovani Exacerbates Disease and Mediates Hypergammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Barrios, Sasha; Smans, Mélina; Duerr, Claudia U; Qureshi, Salman T; Fritz, Jörg H; Descoteaux, Albert; Stäger, Simona

    2016-06-14

    Participation of B cells in the immune response by various antibody-independent mechanisms has recently been uncovered. B cells producing cytokines have been described for several infections and appear to regulate the adaptive immune response. B cell activation by Leishmania donovani results in disease exacerbation. How Leishmania activates B cells is still unknown. We show that L. donovani amastigotes activate B cells by triggering endosomal TLRs; this activation leads to the induction of various cytokines. Cytokine expression is completely abrogated in B cells from Ifnar(-/-) mice upon exposure to L. donovani, suggesting an involvement of IFN-I in a positive feedback loop. IFN-I also appears to enhance the expression of endosomal TLRs following exposure to L. donovani. Cell-specific ablation of endosomal TLR signaling in B cells revealed that innate B cell activation by L. donovani is responsible for disease exacerbation through IL-10 and IFN-I production and for the promotion of hypergammaglobulinemia. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, C.J.; Casas-Selves, M.; Kim, J.; Zaberezhnyy, V.; Aghili, L.; Daniel, A.E.; Jimenez, L.; Azam, T.; McNamee, E.N.; Clambey, E.T.; Klawitter, J.; Serkova, N.J.; Tan, A.C.; Dinarello, C.A.; DeGregori, J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed

  13. The BiP cochaperone ERdj4 is required for B cell development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Fritz

    Full Text Available ERdj4 is a BiP cochaperone regulated by the unfolded protein response to facilitate degradation of unfolded and/or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. As the unfolded protein response plays a critical role in B cell maturation and antibody production, ERdj4 gene trap mice were generated to determine if this chaperone was required for B cell homeostasis. Homozygosity for the trapped allele resulted in hypomorphic expression of ERdj4 in bone marrow cells and abnormal development of hematopoietic lineages in the bone marrow. The number of myeloid cells was increased, while the number of erythroid and B lymphoid cells was reduced in ERdj4 gene trap mice compared to controls. An intrinsic B cell defect was identified that decreased survival of B cell precursors including large and small pre-B, and immature B cells. Consistent with impaired B lymphopoiesis, the number of mature follicular B cells was reduced in both the bone marrow and spleen of ERdj4 gene trap mice. Paradoxically, unchallenged ERdj4 gene trap mice showed non-specific hypergammaglobulinemia and gene trap B cells exhibited increased proliferation, survival and isotype switching in response to LPS stimulation. Although ERdj4 gene trap mice responded normally to T cell-independent antigen, they failed to mount a specific antibody response to T cell-dependent antigen in vivo. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the chaperone activity of ERdj4 is required for survival of B cell progenitors and normal antibody production.

  14. Localization in situ of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyth-Dreese, F.A.; Boot, H.; Dellemijn, T.A.M.; Majoor, D.M.; Oomen, L.C.J.M.; Laman, J.D.; Meurs, M. van; Weger, R.A. de; Jong, D. de

    1998-01-01

    Costimulatory molecules are essential in cognate interactions between T and B lymphocytes. To study the prerequisites of functional interactions between malignant B cells and intermingled T cells in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHL), we examined the expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 and their

  15. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  16. IL-17 Enhances Chemotaxis of Primary Human B Cells during Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih Halwani

    Full Text Available IL-17 is a pro-inflammatory mediator that is believed to play a critical role in regulating tissue inflammation during asthma, COPD, as well as other inflammatory disorders. The level of expression of IL-17 has been shown to be upregulated in lung bronchial tissue of asthmatic patients. Several reports have provided further evidence that this cytokine could play a key role in enhancing the migration of inflammatory as well as structural cells of the bronchial lung tissue during asthma and COPD. B cell infiltration to sites of inflammation during inflammatory disorders such as bowel disease, asthma and COPD has been reported. Accordingly, in this study we hypothesized that IL-17 may exert a chemotactic effect on primary B cells during asthma. We observed that B cells from asthmatic patients expressed significantly higher levels of IL-17RA and IL-17RC, compared to those of healthy subjects. Using an in-vitro migration assay, B cells were shown to migrate towards both IL-17A and IL-17F. Interestingly, blocking IL-17A and IL-17F signaling using either anti-IL-17R antibodies or MAP kinase inhibitors prevented in vitro migration of B cell towards IL-17. These observations indicate a direct chemotactic effect of IL-17 cytokines on primary peripheral blood B cells with higher effect being on asthmatic B cells. These findings revealed a key role for IL-17 in enhancing the migration of B cells to the lung tissue during asthma or COPD.

  17. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W L William Chang

    Full Text Available Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease.

  18. Human B cells produce chemokine CXCL10 in the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Soren T; Salman, Ahmed M; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille; Brock, Inger; Elsheikh, Nabila; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    The role of B cells in human host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is still controversial, but recent evidence suggest that B cell follicle like structures within the lung may influence host responses through regulation of the local cytokine environment. A candidate for such regulation could be the chemokine CXCL10. CXCL10 is mainly produced by human monocytes, but a few reports have also found CXCL10 production by human B cells. The objective of this study was to investigate CXCL10 production by human B cells in response to in vitro stimulation with Mtb antigens. We analyzed human blood samples from 30 volunteer donors using multiparameter flow cytometry, and identified a subgroup of B cells producing CXCL10 in response to in vitro stimulation with antigens. T cells did not produce CXCL10, but CXCL10 production by B cells appeared to be mediated via IFN-γ and dependent on contact with antigen-specific T cells recognizing the antigen. Human B cells are able to produce CXCL10 in an IFN-γ and T cell contact-dependent manner. The present findings suggest a possible mechanism through which B cells in part may influence granuloma formation in human tuberculosis (TB) and participate in infection control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Abstract. The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepa- titis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology model- ling and ...

  20. B-Cell Cross-Presentation of Autologous Antigen Precipitates Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Eliana; Tan, Bernice; Binge, Lauren; Mackay, Charles R.; Grey, Shane T.

    2012-01-01

    For autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes to progress, self-reactive CD8+ T cells would need to interact with peptide–antigen cross-presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted fashion. However, the mechanisms by which autoantigen is cross-presented remain to be identified. In this study, we show cross-presentation of islet-derived autoantigens by B cells. B cells engage self-reactive CD8+ T cells in the pancreatic lymph node, driving their proliferative expansion and differentiation into granzyme B+interferon-γ+lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1+ effector cells. B-cell cross-presentation of insulin required proteolytic cleavage and endosomal localization and was sensitive to inhibitors of protein trafficking. Absent B-cell MHC class I, or B-cell receptor restriction to an irrelevant specificity, blunted the expansion of self-reactive CD8+ T cells, suggesting B-cell antigen capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for CD8 activation. Indeed, the singular loss of B-cell MHC class I subverted the conversion to clinical diabetes in NOD mice, despite the presence of a pool of activated, and B cell–dependent, interleukin-21–expressing Vβ4+CD4+ T cells. Thus, B cells govern the transition from clinically silent insulitis to frank diabetes by cross-presenting autoantigen to self-reactive CD8+ T cells. PMID:22829452

  1. Pattern formation in B-cell immune networks : Domains and dots in shape-space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noest, A.J.; Takumi, K.; Boer, R.J. de

    1997-01-01

    The immune system contains many types of B-cells, which can activate each other if the shapes and surface properties of their receptors (or antibodies) match well. The dynamics of the resulting network is analysed using a recently derived B-cell activation function which captures the effects of the

  2. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  3. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  4. Hepatitis C virus-related B cell subtypes in non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicelli, Adriano M; Marignani, Massimo; Zoli, Valerio; Romano, Mario; Morrone, Aldo; Nosotti, Lorenzo; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Picardi, Antonio; Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Remotti, Daniele; D'Ambrosio, Cecilia; Furlan, Caterina; Mecenate, Fabrizio; Mazzoni, Ettore; Majolino, Ignazio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if indolent B cell-non Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive patients could have different biological and clinical characteristics requiring different management strategies.

  5. Innate Response Activator (IRA B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Chiappini

    Full Text Available Innate response activator (IRA B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  6. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  7. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  8. PDK1 regulates VDJ recombination, cell-cycle exit and survival during B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venigalla, Ram K C; McGuire, Victoria A; Clarke, Rosemary; Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Najafov, Ayaz; Toth, Rachel; McCarthy, Pierre C; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Arthur, J Simon C

    2013-04-03

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) controls the activation of a subset of AGC kinases. Using a conditional knockout of PDK1 in haematopoietic cells, we demonstrate that PDK1 is essential for B cell development. B-cell progenitors lacking PDK1 arrested at the transition of pro-B to pre-B cells, due to a cell autonomous defect. Loss of PDK1 decreased the expression of the IgH chain in pro-B cells due to impaired recombination of the IgH distal variable segments, a process coordinated by the transcription factor Pax5. The expression of Pax5 in pre-B cells was decreased in PDK1 knockouts, which correlated with reduced expression of the Pax5 target genes IRF4, IRF8 and Aiolos. As a result, Ccnd3 is upregulated in PDK1 knockout pre-B cells and they have an impaired ability to undergo cell-cycle arrest, a necessary event for Ig light chain rearrangement. Instead, these cells underwent apoptosis that correlated with diminished expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2A1. Reintroduction of both Pax5 and Bcl2A1 together into PDK1 knockout pro-B cells restored their ability to differentiate in vitro into mature B cells.

  9. Distinct TLR-mediated cytokine production and immunoglobulin secretion in human newborn naive B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettengill, M.A.; Haren, S.D. van; Li, N.; Dowling, D.J.; Bergelson, I.; Jans, J.; Ferwerda, G.; Levy, O.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal innate immunity is distinct from that of adults, which may contribute to increased susceptibility to infection and limit vaccine responses. B cells play critical roles in protection from infection and detect PAMPs via TLRs, that, when co-activated with CD40, can drive B-cell proliferation

  10. Whole-genome fingerprint of the DNA methylome during human B-cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Marta; Merkel, Angelika; Heath, Simon; Queirós, Ana C.; Schuyler, Ronald P.; Castellano, Giancarlo; Beekman, Renée; Raineri, Emanuele; Esteve, Anna; Clot, Guillem; Verdaguer-Dot, Nuria; Duran-Ferrer, Martí; Russiñol, Nuria; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Roser; Ecker, Simone; Pancaldi, Vera; Rico, Daniel; Agueda, Lidia; Blanc, Julie; Richardson, David; Clarke, Laura; Datta, Avik; Pascual, Marien; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Alignani, Diego; Paiva, Bruno; Caron, Gersende; Fest, Thierry; Muench, Marcus O.; Fomin, Marina E.; Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Valencia, Alfonso; Gut, Marta; Flicek, Paul; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Siebert, Reiner; Küppers, Ralf; Gut, Ivo G.; Campo, Elías; Martín-Subero, José I.

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the DNA methylome of ten subpopulations spanning the entire B-cell differentiation program by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density microarrays. We observed that non-CpG methylation disappeared upon B-cell commitment whereas CpG methylation changed extensively during B-cell maturation, showing an accumulative pattern and affecting around 30% of all measured CpGs. Early differentiation stages mainly displayed enhancer demethylation, which was associated with upregulation of key B-cell transcription factors and affected multiple genes involved in B-cell biology. Late differentiation stages, in contrast, showed extensive demethylation of heterochromatin and methylation gain of polycomb-repressed areas, and did not affect genes with apparent functional impact in B cells. This signature, which has been previously linked to aging and cancer, was particularly widespread in mature cells with extended life span. Comparing B-cell neoplasms with their normal counterparts, we identified that they frequently acquire methylation changes in regions undergoing dynamic methylation already during normal B-cell differentiation. PMID:26053498

  11. Inflammatory conditions dictate the effect of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells on B cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Luk (Franka); Carreras-Planella, L. (Laura); S.S. Korevaar (Sander); S.F. De Witte (Samantha Fh); F.E. Borràs (Francesc); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); C.C. Baan (Carla); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); M. Franquesa (Marcella)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) makes them a promising tool for treatment of immune disease and organ transplantation. The effects of MSC on B cells are characterized by an abrogation of plasmablast formation and induction of regulatory B cells

  12. Regulatory T cells induced by B cells: a novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2017-11-18

    Regulatory T cells play a crucial role in the homeostasis of the immune response. In addition to CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, several subsets of Foxp3- regulatory T cells, such as T helper 3 (Th3) cells and type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, have been described in mice and human. Accumulating evidence shows that naïve B cells contribute to tolerance and are able to promote regulatory T cell differentiation. Naïve B cells can convert CD4+CD25- T cells into CD25+Foxp3- regulatory T cells, named Treg-of-B cells by our group. Treg-of-B cells express LAG3, ICOS, GITR, OX40, PD1, and CTLA4 and secrete IL-10. Intriguingly, B-T cell-cell contact but not IL-10 is essential for Treg-of-B cells induction. Moreover, Treg-of-B cells possess both IL-10-dependent and IL-10-independent inhibitory functions. Treg-of-B cells exert suppressive activities in antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific manners in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review the phenotype and function of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 cells, Tr1 cells, and Treg-of-B cells.

  13. Atypical and classical memory B cells produce Plasmodium falciparum neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muellenbeck, Matthias F; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Amulic, Borko

    2013-01-01

    . We show at the single cell level that natural Pf infection induces the development of classical memory B cells (CM) and atypical memory B cells (AtM) that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies against blood stage Pf parasites. CM and AtM contribute to anti-Pf serum IgG production, but only AtM show...

  14. Effects of the allogeneic stimulation on B cell function in thalassaemic polytransfused patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, L; Iudicone, P; Sisti, P; Greca, E; Martini, F; Giuliani, E; Buzzonetti, A; Guglielmetti, M; Liotta, I

    1987-01-01

    The immunological abnormalities of polytransfused patients affected by beta-thalassaemia major have been investigated in relation to B cell function. The spontaneous in vitro production of Ig by patient peripheral mononuclear cells was not modified, while the pokeweed mitogen induced IgM synthesis was significantly reduced. However, by comparing the splenectomized and non-splenectomized patients, this alteration proved to be present only in the splenectomized group. The proliferation of patient peripheral B cells in vitro stimulated with B cell growth factor alone was not significantly enhanced in respect to the controls. These results indicate that in vivo activation state of patient B cells is not different from that of the controls. The stimulation of peripheral B cell with anti-mu or anti-alpha antibodies and anti-mu and anti-alpha antibodies plus B cells growth factor induced a significant increase in proliferative responses of B cells from the splenectomized patients. Taken together, these findings suggest that circulating B cells of thalassaemic polytransfused patients are not hyperactivated. The splenectomy can account for the immunological changes observed in our thalassaemic sample as compared to control group.

  15. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  16. Deficiency in memory B cell compartment in a patient with infertility and recurrent pregnancy losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, N; Byeon, H J; Garcia, M D Salazar; Skariah, A; Wu, L; Dambaeva, S; Beaman, K; Gilman-Sachs, A; Kwak-Kim, J

    2016-11-01

    Alterations in normal balance of B cell subsets have been reported in various rheumatic diseases. In this study, we report a woman with a history of recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL) and infertility who had low levels of memory B cells. A 35-year-old woman with a history of RPL and infertility was demonstrated to have increased peripheral blood CD19+ B cells with persistently low levels of memory B cell subsets. Prior to the frozen donor egg transfer cycle, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIg) treatment was initiated and patient achieved dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies. During pregnancy, proportion (%) of switched memory B cells CD27+IgD- increased, while percent of total CD19+ B cells and CD27-IgD+ naive B cells were gradually decreased with a high dose IVIg treatment. She developed cervical incompetence at 20 weeks of gestation, received a Cesarean section at 32 weeks of gestation due to preterm labor, and delivered twin babies. B cell subset abnormalities may be associated with infertility, RPL and preterm labor, and further investigation is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomics Based Identification of Proteins with Deregulated Expression in B Cell Lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Rui; Nijland, Marcel; Rutgers, Bea; Veenstra, Rianne; Langendonk, Myra; van der Meeren, Lotte E.; Kluin, Philip M.; Li, Guanwu; Diepstra, Arjan; Chiu, Jen-Fu; van den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphomas comprise the main entities of adult B cell malignancies. Although multiple disease driving gene aberrations have been identified by gene expression and genomic studies, only a few studies focused at the protein level. We applied 2 dimensional

  18. Excessive amounts of mu heavy chain block B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingqiao; Chang, Cheong-Hee; Dunnick, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Antigen-independent B-cell development occurs in several stages that depend on the expression of Ig heavy and light chain. We identified a line of mice that lacked mature B cells in the spleen. This mouse line carried approximately 11 copies of a transgene of the murine heavy chain constant region locus, and B-lineage cells expressed excessive amounts of the intracellular μ heavy chain. B-cell development failed in the bone marrow at the pro/pre B-cell transition, and examination of other lines with various copy numbers of the same transgene suggested that deficiencies in B-cell development increased with increased transgene copy number. Expression of a transgenic (Tg) light chain along with the Tg μ heavy chain led to minimal rescue of B-cell development in the bone marrow and B cells in the spleen. There are several potential mechanisms for the death of pro/pre B cells as a consequence of excess heavy chain expression.

  19. Recruitment and selection of marginal zone B cells is independent of exogenous antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, PM; Kroese, FGM

    Marginal zone B (MZ-B) cells of the spleen contribute significantly to the immunity against invasive infections with polysaccharide-encapsulated bacteria. Recent evidence indicates that recruitment and selection of MZ-B cells occurs on the basis of positive selection constraints that likely operate

  20. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: Recommendations from the Dutch Working Group on CLL for daily practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Raa, G. D.; van Oers, M. H.; Kater, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is defined by the presence of small B-cell clones in asymptomatic individuals. Usually, MBL cells are characterised by a chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) phenotype ('CLL phenotype MBL'); however, an atypical phenotype ('atypical-CLL phenotype MBL') or

  1. Regulatory B cells present in lymph nodes draining a murine tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maglioco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, B cells have been classically associated with antibody secretion, antigen presentation and T cell activation. However, a possible role for B lymphocytes in impairing antitumor response and collaborating with tumor growth has been brought into focus. Recent reports have described the capacity of B cells to negatively affect immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The highly immunogenic mouse tumor MCC loses its immunogenicity and induces systemic immune suppression and tolerance as it grows. We have previously demonstrated that MCC growth induces a distinct and progressive increase in B cell number and proportion in the tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLN, as well as a less prominent increase in T regulatory cells. The aim of this research was to study B cell characteristics and function in the lymph node draining MCC tumor and to analyze whether these cells may be playing a role in suppressing antitumor response and favoring tumor progression. Results indicate that B cells from TDLN expressed increased CD86 and MHCII co-stimulatory molecules indicating activated phenotype, as well as intracellular IL-10, FASL and Granzyme B, molecules with regulatory immunosuppressive properties. Additionally, B cells showed high inhibitory upon T cell proliferation ex vivo, and a mild capacity to secrete antibodies. Our conclusion is that even when evidence of B cell-mediated activity of the immune response is present, B cells from TDLN exhibit regulatory phenotype and inhibitory activity, probably contributing to the state of immunological tolerance characteristic of the advanced tumor condition.

  2. A NOVel ELISPOT assay to quantify HLA-specific B cells in HLA-immunized individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidt, S.; Roelen, D.L.; Vaal, Y.J. de; Kester, M.G.; Eijsink, C.; Thomas, S.; Besouw, N.M. van; Volk, H.D.; Weimar, W.; Claas, F.H.; Mulder, A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the humoral alloimmune response is generally achieved by measuring serum HLA antibodies, which provides no information about the cells involved in the humoral immune response. Therefore, we have developed an HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay allowing for quantification of B cells

  3. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W L William; Gonzalez, Denise F; Kieu, Hung T; Castillo, Luis D; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Shacklett, Barbara L; Barry, Peter A; Sparger, Ellen E

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease.

  4. Effect of surface topography on actin dynamics and receptor clustering in B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Song, Wenxia; Fourkas, John; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2013-03-01

    B cells are activated upon binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APC). Activated B cells deform and spread on the surface of APCs which may comprise of complex membrane topologies. In order to model the diverse range of topographies that B cells may encounter, substrates fabricated with vertical ridges separated by gaps ranging from hundreds of nm to microns were coated with activating antigen to enable B cell spreading. Simultaneous imaging of actin and BCR shows that the organization of both depends profoundly on the ridge spacing. On smaller ridge spacing (Cells on larger ridge spacing (>2 microns) exhibit central actin patches and peripheral actin waves and form semi-stable polymerization zones at ridges, while BCR distribution is more homogeneous. Our results indicate that surface topography may be a critical determinant of cytoskeletal dynamics and the spatiotemporal organization of signaling clusters. Biophysics Program

  5. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  6. A role for adhesion molecules in contact-dependent T help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    The role of cell contact in T-dependent B cell activation was examined. Small resting B cells from C57BL/6 mice were cultured with CBA-derived, non-alloreactive cloned T helper cells in anti-T cell receptor V beta 8-coated microwells. This induced polyclonal B cell activation to enter cell cycle......, although proliferative responses were only inhibited to about 50%. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies did not significantly affect lipopolysaccharide-induced responses. T cell activation to interleukin (IL) 3 secretion, nor did they inhibit the formation of multicellular clusters containing T and B cells....... There was no correlation between the level of expression of adhesion molecules by T cells and their ability to induce B cell responses. Anti-LFA-1 abrogated T-dependent responses to IL2 which were inducible after 2 days in culture, but did not inhibit the induction of this IL2 responsiveness. These results suggest...

  7. Rituximab in the treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Ortiz-Romero, P L; Fernández-Misa, R; Montalbán, C

    2014-06-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric mouse-human antibody that targets the CD20 antigen, which is found in both normal and neoplastic B cells. In recent years, it has been increasingly used to treat cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and is now considered an alternative to classic treatment (radiotherapy and surgery) of 2 types of indolent lymphoma, namely, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma and primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. Rituximab is also administered as an alternative to polychemotherapy in the treatment of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma, leg type. Its use as an alternative drug led to it being administered intralesionally, with beneficial effects. In the present article, we review the literature published on the use of rituximab to treat primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  8. An atlas of B-cell clonal distribution in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenzhao; Zhang, Bochao; Schwartz, Gregory W; Rosenfeld, Aaron M; Ren, Daqiu; Thome, Joseph J C; Carpenter, Dustin J; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Lerner, Harvey; Friedman, Amy L; Granot, Tomer; Farber, Donna L; Shlomchik, Mark J; Hershberg, Uri; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2017-09-01

    B-cell responses result in clonal expansion, and can occur in a variety of tissues. To define how B-cell clones are distributed in the body, we sequenced 933,427 B-cell clonal lineages and mapped them to eight different anatomic compartments in six human organ donors. We show that large B-cell clones partition into two broad networks-one spans the blood, bone marrow, spleen and lung, while the other is restricted to tissues within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (jejunum, ileum and colon). Notably, GI tract clones display extensive sharing of sequence variants among different portions of the tract and have higher frequencies of somatic hypermutation, suggesting extensive and serial rounds of clonal expansion and selection. Our findings provide an anatomic atlas of B-cell clonal lineages, their properties and tissue connections. This resource serves as a foundation for studies of tissue-based immunity, including vaccine responses, infections, autoimmunity and cancer.

  9. Mechanism of B-cell activation and self-non-self discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, G.

    1977-01-01

    The evidence for the one, nonspecific signal hypothesis, which states that the B lymphocytes are activated by nonclonally distributed receptors which are not the Ig receptors, has been summarized. Even though protein A is a polyclonal B-cell activator, it does not exert its effect by interacting with the Fc part of Ig receptors. One consequence of the one, nonspecific signal concept is that thymus-dependent antigens cannot activate or tolerize B cells. It was shown that B cells from animals tolerant to a thymus-dependent protein antigen could be activated by polyclonal B-cell activators to produce antibodies against the tolerogen. Experimentally induced tolerance did not differ from tolerance to self antigens, since LPS and PPD induced autoantibodies capable of lysing autologous red cells and isotope-labeled autologous and syngenic spleen cells. Thus B cells cannot discriminate self from non-self, whereas T cells have been shown to possess this ability.

  10. Simultaneous Assessment of Rotavirus-Specific Memory B Cells and Serological Memory after B Cell Depletion Therapy with Rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Daniel; Rojas, Olga L.; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Ángel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of serological memory are still unclear. Rotavirus (RV) memory B cells (mBc) are enriched in IgM+ and CD27- subpopulations, which are associated with autoimmune diseases pathogenesis. In patients with autoimmune diseases treated with Rituximab (RTX), some autoantibodies (auto-Abs) decrease after treatment, but other auto-Abs and pathogen-specific IgG Abs remain unchanged. Thus, maintenance of autoimmune and pathogen-specific serological memory may depend on the type of antigen and/or Ab isotype evaluated. Antigen-specific mBc and antigen-specific Abs of different isotypes have not been simultaneously assessed in patients after RTX treatment. To study the relationship between mBc subpopulations and serological memory we characterized total, RV- and tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific mBc by flow cytometry in patients with autoimmune diseases before and after treatment with RTX. We also measured total, RV- and TT-Abs, and some auto-Abs by kinetic nephelometry, ELISA, and EliA tests, respectively. Minor differences were observed between the relative frequencies of RV-mBc in healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. After RTX treatment, naïve Bc and total, RV- and TT-specific mBc [IgM+, switched (IgA+/IgG+), IgM+ only, IgD+ only, and CD27- (IgA+/IgG+/IgM+)] were significantly diminished. An important decrease in total plasma IgM and minor decreases in total IgG and IgA levels were also observed. IgM rheumatoid factor, IgG anti-CCP, and IgG anti-dsDNA were significantly diminished. In contrast, RV-IgA, RV-IgG and RV-IgG1, and TT-IgG titers remained stable. In conclusion, in patients with autoimmunity, serological memory against RV and TT seem to be maintained by long-lived plasma cells, unaffected by RTX, and an important proportion of total IgM and serological memory against some auto-antigens seem to be maintained by short-lived plasma cells, dependent on mBc precursors depleted by RTX. PMID:24819618

  11. TGF-β-Induced Regulatory T Cells Directly Suppress B Cell Responses through a Noncytotoxic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anping; Liu, Ya; Chen, Weiqian; Wang, Julie; Xue, Youqiu; Huang, Feng; Rong, Liming; Lin, Jin; Liu, Dahai; Yan, Mei; Li, Quan-Zhen; Li, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) playing a crucial role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases consist of thymus-derived naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells (nTreg) and those that can be induced ex vivo with TGF-β (iTreg). Although both Treg subsets share similar phenotypes and functional characteristics, they also have potential biologic differences on their biology. The role of iTreg in regulating B cells remains unclear so far. The suppression assays of Treg subsets on activation, proliferation, and Abs production of B cells were measured using a Treg and B cell coculture system in vitro. Transwell and Ab blockade experiments were performed to assess the roles of cell contact and soluble cytokines. Treg were adoptively transferred to lupus mice to assess in vivo effects on B cells. Like nTreg, iTreg subset also directly suppressed activation and proliferation of B cells. nTreg subset suppressed B cell responses through cytotoxic manner related to expression of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin, whereas the role of iTreg subset on B cells did not involve in cytotoxic action but depending on TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, iTreg subset can significantly suppress Ab produced by lupus B cells in vitro. Comparison experiments using autoantibodies microarrays demonstrated that adoptive transfer of iTreg had a superior effect than nTreg subset on suppressing lupus B cell responses in vivo. Our data implicate a role and advantage of iTreg subset in treating B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, boosting the translational potential of these findings. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Murine complement receptor 1 is required for germinal center B cell maintenance but not initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donius, Luke R; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2014-06-01

    Germinal centers are the anatomic sites for the generation of high affinity immunoglobulin expressing plasma cells and memory B cells. The germinal center B cells that are precursors of these cells circulate between the light zone B cell population that interact with antigen laden follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and the proliferative dark zone B cell population. Antigen retention by follicular dendritic cells is dependent on Fc receptors and complement receptors, and complement receptor 1 (Cr1) is the predominant complement receptor expressed by FDC. The newly created Cr1KO mouse was used to test the effect of Cr1-deficiency on the kinetics of the germinal center reaction and the generation of IgM and switched memory B cell formation. Immunization of Cr1KO mice with a T cell-dependent antigen resulted in the normal initial expansion of B cells with a germinal center phenotype however these cells were preferentially lost in the Cr1KO animal over time (days). Bone marrow chimera animals documented the surprising finding that the loss of germinal center B cell maintenance was linked to the expression of Cr1 on B cells, not the FDC. Cr1-deficiency further resulted in antigen-specific IgM titer and IgM memory B cell reductions, but not antigen-specific IgG after 35-37 days. Investigations of nitrophenyl (NP)-specific IgG demonstrated that Cr1 is not necessary for affinity maturation during the response to particulate antigen. These data, along with those generated in our initial description of the Cr1KO animal describe unique functions of Cr1 on the surface of both B cells and FDC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Dimethyl fumarate treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis influences B-cell subsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Steven K.; Wu, Qi; Wang, Qin; Dowling, Catherine A.; Taitano, Sophina H.; Mao, Guangmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera, BG-12) affects B-cell subsets in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: Peripheral blood B cells were compared for surface marker expression in patients with RRMS prior to initiation of treatment, after 4–6 months, and at more than 1 year of treatment with BG-12. Production of interleukin (IL)–10 by RRMS patient B cells was also analyzed. Results: Total numbers of peripheral blood B lymphocytes declined after 4–6 months of BG-12 treatment, due to losses in both the CD27+ memory B cells and CD27neg B-cell subsets. Some interpatient variability was observed. In contrast, circulating CD24highCD38high (T2-MZP) B cells increased in percentage in the majority of patients with RRMS after 4–6 months and were present in higher numbers in all of the patients after 12 months of treatment. The CD43+CD27+ B-1 B cells also increased at the later time point in most patients but were unchanged at 4–6 months compared to pretreatment levels. Purified B cells from 7 of the 9 patients with RRMS tested after 4–6 months of treatment were able to produce IL-10 following CD40 ligand stimulation, and the amount corresponded with the combined levels of T2-MZP and B-1 B cells in the sample. None of the patients with RRMS in this study have had a relapse while taking BG-12. Conclusions: These data suggest that BG-12 differentially affects B-cell subsets in patients with RRMS, resulting in increased numbers of circulating B lymphocytes with regulatory capacity. PMID:27006972

  14. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Kh. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15–22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2–5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6–11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7–12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16–30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. PMID:27189949

  15. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-08

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

  17. B cells are multifunctional players in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: insights from therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele eClaes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a severe disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by autoimmune inflammation and neurodegeneration. Historically, damage to the CNS was thought to be mediated predominantly by activated pro-inflammatory T cells. B cell involvement in the pathogenesis of MS was solely attributed to autoantibody production. The first clues for the involvement of antibody-independent B cell functions in MS pathology came from positive results in clinical trials of the B cell depleting treatment rituximab in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS. The survival of antibody-secreting plasma cells and decrease in T cell numbers indicated the importance of other B cell functions in MS such as antigen presentation, costimulation and cytokine production. Rituximab provided us with an example of how clinical trials can lead to new research opportunities concerning B cell biology. Moreover, analysis of the antibody-independent B cell functions in MS has gained interest since these trials. Limited information is present on the effects of current immunomodulatory therapies on B cell functions, although effects of both first-line (interferon, glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide, second-line (fingolimod, natalizumab and even third-line (monoclonal antibody therapies treatments on B cell subtype distribution, expression of functional surface markers and secretion of different cytokines by B cells have been studied to some extent. In this review, we summarize the effects of different MS related treatments on B cell functions that have been described up to now in order to find new research opportunities and contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces a regulatory B cell-like phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Abente, Jacobo; Prieto-Sanchez, Adrián; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria-Ángeles; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2017-07-17

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) usually show a general dysregulation and hyper-activation of the immune system. A direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B-cell phenotypes and functions has been previously described. However, the consequences of B-cell dysregulation are still poorly understood. We evaluated the phenotypic changes in primary B cells after direct contact with HIV-1 particles in comparison with different types of stimuli. The functionality of treated B cells was challenged in co-culture experiments with autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We demonstrated that HIV-1 induces a phenotypic change in B cells towards a regulatory B-cell phenotype, showing a higher level of IL-10, TGF-β1, EBI3 or IL-12(p35) mRNA expression and acquiring an immunosuppressive profile. The acquisition of a Breg phenotype was confirmed by co-culture experiments where HIV-treated B cells reduced the proliferation and the TNFα production of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. This suppressive ability of HIV-treated B cells was dependent on cell-to-cell contact between these B cells and effector cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that HIV-1 can directly induce a regulatory B cell-like immunosuppressive phenotype, which could have the ability to impair specific immune responses. This dysregulation could constitute one of the mechanisms underlying unsuccessful efforts to develop an efficient vaccine against HIV-1.Cellular &Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 17 July 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.48.

  19. Combinatorial signaling through TLR-2 and CD86 augments activation and differentiation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available B cells are an integral component in mounting humoral immune responses and they are also crucial in programming T cell mediated immunity. Usually, B cell activation is initiated by recognition of antigen through B cell receptor (BCR, followed by its processing and presentation to T cells. But very little is known about BCR independent activation of B cells. Now, there is an increasing body of evidence indicating the combinatorial effect of innate and adaptive immune components in modulating the functions of B cells. In this study, we demonstrate the activation of resting B cells (RB by simultaneous involvement of Toll like Receptor-2 (TLR-2 and costimulatory molecule, CD86. Interestingly, these B cells exhibited significant level of activation and proliferation. Furthermore, this process of activation leads to the differentiation of RB cells, preferably into marginal zone precursors (CD19(+IgD(hiIgM(hiCD21/35(hiCD23(hi in a shorter time window and showed increased secretion of IgG isotype. These RB cells also showed enhanced antigen uptake capacity. These observations were also substantiated by microarray gene expression results, which strengthen the notion that combinatorial signaling through innate and adaptive immune components enhances B cell mediated immune response. Thus, the present study elucidates a novel BCR independent B cell activation mechanism that links TLR-2 and CD86. Hence signaling of TLRs in conjunction with costimulatory molecules will substantially help in bolstering humoral immune response, which can be extrapolated to formulate vaccination strategies for diseases involving B cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Differential Effects of Tacrolimus versus Sirolimus on the Proliferation, Activation and Differentiation of Human B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opas Traitanon

    Full Text Available The direct effect of immunosuppressive drugs calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus, TAC and mTOR inhibitor (Sirolimus, SRL on B cell activation, differentiation and proliferation is not well documented. Purified human B cells from healthy volunteers were stimulated through the B Cell Receptor with Anti-IgM + anti-CD40 + IL21 in the absence / presence of TAC or SRL. A variety of parameters of B cell activity including activation, differentiation, cytokine productions and proliferation were monitored by flow cytometry. SRL at clinically relevant concentrations (6 ng/ml profoundly inhibited CD19(+ B cell proliferation compared to controls whereas TAC at similar concentrations had a minimal effect. CD27(+ memory B cells were affected more by SRL than naïve CD27- B cells. SRL effectively blocked B cell differentiation into plasma cells (CD19(+CD138(+ and Blimp1(+/Pax5(low cells even at low dose (2 ng/ml, and totally eliminated them at 6 ng/ml. SRL decreased absolute B cell counts, but the residual responding cells acquired an activated phenotype (CD25(+/CD69(+ and increased the expression of HLA-DR. SRL-treated stimulated B cells on a per cell basis were able to enhance the proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+CD25(- T cells and induce a shift toward the Th1 phenotype. Thus, SRL and TAC have different effects on B lymphocytes. These data may provide insights into the clinical use of these two agents in recipients of solid organ transplants.

  1. Immune tolerance induction to factor IX through B cell gene transfer: TLR9 signaling delineates between tolerogenic and immunogenic B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Moghimi, Babak; Zolotukhin, Irene; Morel, Laurence M; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2014-06-01

    A subset of patients with severe hemophilia B, the X-linked bleeding disorder resulting from absence of coagulation factor IX (FIX), develop pathogenic antibody responses during replacement therapy. These inhibitors block standard therapy and are often associated with anaphylactic reactions to FIX. Established clinical immune tolerance induction protocols often fail for FIX inhibitors. In a murine model of this immune complication, retrovirally transduced primary B cells expressing FIX antigen fused with immunoglobulin-G heavy chain prevented antibody formation to FIX and was also highly effective in desensitizing animals with preexisting response. In contrast, transplant of B cells that received the identical expression cassette via nucleofection of plasmid vector substantially heightened antibody formation against FIX, a response that could be blocked by toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) inhibition. While innate responses to TLR4 activation or to retrovirus were minimal in B cells, plasmid DNA activated TLR9, resulting in CpG-dependent NF-κB activation/IL-6 expression and adaptor protein 3 dependent, CpG-independent induction of IFN-I. Neither response was seen in TLR9-deficient B cells. Therefore, TLR9 signaling in B cells, in particular in response to plasmid vector, is highly immunogenic and has to be avoided in design of tolerance protocols.

  2. Improved method for linear B-cell epitope prediction using antigen's primary sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Singh

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in designing a peptide-based vaccine is the identification of antigenic regions in an antigen that can stimulate B-cell's response, also called B-cell epitopes. In the past, several methods have been developed for the prediction of conformational and linear (or continuous B-cell epitopes. However, the existing methods for predicting linear B-cell epitopes are far from perfection. In this study, an attempt has been made to develop an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. We have retrieved experimentally validated B-cell epitopes as well as non B-cell epitopes from Immune Epitope Database and derived two types of datasets called Lbtope_Variable and Lbtope_Fixed length datasets. The Lbtope_Variable dataset contains 14876 B-cell epitope and 23321 non-epitopes of variable length where as Lbtope_Fixed length dataset contains 12063 B-cell epitopes and 20589 non-epitopes of fixed length. We also evaluated the performance of models on above datasets after removing highly identical peptides from the datasets. In addition, we have derived third dataset Lbtope_Confirm having 1042 epitopes and 1795 non-epitopes where each epitope or non-epitope has been experimentally validated in at least two studies. A number of models have been developed to discriminate epitopes and non-epitopes using different machine-learning techniques like Support Vector Machine, and K-Nearest Neighbor. We achieved accuracy from ∼54% to 86% using diverse s features like binary profile, dipeptide composition, AAP (amino acid pair profile. In this study, for the first time experimentally validated non B-cell epitopes have been used for developing method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. In previous studies, random peptides have been used as non B-cell epitopes. In order to provide service to scientific community, a web server LBtope has been developed for predicting and designing B-cell epitopes (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lbtope/.

  3. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II......) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes......, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (PDLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone...

  4. Parotin subunit as a potent polyclonal B cell activator binds to newly found glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins on human B cell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, S; Kimoto, M; Tsujii, T

    1994-04-01

    Parotin subunit (PS) is a unique glycoprotein, isolated from bovine parotid glands, which possesses the ability to induce polyclonal antibody production and IL-1-like activity. The present studies investigated the existence of receptors for PS on B cell surfaces using PS-affinity chromatography. No PS-binding proteins (PSR) solubilized from human B cell surfaces with Triton X-100 were detected, whereas the PSR released from human B cell membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) treatment were composed of 75- and 40-kDa proteins. PI-PLC treatment markedly reduced polyclonal antibody responses to PS but weakly inhibited the responses to PWM, xanthan gum, and LPS in human and mouse lymphocytes. Addition of PSR caused a dose-related reduction in polyclonal IgM and IgG antibody responses to PS. These results suggest that PSR can act as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored receptors for PS.

  5. Monoclonal B-cell hyperplasia and leukocyte imbalance precede development of B-cell malignancies in uracil-DNA glycosylase deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sonja; Ericsson, Madelene; Dai, Hong Yan

    2005-01-01

    Ung-deficient mice have reduced class switch recombination, skewed somatic hypermutation, lymphatic hyperplasia and a 22-fold increased risk of developing B-cell lymphomas. We find that lymphomas are of follicular (FL) and diffuse large B-cell type (DLBCL). All FLs and 75% of the DLBCLs were...... monoclonal while 25% were biclonal. Monoclonality was also observed in hyperplasia, and could represent an early stage of lymphoma development. Lymphoid hyperplasia occurs very early in otherwise healthy Ung-deficient mice, observed as a significant increase of splenic B-cells. Furthermore, loss of Ung also....... The immunological imbalances shown here in the Ung-deficient mice may be central in the development of lymphomas in a background of generalised lymphoid hyperplasia....

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia associated with Borrelia burgdorferi infection showing a marginal zone B-cell lymphoma-like infiltrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Natalie; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    We report on a 69-year-old female patient with specific cutaneous manifestations of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia that arose at the site of erythema chronicum migrans due to Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Histological examination revealed the presence of dense infiltrates of small hyperchromatic lymphocytes admixed with clusters of plasma cells. Immunohistology showed a CD5+/CD20+ phenotype of the lymphocytes and monoclonal expression of kappa immunoglobulin light chain by the plasma cells. Presence of Borrelia DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction studies. The unusual histopathological and phenotypic findings described in this case of cutaneous manifestations of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia associated with Borrelia burgdorferi infection may lead to the misdiagnosis of cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma.

  7. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Disaster Debris Recovery Database (DDRD) promotes the proper recovery, recycling, and disposal of disaster debris for emergency responders at the federal,...

  8. Sialylation of Campylobacter jejuni endotoxin promotes dendritic cell-mediated B cell responses through CD14-dependent production of IFN-β and TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Ruth; van Rijs, Wouter; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J; Kuijf, Mark L; Laman, Jon D; Samsom, Janneke N; Jacobs, Bart C

    2013-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis and often precedes development of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a life-threatening paralytic disease. The incorporation of the carbohydrate sialic acid into C. jejuni lipooligosaccharides (LOS) is associated with increased severity of gastroenteritis and with induction of GBS; however, the underlying mechanisms remain completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that sialic acids in C. jejuni endotoxin enhance the rapid production of IFN-β and TNF-α by human dendritic cells (DCs). Using neutralizing Abs and receptors it was shown that these DC-derived cytokines promote the proliferation of human mucosal B cells in a T cell-independent manner. The production of both IFN-β and TNF-α by DCs in response to LOS requires CD14, and the amplified response of DCs to sialylated C. jejuni LOS is CD14 dependent. Together, these results indicate that sialylation of C. jejuni LOS increases DC activation and promotes subsequent B cell responses through CD14-driven production of IFN-β and TNF-α. This enhanced DC/B cell response may explain the increased pathogenicity of sialylated C. jejuni and may be key to the initiation of B cell-mediated autoimmunity in GBS.

  9. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is captured and displayed for B cell recognition by SIGN-R1(+) lymph node macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung; Arthos, James; Cicala, Claudia; Kehrl, John H

    2015-08-10

    The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a major focus of vaccine efforts; however how it is delivered to B cells to elicit an antibody response is unknown. Here, we show that following local gp120 injection lymph node (LN) SIGN-R1(+) sinus macrophages located in interfollicular pockets and underlying SIGN-R1(+) macrophages form a cellular network that rapidly captures gp120 from the afferent lymph. In contrast, two other antigens, phycoerythrin and hen egg lysozyme, were not captured by these cells. Intravital imaging of mouse LNs revealed persistent, but transient interactions between gp120 bearing interfollicular network cells and both trafficking and LN follicle resident gp120 specific B cells. The gp120 specific, but not the control B cells repetitively extracted gp120 from the network cells. Our findings reveal a specialized LN antigen delivery system poised to deliver gp120 and likely other pathogen derived glycoproteins to B cells.

  10. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is captured and displayed for B cell recognition by SIGN-R1+ lymph node macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung; Arthos, James; Cicala, Claudia; Kehrl, John H

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a major focus of vaccine efforts; however how it is delivered to B cells to elicit an antibody response is unknown. Here, we show that following local gp120 injection lymph node (LN) SIGN-R1+ sinus macrophages located in interfollicular pockets and underlying SIGN-R1+ macrophages form a cellular network that rapidly captures gp120 from the afferent lymph. In contrast, two other antigens, phycoerythrin and hen egg lysozyme, were not captured by these cells. Intravital imaging of mouse LNs revealed persistent, but transient interactions between gp120 bearing interfollicular network cells and both trafficking and LN follicle resident gp120 specific B cells. The gp120 specific, but not the control B cells repetitively extracted gp120 from the network cells. Our findings reveal a specialized LN antigen delivery system poised to deliver gp120 and likely other pathogen derived glycoproteins to B cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06467.001 PMID:26258881

  11. Antigen-based immunofluorescence analysis of B-cell targeting: advanced technology for the generation of novel monoclonal antibodies with high efficiency and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masahiro; Fukuda, Takatomi; Ozu, Akira; Kimura, Kei-ichi; Tsong, Tian Yow; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2006-10-01

    On the basis of immunofluorescence analysis, an entire pathway of B-cell targeting was successfully identified, which can drive selective production of monoclonal antibodies with high efficiency and selectivity. The technique comprises three critical steps, antigen-based preselection of B lymphocytes, formation of antigenselected B lymphocyte and myeloma cell complexes, and selective fusion of B-cell-myeloma cell complexes with electrical pulses. Intriguingly, expression of surface immunoglobulin receptors on B lymphocytes was recognized even after immunization in vitro. The number of the antigen-selected B lymphocytes after in vitro immunization was in fact higher than that obtained after in vivo immunization, suggesting that such shortterm immunization is applicable for B-cell targeting. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed the targeting technique to demonstrate fivefold to tenfold higher efficiency for formation of hybridoma cells than a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated method. This efficiency is in good agreement with production of hybridoma cells secreting desired monoclonal antibodies determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The addition of a low concentration of PEG brought about enhanced fusion efficiency and reduced cell damage at even electric intensities as high as 4.0 kV/cm and 5.0 kV/cm. Here we demonstrate that immunofluorescence analysis can successfully clarify an entire pathway of B-cell targeting and provide advantages over the PEG-mediated method. This advanced technology may be applicable for rapid production of monoclonal antibodies based on in vitro immunization.

  12. Activity of the novel BCR kinase inhibitor IQS019 in preclinical models of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Balsas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological inhibition of B cell receptor (BCR signaling has recently emerged as an effective approach in a wide range of B lymphoid neoplasms. However, despite promising clinical activity of the first Bruton’s kinase (Btk and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitors, a small fraction of patients tend to develop progressive disease after initial response to these agents. Methods We evaluated the antitumor activity of IQS019, a new BCR kinase inhibitor with increased affinity for Btk, Syk, and Lck/Yes novel tyrosine kinase (Lyn, in a set of 34 B lymphoid cell lines and primary cultures, including samples with acquired resistance to the first-in-class Btk inhibitor ibrutinib. Safety and efficacy of the compound were then evaluated in two xenograft mouse models of B cell lymphoma. Results IQS019 simultaneously engaged a rapid and dose-dependent de-phosphorylation of both constitutive and IgM-activated Syk, Lyn, and Btk, leading to impaired cell proliferation, reduced CXCL12-dependent cell migration, and induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Accordingly, B cell lymphoma-bearing mice receiving IQS019 presented a reduced tumor outgrowth characterized by a decreased mitotic index and a lower infiltration of malignant cells in the spleen, in tight correlation with downregulation of phospho-Syk, phospho-Lyn, and phospho-Btk. More interestingly, IQS019 showed improved efficacy in vitro and in vivo when compared to the first-in-class Btk inhibitor ibrutinib, and was active in cells with acquired resistance to this latest. Conclusions These results define IQS019 as a potential drug candidate for a variety of B lymphoid neoplasms, including cases with acquired resistance to current BCR-targeting therapies.

  13. Sprouty 2: a novel attenuator of B-cell receptor and MAPK-Erk signaling in CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ashima; Rai, Karan; Shukla, Vipul; Chaturvedi, Nagendra K; Bociek, R Gregory; Pirruccello, Samuel J; Band, Hamid; Lu, Runqing; Joshi, Shantaram S

    2016-05-12

    Clinical heterogeneity is a major barrier to effective treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Emerging evidence suggests that constitutive activation of various signaling pathways like mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK-Erk) signaling plays a role in the heterogeneous clinical outcome of CLL patients. In this study, we have investigated the role of Sprouty (SPRY)2 as a negative regulator of receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase signaling in the pathogenesis of CLL. We show that SPRY2 expression is significantly decreased in CLL cells, particularly from poor-prognosis patients compared with those from good-prognosis patients. Overexpression of SPRY2 in CLL cells from poor-prognosis patients increased their apoptosis. Conversely, downregulation of SPRY2 in CLL cells from good-prognosis patients resulted in increased proliferation. Furthermore, CLL cells with low SPRY2 expression grew more rapidly in a xenograft model of CLL. Strikingly, B-cell-specific transgenic overexpression of spry2 in mice led to a decrease in the frequency of B1 cells, the precursors of CLL cells in rodents. Mechanistically, we show that SPRY2 attenuates the B-cell receptor (BCR) and MAPK-Erk signaling by binding to and antagonizing the activities of RAF1, BRAF, and spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) in normal B cells and CLL cells. We also show that SPRY2 is targeted by microRNA-21, which in turn leads to increased activity of Syk and Erk in CLL cells. Taken together, these results establish SPRY2 as a critical negative regulator of BCR-mediated MAPK-Erk signaling in CLL, thereby providing one of the molecular mechanisms to explain the clinical heterogeneity of CLL. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. The endocytic adaptor Eps15 controls marginal zone B cell numbers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Pozzi

    Full Text Available Eps15 is an endocytic adaptor protein involved in clathrin and non-clathrin mediated endocytosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster lack of Eps15 leads to defects in synaptic vesicle recycling and synapse formation. We generated Eps15-KO mice to investigate its function in mammals. Eps15-KO mice are born at the expected Mendelian ratio and are fertile. Using a large-scale phenotype screen covering more than 300 parameters correlated to human disease, we found that Eps15-KO mice did not show any sign of disease or neural deficits. Instead, altered blood parameters pointed to an immunological defect. By competitive bone marrow transplantation we demonstrated that Eps15-KO hematopoietic precursor cells were more efficient than the WT counterparts in repopulating B220⁺ bone marrow cells, CD19⁻ thymocytes and splenic marginal zone (MZ B cells. Eps15-KO mice showed a 2-fold increase in MZ B cell numbers when compared with controls. Using reverse bone marrow transplantation, we found that Eps15 regulates MZ B cell numbers in a cell autonomous manner. FACS analysis showed that although MZ B cells were increased in Eps15-KO mice, transitional and pre-MZ B cell numbers were unaffected. The increase in MZ B cell numbers in Eps15 KO mice was not dependent on altered BCR signaling or Notch activity. In conclusion, in mammals, the endocytic adaptor protein Eps15 is a regulator of B-cell lymphopoiesis.

  15. Cyclin D3 is selectively required for proliferative expansion of germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cato, Matthew H; Chintalapati, Suresh K; Yau, Irene W; Omori, Sidne A; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    The generation of robust T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses requires the formation and expansion of germinal center structures within the follicular regions of the secondary lymphoid tissues. B-cell proliferation in the germinal center drives ongoing antigen-dependent selection and the generation of high-affinity class-switched plasma and memory B cells. However, the mechanisms regulating B-cell proliferation within this microenvironment are largely unknown. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is uniquely required for germinal center progression. Ccnd3(-/-) mice exhibit a B-cell-intrinsic defect in germinal center maturation and fail to generate an affinity-matured IgG response. We determined that the defect resulted from failed proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells. Mechanistically, sustained expression of cyclin D3 was found to be regulated at the level of protein stability and controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3 in a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A-dependent manner. The specific defect in proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells in Ccnd3(-/-) mice defines an underappreciated step in germinal center progression and solidifies a role for cyclin D3 in the immune response, and as a potential therapeutic target for germinal center-derived B-cell malignancies.

  16. Antigen Acquisition Enables Newly Arriving B Cells To Enter Ongoing Immunization-Induced Germinal Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jackson S; Benet, Zachary L; Grigorova, Irina L

    2017-08-15

    Modern vaccines must be designed to generate long-lasting, high-affinity, and broadly neutralizing Ab responses against pathogens. The diversity of B cell clones recruited into germinal center (GC) responses is likely to be important for the Ag-neutralization potential of the Ab-secreting cells and memory cells generated upon immunization. However, the factors that influence the diversity of B cell clones recruited into GCs are unclear. As recirculating naive Ag-specific B cells arrive in Ag-draining secondary lymphoid organs, they may join the ongoing GC response. However, the factors that limit their entry are not well understood, and it is not known how that depends on the stage of the ongoing follicular T cell and GC B cell response. In this article, we show that, in mice, naive B cells have a limited window of time during which they can undergo Ag-driven activation and join ongoing immunization-induced GC responses. However, preloading naive B cells with even a threshold-activating amount of Ag is sufficient to rescue their entry into the GC response during its initiation, peak, and contraction. Based on these results, we suggest that productive acquisition of Ag may be one of the main factors limiting entry of new B cell clones into ongoing immunization-triggered GC responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRuffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by continuous antigenic stimulation, chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells has previously been reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for mounting and maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development which are impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  18. Germinal center B cells are essential for collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdah, Albert; Habir, Katrin; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Saxena, Amit; Xu, Bingze; Holmdahl, Rikard; Malin, Stephen

    2017-10-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is considered a prototypical autoimmune disorder. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the known pathological function of B cells in RA, including antigen presentation, cytokine secretion and humoral immunity. To address the function of B lymphocytes in experimental arthritis, we mapped the adaptive immune response following collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We subsequently followed these responses and disease outcomes in novel genetically modified mouse strains that lack mature B cells or germinal center functionality in a B cell-intrinsic manner on a CIA MHC-II susceptible background. Following primary immunisation, the draining lymph node broadly reacts against type II collagen with the formation of germinal centers and T cell activation. Mice that lack functional mature B cells are fully protected against CIA and were severely attenuated in mounting isotype-switched humoral immune responses against type II collagen. Almost identical results were obtained in mice that were selectively deficient in germinal center responses. Importantly, germinal center-deficient mice were fully susceptible to collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Together, we identify germinal center formation and anti-collagen antibody production as the key pathogenic function of B cells in CIA. The role of B cells in RA is likely to be more complex. However, targeting the germinal center reaction could allow for more refined therapeutic interventions than general B cell depletion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocnakova, Lenka; Bhide, Mangesh; Pulzova, Lucia Borszekova

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes.

  20. Cross Talk between Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Transcription and RNA Surveillance during B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Aurélien; Chemin, Guillaume; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes naturally acquire frequent premature termination codons during the error-prone V(D)J recombination process. Although B cell differentiation is linked to the expression of productive Ig alleles, the transcriptional status of nonfunctionally recombined alleles remains unclear. Here, we tracked transcription and posttranscriptional regulation for both Ig heavy-chain (IgH) alleles in mice carrying a nonfunctional knock-in allele. We show that productively and nonproductively VDJ-rearranged alleles are transcribed throughout B cell development, carry similar active chromatin marks, and even display equivalent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) loading after B cell stimulation. Hence, these results challenge the idea that the repositioning of one allele to heterochromatin could promote the silencing of nonproductive alleles. Interestingly, the efficiency of downstream RNA surveillance mechanisms fluctuates according to B cell activation and terminal differentiation: unspliced nonfunctional transcripts accumulate in primary B cells, while B cell activation promotes IgH transcription, RNA splicing, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Altogether, IgH transcription and RNA splicing rates determine by which RNA surveillance mechanisms a B cell can get rid of nonproductive IgH mRNAs. PMID:22037763

  1. A monoclonal antibody defining human B cell differentiation antigen (HLB-1 antigen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, K; Koshiba, H; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, K

    1983-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for human B cell differentiation antigen (HLB-1) is produced by a hybridoma established by fusion of splenocytes of mice immunized with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed peripheral B cell line, RPMI-8057. This monoclonal, antibody designated anti-HLB-1 monoclonal antibody (anti-HLB-1), reacted with surface immunoglobulin (sIg)-positive B cells of normal peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues and sIg-positive leukemic cells. The cells of T cell leukemia, non-T non-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and nonlymphoid leukemia were HLB-1 negative. These data were further confirmed by studying a panel of cultured human hematopoietic cell lines. Anti-HLB-1 reacted with B cell lines derived from pre-B, Burkitt's lymphoma, B cell type ALL and EBV-transformed peripheral B cells. Anti-HLB-1 was reactive with only one of three human myeloma cell lines, and with none of the T cell, myeloid and non-T non-B ALL cell lines. This newly defined HLB-1 antigen is different from other conventional human B cell markers such as sIg, Ia antigens, and receptors for the Fc portion of Ig and complement C3.

  2. Characterization of antigen-specific B cells using nominal antigen-coated flow-beads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Degauque

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the reactivity of B cells against nominal antigens, a method based on the coupling of antigens onto the surface of fluorescent core polystyrene beads was developed. We first demonstrate that murine B cells with a human MOG-specific BCR are able to interact with MOG-coated beads and do not recognize beads coated with human albumin or pp65. B cells purified from human healthy volunteer blood or immunized individuals were tested for their ability to interact with various nominal antigens, including viral, vaccine, self and alloantigens, chosen for their usefulness in studying a variety of pathological processes. A substantial amount of B cells binding self-antigen MOG-coated beads can be detected in normal blood. Furthermore, greater frequencies of B cell against anti-Tetanic Toxin or anti-EBNA1 were observed in primed individuals. This method can reveal increased frequencies of anti-HLA committed B cells in patients with circulating anti-HLA antibodies compared to unsensitized patients and normal individuals. Of interest, those specific CD19 cells were preferentially identified within CD27(-IgD(+ (i-e naïve subset. These observations suggest that a broad range of medical situations could benefit from a tool that allows the detection, the quantification and the characterization of antigen-specific blood B cells.

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi-associated lymphocytoma cutis simulating a primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Florent; Wechsler, Janine; Guillaume, Jean-Claude; Tortel, Jacques; Tortel, Marie-Claire; Audhuy, Bruno; Jaulhac, Benoit; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2002-10-01

    The distinction between primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and B-cell pseudolymphoma on a histologic basis may be difficult, particularly in some cases of Borrelia burgdorferi-associated lymphoid proliferations. We report two cases of B. burgdorferi-associated pseudolymphoma that showed a dense infiltrate with a predominance of large atypical B cells. Because of this misleading histologic feature, a diagnosis of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma was first suspected in both cases. In one case, successive recurrences led to aggressive therapies before the B. burgdorferi infection was recognized. However, a detailed review of histologic and immunohistochemical features was finally suggestive of a B. burgdorferi-associated pseudolymphoma in both cases. The etiologic role of B. burgdorferi was confirmed by serology, polymerase chain reaction analysis of B. burgdorferi DNA within the lesional skin, and response to antibiotic therapy. Because the distinction between B. burgdorferi-associated pseudolymphoma and primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas may be difficult and true B. burgdorferi-associated B-cell lymphomas have been described, we suggest that antibiotic therapy should be considered as a first-line treatment in suspected or confirmed cases of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma in regions with endemic B. burgdorferi infection.

  4. Bortezomib-based triplets are associated with a high probability of dialysis independence and rapid renal recovery in newly diagnosed myeloma patients with severe renal failure or those requiring dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Roussou, Maria; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Psimenou, Erasmia; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, Evangelos; Migkou, Magdalini; Matsouka, Charis; Mparmparousi, Despoina; Gika, Dimitra; Kafantari, Eftychia; Ziogas, Dimitrios; Fotiou, Despoina; Panagiotidis, Ioannis; Terpos, Evangelos; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2016-05-01

    Renal failure (RF) is a common and severe complication of symptomatic myeloma, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Such patients are commonly excluded from clinical trials. Bortezomib/dexamethasone (VD)-based regimens are the backbone of the treatment of newly diagnosed MM patients who present with severe RF even those requiring dialysis. We analyzed the outcomes of 83 consecutive bortezomib-treated patients with severe RF (eGFR dialysis. By IMWG renal response criteria, 54 (65%) patients achieved at least MRrenal, including CRrenal in 35% and PRrenal in 12%. Triplet combinations (i.e., VD plus a third agent) versus VD alone were associated with higher rates of renal responses (72 vs. 50%; P = 0.06). Fifteen of the 31 (48%) patients became dialysis independent within a median of 217 days (range 11-724). Triplets were associated with a higher probability of dialysis discontinuation (57 vs. 35%). Serum free light chain (sFLC) level ≥11,550 mg/L was associated with lower rates of major renal response, longer time to major renal response, lower probability, and longer time to dialysis discontinuation. Rapid myeloma response (≥PR within the first month) was also associated with higher rates of renal response. Patients who became dialysis-independent had longer survival than those remaining on dialysis. In conclusion, VD-based triplets are associated with a significant probability of renal response and dialysis discontinuation, improving the survival of patients who became dialysis independent. Rapid disease response is important for renal recovery and sFLCs are predictive of the probability and of the time required for renal response. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The progeny of a single virgin B cell predominates the human recall B cell response to the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Hougs, L; Juul, L

    1996-01-01

    of Haemophilus influenzae type b coupled to tetanus toxoid. We combined affinity purification of circulating vaccine-induced Ab-secreting cells with PCR amplification of cDNA followed by cloning and sequencing. Forty-eight and 42 kappa VJ gene transcripts were analyzed from two adults, respectively. Both...... of the cells originated from a common virgin B cell. Kinetic considerations implied that an extremely selected population of hypermutated memory B cells must have existed in these individuals before the first systemic immunization with the Ag. A possible role for the mucosal immune system in the priming...

  6. TAK1 maintains the survival of immunoglobulin λ-chain-positive B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Hisaaki; Nagashima, Takeshi; Cascalho, Marilia I; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-11-01

    TAK1 (MAP3K7) mediation of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway is crucial for the activation of immune response and to perpetuate inflammation. Although progress has been made to understand TAK1 function in the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, the physiological roles of TAK1 in B-cell development, particularly in the bone marrow (BM), remain elusive. Previous studies suggested that the IKK complex is required for the development of immunoglobulin light chain λ-positive B cells, but not for receptor editing. In contrast, NF-κB activity is suggested to be involved in the regulation of receptor editing. Thus, NF-κB signaling in early B-cell development is yet to be fully characterized. Therefore, we addressed the role of TAK1 in early B-cell development. TAK1-deficient mice showed significant reduction of BM Igλ-positive B-cell numbers without any alteration in the BCR editing. Furthermore, the expression of survival factor Bcl-2 was reduced in TAK1-deficient BM B cells as assessed by microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. Ex vivo over-expression of exogenous Bcl-2 enhanced the survival of TAK1-deficient Igλ-positive B cells. TAK1-IKK-NF-κB signaling contributes to the survival of λ-chain-positive B cells through NF-κB-dependent anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Production of autoantibodies against citrullinated antigens/peptides by human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellatin, Maria F; Han, Mei; Fallena, Margarita; Fan, Lin; Xia, Donglan; Olsen, Nancy; Branch, Valerie; Karp, David; Stastny, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Autoantibodies against citrullinated protein Ags (ACPA) are associated with the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This immune response against citrullinated protein Ags, which is thought to be facilitated by certain MHC HLA-DR alleles, is highly specific for this disease and has been speculated to be involved in the pathogenesis. We have previously studied cultures of B cells for the production of Abs against HLA Ags. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of B cells in the production of ACPA in patients with RA. Peripheral blood B cells from RA patients and healthy people were cultured with EL4-B5, a murine cell line expressing human CD40L, and with T cell factors to stimulate the in vitro production of Abs by B cells isolated from peripheral blood. ACPA were produced by cultured B cells from RA patients, as determined by reactivity to cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP). The results showed that 22% of the healthy persons tested also had B cells that could produce ACPA. Patients with HLA-DR alleles carrying the RA-associated shared epitope appeared to have more B cells with autoimmune potential for CCP than those without such HLA alleles (odds ratio 8.1, p = 0.001). In healthy individuals, anti-CCP-producing B cells were also observed more frequently if the RA-associated MHC genes were present (odds ratio 8.0, p = 0.01). Analysis of B cells in cultures may shed light on the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in the development of RA.

  8. Allergen extract-induced interleukin-10 in human memory B cells inhibits immunoglobulin E production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, M; Heine, G; Zuberbier, T; Worm, M

    2009-05-01

    Elevated specific IgE antibody levels are common in atopic individuals, caused by T-helper type 2-dominated B cell activation. The induction of antigen-specific IL-10 secreting T cells is discussed as an important mechanism during specific immunotherapy. By contrast the presence and function of B cell-derived IL-10 is not well defined yet. We investigated whether type-I allergen extracts induce IL-10 expression in human B cells and analysed its functional role on IgE production. Human peripheral B cells were stimulated with grass pollen, house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssimus; Der p) and dog allergen extract. Expression of IL-10 by activated human B cells was determined by flow cytometric analysis and ELISA. Functional analysis considering immunoglobulin production was assayed by ELISA. The allergen extracts studied induced IL-10 expression in B cells. However, the ability to induce IL-10 differed between the allergen extracts. The most potent allergen extract was dog (169+/-28 pg/mL), followed by grass pollen (141+/-10 pg/mL) and HDM allergen (125+/-11 pg/mL). Upon allergen extract stimulation only CD27 expressing memory B cells produced IL-10 and co-expressed the very early activation antigen CD69. The addition of allergen extracts to B cells activated by anti-CD40 and IL-4 selectively inhibited IgE which was dependent on allergen extract-induced IL-10. By contrast the other immunoglobulin subclasses like IgA, IgG or IgM were not altered upon allergen extract challenge. Our data indicate that allergen-activated memory B cells can modulate IgE production through secretion of IL-10.

  9. Germinal center B cell depletion diminishes CD4+ follicular T helper cells in autoimmune mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isharat Yusuf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous support from follicular CD4(+ T helper (Tfh cells drives germinal center (GC responses, which last for several weeks to produce high affinity memory B cells and plasma cells. In autoimmune Sle1 and NZB/W F1 mice, elevated numbers of Tfh cells persist, promoting the expansion of self-reactive B cells. Expansion of circulating Tfh like cells have also been described in several autoimmune diseases. Although, the signals required for Tfh differentiation have now been well described, the mechanisms that sustain the maintenance of fully differentiated Tfh are less understood. Recent data demonstrate a role for GC B cells for Tfh maintenance after protein immunization. METHODS AND FINDING: Given the pathogenic role Tfh play in autoimmune disease, we explored whether B cells are required for maintenance of autoreactive Tfh. Our data suggest that the number of mature autoreactive Tfh cells is controlled by GC B cells. Depletion of B cells in Sle1 autoimmune mice leads to a dramatic reduction in Tfh cells. In NZB/W F1 autoimmune mice, similar to the SRBC immunization model, GC B cells support the maintenance of mature Tfh, which is dependent mainly on ICOS. The CD28-associated pathway is dispensable for Tfh maintenance in SRBC immunized mice, but is required in the spontaneous NZB/W F1 model. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that mature Tfh cells require signals from GC B cells to sustain their optimal numbers and function in both autoimmune and immunization models. Thus, immunotherapies targeting B cells in autoimmune disease may affect pathogenic Tfh cells.

  10. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (Δ30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (Δ41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-β expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ≈35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. TNFRSF13B hemizygosity reveals TACI haploinsufficiency at later stages of B-cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Neil; Virdee, Manmeet; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Oe, Tyler; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Perkins, Tiffany; Cantaert, Tineke; Rachid, Rima; Rosengren, Sally; Palazzo, Regina; Geha, Raif; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterozygous C104R or A181E TNFRSF13B mutations impair the removal of autoreactive B cells, weaken B-cell activation and convey to common variable immune deficiency (CVID) patients an increased risk for autoimmunity. How mutant TACI influences wildtype TACI function is unclear; different models suggest either a dominant-negative effect or haploinsufficiency. Objective We investigated potential TACI haploinsufficiency by analyzing antibody-deficient Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) patients, who possess only one TNFRSF13B allele and antibody-deficient patients carrying one c.204insA TNFRSF13B null mutation. Methods We tested the reactivity of antibodies isolated from single B cells from SMS patients and patients with a c.204insA TNFRSF13B mutation and compared them with counterparts from CVID patients with heterozygous C104R or A181E TNFRSF13B missense mutations. We also assessed if loss of a TNFRSF13B allele induced haploinsufficiency in naïve and memory B cells recapitulate abnormal immunological features typical of CVID patients with heterozygous TNFRSF13B missense mutations. Results We found loss of a TNFRSF13B allele does not impact TACI expression, activation responses, or establishment of central B-cell tolerance in naïve B cells. Additionally, SMS patients and patients with a c.204insA TNFRSF13B mutation display normal Treg function and peripheral B-cell tolerance. The lack of a TNFRSF13B allele did result in decreased TACI expression on memory B cells, resulting in impaired activation and antibody secretion. Conclusion TNFRSF13B hemizygosity does not recapitulate autoimmune features of CVID-associated C104R and A181E TNFRSF13B mutations, which likely encode dominant-negative products, but instead reveals selective TACI haploinsufficiency at later stages of B-cell development. PMID:26100089

  12. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce extended remissions in transgenic mice with mature B cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refaeli Yosef

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a mouse model based on overexpression of c-Myc in B cells genetically engineered to be self-reactive to test the hypothesis that farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs can effectively treat mature B cell lymphomas. FTIs are undergoing clinical trials to treat both lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies and we wished to obtain evidence to support the inclusion of B cell lymphomas in future trials. Results We report that two FTIs, L-744,832 and SCH66336, blocked the growth of mature B cell lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The FTI treatment affected the proliferation and survival of the transformed B cells to a greater extent than naïve B cells stimulated with antigen. In syngeneic mice transplanted with the transgenic lymphoma cells, L-744,832 treatment prevented the growth of the tumor cells and the morbidity associated with the resulting lymphoma progression. Tumors that arose from transplantation of the lymphoma cells regressed with as little as three days of treatment with L-744,832 or SCH66336. Treatment of these established lymphomas with L-744,832 for seven days led to long-term remission of the disease in approximately 25% of animals. Conclusion FTI treatment can block the proliferation and survival of self-reactive transformed B cells that overexpress Myc. In mice transplanted with mature B cell lymphomas, we found that FTI treatment led to regression of disease. FTIs warrant further consideration as therapeutic agents for mature B cell lymphomas and other lymphoid tumors.

  13. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  14. To B or not to B cells-mediate a healthy start to life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T G; Ward, C M; Morris, J M

    2013-02-01

    Maternal immune responses during pregnancy are critical in programming the future health of a newborn. The maternal immune system is required to accommodate fetal immune tolerance as well as to provide a protective defence against infections for the immunocompromised mother and her baby during gestation and lactation. Natural immunity and antibody production by maternal B cells play a significant role in providing such immunoprotection. However, aberrations in the B cell compartment as a consequence of maternal autoimmunity can pose serious risks to both the mother and her baby. Despite their potential implication in shaping pregnancy outcomes, the role of B cells in human pregnancy has been poorly studied. This review focuses on the role of B cells and the implications of B cell depletion therapy in pregnancy. It highlights the evidence of an association between aberrant B cell compartment and obstetric conditions. It also alludes to the potential mechanisms that amplify these B cell aberrances and thereby contribute to exacerbation of some maternal autoimmune conditions and poor neonatal outcomes. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests strongly that maternal autoantibodies contribute directly to the pathologies of obstetric and neonatal conditions that have significant implications for the lifelong health of a newborn. The evidence for clinical benefit and safety of B cell depletion therapies in pregnancy is reviewed, and an argument is mounted for further clinical evaluation of B cell-targeted therapies in high-risk pregnancy, with an emphasis on improving neonatal outcomes and prevention of neonatal conditions such as congenital heart block and fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  15. Micro RNA-98 suppresses interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells in patient post-cardio transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangping; Su, Wenjun; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Ningning; Li, Mao-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang; Wang, Liqing

    2017-04-25

    The immune tolerance to the transplant heart survival is critical. Regulatory B cells are one of the major immune regulatory cell populations in the immune tolerance. Micro RNAs (miR) can regulate the activities of immune cells, such as the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by B cells. This study tests a hypothesis that micro RNA (miR)-98 plays a role in the regulation of interleukin (IL)-10 expression in B cells (B10 cell) after heart transplantation. In this study, the peripheral blood samples were collected from patients before and after heart transplantation. The expression of miR-98 and IL-10 in B cells was assessed by real time RT-PCR. An allograft heart transplantation mouse model was developed. We observed that after heart transplantation, the frequency of peripheral B10 cell and the IL-10 mRNA levels in peripheral B cells were significantly decreased, the levels of miR-98 were increased in peripheral B cells and the serum levels of cortisol were increased in the patients. Treating naive B cells with cortisol in the culture suppressed the expression of IL-10 in B cells, which was abolished by knocking down the miR-98 gene. Administration with anti-miR-98, or cortisol inhibitor, or adoptive transfer with B10 cells, significantly enhanced the survival rate and time of mice received allograft heart transplantation. In conclusion, the enhancement of serum cortisol affects the immune tolerant feature of B cells, which can be attenuated by anti-miR-98-carrying liposomes.

  16. Loss of signalling via Gα13 in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppidi, Jagan R; Schmitz, Roland; Green, Jesse A; Xiao, Wenming; Larsen, Adrien B; Braun, Sterling E; An, Jinping; Xu, Ying; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Staudt, Louis M; Cyster, Jason G

    2014-12-11

    Germinal centre B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL) is a common malignancy, yet the signalling pathways that are deregulated and the factors leading to its systemic dissemination are poorly defined. Work in mice showed that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (S1PR2), a Gα12 and Gα13 coupled receptor, promotes growth regulation and local confinement of germinal centre B cells. Recent deep sequencing studies of GCB-DLBCL have revealed mutations in many genes in this cancer, including in GNA13 (encoding Gα13) and S1PR2 (refs 5,6, 7). Here we show, using in vitro and in vivo assays, that GCB-DLBCL-associated mutations occurring in S1PR2 frequently disrupt the receptor's Akt and migration inhibitory functions. Gα13-deficient mouse germinal centre B cells and human GCB-DLBCL cells were unable to suppress pAkt and migration in response to S1P, and Gα13-deficient mice developed germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma. Germinal centre B cells, unlike most lymphocytes, are tightly confined in lymphoid organs and do not recirculate. Remarkably, deficiency in Gα13, but not S1PR2, led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination into lymph and blood. GCB-DLBCL cell lines frequently carried mutations in the Gα13 effector ARHGEF1, and Arhgef1 deficiency also led to germinal centre B-cell dissemination. The incomplete phenocopy of Gα13- and S1PR2 deficiency led us to discover that P2RY8, an orphan receptor that is mutated in GCB-DLBCL and another germinal centre B-cell-derived malignancy, Burkitt's lymphoma, also represses germinal centre B-cell growth and promotes confinement via Gα13. These findings identify a Gα13-dependent pathway that exerts dual actions in suppressing growth and blocking dissemination of germinal centre B cells that is frequently disrupted in germinal centre B-cell-derived lymphoma.

  17. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pinto, Daniel; Saravia, Nancy Gore; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2014-02-25

    An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to activate CD4 T cells and induce cytokine

  18. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  19. B-cell display-based one-step method to generate chimeric human IgG monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Waka; Kurosawa, Kohei; Murayama, Akiho; Kagaya, Eri; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2011-02-01

    The recent development of screening strategies based on the generation and display of large libraries of antibody fragments has allowed considerable advances for the in vitro isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We previously developed a technology referred to as the 'ADLib (Autonomously Diversifying Library) system', which allows the rapid screening and isolation in vitro of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from libraries of immunoglobulin M (IgM) displayed by the chicken B-cell line DT40. Here, we report a novel application of the ADLib system to the production of chimeric human mAbs. We have designed gene knock-in constructs to generate DT40 strains that coexpress chimeric human IgG and chicken IgM via B-cell-specific RNA alternative splicing. We demonstrate that the application of the ADLib system to these strains allows the one-step selection of antigen-specific human chimeric IgG. In addition, the production of chimeric IgG can be selectively increased when we modulate RNA processing by overexpressing the polyadenylation factor CstF-64. This method provides a new way to efficiently design mAbs suitable for a wide range of purposes including antibody therapy.

  20. Prediction of B-cell Linear Epitopes with a Combination of Support Vector Machine Classification and Amino Acid Propensity Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitopes are antigenic determinants that are useful because they induce B-cell antibody production and stimulate T-cell activation. Bioinformatics can enable rapid, efficient prediction of potential epitopes. Here, we designed a novel B-cell linear epitope prediction system called LEPS, Linear Epitope Prediction by Propensities and Support Vector Machine, that combined physico-chemical propensity identification and support vector machine (SVM classification. We tested the LEPS on four datasets: AntiJen, HIV, a newly generated PC, and AHP, a combination of these three datasets. Peptides with globally or locally high physicochemical propensities were first identified as primitive linear epitope (LE candidates. Then, candidates were classified with the SVM based on the unique features of amino acid segments. This reduced the number of predicted epitopes and enhanced the positive prediction value (PPV. Compared to four other well-known LE prediction systems, the LEPS achieved the highest accuracy (72.52%, specificity (84.22%, PPV (32.07%, and Matthews' correlation coefficient (10.36%.

  1. Enhanced B-Cell Receptor Recognition of the Autoantigen Transglutaminase 2 by Efficient Catalytic Self-Multimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorunn Stamnaes

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the gluten-driven enteropathy celiac disease is autoantibody production towards the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2 that catalyzes the formation of covalent protein-protein cross-links. Activation of TG2-specific B cells likely involves gluten-specific CD4 T cells as production of the antibodies is dependent on disease-associated HLA-DQ allotypes and dietary intake of gluten. IgA plasma cells producing TG2 antibodies with few mutations are abundant in the celiac gut lesion. These plasma cells and serum antibodies to TG2 drop rapidly after initiation of a gluten-free diet, suggestive of extrafollicular responses or germinal center reactions of short duration. High antigen avidity is known to promote such responses, and is also important for breakage of self-tolerance. We here inquired whether TG2 avidity could be a feature relevant to celiac disease. Using recombinant enzyme we show by dynamic light scattering and gel electrophoresis that TG2 efficiently utilizes itself as a substrate due to conformation-dependent homotypic association, which involves the C-terminal domains of the enzyme. This leads to the formation of covalently linked TG2 multimers. The presence of exogenous substrate such as gluten peptide does not inhibit TG2 self-cross-linking, but rather results in formation of TG2-TG2-gluten complexes. The celiac disease autoantibody epitopes, clustered in the N-terminal part of TG2, are conserved in the TG2-multimers as determined by mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation analysis. TG2 multimers are superior to TG2 monomer in activating A20 B cells transduced with TG2-specific B-cell receptor, and uptake of TG2-TG2-gluten multimers leads to efficient activation of gluten-specific T cells. Efficient catalytic self-multimerization of TG2 and generation of multivalent TG2 antigen decorated with gluten peptides suggest a mechanism by which self-reactive B cells are activated to give abundant numbers of plasma cells in celiac

  2. Loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 function contributes to poor prognosis of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Tzankov, A; Li, X; Manyam, G C; Murty, V; Bhagat, G; Zhang, S; Pasqualucci, L; Visco, C; Dybkaer, K; Chiu, A; Orazi, A; Zu, Y; Richards, K L; Hsi, E D; Choi, W W L; van Krieken, J H; Huh, J; Ponzoni, M; Ferreri, A J M; Møller, M B; Parsons, B M; Winter, J N; Piris, M A; Westin, J; Fowler, N; Miranda, R N; Ok, C Y; Li, Y; Li, J; Medeiros, L J; Young, K H

    2017-03-01

    PRDM1/BLIMP-1, a master regulator of plasma-cell differentiation, is frequently inactivated in activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Little is known about its genetic aberrations and relevant clinical implications. A large series of patients with de novo DLBCL was effectively evaluated for PRDM1/BLIMP-1 deletion, mutation, and protein expression. BLIMP-1 expression was frequently associated with the ABC phenotype and plasmablastic morphologic subtype of DLBCL, yet 63% of the ABC-DLBCL patients were negative for BLIMP-1 protein expression. In these patients, loss of BLIMP-1 was associated with Myc overexpression and decreased expression of p53 pathway molecules. In addition, homozygous PRDM1 deletions and PRDM1 mutations within exons 1 and 2, which encode for domains crucial for transcriptional repression, were found to show a poor prognostic impact in patients with ABC-DLBCL but not in those with germinal center B-cell-like DLBCL (GCB-DLBCL). Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 expression correlated with a decreased plasma-cell differentiation signature and upregulation of genes involved in B-cell receptor signaling and tumor-cell proliferation. In conclusion, these results provide novel clinical and biological insight into the tumor-suppressive role of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 in ABC-DLBCL patients and suggest that loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 function contributes to the overall poor prognosis of ABC-DLBCL patients.

  3. Non-CpG Oligonucleotides Exert Adjuvant Effects by Enhancing Cognate B Cell-T Cell Interactions, Leading to B Cell Activation, Differentiation, and Isotype Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Herbáth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural and synthetic nucleic acids are known to exert immunomodulatory properties. Notably, nucleic acids are known to modulate immune function via several different pathways and various cell types, necessitating a complex interpretation of their effects. In this study we set out to compare the effects of a CpG motif containing oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN with those of a control and an inhibitory non-CpG ODN during cognate B cell-T cell interactions. We employed an antigen presentation system using splenocytes from TCR transgenic DO11.10 mice and the ovalbumin peptide recognized by the TCR as model antigen. We followed early activation events by measuring CD69 expression, late activation by MHC class II expression, cell division and antibody production of switched, and nonswitched isotypes. We found that both of the tested non-CpG ODN exerted significant immunomodulatory effects on early T cell and on late B cell activation events. Importantly, a synergism between non-CpG effects and T cell help acting on B cells was observed, resulting in enhanced IgG production following cognate T cell-B cell interactions. We propose that non-CpG ODN may perform as better adjuvants when a strong antigen-independent immune activation, elicited by CpG ODNs, is undesirable.

  4. Non-CpG Oligonucleotides Exert Adjuvant Effects by Enhancing Cognate B Cell-T Cell Interactions, Leading to B Cell Activation, Differentiation, and Isotype Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Erdei, Anna; Prechl, József

    2015-01-01

    Natural and synthetic nucleic acids are known to exert immunomodulatory properties. Notably, nucleic acids are known to modulate immune function via several different pathways and various cell types, necessitating a complex interpretation of their effects. In this study we set out to compare the effects of a CpG motif containing oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) with those of a control and an inhibitory non-CpG ODN during cognate B cell-T cell interactions. We employed an antigen presentation system using splenocytes from TCR transgenic DO11.10 mice and the ovalbumin peptide recognized by the TCR as model antigen. We followed early activation events by measuring CD69 expression, late activation by MHC class II expression, cell division and antibody production of switched, and nonswitched isotypes. We found that both of the tested non-CpG ODN exerted significant immunomodulatory effects on early T cell and on late B cell activation events. Importantly, a synergism between non-CpG effects and T cell help acting on B cells was observed, resulting in enhanced IgG production following cognate T cell-B cell interactions. We propose that non-CpG ODN may perform as better adjuvants when a strong antigen-independent immune activation, elicited by CpG ODNs, is undesirable. PMID:26380319

  5. Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesizing Enzymes in Rheumatoid Arthritis B Cells and the Effects of B Cell Depleting Therapy on Enzyme Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghe, Karina Roxana; Thurlings, Rogier M.; Westman, Marie; Boumans, Maartje J.; Malmström, Vivianne; Trollmo, Christina; Korotkova, Marina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Tak, Paul-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: B cells may play an important role in promoting immune activation in the rheumatoid synovium and can produce prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) when activated. In its turn, PGE(2) formed by cyclooxygenase (COX) and microsomal prostaglandin E-2 synthase 1 (MPGES1) contributes to the rheumatoid

  6. Rapidly progressive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sirolimus, a potent inhibitor of B- and T-cell activation, is a commonly used immunosuppressant after renal transplantation. Withdrawal of sirolimus from the immunosuppression regimen may reduce B-cell surveillance. We present a case of rapidly progressive central nervous system (CNS) polymorphic Epstein-Barr virus ...

  7. Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from B Cells Expressing Constitutively Active STAT5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, F.A.; van Geelen, C.M.M.; Yasuda, E.; Spits, H.; Beaumont, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. Methodology/Principal Findings: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer

  8. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carbone, Mario; Della Ferrera, Francesco; Carbone, Lucio; Gatti, Gaia; Carrozzo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    .... The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar...

  9. A study of serum levels of B cell-attracting chemokine-13 (CXCL 13 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HCV) infection including; arthralgia, myalgia, fatigue, fibromyalgia, vasculitis, and sicca syndrome. The relationship between emergence and persistence of intrahepatic or circulating B cell clonotypes and HCV infection is still unknown.

  10. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma of stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Figen; Kandemir, Nilufer Onak; Gun, Banu Dogan; Ozdamar, Sukru Oguz

    2016-07-01

    T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma is an unusually encountered lymphoid neoplasm of stomach with aggressive course, and is an uncommon morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An ulcerated mass, 7x5x1 cm in size was observed within the gastrectomy specimen of a 76-year-old female patient. In cross sections, besides mature lymphoid cells displaying T-cell phenotype, a neoplastic formation composed of large, pleomorphic atypical lymphoid cells with, prominent nucleoli, vesicular nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm displaying B-cell phenotype were observed. Meanwhile, histiocyte-like mononuclear cells and Reed-Sternberg-like multinuclear cells expressing CD68 and Mac387 were also observed. The diagnosis of the case was T cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma. This rarely encountered neoplasm should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of primary gastric lymphomas.

  11. Crosstalk Between T and B Cells in the Germinal Center After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwun, Jean; Manook, Miriam; Page, Eugenia; Burghuber, Christopher; Hong, Jungjoo; Knechtle, Stuart J

    2017-04-01

    Crosstalk between B and T cells in transplantation is increasingly recognized as being important in the alloimmune response. T cell activation of B cells occurs by a 3-stage pathway, culminating with costimulation signals. We review the distinct T cell subtypes required for B-cell activation and discuss the formation of the germinal center (GC) after transplantation, with particular reference to the repopulation of the GC after depletional induction, and the subsequent effect of immunosuppressive manipulation of T cell-B cell interactions. In addition, ectopic GCs are seen in transplantation, but their role is not fully understood. Therapeutic options to target T cell-B cell interactions are of considerable interest, both as immunosuppressive tools, and to aid in the further understanding of these important alloimmune mechanisms.

  12. Efficient B cell depletion via diphtheria toxin in CD19-Cre/iDTR mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Demircik

    Full Text Available B cells were first discovered as antibody producing cells, as B-1 B cells and finally as effector cells. In recent years their capacity to serve as antigen presenting cells is increasingly appreciated, and better tools are needed to study their function. We have previously described a new mouse model, the iDTR mice, that allow for the Cre-mediated expression of the diphtheria toxin receptor, thus rendering cells that express the Cre-recombinase sensitivity to diphtheria toxin. Herein we describe a new mouse line, the B-DTR mice, where the CD19-Cre was crossed to the iDTR mice. B-DTR allows for the efficient and cost-effective depletion of different B cell subpopulations, but only partially plasma cells. These mice can therefore be used to study the importance of B cells versus plasma cells in different immune responses and autoimmune diseases.

  13. Protective effects of sesaminol on BEAS-2B cells impaired by cigarette smoke extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ping; Fu, Xiao; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Wen-mei; Cao, Wen-ming; Zhang, Wei-yun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate protective effects of sesaminol on the human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell line against oxidative damage of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). BEAS-2B cells were pre-incubated with sesaminol for 12 h and then treated with various concentrations of CSE for 24 h. After that proliferation ability, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cell apoptosis, activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and mRNA levels of IL-8 and IL-6 were measured. The results showed that sesaminol significantly improved BEAS-2B cell viability, reduced the production of ROS and LDH of cells, inhibited cell apoptosis and increased CAT and SOD activities in CSE-treated cells. Sesaminol also inhibited the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 mRNA following CSE exposure. In conclusion, sesaminol may protect BEAS-2B cells against CSE-induced oxidative damage.

  14. Coordinate suppression of B cell lymphoma by PTEN and SHIP phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miletic, Ana V; Anzelon-Mills, Amy N; Mills, David M

    2010-01-01

    The inositol phosphatases phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated growth, survival, and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. Although deletion of PTEN in mouse T cells...... proliferate to the prosurvival factor B cell activating factor (BAFF). Interestingly, although BAFF availability may promote lymphoma progression, we demonstrate that BAFF is not required for the expansion of transferred bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells. This study reveals that PTEN and SHIP act cooperatively...... to suppress B cell lymphoma and provides the first direct evidence that SHIP is a tumor suppressor. As such, assessment of both PTEN and SHIP function are relevant to understanding the etiology of human B cell malignancies that exhibit augmented activation of the PI3K pathway....

  15. Regulation of germinal center, B-cell memory and plasma cell formation by histone modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim eGood-Jacobson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of antibody production and B-cell memory formation and function is core to finding new treatments for B-cell-derived cancers, antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders and immunodeficiencies. Progression from a small number of antigen-specific B-cells to the production of a large number of antibody-secreting cells is tightly regulated. Although much progress has been made in revealing the transcriptional regulation of B-cell differentiation that occurs during humoral immune responses, there are still many questions that remain unanswered. Recent work on the expression and roles of histone modifiers in lymphocytes has begun to shed light on this additional level of regulation. This review will discuss the recent advancements in understanding how humoral immune responses, in particular germinal centers and memory cells, are modulated by histone modifiers.

  16. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  17. Studies of generation of B-cell diversity in mouse, man, and chicken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.D.; Kearney, J.F.; Lydyard, P.M.; Grossi, C.E.; Lawton, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    We have compared the development of B cells in chickens, mice, and humans, attempting wherever possible to use the differences among them to experimental advantage. Because expression of immunoglobulins at the cell surface occurs earlier in the life history of B cells in chickens, we used them to study generation of diversity of antigen-binding cells (ABC). Studies in mammals have focused on the parallel problem of expression of different immunoglobulin classes. Our studies suggest that clonal diversity is generated sequentially in a programmed manner and first among B cells that express only IgM, and Ig class heterogeneity is developed secondarily by an antigen-independent switch in expression of heavy-chain genes by members of each B-cell clone.

  18. Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanemo Myhrinder, Anna; Hellqvist, Eva; Bergh, Ann-Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells resemble self-renewing CD5 + B-cells carrying auto/xeno-antigen-reactive B-cell receptors (BCRs) and multiple innate pattern-recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors and scavenger receptors. Integration of signals from BCRs with multiple surface...... membrane receptors determines whether the cells will be proliferating, anergic or apoptotic. To better understand the role of antigen in leukemogenesis, CLL cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will facilitate structural analysis of antigens and supply DNA for genetic studies. We present here...... a comprehensive genotypic and phenotypic characterization of available CLL and normal B-cell-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the same individuals (n = 17). Authenticity and verification studies of CLL-patient origin were done by IGHV sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA...

  19. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Maturation-Associated B-Cell Subsets in Chronic Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Julia; Polvorosa, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Madruga, Ignacio; Marcos, Miguel; Pérez-Nieto, Maria Angeles; Hernandez-Cerceño, Maria Luisa; Orfao, Alberto; Laso, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-01

    Although decreased counts of peripheral blood (PB) B cells-associated with an apparently contradictory polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia-have been reported in chronic alcoholism, no information exists about the specific subsets of circulating B cells altered and their relationship with antibody production. Here, we analyzed for the first time the distribution of multiple maturation-associated subpopulations of PB B cells in alcoholism and its potential relationship with the onset of liver disease. PB samples from 35 male patients-20 had alcoholic hepatitis (AH) and 15 chronic alcoholism without liver disease (AWLD)-were studied, in parallel to 19 male healthy donors (controls). The distribution of PB B-cell subsets (immature/regulatory, naïve, CD27(-) and CD27(+) memory B lymphocytes, and circulating plasmablasts of distinct immunoglobulin-Ig-isotypes) was analyzed by flow cytometry. Patients with AH showed significantly decreased numbers of total PB B lymphocytes (vs. controls and AWLD), at the expense of immature, memory, and, to a lesser extent, also naïve B cells. AWLD showed reduced numbers of immature and naïve B cells (vs. controls), but higher PB counts of plasmablasts (vs. the other 2 groups). Although PB memory B cells were reduced among the patients, the percentage of surface (s)IgA(+) cells (particularly CD27(-) /sIgA(+) cells) was increased in AH, whereas both sIgG(+) and sIgA(+) memory B cells were significantly overrepresented in AWLD versus healthy donors. Regarding circulating plasmablasts, patients with AH only showed significantly reduced counts of sIgG(+) cells versus controls. In contrast, the proportion of both sIgA(+) and sIgG(+) plasmablasts-from all plasmablasts-was reduced in AH and increased in AWLD (vs. the other 2 groups). AH and AWLD patients display a significantly reduced PB B-cell count, at the expense of decreased numbers of recently produced immature/regulatory B cells and naïve B cells, together with an increase in Ig

  20. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  1. B-cell abnormalities and impact on antibody response in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Alessandra; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present review is to provide an update on the current development in the field of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) and their potential use in the prevention and therapeutic settings, and an evaluation of the B-cell abnormalities that may impair antibody responses in HIV infection. Major advances have been achieved in the characterization of bNabs directed against different vulnerable regions of HIV Envelope (Env). Recent observations have clearly demonstrated the ability of bNabs to prevent HIV infection in the nonhuman primate model of HIV infection and to suppress viremia in individuals with chronic HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, substantial advances have also been obtained in the development of HIV Env proteins and immunization strategies inducing bNabs in small animal models. Several studies have also shed light on the B-cell abnormalities associated with the viremic phase of HIV infection that cause impaired B-cell maturation and antibody responses. Of note, preliminary observations have provided evidence for a correlation between the expansion of a specific population of B cells, for example, germinal center B cells, the expansion of T follicular helper cells (Tfh), and the generation of neutralizing antibodies. The recent observations on the antiviral effects of bNabs in vivo indicate that bNabs may play a central role in both the prevention and the therapeutic settings. The identification of the role of germinal center B cells and Tfh cells as critical components of the immune response leading to the generation of neutralizing antibodies, will allow the development of specific immunization strategies for the stimulation of germinal center B cells and Tfh cells. A lot of work still remains to be done for the delineation of B-cell and Tfh cell biology from human lymphoid tissues and in the development of HIV Env proteins and immunization strategies leading to the generation of bNabs.

  2. Role of B cells in host defense against primary Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William J; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite Coxiella burnetii being an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, our recent study demonstrated that B cells play a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity to C. burnetii infection by producing protective antibodies. However, the role of B cells in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether B cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. The results showed that peritoneal B cells were able to phagocytose virulent C. burnetii bacteria and form Coxiella-containing vacuoles (CCVs) and that C. burnetii can infect and replicate in peritoneal B1a subset B cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential role for peritoneal B cells in host defense against C. burnetii infection in vivo. In addition, the results showing that B1a cells secreted a high level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in response to C. burnetii infection in vitro suggest that B1a cells may play an important role in inhibiting the C. burnetii infection-induced inflammatory response. The observation that adoptive transfer of peritoneal B cells did not significantly affect the severity of C. burnetii infection-induced diseases in both severe combined immunity-deficient (SCID) and μMT mice indicates that peritoneal B cells alone may not be able to control C. burnetii infection. In contrast, our finding that C. burnetii infection induced more-severe splenomegaly and a higher bacterial burden in the spleens of B1a cell-deficient Bruton's tyrosine kinase x-linked immunity-deficient (BTK(xid)) mice than in their wild-type counterparts further suggests that B1a cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Prognostic significance of B-cells and pSTAT3 in patients with ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous studies have identified a strong association between T-cell infiltration and clinical outcome in ovarian cancer. The role of B-cells remains controversial, however. METHODS: Forty-nine paraffin-embedded omental specimens derived from patients with high grade epithelial ovarian cancer were assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to characterize expression of CD19(+ B-cells and pSTAT3 as high (>50% positively staining cells [PSCs] or low (<50% PSCs. The Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test was used to determine the association between clinicopathologic parameters and overall survival (OS. A multi-variate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis including nature of debulking (primary vs secondary, histology, tumor grade, receipt of prior chemotherapy, B-cell infiltration and pSTAT3 expression was performed. RESULTS: Median OS was 160.6 months in those patients with low B-cell expression vs 47.3 months in those with high B-cell expression (P = 0.0015. Similarly, median OS was improved in those patients with low pSTAT3 expression (160.6 vs 47.9 months, P = 0.02. In a multivariate model to predict survival, only the degree of B-cell infiltration and clinical stage were retained. pSTAT3 expression did not enter the final model, possibly be due to a high positive correlation with B-cell infiltration (r = 0.82, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Increased B-cell infiltration and pSTAT3 expression in omental tissue are associated with poorer survival.

  4. Follicular B Cell Lymphoma with Accompanying Ischemic Gastritis Completely Resolved by Rituximab

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq, Anam; Mehta, Neal; Peroutka, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 89 Final Diagnosis: Follicular B-cell lymphoma with accompanying ischemic gastritis completely resolved by rituximab Symptoms: Nausea ? vomiting Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Follicular B cell lymphomas account for a significant portion of all newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin?s lymphomas. While involvement can be varied, the most common extranodal presentation is within the gastrointestinal tract beyond the stomach. In ...

  5. The mast cell-B cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2017-05-01

    Over past years, a critical role for the immune system and, in particular, for mast cells in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats and B cell-deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, Sugen/hypoxia, and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell-dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B cells, as 1 ) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast-cell stabilizers and 2 ) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B cells in PH was demonstrated in that either blocking B cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell-B cell axis driven by IL-6 as a critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. γδ T Cells Shape Pre-Immune Peripheral B Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A.; Detanico, Thiago O.; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Casper, Tamara L.; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Carding, Simon R.; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J.; Cambier, John C.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum antibody levels in non-immunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4+ and Vγ6+ γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/−), we observed expanded Vγ1+ cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/− mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of antibody-producing cells, and serum levels of antibodies, IL-4 and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain, and their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of pre-immune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  7. Distinct cytokines balance the development of regulatory T cells and interleukin-10-producing regulatory B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, Vladimir; Zajicova, Alena; Javorkova, Eliska; Trosan, Peter; Chudickova, Milada; Pavlikova, Michaela; Krulova, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells have been well described and the factors regulating their development and function have been identified. Recently, a growing body of evidence has documented the existence of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing B cells, which are called regulatory B10 cells. These cells attenuate autoimmune, inflammatory and transplantation reactions, and the main mechanism of their inhibitory action is the production of IL-10. We show that the production of IL-10 by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B cells is significantly enhanced by IL-12 and interferon-γ and negatively regulated by IL-21 and transforming growth factor-β. In addition, exogenous IL-10 also inhibits B-cell proliferation and the expression of the IL-10 gene in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B cells. The negative autoregulation of IL-10 production is supported by the observation that the inclusion of anti-IL-10 receptor monoclonal antibody enhances IL-10 production and the proliferation of activated B cells. The effects of cytokines on IL-10 production by B10 cells did not correlate with their effects on B-cell proliferation or on IL-10 production by T cells or macrophages. The cytokine-induced changes in IL-10 production occurred on the level of IL-10 gene expression, as confirmed by increased or decreased IL-10 mRNA expression in the presence of a particular cytokine. The regulatory cytokines modulate the number of IL-10-producing cells rather than augmenting or decreasing the secretion of IL-10 on a single-cell level. Altogether these data show that the production of IL-10 by B cells is under the strict regulatory control of cytokines and that individual cytokines differentially regulate the development and activity of regulatory T cells and IL-10-producing regulatory B cells. PMID:24256319

  8. Schistosome egg antigens, including the glycoprotein IPSE/alpha-1, trigger the development of regulatory B cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haeberlein, Simone; Obieglo, Katja; Ozir-Fazalalikhan, Arifa; Chayé, Mathilde A.M; Veninga, Henrike; Vlugt, van der, Luciën E.P.M; Voskamp, Astrid; Boon, Louis; Haan, den, Joke M.M; Westerhof, Lotte B; Wilbers, Ruud H.P; Schots, Arjen; Schramm, Gabriele; Hokke, Cornelis H; Smits, Hermelijn H

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, we investigated whether S. mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA) directly interact with B cells to enhance their regulatory potential, or act indirectly on B cells via SEA-modulated macrophage subsets...

  9. Chidamide Combined With R-GDP in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-12

    Chidamide; Lymphoma, B-Cell; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Neoplasm by Histology; Neoplasms; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Lymphatic Diseases; Immunoproliferative Disorders; Immune System Diseases; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Cyclophosphamide; Rituximab; Gemcitabine; Cisplatin; Dexamethasone; HDAC Inhibitor

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for the Treatment of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Tomuleasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell technology has seen a rapid development over the last decade mostly due to the potential that these cells may have in treating malignant diseases. It is a generally accepted principle that very few therapeutic compounds deliver a clinical response without treatment-related toxicity, and studies have shown that CAR T-cells are not an exception to this rule. While large multinational drug companies are currently investigating the potential role of CAR T-cells in hematological oncology, the potential of such cellular therapies are being recognized worldwide as they are expected to expand in the patient to support the establishment of the immune memory, provide a continuous surveillance to prevent and/or treat a relapse, and keep the targeted malignant cell subpopulation in check. In this article, we present the possible advantages of using CAR T-cells in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, presenting the technology and the current knowledge in their preclinical and early clinical trial use. Thus, this article first presents the main present-day knowledge on the standard of care for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Afterward, current knowledge is presented about the use of CAR T-cells in cancer immunotherapy, describing their design, the molecular constructs, and the preclinical data on murine models to properly explain the background for their clinical use. Last, but certainly not least, this article presents the use of CAR T-cells for the immunotherapy of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, describing both their potential clinical advantages and the possible side effects.

  11. The 9-MilCA method as a rapid, partly automated protocol for simultaneously recording milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Stocco, G; Bittante, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and test a new laboratory cheesemaking procedure [9-mL milk cheesemaking assessment (9-MilCA)], which records 15 traits related to milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss. This