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Sample records for rapid antibiotic susceptibility

  1. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid cytometric antibiotic susceptibility testing utilizing adaptive multidimensional statistical metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Hsueh; Ning, Xinghai; Wang, Xiaojian; Murthy, Niren; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Dickson, Robert M

    2015-02-03

    Flow cytometry holds promise to accelerate antibiotic susceptibility determinations; however, without robust multidimensional statistical analysis, general discrimination criteria have remained elusive. In this study, a new statistical method, probability binning signature quadratic form (PB-sQF), was developed and applied to analyze flow cytometric data of bacterial responses to antibiotic exposure. Both sensitive lab strains (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a multidrug resistant, clinically isolated strain (E. coli) were incubated with the bacteria-targeted dye, maltohexaose-conjugated IR786, and each of many bactericidal or bacteriostatic antibiotics to identify changes induced around corresponding minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC). The antibiotic-induced damages were monitored by flow cytometry after 1-h incubation through forward scatter, side scatter, and fluorescence channels. The 3-dimensional differences between the flow cytometric data of the no-antibiotic treated bacteria and the antibiotic-treated bacteria were characterized by PB-sQF into a 1-dimensional linear distance. A 99% confidence level was established by statistical bootstrapping for each antibiotic-bacteria pair. For the susceptible E. coli strain, statistically significant increments from this 99% confidence level were observed from 1/16x MIC to 1x MIC for all the antibiotics. The same increments were recorded for P. aeruginosa, which has been reported to cause difficulty in flow-based viability tests. For the multidrug resistant E. coli, significant distances from control samples were observed only when an effective antibiotic treatment was utilized. Our results suggest that a rapid and robust antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) can be constructed by statistically characterizing the differences between sample and control flow cytometric populations, even in a label-free scheme with scattered light alone. These distances vs paired controls coupled with rigorous

  3. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Ying Liu; Yin-Yi Han; Po-Han Shih; Wei-Nan Lian; Huai-Hsien Wang; Chi-Hung Lin; Po-Ren Hsueh; Juen-Kai Wang; Yuh-Lin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploi...

  4. Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test based on simple surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ying; Han, Yin-Yi; Shih, Po-Han; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Hung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2016-03-01

    Rapid bacterial antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurement are important to help reduce the widespread misuse of antibiotics and alleviate the growing drug-resistance problem. We discovered that, when a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli is exposed to an antibiotic, the intensity of specific biomarkers in its surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra drops evidently in two hours. The discovery has been exploited for rapid AST and MIC determination of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and wild-type E. coli as well as clinical isolates. The results obtained by this SERS-AST method were consistent with that by the standard incubation-based method, indicating its high potential to supplement or replace existing time-consuming methods and help mitigate the challenge of drug resistance in clinical microbiology.

  5. A microfluidic platform for rapid, stress-induced antibiotic susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, Maxim; Lee, Jean C; Campbell, Jennifer; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2012-11-07

    The emergence and spread of bacterial resistance to ever increasing classes of antibiotics intensifies the need for fast phenotype-based clinical tests for determining antibiotic susceptibility. Standard susceptibility testing relies on the passive observation of bacterial growth inhibition in the presence of antibiotics. In this paper, we present a novel microfluidic platform for antibiotic susceptibility testing based on stress-activation of biosynthetic pathways that are the primary targets of antibiotics. We chose Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) as a model system due to its clinical importance, and we selected bacterial cell wall biosynthesis as the primary target of both stress and antibiotic. Enzymatic and mechanical stresses were used to damage the bacterial cell wall, and a β-lactam antibiotic interfered with the repair process, resulting in rapid cell death of strains that harbor no resistance mechanism. In contrast, resistant bacteria remained viable under the assay conditions. Bacteria, covalently-bound to the bottom of the microfluidic channel, were subjected to mechanical shear stress created by flowing culture media through the microfluidic channel and to enzymatic stress with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the bactericidal agent lysostaphin. Bacterial cell death was monitored via fluorescence using the Sytox Green dead cell stain, and rates of killing were measured for the bacterial samples in the presence and absence of oxacillin. Using model susceptible (Sanger 476) and resistant (MW2) S. aureus strains, a metric was established to separate susceptible and resistant staphylococci based on normalized fluorescence values after 60 min of exposure to stress and antibiotic. Because this ground-breaking approach is not based on standard methodology, it circumvents the need for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements and long wait times. We demonstrate the successful development of a rapid microfluidic-based and stress

  6. A microfluidic platform for rapid, stress-induced antibiotic susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kalashnikov, Maxim; Lee, Jean C.; Campbell, Jennifer; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and spread of bacterial resistance to ever increasing classes of antibiotics intensifies the need for fast phenotype-based clinical tests for determining antibiotic susceptibility. Standard susceptibility testing relies on the passive observation of bacterial growth inhibition in the presence of antibiotics. In this paper, we present a novel microfluidic platform for antibiotic susceptibility testing basedon stress-activation of biosynthetic pathways that are the primary targets...

  7. Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing in a microfluidic pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanyan; Zhen, Li; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2013-03-05

    For appropriate selection of antibiotics in the treatment of pathogen infection, rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) is urgently needed in clinical practice. This study reports the utilization of a microfluidic pH sensor for monitoring bacterial growth rate in culture media spiked with different kinds of antibiotics. The microfluidic pH sensor was fabricated by integration of pH-sensitive chitosan hydrogel with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels. For facilitating the reflectometric interference spectroscopic measurements, the chitosan hydrogel was coated on an electrochemically etched porous silicon chip, which was used as the substrate of the microfluidic channel. Real-time observation of the pH change in the microchannel can be realized by Fourier transform reflectometric interference spectroscopy (FT-RIFS), in which the effective optical thickness (EOT) was selected as the optical signal for indicating the reversible swelling process of chitosan hydrogel stimulated by pH change. With this microfluidic pH sensor, we demonstrate that confinement of bacterial cells in a nanoliter size channel allows rapid accumulation of metabolic products and eliminates the need for long-time preincubation, thus reducing the whole detection time. On the basis of this technology, the whole bacterial growth curve can be obtained in less than 2 h, and consequently rapid AST can be realized. Compared with conventional methods, the AST data acquired from the bacterial growth curve can provide more detailed information for studying the antimicrobial behavior of antibiotics during different stages. Furthermore, the new technology also provides a convenient method for rapid minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) determination of individual antibiotics or the combinations of antibiotics against human pathogens that will find application in clinical and point-of-care medicine.

  8. Modified agar dilution method for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C W; Martin, W J

    1978-01-01

    A simplified method has been developed for agar dilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria, designed to economize on time and money when only a few isolates need to be tested. The procedure is based on the principle of using filter paper disks as carriers of the antibiotic and 35- by 10-mm petri dishes which, when inoculated with the Steers replicator, can test up to four organisms per plate. The procedure was run in parallel with conventional agar dilution techniques and showed 95% agreement to within one dilution for all minimal inhibitory concentrations recorded on fresh anaerobic isolates from clinical specimens. The technique was further simplified by using commercially available antibiotic-containing disks, thereby alleviating the tedious and time-consuming procedure of preparing the disks. The data indicated that 48- to 72-h diffusion periods were sufficient to achieve a uniform concentration of the antibiotic in the petri plate and that the antibiotics were stable at room temperature for that period of time. In terms of applicability and relevance to the needs of the clinical microbiology laboratory, the modified agar dilution method for rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of individual anaerobic isolates was found to be superior to the broth dilution method since it was easier to read and required considerably less set up time. PMID:400819

  9. Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis : Its utility in resource poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojary A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the rapid colorimetric nitrate reductase based antibiotic susceptibility (CONRAS test performed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with the conventional method i.e., the proportion method. Methods: One hundred clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were tested for susceptibility to isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF by the conventional proportion method and CONRAS in Middlebrook 7H9 liquid medium enriched with growth supplements (MB7H9S. Results: The performance of the CONRAS test was evaluated using proportion method as the gold standard. The sensitivity (ability to detect true drug resistance and specificity (ability to detect true drug susceptibility of the CONRAS test to INH was 93.75 and 98.52% and for RIF it was 96.10 and 100% respectively. The mean time for reporting was 6.3 days and the test showed excellent reproducibility. The kappa (k value for INH was 0.92 and for RIF was 0.99, indicating excellent agreement between the two methods. Conclusions: CONRAS test is a rapid and reliable method of drug susceptibility for M. tuberculosis.

  10. Rapid, low-cost fluorescent assay of β-lactamase-derived antibiotic resistance and related antibiotic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, S. Sibel; Khan, Shazia; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is increasingly prevalent in low and middle income countries (LMICs), but the extent of the problem is poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is a critical deficiency, leaving local health authorities essentially blind to AR outbreaks and crippling their ability to provide effective treatment guidelines. The crux of the problem is the lack of microbiology laboratory capacity available in LMICs. To address this unmet need, we demonstrate a rapid and simple test of β-lactamase resistance (the most common form of AR) that uses a modified β-lactam structure decorated with two fluorophores quenched due to their close proximity. When the β-lactam core is cleaved by β-lactamase, the fluorophores dequench, allowing assay speeds of 20 min to be obtained with a simple, streamlined protocol. Furthermore, by testing in competition with antibiotics, the β-lactamase-associated antibiotic susceptibility can also be extracted. This assay can be easily implemented into standard lab work flows to provide near real-time information of β-lactamase resistance, both for epidemiological purposes as well as individualized patient care.

  11. ISOLATION AND ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING OF RAPIDLY-GROWING MYCOBACTERIA FROM GRASSLAND SOILS

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    Martina Kyselková

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM are common soil saprophytes, but certain strains cause infections in human and animals. The infections due to RGM have been increasing in past decades and are often difficult to treat. The susceptibility to antibiotics is regularly evaluated in clinical isolates of RGM, but the data on soil RGM are missing. The objectives of this study was to isolate RGM from four grassland soils with different impact of manuring, and assess their resistance to antibiotics and the ability to grow at 37°C and 42°C. Since isolation of RGM from soil is a challenge, a conventional decontamination method (NaOH/malachite green/cycloheximide and a recent method based on olive oil/SDS demulsification were compared. The olive oil/SDS method was less efficient, mainly because of the emulsion instability and plate overgrowing with other bacteria. Altogether, 44 isolates were obtained and 23 representatives of different RGM genotypes were screened. The number of isolates per soil decreased with increasing soil pH, consistently with previous findings that mycobacteria were more abundant in low pH soils. Most of the isolates belonged to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The majority of isolates was resistant to 2-4 antibiotics. Multiresistant strains occurred also in a control soil that has a long history without the exposure to antibiotic-containing manure. Seven isolates grew at 37°C, including the species M. septicum and M. fortuitum known for infections in humans. This study shows that multiresistant RGM close to known human pathogens occur in grassland soils regardless the soil history of manuring.

  12. Real-Time Digital Bright Field Technology for Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Chiara; Spillum, Erik; Valvik, Martin; Agersnap, Niels; Olesen, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Optical scanning through bacterial samples and image-based analysis may provide a robust method for bacterial identification, fast estimation of growth rates and their modulation due to the presence of antimicrobial agents. Here, we describe an automated digital, time-lapse, bright field imaging system (oCelloScope, BioSense Solutions ApS, Farum, Denmark) for rapid and higher throughput antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) of up to 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time. The imaging system consists of a digital camera, an illumination unit and a lens where the optical axis is tilted 6.25° relative to the horizontal plane of the stage. Such tilting grants more freedom of operation at both high and low concentrations of microorganisms. When considering a bacterial suspension in a microwell, the oCelloScope acquires a sequence of 6.25°-tilted images to form an image Z-stack. The stack contains the best-focus image, as well as the adjacent out-of-focus images (which contain progressively more out-of-focus bacteria, the further the distance from the best-focus position). The acquisition process is repeated over time, so that the time-lapse sequence of best-focus images is used to generate a video. The setting of the experiment, image analysis and generation of time-lapse videos can be performed through a dedicated software (UniExplorer, BioSense Solutions ApS). The acquired images can be processed for online and offline quantification of several morphological parameters, microbial growth, and inhibition over time.

  13. A rapid in situ procedure for determination of bacterial susceptibility or resistance to antibiotics that inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou Germán

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics which inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis are the most widely used in current clinical practice. Nevertheless, resistant strains increase dramatically, with serious economic impact and effects on public health, and are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. Critical clinical situations should benefit from a rapid procedure to evaluate the sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics that act at the cell wall. We have adapted a kit for rapid determination of bacterial DNA fragmentation, to assess cell wall integrity. Results Cells incubated with the antibiotic were embedded in an agarose microgel on a slide, incubated in an adapted lysis buffer, stained with a DNA fluorochrome, SYBR Gold and observed under fluorescence microscopy. The lysis affects the cells differentially, depending on the integrity of the wall. If the bacterium is susceptible to the antibiotic, the weakened cell wall is affected by the lysing solution so the nucleoid of DNA contained inside the bacterium is released and spread. Alternatively, if the bacterium is resistant to the antibiotic, it is practically unaffected by the lysis solution and does not liberate the nucleoid, retaining its normal morphological appearance. In an initial approach, the procedure accurately discriminates susceptible, intermediate and resistant strains of Escherichia coli to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. When the bacteria came from an exponentially growing liquid culture, the effect on the cell wall of the β-lactam was evident much earlier that when they came from an agar plate. A dose-response experiment with an E. coli strain susceptible to ampicillin demonstrated a weak effect before the MIC dose. The cell wall damage was not homogenous among the different cells, but the level of damage increased as dose increased with a predominant degree of effect for each dose. A microgranular-fibrilar extracellular background was evident in gram

  14. Fully automated disc diffusion for rapid antibiotic susceptibility test results: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Jetter, Marion; Blöchliger, Nicolas; Kolesnik-Goldmann, Natalia; Böttger, Erik C

    2017-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a significant threat to patients suffering from infectious diseases. Early readings of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results could be of critical importance to ensure adequate treatment. Disc diffusion is a well-standardized, established and cost-efficient AST procedure; however, its use in the clinical laboratory is hampered by the many manual steps involved, and an incubation time of 16-18 h, which is required to achieve reliable test results. We have evaluated a fully automated system for its potential for early reading of disc diffusion diameters after 6-12 h of incubation. We assessed availability of results, methodological precision, categorical agreement and interpretation errors as compared with an 18 h standard. In total, 1028 clinical strains (291 Escherichia coli , 272 Klebsiella pneumoniae , 176 Staphylococcus aureus and 289 Staphylococcus epidermidis ) were included in this study. Disc diffusion plates were streaked, incubated and imaged using the WASPLab TM automation system. Our results demonstrate that: (i) early AST reading is possible for important pathogens; (ii) methodological precision is not hampered at early timepoints; and (iii) species-specific reading times must be selected. As inhibition zone diameters change over time and are phenotype/drug combination dependent, specific cut-offs and expert rules will be essential to ensure reliable interpretation and reporting of early susceptibility testing results.

  15. Rapid Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Uropathogenic E. coli by Tracking Submicron Scale Motion of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syal, Karan; Shen, Simon; Yang, Yunze; Wang, Shaopeng; Haydel, Shelley E; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-08-25

    To combat antibiotic resistance, a rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) technology that can identify resistant infections at disease onset is required. Current clinical AST technologies take 1-3 days, which is often too slow for accurate treatment. Here we demonstrate a rapid AST method by tracking sub-μm scale bacterial motion with an optical imaging and tracking technique. We apply the method to clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157: H7 and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) loosely tethered to a glass surface. By analyzing dose-dependent sub-μm motion changes in a population of bacterial cells, we obtain the minimum bactericidal concentration within 2 h using human urine samples spiked with UPEC. We validate the AST method using the standard culture-based AST methods. In addition to population studies, the method allows single cell analysis, which can identify subpopulations of resistance strains within a sample.

  16. Rapid urinary tract infection diagnostics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS): identification and antibiotic susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasiri, W R; Chen, Ying; Williamson, P M; Bandarage, D C; Pyles, C; Ziegler, L D

    2017-04-01

    SERS spectra of 12 bacterial strains of urinary tract infection (UTI) clinical isolates grown and enriched from urine are reported. A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) classification treatment of these SERS spectra results in strain level identification with >95% sensitivity and >99% specificity. The classification model successfully identified the SERS spectra of a urine-cultured strain not used to build this statistical model. Enrichment was accomplished by a filtration and centrifugation protocol. The predetermined drug susceptibility profiles of these clinical isolates thus allowed the SERS methodology to provide appropriate UTI antibiotic information in less than 1 h. Most of this time was used for sample preparation procedures (enrichment and washing) for this proof of principle study. SERS spectra of the enriched bacterial samples are dominated by nucleotide degradation metabolites: adenine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanine, uric acid, AMP, and guanosine. Strain-specific specificity is due to the different relative amounts of these purines contributing to the corresponding SERS spectra of these clinical isolates. All measurements were made at the minimal bacterial concentration in urine for UTI diagnosis (105 cfu/mL). Graphical abstract The relative contribution of each of the seven purines found to contribute to the bacterial SERS spectra are summarized in this bar graph. Although strain specific differences are evident, it can be see how the pattern of contributing purines is more different between the four species than between strains of a given species.

  17. Comparative assessment of antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci in biofilm versus planktonic culture as assessed by bacterial enumeration or rapid XTT colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, Nuno; Martins, Silvia; Cerca, Filipe; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Pier, Gerald B; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2005-08-01

    To quantitatively compare the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms formed by the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus with the susceptibility of planktonic cultures. Several CoNS strains were grown planktonically or as biofilms to determine the effect of the mode of growth on the level of susceptibility to antibiotics with different mechanisms of action. The utility of a new, rapid colorimetric method that is based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) to measure cell viability was tested by comparison with standard bacterial enumeration techniques. A 6 h kinetic study was performed using dicloxacillin, cefazolin, vancomycin, tetracycline and rifampicin at the peak serum concentration of each antibiotic. In planktonic cells, inhibitors of cell wall synthesis were highly effective over a 3 h period. Biofilms were much less susceptible than planktonic cultures to all antibiotics tested, particularly inhibitors of cell wall synthesis. The susceptibility to inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis was affected by the biofilm phenotype to a lesser degree. Standard bacterial enumeration techniques and the XTT method produced equivalent results both in biofilms and planktonic assays. This study provides a more accurate comparison between the antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic versus biofilm populations, because the cell densities in the two populations were similar and because we measured the concentration required to inhibit bacterial metabolism rather than to eradicate the entire bacterial population. While the biofilm phenotype is highly resistant to antibiotics that target cell wall synthesis, it is fairly susceptible to antibiotics that target RNA and protein synthesis.

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of grown blood cultures by combining culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction is rapid and effective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Beuving

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy in bacteraemia patients dramatically reduces mortality. A new method for RApid Molecular Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (RAMAST that can be applied directly to positive blood cultures was developed and evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Growth curves and antibiotic susceptibility of blood culture isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci and (facultative aerobic gram-negative rods were determined by incubating diluted blood cultures with and without antibiotics, followed by a quantitative universal 16S PCR to detect the presence or absence of growth. Testing 114 positive blood cultures, RAMAST showed an agreement with microbroth dilution of 96.7% for gram-negative rods, with a minor error (false-susceptibility with a intermediate resistant strain rate of 1.9%, a major error (false resistance rate of 0.8% and a very major error (false susceptibility rate of 0.6%. Agreement for S. aureus was 97.9%, with a very major error rate of 2.1%. Enterococcus species showed 95.0% agreement, with a major error rate of 5.0%. These agreements are comparable with those of the Phoenix system. Starting from a positive blood culture, the test was completed within 9 hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This new rapid method for antibiotic susceptibility testing can potentially provide accurate results for most relevant bacteria commonly isolated from positive blood cultures in less time than routine methods.

  19. Genetic architecture of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility.

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    Hany S Girgis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic exposure rapidly selects for more resistant bacterial strains, and both a drug's chemical structure and a bacterium's cellular network affect the types of mutations acquired.To better characterize the genetic determinants of antibiotic susceptibility, we exposed a transposon-mutagenized library of Escherichia coli to each of 17 antibiotics that encompass a wide range of drug classes and mechanisms of action. Propagating the library for multiple generations with drug concentrations that moderately inhibited the growth of the isogenic parental strain caused the abundance of strains with even minor fitness advantages or disadvantages to change measurably and reproducibly. Using a microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy, we then determined the quantitative contribution of each gene to E. coli's intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility. We found both loci whose removal increased general antibiotic tolerance as well as pathways whose down-regulation increased tolerance to specific drugs and drug classes. The beneficial mutations identified span multiple pathways, and we identified pairs of mutations that individually provide only minor decreases in antibiotic susceptibility but that combine to provide higher tolerance.Our results illustrate that a wide-range of mutations can modulate the activity of many cellular resistance processes and demonstrate that E. coli has a large mutational target size for increasing antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, the work suggests that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance might develop through the sequential accumulation of chromosomal mutations of small individual effect.

  20. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

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    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  1. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibilities, genotypic characteristics and biofilm formation abilities of antibiotic-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus KACC 13236 (SAS), multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus CCARM 3080 (SAR), antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253 (STS) and ...

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility of Atopobium vaginae

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    Verschraegen Gerda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have indicated that a recently described anaerobic bacterium, Atopobium vaginae is associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV. Thus far the four isolates of this fastidious micro-organism were found to be highly resistant to metronidazole and susceptible for clindamycin, two antibiotics preferred for the treatment of BV. Methods Nine strains of Atopobium vaginae, four strains of Gardnerella vaginalis, two strains of Lactobacillus iners and one strain each of Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii were tested against 15 antimicrobial agents using the Etest. Results All nine strains of A. vaginae were highly resistant to nalidixic acid and colistin while being inhibited by low concentrations of clindamycin (range: G. vaginalis strains were also susceptible for clindamycin ( 256 μg/ml but susceptible to clindamycin (0.023 – 0.125 μg/ml. Conclusion Clindamycin has higher activity against G. vaginalis and A. vaginae than metronidazole, but not all A. vaginae isolates are metronidazole resistant, as seemed to be a straightforward conclusion from previous studies on a more limited number of strains.

  3. Direct susceptibility testing by disk diffusion on clinical samples : a rapid and accurate tool for antibiotic stewardship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coorevits, L.; Boelens, J.; Claeys, G.

    We compared the accuracy of direct susceptibility testing (DST) with conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), both using disk diffusion, on clinical samples. A total of 123 clinical samples (respiratory tract samples, urine, vaginal and abdominal abscess discharges, bile fluid and a

  4. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Rebriarina Hapsari; Vincentia Rizke Ciptaningtyas; Masfiyah Masfiyah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid and accurate information on susceptibility of bacteria causing bacteraemia is very helpful in sepsis management. Blood culture is the gold standard for bacteraemia diagnosis. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing needs at least three days for completion while direct method can give the result a day earlier. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of direct antibiotic susceptibility testing in blood culture. Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC b...

  5. Short Communication Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The multiple drug resistance as evident in high MICs of the antibiotics tested could probably be due to abuse/misuse of antibiotics resulting in recurrence of furuncles in the patients. Keywords: Antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase, Recurrent furunculosis, Staphylococcus aureus. Received 08 August 2011/ Accepted 30 ...

  6. antibiotic susceptibility pattern and multiple antibiotic resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pg, gentamicin 10 pg, streptomycin 30 pg, erythromycin 30 ug and chloramphenicol 20 tlg. Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 10662 served as control. Determination of MAR index. The MAR index was determined for each isolate by dividing the number of antibiotics to which the isolate is resistant by the total number of ...

  7. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a multidrug resistant bacterium that threatens the continued effectiveness of antibiotics worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern in patients with burns and bedsore. This was a cross- sectional ...

  8. Bacterial Nanoscale Cultures for Phenotypic Multiplexed Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

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    Weibull, Emilie; Antypas, Haris; Kjäll, Peter; Brauner, Annelie; Andersson-Svahn, Helene

    2014-01-01

    An optimal antimicrobial drug regimen is the key to successful clinical outcomes of bacterial infections. To direct the choice of antibiotic, access to fast and precise antibiotic susceptibility profiling of the infecting bacteria is critical. We have developed a high-throughput nanowell antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) device for direct, multiplexed analysis. By processing in real time the optical recordings of nanoscale cultures of reference and clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains with a mathematical algorithm, the time point when growth shifts from lag phase to early logarithmic phase (Tlag) was identified for each of the several hundreds of cultures tested. Based on Tlag, the MIC could be defined within 4 h. Heatmap presentation of data from this high-throughput analysis allowed multiple resistance patterns to be differentiated at a glance. With a possibility to enhance multiplexing capacity, this device serves as a high-throughput diagnostic tool that rapidly aids clinicians in prescribing the optimal antibiotic therapy. PMID:24989602

  9. Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus amongst patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) in UBTH Benin City, Nigeria. ... (4.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.0%) and Candida albican (1.0%). No growth was recorded in 46.6% of cultures. The occurrence of S. aureus was found to be ...

  10. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to .... with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in the majority of .... Antibiotic and bacterial strain specific distribution of resistance in bacteria isolated from patients attending.

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of various bacterial pathogens including extended spectrum betalactamase (ESBL) producers in Kano, Nigeria. Method: A total of 604 consecutive clinical samples obtained from Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. (AKTH), Kano between January and July 2010 were ...

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotics susceptibility tests including, ESBL screening and confirmation, were carried out by disc diffusion technique using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. Results: Ten different types of bacteria genera were observed from nine different clinical samples. E. coli was the most frequently isolated bacteria ...

  13. Enumeration, Isolation and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out between February and March, 2012, to enumerate, isolate and identify bacteria associated with mobile cell phones in a University environment. This was with a view to determining the bacterial load and their susceptibility pattern to some commonly-used antibiotics. Samples were collected from ...

  14. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile and Survival of Bifidobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bifidobacteria are categorized as health-promoting microorganisms (probiotics) in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. Antibiotic susceptibility is a key criterion for probiotic agent selection. Good survival of probiotics during storage at selected storage temperature(s) is highly desirable. Bifidobacteria isolated ...

  15. Biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen associated with nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Despite multiple reports on the severity and recurrent nature of S. aureus infection, the pathogenesis as well as antibiotic susceptibility profiles of S. aureus infecting HIV and AIDS patients has not been well ...

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ocaña

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora.

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Potentially Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Virginia; Silva, Clara; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To study the antimicrobial susceptibility of six vaginal probiotic lactobacilli. Methods. The disc diffusion method in Müeller Hinton, LAPTg and MRS agars by the NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards) procedure was performed. Due to the absence of a Lactobacillus reference strains, the results were compared to those of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) with 21 different antibiotics in LAPTg agar and broth was also determined. Results. LAPTg and MRS agars are suitable media to study antimicrobial susceptibility of lactobacilli. However, the NCCLS procedure needs to be standardized for this genus. The MICs have shown that all Lactobacillus strains grew at concentrations above 10 μg/mL of chloramphenicol, aztreonam, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, streptomycin and kanamycin. Four lactobacilli were sensitive to 1 μg/mL vancomycin and all of them were resistant to 1000 μg/mL of metronidazole. Sensitivity to other antibiotics depended on each particular strain. Conclusions. The NCCLS method needs to be standardized in an appropriate medium to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus. Vaginal probiotic lactobacilli do not display uniform susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to high concentrations of metronidazole suggests that lactobacilli could be simultaneously used with a bacterial vaginosis treatment to restore the vaginal normal flora. PMID:17485797

  18. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptomycin showed the highest susceptibility to bacteria isolates while the least susceptibility was observed with augmentin. Rational use of antibiotics with regular antibiotics susceptibility surveillance studies is recommended to maintain high antibiotic therapeutic profile. Keywords: Community-acquired urinary tract ...

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Vibrio cholerae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Shrestha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cholera is one of the most common diarrhoeal diseases in Nepal. Etiological agent of cholera is Vibrio cholerae which removes essential body fluids, salts and vital nutrients, which are necessary for life causing dehydration and malnutrition. Emerging antimicrobial resistant is common. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of cholera patients in Nepal. METHODS: All the laboratory works were conducted in the bacteriology section of National Public Health Laboratory, Teku from March to September 2005. During this period a total of 340 stool samples from diarrhoeal patients were collected and processed according to the standard laboratory methods. Each patient suffering from diarrhoea was directly interviewed for his or her clinical history during sample collection. RESULTS: A total of 340 stool samples were processed and studied from both sex including all ages of patients. Among the processed sample 53 Vibrio cholerae cases were found. All isolated Vibrio cholerae O1 were El Tor, Inaba. All isolated (100% Vibrio cholerae O1 were sensitive to Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline whereas all were resistant to Nalidixic acid and Cotrimoxazole. Only 15.1% cases were sensitive to Furazolidone whereas 84.9% were resistant. CONCLUSION: All V. cholerae strains isolated in this study were found resistant to Multi Drug Resistant (resistant to at least two antibiotics of different group. Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline were found still more potent antibiotics against Vibrio cholerae isolated during the study. Keywords: antibiotics, susceptibility, Vibrio cholera.

  20. Informing Antibiotic Treatment Decisions: Evaluating Rapid Molecular Diagnostics To Identify Susceptibility and Resistance to Carbapenems against Acinetobacter spp. in PRIMERS III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scott R; Hujer, Andrea M; Jiang, Hongyu; Hill, Carol B; Hujer, Kristine M; Mediavilla, Jose R; Manca, Claudia; Tran, Thuy Tien T; Domitrovic, T Nicholas; Higgins, Paul G; Seifert, Harald; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Patel, Robin; Jacobs, Michael R; Chen, Liang; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hall, Thomas; Marzan, Christine; Fowler, Vance G; Chambers, Henry F; Bonomo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The widespread dissemination of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. has created significant therapeutic challenges. At present, rapid molecular diagnostics (RMDs) that can identify this phenotype are not commercially available. Two RMD platforms, PCR combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) and molecular beacons (MB), for detecting genes conferring resistance/susceptibility to carbapenems in Acinetobacter spp. were evaluated. An archived collection of 200 clinical Acinetobacter sp. isolates was tested. Predictive values for susceptibility and resistance were estimated as a function of susceptibility prevalence and were based on the absence or presence of beta-lactamase (bla) NDM, VIM, IMP, KPC, and OXA carbapenemase genes (e.g., blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24/40, and blaOXA-58 found in this study) against the reference standard of MIC determinations. According to the interpretation of MICs, 49% (n = 98) of the isolates were carbapenem resistant (as defined by either resistance or intermediate resistance to imipenem). The susceptibility sensitivities (95% confidence interval [CI]) for imipenem were 82% (74%, 89%) and 92% (85%, 97%) for PCR/ESI-MS and MB, respectively. Resistance sensitivities (95% CI) for imipenem were 95% (88%, 98%) and 88% (80%, 94%) for PCR/ESI-MS and MB, respectively. PRIMERS III establishes that RMDs can discriminate between carbapenem resistance and susceptibility in Acinetobacter spp. In the context of a known prevalence of resistance, SPVs and RPVs can inform clinicians regarding the best choice for empiric antimicrobial therapy against this multidrug-resistant pathogen. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Rapid optical determination of β-lactamase and antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of rapid tests evaluating antibiotic susceptibility results in the empirical prescription of antibiotics. This can lead to treatment failures due to escalating antibiotic resistance, and also furthers the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. This study reports a rapid optical method to detect β-lactamase and thereby assess activity of β-lactam antibiotics, which could provide an approach for targeted prescription of antibiotics. The methodology is centred on a fluorescence quenching based probe (β-LEAF – β-Lactamase Enzyme Activated Fluorophore) that mimics the structure of β-lactam antibiotics. Results The β-LEAF assay was performed for rapid determination of β-lactamase production and activity of β-lactam antibiotic (cefazolin) on a panel of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC strains and clinical isolates. Four of the clinical isolates were determined to be lactamase producers, with the capacity to inactivate cefazolin, out of the twenty-five isolates tested. These results were compared against gold standard methods, nitrocefin disk test for β-lactamase detection and disk diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility, showing results to be largely consistent. Furthermore, in the sub-set of β-lactamase producers, it was demonstrated and validated that multiple antibiotics (cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefepime) could be assessed simultaneously to predict the antibiotic that would be most active for a given bacterial isolate. Conclusions The study establishes the rapid β-LEAF assay for β-lactamase detection and prediction of antibiotic activity using S. aureus clinical isolates. Although the focus in the current study is β-lactamase-based resistance, the overall approach represents a broad diagnostic platform. In the long-term, these studies form the basis for the development of assays utilizing a broader variety of targets, pathogens and drugs. PMID:24708478

  2. Rapid methods for detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto

    2017-03-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. Here we review the main techniques for rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, microarrays, commercial methods used in work routine, immunochromatographic methods, colorimetric methods, image methods, nephelometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, microfluids and methods based on cell disruption are analysed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF POTENTIALLY PROBIOTIC LACTOBACILLUS STRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of 29 Lactobacilli to 13 antibiotics was assayed by paper disc diffusion method. Plasmids and gastrointestinal tolerance were detected. The relationship between plasmids andantibiotic resistance was discussed. The results showed that all of the strains were resistant to bacitracin, polymyxin B, kanamycin, and nalidixic acid. Many strains were relatively sensitive tochloramphenicol and tetracycline. Six strains contained plasmids and showed good gastrointestinal tolerance. β-lactam resistance gene blr was found in the plasmid of L. plantarum CICC 23180by PCR. The study will be helpful to promote the safety evaluation and development of potentially probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

  4. Spectrum of Uropathogens and its Antibiotic Susceptibility in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectrum of Uropathogens and its Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pregnant Women with Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. Running headline: Urinary Tract Infection in Pregnancy.

  5. [Examination of urogenital tract microorganism infection and antibiotic susceptibility test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yan, Zu-wei; Dai, Gan

    2003-06-01

    To isolate bacteria, mycoplasma and chlamydia from the urogenital tract, and to determine their antibiotic susceptibility. Bacteria, mycoplasma and chlamydia were isolated from the urogenital tract secretion by artifical culture, and their antibiotic susceptibility was detected by disk diffusion. The common microorganisms were S. epidermidis and corynebacberium, and the minority microorganisms were G- bacteria or E. coli. Bacteria were susceptible to amikacin, cephazolin V, rifampin, gentamycin, and docycyclin. S. epidermidis and corynebacterium are important pathogens of the urogenital tract infection. Disk susceptibility test can be used to screen the susceptible antibiotic.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Mónica; Martínez, Claudia; Aguerre, Lorena; Rocca, María Florencia; Cipolla, Lucía; Callejo, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a food-borne disease that mainly affects pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. The primary treatment of choice of listeriosis is the combination of ampicillin or penicillin G, with an aminoglycoside, classically gentamicin. The second-choice therapy for patients allergic to β-lactams is the combination of trimethoprim with a sulfonamide (such as co-trimoxazole). The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of strains isolated from human infections and food during the last two decades in Argentina. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 antimicrobial agents was determined for a set of 250 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina during the period 1992-2012. Food-borne and human isolates were included in this study. The antibiotics tested were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, gentamicin, penicillin G, tetracycline and rifampicin. Breakpoints for penicillin G, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were those given in the CLSI for L. monocytogenes. CLSI criteria for staphylococci were applied to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Strains were serotyped by PCR, and confirmed by an agglutination method. Strains recovered from human listeriosis patients showed a prevalence of serotype 4b (71%), with the remaining 29% corresponding to serotype 1/2b. Serotypes among food isolates were distributed as 62% serotype 1/2b and 38% serotype 4b. All antimicrobial agents showed good activity. The strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Argentina over a period of 20 years remain susceptible to antimicrobial agents, and that susceptibility pattern has not changed during this period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary indications for antibiotic susceptibility tests in less than six hour in positive blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselina Kroumova

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A rapid determination of the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens responsible for sepsis represents a significant milestone for a timely correct antibiotic therapy.The system HB&L® (ALIFAX allows reduced time in the detection of bacterial growth and consequently is able to detect the growth or absence of certain microorganisms in the presence of a given antibiotic. In this study three system for rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests among bacteria isolated from blood were compared: HB&L® (ALIFAX,VITEK®2 (bioMérieux and essays Etest® (bioMérieux. Present findings indicate that HB&L® (ALIFAX is rapid reliable instrument that may support the clinician for a rapid and appropriate treatment, particularly in the critical patient.

  8. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater Cyanobacteria spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Elsa; Oliveira, Micaela; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Ferreira, Eugénia; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. ...

  9. Characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum with reduced susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics by a standardized antibiotic susceptibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Linda D; Nguyen, Oanh T; Deinhard, Rebecca K; White, Teresa M; Harrell, Lee W; Roberts, Marilyn C

    2008-08-07

    Three cohorts of juvenile and subadult Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha received multiple treatments with macrolide antibiotics for bacterial kidney disease (BKD) during rearing in a captive broodstock program. A total of 77 mortalities among the cohorts were screened for Renibacterium salmoninarum, the etiologic agent of BKD, by agar culture from kidney, and isolates from 7 fish were suitable for growth testing in the presence of macrolide antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin and azithromycin was determined by a modification of the standardized broth assay using defined medium. The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) type strain 33209 exhibited a MIC of 0.008 microg m(-1) to either erythromycin or azithromycin. Isolates from 3 fish displayed MICs identical to the MICs for the ATCC type strain 33209. In contrast, isolates from 4 fish exhibited higher MICs, ranging between 0.125 and 0.250 microg ml(-1) for erythromycin and between 0.016 and 0.031 microg ml(-1) for azithromycin. Sequence analysis of the mutational hotspots for macrolide resistance in the 23S rDNA gene and the open reading frames of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 found identical sequences among all isolates, indicating that the phenotype was not due to mutations associated with the drug-binding site of 23S rRNA. These results are the first report of R. salmoninarum with reduced susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics isolated from fish receiving multiple antibiotic treatments.

  10. Inducing optimal substitution between antibiotics under open access to the resource of antibiotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Markus; Nkuiya, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    This paper designs a bio-economic model to examine the use of substitute antibiotic drugs (analogs) sold by an industry that has open access to the resource of the antibiotic class's susceptibility (treatment effectiveness). Antibiotics are characterized by different expected recovery rates and production costs, which in conjunction with the class's treatment susceptibility determines their relative effectiveness. Our analysis reveals that the high-quality antibiotic drug loses its comparative advantage over time making the low-quality drug the treatment of last resort in the market equilibrium and the social optimum when antibiotic susceptibility cannot replenish. However, when antibiotic susceptibility is renewable, both antibiotics may be used in the long run, and the comparative advantage of the high-quality drug may be restored in the social optimum that allows lowering infection in the long run. We develop the optimal tax/subsidy scheme that would induce antibiotic producers under open access to behave optimally and account for the social cost of infection and value of antibiotic susceptibility. We show that the welfare loss associated with the uncorrected open-access allocation is highest; when the resource of antibiotic susceptibility is non-renewable, high morbidity costs are incurred by individuals, and low social discount rates apply. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of anaerobic pathogens in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the Bacteroides fragilis group, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC), Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., Veillonella spp. and Bilophila wadsworthia for amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clindamycin and metronidazole was determined. Human clinical

  12. Biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty Santanu Kar Mahapatra Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    ... and sucrose.Antibiotic susceptibility were carried out by minimum inhibilory concentration test,minium bactericidal concentration test,disc agar diffusion test and brain heart infusion oxacillin screening...

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in patients presenting at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. ... encourage prudent use of antimicrobials. Objectives: To identify bacterial pathogens causing UTI and determine the association between the pathogens isolated from patients attending KNH.

  14. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Schoepp, Nathan G.; Khorosheva, Eugenia M.; Schlappi, Travis S.; Curtis, Matthew S.; Humphries, Romney M.; Hindler, Janet A.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The “holy grail” of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen’s susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiot...

  15. Genetic diversity and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... sulfomethoxazole. Key words: Genetic diversity, Salmonella, water, antibiotic susceptibility. INTRODUCTION ... The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial patho- gens has become a major public health .... sludge tank; strains 26, 32, 36, 37, 38, 39 and 40 isolated from Amalinda waste water plant's ...

  16. Profiles of antibiotic susceptibilities of bacterial isolates and physico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profiles of antibiotic susceptibilities of bacterial isolates and physico-chemical quality of water supply in rural Venda communities, South Africa. ... These effective antibiotics are therefore indicated in the empiric treatment of diarrhoeal cases or water-borne diseases of bacterial aetiology. Keywords: Water quality, Microbial, ...

  17. Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... Survey of resistant patterns of microbes to drugs has shown a rise in the incidence of microbial resistance to most prescribed antibiotics. Therefore this study is aimed at determining the incidence of S. aureus in UTI cases and also to document the antibiotic sensitivity pattern in our environment, with the ...

  18. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater cyanobacteria spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa eDias

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. In this study we aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of four cyanobacterial isolates from different genera (Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon gracile, Chrisosporum bergii, Planktothix agradhii, and among them nine isolates from the same specie (M. aeruginosa to distinct antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycine, gentamicine, tetracycline, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin. We used a method adapted from the bacteria standard broth microdilution. Cyanobacteria were exposed to serial dilution of each antibiotic (0.0015-1.6 mg/L in Z8 medium (20 ± 1 ºC; 14/10 h L/D cycle; light intensity 16 ± 4 µEm-2 s-1. Cell growth was followed overtime (OD450nm/microscopic examination and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were calculated for each antibiotic/isolate. We found that -lactams exhibited the lower MICs, aminoglycosides, tetracycline and norfloxacine presented intermediate MICs; none of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim and nalidixic acid. The reduced susceptibility of all tested cyanobacteria to some antibiotics suggests that they might be naturally non-susceptible to these compounds, or that that they might became non-susceptible due to antibiotic contamination pressure, or to the transfer of genes from resistant bacteria present in the environment.

  19. Assessing the antibiotic susceptibility of freshwater Cyanobacteria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Elsa; Oliveira, Micaela; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Ferreira, Eugénia; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater is a vehicle for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in freshwater, where they are exposed to antibiotics and resistant organisms, but their role on water resistome was never evaluated. Data concerning the effects of antibiotics on cyanobacteria, obtained by distinct methodologies, is often contradictory. This emphasizes the importance of developing procedures to understand the trends of antibiotic susceptibility in cyanobacteria. In this study we aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of four cyanobacterial isolates from different genera (Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon gracile, Chrisosporum bergii, Planktothix agradhii), and among them nine isolates from the same specie (M. aeruginosa) to distinct antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, kanamycine, gentamicine, tetracycline, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin). We used a method adapted from the bacteria standard broth microdilution. Cyanobacteria were exposed to serial dilution of each antibiotic (0.0015-1.6 mg/L) in Z8 medium (20 ± 1°C; 14/10 h L/D cycle; light intensity 16 ± 4 μEm(-2)s(-1)). Cell growth was followed overtime (OD450nm /microscopic examination) and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were calculated for each antibiotic/isolate. We found that β-lactams exhibited the lower MICs, aminoglycosides, tetracycline and norfloxacine presented intermediate MICs; none of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim and nalidixic acid. The reduced susceptibility of all tested cyanobacteria to some antibiotics suggests that they might be naturally non-susceptible to these compounds, or that they might became non-susceptible due to antibiotic contamination pressure, or to the transfer of genes from resistant bacteria present in the environment.

  20. Interventions on Metabolism: Making Antibiotic-Susceptible Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baquero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics act on bacterial metabolism, and antibiotic resistance involves changes in this metabolism. Interventions on metabolism with drugs might therefore modify drug susceptibility and drug resistance. In their recent article, Martin Vestergaard et al. (mBio 8:e01114-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01114-17 illustrate the possibility of converting intrinsically resistant bacteria into susceptible ones. They reported that inhibition of a central metabolic enzyme, ATP synthase, allows otherwise ineffective polymyxin antibiotics to act on Staphylococcus aureus. The study of the intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens has shown that several metabolic genes, including multigene transcriptional regulators, contribute to antibiotic resistance. In some cases, these genes only marginally increase antibiotic resistance, but reduced levels of susceptibility might be critical in the evolution or resistance under low antibiotic concentrations or in the clinical response of highly resistant bacteria. Drug interventions on bacterial metabolism might constitute a critical adjuvant therapy in combination with antibiotics to ensure susceptibility of pathogens with intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistance.

  1. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    integrity and protective function of the skin (Anupurba et al., 2010). The widespread use of antibiotics, together with the ... Despite introduction of a wide variety of antimicrobial agents with anti-pseudomonal activity, life-threatening .... The pattern and outcome of septicaemia in a burns intensive care unit. Ann. Burns and.

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in suppurative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus, a mainly acquired hospital infection is responsible for many suppurative lesions and has demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antimicrobial agents leading to life threatening infections and long hospital stay. Objective: To determined the prevalence and antibiotic ...

  3. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  4. Biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... determining the biofilm producing capability and antibiotic resistance profiles of the S. aureus isolated from drinking water and clinical samples from HIV patients in the Limpopo Province. S. aureus strains isolated from clinical samples including urine, sputum, and stools obtained from HIV and AIDS patients.

  5. Diagnostic Value of Direct Antibiotic Susceptibility Test for Faster BacterialSusceptibility Reporting in Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebriarina Hapsari

    2012-12-01

    Methods: Bloods from positive BACTEC bottles which met inclusion and exclusion criteria were put into sterile tubes and centrifuged. The pellets were then used to make 0.5 McFarland bacterial suspensions and directly used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Interpretations of direct method were compared to standard method to count sensitivity, specificity, sensitive predictive value, resistant predictive value, accuracy, and kappa value. Results: From 58 samples (containing 22 gram negative, 36 gram positive bacteria, there were 309 total antibiotic susceptibility tests. Direct method showed sensitivity, specificity, sensitive predictive value, resistant predictive value, accuracy, and kappa value of 89.3%, 92.9%, 93.8%, 87.8%, 86.4%, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusion: Direct antibiotic susceptibility testing has a good agreement with the standard method so it can aid faster antibiotic susceptibility reporting in bacteraemia (Sains Medika, 4(2:174-181.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibilities of genetically characterized Streptococcus milleri group strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, M; Wanahita, A; Shuhatovich, Y; Goldsmith, E A; Clarridge, J E; Musher, D M

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies of the antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus milleri group organisms have distinguished among species by using phenotypic techniques. Using 44 isolates that were speciated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we studied the MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations of penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and clindamycin for Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus. None of the organisms was resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, although a few isolates were intermediately resistant; one strain of S. anginosus was tolerant to ampicillin, and another was tolerant to ceftriaxone. Six isolates were resistant to clindamycin, with representation from each of the three species. Relatively small differences in antibiotic susceptibilities among species of the S. milleri group show that speciation is unlikely to be important in selecting an antibiotic to treat infection caused by one of these isolates.

  7. Biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated Staphylococcus aureus (S. auerus) strains against some conventional and traditional antibiotics. Methods: Thirty post operative pathogenic isolated S. aureus strains were used in this study. Bacterial culture was done in Mueller-Hinton broth at 37 °C. Characters of these strains were determined by traditional biochemical tests such as hydrolysis test of gelatin, urea, galactose, starch and protein, a...

  8. Distribution and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rise of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become a serious health issue. The emergence of mutidrug – resistant MRSA strains compounds chemotherapy and has raised public health concern. In this preliminary study, the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of ...

  9. Isolation, characterization and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swab sticks were inoculated into brain-heart infusion broth, transported to the laboratory and then inoculated on mannitol salt agar. Isolates with the characteristic colonial morphology of S. aureus were then identified microscopically and characterized biochemically. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to seven ...

  10. Helicobacter pylori : Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E-test strips for metronidazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin were used for susceptibility testing. Results. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in children was 73.3%, and 54.8% in adults. All the H. pylori investigated in this study were largely sensitive to clarithromycin (100%, minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC) <2 ìg/ml) ...

  11. Original Paper Multicenter study on antibiotic susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sampling was performed by fingerprinting on culture media and ... Further investigations and previous works alleged drug use and basic hygiene as crucial in .... Susceptibility testing. This was carried out on 24 h bacterial pure culture. Prior to the test, bacterial isolates were streaked on fresh agar and incubated at 37.

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Commensal Bacteria from Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Wen; Tseng, Shu-Ying; Huang, Mao-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have focused on foodborne or commensal bacteria as vehicles of antibiotic resistance. However, the antibiotic resistance of milk bacteria from healthy donors is still vague in Taiwan. For this purpose, human milk samples were obtained from randomly recruited 19 healthy women between 3 and 360 days post-partum. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria from milk samples was determined. About 20 bacterial species were isolated from milk samples including Staphylococcus (6 species), Streptococcus (4 species), Enterococcus (2 species), Lactobacillus (1 species), and bacteria belonging to other genera (7 species). Some opportunistic or potentially pathogenic bacteria including Kluyvera ascorbata, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Actinomyces bovis, and Staphylococcus aureus were also isolated. Intriguingly, Staphylococcus isolates (22 strains) were resistant to 2–8 of 8 antibiotics, while Streptococcus isolates (3 strains) were resistant to 3–7 of 9 antibiotics, and members of the genus Enterococcus (5 strains) were resistant to 3–8 of 9 antibiotics. Notably, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, S. aureus, Streptococcus parasanguinis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Enterococcus faecalis were resistant to vancomycin, which is considered as the last-resort antibiotic. Therefore, this study shows that most bacterial strains in human milk demonstrate mild to strong antibiotic resistance. Whether commensal bacteria in milk could serve as vehicles of antibiotic resistance should be further investigated.

  13. [Antibiotics susceptibility of Streptococcus and Enterococcus: data of Onerba network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachée, A; Varon, E; Jouy, E; Meunier, D

    2009-05-01

    This work was aimed to analyze trends in susceptibility to antibiotics among the main species of beta-hemolytic streptococci involved in community-acquired infections in human (Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae), or in animals (Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus uberis) and also among the main enterocci species, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Data were recorded since 1996 through the Onerba networks. S. pyogenes, as the other beta-hemolytic streptococci studied remained fully susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. However, susceptibility to macrolides is clearly decreasing in S. pyogenes. In 2002, only 62 to 65% of the strains according to the network considered, were susceptible to erythromycin. A similar trend was observed for S. agalactiae with only 75% of erythromycin susceptibility in 2002, and for both species isolated from animals S. suis and S. uberis, with respectively 35 and 76% of strains susceptible to erythromycin. In enterococci, susceptibility to beta-lactams remained stable between 2000 and 2004. Indeed, the susceptibility to aminopenicillins remained high in E. faecalis (about 98%), whereas the proportion of E. faecium isolates susceptible to these antibiotics were lower than 60%. From 1999 to 2004, various studies conducted in French hospitals showed that the vancomycin resistance among enterococci accounted for less than 2%. However, the recent emergence of glycopeptide resistant enterococci clusters in French hospitals is a matter of concern and emphasizes the need for an ongoing surveillance. Such trend in macrolide resistance among S. pyogenes or S. agalactiae should consequently lead to propose other alternatives in case of beta-lactam allergy, and for pharyngitis, to rethink the place of the culture for susceptibility testing.

  14. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  15. In vitro susceptibilities of Brucella melitensis isolates to eleven antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loukaides Feidias

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is an endemic disease present in many countries worldwide, but it is rare in Europe and North America. Nevertheless brucella is included in the bacteria potentially used for bioterrorism. The aim of this study was the investigation of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of brucella isolates from areas of the eastern Mediterranean where it has been endemic. Methods The susceptibilities of 74 Brucella melitensis isolates derived from clinical samples (57 and animal products (17 were tested in vitro. The strains originate from Crete (59, Cyprus (10, and Syria (5. MICs of tetracycline, rifampicin, streptomycin, gentamicin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and erythromycin were detected by E-test method. The NCCLS criteria for slow growing bacteria were considered to interpret the results. Results All the isolates were susceptible to tetracycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and levofloxacin. Two isolates presented reduced susceptibility to rifampicin (MIC value: 1.5 mg/l and eight to SXT (MIC values: 0.75–1.5 mg/l. Erythromycin had the highest (4 mg/l MIC90value and both norfloxacin and erythromycin the highest (1.5 mg/l MIC50 value. Conclusion Brucella isolates remain susceptible in vitro to most antibiotics used for treatment of brucellosis. The establishment of a standardized antibiotic susceptibility method for Brucella spp would be useful for resistance determination in these bacteria and possible evaluation of bioterorism risks.

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta-Lactamase Production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Biomedical Sciences Vol.3(2) 2004: The study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and beta-lactamase production of Campylobacter jejuni/coli isolates obtained from stool specimens from children with diarrhoea at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex ...

  17. Genetic diversity and in vitro antibiotic susceptibility profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the genetic diversity of forty Salmonella isolates obtained from selected domestic water and waste water sources in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa using DNA fingerprinting and antibiotic susceptibility profile as test indices. Restriction digests and SDS/PAGE as well as the DNA dendograms of the ...

  18. Antibiotics susceptibility patterns of urine bacterial isolates in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The prevalence of E. coli, Ps. aeruginosa and Staph aureus isolates from urine of selected residents in Zaria was investigated. This was an attempt to elucidate the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of these bacteria commonly implicated in urinary tact infection. Methods: Urine samples collected from students of ...

  19. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ninety two raw milk samples were collected from lactating cows identified in Fulani herds and small scale dairy farms within Sokoto metropolis in order to investigate the presence and determine the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes in the milk. Selective culture and identification method ...

  20. Determination of antibiotic susceptibility and fatty acid methyl ester ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a total of 77 Bacillus cereus isolates were obtained from four different food samples (58 raw milks, 8 chickens, 7 cereals and 4 meats) consumed in Turkey by using Chromogenic Bacillus Cereus Agar (Oxoid, CM1036). They were tested for susceptibilities to a total of 10 different antibiotics (penicillin, oxacillin, ...

  1. Patterns of antibiotics susceptibility of isolates and plasmid analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    we surveyed the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of aerobic bacterial isolates from postoperative wound infections and determined whether resistance in Staphylococcus aureus was genetically mediated. A total of 161 isolates were obtained from 153 swab samples of infected wounds using cultural, morphological, and ...

  2. Multicenter study on antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multicenter study on antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends in the western region of Cameroon. Reine Flaviette Tchapdie Ngassam, Megne Tantse, Pierre René Fotsing Kwetche, Dorice Pascale Noukela Noumi, Jonas Kouamouo, Josué Simo Louokdom, Sandrine Gamwo Dongmo, Serge Honoré Tchoukoua, Blandine ...

  3. Antibiotics susceptibility pattern of Escherichia coli strains isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the susceptibility of E coli strains isolated from broiler and layer chicken with colisepticemia to antibiotics used in poultry industry in the country. A total of fifty seven E. coli strains isolated from 43 broiler and14 layer farms with colisepticemia in Khartoum and Gezera state were ...

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori in times of increasing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sinéad M; O'Morain, Colm; McNamara, Deirdre

    2014-08-07

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) causes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Treatment is recommended in all symptomatic patients. The current treatment options for H. pylori infection are outlined in this review in light of the recent challenges in eradication success, largely due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of H. pylori. Antibiotic resistance is a constantly evolving process and numerous studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori antibiotic resistance varies significantly from country to country, and even between regions within the same country. In addition, recent data has shown that previous antibiotic use is associated with harbouring antibiotic resistant H. pylori. Local surveillance of antibiotic resistance is warranted to guide clinicians in their choice of therapy. Antimicrobial resistance is assessed by H. pylori culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Recently developed molecular tests offer an attractive alternative to culture and allow for the rapid molecular genetic identification of H. pylori and resistance-associated mutations directly from biopsy samples or bacterial culture material. Accumulating evidence indicates that surveillance of antimicrobial resistance by susceptibility testing is feasible and necessary to inform clinicians in their choice of therapy for management of H. pylori infection.

  5. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmana, Murad; Lebron, Carlos I.; Taslim, Djufri; Tjaniadi, Periska; Subekti, Decy; Wasfy, Momtaz O.; Campbell, James R.; Oyofo, Buhari A.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 122 Neisseria gonorrheae isolates obtained from 400 sex workers in Jakarta, Indonesia, and susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and spectinomycin were found. All isolates were resistant to tetracycline. A number of the isolates demonstrated decreased susceptibilities to erythromycin (MIC ≥ 1.0 μg/ml), thiamphenicol (MIC ≥ 1.0 μg/ml), kanamycin (MIC ≥ 16.0 μg/ml), penicillin (MIC ≥ 2.0 μg/ml), gentamicin (MIC ≥ 16.0 μg/ml), and norfloxacin (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml). These data showed that certain antibiotics previously used in the treatment of gonorrhea are no longer effective. PMID:11120999

  6. Biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Roy, Somenath

    2011-06-01

    To observe the biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated Staphylococcus aureus (S. auerus) strains against some conventional and traditional antibiotics. Thirty post operative pathogenic isolated S. aureus strains were used in this study. Bacterial culture was done in Mueller-Hinton broth at 37 °C. Characters of these strains were determined by traditional biochemical tests such as hydrolysis test of gelatin, urea, galactose, starch and protein, and fermentation of lactose and sucrose. Antibiotic susceptibility were carried out by minimum inhibitory concentration test, minium bactericidal concentration test, disc agar diffusion test and brain heart infusion oxacillin screening agar. From this study, it was observed that 100% S. aureus isolates showed positive results in gelatin, urea and galactose hydrolysis test, 50% isolates were positive in starch hydrolysis test, 35% in protein hydrolysis test, 100% isolates in lactose fermenting test, but no isolate was positive in sucrose fermenting test. Antibiotic susceptibility testing suggested that 20% of isolates were resistant to kanamycin and 46.67% were resistant to oxacillin. These findings show that all these isolates have gelatin, urea, galactose hydrolysis and lactose fermenting activity. 20% of these isolates were resistant to kanamycin and 46.67% were resistant to oxacillin.

  7. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Lise, Kristensen,; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics......Vancomycin-resistant enterococci: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of novel antibiotics...

  8. Abundance and antibiotic susceptibility of Vibrio spp. isolated from microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, A. L.; Darr, K.; Dobbs, F. C.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing concern for `microplastics' (particles resistance profiles of Vibrio spp. found on them. We collected 22 microplastic pieces, paired seawater samples, and from them cultured 44 putative Vibrio spp. isolates, 18 of which were PCR-confirmed as V. parahaemolyticus and 3 as V. vulnificus. There were no PCR-confirmed V. cholerae isolates. We used the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test to examine the isolates' response to six antibiotics: chloramphenicol (30μg), gentamicin (10μg), ampicillin (10μg), streptomycin (10μg), tetracycline (30μg), and rifampin (5μg). Vibrio isolates were susceptible to three or more of the six antibiotics tested and all were susceptible to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. There were no apparent differences between the antibiotic susceptibilities of vibrios isolated from microplastics compared to those from the water column. In every instance tested, vibrios on microplastics were enriched by at least two orders of magnitude compared to those from paired seawater samples. This study demonstrates that microplastic particles serve as a habitat for Vibrio species, in particular V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, confirming the conjecture of Zettler et al. (2013) that plastics may serve as a vector for these and other potentially pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase prevents antibiotic-induced susceptibility to enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sayeda Nasrin; Yammine, Halim; Moaven, Omeed; Ahmed, Rizwan; Moss, Angela K; Biswas, Brishti; Muhammad, Nur; Biswas, Rakesh; Raychowdhury, Atri; Kaliannan, Kanakaraju; Ghosh, Sathi; Ray, Madhury; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Barua, Soumik; Malo, Nondita S; Bhan, Atul K; Malo, Madhu S; Hodin, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of oral supplementation of the gut enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) in preventing antibiotic-associated infections from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Clostridium difficile. The intestinal microbiota plays a pivotal role in human health and well-being. Antibiotics inherently cause dysbiosis, an imbalance in the number and composition of intestinal commensal bacteria, which leads to susceptibility to opportunistic bacterial infections. Previously, we have shown that IAP preserves the normal homeostasis of intestinal microbiota and that oral supplementation with calf IAP (cIAP) rapidly restores the normal gut flora. We hypothesized that oral IAP supplementation would protect against antibiotic-associated bacterial infections. C57BL/6 mice were treated with antibiotic(s) ± cIAP in the drinking water, followed by oral gavage of S. Typhimurium or C. difficile. Mice were observed for clinical conditions and mortality. After a defined period of time, mice were killed and investigated for hematological, inflammatory, and histological changes. We observed that oral supplementation with cIAP during antibiotic treatment protects mice from infections with S. Typhimurium as well as with C. difficile. Animals given IAP maintained their weight, had reduced clinical severity and gut inflammation, and showed improved survival. Oral IAP supplementation protected mice from antibiotic-associated bacterial infections. We postulate that oral IAP supplementation could represent a novel therapy to protect against antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD), and other enteric infections in humans.

  10. Clinical Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains with Higher Susceptibility to Environmental Phages than Antibiotic-sensitive Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Li-Kuang; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chang, Kai-Chih; Cheng, Chieh-Chen; Yu, Pei-Ying; Chang, Chih-Hui; Chen, Tren-Yi; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is associated with nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we used clinically isolated A. baumannii strains as models to demonstrate whether antibiotic resistance is correlated with an increased susceptibility to bacteriophages. In this study, 24 active phages capable of infecting A. baumannii were isolated from various environments, and the susceptibilities of both antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of A. baumannii to different p...

  11. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Quach

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP, which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and -resistant (MRSA clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71 within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS S. aureus strains (n = 20 within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  12. Nanomechanical sensor applied to blood culture pellets: a fast approach to determine the antibiotic susceptibility against agents of bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupar, P; Opota, O; Longo, G; Prod'hom, G; Dietler, G; Greub, G; Kasas, S

    2017-06-01

    The management of bloodstream infection, a life-threatening disease, largely relies on early detection of infecting microorganisms and accurate determination of their antibiotic susceptibility to reduce both mortality and morbidity. Recently we developed a new technique based on atomic force microscopy capable of detecting movements of biologic samples at the nanoscale. Such sensor is able to monitor the response of bacteria to antibiotic's pressure, allowing a fast and versatile susceptibility test. Furthermore, rapid preparation of a bacterial pellet from a positive blood culture can improve downstream characterization of the recovered pathogen as a result of the increased bacterial concentration obtained. Using artificially inoculated blood cultures, we combined these two innovative procedures and validated them in double-blind experiments to determine the susceptibility and resistance of Escherichia coli strains (ATCC 25933 as susceptible and a characterized clinical isolate as resistant strain) towards a selection of antibiotics commonly used in clinical settings. On the basis of the variance of the sensor movements, we were able to positively discriminate the resistant from the susceptible E. coli strains in 16 of 17 blindly investigated cases. Furthermore, we defined a variance change threshold of 60% that discriminates susceptible from resistant strains. By combining the nanomotion sensor with the rapid preparation method of blood culture pellets, we obtained an innovative, rapid and relatively accurate method for antibiotic susceptibility test directly from positive blood culture bottles, without the need for bacterial subculture. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility of Tropheryma whipplei in MRC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Areen; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Raoult, Didier

    2004-03-01

    Whipple's disease is considered a rare chronic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Several antibiotics have been used for the treatment of this disease, and the current reference treatment was determined empirically on the basis of only a few clinical observations. Patients should be treated for months, and many relapse after antibiotic withdrawal. We report here the first extensive study on the susceptibilities of three reference strains of Tropheryma whipplei to antibiotic in cell culture by using a real-time PCR assay as previously described. We found that doxycycline, macrolides, ketolides, aminoglygosides, penicillin, rifampin, teicoplanin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were active, with MICs ranging from 0.25 to 2 microg/ml. Vancomycin was somewhat active at an MIC of 10 microg/ml. We found heterogeneity in the susceptibility to imipenem, with one strain being susceptible and the two other strains being resistant. Cephalosporins, colimycine, aztreonam, and fluoroquinolones were not active. We also demonstrated that a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine was bactericidal. This combination has been shown to be active in the treatment of patients suffering from chronic infections with Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that is also found intracellularly in acidic vacuoles. We believe, then, that this combination therapy should be further evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of Whipple's disease.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans JP2 in a biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Oettinger-Barak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP is an inflammatory disease associated with specific bacteria, particularly Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, which can result in early tooth loss. The bacteria grow as a biofilm known as subgingival plaque. Treatment includes mechanical debridement of the biofilm, often associated with empirical antibiotic treatment. Objective: The aims of this study were to test in vitro the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 during planktonic and biofilm growth to doxycycline and to the combination of metronidazole and amoxicillin, which are two antibiotic protocols commonly used in clinical practice. Design: Two in vitro biofilm models were used to test the effects of the antibiotics: a static 96-well plate assay was used to investigate the effect of these antibiotics on biofilm formation whilst a flow chamber model was used to examine the effect on established biofilms. Results: Of the antibiotics tested in this model system, doxycycline was most efficacious with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC against planktonic cells of 0.21 mg/L and minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC of 2.10 mg/L. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic regimen, amoxicillin + metronidazole, was much less effective against both planktonic and biofilm cells with an MIC and MBIC of 12.0 mg/L and 20.2 mg/L, respectively. A single treatment of the clinically achievable concentration of 10 mg/L doxycycline to sparse A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms in the flow chamber model resulted in significant decreases in biofilm thickness, biovolume, and cell viability. Dense A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms were significantly more resistant to doxycycline treatment. Low concentrations of antibiotics enhanced biofilm formation. Conclusion: A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 homotypic biofilms were more susceptible in vitro to doxycycline than amoxicillin + metronidazole.

  15. Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Baltekin, Özden; Boucharin, Alexis; Tano, Eva; Andersson, Dan I.; Elf, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to human health. The problem is aggravated by unnecessary and incorrect use of broad spectrum antibiotics. One way to provide correct treatment and slow down the development of antibiotic resistance is to assay the susceptibility profile of the infecting bacteria before treatment is initiated and let this information guide the choice of antibiotic. Here, we present an antibiotic susceptibility test that is sufficiently fast to be used at the point of c...

  16. Bacteriology and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Peitonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Acharya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Peritonsillar abscess is a common complication of acute tonsillitis. Its management consists of aspiration or surgical drainage followed by appropriate antibiotics. Appropriate antibiotic treatment depends on the common organisms associated with infection and their antibioticsensitivity pattern in local scenario. METHODS: Pus samples aspirated from diagnosed cases of peritonsillar abscess and submitted for culture and sensitivity in last two years were included in this study. Identification of different microorganisms was made on the basis of the microscopic findings, observation of their colony morphology and standard biochemical reactions. Susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics were determined by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: Altogether 24 pus samples were included in the study. Positive culture was obtained from 18 samples. Among them one organism was isolated from 13 samples whereas from five samples multiple organisms were isolated. From six samples no organisms could be cultured. Altogether Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from 12 samples and Staphylococcus aureus from five samples. Other isolated organisms included Haemophlilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus species. Penicillin was effective for Streptococcus pyogenes whereas Staphylococcus aureus was resistant to it. Cloxacillin was found to be effective for Staphylococcus aureus. Ciprofloxacin and Ceftazidime were found to be effective for both organisms. CONCLUSIONS: Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were more commonly associated with peritonsillar abscess. Streptococcus pyogenes were sensitive to penicillin but all Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to it. This fact should be considered in clinical practice for management of peritonsillar abscess. KEYWORDS: Bacteriology, Peritonsillar abscess, Susceptibility pattern.

  17. Formation of Linear Gradient of Antibiotics on Microfluidic Chips for High-throughput Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunggyu; Lee, Seokhun; Jeon, Jessie S.

    2017-11-01

    To determine the most effective antimicrobial treatments of infectious pathogen, high-throughput antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) is critically required. However, the conventional AST requires at least 16 hours to reach the minimum observable population. Therefore, we developed a microfluidic system that allows maintenance of linear antibiotic concentration and measurement of local bacterial density. Based on the Stokes-Einstein equation, the flow rate in the microchannel was optimized so that linearization was achieved within 10 minutes, taking into account the diffusion coefficient of each antibiotic in the agar gel. As a result, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each antibiotic against P. aeruginosa could be immediately determined 6 hours after treatment of the linear antibiotic concentration. In conclusion, our system proved the efficacy of a high-throughput AST platform through MIC comparison with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) range of antibiotics. This work was supported by the Climate Change Research Hub (Grant No. N11170060) of the KAIST and by the Brain Korea 21 Plus project.

  18. Long-Term Trends in the Epidemiology of Neonatal Sepsis and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Causative Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, Agnes; Gerards, Leo J.; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Fleer, Andre; Krediet, Tannette G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In an era with increased maternal antibiotic use, patterns in early- and late-onset sepsis and antibiotic susceptibility may have changed. Objectives: To identify longitudinal trends in causative microorganisms for neonatal sepsis and analyze antibiotic susceptibility of all blood

  19. Bacteriological study of pyoderma with special reference to antibiotic susceptibility to newer antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadage D

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hundred and forty-two cases of pyoderma were investigated to study bacterial aetiology and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Of these 65.87% cases were of primary pyoderma and the rest were of secondary pyoderma. Maximum cases were of impetigo (38.78% followed by folliculitis (12.92%, furunculosis (2.95%, ecthyma (3.5%, carbuncle (1.5% and sycosis barbae (0.4%. Secondary pyoderma constituted infected trophic ulcer (18.82%, infected pemphigus (7.2%, infected contact dermatitis (6.27%, and infected scabies (1.8%. Single organism was isolated from 46.9% cases and more than one type of organisms in 65.46% of cases. No organism was isolated in 5% of cases. Staphylococcus (67.34% was the predominant species isolated followed by beta-haemolytic streptococcus (21.77%. Maximum strains of Staph. aureus were susceptible to amikacin (75%, co-trimoxazole (72%, cefotaxime (65%, chloramphenicol (62%, ciprofloxacin (61% and clindamycin (61%. There was low susceptibility to cephaloridin (11%, gentamicin (12% and penicillin (21%. Streptococcus betahaemolyticus was highly sensitive to most of the antibiotics and less sensitive to cefotaxime (7%, co-trimoxazole (11% and penicillin (27%. Most of the strains were found to be resistant to one or more antibiotics.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibilities and Serotyping of Clinical Streptococcus Agalactiae Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Atalay

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococci, GBS are frequently responsible for sepsis and meningitis seen in the early weeks of life. GBS may cause perinatal infection and premature birth in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to serotype GBS strains isolated from clinical samples and evaluate their serotype distribution according to their susceptibilities to antibiotics and isolation sites. Material and Methods: One hundred thirty one S. agalactiae strains isolated from the clinical samples were included in the study. Of the strains, 99 were isolated from urine, 20 from soft tissue, 10 from blood and 2 from vaginal swab. Penicillin G and ceftriaxone susceptibilities of GBS were determined by the agar dilution method. Susceptibilities to erythromycin, clindamycin, vancomycin and tetracycline were determined by the Kirby-Bauer method according to CLSI criteria. Serotyping was performed using the latex aglutination method using specific antisera (Ia, Ib, II-VIII. Results: While in 131 GBS strains, serotypes VII and VIII were not detected, the most frequently isolated serotypes were types Ia (36%, III (30.5% and II (13% respectively. Serotype Ia was the most frequently seen serotype in all samples. All GBS isolates were susceptible to penicilin G, ceftriaxone and vancomycin. Among the strains, tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin resistance rates were determined as 90%, 14.5%, and 13% respectively. Conclusion: Penicillin is still the first choice of treatment for the infections with all serotypes of S. agalactiae in Turkey.

  1. A new approach to determine the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics directly from positive blood culture bottles in two hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Gabriel A; García-Loygorri, María C; Simarro, María; Gutiérrez, María P; Orduña, Antonio; Bratos, Miguel A

    2015-02-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility test of bacteria causing bloodstream infections are given a very high priority by clinical laboratories. In an effort to reduce the time required for performing antibiotic susceptibility test (AST), we have developed a new method to be applied from positive blood culture bottles. The design of method was performed using blood culture bottles prepared artificially with five strains which have a known susceptibility. An aliquot of the blood culture was subcultured in the presence of specific antibiotics and bacterial counts were monitored using the Sysmex UF-1000i flow cytometer at different times up to 180min. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis allowed us to find out the cut-off point for differentiating between sensitive and resistant strains to the tested antibiotic. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on a total of 100 positive blood culture bottles from patients. First, bacterial identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) directly from positive blood culture bottles as we have previously reported. Secondly, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed in the same way that was carried out in artificially prepared blood culture bottles. Our results indicate that antibiotic susceptibility test can be determined as early as 120min since a blood culture bottle is flagged as positive. The essential agreement between our susceptibility test and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and Vitek) was 99%. In summary, we conclude that reliable results on bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility test performed directly from positive blood culture bottles can be obtained within 3h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains with Higher Susceptibility to Environmental Phages than Antibiotic-sensitive Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Kuang; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chang, Kai-Chih; Cheng, Chieh-Chen; Yu, Pei-Ying; Chang, Chih-Hui; Chen, Tren-Yi; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2017-07-24

    Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is associated with nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we used clinically isolated A. baumannii strains as models to demonstrate whether antibiotic resistance is correlated with an increased susceptibility to bacteriophages. In this study, 24 active phages capable of infecting A. baumannii were isolated from various environments, and the susceptibilities of both antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of A. baumannii to different phages were compared. In our study, a total of 403 clinically isolated A. baumannii strains were identified. On average, the phage infection percentage of the antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii strains was 84% (from 81-86%), whereas the infection percentage in the antibiotic-sensitive A. baumannii strains was only 56.5% (from 49-64%). In addition, the risk of phage infection for A. baumannii was significantly increased in the strains that were resistant to at least four antibiotics and exhibited a dose-dependent response (p-trend baumannii isolates, 75.6% were phage typeable. The results of phage typing might also reveal the antibiotic-resistant profiles of clinical A. baumannii strains. In conclusion, phage susceptibility represents an evolutionary trade-off in A. baumannii strains that show adaptations for antibiotic resistance, particularly in medical environments that have high antibiotic use.

  3. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida eSteinberger-Levy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test.

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis: clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhablani J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay Chhablani,1 Aditya Sudhalkar,1 Animesh Jindal,2 Taraprasad Das,1 Swapna R Motukupally,3 Savitri Sharma,3 Avinash Pathengay,2 Harry W Flynn Jr4 1Srimati Kannuri Santhamma Centre for Vitreoretinal Diseases, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kallam Anji Reddy Campus, Hyderabad, India; 2L V Prasad Eye Institute, GMR Varalakshmi Campus, Visakhapatnam, India; 3Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kallam Anji Reddy Campus, Hyderabad, India; 4Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Objective: To describe clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes in patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis.Design: Retrospective case series.Participants: Four eyes of four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis.Methods: Retrospective chart review of culture-positive S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis treated at L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India, between January 2007 and December 2012, was done. Collected information included demographic, clinical, and microbiology data.Results: These four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis cases accounted for 0.47% (4/836 of total bacterial endophthalmitis cases treated in this period. All patients were from a rural setting and younger than 40 years. Two of the four patients had a history of immune compromise or hospitalization. The visual acuity at presentation was less than 20/320 in all patients. Common presenting features were severe anterior and posterior segment inflammation and hypopyon. All patients underwent vitrectomy with injection of intravitreal antibiotics and dexamethasone. Direct microscopy of the vitreous sample was positive in all cases. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol; sensitivity to aminoglycosides and third-generation cephalosporins was highly variable. The final visual acuity was 20

  5. Incidence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Bacterial Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    added a new dimension to the problem of wound infections [1]. This is ... Certain parasite. (e.g.,. Hookworm .... Gram negative bacilli as agents of wound infection which was .... antibiotic, broad spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospital stay and ...

  6. The evolution of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance during the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms in the absence of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyerman Jabus G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Explanations for bacterial biofilm persistence during antibiotic treatment typically depend on non-genetic mechanisms, and rarely consider the contribution of evolutionary processes. Results Using Escherichia coli biofilms, we demonstrate that heritable variation for broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance can arise and accumulate rapidly during biofilm development, even in the absence of antibiotic selection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the rapid de novo evolution of heritable variation in antibiotic sensitivity and resistance during E. coli biofilm development. We suggest that evolutionary processes, whether genetic drift or natural selection, should be considered as a factor to explain the elevated tolerance to antibiotics typically observed in bacterial biofilms. This could be an under-appreciated mechanism that accounts why biofilm populations are, in general, highly resistant to antibiotic treatment.

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern and Beta-lactamase Production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 102 isolates, 30(29.4%) strains possessed β-lactamase and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of selected antibiotics was in the range of 3.95– 250μg/ml. The multiple drug resistance as evident in high MICs of the antibiotics tested could probably be due to abuse/misuse of antibiotics resulting in recurrence ...

  8. Rapid detection of blaOXA in carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter radioresistens bacteremia leading to unnecessary antimicrobial administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Adam C; Lewis, James S; Pfeiffer, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Rapid molecular techniques to identify resistant pathogens are revolutionizing antibiotic stewardship; however, it is important to recognize the limitations of these techniques. Herein we describe two cases of bacteremia that were both initially identified by genotypic testing as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and subsequently identified phenotypically as carbapenem-susceptible A. radioresistens. The genotypic results prompted unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotic use and infection control concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pne...

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-susceptible (MS) and methicillin-resistant (MR) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) strains isolated from milk of cows with mastitis. The study was conducted on 100 CNS strains (20 MRCNS and 80 MSCNS) isolated from milk samples of 86 cows from the Lublin (Poland) region farms. Antibiotic susceptibility of microorganisms was evaluated using the disc-diffusion method on the Mueller-Hinton agar according to the guidelines of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The highest efficacy against MSCNS was demonstrated for cephalosporin antibiotics, i.e. cefacetril (91.3%), ceftiofur (67.5%), cefoperazone (66.3%) and cephalexin (60.0% of susceptible MSCNS strains). Moreover, a high percentage of vancomycin-susceptible strains was demonstrated (83.8%). The activity of combination of amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and gentamicin was found weaker (63.8% and 61.3% of susceptible strains, respectively). About 50.0% of MSCNS were susceptible to erythromycin, enrofloxacine and amoxicillin. A large proportion of CNS was resistant to neomycin, penicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, lincomycin and ampicillin (28.8%, 30.0%, 31.3%, 31.3%, 33.8% and 33.8% of susceptible strains, respectively). The highest percentage of MRCNS was susceptible to vancomycin (75.0%), erythromycin (65.0%) and streptomycin (50.0%). Their susceptibility to enrofloxacine (35.0%) as well as gentamicin and tetracycline (30.0%) was markedly lower. The lowest activity was found for lincomycin and neomycin (20.0% of susceptible MRCNS strains, each).

  11. Control of Staphylococcal Adhesion to Polymethylmethacrylate and Enhancement of Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Poloxamer 407

    OpenAIRE

    Veyries, Marie-Laure; Faurisson, Francois; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rouveix, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    We studied the antiadhesive effect of Poloxamer 407 (P407), together with modifications in the antimicrobial susceptibility of residual adherent staphylococci. Bacterial adherence was markedly inhibited (77% to more than 99.9%) whether polymethylmethacrylate was exposed to P407 before or during the adherence assay. Furthermore, residual adherent staphylococci appeared to be more susceptible to antibiotic activity, suggesting that combination of P407 with antibiotics could be a promising appro...

  12. Control of staphylococcal adhesion to polymethylmethacrylate and enhancement of susceptibility to antibiotics by poloxamer 407.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyries, M L; Faurisson, F; Joly-Guillou, M L; Rouveix, B

    2000-04-01

    We studied the antiadhesive effect of Poloxamer 407 (P407), together with modifications in the antimicrobial susceptibility of residual adherent staphylococci. Bacterial adherence was markedly inhibited (77% to more than 99.9%) whether polymethylmethacrylate was exposed to P407 before or during the adherence assay. Furthermore, residual adherent staphylococci appeared to be more susceptible to antibiotic activity, suggesting that combination of P407 with antibiotics could be a promising approach to the prevention of infection of foreign material.

  13. Change of antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST: Influence on cumulative hospital antibiograms

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Wolfensberger; Hugo Sax; Rainer Weber; Reinhard Zbinden; Kuster, Stefan P.; Michael Hombach

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We studied whether the change in antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST influenced cumulative antibiograms in a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. METHODS: Antibiotic susceptibilities of non-duplicate isolates collected within a one-year period before (period A) and after (period B) changing AST interpretation from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 1.3 (2011) guidelines were analysed. In addition, period B isolates were reinterpreted according to the CLSI 2009...

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?zner, D?nes; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga M.; R?nai, Zsuzsanna; Hrivn?k, Veronika; Turcs?nyi, Ibolya; J?nosi, Szil?rd; Gyuranecz, Mikl?s

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma sp. 1220 can induce inflammation primarily in the genital and respiratory tracts of waterfowl, leading to serious economic losses. Adequate housing and appropriate antibiotic treatment are promoted in the control of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to thirteen different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of thirty-eight M. sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese and a duck in several parts of Hungary, Central Euro...

  15. A two-hour antibiotic susceptibility test by ATP-bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; García-Loygorri Jordán de Urries, María Cristina; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Purificación; Simarro Grande, María; Orduña Domingo, Antonio; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) in Clinical Microbiology laboratories is still time-consuming, and most procedures take 24h to yield results. In this study, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test using ATP-bioluminescence has been developed. The design of method was performed using five ATCC collection strains of known susceptibility. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on 10 strains of enterococci, 10 staphylococci, 10 non-fermenting gram negative bacilli, and 13 Enterobacteriaceae from patients. The agreement obtained in the sensitivity between the ATP-bioluminescence method and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and VITEK2) was 100%. In summary, the preliminary results obtained in this work show that the ATP-bioluminescence method could provide a fast and reliable AST in two hours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous Identification and Susceptibility Determination to Multiple Antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus by Bacteriophage Amplification Detection Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Pierce, Carrie L; Schieltz, David M; Barr, John R

    2015-07-07

    The continued advance of antibiotic resistance in clinically relevant bacterial strains necessitates the development and refinement of assays that can rapidly and cost-effectively identify bacteria and determine their susceptibility to a panel of antibiotics. A methodology is described herein that exploits the specificity and physiology of the Staphylococci bacteriophage K to identify Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and determine its susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin. The method uses liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor the replication of bacteriophage after it is used to infect samples thought to contain S. aureus. Amplification of bacteriophage K indicates the sample contains S. aureus, for it is only in the presence of a suitable host that bacteriophage K can amplify. If bacteriophage amplification is detected in samples containing the antibiotics clindamycin or cefoxitin, the sample is deemed to be resistant to these antibiotics, respectively, for bacteriophage can only amplify in a viable host. Thus, with a single work flow, S. aureus can be detected in an unknown sample and susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin can be ascertained. This Article discusses implications for the use of bacteriophage amplification in the clinical laboratory.

  17. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility in viridans group streptococci in low and high antibiotic-prescribing General Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, C E; Hara, Y; Sato, T; Nakajima, T; Nakanishi, S; Mason, C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M; Coulter, W A

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a global public health issue. Most antibiotics are prescribed in the community, although there is less stewardship of such agents in the community compared to secondary and tertiary care. Few studies have attempted to examine the prescribing practices in General Practice and its impact on antibiotic resistance and, therefore, a study was performed in order to compare antibiotic susceptibilities of commensal viridans group streptococci (VGS) obtained from patient cohorts in General Practices (GP), who were high and low prescribers of oral antibiotics. Sixty-five patients (antibiotic susceptibility against (i) tetracyclines (doxycycline); (ii) macrolides (erythromycin); (iii) β-lactams (penicillin G); and (iv) fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin & levofloxacin). There were no significant differences in MICs between high and low GP prescribers with doxycycline (P = 0·094), erythromycin (P = 0·122), ofloxacin (P = 0·193) and levofloxacin (P = 0·058). However, there was a significant difference between high and low GP practices with regard to penicillin G (P = 0·031). This finding is important as the β-lactams are the most commonly prescribed oral antibiotic in the community. This study demonstrates that high prescribing practices may lead to an altered (higher) level of resistance to these agents in the commensal VGS population, which may be important as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants in subsequent horizontal gene transfer events, particularly with newly colonizing pathogens, including pneumococci. Primary care physicians should be aware that increased prescribing of antibiotics may led to increased level of penicillin resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles for group B streptococci isolated from neonates, 1995-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, FYC; Azimi, PH; Weisman, LE; Philips, JB; Regan, J; Clark, P; Rhoads, GG; Clemens, J; Troendle, J; Pratt, E; Brenner, RA; Gill, [No Value

    Antibiotic susceptibility profiles were analyzed for 119 invasive and 227 colonizing strains of group B streptococci isolated from neonates at 6 US academic centers, All strains were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and cefotaxime, The rate of resistance to erythromycin was

  19. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis determined by broth microdilution following CLSI methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Henry S; Hershfield, Jeremy; Marchand, Charles; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K; Worsham, Patricia L

    2015-04-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two temperatures. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of Y. pestis strains by standardized methods and establishing population ranges and MIC50 and MIC90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and also provide a baseline for use in monitoring any future emergence of resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Plasmid Profile of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    32.14%) samples of Vibrio cholerae isolates recovered from water samples from Elele Community. All isolates showed a multiple resistance patterns to 7 antibiotics namely amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, tetracycline, ...

  1. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Grushnikov, Andrey; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yagi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM) device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller–Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation. PMID:26872134

  2. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation.

  3. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Francisella tularensis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Henry S; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K

    2017-09-01

    In vitro susceptibilities for 47 antibiotics were determined in 30 genetic diverse strains of Francisella tularensis by the broth microdilution method following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The F. tularensis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. There was a distinct difference in macrolide susceptibilities between A and B type strains, as has been noted previously. The establishment and comparison of antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of F. tularensis strains by standardized methods and the establishment of population ranges and MIC50/90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and a baseline to monitor any future emergence of resistance, whether natural or intentional. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C. Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922 treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method.

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of periodontal Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections. Because systemic antibiotics are often used in these clinical situations, and little is known of the antibiotic susceptibility of subgingival isolates of these two bacterial species, this study determined the in vitro susceptibility to six antibiotics of fresh S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates from human periodontitis lesions. A total of 33 S. constellatus and 17 S. intermedius subgingival strains, each recovered from separate patients with severe chronic periodontitis (n = 50) before treatment, were subjected to antibiotic gradient strip susceptibility testing with amoxicillin, azithromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline on blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar and to the inhibitory effects of metronidazole at 16 mg/L in an enriched Brucella blood agar dilution assay. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing interpretative standards were used to assess the results. Clindamycin was the most active antibiotic against S. constellatus (minimum inhibitory concentration at 90% [MIC90] 0.25 mg/L), and amoxicillin was most active against S. intermedius (MIC90 0.125 mg/L). A total of 30% of the S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates were resistant in vitro to doxycycline, 98% were only intermediate in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, and 90% were resistant to metronidazole at 16 mg/L. Subgingival S. constellatus and S. intermedius exhibited variable antibiotic susceptibility profiles, potentially complicating empirical selection of periodontitis antibiotic therapy in patients who are species positive.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacilli isolated from the skin of healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tarale

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present work, twelve bacilli were isolated from four different regions of human skin from Bela population of Nagpur district, India. The isolated bacilli were identified by their morphological, cultural and biochemical characteristics. Seven isolates were Gram negative rods, out of which five were belong to genus Pseudomonas. Three among the five Gram positive isolates were identified as Dermabactor and the remaining two Bacillus. Their antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The isolates showed resistance to several currently used broad-spectrum antibiotics. The Dermabactor genus was resistant to vancomycin, although it was earlier reported to be susceptible. Imipenem was found to be the most effective antibiotic for Pseudomonas while nalidixic acid, ampicillin and tetracycline were ineffective. Isolates of Bacillus displayed resistance to the extended spectrum antibiotics cephalosporin and ceftazidime. Imipenem, carbenicillin and ticarcillin were found to be the most effective antibiotics as all the investigated isolates were susceptible to them. Antibiotic resistance may be due to the overuse or misuse of antibiotics during the treatment, or following constant exposure to antibiotic-containing cosmetic formulations.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltekin, Özden; Boucharin, Alexis; Tano, Eva; Andersson, Dan I; Elf, Johan

    2017-08-22

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are aggravated by incorrect prescription and use of antibiotics. A core problem is that there is no sufficiently fast diagnostic test to guide correct antibiotic prescription at the point of care. Here, we investigate if it is possible to develop a point-of-care susceptibility test for urinary tract infection, a disease that 100 million women suffer from annually and that exhibits widespread antibiotic resistance. We capture bacterial cells directly from samples with low bacterial counts (10(4) cfu/mL) using a custom-designed microfluidic chip and monitor their individual growth rates using microscopy. By averaging the growth rate response to an antibiotic over many individual cells, we can push the detection time to the biological response time of the bacteria. We find that it is possible to detect changes in growth rate in response to each of nine antibiotics that are used to treat urinary tract infections in minutes. In a test of 49 clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates, all were correctly classified as susceptible or resistant to ciprofloxacin in less than 10 min. The total time for antibiotic susceptibility testing, from loading of sample to diagnostic readout, is less than 30 min, which allows the development of a point-of-care test that can guide correct treatment of urinary tract infection.

  8. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among verotoxic non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... ethanol stem bark extracts of C. dentata (MIC, 70 to 150 mg/ml). The presence of pathogenic verotoxic antibiotic resistant E. coli in ..... SXT- sulphomethaxazole / trimethoprim; OFX, ofloxacin; ATM, aztreonam; AMP, ampicillin; TE, tetracycline;. AK, amikacin; CAZ, ceftazidim; CL, cephalexin; CRO, ceftriazone ...

  9. Urinary Bacterial Profile and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is associated with significant morbidity for both the mother and the baby. The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance pattern of the urinary pathogens isolated from pregnant women at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital Bahirdar, Ethiopia.

  10. antibiotic susceptibility pattern of streptoccocus pneumoniae in ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight three percent of the isolates were resistant to penicillin G and 12.7% were resistant to more than three antibiotics. The isolates were largely sensitive to the third generation cephalosporins and quinoiones. The study has shown that penicillins are no longer useful for the treatment of infections caused by Streptococcus ...

  11. Who are susceptible to pseudomembranous colitis among patients with presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Sung; Shin, Woon Geon; Jang, Myoung Kuk; Kim, Hyoung Su; Kim, Hee Seon; Park, Chi Jun; Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Joon Young; Lee, Jin Heon; Kim, Hak Yang; Cho, Sung Jin; Yoo, Jae Young

    2006-10-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis is a severe form of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, there have been no reports about the factors that make patients with presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea susceptible to pseudomembranous colitis. This study was designed to determine the clinical risk factors for pseudomembranous colitis among the patients with presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This was a retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients admitted to our institution between January 2000 and December 2004 with a diagnosis of presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea. All patients underwent sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy because of diarrhea after administration of antibiotics. Pseudomembranous colitis was confirmed both endoscopically and histologically. Various clinical parameters were compared between the pseudomembranous colitis group and non-pseudomembranous colitis group. The mean age of patients was 61 years, and 60 percent (90/150) was female. Pseudomembranous colitis was diagnosed in 53 percent (80/150). On univariate analysis, older than aged 70 years (P = 0.014), antibiotic therapy for more than 15 days (P pseudomembranous colitis. On multivariate analysis, the important clinical risk factors were advanced age (older than aged 70 years; adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.208-6.131; P pseudomembranous colitis was 0.86. Advanced age and long hospital stay may make patients with presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea susceptible to pseudomembranous colitis. Therefore, pseudomembranous colitis should be first suspected in cases with presumed antibiotic-associated diarrhea having such risk factors.

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Isolated from Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtar Camara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is one of the major causes of respiratory tract infections. The objectives of this study were to identify isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from respiratory tract infections, and to assess their susceptibility to several antibiotics. A total of 40 strains were isolated and their susceptibility to 17 antibiotics was tested using a standard disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined using the E-test. All isolates were sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics including penicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalosporins. Macrolides remain active with the exception of spiramycin, which showed reduced susceptibility. Out of the 40 isolates, 100% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Interestingly, isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, teicoplanin, vancomycine, and levofloxacin, providing potential alternative choices of treatment against infections with S. pyogenes.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma synoviae strains originating from Central and Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Grózner, Dénes; Sulyok, Kinga M.; Nilsson, Kristin; Hrivnák, Veronika; Benčina, Dušan; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma synoviae causes infectious synovitis and respiratory diseases in chickens and turkeys and may lead to egg shell apex abnormalities in chickens; hence possesses high economic impact on the poultry industry. Control of the disease consists of eradication, vaccination or medication. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to 14 different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of M. synoviae strains originating from Hungary and other coun...

  14. Development of a Novel Test for Simultaneous Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Faro; Malika Mitchell; Yuh-Jue Chen; Sarah Kamal; Gerald Riddle; Sebastian Faro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elucidation of a pathogen’s antimicrobial susceptibility requires subculture after the organism is first isolated. This takes several days, requiring patients to be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. This approach contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. Methods. Microtiter wells were coated with a polyclonal antibody targeting the pathogen of interest. Bacterial suspensions were added in the presence/absence of selected antibiotics. After washing, captured ba...

  15. Infectious agents and antibiotic susceptibility in neurosurgery intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Güzel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Knowing the most frequent causative agents and their sensitivities to antibiotics may contribute to use of appropriate antibiotics. In this study, we aimed to inves-tigate the agents and their antibiotic sensitivity which is isolated from intensive care unit of neurosurgery clinic.Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed from 2001 to 2005 at the Neurosurgery inten-sive care unit of Dicle University, Diyarbakir. The pa-tients charts who were followed up more than 48 hours in intensive care unit and their culture results were inves-tigated.Results: There was 457 of 2197 patients which were operated in neurosurgery clinic and it was obtained 1155 culture samples from these patients in five years period. 317 positive cultures were obtained from 123 patients including 73 cerebrospinal fluid, 45 wound, 47 deep tra-cheal aspirate, 96 were urine samples, 27 blood sam-ples and 29 venous catheters samples. Mostly Staphilo-coccus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococcus (CNS were growth in cultures. From the cerebrospinal fluidd, blood and wound the most growth bacteria was coagulase negative staphilococcus, from the urine Es-chericha coli, from deep tracheal aspiration. Klebsiella pnömonia, and from venous catheters Pseudomonas au-reginosa was mostly showed reproduction.Conclusion: S. aureus, CNS and P. aureginosa were mostly isolated bacteria in neurosurgery intensive care unit. Nosocomial intensive care unit infections can be decreased by appropriate preventive measures

  16. Are there clinical variables determining antibiotic prophylaxis-susceptible versus resistant infection in open fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Amanda; Suvà, Domizio; Dunkel, Nathalie; Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Lomessy, Antoine; Lauper, Nicolas; Rohner, Peter; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2014-11-01

    In Gustilo grade III open fractures, it remains unknown which demographic or clinical features may be associated with an infection resistant to the administered prophylactic agent, compared to one that is susceptible. This was a retrospective case-control study on patients hospitalized from 2004 to 2009. We identified 310 patients with Gustilo-III open fractures, 36 (12%) of which became infected after a median of ten days. In 26 (72%) of the episodes the pathogen was susceptible to the prophylactic antibiotic agent prescribed upon admission, while in the other ten it was resistant. All antibiotic prophylaxis was intravenous; the median duration of treatment was three days and the median delay between trauma and surgery was one day. In multivariate analysis adjusting for case-mix, only Gustilo-grade-IIIc fractures (vascular lesions) showed tendency to be infected with resistant pathogens (odds ratio 10; 95% confidence interval 1.0-10; p = 0.058). There were no significant differences between cases caused by antibiotic resistant and susceptible pathogen cases in patient's sex, presence of immune suppression, duration and choice of antibiotic prophylaxis, choice of surgical technique or materials, time delay until surgery, use of bone reaming, fracture localization, or presence of compartment syndrome. We were unable to identify any specific clinical parameters associated with infection with antibiotic resistant pathogens in Gustilo-grade III open fractures, other than the severity of the fracture itself. More research is needed to identify patients who might benefit from a broader-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis.

  17. Patterns of antibiotics susceptibility of isolates and plasmid analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. aureus showed percentage susceptibility of 50-100% and Staphylococcus epidermidis (50-100%) for cloxacillin and augmentin, and less than 60% for amoxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, cotrimoxazole, gentamicin and chloramphenicol. Multi drug resistance (MDR) of S. aureus strains to at least three classes of the ...

  18. Incidence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Bacterial Isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of different bacteria isolates in 150 wound infections in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria and their antibacterial susceptibility patterns. Methods: Wound swab samples were collected from general culture bench of the Microbiology Department, after obtaining consent from ...

  19. Isolation and Antibiotics Susceptibility Patterns of Escherichia Coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli 0157.H7 were confirmed serologically using latex agglutination kits (OxoidR UK). The isolates were tested for susceptibility to five commonly used antimicrobial agents and plasmid transfer was also carried out using E. coli K12 356 recipient. Out of the 61 non-Sorbitol fermenting (NSF) E. coli isolated from ...

  20. Antibiotic susceptibility of Serratia marcescens and Serratia liquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, W H

    2000-01-01

    Over a period of 20 years, a total of 1,603 Serratia isolates were recovered from clinical specimens and examined for susceptibility to 29 antimicrobial drugs using the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test. Serratia marcescens was recovered most frequently (n = 1,409), followed by S. liquefaciens (n = 172); other Serratia species were scarce. During the 2-decade observation period there occurred 35 putative episodes/clusters of nosocomial cross-infection and 1 pseudo-outbreak due to S. marcescens, but none due to S. liquefaciens. The antimicrobial susceptibility data for S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were subdivided into two observation periods: I = 1980-1993, and II = 1993-1999. The crude data (series A) obtained for S. marcescens were corrected in two ways: by the omission of repetitive patient isolates (series B) and the additional removal of outbreak isolates except for index case isolates (series C). Comparison of data obtained in series IC and IIC disclosed an increase in the susceptibility of S. marcescens to ampicillin + sulbactam, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, fosfomycin, gentamicin, piperacillin, piperacillin + tazobactam, timentin and tobramycin during observation period II. Conversely, there was a decrease in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and trovafloxacin, and slightly diminished susceptibility to norfloxacin and ofloxacin during observation period II as compared with the previous period. The crude data obtained for S. liquefaciens required no correction, as there were only a few repeat isolates. There was an increase in susceptibility to ampicillin, ampicillin + sulbactam, cefuroxime, doxycycline, fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin and polymyxin B (clear inhibition zones). However, there was an inexplicable decrease in susceptibility to piperacillin + tazobactam. Cocarde growth around polymyxin B disks was noted with 55.8% of the S. marcescens isolates as compared with 6.8% of the S. liquefaciens isolates. Slime around

  1. Rapid identification of antibiotic resistance using droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, Marie C; O'Brien, Mark; Hussain, Anam; Kiely, Patrick A; Dalton, Tara

    2016-04-02

    Culturing bacteria and monitoring bacterial cell growth is a critical issue when dealing with patients who present with bacterial infections. One of the main challenges that arises is the time taken to identify the particular strain of bacteria and consequently, decide the correct treatment. In the majority of cases, broad spectrum antibiotics are used to target infections when a narrow spectrum drug would be more appropriate. The efficient monitoring of bacterial growth and potential antibiotic resistance is necessary to identify the best treatment options for patients. Minturising the reactions into microfluidic droplets offers a novel method to rapidy analyze bacteria. Microfluidics facilitates low volume reactions that provide a unique system where each droplet reaction acts as an individual bioreactor. Here, we designed and built a novel platform that allowed us to create and monitor E.coli microfluidic droplet cultures. Optical capacity was built in and measurements of bacterial cultures were captured facilitating the continuous monitoring of individual reactions. The capacity of the instrument was demonstrated by the application of treatments to both bacteria and drug resistant strains of bacteria. We were able to detect responses within one hour in the droplet cultures, demonstrating the capacity of this workflow to the culture and rapid characterization of bacterial strains.

  2. Susceptibility of bacterial isolates from chronic canine otitis externa to twenty antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedeja-Marrón, J; Blanco, J L; Ruperez, C; Garcia, M E

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of studies on the susceptibility to antibiotics of bacteria isolated from chronic canine otitis externa. We tested 46 bacterial strains (S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Corynebacterium spp., and gram-negative bacilli) with 20 different antibiotics. We observed increased resistance to antibiotics of bacteria isolated from canine otitis externa as compared to the resistance reported earlier. This may be due to the indiscriminate use of some antibiotics in the last years and indicates the importance of sensitivity testing for the effective treatment of chronic otitis externa, especially that caused by gram-negative bacilli. The clinician may initiate empiric treatment with antibiotics before obtaining the sensitivity test results; the best results may be expected from a topical application of Bacitracin or Chloramphenicol, and from a systemic therapy with Cephalosporines. Therapeutical scheme for treating various bacterial groups are presented in the paper.

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility of glutaraldehyde-tolerant Mycobacterium chelonae from bronchoscope washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuyo; Ogawa, Midori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muratani, Tetsuro; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    2004-06-01

    Contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid is a major problem in the world. Although 2% glutaraldehyde (GA) is widely used as a disinfectant for bronchoscope cleaning, recently, GA-tolerant mycobacteria have been isolated, which makes this problem more complicated. We studied the susceptibility to GA and antibiotics of mycobacteria isolated from bronchoscope washing machines in our hospital. We also studied the minimum inhibitory concentrations of GA and antibiotics with pump inhibitors. Twenty-nine mycobacteria were isolated, of which 26 were Mycobacterium chelonae. Among 18 isolates of M chelonae, excluding 8 isolates in which some results were not reproducible, 50% (9 of 18) were 2% GA-tolerant. One hundred percent (9 of 9) of the GA-tolerant isolates and 11% (1 of 9) of the GA-sensitive isolates were either resistant or intermediately resistant to 2 or 3 classes of antibiotics. Efflux pump inhibitors did not influence the susceptibility to GA and antibiotics. It was suggested that there might be an association of GA tolerance with antibiotic resistance in M chelonae. There may a different mechanism(s) other than that involving efflux pumps with regard to GA tolerance and antibiotic resistance in M chelonae. When bronchoscopy-related mycobacterial infections are suspected, physicians and clinical microbiologists should exercise care in handling GA-tolerant mycobacteria, which may be resistant to multiple antibiotics.

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of ocular bacterial flora in patients undergoing intravitreal injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jason M; Sanislo, Steven R; Ta, Christopher N

    2010-11-01

    To determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of conjunctival flora in patients undergoing intravitreal (IVT) injection. Prospective, observational study. Patients (n = 85) scheduled to undergo 136 IVT injections at California Vitreoretinal Center at Stanford University. Conjunctival cultures were obtained on the day of the IVT injection from the injection site bulbar conjunctiva before the application of povidone-iodine or antibiotics. Bacterial isolates were identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility using either the Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion technique or MicroScan-WalkAway system. Our analysis included 136 samples collected from 90 eyes of 85 patients. Of those with positive cultures (n = 65), the most common bacterial isolates were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), comprising 59 (83%) of the 71 bacterial strains. Among the CNS, all were susceptible to vancomycin and >80% were susceptible to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and imipenem. Between 60% and 80% of the CNS were susceptible to the cephalosporins and newer generation fluoroquinolones. Fewer than 60% were susceptible to the penicillin analogs, erythromycin, and the earlier generation fluoroquinolones. Nearly half of the CNS (47%) were resistant to oxacillin/methicillin. Bacteria isolated from the injection site of patients undergoing IVT injections were mostly CNS. Most are sensitive to vancomycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol. Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Uropathogens in Obstetric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Ekadashi R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most commonly encountered infections in obstetric patients. Although a variety of etiology is involved, Escherichia coli and other coliforms account for a large majority of these naturally acquired infections. The estimation of local etiology and susceptibility profile could support the most effective empirical treatment. Aim: The current study was undertaken to find the spectrum of micro-organisms responsible for causing UTI in obstetric pat...

  6. Accurate assessment of antibiotic susceptibility and screening resistant strains of a bacterial population by linear gradient plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqing; Li, Jingran; Du, Jiafa; Hu, Ming; Bai, Hua; Qi, Jing; Gao, Chao; Wei, Tiantian; Su, Hong; Jin, Jianling; Gao, Peiji

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of a bacterial population exposed to the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic is an important issue in pharmacological research. Therefore, a novel antibiotic susceptibility test is urgently needed that can both precisely determine the MIC and accurately select antibiotic-resistant strains from clinical bacterial populations. For this purpose, we developed a method based on Fick's laws of diffusion using agar plates containing a linear gradient of antibiotic. The gradient plate contained two layers. The bottom layer consisted of 15 mL agar containing the appropriate concentration of enrofloxacin and allowed to harden in the form of a wedge with the plate slanted such that the entire bottom was just covered. The upper layer consisted of 15 mL plain nutrient agar added with the plate held in the horizontal position. After allowing vertical diffusion of the drug from the bottom agar layer for 12 h, the enrofloxacin concentration was diluted in proportion to the ratio of the agar layer thicknesses. The uniform linear concentration gradient was verified by measuring the enrofloxacin concentration on the agar surface. When heavy bacterial suspensions were spread on the agar surface and incubated for more than 12 h, only resistant cells were able to form colonies beyond the boundary of confluent growth of susceptible cells. In this way, the true MIC of enrofloxacin was determined. The MICs obtained using this linear gradient plate were consistent with those obtained using conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests. Discrete colonies were then spread onto a gradient plate with higher antibiotic concentrations; the boundary line increased significantly, and gene mutations conferring resistance were identified. This new method enables the rapid identification of resistant strains in the bacterial population. Use of the linear gradient plate can easily identify the precise MIC and reveal the dynamic differentiation of bacteria near the MIC

  7. Evolution of Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to antibiotics during a 10-year period in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupcinskas, Limas; Rasmussen, Lone; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2013-01-01

    .5 times, the total macrolide consumption remains one of the lowest in Europe. We have not observed any significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics during the recent 10-year period. The low resistance rate to clarithromycin might be related to the policy...

  8. A study of bacterial pathogens and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofatteh, M R; Shahabian Moghaddam, F; Yousefi, M; Namaei, M H

    2018-01-01

    To assess the frequency of bacterial agents in chronic suppurative otitis media and the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolates among patients. A total of 185 patients clinically diagnosed with chronic suppurative otitis media were interviewed and middle-ear effusion samples were collected using sterile swabs. All bacterial isolates were identified by conventional microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion. Staphylococci spp. (64.9 per cent) were the most prevalent bacteria isolated, followed by Klebsiella spp. (12.9 per cent) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.3 per cent). The most effective antibiotic for treatment of bacterial chronic suppurative otitis media was ciprofloxacin. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in bacterial infestations among chronic suppurative otitis media patients and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the bacterial isolates based on gender and age (p > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of a continuous and periodic evaluation of the bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in chronic suppurative otitis media patients for efficacious treatment of the infection.

  9. Susceptibility of human and probiotic Bifidobacterium spp. to selected antibiotics as determined by the Etest method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matto, J.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Domig, K.J.; Saarela, M.; Flórez, A.B.; Brockmann, E.; Amtmann, E.; Mayo, B.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Danielsen, M.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the antibiotic susceptibility of 203 strains representing human or probiotic associated Bifidobacterium species as determined by the Etest method. Strains showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for tetracycline >= 16 mu g mL(-1) were detected in all studied

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility of members of the Lactobacillus acidophilus group using broth microdilution and molecular identification of their resistance determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayrhofer, S.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Mair, C.; Huys, G.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Kneifel, W.; Domig, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    The range of antibiotic susceptibility to 13 antibiotics in 101 strains of the Lactobacillus acidophilus group was examined using the lactic acid bacteria susceptibility test medium (LSM) and broth microdilution. Additionally, microarray analysis and PCR were applied to identify resistance genes

  11. Synergistic activity of gentamicin plus carbenicillin upon Pseudomonas aeruginosa: its relationship with pyocin and antibiotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemelman, R; Mondaca, M A; Monge, A

    1977-01-01

    The synergistic effect of combinations of gentamicin and carbenicillin, as well as the type or subtype of the pyocins produced, were investigated in 170 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from clinical specimens. A high proportion of strains were synergistically inhibited (73.5%), but among strains producing pyocins 7, 14 and 31, synergy was infrequent or absent. The synergistic effect was more frequent upon gentamicin- or carbenicillin-susceptible strains. However, among untypable strains, synergy was more frequent among gentamicin-resistant strains. Susceptibility to both gentamicin and carbenicillin must be considered if antibiotic susceptibility is to be related to synergy.

  12. The Importance of Growth Kinetic Analysis in Determining Bacterial Susceptibility against Antibiotics and Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eTheophel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18–24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48-h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07 as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 µg mL-1 of vancomycin and 8 µg mL-1 of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0 nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from infections in cats and dogs throughout Europe (2002-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, Stéphane; El Garch, Farid; Galland, Delphine; Petit, Jean-Luc; Woehrle, Frédérique; Boulouis, Henri-Jean

    2014-03-01

    A monitoring program of the pre-treatment susceptibility of clinical isolates of bacteria from diseased dogs and cats was active between the years 2002 and 2009. Susceptibility of each isolated strain to a panel of nine antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, trimethoprim and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of marbofloxacin was also determined by a standardized microdilution technique following CLSI recommendations. In total, 1857 bacterial strains were collected throughout Europe from cases of otitis, respiratory, urinary and dermatological infections. Although bacterial susceptibility varied for each of the antibiotics within the panel, patterns of susceptibility were similar to those described in the literature for comparable time periods and geographical areas. With a clinical resistance varying from 0 to 14.48% against the isolated strains, marbofloxacin susceptibility was very high and remains an effective antibiotic for the treatment of otitis, urinary, respiratory and dermatological infections in companion animals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. HB&L System: rapid determination of antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria isolated from blood cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Barocci

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Blood culture is an important method to detect microbial pathogens on blood, very useful for diagnosing bacterial infections. Unfortunately, classical diagnostic protocols cannot directly identify bacteria responsible for sepsis and accordingly their antimicrobial profiles. This problem causes a delay of almost two days in the availability of a specific antimicrobial profile. Objective. Among the main causes of death, sepsis have a relevant importance. For this reason it is important both to identify pathogens and to perform an antimicrobial susceptibility test in the shortest time as possible. For this purpose, the main aim of this study is the evaluation of the performances of an antimicrobial susceptibility determination directly performed on positive blood cultures. Materials and methods. This study has been performed on 70 positive blood cultures, during the period from January to July 2009. A number of 35 blood cultures were positive for Gram negative bacteria, and 35 were positive for Gram positive bacteria. From these positive blood cultures, after a short sample preparation, it has been possible to directly determine antimicrobial susceptibility profiles by using the HB&L (formerly URO-QUICK instrument. Results. The HB&L system results showed a very good correlation with both the classical disk diffusion method and VITEK 2 automatic system.The performances between the methods carried out in this study were equivalent. Conclusions. From data reported, thanks to the rapidity and simplicity of the method used, we can assert that the direct susceptibility test available with the HB&L system, is useful for a rapid and early choice of the antibiotic treatment.

  15. Change of antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST: influence on cumulative hospital antibiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Aline; Sax, Hugo; Weber, Rainer; Zbinden, Reinhard; Kuster, Stefan P; Hombach, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether the change in antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST influenced cumulative antibiograms in a tertiary care hospital in Switzerland. Antibiotic susceptibilities of non-duplicate isolates collected within a one-year period before (period A) and after (period B) changing AST interpretation from CLSI 2009 to EUCAST 1.3 (2011) guidelines were analysed. In addition, period B isolates were reinterpreted according to the CLSI 2009, CLSI 2013 and EUCAST 3.1 (2013) guidelines. The majority of species/drug combinations showed no differences in susceptibility rates comparing periods A and B. However, in some gram-negative bacilli, decreased susceptibility rates were observed when comparing CLSI 2009 with EUCAST 1.3 within period B: Escherichia coli / cefepime, 95.8% (CLSI 2009) vs. 93.1% (EUCAST 1.3), P=0.005; Enterobacter cloacae / cefepime, 97.0 (CLSI 2009) vs. 90.5% (EUCAST 1.3), P=0.012; Pseudomonas aeruginosa / meropenem, 88.1% (CLSI 2009) vs. 78.3% (EUCAST 1.3), P=0.002. These differences were still evident when comparing susceptibility rates according to the CLSI 2013 guideline with EUCAST 3.1 guideline. For P. aeruginosa and imipenem, a trend towards a lower antibiotic susceptibility rate in ICUs compared to general wards turned into a significant difference after the change to EUCAST: 87.9% vs. 79.8%, P=0.08 (CLSI 2009) and 86.3% vs. 76.8%, P=0.048 (EUCAST 1.3). The change of AST guidelines from CLSI to EUCAST led to a clinically relevant decrease of susceptibility rates in cumulative antibiograms for defined species/drug combinations, particularly in those with considerable differences in clinical susceptibility breakpoints between the two guidelines.

  16. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from dogs with otitis externa in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugden, D L

    2013-01-01

    To identify and quantify the five most frequently isolated significant bacterial microorganisms, and their antibiotic susceptibility, from bacterial cultures of samples taken from the ears of dogs with otitis externa. Bacterial culture and susceptibility testing data for ear swabs from dogs with presumed otitis externa were collated and evaluated. The five most frequently isolated microorganisms were: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Proteus sp., beta-haemolytic streptococci and Escherichia coli. Susceptibility to gentamicin was very high for most isolates, whereas for polymyxin B, high levels of resistance were seen. Beta-haemolytic streptococci had high levels of resistance to all of the antibiotics tested. This study provides veterinarians with Australian data to assist in cytological interpretation and initial empirical therapy of canine otitis externa. © 2012 The Author. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  17. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides fragilis group isolated from stool samples in North Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Yehya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifty one strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group were isolated from 45 fecal samples. Classical phenotypic identification showed that 16 isolates were B. thetaiotaomicron, 12 B. uniformis, 9 B. eggerthii,7 B. vulgatus,3 B. caccae,2 Parabacteroides distasonis with 1 identified B. ovatus and 1 B. fragilis. The 51 strains were tested for susceptibility against 16 antimicrobial agents and the MICs for metronidazole were determined. The tests showed that imipenem, meropenem and chloram-phenicol were the most effective antibiotics (98%, 98% and 92.16% of susceptibility, respectively followed by ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam, rifampin (88.24% susceptibility, moxifloxacin 86.27% and tigecycline 84.31%. Ofloxacin and cefotaxime were the least effective antibiotics with 27.45% and 0% of activity respectively. Only six of the 51 isolated strains were resistant to metronidazole with MICs = 64 mg/L (1 strain and > 256 mg/L (5 strains.

  18. pso.ATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isolates vere made using standard methods, Antibiotic susceptibility tests against commonly prescribed ... Acute otitis media is rapid with short .... sensitivity tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests: The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major Gram positive and negative bacterial isolates obtained from clinical specimens.

  19. Effect of citral and carvacrol on the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S F; Silva-Angulo, A B; Rosenthal, A; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria innocua (L. innocua) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) cells in the presence of citral and carvacrol at sublethal concentrations in an agar medium. The presence of terpenes in the L. monocytogenes and L. innocua culture medium provided a reduction in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all the antibiotics tested. These effects were dependent on the concentration of terpenes present in the culture medium. The combination of citral and carvacrol potentiated antibiotic activity by reducing the MIC values of bacitracin and colistin from 32.0 and 128.0 μg ml⁻¹ to 1.0 and 2.0 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Thus, both Listeria species became more susceptible to these drugs. In this way, the colistin and bacitracin resistance of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua was reversed in the presence of terpenes. Results obtained in this study show that the phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity, reducing the MIC values of cultured L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. Phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity of erythromycin, bacitracin and colistin by reducing the MIC values of cultured Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. This effect in reducing the MIC values of the antibiotics tested in both micro-organisms was increased when natural antimicrobials were combined. This finding indicated that the combination among terpenes and antibiotic may contribute in reducing the required dosage of antibiotics due to the possible effect of terpenes on permeation barrier of the micro-organism cell membrane. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from poultry and red meat in Morocco

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    Hayat Ennaji

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hayat Ennaji1,2, Mohammed Timinouni2, My Mustapha Ennaji3, Mohammed Hassar1, Nozha Cohen11Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Hygiène des Aliments et de l’Environnement, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 2Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Biologie Moléculaire, Institut Pasteur du Maroc., Casablanca, Morocco; 3Laboratoire de Virologie et Hygiène and Microbiologie., Faculté des Sciences et Techniques - Mohammedia, Université Hassan II, Mohammedia, MoroccoAbstract: This study was carried out on 426 samples of raw meats collected from butcheries and supermarkets in Casablanca, Morocco. The samples were examined for the occurrence of Listeria species. Strains of Listeria monocytogenes were characterized by several biochemical tests and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. β-hemolytic cultures and nonhemolytic isolates were tested for biochemical properties with the Listeria API test. Among the 43 Listeria species isolates; we identified 10 strains for L. monocytogenes (23.3%, 31 strains for L. innocua (72.1% and 2 strains for L. welshimeri (4.6%. Strains of L. monocytogenes were separated by multiplex PCR; two serogroups IIb and IVb were thus differentiated. Antibiotic susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to 21 antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method. All isolates were susceptible to a wide range of the tested antibiotics with the exception of nalidixic acid, colistine and cephalosporins second and third generation for which they were all resistant.Keywords: antibiotic susceptibility, Listeria monocytogenes, meat, PCR

  1. Escherichia coli adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility on biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, L C; Silva, L N; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test materials typically used in the construction of medical devices regarding their influence in the initial adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli biofilms. Adhesion and biofilm development was monitored in 12-well microtiter plates containing coupons of different biomedical materials--silicone (SIL), stainless steel (SS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)--and glass (GLA) as control. The susceptibility of biofilms to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin was assessed, and the antibiotic effect in cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface hydrophobicity of the bacterial strain and materials was also evaluated from contact angle measurements. Surface hydrophobicity was related with initial E. coli adhesion and subsequent biofilm development. Hydrophobic materials, such as SIL, SS, and PVC, showed higher bacterial colonization than the hydrophilic GLA. Silicone was the surface with the greatest number of adhered cells and the biofilms formed on this material were also less susceptible to both antibiotics. It was found that different antibiotics induced different levels of elongation on E. coli sessile cells. Results revealed that, by affecting the initial adhesion, the surface properties of a given material can modulate biofilm buildup and interfere with the outcome of antimicrobial therapy. These findings raise the possibility of fine-tuning surface properties as a strategy to reach higher therapeutic efficacy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Repeat gram-negative hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic susceptibility: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Mansi; Shiau, Stephanie; Larson, Elaine L

    2017-10-20

    Repeat HAIs among frequently hospitalized patients may be contributing to the high rates of antibiotic resistance seen in gram-negative bacteria (GNB) in hospital settings. This systematic review examines the state of the literature assessing the association between repeat GNB HAIs and changes in antibiotic susceptibility patterns. A systematic search of English language published literature was conducted to identify studies in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2015. Studies must have assessed drug resistance in repeat GNB infections longitudinally at the patient level. Two researchers independently reviewed search results for papers meeting inclusion criteria and extracted data. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified quality assessment tool based on the Checklist for Measuring Study Quality and the Quality Assessment Checklist for Cases Series. From 3385 articles identified in the search, seven met inclusion criteria. Five reported lower antibiotic susceptibility in repeated infections, one found a change but did not specify in which direction, and one reported no change. All studies were of low to average quality. Despite the dearth of studies examining repeat GNB infections, evidence suggests that repeat infections result in lower antibiotic susceptibility among hospitalized patients. Larger scale studies with strong methodology are warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of minimal inhibitory concentration breakpoints on local cumulative bacterial susceptibility data and antibiotic consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokkou, Sofia; Tammer, Ina; Zibolka, Stefanie; Grabau, Christina; Geginat, Gernot

    2014-09-03

    The phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria depends on minimal inhibitory concentration breakpoints issued by national and international breakpoint committees. The current study was performed in order to test the influence of different AST standards on local cumulative AST data and on antibiotic consumption. Automated AST was performed with clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterococcus faecalis, and E. faecium. From each species 100 prospectively collected non-duplicate clinical isolates were tested and MIC data were interpreted according to the interpretation standards issued by DIN and EUCAST, respectively. In addition cumulative AST data from clinical isolates and antibiotic consumption were monitored before and after implementation of new EUCAST MIC breakpoints. The susceptibility rate of P. aeruginosa against piperacillin and gentamicin, and of C. freundii against piperacillin/tazobactam increased significantly, whereas the susceptibility rates of E. cloacae, S. marcescens, and M. morganii against ciprofloxacin decreased significantly after switching from DIN to EUCAST MIC breakpoints. These changes in the cumulative antibiotic resistance pattern were reflected by enhanced consumption of piperacillin/tazobactam after implementation of EUCAST MIC breakpoints. These data show that changes of AST breakpoints have a significant influence on local cumulative AST data and on antibiotic consumption.

  4. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Aeromonas Species Isolated from Wastewater Treatment Plant

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    Isoken H. Igbinosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Aeromonas species isolated from Alice and Fort Beaufort wastewater treatment plant in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using the disc diffusion method, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was employed for the detection of antibiotics resistance genes. Variable susceptibilities were observed against ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, gentamicin, minocycline, among others. Aeromonas isolates from both locations were 100% resistant to penicillin, oxacillin, ampicillin, and vancomycin. Higher phenotypic resistance was observed in isolates from Fort Beaufort compared to isolates from Alice. Class A pse1 β-lactamase was detected in 20.8% of the isolates with a lower detection rate of 8.3% for blaTEM gene. Class 1 integron was present in 20.8% of Aeromonas isolates while class 2 integron and TetC gene were not detected in any isolate. The antibiotic resistance phenotypes observed in the isolates and the presence of β-lactamases genes detected in some isolates are of clinical and public health concern as this has consequences for antimicrobial chemotherapy of infections associated with Aeromonas species. This study further supports wastewater as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants in the environment.

  5. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates in Hamadan, West of Iran

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    Amir Majlesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surveillance data on Helicobacter pylori antibiotic susceptibilities are limited in Hamadan, Iran. Since antibiotic resistance is one of the reasons in therapies failure. Objectives: Thus the resistance patterns of H. pylori strains to the antibiotics metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline were evaluated. Patients and Methods: Gastric biopsy specimens of 153 patients with nonulcer dyspepsia, peptic ulcer dyspepsia, and peptic cancer collected during May 2010 to February of 2011, and were cultured on Brucella agar (Merck, Germany under microaerophilic conditions. H. pylori isolates were identified using standard biochemical test. Eighty three (54.2 % specimens had positive results by culture. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion method. Results: Totally in vitro resistance rates were 63.8% for metronidazole, 26.5% for clarithromycin, and 7.2% for amoxicillin. Although, 25.3% of strains showed resistance to two antibiotics, and 3.6% to three antibiotics. Tetracycline resistance was identified in only two isolates. Fifty nine percent of the clarithromycin resistant strains also showed resistance to metronidazole. No gender and age associations with resistance were detected. Conclusion: Our results showed a high incidence of metronidazole resistance (often combined with clarithromycin-resistance in the isolates. Continuous surveillance is recommended to examine the treatment strategies for H. pylori eradication.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility among Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections, with focus on doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Tarza; Hellmark, Bengt; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa; Söderquist, Bo

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, coagulase-negative staphylococci such as Staphylococcus epidermidis have gained importance as nosocomial pathogens, especially in immunocompromised patients and prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). These infections are often long lasting and difficult to treat due to the production of bacterial biofilm and the transformation of the bacteria into a stationary growth phase. Rifampicin is able to penetrate the biofilm, but to reduce the risk of development of rifampicin resistance it should be used in combination with an additional antibiotic. In this study we used Etest to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of 134 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis obtained from PJIs to six oral antibiotics: doxycycline, rifampicin, linezolid, fusidic acid, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin. We also performed synergy testing on doxycycline in combination with each of the remaining antibiotics. Ninety-three (69%) of the 134 isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, 94/134 (70%) to rifampicin, 56/134 (42%) to clindamycin, 25/134 (19%) to ciprofloxacin, 81/134 (60%) to fusidic acid, and 100% to linezolid. Thirty-two (80%) of the 40 isolates not fully susceptible to rifampicin were susceptible to doxycycline. Doxycycline in combination with each of the other investigated antibiotics exerted an additive effect on nearly half of the isolates, with the exception of clindamycin, which displayed an even higher percentage of additive effect (69%). To conclude, as the majority of the S. epidermidis isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, this antimicrobial agent may provide a potential alternative for combination therapy together with rifampicin. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Salmonella on Raw Poultry in Retail Markets in Guatemala: Levels, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Serovar Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarquin, Claudia; Alvarez, Danilo; Morales, Oneida; Morales, Ana Judith; López, Beatriz; Donado, Pilar; Valencia, Maria F; Arévalo, Alejandra; Muñoz, Fredy; Walls, Isabel; Doyle, Michael P; Alali, Walid Q

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine Salmonella numbers on retail raw chicken carcasses in Guatemala and to phenotypically characterize the isolates (serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility). In total, 300 chicken carcasses were collected from seven departments in Guatemala. Salmonella numbers were determined using the most-probable-number method following the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service protocol. In total, 103 isolates were obtained, all of which were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, whereas 46 isolates were serotyped. Overall, Salmonella prevalence and mean number (mean log most probable number per carcass) was 34.3% and 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.1 to 2.5), respectively. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in Salmonella prevalence were found by storage condition (refrigerated or ambient temperature), market type (wet markets, supermarkets, and independent poultry stores), chicken production system (integrated or nonintegrated production company), and chicken skin color (white or yellow). Chickens produced by integrated companies had lower Salmonella numbers (P < 0.05) than nonintegrated companies, and white-skin carcasses had lower numbers (P < 0.05) than yellow-skin carcasses. Among 13 different Salmonella serovars identified, Paratyphi B (34.8%) was most prevalent, followed by Heidelberg (16.3%) and Derby (11.6%). Of all the Salmonella isolates, 59.2% were resistant to one to three antibiotics and 13.6% to four or more antibiotics. Among all the serovars obtained, Salmonella Paratyphi B and Heidelberg were the most resistant to the antibiotics tested. Salmonella levels and antibiotic resistant profiles among isolates from raw poultry at the retail market level were high relative to other reports from North and South America. These data can be used by Guatemalan stakeholders to develop risk assessment models and support further research opportunities to control transmission of Salmonella spp. and

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grózner, Dénes; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga M; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Hrivnák, Veronika; Turcsányi, Ibolya; Jánosi, Szilárd; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    Mycoplasma sp. 1220 can induce inflammation primarily in the genital and respiratory tracts of waterfowl, leading to serious economic losses. Adequate housing and appropriate antibiotic treatment are promoted in the control of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to thirteen different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of thirty-eight M. sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese and a duck in several parts of Hungary, Central Europe between 2011 and 2015. High MIC50 values were observed in the cases of tilmicosin (>64 μg/ml), oxytetracycline (64 μg/ml), norfloxacin (>10 μg/ml) and difloxacin (10 μg/ml). The examined strains yielded the same MIC50 values with spectinomycin, tylosin and florfenicol (8 μg/ml), while enrofloxacin (MIC50 5 μg/ml), doxycycline (MIC50 5 μg/ml), lincomycin (MIC50 4 μg/ml) and lincomycin-spectinomycin (1:2) combination (MIC50 4 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of the bacteria with lower concentrations. Tylvalosin (MIC50 0.5 μg/ml) and two pleuromutilins (tiamulin MIC50 0.625 μg/ml; valnemulin MIC50 ≤ 0.039 μg/ml) were found to be the most effective drugs against M. sp. 1220. However, strains with elevated MIC values were detected for all applied antibiotics. Valnemulin, tiamulin and tylvalosin were found to be the most effective antibiotics in the study. Increasing resistance was observed in the cases of several antibiotics. The results highlight the importance of testing Mycoplasma species for antibiotic susceptibility before therapy.

  9. Standard versus biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing to guide antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Valerie; Ratjen, Felix

    2017-10-05

    The antibiotics used to treat pulmonary infections in people with cystic fibrosis are typically chosen based on the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed on bacteria traditionally grown in a planktonic mode (grown in a liquid). However, there is considerable evidence to suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa actually grows in a biofilm (or slime layer) in the airways of people with cystic fibrosis with chronic pulmonary infections. Therefore, choosing antibiotics based on biofilm rather than conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing could potentially improve response to treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To compare biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing-driven therapy to conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing-driven therapy in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. Most recent search: 19 June 2017.We also searched two ongoing trials registries and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. Most recent searches: 24 August 2017 and 05 September 2017. Randomized controlled trials of antibiotic therapy based on biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility testing compared to antibiotic therapy based on conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection in people with cystic fibrosis. Both authors independently selected trials, assessed their risk of bias and extracted data from eligible trials. Additionally, the review authors contacted the trial investigators to obtain further information. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE criteria. The searches identified two multicentre, randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trials eligible for inclusion

  10. Prevalence and antibiotics susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in traditional Kouzeh cheese at Saqqez retails

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    s Khalifezadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is proposed as the third important foodborne organism worldwide. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of in traditional Kouzeh cheese at Saqqez retails and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates. For this purpose, 100 Kouzeh cheese were collected from different parts of Saqqez. The samples were analyzed for the presence of S. aureus using conventional culture techniques. Afterwards, the pattern of antibiotic resistance of the isolates was investigated against 12 antibiotics using the disk diffusion’s method. According to the results, S. aureus was detected in 41 samples (41%. Amongst, only one of the isolates was found sensitive to all of the 12 antibiotics. In contrast, one of the isolates showed resistance to 9 antibiotics. Other isolates demonstrated various degrees of resistance (2 to 8 antibiotics. Regarding the high prevalence rate of contamination in Kouzeh cheese, application of efficient heat treatments of cheese-milk together with the and maintaining the hygiene conditions during cheese preparation is essential.

  11. RAPD Analysis and Antibiotic Susceptibility for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Isolated from Different Locations in Egypt

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    Ali, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The routine identification of mycobacterial strains isolated from patients in different locations in Egypt was confirmed by specific DNA fragment amplification. The susceptibilities of 72 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains against the four antibiotics used in tuberculosis treatment (Isoniazid, INH; Rifampicin, Rif; Streptomycin, St and Ethambutol, E were examined. Our results indicated that, multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB represents about 19.5% of the tested strains, whereas sensitive strains represented 26.4%. The genetic polymorphism of the tested strains was examined using RAPD analysis. Six selected strains represent the different antibiotic susceptibility groups were examined using RAPD fingerprinting. No difference between the strains was recorded using the RFLP analysis of amplified specific fragment. The discrimination power of RAPD analysis was inadequate to clarify the genetic correlation between the tested strains. MDR-TB was approximately double time in 2008 compared with the value in 2007. Most of the new MDRTB was correlated with resident dense population regions.

  12. Short communication: N-Acetylcysteine-mediated modulation of antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Liu, L H; Li, X P; Luo, J Y; Zhang, Z; Yan, Z T; Zhang, S D; Li, H S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were tested by the agar-based E-test method. The presence of 10mM NAC reduced the MIC of penicillin and ampicillin but enhanced the MIC of erythromycin and ciprofloxacin for all of the strains. In addition, NAC-mediated modulation of MIC of kanamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin was diverse, depending on the target bacterial pathogen and antibiotic being used. The results suggest that NAC is an important modulator of antibiotic activity against the major bovine mastitis pathogens. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. “Neonatal Sepsis”: Bacteria & their Susceptibility Pattern towards Antibiotics in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Chandra Madhur; Agrawal, Ravi Prakash; Sharan, Hariom; Kumar, Bijay; Sharma, Deepti; Bhatia, Santokh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sepsis is one of the most common causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity, particularly in the developing countries. Its causative bacteria and their respective sensitivity patterns are different in each hospital and region. The objective of this study was to determine the causative bacteria and pattern of susceptibility to antibiotics in NICU of a tertiary care centre, which in turn may help in implementation of empirical therapy.

  14. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Bacteria from Diabetic Foot Infections in Selected Teaching Hospitals in Southwestern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Bello, Olorunjuwon O; Oyekanmi, Edward O; Kelly, Babatunde A; Mebude, Olakunle O; Bello, Temitope K

    2018-01-01

    One of the serious complications associated with diabetes is foot ulcer and this condition affects the quality of life in patients in all classes, races and ages. Chronic wounds are prone to colonization by wide array of microorganisms which could be extremely hazardous to patients if effective and timely therapeutic intervention is not made. This study was conducted to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria from diabetic foot infections in southwestern Nigeria. Samples ...

  15. [Susceptibility to azithromycin and other antibiotics in recent isolates of Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pozo, Angeles; Arana, David M; Fuentes, Miriam; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Azithromycin represents an alternative option to treat bacterial diarrhea when the antibiotic therapy is indicated. Little is known regarding the susceptibility to azithromycin in enteropathogens in Spain. The MICs of azithromycin were determined by E-test against Salmonella non-typhi (SNT), Shigella and Yersinia isolates collected over the last three years (2010-2012). In addition, the susceptibility to other antibiotics usually used to treat gastrointestinal diseases was determined in these isolates by using a microdilution method. A total of 139 strains of SNT, Shigella and Yersinia were studied. All of them, except one strain, had a MIC≤16mg/L of azithromycin. In the adult population, 14.7% and 40.6% of SNT and Shigella isolates, respectively, were resistant to at least 2 of following antibiotics: amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. In the pediatric population, 10% of SNT clinical isolates and 28.6% (2/7) of Shigella isolates were resistant to amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. In our experience, azithromycin would be a useful antibiotic alternative to treat bacterial diarrhea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Validity of direct identification and antibiotic susceptibility of microrganisms from bottles of blood culture

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    Carmela Mazzone

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood culture is a very important laboratory test: if bacteremia or sepsis are suspected, the diagnosis of the pathogen and antibiotic therapy may be achieved making use of it. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility test carried out directly from the bottle may give important information in a shorter time. The introduction of the automatic instrumentation has improved the discovering of pathogens in the blood, however the elapsing time between the positive detection and the microbiological report is still along.The aim of our work was to verify the validity of the direct use of blood culture broth in which growth of microorganisms has been detected, which could reduce the response time of the bacteremia diagnosis. During the period February - July 2009, a total of 150 blood cultures were analysed:we compared the results obtained both by direct method and by reference method. 20 Gram positive microrganisms and 13 Gram negative microrganisms were respectively isolated and identified. The identification of Gram-negative and Gram-positive microrganisms showed an agreement of 100% between the direct and the reference method. For antibiotic susceptibility tests, among the Gram positive has reported 1.3% very major error, 2.9% major error and 1.4% minor error, while the Gram negative, respectivety 0.3%, 1.4%, 0%. The use of direct identification and susceptibility testing from positive blood cultures, can improve the response time and better efficiency in diagnostic procedures.

  17. Childhood Septicemia in Nepal: Documenting the Bacterial Etiology and Its Susceptibility to Antibiotics

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    Shamshul Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Children are among the most vulnerable population groups to contract illnesses. The varying microbiological pattern of septicemia warrants the need for an ongoing review of the causative organisms and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. Therefore, the objective of this study was to document the bacterial etiology of childhood septicemia and its antibiotic susceptibility profile. Methods. Cross-sectional type of study in 1630 suspected patients was conducted at CMCTH from January 2012 to December 2013. Blood samples were collected aseptically for culture. The organisms grown were identified by standard microbiological methods recommended by American Society for Microbiology (ASM and subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Methicillin resistance was confirmed using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks methods. Results. Septicemia was detected in 172 (10.6% cases. Among Gram-positive organisms, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS were leading pathogen and Acinetobacter spp. were leading pathogen among Gram-negative isolates. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and clindamycin were the most effective antibiotics against Gram-positive isolates while amikacin was effective against Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative isolates. Methicillin resistance was detected in 44.4% of Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions. This study has highlighted the burden of bacterial etiology for septicemia among children in a tertiary care center of central Nepal.

  18. Development of a Novel Test for Simultaneous Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Jonathan; Mitchell, Malika; Chen, Yuh-Jue; Kamal, Sarah; Riddle, Gerald; Faro, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elucidation of a pathogen's antimicrobial susceptibility requires subculture after the organism is first isolated. This takes several days, requiring patients to be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. This approach contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. Methods. Microtiter wells were coated with a polyclonal antibody targeting the pathogen of interest. Bacterial suspensions were added in the presence/absence of selected antibiotics. After washing, captured bacteria were detected. Findings. Group B streptococcus (GBS), Enterococcus faecalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were each detected at 105 bacteria/mL following a 20-minute incubation period. Susceptibility to select antibiotics was discernable following a 6-hour incubation period (GBS and Enterococcus). Sensitivity was increased to 10-2 bacteria/mL for GBS, 10-1 bacteria/mL for E. faecalis, and 101 bacteria/mL for N. gonorrhoeae following 18-24-hour culture. Conclusion. This novel assay allows for the highly sensitive and specific identification of a pathogen and simultaneous determination of its antimicrobial susceptibility in a reduced time.

  19. Childhood septicemia in Nepal: documenting the bacterial etiology and its susceptibility to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shamshul; Nepal, Hari Prasad; Gautam, Rajendra; Shrestha, Sony; Neopane, Puja; Rimal, Brihaspati; Mandal, Fuleshwar; Ansari, Safiur Rahman; Chapagain, Moti Lal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Children are among the most vulnerable population groups to contract illnesses. The varying microbiological pattern of septicemia warrants the need for an ongoing review of the causative organisms and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. Therefore, the objective of this study was to document the bacterial etiology of childhood septicemia and its antibiotic susceptibility profile. Methods. Cross-sectional type of study in 1630 suspected patients was conducted at CMCTH from January 2012 to December 2013. Blood samples were collected aseptically for culture. The organisms grown were identified by standard microbiological methods recommended by American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Methicillin resistance was confirmed using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks methods. Results. Septicemia was detected in 172 (10.6%) cases. Among Gram-positive organisms, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) were leading pathogen and Acinetobacter spp. were leading pathogen among Gram-negative isolates. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and clindamycin were the most effective antibiotics against Gram-positive isolates while amikacin was effective against Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative isolates. Methicillin resistance was detected in 44.4% of Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions. This study has highlighted the burden of bacterial etiology for septicemia among children in a tertiary care center of central Nepal.

  20. Development of a Novel Test for Simultaneous Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Faro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of a pathogen’s antimicrobial susceptibility requires subculture after the organism is first isolated. This takes several days, requiring patients to be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. This approach contributes to the development of bacterial resistance. Methods. Microtiter wells were coated with a polyclonal antibody targeting the pathogen of interest. Bacterial suspensions were added in the presence/absence of selected antibiotics. After washing, captured bacteria were detected. Findings. Group B streptococcus (GBS, Enterococcus faecalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were each detected at 105 bacteria/mL following a 20-minute incubation period. Susceptibility to select antibiotics was discernable following a 6-hour incubation period (GBS and Enterococcus. Sensitivity was increased to 10−2 bacteria/mL for GBS, 10−1 bacteria/mL for E. faecalis, and 101 bacteria/mL for N. gonorrhoeae following 18–24-hour culture. Conclusion. This novel assay allows for the highly sensitive and specific identification of a pathogen and simultaneous determination of its antimicrobial susceptibility in a reduced time.

  1. [Rapid test for detection of susceptibility to cefotaxime in Enterobacteriaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Guerra, Gemma; Hoyos-Mallecot, Yannik; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    In this work an "in house" rapid test based on the change in pH that is due to hydrolysis for detecting Enterobacteriaceae susceptible to cefotaxime is evaluated. The strains of Enterobacteriaceae from 1947 urine cultures were assessed using MicroScan panels and the "in house" test. This rapid test includes red phenol solution and cefotaxime. Using MicroScan panels, 499 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were evaluated, which included 27 isolates of Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), 16 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL and 1 isolate of Klebsiella oxytoca ESBL. The "in house" test offers the following values: sensitivity 98% and specificity 97%, with negative predictive value 100% and positive predictive value 78%. The "in house" test based on the change of pH is useful in our area for detecting presumptively cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanomotion Detection Method for Testing Antibiotic Resistance and Susceptibility of Slow-Growing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, María Ines; Stupar, Petar; Chomicki, Wojciech; Bertacchi, Massimiliano; Dietler, Giovanni; Arnal, Laura; Vela, María Elena; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Kasas, Sandor

    2017-12-04

    Infectious diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms and are often severe. Time to fully characterize an infectious agent after sampling and to find the right antibiotic and dose are important factors in the overall success of a patient's treatment. Previous results suggest that a nanomotion detection method could be a convenient tool for reducing antibiotic sensitivity characterization time to several hours. Here, the application of the method for slow-growing bacteria is demonstrated, taking Bordetella pertussis strains as a model. A low-cost nanomotion device is able to characterize B. pertussis sensitivity against specific antibiotics within several hours, instead of days, as it is still the case with conventional growth-based techniques. It can discriminate between resistant and susceptible B. pertussis strains, based on the changes of the sensor's signal before and after the antibiotic addition. Furthermore, minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of clinically applied antibiotics are compared using both techniques and the suggested similarity is discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Variability of laboratory identification and antibiotic susceptibility reporting of Pseudomonas spp. isolates from dogs with chronic otitis externa.

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    Schick, Anthea E; Angus, John C; Coyner, Kimberly S

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate interlaboratory variation in isolation and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Pseudomonas spp. as reported to veterinarians for cases of canine chronic bacterial otitis externa. Twenty-six dogs with unilateral or bilateral bacterial otitis externa from multiple referral practices were included in this prospective study. Triplicate samples collected simultaneously from the same location in the external ear canal were randomly submitted to three laboratories for culture and susceptibility testing. Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from 18 of 34 (53%) ears. All three laboratories agreed on the presence of Pseudomonas spp. in 15 (83.3%) ears sampled. However, two laboratories agreed on two (11.1%) occasions, and on one occasion (5.5%) Pseudomonas spp. were identified in only one laboratory. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics were compared between laboratories B and C. Using laboratory-defined susceptibility of sensitive (S), intermediate (I) and resistant (R), none of the 16 Pseudomonas spp. with MIC data reported had identical patterns of antibiotic susceptibility. Agreement in susceptibility to individual antibiotics was observed in 13 of 16 (81%) occasions for amikacin and gentamicin, 10 of 16 (63%) occasions for ticarcillin, and nine of 16 (56%) for enrofloxacin. These results indicate that Pseudomonas spp. were identified by all three laboratories chosen for this study in 83% of the time. Moreover, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and MIC values reported to veterinarians may not agree between laboratories. Veterinarians should interpret bacterial culture and susceptibility results with multiple caveats including variability between laboratories.

  4. Integrated Biosensor Assay for Rapid Uropathogen Identification and Phenotypic Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emanuela; Mohan, Ruchika; Mach, Kathleen E; Sin, Mandy Lai Yi; Anikst, Victoria; Buscarini, Maurizio; Wong, Pak Kin; Gau, Vincent; Banaei, Niaz; Liao, Joseph C

    2017-04-01

    Standard diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) via urine culture for pathogen identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) takes 2-3 d. This delay results in empiric treatment and contributes to the misuse of antibiotics and the rise of resistant pathogens. A rapid diagnostic test for UTI may improve patient care and antibiotic stewardship. To develop and validate an integrated biosensor assay for UTI diagnosis, including pathogen ID and AST, with determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin. Urine samples positive for Enterobacteriaceae (n=84) or culture-negative (n=23) were obtained from the Stanford Clinical Microbiology Laboratory between November 2013 and September 2014. Each sample was diluted and cultured for 5h with and without ciprofloxacin, followed by quantitative detection of bacterial 16S rRNA using a single electrochemical biosensor array functionalized with a panel of complementary DNA probes. Pathogen ID was determined using universal bacterial, Enterobacteriaceae (EB), and pathogen-specific probes. Phenotypic AST with ciprofloxacin MIC was determined using an EB probe to measure 16S rRNA levels as a function of bacterial growth. Electrochemical signals for pathogen ID at 6 SD over background were considered positive. An MIC signal of 0.4 log units lower than the no-antibiotic control indicated sensitivity. Results were compared to clinical microbiology reports. For pathogen ID, the assay had 98.5% sensitivity, 96.6% specificity, 93.0% positive predictive value, and 99.3% negative predictive value. For ciprofloxacin MIC the categorical and essential agreement was 97.6%. Further automation, testing of additional pathogens and antibiotics, and a full prospective study will be necessary for translation to clinical use. The integrated biosensor platform achieved microbiological results including MIC comparable to standard culture in a significantly shorter assay time. Further assay automation

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in intensive care unit in Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijovic, Gordana; Pejakov, Ljubica; Vujosevic, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    The global increase in multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter has created widespread problems in the treatment of patients in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to assess the current level of antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter species in ICU of Clinical Centre of Montenegro and determine their epidemiology. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested in 70 isolates of Acinetobacter collected from non-repeating samples taken from 40 patients. The first nine isolates were genotyped by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR). Tigecycline was found to be the most active antimicrobial agent with 80.6% of susceptibility. All the isolates were multidrug resistant with fully resistance to cefalosporinas, piperacillin and piperacillin/tazobactam. More than half of them (58.5%) were probably extensively resistant. Seven out of nine examined strains were clonally related by rep-PCR. Our results showed extremely high rate of multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter isolates and high percentage of its clonally spreading.

  6. [The comparison of antibiotic susceptibilities of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates in transition from CLSI to EUCAST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süzük, Serap; Kaşkatepe, Banu; Avcıküçük, Havva; Aksaray, Sebahat; Başustaoğlu, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    Determination of treatment protocols for infections according to antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) results is are important for controlling the problem of antibiotic resistance. Two standards are widely used in the world. One of them is Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards used in Turkey for many years and the other is the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) standards which is used in European Union member countries and came into use in 2015 in Turkey. Since the EUCAST standards had higher clinical sensitivity limits particularly for gram-negative bacilli compared to CLSI (2009) standards, there will be some changes in antibiotic resistance profiles of Turkey with the use of EUCAST. CLSI has changed zone diameters after 2009 versions and the differences between the two standards were brought to a minimum level. Knowledge of local epidemiological data is important to determine empirical therapy which will be used in urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim of this study was to determine the differences of antibiotic susceptibility zone diameters based on our local epidemiological data among uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates according to EUCAST 2014 and CLSI 2014 standards. A total of 298 E.coli strains isolated from urine samples as the cause of uncomplicated acute UTI agents, were included in the study. Isolates were identified by conventional methods and with BBL Crystal E/NF ID System (Becton Dickinson, USA). AST was performed with Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method and results were evaluated and interpreted according to the CLSI 2014 and EUCAST 2014 standards. According to the results, susceptibility rates of isolates against amikacin (100%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (63.09%) were identical in both standards. However, statistically significant differences were observed between CLSI and EUCAST standards in terms of susceptibilities against gentamicin (91.95% and 84.56%, respectively; p= 0

  7. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ocular infections

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    Maria Eugenia Vola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among S. aureus ocular infections in a tertiary health center in Brazil and compare antibiotic susceptibility patterns between MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates. METHODS: Electronic records from the ocular microbiology laboratory of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (between January 2000 and December 2009 all conjunctivitis, keratitis, and endophthalmitis cases with a positive culture for S. aureus were identified. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. RESULTS: Five hundred sixty-six S. aureus isolates were identified; of those, 56 (9.9% were resistant to methicillin. Throughout the 10-year period, Staphylococcus aureus showed a significant increasing trend from 7.55% to 16.18% among overall S. aurues infections (p=0.001 and from 3.7% to 13.16% in conjunctivitis (p=0.001. Conversely, we did not observe the same trend among those with keratitis (p=0.38. Staphylococcus aureus isolates showed higher resistance rates to tobramycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin when compared with S. aureus isolates (p< 0.001. All cases were susceptible to vancomycin. CONCLUSION: We observed an increasing trend in the overall prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus ocular infections and statistically significant higher resistance rates to commonly used antibiotics compared to Staphylococcus aureus. Our data supports the need for constant bacterial surveillance and should be taken into consideration before initiating empiric treatment of ocular infections.

  9. Ocular flora and their antibiotic susceptibility in patients having cataract surgery in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Vincenzo; Blanco, Anna Rita; Santocono, Marcello

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the ocular flora in a consecutive group of patients having cataract surgery and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of isolates to several ophthalmic antibiotics. Hospital Di Stefano, Catania, Italy. Observational case series. Conjunctival and eyelid cultures from patients were obtained 14 days before surgery and, if positive, repeated the day of the surgery. Antimicrobial susceptibility for aminoglycosides (netilmicin and tobramycin), fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin), chloramphenicol, and azithromycin was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Susceptibility was also tested for oxacillin, cefuroxime, and vancomycin. All positive patients received a 2-day preoperative course of 3 mg/mL netilmicin ophthalmic solution 4 times a day. The recovery rate of microorganisms after antibiotic treatment compared with baseline was calculated. One hundred twenty consecutive patients were included in the study. Cultures were positive in 72.5% of patients; 131 isolates, mainly gram-positive, were identified. Staphylococcus epidermidis (58.0%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.3%) were the most frequently isolated microorganisms. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci accounted for 3.8% of S epidermidis and 20.0% of S aureus. A high in vitro susceptibility (>90%) for all isolates, including multiresistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, was obtained for netilmicin, vancomycin, and cefuroxime. The recovery rate of isolates before surgery was reduced by 93.9% (P Industria Farmaceutica Italiana SpA. Dr. Santocono has no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  11. [Evolution of use of antibiotics of restricted prescription and trend of bacterial susceptibility in Concepcion Regional Hospital, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Felipe E; Villa, Lorenzo A; Fernández, Pola B; López, Mariela A; Mella, Sergio; Muñoz, Maritza

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was analyze the use of restricted antibiotics by patients hospitalized between 2004 and 2008 in Guillermo Grant Benavente Hospital in Concepcion. Also we attempted to identify possible correlations between antibiotic consumption and patterns of bacterial susceptibility. We performed a retrospective observational study that quantified the use of restricted antibiotics using DDD/100-bed-days, and cumulative susceptibility reports informed by the hospital's microbiology laboratory for bacterial susceptibility. The consumption of restricted antibiotics significantly increased between 2004 and 2008 (35%, p = 0.005). The groups with largest use were glycopeptides (37%) and carbapenems (30 %). These results can be explained by the emergence of endemic Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) Gram negative bacilli. Results showed a decrease in susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to imipenem (p = 0.038) and K. pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin (p = 0.021). The total consumption of restricted antibiotic has significantly increased, especially among complex medical services. A significant decrease in bacterial susceptibility has been observed mainly in gram-negative bacilli. The monitoring of antimicrobial prescribing practices and local susceptibility patterns are essential to promote the rational use of antibiotics.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Mascellino MT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Teresa Mascellino,1 Barbara Porowska,2 Massimiliano De Angelis,1 Alessandra Oliva1 1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Cardio-Thoracic, Vascular, General Surgery and of Organ Transplants, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy Abstract: In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori (Hp eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016 are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI, bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently

  13. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of uropathogens among children with urinary tract infection in Shiraz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Basiratnia, Mitra; Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Abbasi, Pejman; Amirmoezi, Fatemeh; Zare, Samaneh

    2017-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in pediatrics. Delay in diagnosis and treatment can cause significant morbidity. The physicians knowledge regarding the symptoms, microorganisms that caused UTI, and effective antibiotics in a geographical area can help them to select the appropriate antibiotics. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of bacteria that cause UTI and their susceptibility to common antibiotics as well as the common symptoms and associated factors in children of Shiraz, Southern Iran.This cross sectional study was performed among 202 children with UTI, aged 2 months to 18 years old, between August and November 2014 in pediatric medical centers of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Urine samples were collected using urinary catheter or suprapubic in children antibiotic susceptibility for each organism was assayed by the Kirby Bauer method using antibiogram test. Patient's information was collected through checking the medical documents and interview with parents.Our results showed that the frequency of UTI was significantly higher in girls (70.3%) than in boys. The most commonly discovered pathogens were Escherichia coli (E coli) (51.5%), followed by Klebsiella spp. (16.8%), and Enterococcus spp. (9.9%). Overall susceptibility test showed the highest resistance to ampicillin (81.2%) and cotrimoxazole (79.2%), and the highest sensitivity to imipenem (90.1%) and Gentamicin (65.3%). Gram negative and positive bacteria showed the highest antibiotic resistance to amoxicillin (83.8%) and clindamycin (100%), respectively. In addition, production of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) was 69.2% and 30.8% in E coli and Kelebsiella respectively.The efficacy of third generation of the cephalosporins was reduced because of the high rate of production of ESBL and drug resistance. These results inform the physician as to which antibiotics are appropriate to prescribe for the patient, as well as urine

  14. Clinical Presentation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Contact Lens Associated Microbial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Hedayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, the number of contact lens wearers has dramatically increased in Iran, particularly in youngsters. The purpose of current study was to assess the clinical presentation and antibiotic susceptibility of contact lens related microbial keratitis in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran. Methodology. A cross-sectional investigation of 26 patients (33 eyes with contact lens induced corneal ulcers who were admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahwaz City, from June 2012 to June 2013 was done. In order to study microbial culture and susceptibility of corneal ulcers, all of them were scraped. Results. Eight samples were reported as sterile. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (80% in positive cultures was the most widely recognized causative organism isolated. This is followed by Staphylococcus aureus 12% and Enterobacter 8%. The results showed that 84% of the microorganism cases were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, while imipenem, meropenem, and ceftazidime were the second most effective antibiotics (76%. Conclusion. Results of current study show the importance of referring all contact lens wearers with suspected corneal infection to ophthalmologists for more cure. The corneal scraping culture and contact lens solution should be performed to guide antibiotic therapy.

  15. The effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone on the susceptibility of Escherichia coli to different antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, G; Bezmaternykh, K; Oktyabrsky, O N

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) on the susceptibility of growing Escherichia coli to antibiotics. Susceptibility of E. coli to antibiotics in the presence of 20E was estimated by determination of the colony-forming ability and the specific growth rate. Pretreatment with 20E decreased the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin (0·3 and 3·0 μg ml-1 ), streptomycin (10 and 40 μg ml-1 ) and kanamycin (10 μg ml-1 ) and increased the bactericidal action of 0·03 μg ml-1 ciprofloxacin. To study the influence of 20E on gene expression, we used strains of E. coli carrying fusions of promoters of relevant genes with the structural gene of β-galactosidase. 20E had no marked effect on the expression of antioxidant genes katG, katE, sodA and the rpoS gene (general stress response), while it (alone or combined with ciprofloxacin) markedly stimulated expression of the sulA gene belonging to the SOS regulon (DNA damage response). In growing E. coli, 20E modulated the bactericidal action of antibiotics and stimulated the SOS response. The results of this study may be used to enhance the efficiency of antibacterial therapies. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in neonatal septicemia in view of emerging drug resistance

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    Maimoona Mustafa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate pathogenic bacteria in neo-natal septicaemia cases, and to know their antibiograms. Under aseptic precautions, blood was drawn from 140 neonates with sus-pected septicaemia and inoculated in brain heart infusion (BHI broth. Isolates obtained were identified as per standard protocol and antibi-otic susceptibility was done by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method (as per CLSI guidelines. A total number of 62 (44.2% patients had positive blood cultures. The most common pathogens isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=22, 35% followed by Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 24.1%, Escherichia coli (n=14, 22.5%, CONS (n=7, 11.2% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=4, 6.4%. The Gram nega-tive organisms showed high resistance to commonly used antibiotics and were highly sensitive to Meropenem. The Gram positive bacteria showed high resistance to Ampicillin, Erythromycin and Amoxycillin; but they were highly susceptible to Linizolid and Vancomycin. As the Gram negative organisms were the most common isolates in neona-tal septicemia, their resistance pattern should be considered essen-tial for deciding the empirical treatment. Prompt treatment of neonatal sepsis with judicious use of appropriate antibiotics can minimize the morbidity and mortality, besides reducing the emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms in intensive care units (ICUs.

  17. Antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of autochthonous starter cultures as safety parameters for fresh cheese production

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    Dora Bučan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity, as food safety parameters important for application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB, that previously satisfied technological criteria for functional starter cultures in fresh cheese production were examined. Soluble whole cell protein patterns of autochthonous LAB strains from fresh cheese, obtained by SDS-PAGE, revealed the presence of two predominant strains, which were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum A8 and Enterococcus faecium A7. These strains were not resistant and shown susceptibility to antibiotics: ampicillin, bacitracin, penicillin G, azithromycin, chloramphenicol, clarithromycin, clindamycin, spiramycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, neomycin, gentamicin, erythromycin, rifampicin and novobiocin. Lb. fermentum A8 strain displayed phenotypic resistance to vancomycin, but this resistance is intrinsic, not transferable and it is acceptable from the safety aspect. The capacity of Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 to inhibit growth of test-microorganisms Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 11911, Escherichia coli 3014, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium FP1 and Staphylococcus aureus 3048, was also analysed. According to obtained results, Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 are safe from the aspect of spreading antibiotic resistance and could be useful as bioprotective cultures that inhibit common bacterial food contaminants, including L. monocytogenes.

  18. Bacterial isolates from infected wounds and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern: some remarks about wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Lucinda J; Fazii, Paolo; Di Giulio, Mara; Cellini, Luigina

    2015-02-01

    Wound infection plays an important role in the development of chronicity, delaying wound healing. This study aimed to identify the bacterial pathogens present in infected wounds and characterise their resistance profile to the most common antibiotics used in therapy. Three hundred and twelve wound swab samples were collected from 213 patients and analysed for the identification of microorganisms and for the determination of their antibiotic susceptibility. Patients with diverse type of wounds were included in this retrospective study, carried out from March to September 2012. A total of 28 species were isolated from 217 infected wounds. The most common bacterial species detected was Staphylococcus aureus (37%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17%), Proteus mirabilis (10%), Escherichia coli (6%) and Corynebacterium spp. (5%). Polymicrobial infection was found in 59 (27·1%) of the samples and was mainly constituted with two species. The most common association was S. aureus/P. aeruginosa. All Gram-positives were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Gram-negatives showed quite high resistance to the majority of antibiotics, being amikacin the most active against these bacteria. This study is mostly oriented to health care practitioners who deal with wound management, making them aware about the importance of wound infection and helping them to choose the adequate treatment options to control microbial infection in wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Decreased Streptococcus pneumoniae susceptibility to oral antibiotics among children in rural Vietnam: a community study

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    Phuc Ho D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most significant bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia among children under five years worldwide. Updated resistance information of S. pneumoniae among children is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, which will have immense implications for local and global health. This study investigated the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in isolated strains of S. pneumoniae and relationship with antibiotic use and demographic factors of children under five in rural Vietnam in 2007. Methods In Bavi district, 847 children 6 to 60 months were selected from 847 households. The main child-caregivers in the households were interviewed weekly using structured questionnaires to collect information of daily illness symptoms and drug use for the selected child over a four-week period (from March through June 2007. In the 3rd week, the children were invited for a clinical examination and to collect nasopharyngeal samples for S. pneumoniae identification. Etest and disk diffusion were used to test antibiotic susceptibility. Results Of 818 participating children, 258 (32% had ongoing respiratory infections, 421 (52% carried S. pneumoniae, and 477 (58% had used antibiotics within the previous three weeks. Of the 421 isolates, 95% were resistant to at least one antibiotic (401/421. Resistance to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline, phenoxymethylpenicillin, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin was 78%, 75%, 75%, 70% and 28%, respectively. Low resistance was noted for amoxicillin (4%, benzylpenicillin (4%, and cefotaxime (2%. The intermediate resistance to amoxicillin was 32%. Multidrug-resistance was seen in 60%. The most common pattern was co-resistance to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and erythromycin. The proportion of children carrying resistant bacteria was higher among the children who had used antibiotics in the previous three weeks. Conclusions Resistance

  20. Effect of antibiotic use and mold exposure in infancy on allergic rhinitis in susceptible adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-I; Lee, Eun; Jung, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung Young; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Lee, So-Yeon; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Shim, Jung Yeon; Kang, Mi-Jin; Yu, Ho-Sung; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotic use in infancy induces alteration in intestinal microbiota and is associated with the development of allergic diseases. Mold exposure is also associated with allergic diseases. Genetic susceptibility may interact with specific environmental factors in allergic disease development. To investigate independent and combined effects of antibiotic use and mold exposure in infancy on the risk of allergic rhinitis (AR) in adolescents. Data on AR and environmental factors were collected using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire from 7,389 adolescents from Seoul, Korea. TaqMan genotyping was performed for interleukin 13 (IL-13) (rs20541) and Toll-like receptor 4 (rs1927911) polymorphisms in 1,395 adolescents. Age, parental history of AR, antibiotic use in infancy, and pet ownership during pregnancy or infancy were associated with an increased risk of current AR (diagnosis of AR and symptoms of AR within the preceding 12 months). Having older siblings was a protective effect. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for current AR for combined antibiotic use and mold exposure in infancy was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-2.09). For each factor separately, aORs were 1.25 (95% CI, 1.04-1.50) and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.75-1.31), respectively. Antibiotic and mold exposure in infancy, GA or AA genotypes of IL-13 (rs20541) (aOR 4.53; 95% CI, 1.66-12.38; P for interaction = .05), and CT+TT genotype of Toll-like receptor 4 (rs1927911) (aOR, 3.20; 95% CI, 1.24-8.26; P for interaction = .18) increased the risk of current AR. Antibiotic use and mold exposure in infancy have additive effects on the risk of current AR in genetically susceptible adolescents. Gene-environment interactions between IL-13 (rs20541) and antibiotics or mold may play a role in AR. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacteriology Of Diabetic Foot In Tertiary Care Hospital; Frequency, Antibiotic Susceptibility And Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Syeda Sadia; Zafar, Jamal; Shams, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic foot being one of the frequent and disabling complications of diabetes. In view of widespread regional variation in causative organisms and antimicrobial susceptibility, the current study aimed to determine frequency of causative organisms, their antimicrobial susceptibility and associated risk factors. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 6 months' duration at dept. of Medicine; PIMS Hospital Islamabad. Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic foot ulcer were enrolled after informed consent. Patients already receiving antibiotics, having no growth on culture and >3 weeks' duration of ulcer were excluded. Sample from wound was sent for culture and sensitivity. Antibiotic susceptibility testing identified the susceptible and resistant strains of organisms. Among 114 patients (66.67% males and 33.33% females); mean age was 55.11±11.96 years. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in 46%, E. coli in 28%, Pseudomonas in 6%, Klebsiella in 3.5% and other organisms in 17%. 92% of S. aureus was sensitive to Vancomycin and 67% to Clindamycin. Amongst E. coli, 81% showed sensitivity to Imipenem, 69% to Aminoglycosides and 31% to Quinolones. Glycaemic control was unsatisfactory in 65.8%. Peripheral vascular disease was found in 46% patients and sensory neuropathy in 94%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate amongst gram positive organisms while E. coli amongst gram-negatives. Vancomycin is suggested to be the drug of choice for gram positive and Imipenem for gram negative organisms. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy according to susceptibility patterns would reduce the morbidity and emergence of multidrug resistant organisms in diabetic foot infections.

  2. [In vitro susceptibility of Pasteurella and related bacteria to five orally administered antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, C; Lozniewski, A; Conroy, M C; Weber, M

    1996-05-01

    Tetracyclines and beta-lactam antibiotics are usually recommended for the treatment of pasteurellosis following bite wounds. However other oral antimicrobial agents could be proposed. In vitro susceptibility of 94 Pasteurella strains [P. multocida (79), P. stomatis (11), P. dagmatis (2), P. canis (1), P. "SP" (1)], 20 group EF-4 strains and 28 Neisseria weaveri strains (formerly group M-5), that are bacteria often isolated after animal-inflicted wounds, was studied towards five antibiotics: clarithromycin, azithromycin, pristinamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method using HTM medium (Oxoïd), and for pristinamycin using both HTM and Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 5% horse blood (BMH). Most of Pasteurella isolates showed intermediate susceptibility to clarithromycin (63%) and to azithromycin (90.5%) with lower MICs for azithromycin. Fourty-two and thirty-two percent of Pasteurella strains were susceptible to pristinamycin respectively on HTM and on BMH. EF-4 and N. weaveri were more sensitive than Pasteurella to macrolides and to pristinamycin. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was active against all isolates, with higher MICs for EF-4 and N. weaveri. On all strains tested, the lowest MICs were observed for ciprofloxacin. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin could be proposed as a therapeutic alternative in case of pasteurellosis following animal bites.

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from freshwater fishes

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    Halima Sarder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic microorganism. It is a secondary biological agent that contributes to the occurrence of fish diseases and its deterioration. This research was undertaken to determine the prevalence of A. hydrophila in some freshwater fishes collected from three different fish markets of Dhaka City and to test their antibiotic susceptibility. Total bacterial count and total aeromonas on different aeromonas selective media were enumerated using serial dilution technique. Bacterial isolates were characterized to identify A. hydrophila using biochemical tests and with comparison to reference strain (ATCC 7966. The lowest Aeromonas count was detected to be 2.83±0.40×102 cfu/g in Anabas testudineus and the highest was 1.03±0.153×103 cfu/g in Oreochromis mossambicus. On market basis highest aeromonas count was found in Anando Bazar (8.10±1.09×102 cfu/g and lowest in Hatirpool Bazar (5.63±0.90×102 cfu/g with no significant difference. Maximum susceptibility to amikacin and gentamicin was observed whereas all of the isolates were found resistant to a commonly used antibiotic amoxycillin. The obtained results point that antimicrobial susceptibility was more or less similar regardless of the origin of the samples collected. All the fishes investigated in this study contained A. hydrophila in their different organs.

  4. Evaluation of the antibiotic susceptibility of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci in children

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    reza Ghotaslou

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghotaslou R1, Gharashi Z2, Pour-asl M3 1. Assistant professor, Department of pathobiology, Faculty of medicine, Tabriz University of medical sciences 2. Associate professor, Department of pediatrics, Tabriz University of medical sciences 3. Instructor, Department of pathobiology, Faculty of health, Tabriz University of medical sciences Abstract Background: The most common microorganism in blood cultures is Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNSt. Exact diagnosis of bacterial agents in blood and their antibiograms are an important value in septicemia therapy. The purpose of the present study is to identify and determine antibiotic susceptibility of CNSt isolated from blood in children. Materials and methods: Samples were collected from 270 patients with CNSt positive blood cultures during 2 years (2003-2004 in pediatric center of Tabriz by routine microbiological methods. The disc agar diffusion technique (kriby-Bauer was used to evaluate the susceptibility test of CNSt. Results: In our study mean age of patients was 10 month. 54.4% and 45.6% were male and female repectively. In 270 CNSt, the resistance to Penicillin, Ampicilline, Cephalexin, Ceftizoxime, Ceftriaxon and Vancomycin were respectively 98.1%, 95.9%, 62.3%, 55.9%, 53.7% and 2.6%. Conclusion: Antibiotic susceptibility of CNSt is not predictable and multiresistant strains are common. Vancomycin is the drug of choice, since only 2.6% resistant CNSt were noticed.

  5. Biocide and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella isolates obtained before and after cleaning at six Danish pig slaughterhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Pedersen, Karl; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2014-01-01

    that bacteria exposed to disinfectants can develop resistance toward disinfectants and can have a higher risk of developing antibiotic resistance.The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of biocide resistant Salmonella sp. in Danish pig slaughterhouses, to evaluate if there was a correlation...... between susceptibilities to biocides and antibiotics, and to examine if cleaning and disinfection select isolates with changed susceptibility toward biocides or antibiotics.Salmonella sp. was isolated from the environment in Danish pig slaughterhouses before and after cleaning and disinfection...

  6. Molecular Epidemiological and Antibiotic Susceptibility Characterization of Brucella Isolates from Humans in Sicily, Italy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Graziani, Caterina; Santangelo, Carmela; Xibilia, Maria Teresa; Imbriani, Alida; Amato, Rosa; Neri, Domenico; Cuccia, Mario; Rinnone, Sebastiano; Di Marco, Vincenzo; Ciuchini, Franco

    2007-01-01

    Brucellosis is a serious problem in Sicily. Brucella melitensis was identified as the species most frequently isolated in humans in Italy. No data, however, are available about the molecular epidemiological characterization of Brucella isolates from humans. We have conducted this study to molecularly characterize clinical isolates of Brucella spp. and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Twenty Brucella isolates were studied. Differential growth characteristics and DNA polymorphisms such as the restriction patterns of the PCR-amplified omp2a and omp2b genes, rpoB nucleotide sequencing, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of 16 loci (MLVA-16) were used to characterize the strains. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the E-test method on two different agar media, and the results were compared. All isolates were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3. rpoB nucleotide sequence analysis allowed the identification of two different genotypes of B. melitensis biovar 3. On the other hand, the MLVA-16 typing assay recognized 17 distinct genotypes. All isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics (rifampin, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and the Mueller-Hinton agar plate is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the E-test method. Our findings identify B. melitensis biovar 3 as the etiological agent isolated in Sicily and encourage the use of both molecular methods, and in particular of the MLVA-16 assay, in epidemiological trace-back analysis. This study represents the first epidemiological data from molecular typing of Brucella strains circulating in Italy and, in particular, in eastern Sicily. PMID:17634297

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Pakistan: a review of results from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) 2002-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, A; Hasan, R; Nizamuddin, S; Mahmood, N; Mukhtar, S; Ali, F; Morrissey, I; Barker, K; Torumkuney, D

    2016-05-01

    To investigate changes in the antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pyogenes from the Survey of Antibiotic Resistance (SOAR) in community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CA-RTIs) between 2002 and 2015 in Pakistan. This is a review based on previously published studies from 2002-03, 2004-06 and 2007-09 and also new data from 2014-15. Susceptibility was determined by Etest(®) or disc diffusion according to CLSI and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) breakpoints. A total of 706 isolates from CA-RTIs comprising 381 S. pneumoniae, 230 H. influenzae and 95 S. pyogenes were collected between 2002 and 2015 and tested against a range of antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae rose steeply from 2002 to 2009, with isolates non-susceptible to penicillin and macrolides increasing from 10% to 34.1% and from 13%-14% to 29.7%, respectively. Susceptibility to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (and by inference amoxicillin) remained between 99.4% and 100% from 2002 to 2015. Over the years, the prevalence of susceptibility to cefuroxime was 98%-100% among S. pneumoniae. Resistance in S. pneumoniae to some older antibiotics between 2007 and 2009 was high (86.8% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and 57.2% for tetracycline). Between 2002 and 2015, ampicillin resistance (β-lactamase-positive strains) among H. influenzae has remained low (between 2.6% and 3.2%) and almost unchanged over the years (H. influenzae was not tested during 2004-06). For S. pyogenes isolates, macrolide resistance reached 22%; however, susceptibility to penicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and cefuroxime remained stable at 100%. In S. pneumoniae from Pakistan, there has been a clear reduction in susceptibility to key antibiotics since 2002, but not to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (amoxicillin) or cefuroxime. However, susceptibility in H. influenzae has remained stable. Local antibiotic susceptibility/resistance data are essential to

  8. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Samuel C.; Stefano Cestellos-Blanco; Keisuke Inoue; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, econo...

  9. A Flow Cytometry Method for Rapidly Assessing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Responses to Antibiotics with Different Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte Louise; Doris, Kathryn Sarah; Thomas, Stephen Richard; Allnutt, Jonathan Charles; Marriott, Alice Ann Neville; Hatch, Kim Alexandra; Watson, Robert James; Bottley, Graham; Marsh, Philip David; Taylor, Stephen Charles; Bacon, Joanna

    2016-07-01

    Current methods for assessing the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are lengthy and do not capture information about viable organisms that are not immediately culturable under standard laboratory conditions as a result of antibiotic exposure. We have developed a rapid dual-fluorescence flow cytometry method using markers for cell viability and death. We show that the fluorescent marker calcein violet with an acetoxy-methyl ester group (CV-AM) can differentiate between populations of M. tuberculosis growing at different rates, while Sytox green (SG) can differentiate between live and dead mycobacteria. M. tuberculosis was exposed to isoniazid or rifampin at different concentrations over time and either dual stained with CV-AM and SG and analyzed by flow cytometry or plated to determine the viability of the cells. Although similar trends in the loss of viability were observed when the results of flow cytometry and the plate counting methods were compared, there was a lack of correlation between these two approaches, as the flow cytometry analysis potentially captured information about cell populations that were unable to grow under standard conditions. The flow cytometry approach had an additional advantage in that it could provide insights into the mode of action of the drug: antibiotics targeting the cell wall gave a flow cytometry profile distinct from those inhibiting intracellular processes. This rapid drug susceptibility testing method could identify more effective antimycobacterials, provide information about their potential mode of action, and accelerate their progress to the clinic. Copyright © 2016 Hendon-Dunn et al.

  10. Broad-spectrum in vitro antibacterial activities of clay minerals against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.; REMENIH, CHRISTINE M.; WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives The capacity to properly address the worldwide incidence of infectious diseases lies in the ability to detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. Therefore, identifying and analyzing inhibitory agents are worthwhile endeavors in an era when few new classes of effective antimicrobials have been developed. The use of geological nanomaterials to heal skin infections has been evident since the earliest recorded history, and specific clay minerals may prove valuable in the treatment of bacterial diseases, including infections for which there are no effective antibiotics, such as Buruli ulcer and multi-drug resistant infections. Methods We have subjected two iron-rich clay minerals, which have previously been used to treat Buruli ulcer patients, to broth culture testing of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant pathogenic bacteria to assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as therapeutic agents. Results One specific mineral, CsAg02, demonstrated bactericidal activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) E. coli, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium marinum and a combined bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Mycobacterium smegmatis, while another mineral with similar structure and bulk crystal chemistry, CsAr02, had no effect on or enhanced bacterial growth. The <0.2 μm fraction of CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 200°C or 550°C retained bactericidal activity, while cation-exchanged CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 900°C no longer killed E. coli. Conclusions Our results indicate that specific mineral products have intrinsic, heat-stable antibacterial properties, which could provide an inexpensive treatment against numerous human bacterial infections. PMID:18070832

  11. Evaluation of Etiologic Agents and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Patients with Corneal Ulcer

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    F. Eslami

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Corneal ulcer is one of the most important medical emergencies that in the absence of on time diagnosis and treatment can lead to loss of vision. Therefore, identification of microorganisms and their response to drugs in each region is important. The aim of this study was to determine the most common organisms that cause keratitis and antibiotic sensitivity in this region. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effect of various factors such as age, sex, demographic properties, risk factors, culture results and antibiotic sensitivity of patients with corneal ulcer were studied in Farshchian Hospital. Results: In this study, 80 patients with corneal ulcers were investigated. 46 cases with corneal ulcers had positive results (55.7%. 54% of culture-positives were men and 46% were female. Age distribution of outbreaks in two age ranges including under ten years and 50 to 69 years of age were more than others. Among the patients, trauma was the most important risk factor for corneal ulcer. Of the 80 evaluated corneal ulcers 57.5% of patients had positive corneal culture and 42.5% showed negative culture results. 84.4% out of 57.5% culture-positive samples had positive bacterial culture, and 15.6% had positive fungal cultures. The most common microorganism causing corneal ulcers was staph aureus with 36.8 percent among which Staph epidermidis (21.7% is the most prevalent. The corneal ulcer causing microorganisms responded well to Ciprofloxacin therapy. Conclusions: The result of this study shows that culture and antibiogram of corneal ulcers are essential to determine the cause of ulcer and antibiotic susceptibility. Before obtaining culture results and antibiotic sensitivity, the most appropriate antibiotic must be selected as the empirical therapy based on the epidemiological conditions and the most common microorganism. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (1:83-87

  12. Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria in Blood Cultures and Susceptibility Testing of Isolates With Various Antibiotics

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    Kholoujini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Blood infections are an extensive range of disorders that can vary from limited bacteremia to fatal septicemia. Bacteremia refers to the transient presence of a bacterium in the bloodstream. A delay in the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis can cause mortality, with a 20% - 50% prevalence rate. Objectives Due to the changing patterns of antibiotic resistance, as well as differences in patterns over time in different settings, we decided to identify infectious agents and their antibiotic resistance patterns in blood cultures. Materials and Methods This study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti hospital, Hamadan, Iran, during a one-year period (March 21, 2014, to March 22, 2015. From patients with suspected bloodstream infections, 5-10 mL of blood was collected three times and inoculated into culture bottles. After identifying the types of microorganisms, susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI standards, and the results were analyzed with statistical software. Results In the present study, 2,130 blood cultures were obtained from 710 patients (384 females and 326 males. Of these cultures, 232 (18.9% were positive; 107 (46% and 125 (54% were from females and males, respectively. Most of the positive cultures were related to the internal medicine and hematology wards, which had 132 cases (56.9%, and the ICU, with 37 cases (16%. The most frequent isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus, with prevalence rates of 18.2%, 24.1%, 10.3%, and 10.3%, respectively. The most effective antibiotic against Gram-positive isolates was vancomycin. Conclusions This study revealed that the most effective antibiotics against two Gram-negative and Gram-positive groups were amikacin and norfloxacin, so it is recommended that these antibiotics be used empirically, at least in the setting where this study was conducted, before performing the culturing and antibiogram

  13. Direct, rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test from positive blood cultures based on microscopic imaging analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jungil; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Lee, Gi Yoon; Han, Sangkwon; Han, Shinhun; Jin, Bonghwan; Lim, Taegeun; Kim, Shin; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Eui-Chong; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Taek Soo; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2017-01-01

    For the timely treatment of patients with infections in bloodstream and cerebrospinal fluid, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is urgently needed. Here, we describe a direct and rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (dRAST) system, which can determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from a positive blood culture bottle (PBCB) in six hours. The positive blood culture sample is directly mixed with agarose and inoculated into a micropatterned plastic microchip wit...

  14. EVALUATION OF ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ANAEROBIC PATHOGENS BACTEROIDES, PREVOTELLA AND FUSOBACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM CANCER PATIENTS

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    I. I. Shilnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study 122 strains of strictly anaerobic gram-negative rods Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium, isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were analyzed. The most common strains were B. fragilis (55 % followed by Prevotella (34.4 % and Fusobacterium spp (10.6 %. The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Among the B. fragilis group strains, B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus were isolated most frequently. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and 77 % of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the isolates to antimicrobial agents were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole, 97 %; imipenem, 95.5 %; amoxicillin/clavulanate, 95.5 % and clindamycin, 77.6 %. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (simultaneously to imipenem, amoxicillin/ clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin. All Prevotella isolates were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6 % of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4 % of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin. The number of strains susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93 % and 88 %, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin.

  15. Real time PCR for the rapid identification and drug susceptibility of Mycobacteria present in Bronchial washings

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    Thilini Piushani Keerthirathne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacteria have a spectrum of virulence and different susceptibilities to antibiotics. Distinguishing mycobacterial species is vital as patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM infections present clinical features that are similar to those of patients with tuberculosis. Thus, rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from NTM is critical to administer appropriate treatment. Hence the aim of the study was to rapid identification of mycobacterial species present in bronchial washings using multiplex real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and to determine the drug susceptibility in identified mycobacterial species. Methods Sputum smear negative bronchoscopy specimens (n = 150 were collected for a period of one year, from patients attending the General Hospital Kandy, Sri Lanka. The specimens were processed with modified Petroff’s method and were cultured on Löwenstein– Jensen medium. DNA, extracted from the mycobacterial isolates were subjected to a SYBR green mediated real time multiplex, PCR assay with primers specific for the M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium complex, M. chelonae-M.abscessus group and M. fortuitum group. DNA sequencing was performed for the species confirmation, by targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the drug susceptibility testing was performed for the molecularly identified isolates of M. tuberculosis and NTM. Results The optimized SYBR Green mediated multiplex real-time PCR assay was able to identify the presence of genus Mycobacterium in 25 out of 26 AFB positive isolates, two M. tuberculosis complex, three M. avium complex and two isolates belonging to M. chelonae-M. abscessus group. DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of M. tuberculosis, M. chelonae-M. abscessus, M. intracellulare, M. avium, Rhodococcus sp. and M. celatum. Remaining isolates were identified as Mycobacterium sp. All the NTM isolates were sensitive to amikacin and seven were resistant to ciproflaxacin

  16. Diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of autochthonous dairy enterococci isolates: Are they safe candidates for autochthonous starter cultures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarela eTerzić-Vidojević

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci represent the most controversial group of dairy bacteria. They are found to be the main constituent of many traditional Mediterranean dairy products and contribute to their characteristic taste and flavor. On the other hand, during the last 50 years antibiotic-resistant enterococci have emerged as leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity, technological properties, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence traits of 636 enterococci previously isolated from 55 artisan dairy products from 12 locations in the Western Balkan countries of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. All strains were identified both by microbiological and molecular methods. The predominant species was Enterococcus durans, followed by E. faecalis and E. faecium. Over 44% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, while 26.2% of the isolates were multi-resistant to three or more antibiotics belonging to different families. 185 isolates (29.1% were susceptible to all 13 of the antibiotics tested. The antibiotic-susceptible isolates were further tested for possible virulence genes and the production of biogenic amines. Finally, five enterococci isolates were found to be antibiotic susceptible with good technological characteristics and without virulence traits or the ability to produce biogenic amines, making them possible candidates for biotechnological application as starter cultures in the dairy industry.

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility, Genetic Diversity, and the Presence of Toxin Producing Genes in Campylobacter Isolates from Poultry

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    Jeeyeon Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined antibiotic susceptibility, genetic diversity, and characteristics of virulence genes in Campylobacter isolates from poultry. Chicken (n = 152 and duck (n = 154 samples were collected from 18 wet markets in Korea. Campylobacter spp. isolated from the carcasses were identified by PCR. The isolated colonies were analyzed for antibiotic susceptibility to chloramphenicol, amikacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and enrofloxacin. The isolates were also used to analyze genetic diversity using the DiversiLabTM system and were tested for the presence of cytolethal distending toxin (cdt genes. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 45 poultry samples out of 306 poultry samples (14.7% and the average levels of Campylobacter contamination were 22.0 CFU/g and 366.1 CFU/g in chicken and duck samples, respectively. Moreover, more than 90% of the isolates showed resistance to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Genetic correlation analysis showed greater than 95% similarity between 84.4% of the isolates, and three cdt genes (cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC were present in 71.1% of Campylobacter isolates. These results indicate that Campylobacter contamination should be decreased to prevent and treat Campylobacter foodborne illness.

  18. In-vitro susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains to antibiotics

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    İsmail Güler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Methicillin resistance of S.aureus strains sourced from hospitals and community-acquired has been increasing. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine the resistance rates to alternative antibiotics of meticilline resistant S.aureus (MRSA strains, where the multiple resistances are encountered the most.Materials and methods: A total of 100 MRSA strains isolated consequently from the clinical samples of hospitalized patients in Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospitals between September 2008 and October 2009 were included in the study. According to “Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institude (CLSI” criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method.Results: The rates of resistance to antibiotics of the MRSA strains included within the study were 77% to erythromycin, 1% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SXT, 90% to rifampin, 63% clindamycin, 84% to gentamicin and 0% to teicoplanin and vancomycin.Conclusion: All MRSA strains were susceptible to vancomycine and teicoplanin. On the other hand, TMP-SXT seems to be alternative agent for treatment of MRSA infections.

  19. [Antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy carrier children in Murcia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfayate-Miguélez, S; Ruiz Gómez, J; Sanchez-Solis de Querol, M; Guerrero Gómez, C; Pérez Simón, M; Ortiz Romero, M M; Núñez Trigueros, M L; López Yepes, M L; Blazquez Abellán, A; Zarauz García, J M; Ruiz Merino, G; Ortuño del Moral, M P

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a human pathogen that involves a high use of antibiotics. The objective of the study was to determine the susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics and their associated risk factors, in order to promote rational use of antibiotics. In A multicentre study was conducted in summer 2009 and winter 2010 on children attending paediatric clinics in the Region of Murcia. A nasopharyngeal sample was collected and an epidemiological questionnaire was completed. The study included 1562 children aged 1 and 4 years old. Almost one-third (31.3%, 489/1562) of children were nasal carriers. A sensitivity study was carried out on 376 isolates, of which 343 were serotyped. Almost two-thirds (61.7%, 964/1562) of children had received at least one dose of PCV7 (heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine), and 12.8% (44/343) of the isolates belonged to PCV7 serotypes. The prevalence rates of penicillin resistance (meningitis infections criteria CMI>0.06mg/L) were 28.1%; however, this percentage was 54% in PCV7 serotypes. None of the isolates had (MIC >2mg/L), so prevalence rates of susceptibility with non-meningitis infections criteria were 100%. There was a high percentage of erythromycin resistance (45.7%). The factors favouring resistance to penicillin and cefotaxime were the consumption of antibiotics in the previous month and the carrying of vaccine serotypes. On the other hand, the age of 4 years old was a protective factor of resistance. The 14, 35B, 19A, 15A, and 19F serotypes were less susceptible to penicillin. Both oral amoxicillin given to outpatients and intravenous penicillin or ampicillin to hospitalized patients are excellent options for the treatment of non-meningeal infections, as seen with pneumonia in these kinds of environments, where there is low incidence of isolates highly resistant to penicillin (CMI ≥ 2mg/L). Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma synoviae strains originating from Central and Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Grózner, Dénes; Sulyok, Kinga M; Nilsson, Kristin; Hrivnák, Veronika; Benčina, Dušan; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2017-11-17

    Mycoplasma synoviae causes infectious synovitis and respiratory diseases in chickens and turkeys and may lead to egg shell apex abnormalities in chickens; hence possesses high economic impact on the poultry industry. Control of the disease consists of eradication, vaccination or medication. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to 14 different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of M. synoviae strains originating from Hungary and other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of a total of 41 M. synoviae strains were determined by the microbroth dilution method. The strains were collected between 2002 and 2016 and originated from Hungary (n = 26), Austria (n = 3), the Czech Republic (n = 3), Slovenia (n = 3), Ukraine (n = 3), Russia (n = 2) and Serbia (n = 1). Tetracyclines (with MIC 50 values of 0.078 μg/ml, ≤0.25 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml for doxycycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline, respectively), macrolides (with MIC 50 values of ≤0.25 μg/ml for tylvalosin, tylosin and tilmicosin), pleuromutilins (with MIC 50 values of 0.078 μg/ml and ≤0.039 μg/ml for tiamulin and valnemulin) and the combination of lincomycin and spectinomycin (MIC 50 1 μg/ml (0.333/0.667 μg/ml)) were found to be the most effective antibiotic agents against M. synoviae in vitro. High MIC values were detected in numerous strains for fluoroquinolones (with MIC 50 values of 1.25 μg/ml and 2.5 μg/ml for enrofloxacin and difloxacin), neomycin (MIC 50 32 μg/ml), spectinomycin (MIC 50 2 μg/ml), lincomycin (MIC 50 0.5 μg/ml) and florfenicol (MIC 50 4 μg/ml). Nevertheless, strains with elevated MIC values were detected for most of the applied antibiotics. In the medical control of M. synoviae infections the preliminary in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing and the careful evaluation of the data are crucial. Based on the in vitro examinations

  1. Serotypes, genotypes, and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of group B streptococci causing neonatal sepsis and meningitis before and after introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijbels-Smeulders, M.A.; Kimpen, J.L.; Kollee, L.A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Spanjaard, L.; Wannet, W.J.; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the characteristics of strains isolated from neonates with group B streptococci sepsis and meningitis, before and after the introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in The Netherlands. In 1999, 1 year after this introduction the serotype and genotype distribution and the susceptibility

  2. Antepartum Antibiotic Treatment Increases Offspring Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: A Role of the Gut Microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Mumbi Munyaka

    Full Text Available Postnatal maturation of the immune system is largely driven by exposure to microbes, and thus the nature of intestinal colonization may be associated with development of childhood diseases that may persist into adulthood. We investigated whether antepartum antibiotic (ATB therapy can increase offspring susceptibility to experimental colitis through alteration of the gut microbiota.Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were treated with cefazolin at 160 mg/kg body weight or with saline starting six days before due date. At 7 weeks, fecal samples were collected from male offspring after which they received 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in drinking water for 5 days. Disease activity index, histology, colonic IL-6, IL-1β and serum C-reactive protein (CRP were determined. The V3-V4 region of colonic and fecal bacterial 16S rRNA was sequenced. Alpha-, beta-diversity and differences at the phylum and genus levels were determined, while functional pathways of classified bacteria were predicted.ATB influenced fecal bacterial composition and hence bacterial functional pathways before induction of colitis. After induction of colitis, ATB increased onset of clinical disease, histologic score, and colonic IL-6. In addition, ATB decreased fecal microbial richness, changed fecal and colon microbial composition, which was accompanied by a modification of microbial functional pathways. Also, several taxa were associated with ATB at lower taxonomical levels.The results support the hypothesis that antepartum antibiotics modulate offspring intestinal bacterial colonization and increase susceptibility to develop colonic inflammation in a murine model of colitis, and may guide future interventions to restore physiologic intestinal colonization in offspring born by antibiotic-exposed mothers.

  3. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Molecular Typing by REP-PCR among Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

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    Delsuz Rezaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen with increasing relevance in a variety of hospital-acquired infections especially among intensive care unit patients. A. baumannii is mostly a cause of septicemia, pneumonia and urinary tract infection following hospitalization of patients. In this study antibiotic susceptibility pattern of A.baumannii isolates and molecular typing among isolates resistant by REP-PCR were determined.   Methods : During study, the A. baumannii, were isolated from hospitals in Tehran. The isolates were identified using standard biochemical tests and antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. Extraction of DNA and molecular typing of isolates performed using CTAB method and REP-PCR, respectively.   Results : In this study 75 A. baumannii isolates separated from patients with an average age of 51 ± 18.45 years . The highest resistance rate was against azteronam (97%, ceftazidim (93%, cefepime (93%, piperacillin-tazobactam (93%, ciprofloxacin (93% and ticarcillin (93% while the lowest resistance rate was against tigecycline (n= 51, 68%, followed by tobramycin (n=24, 32%, ampicillin-sulbactam (n=21, 28%, amikacin (n=16, 21%, and carbapenems (n=11, 15%. The REP-PCR in resistant of A. baumannii isolates showed that the genotypes of A, B and C are the predominant genotypes in the resistant antibiotics.   Conclusion: This study showed a high percentage of resistance to antimicrobial agents among genotypes A, B, and C of the A. baumannii isolates therefore strategies to control the spread of A. baumannii isolates must be designed and evaluated.

  4. Development of an antibiotic spectrum score based on veterans affairs culture and susceptibility data for the purpose of measuring antibiotic de-escalation: a modified Delphi approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaras-Kelly, Karl; Jones, Makoto; Remington, Richard; Hill, Nicole; Huttner, Benedikt; Samore, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Development of a numerical score to measure the microbial spectrum of antibiotic regimens (spectrum score) and method to identify antibiotic de-escalation events based on application of the score. Web-based modified Delphi method. Physician and pharmacist antimicrobial stewards practicing in the United States recruited through infectious diseases-focused listservs. Three Delphi rounds investigated: organisms and antibiotics to include in the spectrum score, operationalization of rules for the score, and de-escalation measurement. A 4-point ordinal scale was used to score antibiotic susceptibility for organism-antibiotic domain pairs. Antibiotic regimen scores, which represented combined activity of antibiotics in a regimen across all organism domains, were used to compare antibiotic spectrum administered early (day 2) and later (day 4) in therapy. Changes in spectrum score were calculated and compared with Delphi participants' judgments on de-escalation with 20 antibiotic regimen vignettes and with non-Delphi steward judgments on de-escalation of 300 pneumonia regimen vignettes. Method sensitivity and specificity to predict expert de-escalation status were calculated. Twenty-four participants completed all Delphi rounds. Expert support for concepts utilized in metric development was identified. For vignettes presented in the Delphi, the sign of change in score correctly classified de-escalation in all vignettes except those involving substitution of oral antibiotics. The sensitivity and specificity of the method to identify de-escalation events as judged by non-Delphi stewards were 86.3% and 96.0%, respectively. Identification of de-escalation events based on an algorithm that measures microbial spectrum of antibiotic regimens generally agreed with steward judgments of de-escalation status.

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci isolates from patients with chronic conjunctivitis: including associated factors and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Claudia; Núñez, María Ximena

    2013-11-01

    To determine species of staphylococci in chronic conjunctivitis, their antibiotic susceptibility pattern, patient treatments, clinical course, and clinical conditions. In this prospective study, 243 conjunctival cultures were taken from 191 patients with chronic conjunctivitis, we obtained staphylococci susceptibility patterns with E-test, and they were analyzed in coagulase-positive and negative. The minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) was determined for Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Additionally, clinical follow-up and associated factors of all patients were analyzed depending on methicillin resistance (MR) or susceptibility (MS) bacterial state. One hundred and eight (44%) cultures were positive; 81 positive cultures were Gram-positive of which, 77 were staphylococci, 29 coagulase-positive with S. aureus as the most prevalent, 89% MS, and 11% MR. And 48 were coagulase-negative with S. epidermidis as the most isolated with 36% of MS and 64% of MR. Poor susceptibility was found in the staphylococcus coagulase-negative/MR group. Moxifloxacin and vancomycin show the best in vitro activity for all isolates. The MIC90 of moxifloxacin and vancomycin were 0.064/1.5, 0.64/3.0, and 1/3.0 for S. aureus-MS, S. epidermidis-MS, and S. epidermidis-MR, respectively. The most frequently associated factors found in patients with positive culture for staphylococcus were exposure to the health care system 23 (29.87%) of 77 patients and dry eye 23 (29.87%) of 77 patients. Both with a proportion of 3 in 10. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated from the conjunctiva with 58.33% of MR; even though multiresistance was detected, their susceptibility to a fourth-generation fluoroquinolone, commonly used, such as moxifloxacin, was preserved.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella spp.: a comparison of two surveys with a 5 years interval

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    Gordana Mijović

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella infections are one of the major global public health problems. During the last decade, antibiotic resistance and multiresistance of Salmonella spp. have increased a great deal, especially in developing countries with an increased and indiscriminate use of antibiotics in the treatment of humans and animals. This study aims to investigate and compare antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella during 2005 and 2010.A total of 186 Salmonella strain during 2005 and 140 Salmonella strain during 2010 were isolated from stool specimens using standard methods. The isolates were confirmed as Salmonella by using a battery of biochemical reactions. Specific antisera were used for serologic characterization of Salmonella strain. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by standard disk diffusion method using ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxasole, ceftriaxon, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin.One hundred eighty (96.8% of 186 isolated Salmonella strains in 2005, and 133 (95% of 140 isolated Salmonella strain in 2010 are recognized as Salmonella Enteritidis. Sensitivity of Salmonella isolates during 2005 and 2010 were 91.9% and 92.9% to ampicillin, 95.7% and 97.1% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxasole, 99.5% and 100% to chloramphenicol, 99.5% and 100% to ciprofloxacin, 98.9% and 97.1% to ceftriaxon, 73.1% and 95.7% to nalidixic acid, respectively.Sensitivity of Salmonella isolates to all tested antimicrobial agents except to ceftriaxon was been slightly improved over testing period. Resistance rate to ceftriaxon was higher in 2010 than in 2005, and this fact deserves attention. Significantly increase susceptibility rate to nalidixic acid was observed between the two surveys

  7. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  8. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Araújo, Carlos; Campanero, Cristina; del Campo, Rosa; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    .... The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental...

  9. Enzyme production and antibiotic susceptibility of propionibacterium acnes and p. Granulosum from acne vulgaris patients and healthy persons

    OpenAIRE

    Al Hadithi, H. T. [هـ. ت. الحديثي; Khudaier, B. Y.

    1996-01-01

    Seventeen strains of Propionibacterium acnes and ten strains of P. granulosum were isolated from acne patients, in addition to ten isolates of each species from healthy persons. All strains were examined for their enzymatic activity and antibiotic susceptibility to ten antibiotics. Percentage of lipase, lecithinase and casenase production by strains of both species from acne lesions was higher than that from healthy persons in contrast to gelatinase. Haemolysin was produced almost by all stra...

  10. Phenotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish and Thai oral isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Susanne; Leonhardt, Åsa; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Carlen, Anette; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study investigated phenotypes, virulence genotypes, and antibiotic susceptibility of oral Staphylococcus aureus strains in order to get more information on whether oral infections with this bacterium are associated with certain subtypes or related to an over-growth of the S. aureus variants normally found in the oral cavity of healthy carriers. Materials and methods A total number of 157 S. aureus strains were investigated. Sixty-two strains were isolated from Swedish adults with oral infections, 25 strains were from saliva of healthy Swedish dental students, and 45 strains were from tongue scrapings of HIV-positive subjects in Thailand, and 25 Thai strains from non-HIV controls. The isolates were tested for coagulase, nitrate, arginine, and hemolysin, and for the presence of the virulence genes: hlg, clfA, can, sdrC, sdrD, sdrE, map/eap (adhesins) and sea, seb, sec, tst, eta, etb, pvl (toxins). MIC90 and MIC50 were determined by E-test against penicillin V, oxacillin, amoxicillin, clindamycin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, and cefoxitin. Results While the hemolytic phenotype was significantly (p<0.001) more common among the Thai strains compared to Swedish strains, the virulence genes were found in a similar frequency in the S. aureus strains isolated from all four subject groups. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genotype was found in 73–100% of the strains. More than 10% of the strains from Swedish oral infections and from Thai HIV-positives showed low antibiotic susceptibility, most commonly for clindamycin. Only three methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were identified, two from oral infections and one from a Thai HIV patient. Conclusions S. aureus is occasionally occurring in the oral cavity in both health and disease in Sweden and Thailand. It is therefore most likely that S. aureus in opportunistic oral infections originate from the oral microbiota. S. aureus should be considered in case of oral infections and complaints

  11. Phenotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish and Thai oral isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Susanne Blomqvist

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study investigated phenotypes, virulence genotypes, and antibiotic susceptibility of oral Staphylococcus aureus strains in order to get more information on whether oral infections with this bacterium are associated with certain subtypes or related to an over-growth of the S. aureus variants normally found in the oral cavity of healthy carriers. Materials and methods: A total number of 157 S. aureus strains were investigated. Sixty-two strains were isolated from Swedish adults with oral infections, 25 strains were from saliva of healthy Swedish dental students, and 45 strains were from tongue scrapings of HIV-positive subjects in Thailand, and 25 Thai strains from non-HIV controls. The isolates were tested for coagulase, nitrate, arginine, and hemolysin, and for the presence of the virulence genes: hlg, clfA, can, sdrC, sdrD, sdrE, map/eap (adhesins and sea, seb, sec, tst, eta, etb, pvl (toxins. MIC90 and MIC50 were determined by E-test against penicillin V, oxacillin, amoxicillin, clindamycin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, and cefoxitin. Results: While the hemolytic phenotype was significantly (p<0.001 more common among the Thai strains compared to Swedish strains, the virulence genes were found in a similar frequency in the S. aureus strains isolated from all four subject groups. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genotype was found in 73–100% of the strains. More than 10% of the strains from Swedish oral infections and from Thai HIV-positives showed low antibiotic susceptibility, most commonly for clindamycin. Only three methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains were identified, two from oral infections and one from a Thai HIV patient. Conclusions: S. aureus is occasionally occurring in the oral cavity in both health and disease in Sweden and Thailand. It is therefore most likely that S. aureus in opportunistic oral infections originate from the oral microbiota. S. aureus should be considered in case of oral

  12. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Bacterial Isolates from Pus Samples in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Punjab, India

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    Rugira Trojan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibilities patterns of bacterial isolates from pus samples collected from patients in a tertiary care hospital of Punjab, India. E. coli was the most prevalent pathogen (51.2% followed by Staphylococcus aureus (21%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.8%, Citrobacter spp. (3.5%, Acinetobacter baumannii (2.3%, Proteus mirabilis (2.3%, and Streptococcus spp. (2.3%. E. coli, K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, and Citrobacter isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics including higher generation cephalosporins. S. aureus and Streptococcus isolates were sensitive to cloxacillin and vancomycin. However, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis, and Streptococcus isolates were found to be less resistant to the spectrum of antibiotics tested. Overall, our findings indicate the prevalence of resistance to different classes of antibiotics in bacterial isolates from pus infections and hence highlight the need for effective surveillance, regulator reporting, and antibiogram-guided antibiotic prescription.

  14. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila isolated from water systems in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Gładysz, Iwona; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Wójtowicz-Bobin, Małgorzata; Stańczak, Tomasz; Matuszewska, Renata; Krogulska, Bożena

    2017-03-21

    Several studies have reported therapy failures in patients with legionnaires'disease; however, antimicrobial resistance of clinical and environmental isolates of Legionella spp. has not yet been documented. Routine susceptibility testing of Legionella spp. is not recommended because of difficulties in determining standard minimal inhibitory concentration values. The purpose of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila. strains isolated from a water supply system. Twenty-eight isolates of L. pneumophila (16 - L. pneumophila SG 1, 12 - L. pneumophila SG 2-14) obtained from water systems in public buildings in Poland were tested. Susceptibility testing was performed using the E-test method. The tested antibiotic were azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin. The medium used for the susceptibility testing was BCYE-, a special medium for Legionella cultivation. Among the tested strains, L. pneumophila was the only one resistant to azithromycin. It was a strain of L. pneumophila SG 2-14 isolated from the water system in a sanitorium. All isolates were found to be sensitive to ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. However, the azithromycin-resistant strain exhibited higher ciprofloxacin and rifampicin MIC (1.5 μg/ml, and 0.19 μg/ml, respectively). The MIC50 for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin were 0,032, 0,125, and 0,003 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC90 for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin were 0,032, 0,125, and 0,003 μg/ml, respectively. Azithromycin resistance was found in one strain of L. pneumophila SG 2-14, but the resistance mechanism is unknown and needs further study. It is possible that therapeutic failures in Legionnaires' disease may be associated with bacterial resistance which should be taken into account. The antibiotic sensitivity testing described in this study could be helpful in detecting the resistance of clinical L. pneumophila isolates. Ciprofloxacin and rifampicin have good in vitro

  15. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella spp. from water sources in Tamale, Ghana

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    Frederick Adzitey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study investigated the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella species isolated from drinking water sources in Tamale Metropolis. Materials and Methods: Isolation of Salmonella species from 275 different drinking water samples (25 each from dam, well, rain, and bottle, 35 from tap, 40 from water trough, and 100 from sachet was done using a slightly modified method of the Bacteriological Analytical Manual of the Food and Drugs Administration, USA. 34 Salmonella species isolated from the water samples were examined for their susceptibility to nine different antibiotics using the disc diffusion method. The study was carried out from July 2014 to January 2015. Results: The overall prevalence of Salmonella species was 4.36% (12/275. Dam 16.00% (4/25 and well 16.00% (4/25 water samples were the most contaminated source, followed by rain water (stored 12.00% (3/25 and tap water samples 2.86% (1/35. There were no significant differences among water samples which were positive for Salmonella species (p>0.05; however, dam and well samples that were positive for Salmonella species differ significantly (p<0.05 from bottle water, sachet water, and water trough samples, which were negative for Salmonella species. The 34 Salmonella isolates were highly resistant to erythromycin (E (100% and vancomycin (VA (94.12%. Few isolates exhibited intermediate resistances to ceftriaxone (CRO (17.65%, gentamicin (CN (17.65%, tetracycline (14.71%, chloramphenicol (C (5.88%, ciprofloxacin (CIP (2.94%, and amoxicillin (AMC (2.94%. Salmonella isolates also exhibited six different antibiotic resistant patterns (VA-E, VA-E-AMC, VA-E-CRO, VA-E-C, VA-E-CRO-AMC, and VA-E-AMC-CN. The resistant pattern VA-E (with multiple antibiotic resistance index of 0.22 was the commonest. Conclusion: This study indicated that some drinking water sources for humans and animals in Tamale Metropolis are contaminated with Salmonella species which exhibited varying resistance to

  16. Identification of Outpatient Urinary Pathogens and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern in Ahwaz, Iran 2002-2003

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    mohammad saeed Saraj

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common syndrom in community, especially in females. The object of this study is to determine the prevalence of most common Bacteria causing UTI and Antibiogram pattern respectively in Ahwas population. Materials & methods: In this retrospective descriptive study we gathered all urine culture results from lab centers. Results: From 48850 cases, 34360 (70.34% and 14490 (29.66% were females and males, respectively. The most frequent pathogens were E.coli (46.29%, S.saprophyticus (25.8% and Klebsiella (16.93%. Enterobacter, Proteus citrobacter, Pseudomonas and S.epidermidis were consisted the remainder of causes. The most Susceptible Antibiotics for the most prevalent pathogens, were: Nalidixic Acid, Vancomycine, and Nitrofurantoin, respectively. Conclusion: This pattern is similar to that mentioned in textbooks and published reports from other cities in Iran.

  17. Carbon Sources Tune Antibiotic Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Sylvain; Porter, Caroline B M; Yang, Jason H; Belenky, Peter; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Lobritz, Michael A; Park, Jihye; Kim, Sun H; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Collins, James J

    2017-02-16

    Metabolically dormant bacteria present a critical challenge to effective antimicrobial therapy because these bacteria are genetically susceptible to antibiotic treatment but phenotypically tolerant. Such tolerance has been attributed to impaired drug uptake, which can be reversed by metabolic stimulation. Here, we evaluate the effects of central carbon metabolite stimulations on aminoglycoside sensitivity in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We identify fumarate as a tobramycin potentiator that activates cellular respiration and generates a proton motive force by stimulating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, we find that glyoxylate induces phenotypic tolerance by inhibiting cellular respiration with acetyl-coenzyme A diversion through the glyoxylate shunt, despite drug import. Collectively, this work demonstrates that TCA cycle activity is important for both aminoglycoside uptake and downstream lethality and identifies a potential strategy for potentiating aminoglycoside treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Endodontic pathogens causing deep neck space infections: clinical impact of different sampling techniques and antibiotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Paul W; Crepaz, Valentina; Russmueller, Guenter; Seemann, Rudolf; Hirschl, Alexander M; Ewers, Rolf

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare microbial populations in patients suffering from deep neck space abscesses caused by primary endodontic infections by sampling the infections with aspiration or swabbing techniques and to determine the susceptibility rates of the isolated bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. A total of 89 patients with deep neck space abscesses caused by primary endodontic infections requiring extraoral incision and drainage under general anesthesia were included. Either aspiration or swabbing was used to sample microbial pus specimens. The culture of the microbial specimens and susceptibility testing were performed following standard procedures. A total of 142 strains were recovered from 76 patients. In 13 patients, no bacteria were found. The predominant bacteria observed were streptococci (36%), staphylococci (13%), Prevotella (8%), and Peptostreptococcus (6%). A statistically significant greater number of obligate anaerobes were found in the aspiration group. The majority of patients presented a mixed aerobic-anaerobic population of bacterial flora (62%). The antibiotic resistance rates for the predominant bacteria were 10% for penicillin G, 9% for amoxicillin, 0% for amoxicillin clavulanate, 24% for clindamycin, and 24% for erythromycin. The results of our study indicated that a greater number of anaerobes were found when sampling using the aspiration technique. Penicillin G and aminopenicillins alone are not always sufficient for the treatment of severe deep neck space abscesses; beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations are more effective. Bacteria showed significant resistant rates to clindamycin. Thus, its single use in penicillin-allergic patients has to be carefully considered. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  20. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility in enterococci isolated from oral mucosal and deep infections

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    Gunnar Dahlén

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the presence of virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among enterococcal isolates from oral mucosal and deep infections. Forty-three enterococcal strains from oral mucosal lesions and 18 from deep infections were isolated from 830 samples that were sent during 2 years to Oral Microbiology, University of Gothenburg, for analysis. The 61 strains were identified by 16S rDNA, and characterized by the presence of the virulence genes efa A (endocarditis gene, gel E (gelatinase gene, ace (collagen binding antigen gene, asa (aggregation substance gene, cyl A (cytolysin activator gene and esp (surface adhesin gene, tested for the production of bacteriocins and presence of plasmids. MIC determination was performed using the E-test method against the most commonly used antibiotics in dentistry, for example, penicillin V, amoxicillin and clindamycin. Vancomycin was included in order to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE strains. Sixty strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus faecium. All the virulence genes were detected in more than 93.3% (efa A and esp of the E. faecalis strains, while the presence of phenotypic characteristics was much lower (gelatinase 10% and hemolysin 16.7%. Forty-six strains produced bacteriocins and one to six plasmids were detected in half of the isolates. Enterococcal strains from oral infections had a high virulence capacity, showed bacteriocin production and had numerous plasmids. They were generally susceptible to ampicillins but were resistant to clindamycin, commonly used in dentistry, and no VRE-strain was found.

  1. Molecular and antibiotic susceptibility characterization of Aerococcus viridans isolated from porcine urinary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Matajira, Carlos E C; Gomes, Vasco T M; Silva, Ana Paula S; Mesquita, Renan E; Christ, Ana Paula G; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-02-29

    Aerococcus viridans has been reported as a human and animal pathogen causing urinary tract infection, arthritis, pneumonia, meningitis and endocarditis. Routinely, A. viridans is not surveyed in clinical diagnosis laboratories and commonly is misidentified as other bacteria. There is no concrete data on the prevalence and impact of the pathogen to both human and animal health. In the present study, we report the isolation and molecular and antibiotic susceptibility characterization of A. viridans strains from porcine urinary infections. A total of 22 isolates were identified as A. viridans by MALDI-TOF MS and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Isolates were genotyped by single enzyme amplified fragments length polymorphism (SE-AFLP) that resulted in 19 clusters of which 81.2% were composed by single isolates. The high genetic heterogeneity corroborates previous studies and appears to be a particularity of A. viridans. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values also presented variability especially for ceftiofur, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. The high MICs of aminoglycosides, tetracyclines and macrolides seen among the A. viridans corroborate previous reports and the widespread veterinary usage of these antibiotics demand attention for the implication of A. viridans infection to both human and animal health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Antibiotic susceptibility of community-acquired strains ofstaphylococcus aureus in Nouakchott Region (Mauritania)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Lemine Ould; Ghaber, Sidi Mohamed; Baba, Sidi El Wafi Ould; Maouloud, Mohamed Mahmoud Ould

    2016-01-01

    Staphilococcus aureus is a leading pathogen for humans causing a variety of infections such as skin, urinary tract and lung infections as well as sepsis. This study aims to evaluate the susceptibility of community-acquired strains of Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from various pathological products, compared with major antibiotics used in Nouakchott Region (Mauritania). We conducted a retrospective study of 281 strains of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from various pathological products from non-hospitalized patients in the National referral hospital laboratory and in two private laboratories in the city of Nouakchott between January 2014 and August 2015. Antibiotic sensitivity was determined by disk diffusion method using agar containing Mueller-Hinton medium according to CA-SFM's recommendations. The resistance rate to penicillin G was high (96-100%). Community-acquired MRSA rate was between 25 and 26% in suppurations, 34.3% in urine cultures and 28% in sperm cultures. Macrolide -Lincosamyne-streptogramins (MLS) resistance, giving rise to the phenotype MLSb inducible, was found in 6% of urinary strains and 27% of strains isolated from suppurations. The activity of aminoglycosides was variable, amikacin was active against all strains. Cotrimoxazole activity was low (77% had resistance) and no vancomycin resistance was reported. The activity of penicillin G against Staphylococcus aureusstrains isolated in Nouakchott region is almost zero and community-acquired MRSA rate is high, accounting for 34%. This could be explained by uncontrolled use of these molecules in our country.

  3. Urinary tract infection, its causative microorganism and antibiotic susceptibility in Nagaland

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    Sedevi Angami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We studied the causative microorganisms and antibiotic susceptibility of urinary tract infections (UTI for both male and female in Nagaland, North-Eastern India. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study done at Christian Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Dimapur, where urinary samples received for culture and sensitivity in the laboratory from January 2012 to June 2013 were included. Organisms were identified by doing standard culture method, and antibiotic sensitivity was done by Kirby-Bauer Disc diffusion method from mid-stream clean catch urine sample. Results: A total of 1789 samples were analyzed in this study, where 502 (28.1% showed significant growth, 330 (18.4% showed insignificant growth, and the rest 957 (53.5% showed no growth. The most commonly isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli both in an outpatient department (31% and in-patient department (38% patients followed by Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas sp., Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida, and Proteus. Analysis of the samples showed that UTI was more common in females (60% as compared to males (40%. It was also observed that the samples responded effectively to chloramphenicol (29%, gentamicin (28%, imipenem (26%, and amikacin (21%. High degree of resistance was shown for nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, amoxyclav, and ofloxacin. Conclusion: Antibiotics have been in use for a long period and more often the misuse of antimicrobial drugs has today led to a general rise in the emergence of resistant bacteria. This study may aid health professionals in choosing the appropriate treatment for patients in North-Eastern India.

  4. New method for rapid Susceptibility Testing on blood culture with HB&L system: preliminary data

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    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood culture, although represents the gold standard in detecting the ethiological agent of sepsis, is rather rarely required in relation to the real diagnostic importance. The result of this test depends in fact on many factors (sample volume, time of collection, accuracy, antibiotic therapy, contamination, number of drawings, drawing site, interpretation difficulties, etc. that are often considered by many clinicians so limited as to doubt about their actual value. The disadvantages are therefore represented by the lack of standardization but also by the low sensitivity and above all by the technical times too long for the clinical needs. Blood culture begins with the drawing of samples from the “septic” patient followed incubation of the bottles in automatic thermostated systems. In case of positive result (36 hours, the culture is Gram stained and streaked on solid media in order to obtain isolated colonies for the identification and the susceptibility testing (48 hours from positive result. The long time required for pathogen identification and susceptibility testing involves empirical broad spectrum antibiotic therapy that can promote the increase of bacterial resistance but also patient management costs. A clinically useful report should be available on short notice in order to guide the clinician to choose the most appropriate antibiotic. The microbiologist has therefore the hard work of reviewing the organization and the management of the procedures.We have therefore started to consider the possibility of treating the blood as an biological liquid in order to quickly determine the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics.

  5. Protein-Adsorbed Magnetic-Nanoparticle-Mediated Assay for Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

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    Cowger, Taku A; Yang, Yaping; Rink, David E; Todd, Trever; Chen, Hongmin; Shen, Ye; Yan, Yajun; Xie, Jin

    2017-04-19

    Antibiotic susceptibility tests have been used for years as a crucial diagnostic tool against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, due to a lack of biomarkers specific to resistant types, these approaches are often time-consuming, inaccurate, and inflexible in drug selections. Here, we present a novel susceptibility test method named protein-adsorbed nanoparticle-mediated matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry, or PANMS. Briefly, we adsorb five different proteins (β-casein, α-lactalbumin, human serum albumin, fibrinogen, and avidin) onto the surface of Fe3O4. Upon interaction with bacteria surface, proteins were displaced from the nanoparticle surface, the amounts of which were quantified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. We find that the protein displacement profile was different distinctive among different bacteria strains and, in particular, between wild-type and drug-resistant strains. More excitingly, we observe bacteria resistant to drugs of the same mechanisms share similar displacement profiles on a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) map. This suggests the possibility of using PANMS to identify the type of mechanism behind antibiotic resistance, which was confirmed in a blind test. Given that PANMS is free of drug incubation and the whole procedure takes less than 50 min, it holds great potential as a high-throughput, low-cost, and accurate drug susceptibility test in the clinic.

  6. Impact of introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Heidi; Bruxvoort, Katia J; Cairns, Matthew E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the impact of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on prescribing of antimicrobials, specifically antibiotics, for acute febrile illness in Africa and Asia.Design Analysisof nine preselected linked and codesigned observational and randomised studies (eight cluster...... or individually randomised trials and one observational study).Setting Public and private healthcare settings, 2007-13, in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda.Participants 522 480 children and adults with acute febrile illness.Interventions Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria.Main outcome...... in different settings.Results Antibiotics were prescribed to 127 052/238 797 (53%) patients in control groups and 167 714/283 683 (59%) patients in intervention groups. Antibiotics were prescribed to 40% (35 505/89 719) of patients with a positive test result for malaria and to 69% (39 400/57 080) of those...

  7. Rapid Assessment of Resistance to Antibiotic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis in the Gram-Positive Pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Based on Evaluation of the Lytic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Fátima; Tamayo, María; Santiso, Rebeca; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán; Fernández, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    A novel assay for rapid determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis was developed for the gram-positive pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To this purpose, a lytic response was obtained by a brief incubation with lysozyme or a mixture of lysozyme, Triton X-100, and EDTA for E. faecalis (n = 82) and S. pneumoniae (n = 51), respectively. Lysis was quantified by visualizing the released nucleoids. Antibiotic-susceptible bacteria treated with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint doses of erythromycin, azithromycin, or doxycycline that inhibited protein synthesis demonstrated a large reduction of lysed cells with respect to the control, that is, without antibiotics. However, cell lysis prevention was much lower in nonsusceptible strains, with unsuccessful inhibition of protein synthesis. ROC analysis showed that a reduction value of ≥35.6% and ≥40.4% discriminates susceptible and nonsusceptible strains for erythromycin and for doxycycline, respectively, in E. faecalis, whereas ≥20.0% is adequate for both macrolides and doxycycline in S. pneumoniae. Resistant stains were identified in 90-120 min with sensitivity and specificity between 91.7% and 100%. This is a proof of concept that evaluation of the lytic response may be a rapid and efficient test for determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and genotyping of campylobacter species isolated from children suffering from gastroenteritis

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    R M Abd El-Baky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the prevalence and the antimicrobial resistance of campylobacter species isolated from children suffering from gastroenteritis . Materials and Methods: A total of 125 stool samples were collected from children with gastroenteritis. The identification of isolates was performed with conventional methods as well as with molecular methods based on 16SrRNA species-specific gene amplification by PCR and product analysis. Resistance pattern of the isolated strains was determined using agar dilution method. Results: Conventional methods including sodium hippurate hydrolysis revealed that 12 (9.6% samples were positive for Campylobacter species. Ten out of 12 Campylobacter spp. were identified as Campylobacter jejuni and 2 as Campylobacter coli but PCR assay revealed that five samples only were positive for Campylobacter and all were C. jejuni. Antimicrobial susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials was performed and all isolates (five isolates of C. jejuni were susceptible to chloramphenicol, gentamicin and amikacin but all were resistant to ceftriaxone. Conclusion: PCR assay method allows reliable detection of C. jejuni. C. jejuni was the most prevalent Campylobacter species. Gentamicin, amikacin and chloramphenicol were the most effective antibiotic.

  9. Susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from patients with acne vulgaris to zinc ascorbate and antibiotics

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    Iinuma K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Katsuhiro Iinuma1, Norihisa Noguchi2, Hidemasa Nakaminami2, Masanori Sasatsu2, Setsuko Nishijima3, Isami Tsuboi1 1BML General Laboratory, Matoba, Kawagoe, Saitama, 2Department of Microbiology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Tokyo, 3Department of Dermatology, Nishijima Skin Clinic, Osaka, Japan Purpose: The in vitro antimicrobial activity of ascorbic acid derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes was tested either alone or in combination with a variety of antimicrobial agents, and their fractional inhibitory concentration index was determined using checkerboard tests. The antimicrobial effectiveness of zinc ascorbate in the treatment of acne vulgaris, either alone or in combination with antibiotics such as clindamycin that are commonly used in Japan for the treatment of acne vulgaris, was therefore examined. Materials and methods: The antimicrobial susceptibility of 41 strains of clindamycin-sensitive and/or clindamycin-resistant P. acnes isolated from acne vulgaris patients was tested, in comparison with a type strain of P. acnes. Results: Zinc ascorbate showed antimicrobial activity against a type strain of P. acnes and its concentration (0.064% was sufficiently lower than the normal dose (5% of other ascorbic acid derivatives. Combinations of zinc ascorbate with clindamycin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol showed an additive effect, and zinc ascorbate alone effectively inhibited the growth of all P. acnes including clindamycin-resistant strains. Conclusion: The results provide novel evidence that the combination of zinc ascorbate and clindamycin is effective for acne vulgaris treatment. Keywords: antimicrobial susceptibility, ascorbic acid derivatives, combination therapy, checkerboard test

  10. Clinical Features, Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles, and Outcomes of Infectious Keratitis Caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, Oriel; Monsalve, Pedro F; OʼBrien, Terrence P; Alfonso, Eduardo C; Gologorsky, Daniel; Miller, Darlene

    2016-05-01

    Reports on Achromobacter xylosoxidans ocular infections are increasing, drawing attention to its emerging role in infectious keratitis. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes of infectious keratitis secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. A microbiology database and clinical chart review was performed in all patients diagnosed with A. xylosoxidans keratitis at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between the years 1987 and 2014. Initial presentation, antimicrobial susceptibilities, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), treatment course, and outcomes were recorded. Twenty-eight patients were identified. The main risk factors were corneal graft (n = 8, 28.6%) and contact lens wear (n = 8, 28.6%). On presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 or worse in 20 (71.2%) patients. Hypopyon was present in 7 (25.0%) patients. In most cases, topical fluoroquinolones or tobramycin were the initial treatment, often accompanied by vancomycin. High susceptibility rates were found for piperacillin [100%, minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) = 8] and ticarcillin (100%, MIC90 = 16). Low susceptibility rates were documented for ciprofloxacin (46.7%, MIC90 = 8), tobramycin (26.7%, MIC90 = 16), and gentamicin (20%, MIC90 = 16). One (3.6%) patient suffered endophthalmitis. Six (21.4%) patients underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty, and 2 (7.1%) patients had conjunctival flap surgery. Visual acuity at final follow-up was 20/100 or worse in 16 (57.1%) patients. Infectious keratitis caused by A. xylosoxidans is associated with poor visual outcomes. Fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are not appropriate treatments for these ocular infections. Further studies are needed to define the clinical application of compound piperacillin and ticarcillin eye drops.

  11. Bacteriological study of neonatal sepsis and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R K; Rai, S K; Khanal, L K; Manda, P K

    2013-03-01

    Bloodstream infections in neonates are life-threatening emergencies. Identification of the common bacteria causing such infections and their susceptibility patterns will provide necessary information for timely intervention. This study was done to determine the prevalence of neonatal septicaemia, identify the bacterial isolates and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH), Kathmandu, Nepal. This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in NMCTH from July 2011 to January 2012. Blood culture of all neonates who were suspected for neonatal sepsis was performed. Bacterial isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done by standard microbiological method. Out of 120 neonates suspected of having neonatal sepsis, 30.8% (37/120) were blood culture positive (i.e. prevalence = 30.8%). The most common causative agents of neonatal sepsis was Staphylococcus aureus (56.8%; 21/37) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (21.7%; 8/37), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.4%; 5/37) and others. Neonatal sepsis was more frequent in male neonates (32.5%) while (26.5%) in female neonates in the ratio of 1.2:1 (p > 0.05). Neonatal sepsis was significantly higher (58.3%) in low birth weight (LBW) (neonates compared with good birth weight (GBW) (23.9%) (neonates (57.8%; 11/19) as compared with term-babies (25.7%) (P = 0.05). Generally, all of the isolates were sensitive to most of the antibiotics used as the first line drugs like amikacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and ampicillin except Acinetobacter baumannii. This organisms was only sensitive towards cotrimoxazole, azithromicin, cefotaxime and ceftazidime.

  12. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to nine antibiotics currently used in Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Mara; Di Campli, Emanuela; Di Bartolomeo, Soraya; Cataldi, Valentina; Marzio, Leonardo; Grossi, Laurino; Ciccaglione, Antonio Francesco; Nostro, Antonia; Cellini, Luigina

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori expresses an increased resistance in respect to antimicrobials currently used in therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial profiles of H. pylori isolates to nine conventional antibiotics used in a Central Region (Abruzzo) of Italy. Biopsies were taken from antrum and fundus of 112 adult and 3 children with Urea Breath Test positive with dyspeptic symptoms and analyzed for H. pylori culture and antibacterial activity. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed for clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and rifabutin by a modified agar dilution susceptibility test. Bacterial culture was successful in 100 out of 115 patients. Helicobacter pylori strains were isolated from 98 antrum and 83 fundus samples. The rate of recovery of H. pylori strains was 90.50% (181/200). The percentages of resistance were as follows: clarithromycin 72.44% antrum, 72.28% fundus; metronidazole 34.69% antrum, 42.16% fundus; levofloxacin 42.85% antrum, 53.01% fundus; moxifloxacin 37.35% antrum, 46.57% fundus; ciprofloxacin 39.47% antrum, 44.28% fundus; tetracycline 2.63% antrum, 2.85% fundus; amoxicillin 1.02% antrum, 1.20% fundus; ampicillin 0% antrum and fundus and rifabutin 0% antrum, 1.20% fundus. A total of 35 subjects harbored multi-resistant strains. This study underlines the high rate of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole and quinolones, which may reflect an overuse of them. Culture and susceptibility test, should be performed to prevent the emergence of multi-resistance and to assess an efficacious regimen.

  13. Distribution of Clinical Isolates at Species Level and Their Antibiotic Susceptibilities in Intensive Care Units Patients

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    Ayşe Barış

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intensive care units are a hospital’s section where hospital infections and resistant microorganisms are most commonly seen. In this study it was aimed to determine the microorganisms which were isolated from various clinical specimens of the patients in intensive care units for a year and antibiotic susceptibility of the microorganisms. Materials and Methods: MALDI TOF MS and BD Phoenix system were used for the identification of bacteria, antibiotic sensitivities were evaluated by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and BD Phoenix system in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Results: In this study, a total of 1163 microorganisms were obtained; 575 (49.4% gram-negative bacteria (GNB, 556 (47.8% gram-positive bacteria (GPB and 32 Candida spp. (2.7%. Strains were produced from blood (488, urine (233, respiratory tract (224, sterile body fluid (88, wounds (68 and catheter samples (62. The most frequently isolated GNBs were found to be Acinetobacter baumannii 131 (11.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 109 (9.3%, Escherichia coli 91 (7.8% in order of frequency. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was observed in 16 E. coli, 29 Klebsiella spp. Carbapenem resistance was identified in 132 Acinetobacter spp., 27 Pseudomonas spp., 14 K. pneumoniae, 1 E. coli. For Pseudomonas strains, ciprofloxacin and amikacin; for Acinetobacter strains, amikacin and colistin; for Escherichia and Klebsiella strains, amikacin and imipenem were determined as the most effective antibiotics. The most frequently isolated GPBs were 351 (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS (192 S. epidermidis, 111 (9.5% Enterococcus spp. (67 Enterococcus faecalis, 55 Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. While Methicillin resistance was determined in 7 S. aureus and 191 CNS; vancomycin resistance was detected in 3 Enterococcus faecium strains. The most effective antibiotics against S. aureus and Enterococcus spp. strains were

  14. Helicobacter pylori susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy differ in the maturation and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar, Andreja N; Skvarc, Miha; Tepes, Bojan; Kos, Janko; Ihan, Alojz

    2013-12-01

    The natural course of Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as the success of antibiotic eradication is determined by the immune response to bacteria. The aim of the study is to investigate how different Helicobacter pylori isolates influence the dendritic cells maturation and antigen-presenting function in order to elucidate the differences between Helicobacter pylori strains, isolated from the patients with successful antibiotic eradication therapy or repeated eradication failure. Dendritic cells maturation and antigen presentation were monitored by flow cytometry analysis of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and costimulatory molecules expression, and by determining cytokine secretion. Dendritic cells stimulated with Helicobacter pylori isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure expressed less human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), CD86, TLR-2, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy; the latter expressed lower production of IL-10. Polymyxin B inhibition of lipopolysaccharide reduces IL-8 secretion in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains susceptible to antibiotic therapy. The differences in IL-8 secretion between both groups are lipopolysaccharide dependent, while the differences in secretion of IL-10 remain unchanged after lipopolysaccharide inhibition. Inhibitor of cathepsin X Mab 2F12 reduced the secretion of IL-6, and the secretion was significantly lower in the group of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with repeated antibiotic eradication failure. Helicobacter pylori strains, susceptible/resistant to antibiotic eradication therapy, differ in their capability to induce DCs maturation and antigen-presenting function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance profiles of cultivable lactic acid bacteria from intestinal tract of domestic chickens collected in Adjara

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    Lia L. Amiranashvili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elaboration and introduction of safe, effective probiotic preparations as alternatives to antibiotics are being actively conducted throughout the world. 66 LAB isolates were isolated from ileal, cecal and rectal samples collected from domestic chickens collected in different districts of Adjara, Georgia. Their resistance to 17 antibiotics and antibacterial activity were studied using the agar diffusion method. Among the isolates, widespread resistance was found to metronidazole and nystatin, sensitivity – to ampicillin, tylosin, rifampicin and bacitracin. Most of isolates have intermediate susceptibility to the majority of the antibiotics. 3 LAB isolates were selected by antibacterial action against the several bacterial indicator strains that makes them effective remedy to control antibiotic-independent pathogen through competitive exclusion and promotion of good protective microbiota and perspective probiotic additives for chicken food. Future investigations, proving the safety of the strains and their antimicrobial compounds will enable to apply in vivo probiotic properties on poultry production.

  16. Clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from a Portuguese hospital: PFGE characterization, antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Andreia; Ferreira, Susana; Almeida, Sofia; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging pathogen associated with nosocomial infections that in addition has shown an increasing resistance to antibiotics. In this work the genetic diversity of A. baumannii isolates from a Portuguese hospital, their antibiotic resistance profiles and ability to form biofilms was studied. Seventy-nine clinical A. baumannii isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with 9 different PFGE profiles being obtained. Concerning the antimicrobial susceptibility, all A. baumannii isolates were resistant to 12 of the 17 tested antibiotics and classified as multidrug-resistant (MDR). In addition, 74.7% of the isolates showed biofilm formation ability, however no statistical significance with antibiotic resistance was observed. In contrast, urine samples isolates were more likely to form biofilms than strains isolated from other sources. Our findings highlight the high number of MDR A. baumannii isolates and the importance of the formation of biofilms as a potential virulence factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. EHS matrix incubated in media containing penicillin retains sufficient concentrations of antibiotic to inhibit growth of susceptible microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mark P; Niedziela, Dagmara A; Keane, Orla M

    2017-08-01

    In studying the interaction between bacteria and host cells in vitro, the latter are frequently cultured on commercially available biotic matrices such as Matrigel® or Geltrex®. To avoid contamination, host cells are commonly grown in the presence of antibiotics. However, we present here the finding that cell culture on such a matrix in the presence of antibiotics interferes with the outcome of subsequent infection experiments by virtue of diminished bacterial survival. By comparing outcomes for penicillin-susceptible and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, we show that residual penicillin remains in the matrix despite the antibiotics' withdrawal from culture. Hence, the use of antibiotics should be avoided in this context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter isolates from free range domestic duck (Cairina moschata) in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonga, Hezron Emmanuel; Muhairwa, A P

    2010-02-01

    Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter isolated from free-ranging ducks was determined in Morogoro Municipality, Tanzania. Ninety intestinal contents from ducks were screened for thermophilic Campylobacter using Skirrow's protocol. Of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates, 50 were tested for sensitivity to 12 antibiotics. Overall prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter was 80%. The prevalence of Campylobacter in adult ducks (91.3%) was significantly (p sodium, tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Between 20-50% of isolates were resistant to erythromycin, gentamicin, cloxacillin and amoxicillin. Norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin had lower C. jejuni resistance of 10% and 16% respectively. C. jejuni isolates from adult ducks showed significantly higher rates of resistance (p < 0.05) to most antibiotics than did duckling isolates. High prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter in ducks could be of public health significance in Morogoro municipality. The observed multidrug resistance in this study poses a threat of transfer of antibiotic resistance to human pathogens because of the close contact between ducks and human.

  19. Cell-on-hydrogel platform made of agar and alginate for rapid, low-cost, multidimensional test of antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Liu, Zhengzhi; Hu, Chong; Ren, Kangning

    2016-08-02

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a rapidly increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. The two major remedies include: (1) using narrow-spectrum antibiotics based on rapid diagnosis; and (2) developing new antibiotics. A key part of both remedies is the antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST). However, the current standard ASTs that monitor colony formation are costly and time-consuming and the new strategies proposed are not yet practical to be implemented. Herein, we report a strategy to fabricate whole-hydrogel microfluidic chips using alginate-doped agar. This agar-based microfabrication makes it possible to prepare inexpensive hydrogel devices, and allows a seamless link between microfluidics and conventional agar-based cell culture. Different from common microfluidic systems, in our system the cells are cultured on top of the device, similar to normal agar plate culture; on the other hand, the microfluidic channels inside the hydrogel allow precise generation of linear gradient of drugs, thus giving a better performance than the conventional disk diffusion method. Cells in this system are not exposed to any shear flow, which allows the reliable tracking of individual cells and AST results to be obtained within 2-3 hours. Furthermore, our system could test the synergistic effect of drugs through two-dimensional gradient generation. Finally, the platform could be directly implemented to new drug discovery and other applications wherein a fast, cost-efficient method for studying the response of microorganisms upon drug administration is desirable.

  20. Isolation, molecular and phenotypic characterization, and antibiotic susceptibility of Cronobacter spp. from Brazilian retail foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Marcelo Luiz Lima; Umeda, Natália Scudeller; Jackson, Emily; Forsythe, Stephen James; de Filippis, Ivano

    2017-05-01

    Several Cronobacter species are opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in humans. The aim of this study was to detect Cronobacter spp. from 90 samples of retail foods in Brazil, and characterize the strains by phenotypic tests, molecular assays and antibiotic susceptibility. Three isolation methodologies were evaluated using different selective enrichments and the isolates were identified using Vitek 2.0, PCRs protocols, fusA allele sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Thirty-eight samples (42.2%) contained Cronobacter spp., and the highest percentage was found in flours (66.7%, 20/30), followed by spices and herbs (36.7%, 11/30), and cereal mixes for children (23.3%, 7/30). The 45 isolates included four species: C. sakazakii (n = 37), C. malonaticus (n = 3), C. dublinensis (n = 3), and C. muytjensii (n = 2); that presented 20 different fusA alleles. MLST analysis revealed 32 sequence types (STs), 13 of which were newly identified. All strains were sensitive to all antibiotics (n = 10) tested. The combination of CSB/v enrichment with DFI plating was considered the most efficient for Cronobacter spp. isolation. This study revealed the presence of Cronobacter spp. in foods commercialized in Brazil and the isolates showed a high diversity after MLST analysis and included two strains of the C. sakazakii ST4 neonatal meningitic pathovar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing organisms causing urinary tract infections in Sri Lanka and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern -A hospital based cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, M M P S C; Luke, W A N V; Miththinda, J K N D; Wickramasinghe, R D S S; Sebastiampillai, B S; Gunathilake, M P M L; Silva, F H D S; Premaratna, R

    2017-02-10

    Extended Spectrum Beta- Lactamase producing organisms causing urinary tract infections (ESBL-UTI) are increasing in incidence and pose a major burden to health care. While ESBL producing Klebsiella species seem to account for most nosocomial outbreaks, ESBL-producing E. coli have been isolated from both hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. Although 95-100% ESBL organisms are still considered sensitive to meropenem, rapid emergence of carbapenem resistance has been documented in many countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate urinary tract infections caused by ESBL producers and the antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Sri Lanka. Patients with confirmed ESBL-UTI admitted to Professorial Medical Unit, Colombo North Teaching Hospital from January - June 2015 were recruited to the study. Their urine culture and antibiotic susceptibility reports were evaluated after obtaining informed written consent. Of 61 culture positive ESBL-UTIs, E. coli caused 53 (86.8%), followed by Klebsiella in 8 (13.1%).30 (49.1%) had a history of hospitalization within the past three months and included 6/8(75%) of Klebsiella UTI and 24/53(45.2%) of E.coli UTI. Antibiotic susceptibility of ESBL organisms were; Meropenem 58 (95%), Imipenem 45 (73.7%), Amikacin 37 (60.6%) and Nitrofurantoin 28(45.9%). In 3(4.9%), E.coli were resistant to Meropenem. These three patients had received multiple antibiotics including meropenem in the recent past for recurrent UTI. We observed a higher percentage of E. coli over Klebsiella as ESBL producing organisms suggesting most ESBL-UTIs to be community acquired, Carbapenems seem to remain as the first line therapy for majority of ESBL-UTIs in the local setting. However 4.9% prevalence of meropenem resistance is alarming compared to other countries. Although prior antibiotic utilization and hospitalization may contribute to emergence of ESBL producing Klebsiella and E.coli in Sri Lanka, high prevalence of community acquired ESBL-E. coli needs

  2. Incidence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Wounds of Patients at Specialist Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

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    Ahmed Olowo-Okere

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen causing varieties of mild to life threatening community and hospital on-set infections. This study was carried out to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from wounds of patients at a tertiary healthcare facility in Sokoto, Nigeria.Methods:  All wound swabs obtained from patients with wound infections during the study period were cultured on mannitol salt agar media. The isolates were identified using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out on the identified isolates using the modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA test was carried out using Oxacillin agar screen test as described by Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI, 2016.Results:     A total of twenty (20 Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from thirty-eight (38 wound specimens investigated. Out of which, five (25.0% were found to be MRSA. The isolates were resistant to most of the antibiotics tested and susceptible only to Gentamicin (85%, Norfloxacin (80% and Amoxiclav (50%.Conclusion:    The high incidence of Staphylococcus aureus isolates resistant to the commonly used antibiotics in the hospital calls for urgent need to put in place measures to curtail the spread of MRSA infections in the hospital.

  3. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test for identification of new therapeutics and drug combinations against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Weingarten, Rebecca A; Xu, Miao; Southall, Noel; Dai, Sheng; Shinn, Paul; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; Frank, Karen M; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current antimicrobial susceptibility testing has limited screening capability for identifying empirical antibiotic combinations to treat severe bacterial infections with multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms. We developed a new antimicrobial susceptibility assay using automated ultra-high-throughput screen technology in combination with a simple bacterial growth assay. A rapid screening of 5170 approved drugs and other compounds identified 25 compounds with activities against MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae. To further improve the efficacy and reduce the effective drug concentrations, we applied a targeted drug combination approach that integrates drugs' clinical antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints, achievable plasma concentrations, clinical toxicities and mechanisms of action to identify optimal drug combinations. Three sets of three-drug combinations were identified with broad-spectrum activities against 10 MDR clinical isolates including K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia coli. Colistin–auranofin–ceftazidime and colistin–auranofin–rifabutin suppressed >80% growth of all 10 MDR strains; while rifabutin–colistin–imipenem inhibited >75% of these strains except two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. The results demonstrate this new assay has potential as a real-time method to identify new drugs and effective drug combinations to combat severe clinical infections with MDR organisms. PMID:27826141

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolated bacteria from bile fluids of patients with gallstone disease in Isfahan city (Iran

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    Fatemi Seyed-Masih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are one of the important agents in the creation of gallstones in the gallbladder. In recent years the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL is increasing and of concern in hospitalized patients worldwide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolated bacteria from the bile specimens of patients with chronic and acute cholecystitis who had been operated by single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC in Isfahan (Iran 2 using an antibiogram susceptibility test and molecular technique. The bile fluids of 91 patients were obtained from the Al-Zahra hospital and were cultured on specific media for the isolation of Gram-negative and positive bacteria and the disk diffusion test was done to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolated bacteria. Finally, bacterial DNA was extracted from the bile samples and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed to investigate extended-spectrum β-lactamases genes. The bacteria Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in bile specimens cultured with high frequency, and the results showed that biliary infection increased with aging in patients with gallstone disease operated by SILC. The results showed a high frequency of ESBL genes including TEM, SHV, and CTX-M in isolated bacteria (especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp.. Thus, evaluating the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and screening of ESBLs bacteria in patients with gallstones are essential. Prescribing suitable drugs, designing good strategies, and informing the medical community could decrease bile infection and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in clinical centers and hospitals.

  5. Multicentric study in five African countries of antibiotic susceptibility for three main pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerouali, Khalid; Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Boye, Cheikh; Hammami, Adnane

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing clinical and epidemiological problem. We report on the antibiotic susceptibility of three pathogens isolated from patients in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Senegal, and Tunisia during 2010-2011. In total, 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 428 Staphylococcus aureus, and 414 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were collected. S. pneumoniae resistance was noted against penicillin (30.2%), erythromycin (27.4%), cefpodoxime (19.1%), amoxicillin (12.0%), cefotaxime (7.4%), and levofloxacin (3.2%). All the strains were teicoplanin susceptible. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance differed between countries, from 5.0% in Senegal to 62.7% in Egypt. Levofloxacin resistance was low in all countries, and the highest rate (in Egypt) was still only 13.6% for intermediate and resistant strains combined. Most strains were susceptible to fosfomycin (99.3%) and pristinamycin (94.2%). P. aeruginosa resistance was found against levofloxacin (30.4%), ciprofloxacin (29.9%), tobramycin (19.7%), ceftazidime (19.2%), and imipenem (17.9%), but not colistin. Antibiotic susceptibility varied widely between countries, with resistance typically most prevalent in Egypt.

  6. Slime production and antibiotic susceptibility in staphylococci isolated from clinical samples

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    Seza Arslan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 187 isolates from several clinical specimens were identified to species level as 129 Staphylococcus aureus strains and 58 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS strains by the API Staph System (Biomerieux. Slime production was detected both by the conventional Christensen's method as well as by the Congo red agar method. Seventy-two strains of staphylococci isolates (38.5% were found to be slime producers by Christensen's test tube method whereas 58 strains (31% were slime positive with Congo red agar method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods for the detection of slime production (P > 0.05. Susceptibility of isolates against antimicrobial agents was tested by the disk diffusion method. Staphylococcal species had resistance to one or more antibiotics. Among the various antimicrobial agents, oxacillin (71.1% and erythromycin (47.1% showed higher resistance than most of the agents used against all isolates. Oxacillin resistant S. aureus (ORSA and oxacillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (ORCNS, 97 (75.2% and 36 (62.1% respectively were frequently observed in strains isolated from clinical materials. Among the ORSA strains, two strains were resistant to vancomycin. Moreover, 96 (74.4% of 129 S. aureus strains were positive for blactamase enzyme. However, 78 (81.25% of 96 b-lactamase positive S. aureus strains were b-lactamase positive ORSA isolates, but none of them had vancomycin resistance.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility, antibacterial activity and characterisation ofEnterococcus faeciumstrains isolated from breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun; Kıvanç, Merih; Yiğit, Tülay

    2016-09-01

    Enterococci, which have useful biotechnological applications, produce bacteriocins, including those that exert anti-Listerial activity. The present study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from human breast milk. The strains were identified using carbohydrate fermentation tests and ribotyping. Subsequently, the antibacterial activity of the isolates was investigated, and the quantities of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide produced, and the proteolytic activity of E. faecium , were determined. In addition, biofilm formation by E. faecium strains was assessed. E. faecium strains exhibited antimicrobial activity against food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. Furthermore, following 24 h incubation, the tested strains exhibited resistance to a pH range of 2.0-9.5 and tolerance of bile acid, lysozyme activity and phenol. Supernatants of the E. faecium TM13, TM15, TM17 and TM18 strains were shown to be effective against Listeria monocytogenes , and were also resistant to heat. Further studies are required in order to determine whether certain strains of E. faecium may be used for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility, antibacterial activity and characterisation of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from breast milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıvanç, Sertaç Argun; Kıvanç, Merih; Yiğit, Tülay

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci, which have useful biotechnological applications, produce bacteriocins, including those that exert anti-Listerial activity. The present study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from human breast milk. The strains were identified using carbohydrate fermentation tests and ribotyping. Subsequently, the antibacterial activity of the isolates was investigated, and the quantities of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide produced, and the proteolytic activity of E. faecium, were determined. In addition, biofilm formation by E. faecium strains was assessed. E. faecium strains exhibited antimicrobial activity against food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. Furthermore, following 24 h incubation, the tested strains exhibited resistance to a pH range of 2.0–9.5 and tolerance of bile acid, lysozyme activity and phenol. Supernatants of the E. faecium TM13, TM15, TM17 and TM18 strains were shown to be effective against Listeria monocytogenes, and were also resistant to heat. Further studies are required in order to determine whether certain strains of E. faecium may be used for the development of novel antibacterial agents. PMID:27602088

  9. [Occurrence and susceptibility to antibiotics of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains between 1998 and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Skalski, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    P. aeruginosa rods are dangerous pathogens mainly responsible for nosocomial infections of different localization. Resistance to carbapenems, observed among them, is a serious threat due to ability to be transmitted between bacterial species. The aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the frequency of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of imipenem- and meropenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated between 1998 and 2009 from patients of University Hospital No 1 of dr A. Jurasz in Bydgoszcz. Study shows increasing number of isolation that type of strains from 19 in 1998 to 144 in 2009. Among all isolated P. aeruginosa strains majority was obtained from patients of the Intensive Care Units, Rehabilitation and Surgery Clinics. Examined strains of P. aeruginosa rods were mainly isolated from urine (20.5%), bronchoalveolar lavage (17.7%) and wound swabs (14.5%) samples. The isolates demonstrated frequently resistance to carbenicillin (> or 66.7%), ticarcillin (> or = 72.7%) and cefotaxime (> or = 75.6%). The lowest rate of resistant strains was observed in case of ceftazidime (< or = 68.8%), aztreonam (< or = 47.4%) and colistin (< or = 1.7%) suggesting the highest activity of that antimicrobials against infections caused by examined strains.

  10. Biocide and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella isolates obtained before and after cleaning at six Danish pig slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Pedersen, Karl; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2014-07-02

    Salmonella sp. continues to be one of the most important foodborne pathogens. Control measures in terms of cleaning and disinfection on food production plants are very important for limiting the risk of contaminated food products to reach the consumer. In the last decade concern has arisen that bacteria exposed to disinfectants can develop resistance toward disinfectants and can have a higher risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of biocide resistant Salmonella sp. in Danish pig slaughterhouses, to evaluate if there was a correlation between susceptibilities to biocides and antibiotics, and to examine if cleaning and disinfection select isolates with changed susceptibility toward biocides or antibiotics. Salmonella sp. was isolated from the environment in Danish pig slaughterhouses before and after cleaning and disinfection. The susceptibility toward three different biocides, triclosan and two commercial disinfection products: Desinfect Maxi, a quaternary ammonium compound, and Incimaxx DES, an acetic compound, was determined. We found no resistance toward the biocides tested, but we did find that isolates obtained after cleaning had higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values toward one of the disinfectants (Incimaxx DES) compared to isolates obtained before cleaning and disinfection. This could indicate selection of strains that are more tolerant, due to the cleaning and disinfection. Furthermore, we found that there was a weak statistical correlation between MICs toward the biocides and some antibiotics, but no difference in log(MIC)s toward antibiotics between isolates obtained before and after cleaning, nor did we find any difference in the number of resistances of isolates obtained before and after cleaning and disinfection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negatives isolated from bacteremia in children with cancer. Implications for empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, Elio; Caviglia, Ilaria; Pescetto, Luisa; Bagnasco, Francesca; Haupt, Riccardo; Bandettini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Monotherapy is recommended as the first choice for initial empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia, but local epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility data are now considered pivotal to design a correct management strategy. To evaluate the proportion of Gram-negative rods isolated in bloodstream infections in children with cancer resistant to antibiotics recommended for this indication. The in vitro susceptibility to ceftazidime, piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem and amikacin of Gram-negatives isolated in bacteremic episodes in children with cancer followed at the Istituto "Giannina Gaslini", Genoa, Italy in the period of 2001-2013 was retrospectively analyzed using the definitions recommended by EUCAST in 2014. Data were analyzed for any single drug and to the combination of amikacin with each β-lactam. The combination was considered effective in absence of concomitant resistance to both drugs, and not evaluated by means of in vitro analysis of antibiotic combinations (e.g., checkerboard). A total of 263 strains were evaluated: 27% were resistant to piperacillin-tazobactam, 23% to ceftazidime, 12% to meropenem and 13% to amikacin. Concomitant resistance to β-lactam and amikacin was detected in 6% of strains for piperacillin-tazobactam, 5% for ceftazidime and 5% for meropenem. During the study period there was a nonsignificant increase in the proportions of strains resistant to β-lactams indicated for monotherapy, and also increase in the resistance to combined therapies. in an era of increasing resistance to antibiotics guideline-recommended monotherapy could be not appropriate for initial empirical therapy of febrile neutropenia. Strict local survey on etiology and antibiotic susceptibility is mandatory for a correct management of this complication in cancer patients.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility/resistant gene profiles of Group B streptococci isolates from pregnant women in a tertiary institution in Nigeria

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    Charles J Elikwu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Penicillin is recommended as the first-line agent for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP. Although Group B Streptococcus (GBS strains are generally susceptible to penicillin with only occasional resistance, they show varying resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracycline. Therefore, knowledge of the resistance profile of GBS in the local environment will be useful for administration of appropriate intrapartum antibiotics prophylaxis. Methodology: Rectovaginal swabs collected from pregnant women were cultured for GBS using conventional media. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines on GBS isolates to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected by using the D-zone test. Resistance determinants genes were discerned with conventional polymerase chain reaction. Results: Carriage rates of GBS among pregnant women studied were 19.7%. GBS colonizing the pregnant mothers were uniformly susceptible (100% to penicillin, vancomycin, and ceftriaxone. Only three (6.5% of the isolates showed inducible clindamycin resistance. ermA gene was present in all three GBS isolates with inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance. ermB was absent in all the strains tested. mefA/E gene was carried by two of the macrolide-clindamycin resistance isolates. tetM gene was carried by all isolates with tetracycline resistance phenotypes. Conclusion: In this study, all GBS isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, the recommended antibiotic for IAP. The presence of resistance to erythromycin and inducible resistance to clindamycin excludes the use of these agents as alternatives in cases of penicillin allergy. In this case, vancomycin is the drug of choice as recommended in the updated Centers for Disease Control guideline.

  13. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY AND A STATE OF THE COLON MICROFLORA IN PATIENTS WITH ATOPIC DERMATITIS WHICH IS ASSOCIATED WITH GIARDIASIS

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    Shkilna MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Colon microbiocenoses in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis are investigated. The decrease of Bifidumbacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., E. coli and increase of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococus spp., Bacillus spp., Candida spp. have been shown. It means disbacteriosis has been occurred in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis. Antibiotic susceptibility of gut microflora in patients with allergic dermatitis and giardiasis has been studied. There has been shown that isolated strains were sensitive to ftorchinolons and I and III generation of cephalosporines.

  14. A prospective study on evaluation of pathogenesis, biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility of microbial community in urinary catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    This study is aimed to isolate, detect biofilm formation ability and antibiotic susceptibility of urinary catheter adherent microorganisms from elderly hospitalized patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center. Microorganisms were isolated from three samples of urinary catheters (UC) surface; one of the acute vascular rejection patient (UCB) and two from benign prostate hyperplasia patients (UCC and UCD). A total of 100 isolates was isolated with 35 from UCB, 38 (UCC) and 28 (UCD). Ninety six were identified as Gram-negative bacilli, one Gram-positive bacilli and three yeasts. Results of biofilm forming on sterile foley catheter showed that all the isolates can form biofilm at different degrees; strong biofilm forming: 32% from the 35 isolates (UCB), 25% out of 38 isolates (UCC), 26% out of 28 isolates (UCD). As for moderate biofilm forming; 3% from UCB, 10% from UCC and 2% from UCD. Weak biofilm forming in UCC (3%). The antibiotic susceptibility for (UCB) isolates showed highly resistant to ampicillin, novobiocin and penicillin 100 (%), kanamycin (97%), tetracycline (94%), chloramphenicol (91%), streptomycin (77%) and showed low level of resistance to gentamycin (17%), while all the isolates from (UCC-D) showed high resistant towards ampicillin and penicillin, novobiocin (94%), tetracycline (61%), streptomycin (53%), gentamycin (50%) and low level of resistance to kanamycin (48%), chloramphenicol (47%). The findings indicate that these isolates can spread within the community on urinary catheters surface and produce strong biofilm, therefore, monitoring antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated in the aggregation is recommended.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: methicillin-resistance, clinical features, and antibiotic susceptibilities.

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    Chih-Chun Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of ocular infections caused by MRSA and to identify the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular MRSA infections by comparing those of ocular methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The medical records of the patients (n = 519 with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seventy-four patients with MRSA and 245 with MSSA ocular infections were identified. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% and the trend was stable over the ten years (P value for trend  = 0.228. MRSA ocular infections were significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.024, but 66.1% (181/274 patients with MRSA ocular infections had no healthcare exposure. The most common clinical presentation for both MRSA and MSSA ocular infections was keratitis; MRSA and MSSA caused a similar disease spectrum except for lid infections. MRSA was significantly more resistant than MSSA to clindamycin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated a paralleled trend of ocular MRSA infection in a highly prevalent MRSA country by hospital-based survey. Except for lid disorder, MRSA shared similar spectrum of ocular pathology with MSSA. Since S. aureus is a common ocular pathogen, our results raise clinician's attention to the existence of highly prevalent MRSA.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection: Methicillin-Resistance, Clinical Features, and Antibiotic Susceptibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Ma, David Hui-Kang; Lin, Ken-Kuo; Chang, Chee-Jen; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of ocular infections caused by MRSA and to identify the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular MRSA infections by comparing those of ocular methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections. Methodology/Principal Findings The medical records of the patients (n = 519) with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seventy-four patients with MRSA and 245 with MSSA ocular infections were identified. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% and the trend was stable over the ten years (P value for trend  = 0.228). MRSA ocular infections were significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.024), but 66.1% (181/274) patients with MRSA ocular infections had no healthcare exposure. The most common clinical presentation for both MRSA and MSSA ocular infections was keratitis; MRSA and MSSA caused a similar disease spectrum except for lid infections. MRSA was significantly more resistant than MSSA to clindamycin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (all PMRSA infection in a highly prevalent MRSA country by hospital-based survey. Except for lid disorder, MRSA shared similar spectrum of ocular pathology with MSSA. Since S. aureus is a common ocular pathogen, our results raise clinician’s attention to the existence of highly prevalent MRSA. PMID:22880135

  17. Rapid and Profound Shifts in the Vaginal Microbiota Following Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fredricks, David N; Schiffer, Joshua T

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common polymicrobial disease associated with numerous negative reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus acquisition. BV is treatable with antibiotics, but relapse is common. A more detailed understanding of bacterial dynamics during antibiotic therapy for BV could identify conditions that favor establishment, maintenance, and eradication of BV-associated bacterial species, thereby improving treatment outcomes. We used mathematical models to analyze daily quantitative measurements of 11 key bacterial species during metronidazole treatment for 15 cases of BV. We identified complete reorganization of vaginal bacterial composition within a day of initiating therapy. Although baseline bacterial levels predicted a longer time to clearance, all anaerobic species were eliminated rapidly within a median of 3 days. However, reemergence of BV-associated species was common following treatment cessation. Gardnerella vaginalis, a facultative anaerobe, was cleared more slowly than anaerobic BV-associated species, and levels of G. vaginalis often rebounded during treatment. We observed gradual Lactobacillus species growth, indicating that untargeted microbes fill the transient vacuum formed during treatment. Under antibiotic pressure, the human microbiome can undergo rapid shifts on a scale of hours. When treatment is stopped, BV-associated bacteria quickly reemerge, suggesting a possible role for intermittent prophylactic treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of rapid susceptibility testing against second-line drugs for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dowdy, D. W.; van't Hoog, A.; Shah, M.; Cobelens, F.

    2014-01-01

    Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against second-line tuberculosis drugs (SLDs) is essential for improving outcomes among multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) cases. To evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of rapid DST for SLDs. We constructed a

  19. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E

    2015-01-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope s...

  20. Characterization of antibiotic and disinfectant susceptibility profiles among Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates recovered during 1994-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, R C; Foley, S L; Davidson, M K; White, D G; McDermott, P F; Bodeis-Jones, S; Zhao, S; Andrews, K; Crippen, T L; Sheffield, C L; Poole, T L; Anderson, R C; Nisbet, D J

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates to antibiotics and disinfectants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from dogs (n = 155) and other animals (n = 20) from sixteen states during 1994-2003 were tested for susceptibility. Most isolates were resistant to twenty-one antimicrobials tested, and the highest prevalence of resistance was to β-lactams (93.8%) and sulphonamides (93.5%). Fluoroquinolone resistance did not increase from 1994 to 2003. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin had a 5 and 16% prevalence of resistance, respectively, while sarafloxacin and nalidixic acid had a prevalence of resistance of 97 and 98%, respectively. Strains were pan-resistant to triclosan and chlorhexidine, were highly resistant to benzalkonium chloride and demonstrated high susceptibility to other disinfectants. Didecyldimethylammonium chloride was the most active ammonium chloride. Inducible resistance was observed to cetyl ammonium halides, chlorhexidine and benzyl ammonium chlorides, which formulate disinfectants used in veterinary clinics and dairies. Organic acid inhibition was associated with the dissociated acid species. Dissociated organic acids appear able to inhibit Ps. aeruginosa, and rates of fluoroquinolone resistance merit sustained companion animal isolate surveillance. This is the first report of Ps. aeruginosa susceptibility to 24 disinfectants and illustrates the high resistance of Ps. aeruginosa to both antibiotics and disinfectants. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Decreased antibiotic susceptibility and enhanced probiotic production potential of goat milk fermented curd in comparison with cow and buffalo milk

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    Jyoti Lakhanpal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to characterize and compare the production potential and antibiotic susceptibility of probiotics isolated from goat, cow and buffalo milk. The probiotics isolated from milk fermented curd were compared with regard to their number, morphology, gram staining, motility, bile salt tolerance, pH-resistance, catalase activity, oxidase production and antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that the probiotics isolated from milk fermented curd of all three species were gram positive, motile, catalase negative, and oxidase negative and were able to produce lactic acid. Further, we observed that buffalo milk is more potent in forming curd with the highest count of probiotics per ml (3.53 × 10!5 as compared to cow (5.8 × 10!6 and goat milk (7×10!7; moreover, goat milk bacterial isolates were more tolerant to acidic pH but were less bile-salt tolerant than cow milk. Also, probiotics isolated from goat milk curd were more resistant to antibiotics (resistant to 12 out of 15 screened antibiotics than those from cow and buffalo milk (resistant to 8-9 antibiotics. This report shows that goat milk fermented products possess the highest antibacterial potential and are highly acid-tolerant.

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility in commonly isolated pathogens from urinary tract infection in a cohort of subjects from low socioeconomic strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwai, Saera Suhail; Nageen, Ayesha; Ghaznavi, Samina; Bashir, Farhat; Ara, Jamal

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the commonest infections seen in clinical practice. Lack of compliance and unjustified antibiotic prescriptions has resulted in bacterial resistance and is proving as a major challenge in the management of these infections. Our aim was to identify the sensitivity pattern of commonly used antibiotics against urinary tract infections so as to suggest an improvised line of action against bacteria causing urinary tract infections'. This was a hospital based cross sectional study extended over a period of four months. Patients were recruited from outpatients department of a tertiary care hospital in an industrial area of Karachi. Adult patients with symptomatic and documented UTI in urine detailed report (pus cells >10) were enrolled after informed consent. A clean catch midstream urine was collected for culture and sensitivity testing using the standard microbiological procedure. Data is analyzed on SPSS 16. A total of 184 samples were collected in 4 months. The Male to Female ratio was 1:2 (n=58/126) with mean age 48.5±12 years. 83(45.6%) patients were between 45-60 years. Most common isolated pathogen was Eschericia coli 108(59%) followed by staphylococcus aureus 30(16.4%) and Klebsiella 20(11%). 55(30%) pathogens showed sensitivity to 4-6 antibiotics, 22(12%) strains to 7-9 antibiotics, 33(18%) were sensitive to ≤3 drugs and in 3(1.6%) patients resistance to all antibiotics is seen. The more resistant pathogens were sensitive to intravenous antibiotics alone. In this low socioeconomic cohort with UTI nearly half the isolated pathogens has shown resistance to most of the commonly used antibiotics recommended in the guidelines especially the floxacin group probably because of its unwarranted use. Therefore, a revised line of management should be developed locally in accordance with the susceptibility pattern of the urinary pathogens to avoid further resistance as well as morbidity of the patient.

  3. Comparison of Two Different Disk Diffusion Agar Tests in Determination of Antibiotic Susceptibility for E-Coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection in Pediatrics

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    I. Sedighi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is one of the most common infections during childhood and E-Coli is the more predominant pathogen recovered in UTI. Disk Diffusion agar test is a method of choice because it is cost effective, simple, and now routinely used for detection of antibiotic susceptibility. A rapid increase in antibiotic resistance in our region made the authors to design a study to compare this traditional method with two different disk diffusion agar tests.Materials & Methods: Our study was conducted between 2009 and 2010 in Be’sat teaching hospital on 100 pediatric patients ranged 15 days to 13 years old with positive urine culture for E-coli. Antibiogram detection was performed by disk diffusion agar test with two different kits as Padtan-Teb (made in Iran and Mast (made in the U.K. for Co-trimoxazol, Amikacin, Ceftriaxone, Nalidixic Acid, Cefixime, and Nitrofurantoin. At last the data was analyzed by McNemar test.Results: Co-trimoxazol obtained the lowest (23% Padtan-Teb and 26% Mast and Nitrofurantoin had the highest (86% Padtan-Teb and 97% Mast sensitivity in the two methods which were used in our study. The results were statistically significant for Amikacin, Ceftriaxone, Cefixime, and Nitrofurantoin. The data was analyzed by Mc Memar test.Conclusion: According to our study the results of antibiotic susceptibility were more compatible with other non national Disk diffusion agar test and thus we recommend that our manufactures in Iran should increase the quality of their products.

  4. Standardized interpretation of antibiotic susceptibility testing and resistance genotyping for Mycobacterium abscessus with regard to subspecies and erm41 sequevar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougari, Faiza; Amarsy, Rishma; Veziris, Nicolas; Bastian, Sylvaine; Brossier, Florence; Berçot, Béatrice; Raskine, Laurent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide standardized antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) for Mycobacterium abscessus with regard to subspecies. One hundred and sixty-five clinical isolates were tested for susceptibility to 15 antibiotics using a commercial microdilution method, at two reading times: (i) early reading time (ERT), when the growth control was first positive; and (ii) late reading time (LRT), of 14 days, for detecting inducible resistance. In addition, genes or mutations involved in resistance were studied [erm(41), rrl and rrs]. Three patterns were observed for clarithromycin: (i) MIC >16 mg/L at ERT (median 5 days) for 15 isolates [10 subsp. abscessus erm(41) sequevar T28, 3 subsp. bolletii and 2 subsp. massiliense] among which 9 harboured an a2058g/c rrl mutation; (ii) MIC ≤16 mg/L at ERT, but >16 mg/L at LRT, for 106 isolates [84 abscessus erm(41) T28 and 22 bolletii] showing intrinsic inducible resistance; and (iii) MIC ≤4 mg/L at ERT and LRT for 44 isolates [18 abscessus erm(41) C28 and 26 massiliense]. Amikacin MIC was >64 mg/L for eight isolates [five abscessus erm(41) T28, two massiliense and one bolletii] among which seven harboured the a1408g rrs mutation, but ≤64 mg/L for the remaining isolates without mutation. For the other antibiotics, only one WT pattern was observed, with cefoxitin, tigecycline and linezolid showing MIC values compatible with susceptibility. Standard AST can predict clarithromycin and amikacin resistance using interpretation rules with regard to subspecies. For other antibiotics, since only one pattern is observed, there is no need for systematic phenotypic or genotypic testing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of ica-positive and ica-negative MRSA in different phases of biofilm growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shivani; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a clinically relevant pathogen because of its resistance to antibiotics and its ability to form potent biofilm. Both ica-negative as well as ica-positive MRSA strains are known to produce biofilm. In the present study, these strains were grown in biofilm mode and susceptibility of these to antibiotics was assessed. Our study suggests that antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA biofilm depends on the biochemical composition of its matrix. The biofilm matrix of ica-positive MRSA was mainly composed of poly-intercellular adhesion (PIA), whereas eDNA was a major constituent of ica-negative MRSA. The results showed that MRSA in planktonic growth was susceptible to clindamycin, vancomycin and minocycline. However, the MIC and MBC of vancomycin for the mature biofilm of ica-negative MRSA was 16 and 32 μg ml(-1), respectively. On the contrary, the MIC and MBC of vancomycin for ica-positive MRSA was >1024 μg ml(-1). The effect of vancomycin and minocycline on young and old biofilms was also determined. Vancomycin was quite effective in eradicating the young biofilm formed by ica-negative MRSA; however, it was completely ineffective on the biofilm of ica-positive MRSA. Minocycline at its highest clinical achievable concentration was found to be quite effective in eradicating the young biofilm formed by both the strains. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results and dot blot assay suggest that the presence of ica locus influenced PIA production, which probably contributed towards the failure of vancomycin in eradicating the biofilm formed by ica-positive strain. However, none of the antibiotics used in this study was effective in eradicating the mature biofilms.

  6. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Andersen, Klaus R; Jørgensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introdu......Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in highly demand in health-care fields as antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope), which based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time......, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility, with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effect within 6 minutes and within 30 minutes...

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance gene transfer analysis of foodborne, clinical, and environmental Listeria spp. isolates including Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, David; Muelli, Mirjam; Weller, Monika; Uruty, Anaïs; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess antibiotic resistance pheno- and genotypes in foodborne, clinical, and environmental Listeria isolates, as well as to elucidate the horizontal gene transfer potential of detected resistance genes. A small fraction of in total 524 Listeria spp. isolates (3.1%) displayed acquired antibiotic resistance mainly to tetracycline (n = 11), but also to clindamycin (n = 4) and trimethoprim (n = 3), which was genotypically confirmed. In two cases, a tetracycline resistance phenotype was observed together with a trimethoprim resistance phenotype, namely in a clinical L. monocytogenes strain and in a foodborne L. innocua isolate. Depending on the applied guidelines, a differing number of isolates (n = 2 or n = 20) showed values for ampicillin that are on the edge between intermediate susceptibility and resistance. Transferability of the antibiotic resistance genes from the Listeria donors, elucidated in vitro by filter matings, was demonstrated for genes located on transposons of the Tn916 family and for an unknown clindamycin resistance determinant. Transfer rates of up to 10(-5) transconjugants per donor were obtained with a L. monocytogenes recipient and up to 10(-7) with an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, respectively. Although the prevalence of acquired antibiotic resistance in Listeria isolates from this study was rather low, the transferability of these resistances enables further spread in the future. This endorses the importance of surveillance of L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. in terms of antibiotic susceptibility. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Alloiococcus otitidis Forms Multispecies Biofilm with Haemophilus influenzae: Effects on Antibiotic Susceptibility and Growth in Adverse Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chun L; Richter, Katharina; Wormald, Peter-John; Psaltis, Alkis J; Vreugde, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a biofilm driven disease and commonly accepted otopathogens, such as Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Moraxella catarrhalis, have been demonstrated to form polymicrobial biofilms within the middle ear cleft. However, Alloiococcus otitidis (A. otitidis), which is one of the most commonly found bacteria within middle ear aspirates of children with OME, has not been described to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. otitidis can form biofilms and investigate the impact on antibiotic susceptibility and survivability in polymicrobial biofilms with H. influenzae in vitro. The ability of A. otitidis to form single-species and polymicrobial biofilms with H. influenzae was explored. Clinical and commercial strains of A. otitidis and H. influenzae were incubated in brain heart infusion with and without supplementation. Biofilm was imaged using confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Quantification of biofilm biomass and viable bacterial number was assessed using crystal violet assays and viable cell counting in both optimal growth conditions and in adverse growth conditions (depleted media and sub-optimal growth temperature). Antimicrobial susceptibility and changes in antibiotic resistance of single-species and multi-species co-culture were assessed using a microdilution method to assess minimal bactericidal concentration and E-test for amoxicillin and ciprofloxacin. A. otitidis formed single-species and polymicrobial biofilms with H. influenzae. Additionally, whilst strain dependent, combinations of polymicrobial biofilms decreased antimicrobial susceptibility, albeit a small magnitude, in both planktonic and polymicrobial biofilms. Moreover, A. otitidis promoted H. influenzae survival by increasing biofilm production in depleted media and at suboptimal growth temperature. Our findings suggest that A. otitidis may play an indirect pathogenic role in otitis

  9. Multiple Genetic Analysis System-Based Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing in Helicobacter pylori and High Eradication Rate With Phenotypic Resistance-Guided Quadruple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fangyuan; Ji, Danian; Huang, Renxiang; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yiqin; Xiang, Ping; Kong, Mimi; Nan, Li; Zeng, Xianping; Wu, Yong; Bao, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major factor for eradication failure. Molecular tests including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and dual priming oligonucleotide-PCR (DPO-PCR) play critical roles in the detection of antibiotic susceptibility; however, limited knowledge is known about application of multiple genetic analysis system (MGAS) in the area of H. pylori identification and antibiotics resistance detection.The aim of this study is to determine the antibiotics resistance using different molecular tests and evaluate the treatment outcomes of E-test-based genotypic resistance.A total of 297 patients with dyspepsia complaint were recruited for gastroscopies. Ninety patients with H. pylori culture positive were randomly divided into 2 groups (test group and control group). E-test, general PCR, and MGAS assay were performed in test group. Patients in control group were treated with empirical therapy (rabeprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin [AMX] + clarithromycin [CLR]), whereas patients in test group received quadruple therapy based on E-test results twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The eradication effect of H. pylori was confirmed by C-urea breath test after at least 4 weeks when treatment was finished.Rapid urease test showed 46.5% (128/297) patients with H. pylori infection, whereas 30.3% (90/297) patients were H. pylori culture positive. E-test showed that H. pylori primary resistance rate to CLR, AMX, metronidazole, tetracycline, and levofloxacin (LVX) was 40.0% (18/45), 4.4% (2/45), 53.3% (24/45), 0% (0/45), and 55.6% (25/45), respectively. In addition, there are many multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, and the MDR strains have higher minimum inhibitory concentration than their single-drug resistant counterparts. Considering E-test as the reference test, the sensitivities of general PCR and MGAS in detecting CLR resistance were 83.3% (15/18) and 94.4% (17

  10. Rapidly Progrediating Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis in an Intravenous Drug User Treated by Antibiotics and Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkia S. Swedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 22-year old male, a self-confessed recreational drug user who developed cardiogenic shock because of severe destruction of the aortic valve by rapidly progressive aortic valve endocarditis. The disease progression was acute; in a matter of days, the clinical manifestations were life-threatening necessitating urgent aortic valve replacement surgery. Cultivation revealed Streptococcus viridans as the microbial agent. Subsequent recovery with antibiotic treatment was without complication. This case report shows that immediately performed transoesophageal echocardiography and early consultation with a cardiac surgeon has fundamental importance in diagnosis and management of acute infective endocarditis in haemodynamically instable patients.

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility testing (agar disk diffusion and agar dilution) of clinical isolates of Corynebacterium jeikeium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, W H; Geipel, U; Leonhard, B; Bauer, D

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-three clinical isolates of Corynebacterium jeikeium were examined for susceptibility to 27 antimicrobial drugs with the agar dilution test. Sheep-blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar performed better than Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Disk susceptibility (Bauer-Kirby) tests were carried out in parallel with 24 of the chemotherapeutic agents. All isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin and vancomycin. All isolates resisted fosfomycin, mupirocin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The isolates varied in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, fusidic acid, ofloxacin, and tetracycline; most were susceptible to rifampin. Surprisingly few discrepancies between agar dilution and disk diffusion tests were encountered when utilizing NCCLS interpretive criteria currently valid for enterococcal isolates.

  12. Prevalence, characterization, and antibiotic susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail aquatic products in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoke; Cheng, Jianheng; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Xie, Tengfei

    2016-03-09

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major foodborne pathogen, particularly in Asian countries. Increased occurrence of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus gastroenteritis in China indicates the need to evaluation of the prevalence of this pathogenic species. V. parahaemolyticus distribution in shellfish from the eastern coast of China has been reported previously. However, to date, the prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in retail aquatic products in North China has not been determined. To investigate the prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in aquatic products in North China, 260 aquatic product samples were obtained from retail markets in 6 provinces of North China from November to December in 2012 and July to August in 2013. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 94 (36.2%) of the samples by the most probable number method. The density of V. parahaemolyticus ranged from 1.50 to 1100 MPN/g. V. parahaemolyticus was detected at a rate of 50.0% and 22.7% in summer and in winter, respectively. The density of V. parahaemolyticus was significantly higher in summer than in winter, with mean levels of 16.5 MPN/g and 5.0 MPN/g, respectively. Among 145 V. parahaemolyticus isolates examined, none of the isolates possessed tdh and trh. In multiplex PCR-based O-antigen serotyping of these 145 isolates, all serotypes, other than O6, O7, and O9, were detected, and serotype O2 was found to be the most prevalent (detected in 54 isolates). The 145 isolates were grouped into 7 clusters by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) at a similarity coefficient of 0.66. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of these 145 isolates to 12 antimicrobial agents revealed that most of the isolates were resistant to streptomycin (86.2%), while fewer were resistant to ampicillin (49.6%), cefazolin (43.5%), cephalothin (35.9%), and kanamycin (22.1%). All of the examined isolates were susceptible to azithromycin and chloramphenicol. The findings of this study will help

  13. Distribution of airborne microbes and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of bacteria during Gwalior trade fair, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jayprakash; Kumar, Awanish; Mahor, Pawan; Goel, Ajay Kumar; Chaudhary, Hotam Singh; Yadava, Pramod Kumar; Yadav, Hariom; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-07-01

    Research into the distribution of bioaerosols during events associated with huge groups of people is lacking, especially in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to understand the distribution pattern of bioaerosols during an annual trade fair in the historical city of Gwalior, central India, a very important historical fair that was started by the King of Gwalior Maharaja Madho Rao in 1905. Air samples were collected from six different sites at the fair ground and three different sites in a residential area before/during/after the fair using an impactor sampler on microbial content test agar and rose bengal agar for total bacteria and fungi, respectively. The representative strains of bacteria and fungi were further identified and selected bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing according to US Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. The bacterial bioaerosol count [colony-forming units (CFU)/m(3)] at fair sites was found to be 9.0 × 10(3), 4.0 × 10(4), and 1.0 × 10(4) before the start of the fair, during the fair, and after the fair, respectively. The fungal bioaerosol count at fair sites was 2.6 × 10(3) CFU/m(3), 6.3 × 10(3) CFU/m(3), and 1.7 × 10(3) CFU/m(3) before the fair, during the fair, and after the fair, respectively. Bacterial/fungal bioaerosols during-fair were increased significantly from the bacterial/fungal bioaerosols of the before-fair period (p fair sites during the event (p fair ground was significantly increased during-fair and was still higher in the after-fair period. Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) were also reported at the fair ground. The study indicates significantly higher bacterial and fungal bioaerosols during the fair event. Therefore, further research is needed to explore the health aspects and guidelines to control microbial load during such types of events. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS): emergence of teicoplanin-non-susceptible CoNS strains with inducible resistance to vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Wang, En Hua; Liu, Yong; Luo, En Jie

    2011-11-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have become increasingly recognized as important agents of nosocomial infection. One of the characteristics of CoNS is their resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents commonly used for the treatment of staphylococcal infections. CoNS strains (n = 745) isolated from a university teaching hospital in China between 2004 and 2009 were tested for antibiotic resistance. The antibiotics were placed into three categories based on resistance levels of the CoNS strains to these antibiotics: high resistance (resistance rate >70 %), including penicillin G, oxacillin and erythromycin; medium resistance (resistance rate between 30 and 70 %), including tetracycline, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol; and low resistance (resistance rate teicoplanin increased from 4.5 to 6.7 % between 2008 and 2009. A one-step vancomycin agar selection experiment and subsequent population analysis revealed potentially vancomycin-resistant subpopulations that have been selected from the teicoplanin-non-susceptible strains. Vigilant surveillance of nosocomial isolates of CoNS is needed to determine their resistance to glycopeptides.

  15. Effect of inoculum size on the antibiotic susceptibilities of β-lactamase positive isolates of Moraxella catarrhalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vraneš

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that bacteria producing β-lactamases in general show marked inoculum effect in susceptibility testing. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of inoculum size on the susceptibility of β-lactamase positive strains of M. catarrhalis to oral β-lactam and non β-lactam antibiotics. MICs of antibiotics were determined by a twofold microdilution technique with two different inoculum sizes were tested: 5x 105 CFU/ml -standard inoculum and 5 x107 CFU/ml -high inoculum. The highest increase (4-fold was observed with penicillins alone (amoxycillin and ampicillin or combined with inhibitor and ceftibuten, followed by older cephalosporins, erithromycine and chloramphenicol ( 2-fold. Tetracycline did not show a significant increase in MIC when a higher inoculum size was applied. In spite of the increase in MIC with high inoculum all strains were still susceptible to amoxycillin combined with clavulanate. MICs of cephalosporins were also below the resistance breakpoint for most of the strains at the higher inoculum. Based on that, we can conclude that therapeutic implications of the inoculum effect were not significant.These data suggest that high inocula should be used to determine MICs of ampicillin and amoxycillin for M. catarrhalis but that this precaution is unnecessary with the cephalosporins tested or with amoxycillin/clavulanate

  16. Mastitis therapy and antimicrobial susceptibility: a multispecies review with a focus on antibiotic treatment of mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, John

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis occurs in numerous species. Antimicrobial agents are used for treatment of infectious mastitis in dairy cattle, other livestock, companion animals, and humans. Mastitis is an economically important disease of dairy cattle and most mastitis research has focused on epidemiology and control of bovine mastitis. Antibiotic treatment of clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle is an established component of mastitis control programs. Research on the treatment of clinical and subclinical mastitis in other dairy species such as sheep and goats has been less frequent, although the general principles of mastitis therapy in small ruminants are similar to those of dairy cattle. Research on treatment of clinical mastitis in humans is limited and as for other species empirical treatment of mastitis appears to be common. While antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended to direct treatment decisions in many clinical settings, the use of susceptibility testing for antibiotic selection for mastitis treatments of dairy cattle has been challenged in a number of publications. The principle objective of this review is to summarize the literature evaluating the question, "Does antimicrobial susceptibility predict treatment outcome for intramammary infections caused by common bacterial pathogens?" This review also addresses current issues related to antimicrobial use and treatment decisions for mastitis in dairy cattle. Information on treatment of mastitis in other species, including humans, is included although research appears to be limited. Issues related to study design, gaps in current knowledge and opportunities for future research are identified for bovine mastitis therapy.

  17. Bacterial isolates and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns among patients with pus and/or wound discharge at Gondar university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluye, Dagnachew; Wondimeneh, Yitayih; Ferede, Getachew; Nega, Tesfaye; Adane, Kasaw; Biadgo, Belete; Tesfa, Habtie; Moges, Feleke

    2014-09-09

    In spite of advances in control of infections, wound infections have not completely controlled due to many reasons. The widespread uses of antibiotics, together with the length of time over which they have been available have led to major problems of resistant organisms contributing to morbidity and mortality. This study was aimed to assess bacterial isolates and their drug susceptibility patterns from patients with pus and/or wound discharge. A retrospective study was conducted at Gondar University Hospital from all individuals who provide pus and/or wound discharge sample from September, 2009 to August, 2012. Socio-demographic and laboratory results were collected from the University Hospital Microbiology Laboratory unit registration books by using a standard data collection format. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 628 study subjects were included in the study with bacterial isolation rate of 441 (70.2%). Of all, 344 (54.8%) were males. Two hundred eighty two (63.9%) of the isolates were gram positive and 159 (36.1%) were gram negative. About 331/ 441 (75.0%) of the total isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (32.9%), Coagulase Negative staphylococci (14.7%), Streptococcus spp. (11.6%), Escherichia coli (9.5%), Klebsiella spp. (6.3%). The result showed that 66.2% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, followed 59.8% for ampicillin, 59.1% for cotrimoxazole, 51.7% for penicillin; least resistant being 6.3% for gentamycin. High prevalence of bacterial isolates were found; S. aureus being the dominant. Most of the isolates were resistant to many of the antibiotics tested where all isolates of Pseudomonas spp. being resistant to two or more antibiotics. Antibiotic susceptibility test is necessary for effective control of wound infections.

  18. Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Stoks, Robby; Coors, Anja; van Doorslaer, Wendy; de Meester, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. However, carbaryl-resistant populations were more susceptible to parasite infection than control populations. Exposure to both stressors reveals a synergistic effect on sterilization rate by P. ramosa, but this synergism did not evolve under pesticide selection. Assessing costs of rapid adaptive evolution to anthropogenic stress in a semi-natural context may be crucial to avoid too optimistic predictions for the fitness of the evolving populations. © 2011 The Author(s).

  19. Susceptibility testing of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B by a rapid radiometric method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, W.G.; Fay, D.; Thumar, B.; Dixon, D.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid, radiometric method was developed to determine the susceptibility of filamentous fungi to amphotericin B. The rapid, radiometric method depended on measurement of the inhibition of /sup 24/CO/sub 2/ production in the presence of amphotericin B. Thirty isolates of filamentous fungi were tested by the rapid, radiometric method and a reference agar dilution method. There was 93% agreement between the two methods when an 80% or greater decrease in CO/sub 2/ production was used to calculate the minimal inhibitory concentration with the rapid, radiometric method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, based on 80% decrease of CO/sub 2/ production, were achieved within 24 h of incubation with all of the fungi tested.

  20. Antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic- and biofilm-grown staphylococci isolated from implant-associated infections: should MBEC and nature of biofilm formation replace MIC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Aaron J; Laverty, Garry; Gilpin, Deirdre F; Kearney, Patricia; Tunney, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative, more clinically relevant approach to susceptibility reporting for implant-associated infections. Using 20 staphylococcal isolates, isolated from clinical implant infections, the majority (85 %) demonstrated biofilm-forming capabilities. A significantly increased minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) compared to minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint was obtained, with MBEC values greater than 256 µg ml-1 for the majority of bacteria. Such a vast increase was also demonstrated for isolates defined as negligible biofilm formers via crystal violet staining, likely due to the high protein content of biofilms, as confirmed by proteinase-K treatment. This study employed a variety of techniques to assess MIC and MBEC of the isolates tested. In addition, the nature of bacterial biofilm across a range of clinical isolates was investigated using crystal violet staining, sodium metaperiodate and proteinase-K treatment, and PCR analysis.Results/Key findings. Infection of medical implants is associated with increased rates of infection and increased bacterial tolerance to antibiotic strategies. Clinical significance is due to the presence of pathogens attached to biomaterial surfaces enclosed in an extracellular polymeric matrix termed the biofilm. This article highlights the importance of defining the clinical susceptibility of implant-associated infections in vitro using methods that are relevant to the biofilm phenotype in vivo, and highlights how current planktonic-based antimicrobial susceptibility tests are often misleading. The use of biofilm-relevant susceptibility tests would improve patient outcomes by enabling correct antimicrobial regimens to be rapidly identified, reducing treatment failure and halting the spread of antimicrobial-resistant strains.

  1. [Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy carrier individuals in primary care in Barcelona area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carles; Boada, Albert; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Grenzner, Elisabet; Juvé, Rosa; Almeda, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    The information available on antibiotic resistance patterns are generally based on specimens from hospitalised individuals. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibiotic resistance rate of nasal carriage strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy individuals, in accordance with age and gender, attended in Primary Care Centres (PCC). Cross-sectional study. Seven PCC in the Barcelona area. Healthy nasal carriers aged 4years or more who did not present with any sign of infectious disease, and had not taken any antibiotic or had been hospitalised in the previous 3months. A total of 3,969 nasal swabs valid for identification were collected between 2010 and 2011 and were sent to one central microbiological laboratory for isolation of both pathogens. Resistance to common antibiotics was determined on the basis of the current European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines on cut-off points. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S.aureus was 1.3% (95%CI: 0.5-2.1%), with resistance rates of 87.1% to phenoxymethylpenicillin and 11.6% to azithromycin, with no significant differences with age and gender. A total of 2.4% (95CI%: 0.1-4.7%) of the pneumococcal strains were highly resistant to both phenoxymethylpenicillin and macrolides, whereas the highest resistance rates were to cefaclor (53.3%), followed by tetracycline (20%) and cefuroxime (12.1%). These pathogens have lower resistance rates in the community than in the hospital setting. Primary Care physicians must be more aware of the current antimicrobial resistance, in order to ensure prudent use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility of wound isolates in plastic surgery patients at a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra B Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wound infection increases the hospital stay and adversely affects the recovery of patients. Culture and sensitivity of wound isolates help in proper diagnosis and management of these patients. Aim: To identify common bacteria causing wound infections and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur from October 2013 to October 2015. Materials and Methods: Pus samples were collected by doctors in ward using Sterile Swab Sticks. Bacterial isolates were identified and cultured, and antibiotic culture sensitivity tests were performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test. Results: There were a total of 150 patients with infected wounds. Most common organism isolated was Pseudomonas followed by Klebsiella and Staphylococcus aureus. All of these organisms were resistant to most routine antibiotics. Conclusion: We suggest a multidisciplinary approach to wound management, rational drug use, routine microbiological surveillance of wounds and institution of hospital infection control policy.

  3. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M; Wozniak, Rachel A F; Dunman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility of body surface and gut micro flora of two aquatic leech species (Hirudinaria manillensis and Hirudinaria javanica in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimannan Sivachandran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To elucidate the antibiotic susceptibility of body surface and gut associated microflora of two local aquatic leech species Hirudinaria manillensis and Hirudinaria javanica. Methods: Four commercially available antibiotics (doxycycline, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were used in this study. A total of 13 isolated gut and two surface micro flora from Hirudinaria manillensis and two gut and two surface micro flora from Hirudinaria javanica were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility. Results: Based on the susceptibility, it was observed that all the isolated bacteria were found to be susceptible to at least three of the antibiotics except Microbacterium resistens, Serratia marcescens and Morganella morganii. This study also found that the bacterial species Bacillus fusiformis has displayed resistance against tetracycline and Tsukamurella inchonensis against chloramphenicol. Conclusions: Among all the antibiotics tested, ciprofloxacin was found to be the best bactericidal agent. The immersion of leeches in ciprofloxacin before the application to the patient may be beneficial to prevent invasive infection of the patient. Further study is needed to sterilize the live leech by immersion/oral mode of administration for the tested antibiotics.

  5. Characterization of Shigella Strains by Plasmid Profile Analysis and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns in a Pediatric Hospital in Ahvaz

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    Amin Sakhaei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: High incidences of dysentery and diarrhea were reported in a pediatric hospital in Ahvaz, Iran during March to April, 2013. Objectives: A cross-sectional study was therefore undertaken to identify the causative agents. Patients and Methods: A total of 230 diarrhea samples were collected from the patients and analyzed by routine bacteriological methods. Bacterial identification, serological assay, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs screening and plasmid profile analysis were performed according to the standard guidelines. Results: A total of 70 Shigella strains including %70 (n = 49 S. sonnei and 30% (n = 21 S. flexneri were isolated from diarrhea samples. Most of the Shigella isolates showed high degrees of resistance to ampicillin, ulafamethoxazole- trimethoprime and cefexim. Concurrent resistance to sulafametoxazole- trimethoprime and ampicillin was the most common resistance pattern. Overall, 11.4% of Shigella isolates showed the ESBL producer criteria. The plasmid profile patterns of all the strains were determined by a modified alkaline lysis method. By plasmid profile analysis 23 genotypes were identified among all the isolates, 14 and 9 genotypes among the S. sonnei and S. Flexneri respectively. S. sonnei and S. flexneri isolates demonstrated unique plasmid profiles. Conclusions: These data demonstrated that S. sonnei strains are the main cause of shigellosis as the prevalent Shigella serotype in Iran. We also found that the antibiotic resistance rates are increasing among Shigella strains. Plasmid profile analysis is more reliable than antibiotic susceptibility patterns in epidemiologic studies.

  6. [Epidemiological characteristics of typhoid fever and antibiotic susceptibility testing of Salmonella Typhi isolates in Guangxi, 1994-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingliu; Kan, Biao; Yang, Jin; Lin, Mei; Yan, Meiying; Zeng, Jun; Quan, Yi; Liao, Hezhuang; Zhou, Lingyun; Jiang, Zhenling; Huang, Dehui

    2014-08-01

    Through analyzing the typhoid epidemics and to determine and monitor regional resistance characteristics of the shift of drug resistant profile on Salmonella (S.) Typhi, to understand the related epidemiological characteristics of typhoid fever and to provide evidence for the development of strategies, in Guangxi. Data of typhoid fever from surveillance and reporting system between 1994 to 2013 was collected and statistically analyzed epidemiologically. The susceptibility of 475 S. Typhi isolates from patients on ten antibiotics was tested by broth micro-dilution method and minimum inhibition concentration was obtained and interpreted based on the CLSI standard. From 1994 to 2013, a total of 57 928 cases of typhoid fever were reported in Guangxi province with an annual incidence of 6.29/100 000 and mortality as 0.03%. The higher incidence was observed in the population under 20 years of age. There was no significant difference on incidence between male and female, but farmers and students were among the hardest hit groups. More cases were seen from the northern part of the province. Cases appeared all year round with the peak from May to October. A total of 13 major outbreaks during 2001 to 2013 were reported and the main transmission route was water-borne. All the strains were sensitive to third generation cephalosporins cefotaxime and fluoroquinolones norfloxacin. The susceptibility rates to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin and gentamicin was around 98% but relative lower susceptible rate to ciprofloxacin was seen as 89.89% . The lowest susceptibility was found for streptomycin and sulfamethoxazole agents, with the rates as 67.73% and 65.89% , respectively. One strain was found to have been resistant to ciprofloxacin and another 47 isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Twenty eight isolates were found to be resistant to multiple antibiotics and one displayed ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole tetracycline and

  7. Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Salmonella species Isolated from Beef and its Related Samples in Techiman Municipality of Ghana

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    Frederick Adzitey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella species are important foodborne pathogens that have been implicated in a number of foodborne outbreaks. A total of 240 beef and its related samples obtained from the Techiman Municipality of Ghana were screened using the conventional method in the Food and Drug Administration-Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM-USA. The overall prevalence of Salmonella species was 57.08%. The prevalence of Salmonella species ranged from 33.30% to 75.00% in the meat and its related samples (table, knife and apron, and 6.30% to 93.80% at the various meat sale points (locations where meat is sold. Prevalence of Salmonella species was significantly higher in meat (75.00%, table (60.00% and knife (60.00%, than apron (33.33%. The most contaminated meat sale point was Kenten and Main markets (93.75% and the least contaminated sale point was Sansema junction (6.25%. All the Salmonella species were susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to vancomycin. Intermediate resistances occur for all the antibiotics except ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. The Salmonella species also exhibited 23 antibiotic resistant patterns with the pattern EVa (erythromycin and vancomycin being the commonest (exhibited by nine different isolates. Multiple antibiotic index (MAR index ranged from 0.11 to 0.67. This study revealed that beef and its related samples in Techiman markets are contaminated with Salmonella.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from natural sources of water from rural areas of East Sikkim

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    Shubra Poonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water, food, and environment with antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a serious public health issue. Objective: The objective was to study the bacterial pollution of the natural sources of water in east Sikkim and to determine the antimicrobial profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 225 samples, 75 each during winter, summer, and monsoon season were collected from the same source in every season for bacteriological analysis by membrane filtration method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using standard disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 19 bacterial species of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, Shigella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, and Serratia were isolated and their antimicrobial sensitivity tested. Generally, most bacterial isolates except Salmonella and Shigella species were found resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (57.5%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxaole (39.1%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (37.4%, cefixime (34.5%, tetracycline (29.1%, ceftazidime (26.3%, ofloxacin (25.9%, amikacin (8.7%, and gentamicin (2.7% but sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion: Natural sources of water in east Sikkim are grossly contaminated with bacteria including enteropathogens. The consumption of untreated water from these sources might pose health risk to consumers.

  9. Rapid antibiotic-resistance predictions from genome sequence data for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Phelim; Gordon, N. Claire; Walker, Timothy M.; Dunn, Laura; Heys, Simon; Huang, Bill; Earle, Sarah; Pankhurst, Louise J.; Anson, Luke; de Cesare, Mariateresa; Piazza, Paolo; Votintseva, Antonina A.; Golubchik, Tanya; Wilson, Daniel J.; Wyllie, David H.; Diel, Roland; Niemann, Stefan; Feuerriegel, Silke; Kohl, Thomas A.; Ismail, Nazir; Omar, Shaheed V.; Smith, E. Grace; Buck, David; McVean, Gil; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.; Iqbal, Zamin

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to an urgent need for rapid detection of drug resistance in clinical samples, and improvements in global surveillance. Here we show how de Bruijn graph representation of bacterial diversity can be used to identify species and resistance profiles of clinical isolates. We implement this method for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a software package (‘Mykrobe predictor') that takes raw sequence data as input, and generates a clinician-friendly report within 3 minutes on a laptop. For S. aureus, the error rates of our method are comparable to gold-standard phenotypic methods, with sensitivity/specificity of 99.1%/99.6% across 12 antibiotics (using an independent validation set, n=470). For M. tuberculosis, our method predicts resistance with sensitivity/specificity of 82.6%/98.5% (independent validation set, n=1,609); sensitivity is lower here, probably because of limited understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. We give evidence that minor alleles improve detection of extremely drug-resistant strains, and demonstrate feasibility of the use of emerging single-molecule nanopore sequencing techniques for these purposes. PMID:26686880

  10. Serotyping and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Common Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infections in Koohdasht, Lorestan Province

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    Amraei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the most common diseases worldwide is urinary tract infection (UTI. The main agents causing these infections are bacteria. Urinary tract infections occur when uropathogens colonize the urethra, migrate to the bladder and invade urinary tract cells. Objectives The purpose of this study was the detection of uropathogens causing UTIs, as well as serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility of the most common bacteria. Materials and Methods The study was performed on 300 urine samples collected from patients referred to Koohdasht Imam Khomeini hospital of Lorestan province. After culturing the samples and determination of uropathogens, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Serotyping was performed for the most common uropathogens by polyvalent and monovalent antisera. Results Of the 300 samples, 61 samples (20.33% were positive for UTIs. Among these, 49 samples (80.33% were Gram-negative bacteria and 12 (19.67% Gram-positive. The most common uropathogens in UTIs were Escherichia coli (55.74%, Proteus species (11.47%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (11.47%, Citrobacter species (8.20%, Staphylococcus aureus (8.20% and Klebsiella species (4.92%, respectively. The rate of UTI in females (83.61% was more than males (16.39%. The highest level of resistance was towards trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and the lowest to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin. The most common uropathogen was Escherichia coli and the most common serotypes were O142:K86 and O25:K11, respectively. Conclusions The treatment of UTIs and resistance control in bacteria should be done based on common strains and choosing an effective antibiotic. Therefore, the determination of prevalent bacterial strains in UTIs of each region based on laboratory tests is very important.

  11. Serotyping and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Common Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infections in Koohdasht, Lorestan Province

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    Siavash Amraei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oneof themostcommondiseases worldwide is urinary tract infection (UTI. The main agents causing these infectionsare bacteria. Urinary tract infections occur when uropathogens colonize the urethra, migrate to the bladder and invade urinary tract cells. Objectives: The purpose of this study was the detection of uropathogens causing UTIs, as well as serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility of the most common bacteria. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on 300 urine samples collected from patients referred to Koohdasht Imam Khomeini hospital of Lorestan province. After culturing the samples and determination of uropathogens, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Serotyping was performed for the most common uropathogens by polyvalent and monovalent antisera. Results: Of the 300 samples, 61 samples (20.33% were positive for UTIs. Among these, 49 samples (80.33% were Gram-negative bacteria and 12 (19.67% Gram-positive. The most common uropathogens in UTIs were Escherichia coli (55.74%, Proteus species (11.47%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (11.47%, Citrobacter species (8.20%, Staphylococcus aureus (8.20% and Klebsiella species (4.92%, respectively. The rate of UTI in females (83.61% was more than males (16.39%. The highest level of resistance was towards trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and the lowest to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin. The most common uropathogen was Escherichia coli and the most common serotypes were O142:K86 and O25:K11, respectively. Conclusions: The treatment of UTIs and resistance control in bacteria should be done based on common strains and choosing an effective antibiotic. Therefore, the determination of prevalent bacterial strains in UTIs of each region based on laboratory tests is very important.

  12. The effect of rapid diagnostic testing for influenza on the reduction of antibiotic use in paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, E; Cambaz, N; Coşkun, Y; Mete, F; Geyik, M; Samanci, N

    2009-10-01

    To determine the influence of rapid diagnosis of influenza on antibiotic prescribing to children presenting with influenza-like illness in the emergency department in a inner city hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. Patients aged 3 to 14 years presenting to an urban children's teaching hospital emergency department were screened for fever and cough, coryza, myalgias and/or malaise. After obtaining informed consent, patients were allocated into two groups. Group 1: patients were prescribed antibiotics after only physical examination; or Group 2: patients were prescribed antibiotics after rapid influenza testing. Nasopharyngeal swabs obtained from all patients were immediately tested in a single-blind manner with Influenza A/B Rapid Test(R) for influenza A and B. A total of 97 patients were enrolled, and 33 (34%) of these tested positive for influenza. Although frequency of positive results for influenza between the groups was similar (36% vs 32%, respectively), patients in Group 2 were less likely to be prescribed antibiotics when compared to those in Group 1 (32% vs 100%, respectively, p < 0.0001). Rapid diagnosis of influenza in the paediatric emergency department may allow a significant reduction in the over-prescription of antibiotics.

  13. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  14. A rapid two-step algorithm detects and identifies clinical macrolide and beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuedong; Nie, Shuping; Xia, Chengjing; Huang, Lie; He, Ying; Wu, Runxiang; Zhang, Li

    2014-07-01

    Aiming to identify macrolide and beta-lactam resistance in clinical bacterial isolates rapidly and accurately, a two-step algorithm was developed based on detection of eight antibiotic resistance genes. Targeting at genes linked to bacterial macrolide (msrA, ermA, ermB, and ermC) and beta-lactam (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-9) antibiotic resistances, this method includes a multiplex real-time PCR, a melting temperature profile analysis as well as a liquid bead microarray assay. Liquid bead microarray assay is applied only when indistinguishable Tm profile is observed. The clinical validity of this method was assessed on clinical bacterial isolates. Among the total 580 isolates that were determined by our diagnostic method, 75% of them were identified by the multiplex real-time PCR with melting temperature analysis alone, while the remaining 25% required both multiplex real-time PCR with melting temperature analysis and liquid bead microarray assay for identification. Compared with the traditional phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility test, an overall agreement of 81.2% (kappa=0.614, 95% CI=0.550-0.679) was observed, with a sensitivity and specificity of 87.7% and 73% respectively. Besides, the average test turnaround time is 3.9h, which is much shorter in comparison with more than 24h for the traditional phenotypic tests. Having the advantages of the shorter operating time and comparable high sensitivity and specificity with the traditional phenotypic test, our two-step algorithm provides an efficient tool for rapid determination of macrolide and beta-lactam antibiotic resistances in clinical bacterial isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bifidobacterium thermophilum and Bifidobacterium pseudolongum Isolates from Animal Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayrhofer, S.; Konrad, J.D.; Amtmann, E.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Petersson, A.; Mair, C.; Mayer, H.K.; Kneifel, W.

    2007-01-01

    The widespread use of antimicrobial substances has led to resistant populations of microorganisms in several ecosystems. In animal husbandry, the application of antibiotics has contributed to resistance development in pathogenic and commensal bacteria. These strains or their resistance genes can be

  16. Epidemiological and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of infectious bacterial diarrhoea in Juba, South Sudan

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    Juma John Hassen Mogga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diarrhoeal diseases have remained a major health problem in South Sudan where they accounted 45% prevalence in under five-year olds. Between 2006 and 2007, the country reported a morbidity of 8,337 cases and 176 deaths due to diarrhoeal outbreaks. Methodology: We investigated causative agents of diarrhoeal diseases and their antibiogram in persons presenting with diarrhoea to selected health facilities in Juba. Results: Bacterial agents were prevalent in 20(6.9% of the 286 patients with 5.7%(4/70 in under five-year olds alone. S. dysenteriae 50% (10/20 accounted for the majority of the identified pathogens followed S. flexneri 25% (5/20 and S. typh 25% (5/20. Antibiotic testing showed that S. flexneri (5/5 and S. typhi (5/5 were all 100% sensitive to ceftriaxone, and gentamicin while S. dysenteriae had varying sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (70%, nalidixic acid (90%, and ceftriaxone(100%. These pathogens had 100% resistance to amoxicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline and cotrimoxazole. No difference existed in isolation rates among different age groups, educational status, gender, water drank, use of chlorine, toilet use, exposure at home to diarrhoea patient, hand washing with soap and location of residence. However, diarrhoeagenic bacteria isolation was higher for participants with no source of income (OR=6.08, p<0.05. Conclusion: With emerging menace of resistance to commonly used antibiotics in South Sudan we recommend antibiotic resistance monitoring and regulation of antibiotic use.

  17. Prevalence, serotype, virulence characteristics, clonality and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica from swine feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Swine are the only known animal reservoir of Yersinia enterocolitica (YE), a human pathogen. Since YE is a fecal organism of swine, the primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, serotype, virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated characteristics, clonality, and antibiotic su...

  18. Rapid calculations of susceptibility-induced magnetostatic field perturbations for in vivo magnetic resonance

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    Koch, Kevin M; Papademetris, Xenophon; Rothman, Douglas L; Graaf, Robin A de [Yale University, Magnetic Resonance Research Center, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Static magnetic field perturbations generated by variations of magnetic susceptibility within samples reduce the quality and integrity of magnetic resonance measurements. These perturbations are difficult to predict in vivo where wide variations of internal magnetic susceptibility distributions are common. Recent developments have provided rapid computational means of estimating static field inhomogeneity within the small susceptibility limits of materials typically studied using magnetic resonance. Such a predictive mechanism could be a valuable tool for sequence simulation, field shimming and post-acquisition image correction. Here, we explore this calculation protocol and demonstrate its predictive power in estimating in vivo inhomogeneity within the human brain. Furthermore, we quantitatively explore the predictive limits of the computation. For in vivo comparison, a method of magnetic susceptibility registration using MRI and CT data is presented and utilized to carry out subject-specific inhomogeneity estimation. Using this algorithm, direct comparisons in human brain and phantoms are made between field map acquisitions and calculated inhomogeneity. Distortion correction in echo-planar images due to static field inhomogeneity is also demonstrated using the computed field maps.

  19. Retrospective Analysis of Blood Stream Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Gram Negative Bacteria in a Tertiary Care Cancer Hospital

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    Radha Rani D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial bloodstream infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of the present study was to determine the bacterial profile of bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern among the clinically diagnosed cases of sepsis in cancer patients. Methods: In the present study, etiological and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of blood cultures over a period of 1 year at a tertiary cancer care hospital was done. Blood culture positive isolates were identified using standard microbiological methods and by Fully automated BD Phoenix 100. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the organisms was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and MIC (Minimum inhibitory concentration was done by Fully automated BD Phoenix 100. Results: There were 1178 blood culture samples, of which 327 (27.7% were identified to be culture positive. Out of 327 positive cultures, 299 (91.4% showed bacterial growth, Gram negative were 161 (53.8% and Gram positive were 138 (46.1%. Candida species were isolated from 13 (3.97% of positive samples and 15 samples showed contamination. The most common Gram-negative isolate was. Escherichia coli (37.80% and Gram-positive isolate was coagulasenegative staphylococci (52.80%. Escherichia coli showed highest sensitivity to amikacin (83.60% and sensitivity to piperacillin+ tazobactum and cefaperazone+sulbactam was 54.09% and 52.45% respectively. High degree of resistance was found to cephalosporins and levofloxacin. Conclusion: The results indicate high level of antimicrobial resistance among Gram negative bacilli in septicemic patients. The results warrant continuous monitoring of antimicrobial pattern so as to build geographical epidemiological data.

  20. Effective antibiotics in combination against extreme drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa with decreased susceptibility to polymyxin B.

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    Tze-Peng Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extreme drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA with decreased susceptibility to polymyxin B (PB has emerged in Singapore, causing infections in immunocompromised hosts. Combination therapy may be the only viable therapeutic option until new antibiotics become available. The objective of this study is to assess the in vitro activity of various antibiotics against local XDR-PA isolates. METHODS: PA isolates from all public hospitals in Singapore were systematically collected between 2006 and 2007. MICs were determined according to CLSI guidelines. All XDR-PA isolates identified were genotyped using a PCR-based method. Time-kill studies (TKS were performed with approximately 10(5 CFU/ml at baseline using clinically achievable unbound concentrations of amikacin (A, levofloxacin (L, meropenem (M, rifampicin (R and PB alone and in combination. Bactericidal activity (primary endpoint was defined as a ≥3 log(10 CFU/ml decrease in the colony count from the initial inoculum at 24 hours. RESULTS: 22 clinical XDR-PA isolates with PB MIC 2-16 µg/ml were collected. From clonal typing, 5 clonal groups were identified and nine isolates exhibited clonal diversity. In TKS, meropenem plus PB, amikacin plus meropenem, amikacin plus rifampicin, amikacin plus PB exhibited bactericidal activity in 8/22, 3/22, 1/22 and 6/22 isolates at 24 hours respectively. Against the remaining ten isolates where none of the dual-drug combination achieved bactericidal activity against, only the triple-antibiotic combinations of ARP and AMP achieved bactericidal activity against 7/10 and 6/10 isolates respectively. CONCLUSION: Bactericidal activity with sustained killing effect of ≥99.9% is critical for eradicating XDR-PA infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. These findings underscore the difficulty of developing combination therapeutic options against XDR-PA, demonstrating that at least 3 antibiotics are required in combination and that efficacy is

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria by microdilution - Experience of a tertiary care centre

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    Set R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of the study was to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM isolated from various clinically suspected cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, from January 2007 to April 2008, at a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. Materials and Methods: The specimens were processed for microscopy and culture using the standard procedures. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined by broth microdilution, using Sensititre CA MHBT. Susceptibility testing was also carried out on Mueller Hinton agar by the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: Of the 1062 specimens received for mycobacterial cultures, 104 (9.79% grew mycobacteria. Of the mycobacterial isolates, six (5.76% were rapid growers. M. abscessus and M. chelonae appeared to be resistant organisms, with M. chelonae showing intermediate resistance to amikacin and minocycline. However, all the six isolates showed sensitivity to vancomycin and gentamicin by the disc diffusion test. Also all three isolates of M. abscessus were sensitive to piperacillin and erythromycin. Further studies are required to test their sensitivity to these four antimicrobials by using the microbroth dilution test, before they can be prescribed to patients. Conclusions: We wish to emphasize that reporting of rapidly growing mycobacteria from clinical settings, along with their sensitivity patterns, is an absolute need of the hour.

  2. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  3. Choosing the correct empirical antibiotic for urinary tract infection in pediatric: Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Escherichia coli by E-Test method.

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Sedighi; Abbas Solgi; Ali Amanati; Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are of the most common bacterial diseases worldwide. We investigate the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from pediatric patients with community acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) to find a clinical guidance for choosing a right empirical antibiotic in these patients. Materials and Methods In this cross sectional study, 100 urine specimens which were positive for E. coli had been inve...

  4. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Colin J; Boonstra, Sjoukje; Levels, Suzanne; de Lange, Marit; Meis, Jacques F; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO) support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture), and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture). Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170) and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170). The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2%) and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%). Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  5. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Ingham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide (PAO support combined with microscopy offers a route to more rapid results. METHODS: Microcolonies of Candida species grown on PAO were stained with the fluorogenic dyes Fun-1 and Calcofluor White and then imaged by fluorescence microscopy. Images were captured by a charge-coupled device camera and processed by publicly available software. By this method, the growth of yeasts could be detected and quantified within 2 h. Microcolony imaging was then used to assess the susceptibility of the yeasts to amphotericin B, anidulafungin and caspofungin (3.5 h culture, and voriconazole and itraconazole (7 h culture. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, the results showed good agreement with EUCAST (86.5% agreement; n = 170 and E-test (85.9% agreement; n = 170. The closest agreement to standard tests was found when testing susceptibility to amphotericin B and echinocandins (88.2 to 91.2% and the least good for the triazoles (79.4 to 82.4%. Furthermore, large datasets on population variation could be rapidly obtained. An analysis of microcolonies revealed subtle effects of antimycotics on resistant strains and below the MIC of sensitive strains, particularly an increase in population heterogeneity and cell density-dependent effects of triazoles. Additionally, the method could be adapted to strain identification via germ tube extension. We suggest PAO culture is a rapid and versatile method that may be usefully adapted to clinical mycology and has research applications.

  6. ENDOPHTHALMITIS CAUSED BY SERRATIA MARCESCENS: Clinical Features, Antibiotic Susceptibilities, and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Jayanth; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W; Smiddy, William E; Venincasa, Vincent D; Miller, Darlene

    2015-06-01

    To report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes associated with endophthalmitis caused by Serratia marcescens. A consecutive case series of patients with vitreous culture-positive endophthalmitis caused by S. marcescens from July 1, 1993, to June 30, 2012, at a large university referral center. Findings from this study were compared with those of a previous study (January 1980-June 1993) from our institution. Of the 10 study patients who were identified, clinical settings included trabeculectomy bleb-associated (n = 3), post-cataract surgery (n = 2), post-penetrating keratoplasty (n = 2), post-scleral buckle (n = 1), glaucoma drainage implant-associated (n = 1), and post-keratoprosthesis (n = 1). Clinical features included pain (n = 10) and hypopyon (n = 5). Presenting visual acuity was hand motions or worse in seven cases. All isolates were sensitive to gentamicin, ceftazidime, imipenem, and levofloxacin. The MIC 90s of isolates for antibiotics tested in the current period compared with isolates from January 1980 to June 1993 were unchanged. All isolates were resistant to vancomycin. Initial treatment strategies were vitreous tap and intravitreal antibiotic injection (n = 8), pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotic injection (n = 1), and evisceration (n = 1). When repeat vitreous fluid was obtained, persistent positive cultures were present in 1 (10%) of 10 patients in this study, compared with 5 (50%) of 10 patients in the previous study. Final visual acuity was no light perception in 6 of 10 patients (60%). Outcomes were generally poor with a high rate of complete visual loss in the affected eye.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility and (3-lactamase prevalence for staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitic milk samples

    OpenAIRE

    Turutoglu H.; Mudul S.; Pehlivanoglu F.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate the mastitis pathogens and to determine the b-lactamase activities of staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis milk samples and the sensitivities of these isolates to various antibiotics. For this purpose, 1180 dairy cows On 131 farms were examined for mastitis and 496 mastitis milk samples were taken 'from 249 cows. Staphylococcus aureus was present in 33.16%, coagulase negative staphylococci in 31.10 %, Eschehchia coli in 11.57 %, S...

  8. Alkaloids Modulate Motility, Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusane, Devendra H.; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Asadishad, Bahareh; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Alkaloid-containing natural compounds have shown promise in the treatment of microbial infections. However, practical application of many of these compounds is pending a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action. We investigated the effect of two alkaloids, piperine (found in black pepper) and reserpine (found in Indian snakeroot), on the ability of the uropathogenic bacterium Escherichia coli CFT073 to colonize abiotic surfaces. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of both compounds (0.5 to 10 µg/mL) decreased bacterial swarming and swimming motilities and increased biofilm formation. qRT-PCR revealed a decrease in the expression of the flagellar gene (fliC) and motility genes (motA and motB) along with an increased expression of adhesin genes (fimA, papA, uvrY). Interestingly, piperine increased penetration of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin into E. coli CFT073 biofilms and consequently enhanced the ability of these antibiotics to disperse pre-established biofilms. The findings suggest that these alkaloids can potentially affect bacterial colonization by hampering bacterial motility and may aid in the treatment of infection by increasing antibiotic penetration in biofilms. PMID:25391152

  9. Alkaloids modulate motility, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibility of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra H Dusane

    Full Text Available Alkaloid-containing natural compounds have shown promise in the treatment of microbial infections. However, practical application of many of these compounds is pending a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action. We investigated the effect of two alkaloids, piperine (found in black pepper and reserpine (found in Indian snakeroot, on the ability of the uropathogenic bacterium Escherichia coli CFT073 to colonize abiotic surfaces. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of both compounds (0.5 to 10 µg/mL decreased bacterial swarming and swimming motilities and increased biofilm formation. qRT-PCR revealed a decrease in the expression of the flagellar gene (fliC and motility genes (motA and motB along with an increased expression of adhesin genes (fimA, papA, uvrY. Interestingly, piperine increased penetration of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin into E. coli CFT073 biofilms and consequently enhanced the ability of these antibiotics to disperse pre-established biofilms. The findings suggest that these alkaloids can potentially affect bacterial colonization by hampering bacterial motility and may aid in the treatment of infection by increasing antibiotic penetration in biofilms.

  10. Choosing the correct empirical antibiotic for urinary tract infection in pediatric: Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Escherichia coli by E-Test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Iraj; Solgi, Abbas; Amanati, Ali; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are of the most common bacterial diseases worldwide. We investigate the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from pediatric patients with community acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) to find a clinical guidance for choosing a right empirical antibiotic in these patients. In this cross sectional study, 100 urine specimens which were positive for E. coli had been investigated for antibiotics susceptibility pattern. The susceptibility to Co-trimoxazol (25μg), Amikacin (30μg), Ceftriaxone (30μg), Nalidixic Acid (30μg), Cefixime (5μg), and Nitrofurantoin (300μg) tested with Disk diffusion agar and MIC determined with the E-test. Mean age of patients was 38 Months. Girls had greater proportion than boys (74 versus 26%). In Disk diffusion method, 26% of the isolates were susceptible to cotrimoxazole. Susceptibility to amikacin, ceftriaxone, nitrofurantoin, nalidixic acid and cefixime was 94%, 66%, 97%, 62% and 52%, respectively. By E-Test method and according to CLSI criteria susceptibility for co-trimoxazol, amikacin, ceftriaxone and nalidixic acid was 37%, 97%, 67% and 50%, respectively. The highest percentage of agreement between Disk diffusion and E-Test method was found for amikacin (96%) and the lowest percentage for co-trimoxazole (89%). Treatment failure, prolonged or repeated hospitalization, increased costs of care, and increased mortality are some consequence of bacterial resistance in UTIs. Misuse of antibiotics in each geographic location directly affects antibiotic resistance pattern. In the treatment of UTI, proper selection of antimicrobial agents should be relevant to the bacterial susceptibility testing surveillance. According to our results, amikacin as an injectable drug and nitrofurantoin as an oral agent could be used as a drug of choice in our region for children with UTIs.

  11. Antibiotic treatment algorithm development based on a microarray nucleic acid assay for rapid bacterial identification and resistance determination from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Jürgen; Karrasch, Matthias; Edel, Birgit; Stoll, Sylvia; Bohnert, Jürgen; Löffler, Bettina; Saupe, Angela; Pfister, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections remains a challenge for the early targeting of an antibiotic therapy in sepsis patients. In recent studies, the reliability of the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive and Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GP and BC-GN) assays for the rapid identification of bacteria and resistance genes directly from positive BCs has been demonstrated. In this work, we have developed a model to define treatment recommendations by combining Verigene test results with knowledge on local antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens. The data of 275 positive BCs were analyzed. Two hundred sixty-three isolates (95.6%) were included in the Verigene assay panels, and 257 isolates (93.5%) were correctly identified. The agreement of the detection of resistance genes with subsequent phenotypic susceptibility testing was 100%. The hospital antibiogram was used to develop a treatment algorithm on the basis of Verigene results that may contribute to a faster patient management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Molecular Screening of Class I Integron in Salmonella Isolates Recovered from Retail Raw Chicken Carcasses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zengfeng; Li, Keting; Wang, Yin; Xia, Xiaodong; Wang, Xin; Xi, Meili; Meng, Jianghong; Cui, Shenghui; Yang, Baowei

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is one of the leading causes for foodborne diseases. Foods, particularly those of animal origin, act as an important role for Salmonella transmission. In this study, the antibiotic susceptibility of 743 Salmonella isolates recovered from retail raw chicken carcasses in eight provinces was tested, and the isolates were also screened for the presence of class I integron and drug-resistant gene cassettes. One hundred thirteen (15.21%) isolates were harboring class I integron. A higher percentage of integron-positive Salmonella isolates were found in retail chicken in Sichuan Province (29.33%), followed by Beijing (22.14%), Shaanxi (19.15%), Guangxi (14.13%), Henan (12.50%), Shanghai (7.25%), Fujian (8.22%), and Guangdong (6.25%) Provinces. The respective prevalence of class I integron in Salmonella isolates recovered from retail chickens in large, free, and small markets was 16.31%, 14.04%, and 15.27%. Moreover, 20.13%, 14.02%, and 13.74% of Salmonella isolates recovered from retail chickens stored in frozen, chilled, and ambient conditions, respectively, were positive for class I integron. Subsequent sequencing of class I integron revealed the presence of 10 gene cassettes harboring resistance genes (dfrA17-aadA5, dfrA17-aadA5, dfrA1-aadA1, dfrA12-aadA2, dfrA17-aadA5-aadA4, dfrA1-aadA1-aadA2, dfrA1, dfrA5, aadA2, aacA4-catB8-aadA1-dfrA1-(aac6-II)-(bla CARB -8), bla PSE-1 -bla P1 ). The most prevalent gene cassette was dfrA17-aadA5 (59.62%). Class I integron-positive isolates were significantly more resistant to multiple antibiotics, and they commonly exhibited corresponding antibiotic resistance profiles to the antibiotic resistance gene cassettes harbored in their class I integron. The results indicated that class I integron with different antibiotic resistance gene cassettes that were prevalent in Salmonella isolates differed from provinces, marketplaces, and chicken storage conditions.

  13. Nitrite modulates bacterial antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation in association with airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Anna C; Shiva, Sruti; Burns, Jane L; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Pilewski, Joseph M; Gladwin, Mark T; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis and other forms of bronchiectasis. Growth in antibiotic-resistant biofilms contributes to the virulence of this organism. Sodium nitrite has antimicrobial properties and has been tolerated as a nebulized compound at high concentrations in human subjects with pulmonary hypertension; however, its effects have not been evaluated on biotic biofilms or in combination with other clinically useful antibiotics. We grew P. aeruginosa on the apical surface of primary human airway epithelial cells to test the efficacy of sodium nitrite against biotic biofilms. Nitrite alone prevented 99% of biofilm growth. We then identified significant cooperative interactions between nitrite and polymyxins. For P. aeruginosa growing on primary CF airway cells, combining nitrite and colistimethate resulted in an additional log of bacterial inhibition compared to treating with either agent alone. Nitrite and colistimethate additively inhibited oxygen consumption by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, whereas the antimicrobial effects of nitrite in planktonic, aerated cultures are nitric oxide (NO) dependent, antimicrobial effects under other growth conditions are not. The inhibitory effect of nitrite on bacterial oxygen consumption and biofilm growth did not require NO as an intermediate as chemically scavenging NO did not block growth inhibition. These data suggest an NO-radical independent nitrosative or oxidative inhibition of respiration. The combination of nebulized sodium nitrite and colistimethate may provide a novel therapy for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections, because sodium nitrite, unlike other antibiotic respiratory chain "poisons," can be safely nebulized at high concentration in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of Borrelia burgdorferi in vitro and in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wretlind, B; Johnson, R C; Hansen, K; Preac-Mursic, V

    1991-01-01

    The development of a rational antibiotic therapy for Lyme borreliosis has been hampered by the lack of reliable microbiologic or serologic criteria for diagnosis or cure. In studies of the treatment, the clinical response, has been used as the primary indicator of efficacy. Studies often differ in their criteria for a successful outcome, and it is not clear whether persistent symptoms are due to incomplete eradication of the pathogen, to a post-infectious syndrome, or to erroneous diagnosis in the first place. Thus, laboratory experiments are needed as a complement to clinical trials.

  15. Assessment of antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila isolated from water systems in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Sikora

    2017-03-01

    Azithromycin resistance was found in one strain of L. pneumophila SG 2–14, but the resistance mechanism is unknown and needs further study. It is possible that therapeutic failures in Legionnaires’ disease may be associated with bacterial resistance which should be taken into account. The antibiotic sensitivity testing described in this study could be helpful in detecting the resistance of clinical L. pneumophila isolates. Ciprofloxacin and rifampicin have good in vitro activity against environmental L. pneumophila SG 1 and SG 2–14 in Poland.

  16. Identification and determination of antibiotic susceptibilities of Brucella strains isolated from patients in van, Turkey by conventional and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Mehmet; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin; Bayram, Yasemin; Çıkman, Aytekin; Aypak, Cenk; Kılıç, Selçuk; Berktaş, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease and still constitutes a major public health problem. In this study, we aimed to identify biovars of Brucella strains isolated from clinical specimens taken from brucellosis patients from the Eastern Anatolia region as well determine the susceptibility of these isolates to tigecycline and azithromycin, drugs that may serve as alternatives to the conventional drugs used in the therapy. Seventy-five Brucella spp. isolates were included in the study. All strains were identified by both conventional and molecular methods. Brucella Multiplex PCR kit (FC-Biotech, Code: 0301, Turkey) and B. melitensis biovar typing PCR kit (FC-Biotech, Code: 0302, Turkey) were used for molecular typing. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of all strains were determined by E-tests. By conventional biotyping, 73 strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 and two strains as B. abortus biovar 3. Molecular typing results were compatible with conventional methods. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of doxycycline were 0.047 and 0.094; tigecycline 0.094 and 0.125; trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 0.064 and 0.19; ciprofloxacin 0.19 for both; streptomycin 0.75 and 1; rifampin 1 and 2 and azithromycin 4 and 8. According to the MIC values, doxycycline was found to be the most effective antibiotic, followed by tigecycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. Currently recommended antibiotics for the treatment of brucellosis such as doxycycline, rifampin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found to be still effective. While our results showed that tigecycline can be used an alternative agent in the treatment of brucellosis, azithromycin has not been confirmed as an appropriate agent for the treatment.

  17. Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) larvae as a model for antibiotic susceptibility testing and acute toxicity trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignasiak, Katarzyna; Maxwell, Anthony

    2017-08-29

    Infectivity trials and toxicity testing in rodents are important prerequisites to the use of compounds in man. However, trials in rats and mice are expensive and there are ethical considerations. Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) larvae are a potential alternative. We have assessed the use of these insects in infectivity trials and toxicity testing. Using four bacterial species (two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive) we have assessed the efficacy of four antibiotics against infections in Galleria and compared the antibiotic susceptibility with that in humans. In general, we find a good correlation. Similarly, we have assessed 11 compounds (initially tested blind) for their toxicity in Galleria and compared this with toxicity trials in mice and rats. Again we found a good correlation between toxicity in Galleria and that in rodents. We have found, in our hands, that G. mellonella larvae can be used in infectivity trials and toxicity testing, and that these assays represent an inexpensive and readily executable alternative to testing in rodents.

  18. Rapid Ganciclovir Susceptibility Assay Using Flow Cytometry for Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan L.; Notka, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Weinberg, Adriana; Shapiro, Howard M.; Reichelderfer, Patricia S.; Crumpacker, Clyde S.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative, and objective determination of the susceptibilities of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates to ganciclovir has been assessed by an assay that uses a fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibody to an HCMV immediate-early antigen and flow cytometry. Analysis of the ganciclovir susceptibilities of 25 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates by flow cytometry demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ganciclovir for 19 of the isolates were between 1.14 and 6.66 μM, with a mean of 4.32 μM (±1.93) (sensitive; IC50 less than 7 μM), the IC50s for 2 isolates were 8.48 and 9.79 μM (partially resistant), and the IC50s for 4 isolates were greater than 96 μM (resistant). Comparative analysis of the drug susceptibilities of these clinical isolates by the plaque reduction assay gave IC50s of less than 6 μM, with a mean of 2.88 μM (±1.40) for the 19 drug-sensitive isolates, IC50s of 6 to 8 μM for the partially resistant isolates, and IC50s of greater than 12 μM for the four resistant clinical isolates. Comparison of the IC50s for the drug-susceptible and partially resistant clinical isolates obtained by the flow cytometry assay with the IC50s obtained by the plaque reduction assay showed an acceptable correlation (r2 = 0.473; P = 0.001), suggesting that the flow cytometry assay could substitute for the more labor-intensive, subjective, and time-consuming plaque reduction assay. PMID:9736557

  19. Variable antibiotic susceptibility patterns among Streptomyces species causing actinomycetoma in man and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mohamed E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy is recommended in conjunction with surgery in treatment of actinomycetoma. The specific prescription depends on the type of bacteria (actinomycetoma or fungi (eumycetoma causing the disease and their in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. Objectives To investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility among isolates of Streptomyces spp. isolated from cases of actinomycetoma in man and animals in Sudan. Methods Streptomyces strains (n = 18 isolated from cases of actinomycetoma were tested in vitro against 15 commonly prescribed antibacterial agents using MIC agar dilution method as per standard guidelines. Results Streptomyces strains isolated from actinomycetoma fall into various phenotypic groups. All of the strains were inhibited by novobiocin (8 μg/mL, gentamycin (8, 32 μg/mL and doxycycline (32 μg/mL. Fusidic acid (64 μg/mL inhibited 94.4% of the strains; bacitracin, streptomycin, cephaloridine, clindamycin, ampicillin, rifampicin and tetracycline (64 μg/mL inhibited between 61.1 and 77.8% of the strains. All strains were found resistant to amphotericin B (64 μg/mL, penicillin (20 μg/mL and sulphamethoxazole (64 μg/mL. Conclusions Saprophytic Streptomyces spp. cause actinomycetoma in man and animal belong to separate phenotypes and have a wide range of susceptibility patterns to antimicrobial agents, which pose a lot of difficulties in selecting effective in vivo treatment for actinomycetoma.

  20. Integrating rapid diagnostics and antimicrobial stewardship improves outcomes in patients with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Katherine K; Olsen, Randall J; Musick, William L; Cernoch, Patricia L; Davis, James R; Peterson, Leif E; Musser, James M

    2014-09-01

    An intervention for Gram-negative bloodstream infections that integrated mass spectrometry technology for rapid diagnosis with antimicrobial stewardship oversight significantly improved patient outcomes and reduced hospital costs. As antibiotic resistance rates continue to grow at an alarming speed, the current study was undertaken to assess the impact of this intervention in a challenging patient population with bloodstream infections caused by antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. A total of 153 patients with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia hospitalized prior to the study intervention were compared to 112 patients treated post-implementation. Outcomes assessed included time to optimal antibiotic therapy, time to active treatment when inactive, hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, all-cause 30-day mortality, and total hospital expenditures. Integrating rapid diagnostics with antimicrobial stewardship improved time to optimal antibiotic therapy (80.9 h in the pre-intervention period versus 23.2 h in the intervention period, P Gram-negatives. The intervention decreased hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, total hospital costs, and reduced all-cause 30-day mortality. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Changing trends in newborn sepsis in Sagamu, Nigeria: bacterial aetiology, risk factors and antibiotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade A; Ogunfowora, Olusoga B; Osinupebi, Olubunmi; Olanrewaju, Durotoye M

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a major contributor to newborn deaths in the developing world. The objective is to determine the prevalence of newborn sepsis, the bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the isolates. A study of consecutive babies hospitalised in Sagamu, Nigeria, with risk factors for or clinical features of sepsis was retrospectively done between January 2006 and December 2007, and prospectively between January and December 2008. Positive blood culture defined neonatal sepsis, and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the organisms was also determined. There were 1050 admissions, and 174 (16.5%) babies had positive blood culture. Of the 527 babies with risk factors and clinical features of sepsis, 174 (33.3%) had confirmed sepsis: 119 (22.5%) had early-onset sepsis, while 55 (10.4%) had late-onset sepsis. The incidence of neonatal sepsis in the hospital was 51.3/1000 live births. Weight less than 1.5 kg, prolonged labour, prolonged rupture of membranes and lower socio-economic status were risk factors for sepsis. Staphylococcus aureus (31.0%), Klebsiella (23.0%), and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (12.6%) and Escherichia coli (11.0%) were the leading aetiologies. The isolates were most sensitive to levofloxacin (95.7%), ofloxacin (95.1%), cefotaxime (86.7%) and ceftazidime (81.3%). Their sensitivity was 56.4% to cefuroxime and gentamicin, which are commonly used. The prevalence of sepsis was high in this cohort of high-risk infants. The low in vitro sensitivity of the leading microbes to commonly used drugs is challenging. Guidelines on the reduction of emergence of drug resistance must be provided and instituted in newborn units. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. The MspA porin promotes growth and increases antibiotic susceptibility of both Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailaender, Claudia; Reiling, Norbert; Engelhardt, Harald; Bossmann, Stefan; Ehlers, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Porins mediate the diffusion of hydrophilic solutes across the outer membrane of mycobacteria, but the efficiency of this pathway is very low compared to Gram-negative bacteria. To examine the importance of porins in slow-growing mycobacteria, the major porin MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis was expressed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Approximately 20 and 35 MspA molecules per microm(2) cell wall were observed in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis BCG, respectively, by electron microscopy and quantitative immunoblot experiments. Surface accessibility of MspA in M. tuberculosis was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Glucose uptake was twofold faster, indicating that the outer membrane permeability of M. bovis BCG to small and hydrophilic solutes was increased by MspA. This significantly accelerated the growth of M. bovis BCG, identifying very slow nutrient uptake as one of the determinants of slow growth in mycobacteria. The susceptibility of both M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis to zwitterionic beta-lactam antibiotics was substantially enhanced by MspA, decreasing the minimal inhibitory concentration up to 16-fold. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis became significantly more susceptible to isoniazid, ethambutol and streptomycin. Fluorescence with the nucleic acid binding dye SYTO 9 was 10-fold increased upon expression of mspA. These results indicated that MspA not only enhanced the efficiency of the porin pathway, but also that of pathways mediating access to large and/or hydrophobic agents. This study provides the first experimental evidence that porins are important for drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis.

  3. Tetracycline susceptibility of the ingested Lactobacillus acidophilus LaCH-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 strains during antibiotic/probiotic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Maria; Maukonen, Johanna; von Wright, Atte; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; Patterson, Andrea J; Scott, Karen P; Hämynen, Heikki; Mättö, Jaana

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of oral therapy with doxycycline, a tetracycline group antibiotic, on the gastrointestinal (GI) survival and tetracycline susceptibility of probiotic strains Lactobacillus acidophilus LaCH-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12. In addition, the influence of doxycycline therapy on the diversity of the predominant faecal microbiota was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Faecal samples from the antibiotic group (receiving antibiotics and probiotics) and the control group (receiving probiotics only) were analysed for anaerobically and aerobically growing bacteria, bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria as well as for the dominant microbiota. Although doxycycline consumption did not have a large impact on GI survival of the probiotics, it had a detrimental effect on the bifidobacteria and on the diversity of the dominant faecal microbiota. A higher proportion of tetracycline-resistant anaerobically growing bacteria and bifidobacteria was detected in the antibiotic group than in the control group. Several antibiotic group subjects had faecal B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12-like isolates with reduced tetracycline susceptibility. This was unlikely to be due to the acquisition of novel tetracycline resistance determinants, since only tet(W), which is also present in the ingested B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12, was found in the resistant isolates. Thus, concomitant ingestion of probiotic L. acidophilus LaCH-5 and B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 with the antibiotic did not generate a safety risk regarding the possible GI transfer of tetracycline resistance genes to the ingested strains.

  4. Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Campylobacter species Isolated From Chicken and Beef Meat

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    Hossein Dabiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and beef meat, and determine the drug susceptibility of strains, 450 samples in Tehran, Iran were investigated. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the antimicrobial resistance of entropathogenic Campylobacter strains ,especially C. jejuni isolated from raw chicken and beef meat in Tehran- Iran. Materials and Methods: Out of 250 chickens and 200 beef meats, 121(26.8 % contaminated cases with Campylobacter strains were isolated. Campylobacter was isolated from a significantly larger number of chickens (44% than beef meats (5.5 % (P < 0.05. Results: From all isolated Campylobacter organisms, 93 (76.8% species were identified as C. jejuni and 28 cases (23.1% as C. coli. Susceptibilities of 121 strains (93 C. jejuni and 28 C. coli were determined against 12 antimicrobial drugs using the disk agar diffusion method. Resistance to nalidixic acid (75% and ciprofloxacin (50% was an alarming finding, moreover, 32.6% of isolates was resistant to tetracycline, 10.8% to ampicillin, 29.3% to colisitin and 26.1% to amoxicillin. The highest sensitivity was seen to erythromycin (95 % and gentamicin (96%. Conclusions: These results showed that a high proportion of chicken and beef meat in Iran is contaminated with Campylobacter, particularly with Campylobacter jejuni. The high rate of contamination, especially chicken is a significant public health concern. Most of the isolates were resistant; therefore, human infection with Campylobacter spp. via consumption of these products is possible.

  5. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  6. Rapid Isolation and Susceptibility Testing of Leptospira spp. Using a New Solid Medium, LVW Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Paris, Daniel H.; Langla, Sayan; Thaipadunpanit, Janjira; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Smythe, Lee D.; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp., the causative agents of leptospirosis, are slow-growing Gram-negative spirochetes. Isolation of Leptospira from clinical samples and testing of antimicrobial susceptibility are difficult and time-consuming. Here, we describe the development of a new solid medium that facilitates more-rapid growth of Leptospira spp. and the use of this medium to evaluate the Etest's performance in determining antimicrobial MICs to drugs in common use for leptospirosis. The medium was developed by evaluating the effects of numerous factors on the growth rate of Leptospira interrogans strain NR-20157. These included the type of base agar, the concentration of rabbit serum (RS), and the concentration and duration of CO2 incubation during the initial period of culture. The highest growth rate of NR-20157 was achieved using a Noble agar base supplemented with 10% RS (named LVW agar), with an initial incubation at 30°C in 5% CO2 for 2 days prior to continuous culture in air at 30°C. These conditions were used to develop the Etest for three species, L. interrogans (NR-20161), L. kirschnerii (NR-20327), and L. borgpetersenii (NR-20151). The MICs were read on day 7 for all samples. The Etest was then performed on 109 isolates of pathogenic Leptospira spp. The MIC90 values for penicillin G, doxycycline, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol were 0.64 units/ml and 0.19, 0.047, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively. The use of LVW agar, which enables rapid growth, isolation of single colonies, and simple antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Leptospira spp., provides an opportunity for new areas of fundamental and applied research. PMID:23114772

  7. Rapid, automated, nonradiometric susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex to four first-line antituberculous drugs used in standard short-course chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Marjamäki, Merja

    2004-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis necessitates rapid and accurate susceptibility testing. The nonradiometric BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) system for susceptibility testing was evaluated on 222 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates...... MGIT system is a rapid and reliable alternative for susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis complex to first-line drugs....

  8. Prevalence, Virulence Potential, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Bovine Raw Milk Samples Obtained From Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjita; Sharma, Vishnu; Dahiya, Dinesh Kumar; Khan, Aarif; Mathur, Manisha; Sharma, Amit

    2017-03-01

    Listeriosis is a serious foodborne disease of a global concern, and can effectively be controlled by a continuous surveillance of the virulent and multidrug-resistant strains of Listeria monocytogenes. This study was planned to investigate prevalence of L. monocytogenes in bovine raw milk samples. A total of 457 raw milk samples collected from 15 major cities in Rajasthan, India, were analyzed for the presence of L. monocytogenes by using standard microbiological and molecular methods. Five of the 457 samples screen tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Multiplex serotyping showed that 3/5 strains belonged to serotype 4b followed by one strain each to 1/2a and to 1/2c. Further virulence potential assessment indicated that all strains possessed inlA and inlC internalins, and, in addition, two strains also possessed the gene for inlB. All strains were positive for Listeriolysin O (LLO) and showed phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity on an in vitro agar medium with variations in production levels among the strains. A good correlation between the in vitro pathogenicity test and the chick embryo test was observed, as the strains showing higher LLO and PI-PLC activity were found to be lethal to fertilized chick embryos. All strains were resistant to the majority of antibiotics and were designated as multidrug-resistant strains. However, these strains were susceptible to 9 of the 22 tested antibiotics. The maximum zone of inhibition (mm) and acceptable minimum inhibitory concentration were observed with azithromycin, and thus it could be the first choice of a treatment. Overall, the presence of multidrug-resistant L. monocytogenes strains in the raw milk of Rajasthan region is an indicator of public health hazard and highlighting the need of consumer awareness in place and implementation of stricter food safety regulations at all levels of milk production.

  9. Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay for Rapid Diagnosis of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Detection of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Daniela E; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Gilman, Robert H; Caviedes, Luz; Rizvi, Hasan; Ticona, Eduardo; Chavez, Gonzalo; Cabrera, José Luis; Matos, Eduardo D; Evans, Carlton A; Moore, David A J; Friedland, Jon S

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 132 patients with lymphadenopathy were investigated. Fifty-two (39.4%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB). The microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay provided rapid (13 days), accurate diagnosis (sensitivity, 65.4%) and reliable drug susceptibility testing (DST). Despite its lower sensitivity than that of other methods, its faster results and simultaneous DST are advantageous in resource-poor settings, supporting the incorporation of MODS into diagnostic algorithms for extrapulmonary TB. Copyright © 2015 Kirwan et al.

  10. Collective antibiotic tolerance: mechanisms, dynamics and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Hannah R; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Lee, Anna J; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at a rate that is alarming considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. Also important, however, is the fact that a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming and interpopulation interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment and provide a time window during which otherwise susceptible bacteria can acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy.

  11. Molecular epidemiology and antibiotic susceptibility of livestock Brucella melitensis isolates from Naryn Oblast, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymbekov, Joldoshbek; Imanseitov, Joldoshbek; Ballif, Marie; Schürch, Nadia; Paniga, Sandra; Pilo, Paola; Tonolla, Mauro; Benagli, Cinzia; Akylbekova, Kulyash; Jumakanova, Zarima; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of human brucellosis in Kyrgyzstan has been increasing in the last years and was identified as a priority disease needing most urgent control measures in the livestock population. The latest species identification of Brucella isolates in Kyrgyzstan was carried out in the 1960s and investigated the circulation of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, B. ovis, and B. suis. However, supporting data and documentation of that experience are lacking. Therefore, typing of Brucella spp. and identification of the most important host species are necessary for the understanding of the main transmission routes and to adopt an effective brucellosis control policy in Kyrgyzstan. Overall, 17 B. melitensis strains from aborted fetuses of sheep and cattle isolated in the province of Naryn were studied. All strains were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, rifampin, ofloxacin, streptomycin, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis showed low genetic diversity. Kyrgyz strains seem to be genetically associated with the Eastern Mediterranean group of the Brucella global phylogeny. We identified and confirmed transmission of B. melitensis to cattle and a close genetic relationship between B. melitensis strains isolated from sheep sharing the same pasture.

  12. Molecular epidemiology and antibiotic susceptibility of livestock Brucella melitensis isolates from Naryn Oblast, Kyrgyzstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joldoshbek Kasymbekov

    Full Text Available The incidence of human brucellosis in Kyrgyzstan has been increasing in the last years and was identified as a priority disease needing most urgent control measures in the livestock population. The latest species identification of Brucella isolates in Kyrgyzstan was carried out in the 1960s and investigated the circulation of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, B. ovis, and B. suis. However, supporting data and documentation of that experience are lacking. Therefore, typing of Brucella spp. and identification of the most important host species are necessary for the understanding of the main transmission routes and to adopt an effective brucellosis control policy in Kyrgyzstan. Overall, 17 B. melitensis strains from aborted fetuses of sheep and cattle isolated in the province of Naryn were studied. All strains were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, rifampin, ofloxacin, streptomycin, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis showed low genetic diversity. Kyrgyz strains seem to be genetically associated with the Eastern Mediterranean group of the Brucella global phylogeny. We identified and confirmed transmission of B. melitensis to cattle and a close genetic relationship between B. melitensis strains isolated from sheep sharing the same pasture.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Livestock Brucella melitensis Isolates from Naryn Oblast, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymbekov, Joldoshbek; Imanseitov, Joldoshbek; Ballif, Marie; Schürch, Nadia; Paniga, Sandra; Pilo, Paola; Tonolla, Mauro; Benagli, Cinzia; Akylbekova, Kulyash; Jumakanova, Zarima; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of human brucellosis in Kyrgyzstan has been increasing in the last years and was identified as a priority disease needing most urgent control measures in the livestock population. The latest species identification of Brucella isolates in Kyrgyzstan was carried out in the 1960s and investigated the circulation of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, B. ovis, and B. suis. However, supporting data and documentation of that experience are lacking. Therefore, typing of Brucella spp. and identification of the most important host species are necessary for the understanding of the main transmission routes and to adopt an effective brucellosis control policy in Kyrgyzstan. Overall, 17 B. melitensis strains from aborted fetuses of sheep and cattle isolated in the province of Naryn were studied. All strains were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, rifampin, ofloxacin, streptomycin, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis showed low genetic diversity. Kyrgyz strains seem to be genetically associated with the Eastern Mediterranean group of the Brucella global phylogeny. We identified and confirmed transmission of B. melitensis to cattle and a close genetic relationship between B. melitensis strains isolated from sheep sharing the same pasture. PMID:23469294

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella strains isolated from public water sources in Macau and Guangzhou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lina; Yan, He; Shi, Lei; Mo, Ziyao

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of waterborne strains of Legionella to eight antimicrobials commonly used in legionellosis therapy. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 66 environmental Legionella strains, isolated from fountains and cooling towers of public facilities (hotels, schools, and shopping malls) in Macau and Guangzhou, were tested using the microdilution method in buffered yeast extract broth. The MIC50/MIC90 values for erythromycin, cefotaxime (CTX), doxycycline (DOC), minocycline (MIN), azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin (LEV), and moxifloxacin were 0.125/0.5 mg/L, 4/8 mg/L, 8/16 mg/L, 4/8 mg/L, 0.125/0.5 mg/L, 0.031/0.031 mg/L, 0.031/0.031 mg/L, and 0.031/0.062 mg/L, respectively. Legionella isolates were inhibited by either low concentrations of macrolides and fluoroquinolones, or high concentrations of CTX and tetracycline drugs. LEV was the most effective drug against different Legionella species and serogroups of L. pneumophila isolates. The latter were inhibited in decreasing order by MIN > CTX >DOC, while non-L. pneumophila isolates were inhibited by CTX> MIN >DOC. In this study, we evaluated drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria from the environment. This may help predict the emergence of drug resistance, improve patient outcomes, and reduce hospitalization costs.

  15. [Frequency of isolation and susceptibility to antibiotics of Escherichia coli strains isolated from blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białucha, Agata; Budzyńska, Anna; Kozuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was the analysis of Escherichia coli strains obtained from patients of University Hospital No 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń and State Infectious Diseases Observatory Hospital of T. Browicz in Bydgoszcz, between 2007 and 2010. Among all microorganisms isolated from blood was 8.7% E. coli strains and 45.1% of all rods from Enterobacteriaceae family. Number of E. coli isolations from positive blood samples was: 64 in 2007, 69 in 2008, 77 in 2009 and 26 in the first half of 2010 year. The highest percentage of E. coli strains were obtained from patients of the Transplantology and Surgery Clinic (16.1%), the Nephrology and Internal Diseases Clinic with the Dialysis Centre (14.0%), the Pediatric, Hematology and Oncology Clinic (13.6%) and the Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Clinic (13.6%). All analysed strains were susceptible to carbapenems, amikacin and tygecycline. The highest percentage of resistant strains were observed to ampicillin (70.7%), piperacillin (43.9%), tetracycline (42.8%) and doxycycline (38.8%). During four years of study 4 (6.3%), one, three and two E. coli strains with ESBL were isolated, respectively.

  16. Serotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence genes screening of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from diarrheic buffalo calves in Egyptian farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf S. Hakim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In Egypt as in many other countries, river water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis is considered an important source of high-quality milk and meat supply. The objective of this study was to investigate serotypes, virulence genes, and antibiotic resistance determinants profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from buffalo at some places in Egypt; noticibly, this issue was not discussed in the country yet. Materials and Methods: A number of 58 rectal samples were collected from diarrheic buffalo calves in different regions in Egypt, and bacteriological investigated for E. coli existence. The E. coli isolates were biochemically, serologicaly identified, tested for antibiotic susceptibility, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance determinants and virulence genes. Results: Overall 14 isolates typed as E. coli (24.1%; 6 were belonged to serogroup O78 (10.3%, followed by O125 (4 isolates, 6.9%, then O158 (3 isolates, 5.2% and one isolate O8 (1.7%, among them, there were 5 E. coli isolates showed a picture of hemolysis (35.7%. The isolates exhibited a high resistance to β lactams over 60%, followed by sulfa (50% and aminoglucoside (42.8% group, in the same time the isolates were sensitive to quinolone, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline (100%, and cephalosporine groups (71.4%. A multiplex PCR was applied to the 14 E. coli isolates revealed that all were carrying at least one gene, as 10 carried blaTEM (71.4%, 8 Sul1 (57.1%, and 6 aadB (42.8%, and 9 isolates could be considered multidrug resistant (MDR by an incidence of 64.3%. A PCR survey was stratified for the most important E. coli virulence genes, and showed the presence of Shiga toxins in 9 isolates carried either one or the two Stx genes (64.3%, 5 isolates carried hylA gene (35.7%, and eae in 2 isolates only (14.3%, all isolates carried at least one virulence gene except two (85.7%. Conclusion: The obtained data displayed that in Egypt, buffalo as

  17. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Listeria monocytogenes Strains Isolated from Food Products and Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caplan Marius Eduard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes are o distribuţie ubiquitară în natură şi poate contamina produsele alimentare de origine animală, provocând infecţii severe la om. Până în prezent există foarte puține date cu privire la profilurile de rezistenţă ale tulpinilor circulante în România. Scopul acestui studiu a fost determinarea pattern-urilor de rezistenţă la antibiotice ale unor tulpini de L. monocytogenes (n=37 izolate din produse alimentare de origine animală şi din probe clinice. Probele din alimente (carne şi produse lactate, au fost colectate în perioada 2009-2013. Probele clinice au fost recoltate de la pacienţi cu septicemie, meningită/meningo-encefalită, cazuri de avort spontan şi nou-născuţi, spitalizaţi în perioada Aprilie 2010 - Aprilie 2013 în trei Instituţii Medicale din Bucureşti: Spitalul Elias, Spitalul Victor Babes si Institutul Naţional de Boli Infecţioase (INBI Matei Bals. Toate tulpinile testate au prezentat rezistenţă la cefalosporine şi acidul nalidixic; o tulpină izolată din melci fierţi a fost rezistentă la Trimetoprim/sulfametoxazol. Rezistenţa unora dintre tulpinile analizate la ampicilina, antibiotic de elecţie pentru terapia infecţiilor cauzate de L. monocytogenes, subliniază necesitatea testării in vitro a sensibilitatii la antibiotice a fiecarui izolat clinic pentru a stabili eficienţa diferitelor antibiotice, precum şi a unor studii epidemiologice extinse în scopul stabilirii profilurilor de rezistenţă ale tulpinilor de L. monocytogenes circulante în ţara noastră.

  18. Isolation, Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Salmonella from Slaughtered Bovines and Ovines in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellae are ubiquitous, found in animals, humans, and the environment, a condition which facilitates transmission and cross contamination. Salmonella enterica serotypes exert huge health and economic impacts due to their virulence or carriage of antibiotic resistance traits. To address this significant issues with regard to public health, availability of adequate information on the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of Salmonella, and establishment of adequate measures to control contamination and infection are needed. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of Salmonella infection in slaughtered bovines and ovines at Addis Ababa abattoir. Samples were collected randomly and processed for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Salmonella spp. From 280 animals examined, 13 (4.64% (8 bovines and 5 ovines were positive, with most samples (12/13, 92% comprising Salmonella Dublin. Very high level of resistance to some antibiotics used in human medicine was detected. Most isolates were susceptible to gentamycin and amikacin. Nine (69% of all isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Serotyping revealed 12 of 13 isolates to be of the Dublin serotype with 9,12:g,p:- antigenic formula. This study emphasizes the importance of improving the evisceration practice during slaughtering and restricting the use of antibiotics in farm animals.

  19. A retrospective analysis of the etiologic agents and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of uropathogens isolated in the Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital, Thimphu, Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeep, M; Nima, T; Kezang, W; Tshokey, T

    2016-01-29

    Urinary tract infection is one of the major public health problems. Specific population studies to understand the common etiologic agents and antibiotic susceptibility patterns are important to determine the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections. This is the first study in Bhutan to analyze the etiologic agents and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of uropathogens isolated from patients visiting Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital with the ultimate goal of guiding empirical treatment. Hospital based (inpatients/outpatients) retrospective cross sectional study of 6030 clinically suspected patients with urinary tract infections who have submitted urine samples for culture in a 6 months period was done. Urine samples were collected and processed as per standard microbiological procedures and antibiotic susceptibility testing performed by CLSI guidelines. Significant bacteriuria were detected in 14.9 % of the total patients. The most common uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli (79.3 %) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Females around the age group of 18-26 have the highest prevalence of urinary tract infection. The highest rate of antibiotic resistance was seen in amoxicillin (71.4 %) and nalidixic acid (80.3 %), and resistance were lower in nitrofuration (3.4 %) and gentamycin (17.5 %). The third generation cephalosporin resistance (which is a surrogate marker of ESBL) was 16.1 % in outpatient and 16.7 % approximately in inpatient setting. Escherichia coli was the predominant uropathogen making up 79.3 % (outpatient 81.1 % and inpatient 69.5 %) of the total and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern needs to be considered for treating community-acquired UTIs empirically. The third generation cephalosporin resistance (which is a surrogate marker of ESBL) is alarmingly high among the isolates and there is need for further studies.

  20. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  1. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  2. Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance: Preliminary Evaluation of PCR Assays Targeting Tetracycline Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Doxycycline Brucella spp. Brucellosis Aminoglycosides, Doxycycline, Tetracyclines Burkholderia mallei Glanders Penicillins, Tetracyclines...antibiotics: Mode of action, applications, molecular biology, and epidemiology of bacterial resistance. Molecular Biology Reviews 65: 232-260 5

  3. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in urine cultures: Antibiotic susceptibility trends over a decade at a tertiary hospital in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Toner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infection and vancomycin-resistant strains are more difficult to treat. The purpose of this surveillance program was to assess the prevalence of and determine the risk factors for vancomycin resistance in adults among urinary isolates of Enterococcus sp. and to detail the antibiotic susceptibility profile, which can be used to guide empirical treatment. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2014 we retrospectively reviewed 5,528 positive Enterococcus sp. urine cultures recorded in a computerized laboratory results database at a tertiary teaching hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Results: Of these cultures, 542 (9.8% were vancomycin resistant. No longitudinal trend was observed in the proportion of vancomycin- resistant strains over the course of the study. We observed emerging resistance to nitrofurantoin with rates climbing from near zero to 40%. Ampicillin resistance fluctuated between 50% and 90%. Low resistance was observed for linezolid and quinupristin/ dalfopristin. Female sex and inpatient status were identified as risk factors for vancomycin resistance. Conclusions: The incidence of vancomycin resistance among urinary isolates was stable over the last decade. Although resistance to nitrofurantoin has increased, it still serves as an appropriate first choice in uncomplicated urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin- resistant Enterococcus sp.

  4. Differential Effects of Penicillin Binding Protein Deletion on the Susceptibility of Enterococcus faecium to Cationic Peptide Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoulas, George; Kumaraswamy, Monika; Nonejuie, Poochit; Werth, Brian J; Rybak, Micahel J; Pogliano, Joseph; Rice, Louis B; Nizet, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics sensitize Enterococcus faecium to killing by endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system and daptomycin through mechanisms yet to be elucidated. It has been speculated that beta-lactam inactivation of select E. faecium penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) may play a pivotal role in this sensitization process. To characterize the specific PBP inactivation that may be responsible for these phenotypes, we utilized a previously characterized set of E. faecium PBP knockout mutants to determine the effects of such mutations on the activity of daptomycin and the AMP human cathelicidin (LL-37). Enhanced susceptibility to daptomycin was dependent more on a cumulative effect of multiple PBP deletions than on inactivation of any single specific PBP. Selective knockout of PBPZ rendered E. faecium more vulnerable to killing by both recombinant LL-37 and human neutrophils, which produce the antimicrobial peptide in high quantities. Pharmacotherapy targeting multiple PBPs may be used as adjunctive therapy with daptomycin to treat difficult E. faecium infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Evaluation of rapid alternative methods for drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Luciano Mengatto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to compare the performance of a commercial method (MGIT and four inexpensive drug susceptibility methods: nitrate reductase assay (NRA, microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, MTT test, and broth microdilution method (BMM. A total of 64 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were studied. The Lowenstein-Jensen proportion method (PM was used as gold standard. MGIT, NRA, MODS, and MTT results were available on an average of less than 10 days, whereas BMM results could be reported in about 20 days. Most of the evaluated tests showed excellent performance for isoniazid and rifampicin, with sensitivity and specificity values > 90%. With most of the assays, sensitivity for ethambutol was low (62-87% whereas for streptomycin, sensitivity values ranged from 84 to 100%; NRA-discrepancies were associated with cultures with a low proportion of EMB-resistant organisms while most discrepancies with quantitative tests (MMT and BMM were seen with isolates whose minimal inhibitory concentrations fell close the cutoff. MGIT is reliable but still expensive. NRA is the most inexpensive and easiest method to perform without changing the organization of the routine PM laboratory performance. While MODS, MTT, and BMM, have the disadvantage from the point of view of biosafety, they offer the possibility of detecting partial resistant strains. This study shows a very good level of agreement of the four low-cost methods compared to the PM for rapid detection of isoniazid, rifampicin and streptomycin resistance (Kappa values > 0.8; more standardization is needed for ethambutol.

  6. Using phenotype microarrays in the assessment of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from wastewater in on-site treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-04-27

    The scope of the study was to apply Phenotype Biolog MicroArray (PM) technology to test the antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial strains isolated from on-site wastewater treatment facilities. In the first step of the study, the percentage values of resistant bacteria from total heterotrophic bacteria growing on solid media supplemented with various antibiotics were determined. In the untreated wastewater, the average shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were 53, 56, and 42%, respectively. Meanwhile, the shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in the treated wastewater were 39, 33, and 29%, respectively. To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria present in the wastewater, using the phenotype microarrays (PMs), the most common isolates from the treated wastewater were chosen: Serratia marcescens ss marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Microbacterium flavescens, Alcaligenes faecalis ss faecalis, Flavobacterium hydatis, Variovorax paradoxus, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Aeromonas bestiarum. The strains were classified as multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most of them were resistant to more than 30 antibiotics from various chemical classes. Phenotype microarrays could be successfully used as an additional tool for evaluation of the multi-antibiotic resistance of environmental bacteria and in preliminary determination of the range of inhibition concentration.

  7. [Use of a rapid rotavirus test in prescription of antibiotics in acute diarrhea in pediatrics: an observational, randomized, controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Andrea; Rivara, Gustavo; Briceño, Diego; Huicho, Luis

    2012-01-01

    To determine the impact of a rapid and accurate rotavirus test in the emergency ward on the reduction of antibiotic prescription in children under 5 years old with acute diarrhea at "Arzobispo Loayza National Hospital", Lima, Peru. We performed an observational prospective randomized controlled study, from July 2008 to January 2009. Stool samples from patients with diarrhea lasting less than 5 days were analyzed. Out of 201 cases, 101 were classified in Group A (with fecal leukocytes test performed) and 100 in Group B (with fecal leukocytes test and rotavirus/adenovirus test performed). We aimed to associate the signs and symptoms with the decision of prescribing antibiotics and with hospitalization risk. Both groups were comparable with regard to age, weight and illness duration. In patients with rotavirus infection, fecal leukocytes were positive in 46.9% of cases. Frequency of antibiotic use was directly associated with the number of fecal leukocytes (Pdiarrhea-attributable deaths were reported. The use of rotavirus test in the pediatric emergency room decreased antibiotic prescription in children with diarrhea.

  8. The early use of appropriate prophylactic antibiotics in susceptible women for the prevention of preterm birth of infectious etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jan Stener; Weile, Louise Katrine Kjær; Lamont, Ronald F

    2014-01-01

    of preterm birth so it is logical to consider the use of antibiotics for the prevention of preterm birth. AREAS COVERED: Infection and antibiotics in the etiology, prediction and prevention of preterm birth. EXPERT OPINION: Antibiotics for the prevention of preterm birth have addressed different risk groups...

  9. Use of Rapid Influenza Testing to Reduce Antibiotic Prescriptions Among Outpatients with Influenza-Like Illness in Southern Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillekeratne, L Gayani; Bodinayake, Champica K; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Vidanagama, Dhammika; Devasiri, Vasantha; Arachchi, Wasantha Kodikara; Kurukulasooriya, Ruvini; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Østbye, Truls; Reller, Megan E; Woods, Christopher W

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are a common reason for unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions worldwide. Our objective was to determine if providing access to rapid influenza test results could reduce antibiotic prescriptions for ARTIs in a resource-limited setting. We conducted a prospective, pre-post study from March 2013 to October 2014. Outpatients presenting to a hospital in Sri Lanka were surveyed for influenza-like illness-onset of fever ≥ 38.0°C and cough in prior 7 days. Enrolled patients were administered a structured questionnaire, physical examination, and nasal/nasopharyngeal sampling for rapid influenza A/B testing. Influenza test results were released only during phase 2 (January-October 2014). We enrolled 571 patients with ILI-316 in phase 1 and 241 in phase 2. The proportion positive for influenza was 46.5% in phase 1 and 28.6% in phase 2, P testing may reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions in resource-limited settings. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Effects of clinical breakpoint changes in CLSI guidelines 2010/2011 and EUCAST guidelines 2011 on antibiotic susceptibility test reporting of Gram-negative bacilli

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Böttger, Erik C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of clinical breakpoint changes in CLSI 2010 and 2011 guidelines and EUCAST 2011 guidelines on antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) reports. Methods In total, 3713 non-duplicate clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii were analysed. Inhibition zone diameters were determined for β-lactams, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides and trimethoprim...

  11. Indoor Air Bacterial Load and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Isolates in Operating Rooms and Surgical Wards at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Tsegaye, Wondewosen

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgical site infection is the second most common health care associated infection. One of the risk factors for such infection is bacterial contamination of operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. In view of that, the microbiological quality of air can be considered as a mirror of the hygienic condition of these rooms. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms' and surgical war...

  12. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  13. Mechanisms of reduced susceptibility and genotypic prediction of antibiotic resistance in Prevotella isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrard, Laura J; Schaible, Bettina; Graham, Kathryn A; McGrath, Stef J; McIlreavey, Leanne; Hatch, Joseph; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Muhlebach, Marianne S; Gilpin, Deirdre F; Schneiders, Thamarai; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate mechanisms of reduced susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics in Prevotella cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), patients with invasive infection and healthy control subjects and to determine whether genotype can be used to predict phenotypic resistance. The susceptibility of 157 Prevotella isolates to seven antibiotics was compared, with detection of resistance genes (cfxA-type gene, ermF and tetQ), mutations within the CfxA-type β-lactamase and expression of efflux pumps. Prevotella isolates positive for a cfxA-type gene had higher MICs of amoxicillin and ceftazidime compared with isolates negative for this gene (P Prevotella isolates had higher MICs of tetracycline (P = 0.001) and doxycycline (P Prevotella spp. were also shown, for the first time, to express resistance nodulation division (RND)-type efflux pumps. This study has demonstrated that Prevotella isolated from various sources harbour a common pool of resistance genes and possess RND-type efflux pumps, which may contribute to tetracycline resistance. The findings indicate that antibiotic resistance is common in Prevotella spp., but the genotypic traits investigated do not reflect phenotypic antibiotic resistance in every instance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Susceptibility of Rhodobacter sphaeroides to beta-lactam antibiotics: isolation and characterization of a periplasmic beta-lactamase (cephalosporinase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, M; Simon, H; Schneider, K H; Danneel, H J; Küster, U; Giffhorn, F

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen strains of the gram-negative, facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were examined fro susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. All strains were sensitive to the semisynthetic penicillins ampicillin, carbenicillin, oxacillin, cloxacillin, and methicillin, but 10 of the 13 strains were resistant to penicillin G, as well as a number of cephalosporins, such as cephalothin, cephapirin, and cephalosporin C. A beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) with strong cephalosporinase activity was detected in all of the resistant strains of R. sphaeroides. With strain Y-1 as a model, it was shown that the beta-lactamase was inducible by penicillin G, cephalosporin C, cephalothin, and to some minor extent, cephapirin. The beta-lactamase was located in the periplasmic space, from which it could be extracted by osmotic shock disruption. By using this fraction, the beta-lactamase was purified 34-fold to homogeneity by steps involving batch adsorption to and elution from DEAE-Sephadex A50, chromatography on Q-Sepharose, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular masses of the native and denatured enzymes were determined to be 38.5 kilodaltons by gel filtration and 40.5 kilodaltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively, indicating a monomeric structure. The isoelectric point was estimated to be at pH 4.3. In Tris hydrochloride buffer, optimum enzyme activity was measured at pH 8.5. The beta-lactamase showed high activity in the presence of the substrates cephalothin, cephapirin, cephalosporin C, and penicillin G, for which the apparent Km values were 144, 100, 65, and 110 microM, respectively. Cephalexin, cepharidine, and cephaloridine were poor substrates. The beta-lactamase was strongly inhibited by cloxacillin and oxacillin but only slightly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride or thiol reagents such as iodoacetate and p-chloromercuribenzoate.

  15. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-05-07

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  16. Isolation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of the Microorganisms Isolated from Diabetic Foot Infections in Nemazee Hospital, Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Anvarinejad; Gholamreza Pouladfar; Aziz Japoni; Shahram Bolandparvaz; Zeinab Satiary; Pejman Abbasi; Jalal Mardaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background. Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are a major public health issue and identification of the microorganisms causing such polymicrobial infections is useful to find out appropriate antibiotic therapy. Meanwhile, many reports have shown antibiotic resistance rising dramatically. In the present study, we sought to determine the prevalence of microorganisms detected on culture in complicated DFIs in hospitalized patients and their antibiotic sensitivity profiles. Methods. A cross-section...

  17. The susceptibility to growth-promoting antibiotics of Enterococcus faecium isolates from pigs and chickens in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Robin; McConville, Malcolm; Phillips, Ian; Shryock, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    To establish the susceptibility of Enterococcus faecium isolates from pigs and chickens to antimicrobial growth promoters that either were or had been in use in the European Union. Samples were taken at abattoirs in two successive years (mid-1998-mid-1999, year 1; mid-1999-mid-2000, year 2) from chickens (France, The Netherlands, Sweden, UK) and pigs (Denmark, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden). E. faecium was isolated from faecal samples at national laboratories and sent to a central laboratory where MICs of avilamycin, avoparcin, bacitracin, flavophospholipol, spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin were determined. Microbiological breakpoints were allocated on the basis of MIC distributions, and comparison was made between host species, country of origin and year of sample. In total, 2567 isolates were obtained from chickens and 1742 from pigs. In all countries, resistance to avoparcin (banned in 1997) was uncommon, but resistance to bacitracin and flavophospholipol was common (and was probably largely intrinsic). The prevalence of resistance was similar in chicken and pig isolates, with the exception of avilamycin, to which resistance was commoner among chicken isolates. The removal of four compounds as growth promoters (bacitracin, spiramycin, tylosin, virginiamycin) between years 1 and 2 appeared to result in a significant decrease in resistance to three of them-spiramycin, tylosin and virginiamycin, with no change in resistance to bacitracin, but an increase in resistance to avilamycin (not discontinued). Associated resistance was shown between some of the compounds. Resistance prevalence declined rapidly following removal of growth promoters in pigs and chickens, suggesting that in the absence of selective pressure, a susceptible population began to replace phenotypically resistant strains. Associated resistance between different compounds, where seen, could have resulted from either shared resistance mechanisms or from carriage of resistance genes on the same

  18. Bacteriocin production, antibiotic susceptibility and prevalence of haemolytic and gelatinase activity in faecal lactic acid bacteria isolated from healthy Ethiopian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders; Tessema, Girum Tadesse; Nes, Ingolf F

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from faecal samples of healthy Ethiopian infants, with emphasis on bacteriocin production and antibiotic susceptibility. One hundred fifty LAB were obtained from 28 healthy Ethiopian infants. The isolates belonged to Lactobacillus (81/150), Enterococcus (54/150) and Streptococcus (15/150) genera. Lactobacillus species were more abundant in the breast-fed infants while Enterococcus dominated the mixed-fed population. Bacteriocin-producing LAB species were isolated from eight of the infants. Many different bacteriocins were identified, including one new bacteriocin from Streptococcus salivarius, avicin A (class IIa) from Enterococcus avium, one class IIa bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis strains, one unknown bacteriocin from E. faecalis and two unknown bacteriocins from Lactobacillus fermentum strains and the two-peptide gassericin T from Lactobacillus gasseri isolate. Susceptibility tests performed for nine antibiotics suggest that some lactobacilli might have acquired resistance to erythromycin (3 %) and tetracycline (4 %) only. The streptococci were generally antibiotic sensitive except for penicillin, to which they showed intermediate resistance. All enterococci were susceptible to ampicillin while 13 % showed penicillin resistance. Only one E. faecalis isolate was vancomycin-resistant. Tetracycline (51 %) and erythromycin (26 %) resistance was prevalent among the enterococci, but multidrug resistance was confined to E. faecalis (47 %) and Enterococcus faecium (33 %). Screening of enterococcal virulence traits revealed that 2 % were β-haemolytic. The structural genes of cytolysin were detected in 28 % of the isolates in five enterococcal species, the majority being E. faecalis and Enterococcus raffinosus. This study shows that bacteriocin production and antibiotic resistance is a common trait of faecal LAB of Ethiopian infants while virulence factors occur at low levels.

  19. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in genital samples collected over 6 years at a Serbian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Skiljevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are implicated in a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and children. Since some species have innate or acquired resistance to certain types of antibiotics, antibiotic susceptibility testing of mycoplasma isolated from the urogenital tract assumes increasing importance. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of M. hominis and U. urealyticum in genital samples collected between 2007 and 2012. Methods: Three hundred and seventy three patients presenting with symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases, infertility or risky sexual behaviour, who had not taken antibiotics in the previous 6 weeks and had ≥10 WBC per high power field on genital smears were studied. Urethral samples were taken in men and endocervical samples in women. The mycoplasma IST-2 kit was used for organism identification and for testing susceptibility to doxycycline, josamycin, ofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, clarithromycin and pristinamycin. Results: U. urealyticum was isolated from 42 patients and M. hominis from 11 patients. From 9.8% of isolates, both organisms were grown. All M. hominis isolates were resistant to tetracycline, clarithromycin and erythromycin while U. urealyticum was highly resistant to clarithromycin (94.6%, tetracycline (86.5%, ciprofloxacin (83.8% and erythromycin (83.8%. M. hominis was sensitive to doxycycline (83.3% and ofloxacin (66.7% while most U. urealyticum strains were sensitive to doxycycline (94.6%. Limitations: Inability of the commercial kit used in the study to detect other potentially pathogenic urogenital mycoplasmas (Ureaplasma parvum, Mycoplasma genitalium. Conclusion: There is significant resistance of U. urealyticum and M. hominis to tetracycline and macrolides. The most active tetracycline for genital mycoplasmas was found to be doxycycline, which continues to be the drug of first choice.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Aerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli Isolated From Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Units of Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagi Saghati Shahrokh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to critical clinical situation and use of mechanical devices, managements including antibiotics and contact with hospital environment and healthcare workers, patients in intensive care units (ICUs are susceptible to various infections, particularly those arising from aerobic gram-negative bacilli with multi-drug resistance. Knowledge of the pattern of antibiotics susceptibility and their empirical therapy helps prevent and reduce morbidity and mortality of infectious disease in ICU. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the medical records of all patients admitted to ICUs of Sina hospital of Tabriz from 2011 to 2015 were evaluated, and the information was extracted from questionnaires and statistically analyzed with SPSS 16. Results: Among a total of 332 patients, 101 (30.42% had nosocomial infection with gram-negative bacilli and Escherichia coli (E. coli had the highest prevalence (35.6%. Urinary tract infection (UTI (76.23%, pneumonia (18.81%, and septicemia (4.9% were the most frequent nosocomial infections. Forty-one patients (12.3% had positive cultures for gram-positive and fungal infections. Additionally, 46.53% of patients were female, and no significant difference existed between the gender quality variable and the isolated aerobic gram-negative bacilli (P > .005. The highest antibiotic resistance was against ampicillin, amikacin and piperacillin and the highest sensitivity was to imipenem. Conclusion: Urinary tract and respiratory tract infections were the first and second common source of infection in ICU and E. coli as an aerobic gram-negative bacillus was the most important etiologic agent. The highest antibiotic susceptibility was to imipenem.

  1. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Bacteria Response to Antibiotics Using Nanoporous Membrane and Graphene Quantum Dot (GQDs-Based Electrochemical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Ye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The wide abuse of antibiotics has accelerated bacterial multiresistance, which means there is a need to develop tools for rapid detection and characterization of bacterial response to antibiotics in the management of infections. In the study, an electrochemical biosensor based on nanoporous alumina membrane and graphene quantum dots (GQDs was developed for bacterial response to antibiotics detection. Anti-Salmonella antibody was conjugated with amino-modified GQDs by glutaraldehyde and immobilized on silanized nanoporous alumina membranes for Salmonella bacteria capture. The impedance signals across nanoporous membranes could monitor the capture of bacteria on nanoporous membranes as well as bacterial response to antibiotics. This nanoporous membrane and GQD-based electrochemical biosensor achieved rapid detection of bacterial response to antibiotics within 30 min, and the detection limit could reach the pM level. It was capable of investigating the response of bacteria exposed to antibiotics much more rapidly and conveniently than traditional tools. The capability of studying the dynamic effects of antibiotics on bacteria has potential applications in the field of monitoring disease therapy, detecting comprehensive food safety hazards and even life in hostile environment.

  2. The Assessment of Proteus mirabilis Susceptibility to Ceftazidime and Ciprofloxacin and the Impact of These Antibiotics at Subinhibitory Concentrations on Proteus mirabilis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Zniszczol, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Rods of the Proteus genus are commonly isolated from patients, especially from the urinary tracts of the catheterised patients. The infections associated with biomaterials are crucial therapeutic obstacles, due to the bactericidal resistance of the biofilm. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of P. mirabilis planktonic forms to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime, the ability to form biofilm, and the impact of chosen sub-MIC concentrations of these antibiotics on biofilm at different stages of its formation. The research included 50 P. mirabilis strains isolated from wounds and the urinary tracts from patients of the University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz. The assessment of susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime was conducted using micromethods. The impact of sub-MIC concentrations of the chosen antibiotics on the biofilm was measured using the TTC method. The resistance to ciprofloxacin was confirmed for 20 strains (40.0%) while to ceftazidime for 32 (64.0%) of the tested P. mirabilis strains. All of the tested strains formed biofilm: 24.0% weakly, 26.0% moderately, and 50.0% strongly. It was determined that ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime caused eradication of the biofilm. Moreover, the connection between origin of the strains, biofilm maturity level, and resistance to antibiotics was proved. PMID:24151628

  3. In vitro activities of 22 beta-lactam antibiotics against penicillin-resistant and penicillin-susceptible viridans group streptococci isolated from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, F; Liñares, J; Pallares, R; Carratala, J; Benitez, M A; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1995-01-01

    A total of 410 strains of viridans group streptococci isolated consecutively from blood were tested by the microdilution method for in vitro susceptibility to 22 beta-lactam antibiotics. One hundred thirty-eight strains (33.6%) were resistant to penicillin with a MIC range of 0.25 to 8 micrograms/ml. MICs of all beta-lactam agents tested were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for susceptible strains. These antibiotics were classified into three groups according to their in vitro activities (MICs at which 50 and 90% of the isolates are inhibited). Beta-Lactams of the first group (these included imipenem, cefpirome, FK-037, cefditoren, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefepime) showed activities higher than or similar to that of penicillin against penicillin-resistant viridans group streptococci. However, 80% of highly penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis organisms required cefotaxime and ceftriaxone MICs of > or = 2 micrograms/ml (range, 2 to 16 micrograms/ml). Beta-Lactams of the second group (cefpodoxime, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin, and cefuroxime) showed lower activities than penicillin. Finally, antibiotics of the third group (cephalothin, oxacillin, ceftazidime, cefixime, cefaclor, cefetamet, cefadroxil, cephalexin, and ceftibuten) showed poor in vitro activities. Therefore, some of the beta-lactam agents included in the first group could be an acceptable alternative in the treatment of serious infections due to strains highly resistant to penicillin, although clinical experience is needed. PMID:8619576

  4. Consequences of revised CLSI and EUCAST guidelines for antibiotic susceptibility patterns of ESBL- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Mouttet, Brice; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to: (i) analyse the antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) profiles of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates applying EUCAST 2013 AST guidelines; and (ii) evaluate discrepancies in AST profiles according to EUCAST 2010 guidelines, EUCAST 2013 guidelines, CLSI 2009 guidelines and CLSI 2013 guidelines. The 195 ESBL- and/or AmpC β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates used in this study were systematically characterized by disc diffusion AST interpreted according to the 2013 guidelines of EUCAST and CLSI, the EUCAST 2010 guidelines and the CLSI 2009 guidelines. Individual cephalosporin AST patterns according to EUCAST 2013 guidelines were described for individual ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genotypes. Significant differences in the susceptibility rates of important cephalosporins such as cefepime, ceftazidime and cefotaxime applying EUCAST 2013 and CLSI 2013 AST guidelines were demonstrated for ESBL- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing isolates. The confirmation of ESBL and/or AmpC β-lactamase production can support the selection of an adequate antibiotic drug therapy. Despite a harmonized CLSI and EUCAST 'report as found' strategy for cephalosporins and ESBL-producing isolates, AST interpretation according to the CLSI 2013 and EUCAST 2013 guidelines shows significant differences in susceptibility rates for mainstay cephalosporins such as cefepime, ceftazidime and cefotaxime. Thus, further harmonization of clinical breakpoints is warranted.

  5. Characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of one antibiotic-sensitive and one multidrug-resistant Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii strain isolated from patients with granulomatous mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fernández-Natal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human infections associated with Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii are rarely reported, and this organism is usually described as antibiotic sensitive. Almost all published cases of C. kroppenstedtii infections have been associated with breast pathology in women and have been described in New Zealand, France, Canada, India and Japan. Here we describe the microbiologic characteristics of two strains isolated from two women diagnosed of granulomatous mastitis in Spain. One C. kroppenstedtii isolate was antibiotic sensitive while the other was multidrug resistant. Biochemical identification was possible using a wide battery of methods including API Coryne V2.0, API Strep, API NH, API NE, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. Antimicrobial susceptibility to 28 antibiotics as determined by Etest showed one isolate being sensitive to benzylpenicillin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, vancomycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, linezolid and rifampin. The second isolate showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, clindamycin, tetracycline and rifampin. The multidrug-resistant isolate contained the erm(X, tet(W, cmx, aphA1-IAB, strAB and sul1 resistance genes known from the R plasmid pJA144188 of Corynebacterium resistens. These genes were absent in the genome of the antibiotic-sensitive isolate. This report confirms the tropism of this microorganism for women's breasts and presents the first description of a multidrug-resistant C. kroppenstedtii strain.

  6. Impact of introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on antibiotic prescribing: analysis of observational and randomised studies in public and private healthcare settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxvoort, Katia J; Cairns, Matthew E; Chandler, Clare I R; Leurent, Baptiste; Ansah, Evelyn K; Baiden, Frank; Baltzell, Kimberly A; Björkman, Anders; Burchett, Helen E D; Clarke, Siân E; DiLiberto, Deborah D; Elfving, Kristina; Goodman, Catherine; Hansen, Kristian S; Kachur, S Patrick; Lal, Sham; Lalloo, David G; Leslie, Toby; Magnussen, Pascal; Jefferies, Lindsay Mangham; Mårtensson, Andreas; Mayan, Ismail; Mbonye, Anthony K; Msellem, Mwinyi I; Onwujekwe, Obinna E; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Reyburn, Hugh; Rowland, Mark W; Shakely, Delér; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Webster, Jayne; Wiseman, Virginia L; Yeung, Shunmay; Schellenberg, David; Staedke, Sarah G; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the impact of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on prescribing of antimicrobials, specifically antibiotics, for acute febrile illness in Africa and Asia. Design Analysisof nine preselected linked and codesigned observational and randomised studies (eight cluster or individually randomised trials and one observational study). Setting Public and private healthcare settings, 2007-13, in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda. Participants 522 480 children and adults with acute febrile illness. Interventions Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Main outcome measures Proportions of patients for whom an antibiotic was prescribed in trial groups who had undergone rapid diagnostic testing compared with controls and in patients with negative test results compared with patients with positive results. A secondary aim compared classes of antibiotics prescribed in different settings. Results Antibiotics were prescribed to 127 052/238 797 (53%) patients in control groups and 167 714/283 683 (59%) patients in intervention groups. Antibiotics were prescribed to 40% (35 505/89 719) of patients with a positive test result for malaria and to 69% (39 400/57 080) of those with a negative result. All but one study showed a trend toward more antibiotic prescribing in groups who underwent rapid diagnostic tests. Random effects meta-analysis of the trials showed that the overall risk of antibiotic prescription was 21% higher (95% confidence interval 7% to 36%) in intervention settings. In most intervention settings, patients with negative test results received more antibiotic prescriptions than patients with positive results for all the most commonly used classes: penicillins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (one exception), tetracyclines, and metronidazole. Conclusions Introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria to reduce unnecessary use of antimalarials—a beneficial public health outcome—could drive up

  7. Impact of introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on antibiotic prescribing: analysis of observational and randomised studies in public and private healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Heidi; Bruxvoort, Katia J; Cairns, Matthew E; Chandler, Clare I R; Leurent, Baptiste; Ansah, Evelyn K; Baiden, Frank; Baltzell, Kimberly A; Björkman, Anders; Burchett, Helen E D; Clarke, Siân E; DiLiberto, Deborah D; Elfving, Kristina; Goodman, Catherine; Hansen, Kristian S; Kachur, S Patrick; Lal, Sham; Lalloo, David G; Leslie, Toby; Magnussen, Pascal; Jefferies, Lindsay Mangham; Mårtensson, Andreas; Mayan, Ismail; Mbonye, Anthony K; Msellem, Mwinyi I; Onwujekwe, Obinna E; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Reyburn, Hugh; Rowland, Mark W; Shakely, Delér; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Webster, Jayne; Wiseman, Virginia L; Yeung, Shunmay; Schellenberg, David; Staedke, Sarah G; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2017-03-29

    Objectives  To examine the impact of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on prescribing of antimicrobials, specifically antibiotics, for acute febrile illness in Africa and Asia. Design  Analysisof nine preselected linked and codesigned observational and randomised studies (eight cluster or individually randomised trials and one observational study). Setting  Public and private healthcare settings, 2007-13, in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda. Participants  522 480 children and adults with acute febrile illness. Interventions  Rapid diagnostic tests for malaria. Main outcome measures  Proportions of patients for whom an antibiotic was prescribed in trial groups who had undergone rapid diagnostic testing compared with controls and in patients with negative test results compared with patients with positive results. A secondary aim compared classes of antibiotics prescribed in different settings. Results  Antibiotics were prescribed to 127 052/238 797 (53%) patients in control groups and 167 714/283 683 (59%) patients in intervention groups. Antibiotics were prescribed to 40% (35 505/89 719) of patients with a positive test result for malaria and to 69% (39 400/57 080) of those with a negative result. All but one study showed a trend toward more antibiotic prescribing in groups who underwent rapid diagnostic tests. Random effects meta-analysis of the trials showed that the overall risk of antibiotic prescription was 21% higher (95% confidence interval 7% to 36%) in intervention settings. In most intervention settings, patients with negative test results received more antibiotic prescriptions than patients with positive results for all the most commonly used classes: penicillins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (one exception), tetracyclines, and metronidazole. Conclusions  Introduction of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria to reduce unnecessary use of antimalarials-a beneficial public health outcome-could drive

  8. Point of care susceptibility testing in primary care - does it lead to a more appropriate prescription of antibiotics in patients with uncomplicated urinary tract infections? Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Sørensen, Tina Møller; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Siersma, Volkert; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-08-21

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection in primary care and is the second leading reason for prescription of antibiotics in Denmark. The diagnosis is often based on symptoms and urine dip-stick, which has limited validity, causing the risk of unnecessary antibiotic prescription. Additionally, with increasing antibiotic resistance, the risk of choosing an antibiotic to which an infecting pathogen is resistant is rising. Combined point-of-care-tests (POCT) for urine culture and susceptibility testing have been developed and validated for primary care, and performing such a test in all patients with suspected UTI in primary care seems rational in order to reduce the use of inappropriate antibiotics. However, the clinical effect of the culture and susceptibility test has not yet been investigated. This study aims to investigate whether POCT urine culture and susceptibility testing decreases the inappropriate use of antibiotics and leads to faster patient recovery. Randomized controlled open label trial of two diagnostic approaches. 750 patients with symptoms of uncomplicated UTI, consecutively contacting their general practitioner (GP), randomized to either POCT urine culture and susceptibility testing and targeted treatment or POCT urine culture without susceptibility testing and empirical treatment. Treatment is started when the POCT is read. The two groups are compared with regard to appropriate choice of antibiotics, clinical remission, and microbiological cure rates. The results of this study may provide important evidence to recommend POCT culture and susceptibility testing in all patients with suspected uncomplicated UTI. This could become an additional strategy to fight antibiotic resistance. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02323087 .

  9. Effect of point-of-care susceptibility testing in general practice on appropriate prescription of antibiotics for patients with uncomplicated urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Cordoba, Gloria; Møller Sørensen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of adding point-of-care (POC) susceptibility testing to POC culture on appropriate use of antibiotics as well as clinical and microbiological cure for patients with suspected uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) in general practice. DESIGN: Open......, individually randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practice. PARTICIPANTS: Women with suspected uncomplicated UTI, including elderly patients above 65, patients with recurrent UTI and patients with diabetes. The sample size calculation predicted 600 patients were needed. INTERVENTIONS: Flexicult SSI......: clinical cure on day five according to a 7-day symptom diary and microbiological cure on day 14. Logistic regression models taking into account clustering within practices were used for analysis. RESULTS: 20 general practices recruited 191 patients for culture and susceptibility testing and 172 for culture...

  10. Mycobacterial Cultures Contain Cell Size and Density Specific Sub-populations of Cells with Significant Differential Susceptibility to Antibiotics, Oxidative and Nitrite Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nair, Rashmi Ravindran; Sharan, Deepti; Jakkala, Kishor; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Swaminath, Sharmada; Pradhan, Atul; Joshi, Niranjan V.; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The present study shows the existence of two specific sub-populations of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells differing in size and density, in the mid-log phase (MLP) cultures, with significant differential susceptibility to antibiotic, oxidative, and nitrite stress. One of these sub-populations (~10% of the total population), contained short-sized cells (SCs) generated through highly-deviated asymmetric cell division (ACD) of normal/long-sized mother cells and symmetric cell divisions (SCD) of short-sized mother cells. The other sub-population (~90% of the total population) contained normal/long-sized cells (NCs). The SCs were acid-fast stainable and heat-susceptible, and contained high density of membrane vesicles (MVs, known to be lipid-rich) on their surface, while the NCs possessed negligible density of MVs on the surface, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Percoll density gradient fractionation of MLP cultures showed the SCs-enriched fraction (SCF) at lower density (probably indicating lipid-richness) and the NCs-enriched fraction (NCF) at higher density of percoll fractions. While live cell imaging showed that the SCs and the NCs could grow and divide to form colony on agarose pads, the SCF, and NCF cells could independently regenerate MLP populations in liquid and solid media, indicating their full genomic content and population regeneration potential. CFU based assays showed the SCF cells to be significantly more susceptible than NCF cells to a range of concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid (antibiotic stress), H2O2 (oxidative stress),and acidified NaNO2 (nitrite stress). Live cell imaging showed significantly higher susceptibility of the SCs of SC-NC sister daughter cell pairs, formed from highly-deviated ACD of normal/long-sized mother cells, to rifampicin and H2O2, as compared to the sister daughter NCs, irrespective of their comparable growth rates. The SC-SC sister daughter cell pairs, formed

  11. A rapid virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method for assessing resistance and susceptibility to cassava mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Taylor, Nigel J

    2017-03-07

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is a major constraint to cassava production in sub-Saharan Africa. Under field conditions, evaluation for resistance to CMD takes 12-18 months, often conducted across multiple years and locations under pressure from whitefly-mediated transmission. Under greenhouse or laboratory settings, evaluation for resistance or susceptibility to CMD involves transmission of the causal viruses from an infected source to healthy plants through grafting, or by using Agrobacterium-mediated or biolistic delivery of infectious clones. Following inoculation, visual assessment for CMD symptom development and recovery requires 12-22 weeks. Here we report a rapid screening system for determining resistance and susceptibility to CMD based on virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of an endogenous cassava gene. A VIGS vector was developed based on an infectious clone of the virulent strain of East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-K201). A sequence from the cassava (Manihot esculenta) ortholog of Arabidopsis SPINDLY (SPY) was cloned into the CP position of the DNA-A genomic component and used to inoculate cassava plants by Helios® Gene Gun microparticle bombardment. Silencing of Manihot esculenta SPY (MeSPY) using MeSPY1-VIGS resulted in shoot-tip necrosis followed by death of the whole plant in CMD susceptible cassava plants within 2-4 weeks. CMD resistant cultivars were not affected and remained healthy after challenge with MeSPY1-VIGS. Significantly higher virus titers were detected in CMD-susceptible cassava lines compared to resistant controls and were correlated with a concomitant reduction in MeSPY expression in susceptible plants. A rapid VIGS-based screening system was developed for assessing resistance and susceptibility to CMD. The method is space and resource efficient, reducing the time required to perform CMD screening to as little as 2-4 weeks. It can be employed as a high throughput rapid screening system to assess new cassava cultivars and for

  12. Susceptibility of selected strains used for evaluation of biocidal efficiency of disinfectants and antibiotic-resistant strains to didecyldimethylammonium chloride in 2-propanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojecka, Agnieszka; Wiercińska, Olga; Röhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride is an active substance which is part of variety of formulations used for the disinfection and antisepsis, both in the medical area as well as in the food, industrial and institutional area. Because of the widespread use of this substance and the development of bacterial resistance to quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), the aim of this study was determination of the susceptibility of the standard strains used for the evaluation of the effectiveness of disinfectants and standard antibiotic-resistant strains to didecyldimethylammonium chloride in 2-propanol and its bactericidal activity. Susceptibility of standard strains used for the evaluation of the effectiveness of disinfectants (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538-SA; Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442-PA) and standard antibiotic-resistant strains (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300-MRSA; Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 47085-PAO-LAC) to CMAP was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBCs). The bactericidal efficiency of CMAP against these strains was evaluated by using phenol coefficient (PC). Susceptibility of Gram-positive tested strains SA and MRSA to CMAP was similar (P>0,05). Significant difference in susceptibility of tested Gram-negative strains to CMAP was evaluated between PA and PAO-LAC strains (P<0,05). However,.higher resistance of PAO-LAC to CMAP was not significant when parameters such as concentration and contact time were applied in PC method. The correct determination and application of "in use" parameters (i.e. concentration, contact time, temperature and interfering substances) in disinfection process prevents the spread of resistant strains in.the environment.

  13. Disinfectant and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from cattle carcasses, feces, and hides and ground beef from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Ross C; Poole, Toni L; Brichta-Harhay, Dayna M; Anderson, Robin C; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hernandez, Charles A; Bono, James L; Arthur, Terrance M; Nagaraja, T G; Crippen, Tawni L; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Nisbet, David J

    2013-01-01

    The disinfectant and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of 344 Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains from cattle carcasses, feces, and hides and ground beef from the United States were determined. A low prevalence of antibiotic resistance was observed (14%). The highest prevalences of resistance were to sulfisoxazole (10.5%), tetracycline (9.9%), streptomycin (7%), and chloramphenicol (4.9%). Four strains were resistant to eight antibiotics (two strains from ground beef and one strain each from hide and preevisceration carcass swabs of cull cattle at harvest). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the E. coli O157:H7 strains revealed two major groups (designated 1 and 2) composed of 17 and 20 clusters, respectively. Clusters 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1G.1 were associated with multidrug-resistant strains. There was no observed correlation between disinfectant resistance and antibiotic resistance. Sixty-nine (20%) of the 344 strains were resistant to chlorhexidine or benzalkonium chloride or the MICs of benzyldimethyldodecylammonium chloride were elevated. Inducible resistance was observed at elevated concentrations of antibiotics (1.4%) and disinfectants (6.1%). The highest rate of disinfectant inducible resistance was to OdoBan, quaternary ammonium chlorides, and the surface disinfectants F25, FS512, and MG, which are used in dairies, restaurants, and food processing plants. High MICs (1,024 to 4,096 m g/ml) of acetic, lactic, and citric acids were found. The decreasing order of acid potency based on molar MICs (MICs(molar)) was acetic, citric, and lactic acid. The correlation of the concentration of dissociated organic acids and MICs(molar) strongly suggests that the observed inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 was primarily due to dissociated forms of the acids.

  14. Direct nitrate reductase assay versus microscopic observation drug susceptibility test for rapid detection of MDR-TB in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Bwanga

    Full Text Available The most common method for detection of drug resistant (DR TB in resource-limited settings (RLSs is indirect susceptibility testing on Lowenstein-Jensen medium (LJ which is very time consuming with results available only after 2-3 months. Effective therapy of DR TB is therefore markedly delayed and patients can transmit resistant strains. Rapid and accurate tests suitable for RLSs in the diagnosis of DR TB are thus highly needed. In this study we compared two direct techniques--Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA and Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility (MODS for rapid detection of MDR-TB in a high burden RLS. The sensitivity, specificity, and proportion of interpretable results were studied. Smear positive sputum was collected from 245 consecutive re-treatment TB patients attending a TB clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Samples were processed at the national reference laboratory and tested for susceptibility to rifampicin and isoniazid with direct NRA, direct MODS and the indirect LJ proportion method as reference. A total of 229 specimens were confirmed as M. tuberculosis, of these interpretable results were obtained in 217 (95% with either the NRA or MODS. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa agreement for MDR-TB diagnosis was 97%, 98% and 0.93 with the NRA; and 87%, 95% and 0.78 with the MODS, respectively. The median time to results was 10, 7 and 64 days with NRA, MODS and the reference technique, respectively. The cost of laboratory supplies per sample was low, around 5 USD, for the rapid tests. The direct NRA and MODS offered rapid detection of resistance almost eight weeks earlier than with the reference method. In the study settings, the direct NRA was highly sensitive and specific. We consider it to have a strong potential for timely detection of MDR-TB in RLS.

  15. Rapid susceptibility testing and microcolony analysis of Candida spp. cultured and imaged on porous aluminum oxide.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Boonstra, S.; Levels, S.; Lange, Marit de; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide

  16. Rapid Susceptibility Testing and Microcolony Analysis of Candida spp. Cultured and Imaged on Porous Aluminum Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Boonstra, S.; Levels, S.; Lange, H.J.; Meis, J.F.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to antifungal agents now supports the introduction of susceptibility testing for species-drug combinations for which this was previously thought unnecessary. For pathogenic yeasts, conventional phenotypic testing needs at least 24 h. Culture on a porous aluminum oxide

  17. Susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to various antibiotics among strains isolated from patients and healthy carriers in different regions of Brazil (1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rossi

    Full Text Available Resistance of microbes to commonly used antibiotics became a major concern at the end of the last century. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common pathogen in respiratory infections, we conducted microbiological assessment of drug susceptibility patterns among strains collected from two different population groups: 1 adult and pediatric patients (375 isolates with different infections, and 2 healthy children in day care centers (< 5 years old; 350 isolates. High level resistance to penicillin was not identified in either group. Intermediate resistance levels were similar in both groups (adults: 9.9%; children: 9.2%. The Central West region of Brazil tended to have lower susceptibility of S.pneumoniae from infected adults and children to penicillin (81% vs. 93% in the South and 90% in the Southeast, tetracycline (64% vs. 80% and 76%, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (14% vs. 34%. Susceptibility was similar among strains from nasal cultures of healthy children tested in each of 4 regions of Brazil. All isolates were susceptible to cefaclor, cefotaxime and amoxacillin/clavulanate. This study, in two distinct populations, allowed characterization of local microbiological resistance patterns. This data is expected to be of use in guiding empiric therapy in the different regions of Brazil.

  18. Susceptibility of important Gram-negative pathogens to tigecycline and other antibiotics in Latin America between 2004 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Canigia Liliana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T. is a global surveillance study of antimicrobial susceptibility. This study reports data from Gram-negative isolates collected from centers in Latin America between 2004 and 2010. Methods Consecutive bacterial isolates were tested at each center using broth microdilution methodology as described by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Susceptibility was determined using the CLSI interpretive criteria. For tigecycline the US Federal Drug Administration (FDA criteria were used. Results A total of 16 232 isolates were analyzed. Susceptibility to imipenem, meropenem, and tigecycline was >95% against both non-extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and ESBL producing Escherichia coli. Susceptibility to amikacin was also >95% for non-ESBL E. coli. 24.3% of E. coli were ESBL producers, ranging from 11.2% (58/519 in Colombia to 40.3% (31/77 in Honduras. Greater than 90% of non-ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae were susceptible to tigecycline, carbapenems and amikacin. 35.3% of K. pneumoniae were ESBL producers, ranging from 17.2% (36/209 in Venezuela to 73.3% (55/75 in Honduras, with only imipenem and tigecycline maintaining >90% susceptibility. Greater than 90% of Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter spp., and Serratia marcescens were susceptible to amikacin, carbapenems and tigecycline. The highest rates of susceptibility against Acinetobacter baumannii were seen for minocycline (89.4% and imipenem (62.5%, while 95.8% of the A. baumannii isolates displayed an MIC ≤2 μg/mL for tigecycline. Conclusions In this study carbapenems and tigecycline remain active against Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii; however, there is cause for concern with carbapenem non-susceptible isolates reported in all countries included in this study.

  19. The Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Salmonella typhi among Patients Attending a Military Hospital in Minna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Adabara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The threat to human health posed by antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens is of growing concern to medical practice. This study investigated the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Salmonella typhi isolated from blood specimen. One hundred blood samples were collected from suspected typhoid fever patients in 31 Artillery Brigade Medical Centre, Minna, and were analyzed for S. typhi while antibiotic sensitivity testing was done Kirby-Bauer method. Sixty (60.0% samples out of the total 100 were positive for bacterial growth. The organisms isolated 2 include Salmonella typhi; 45 (75.0%, Shigella; 6 (10.0%, E. coli; 3 (5.0%, Klebsiella; 3 (5.0%, Enterobacter; 2 (3.3%, and Citrobacter; 1 (1.7%. Result of the sensitivity test showed that the isolates were resistant to all the antibiotics; ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, amoxicillin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, and augmentin, which are the drug of choice routinely used in the study area for the treatment of typhoid fever. They were however sensitive to chloramphenicol and ofloxacin, which, unfortunately, are not used in this study area for the treatment of typhoid fever. There appear to be multiple drug resistant (MDR strain of S. typhi in the study area. These may be as a result of overdependence or uncontrolled use of the few available antibiotics and/or inaccurate or inconclusive diagnosis resulting in the development and spread of resistant strains of S. typhi. The study, therefore, highlights the need for a strong collaboration between the physicians and the laboratory in the choice of antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial diseases in order to discourage the development of resistant strain of bacterial pathogen.

  20. Degree of bacterial contamination and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates from housekeeping surfaces in operating rooms and surgical wards at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, south west Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Hemalatha, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    The role of the hospital environment as a reservoir of potential pathogens has received increasing attention. There are several reports demonstrating contamination of a wide variety of environmental sites in operating rooms (ORs) and surgical wards (SWs) which lead to nosocomial spread. To determine the degree of bacterial contamination and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates from floor and tabletop surfaces in ORs and SWs at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). A cross sectional study was conducted on 144 floor and tabletop surfaces from October to January 2009/2010. Samples were investigated for identification of bacterial species following standard procedures and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using disc diffusion technique. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and compared with the proposed standard value. The mean aerobic colony counts (ACCs) for tabletop surfaces (34 CFU/cm2) and floors (19CFU/cm2) in SWs were significantly higher than the set ACC standard for hand contact surfaces (contamination was measured in both ORs and SWs of the JUSH and the isolated bacteria were also resistant for most of the antibiotics used as a treatment options in the study area. Therefore, appropriate infection control measures needs to be taken to keep the contamination level within the proposed standard.

  1. Antibiotic resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to copper alloys of selected staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różańska, Anna; Chmielarczyk, Agnieszka; Romaniszyn, Dorota; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Walkowicz, Monika; Osuch, Piotr; Knych, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Despite the employment of sanitary regimes, contact transmission of the aetiological agents of hospital infections is still exceedingly common. The issue of microbe transmission becomes particularly important when facing multidrug-resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant staphylococci. In the case of deficiencies in cleaning and disinfection procedures, hospital equipment made of copper alloys can play an important role, complementing traditional hospital hygiene procedures. The objective of this study was to characterize staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards in terms of their drug resistance, ability to form biofilm and susceptibility to antimicrobial activity of copper alloys. The materials for the study were 95 staphylococcal strains isolated from touch surfaces in 13 different hospital wards from Małopolska province (the south of Poland). Phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance were checked for erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Biofilm formation ability for the tested strains was checked with the use of culture on Congo red agar. Susceptibility to copper, tin bronze, brass and new silver was tested using a modification of the Japanese standard. Over 67% of the analysed staphylococcal strains were methicillin-resistant (MR). Four strains were resistant to all of the tested antibiotics, and 14 were resistant to all except mupirocin. Strains classified as MR had significantly increased resistance to the remaining antibiotic groups. About one-third of the analysed strains revealed biofilm-forming ability. Among the majority of species, biofilm-forming and non-biofilm-forming strains were distributed evenly; in the case of S. haemolyticus only, negative strains accounted for 92.8%. Susceptibility to copper alloys was different between strains and rather lower than in the case of the SA strain selected for comparison. Coagulase

  2. Enhancement of bactericidal activity against group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility by uptake of gentamicin into cells resulting from combination with β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, Yoshifumi; Morozumi, Miyuki; Sato, Mamiko; Moritoki, Nobuko; Toyofuku, Meiwa; Takata, Misako; Murata, Mitsuru; Ubukata, Kimiko; Iwata, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    Combined effects of penicillin (PEN) and gentamicin (GM) against Streptococcus agalactiae, i.e. group B streptococci (GBS), are known to occur, but synergy has not been examined in strains with reduced PEN susceptibility, usually called PEN-resistant GBS (PRGBS). We therefore studied combined effects of β-lactam antibiotics and GM in cultures of 3 PRGBS strains belonging to serotype Ia or III that were isolated from Japanese adults with invasive infections. Killing kinetics were determined at 2-h intervals from 0 to 6 h after exposure to ampicillin (AMP) or cefotaxime (CTX) combined with GM. Concentrations of GM in bacterial cells were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Morphologic changes after exposure to agents were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Combining AMP or CTX with GM synergistically increased bactericidal activity against PRGBS beyond that of either β-lactam alone. GM concentrations in bacterial cells increased 5- to 8-fold when GM was combined with AMP or CTX. Electron microscopically, bacterial cells showed aggregates of strands and ribosomal damage most likely reflecting enhanced GM uptake into bacterial cells. This uptake appeared to result from cell wall damage caused by β-lactam antibiotics. This study suggests that combining β-lactam antibiotics with GM might be useful against severe PRGBS infection. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection and identification of bacteria using antibiotic susceptibility and a multi-array electrochemical sensor with pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasinski, Jason; White, Leslie; Zhang, Yachao; Wang, Eric; Andreescu, Silvana; Sadik, Omowunmi A; Lavine, Barry K; Vora, Mehul

    2007-05-15

    This work proposes the use of amperometric signals generated by a 96-well multi-array dissolved oxygen multi-electrode sensor (DOX) coupled with principal component analysis for continuous monitoring, identification and differentiation of bacteria. Two types of differentiation mechanisms were tested: (1) direct monitoring of respiratory activity via oxygen consumption and (2) quantification of the effect of three broad-spectrum antibiotics on bacteria growth and respiration over time. Five species of bacteria were examined including: Escherichia coli, Escherichia adecarboxylata, Comamonas acidovorans, Corynebacterium glutamicum and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The addition of small concentrations of antibiotics to the growth medium alters the oxygen consumption of the cells and a unique fingerprint is created for a specific cell. This fingerprint is shown to evolve over a specific concentration range that is dependant of instrumental constraints of the DOX system. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) to classify the data was also examined. It was shown that bacteria could be classified simply by their oxygen consumption rates over a varying concentration range. Discrimination between species can also be increased by the effects of the antibiotics on the oxygen consumption of varying concentrations of cells. The proposed DOX-PCA system illustrates a generic template that can be tailored to meet specific research goals by the selection of specific cell/antibiotic combinations and concentrations.

  4. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Gram-positive Cocci Cultured from Patients in Three University Hospitals in Tehran, Iran during 2001-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aligholi Marzieh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a serious problem and is increasing in prevalence world-wide at an alarming rate. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 1897 gram-positive bacterial Isolates were evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of isolates which comprised Staphylococcus aureus (927 isolates, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS; 425 isolates, Enterococcus faecalis (320 isolates, Enterococcus faecium (157 isolates, and pneumococci (50 isolates collected from 3 teaching hospitals in Tehran were determined by agar dilution method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. The presence of mecA gene was investigated in methicillin-resistant staphylococci by PCR method and vanA and vanB genes were targeted in enterococcal isolates by Multiplex PCR method. The resistance rate to methicillin among S. aureus and CNS isolates were 33% and 49%, respectively. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin .The lowest rate of resistance in all S. aureus isolates was found for rifampicin (<4%. The vancomycin resistance rate in enterococci isolates was 11% which was more frequent among E. faecium (19% than E. faecalis (4%, all resistant isolates carrying vanA. High-level resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin, were detected in 47% and 87% of enterococcal isolates respectively. The rate of penicillin resistance in pneumococci was 3% and about 27% of isolates had reduced susceptibility to penicillin. The prevalence of erythromycin resistant among pneumococci was 58%. All pneumococcal isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, rifampicin and vancomycin. Our data highlight the importance of access to updated bacterial susceptibility data regarding commonly prescribed agents for clinicians in Iran.

  5. Polypyrrole solid phase microextraction: A new approach to rapid sample preparation for the monitoring of antibiotic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szultka, Malgorzata [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kegler, Ricarda [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Fuchs, Patricia [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 35, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Olszowy, Pawel [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen K. [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 35, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Buszewski, Boguslaw [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus, Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Mundkowski, Ralf G., E-mail: ralf.mundkowski@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Rostock, Schillingallee 70, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2010-05-14

    Simple or even rapid bioanalytical methods are rare, since they generally involve complicated, time-consuming sample preparation from the biological matrices like LLE or SPE. SPME provides a promising approach to overcome these limitations. The full potential of this innovative technique for medical diagnostics, pharmacotherapy or biochemistry has not been tapped yet. In-house manufactured SPME probes with polypyrrole (PPy) coating were evaluated using three antibiotics of high clinical relevance - linezolid, daptomycin, and moxifloxacin - from PBS, plasma, and whole blood. The PPy coating was characterised by scanning electron microscopy. Influences of pH, inorganic salt, and blood anticoagulants were studied for optimum performance. Extraction yields were determined from stagnant media as well as re-circulating human blood using the heart-and-lung machine model system. The PPy-SPME fibres showed high extraction yields, particularly regarding linezolid. The reproducibility of the method was optimised to achieve RSDs of 9% or 17% and 7% for SPME from stagnant or re-circulating blood using fresh and re-used fibres, respectively. The PPy-SPME approach was demonstrated to meet the requirements of therapeutic monitoring of the drugs tested, even from re-circulating blood at physiological flow rates. SPME represents a rapid and simple dual-step procedure with potency to significantly reduce the effort and expenditure of complicated sample preparations in biomedical analysis.

  6. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Araújo, Carlos; Campanero, Cristina; del Campo, Rosa; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2013-01-24

    The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci) isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86%) (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%). Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%), Pediococcus (44%), Lactobacillus (33%), but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5%) and Weissella (6.7%). One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E), and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A) conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively), while a low number of E. faecalis (5%) and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E) in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A) in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of putatively safe LAB intended for use as probiotics

  7. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  8. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci) isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. Results These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86%) (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%). Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%), Pediococcus (44%), Lactobacillus (33%), but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5%) and Weissella (6.7%). One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E), and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A) conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively), while a low number of E. faecalis (5%) and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E) in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A) in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of putatively safe LAB

  9. Antimicrobial activity, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of Lactic Acid Bacteria of aquatic origin intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-Atienza Estefanía

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microorganisms intended for use as probiotics in aquaculture should exert antimicrobial activity and be regarded as safe not only for the aquatic hosts but also for their surrounding environments and humans. The objective of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens, the antibiotic susceptibility, and the prevalence of virulence factors and detrimental enzymatic activities in 99 Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB (59 enterococci and 40 non-enterococci isolated from aquatic animals regarded as human food. Results These LAB displayed a broad antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against the main Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. However, particular safety concerns based on antibiotic resistance and virulence factors were identified in the genus Enterococcus (86% (Enterococcus faecalis, 100%; E. faecium, 79%. Antibiotic resistance was also found in the genera Weissella (60%, Pediococcus (44%, Lactobacillus (33%, but not in leuconostocs and lactococci. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in 7.5% of the non-enterococci, including the genera Pediococcus (12.5% and Weissella (6.7%. One strain of both Pediococcus pentosaceus and Weissella cibaria carried the erythromycin resistance gene mef(A/E, and another two P. pentosaceus strains harboured lnu(A conferring resistance to lincosamides. Gelatinase activity was found in E. faecalis and E. faecium (71 and 11%, respectively, while a low number of E. faecalis (5% and none E. faecium exerted hemolytic activity. None enterococci and non-enterococci showed bile deconjugation and mucin degradation abilities, or other detrimental enzymatic activities. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first description of mef(A/E in the genera Pediococcus and Weissella, and lnu(A in the genus Pediococcus. The in vitro subtractive screening presented in this work constitutes a valuable strategy for the large-scale preliminary selection of

  10. Detection of 140 clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes in the plasmid metagenome of wastewater treatment plant bacteria showing reduced susceptibility to selected antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Linke, Burkhard; Krahn, Irene; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Gützkow, Tim; Eichler, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    To detect plasmid-borne antibiotic-resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria, 192 resistance-gene-specific PCR primer pairs were designed and synthesized. Subsequent PCR analyses on total plasmid DNA preparations obtained from bacteria of activated sludge or the WWTP's final effluents led to the identification of, respectively, 140 and 123 different resistance-gene-specific amplicons. The genes detected included aminoglycoside, beta-lactam, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, macrolide, rifampicin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfonamide resistance genes as well as multidrug efflux and small multidrug resistance genes. Some of these genes were only recently described from clinical isolates, demonstrating genetic exchange between clinical and WWTP bacteria. Sequencing of selected resistance-gene-specific amplicons confirmed their identity or revealed that the amplicon nucleotide sequence is very similar to a gene closely related to the reference gene used for primer design. These results demonstrate that WWTP bacteria are a reservoir for various resistance genes. Moreover, detection of about 64 % of the 192 reference resistance genes in bacteria obtained from the WWTP's final effluents indicates that these resistance determinants might be further disseminated in habitats downstream of the sewage plant.

  11. A novel generic dipstick-based technology for rapid and precise detection of tetracycline, streptogramin and macrolide antibiotics in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Nils; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-02-20

    Excessive use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine and as growth promoters in stock farming has been associated with the dramatically increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant human pathogenic bacteria. European community legislators have therefore restricted the veterinary use of antibiotics and banned them as growth-promoting food additives in stock breeding (1831/2003/EC). The monitoring of such legislation requires technology for precise and straightforward on-site quantification of antibiotics in farm samples and food products without the need for extensive laboratory equipment and trained personnel. Capitalizing on bacterial transcriptional regulators (TetR, PIP, E), which are dose-dependently released from their cognate operators (tetO, PIR, ETR) upon binding of specific classes of antibiotics (tetracycline, streptogramins, macrolides) we have designed an easy-to-handle dipstick-based assay for detection of antibiotic levels in serum, meat and milk whose detection limits are up to 40-fold below licensed threshold values. The generic dipstick consists of either nitrocellulose, nylon or polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF) membrane strips coated with streptavidin and immobilized biotinylated operator DNA, which acts as capture DNA to bind hexa-histidine (His(6))-tagged bacterial biosensors. Antibiotics present in specific samples triggered the dose-dependent release of the capture DNA-biosensor interaction, which, after dipping into two different solutions, results in a correlated conversion of a chromogenic substrate by a standard His(6)-targeted enzyme complex. This can be quantified by comparison of the dipstick to a standardized color scale or by assessing the terminal solution at 450nm. As demonstrated using serum, meat and milk samples spiked with 14 different antibiotics, the dipstick technology provided sensitive detection in a rapid assay format, and could be employed to monitor non-authorized use of antibiotics and to discover novel antibiotics.

  12. Lead tolerance capacity of clinical bacterial isolates and change in their antibiotic susceptibility pattern after exposure to a heavy metal

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Garhwal; Geeta Vaghela; Tanvi Panwala; Sangita Revdiwala; Arpita Shah; Summaiya Mulla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Heavy metal pollutions of soil and wastewater are a significant environmental problem as they are not degraded or destroyed. Several metal resistance mechanisms have been identified which is responsible for alteration of normal cell physiology leading to development of drug resistance in microorganisms. Heavy metals used in industry and in household products are, along with antibiotics, creating a selective pressure in the environment that leads to the mutations in microorganism...

  13. Contamination rate, antibiotic susceptibility profile, biofilm formation and presence of TSST-1 gene in Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ebrahimzadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk and traditional dairy products of West-Azerbaijan Province and also to evaluate the presence of TSST-1 virulence gene, antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation of the isolates. Using stratified random method, a total of 80 raw milk and traditional dairy products (including traditional cheese, cream and curd together with 20 nasal swab samples of the dairy products’ manufacturers were collected. S. aureus strains were isolated and identified by conventional culture methods. Afterwards, the isolates were subjected to PCR analysis to detect the presence of TSST-1 gene. According to the findings, 35% of the samples were contaminated by S. aureus. Moreover TSST-1 gene was recognized in 1 cheese and 2 swab samples. Antibiotic resistance profile revealed that most of S. aureus isolates were resistant towards vancomycin, penicillin, and methicillin and sensitive towards co-trimoxazole, gentamicin, rifampin, oxacillin, and cephalothin. Moreover, 2.85%, 17.15%, and 80% of the isolates were capable to form high, moderate and low amounts of biofilm. High occurrence of S. aureus in milk and dairy products which harbor TSST-1 virulence gene, and the strains that demonstrated resistant to several antibiotics and capable of biofilm formation, could be considered a health threat to the consumers of these products.

  14. Growth Inhibitory, Bactericidal, and Morphostructural Effects of Dehydrocostus Lactone from Magnolia sieboldii Leaves on Antibiotic-Susceptible and -Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Ha Eun; Lee, Haeng-Byung; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Koketsu, Mamoru; Thi My Ngan, Luong; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with various diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as gastric inflammation and duodenal and gastric ulcers. The aim of the study was to assess anti-H. pylori effects of the sesquiterpene lactone dehydrocostus lactone (DCL) from Magnolia sieboldii leaves, compared to commercial pure DCL, two previously known sesquiterpene lactones (costunolide and parthenolide), (–)-epigallocatechin gallate, and four antibiotics. The antibacterial activity of natural DCL toward antibiotic-susceptible H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 700824 strains (MIC, 4.9 and 4.4 mg/L) was similar to that of commercial DCL and was more effective than costunolide, parthenolide, and EGCG. The activity of DCL was slightly lower than that of metronidazole (MIC, 1.10 and 1.07 mg/L). The antibacterial activity of DCL was virtually identical toward susceptible and resistant strains, even though resistance to amoxicillin (MIC, 11.1 mg/L for PED 503G strain), clarithromycin (49.8 mg/L for PED 3582GA strain), metronidazole (21.6 mg/L for H. pylori ATCC 43504 strain; 71.1 mg/L for 221 strain), or tetracycline (14.2 mg/L for B strain) was observed. This finding indicates that DCL and the antibiotics do not share a common mode of action. The bactericidal activity of DCL toward H. pylori ATCC 43504 was not affected by pH values examined (4.0–7.0). DCL caused considerable conversion to coccoid form (94 versus 49% at 8 and 4 mg/L of DCL for 48 h). The Western blot analysis revealed that urease subunits (UreA and UreB) of H. pylori ATCC 43504 were not affected by 10 mM of DCL, whereas UreA monomer band completely disappeared at 0.1 mM of (–)-epigallocatechin gallate. Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on M. sieboldii leaf-derived materials containing DCL as potential antibacterial products or a lead molecule for the prevention or eradication of drug-resistant H. pylori. PMID:24747984

  15. Rapid and sensitive detection of antibiotic resistance on a programmable digital microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Sumit; Valiadi, Martha; Tsaloglou, Maria-Nefeli; Parry-Jones, Lesley; Jacobs, Adrian; Watson, Rob; Turner, Carrie; Amos, Robert; Hadwen, Ben; Buse, Jonathan; Brown, Chris; Sutton, Mark; Morgan, Hywel

    2015-07-21

    The widespread dissemination of CTX-M extended spectrum β-lactamases among Escherichia coli bacteria, both in nosocomial and community environments, is a challenge for diagnostic bacteriology laboratories. We describe a rapid and sensitive detection system for analysis of DNA containing the blaCTX-M-15 gene using isothermal DNA amplification by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on a digital microfluidic platform; active matrix electrowetting-on-dielectric (AM-EWOD). The devices have 16,800 electrodes that can be independently controlled to perform multiple and simultaneous droplet operations. The device includes an in-built impedance sensor for real time droplet position and size detection, an on-chip thermistor for temperature sensing and an integrated heater for regulating the droplet temperature. Automatic dispensing of droplets (45 nL) from reservoir electrodes is demonstrated with a coefficient of variation (CV) in volume of approximately 2%. The RPA reaction is monitored in real-time using exonuclease fluorescent probes. Continuous mixing of droplets during DNA amplification significantly improves target DNA detection by at least 100 times compared to a benchtop assay, enabling the detection of target DNA over four-order-of-magnitude with a limit of detection of a single copy within ~15 minutes.

  16. Re-evaluation of the significance of penicillin binding protein 3 in the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes to β-lactam antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk-Balska Agata

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penicillin binding protein 3 (PBP3 of L. monocytogenes has long been thought of as the primary lethal target for β-lactam antibiotics due to the excellent correlation between the MICs of different β-lactams and their affinity for this protein. The gene encoding PBP3 has not yet been directly identified in this gram-positive bacterium, but based on in silico analysis, this protein is likely to be encoded by lmo1438. However, studies examining the effects of mutations in genes encoding known and putative L. monocytogenes PBPs have demonstrated that inactivation of lmo1438 does not affect sensitivity to β-lactams. Results In this study, overexpression of lmo1438 was achieved using an inducible (nisin-controlled expression system. This permitted the direct demonstration that lmo1438 encodes PBP3. PBP3 overexpression was accompanied by slightly elevated PBP4 expression. The recombinant strain overexpressing PBP3 displayed significant growth retardation and greatly reduced cell length in the stationary phase of growth in culture. In antibiotic susceptibility assays, the strain overexpressing PBP3 displayed increased sensitivity to subinhibitory concentrations of several β-lactams and decreased survival in the presence of a lethal dose of penicillin G. However, the MIC values of the tested β-lactams for this recombinant strain were unchanged compared to the parent strain. Conclusions The present study allows a reevaluation of the importance of PBP3 in the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams. It is clear that PBP3 is not the primary lethal target for β-lactams, since neither the absence nor an excess of this protein affect the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to these antibiotics. The elevated level of PBP4 expression observed in the recombinant strain overexpressing PBP3 demonstrates that the composition of the L. monocytogenes cell wall is subject to tight regulation. The observed changes in the morphology of

  17. Has introduction of rapid drug susceptibility testing at diagnosis impacted treatment outcomes among previously treated tuberculosis patients in Gujarat, India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Paresh; Vadera, Bhavin; Kumar, Ajay M V; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Modi, Bhavesh; Solanki, Rajesh; Patel, Pranav; Patel, Prakash; Pujara, Kirit; Nimavat, Pankaj; Shah, Amar; Bharaswadkar, Sandeep; Rade, Kiran; Parmar, Malik; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan

    2015-01-01

    Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) in India recommends that all previously-treated TB (PT) patients are offered drug susceptibility testing (DST) at diagnosis, using rapid diagnostics and screened out for rifampicin resistance before being treated with standardized, eight-month, retreatment regimen. This is intended to improve the early diagnosis of rifampicin resistance and its appropriate management and improve the treatment outcomes among the rest of the patients. In this state-wide study from Gujarat, India, we assess proportion of PT patients underwent rapid DST at diagnosis and the impact of this intervention on their treatment outcomes. This is a retrospective cohort study involving review of electronic patient-records maintained routinely under RNTCP. All PT patients registered for treatment in Gujarat during January-June 2013 were included. Information on DST and treatment outcomes were extracted from 'presumptive DR-TB patient register' and TB treatment register respectively. We performed a multivariate analysis to assess if getting tested is independently associated with unfavourable outcomes (death, loss-to-follow-up, failure, transfer out). Of 5,829 PT patients, 5306(91%) were tested for drug susceptibility with rapid diagnostics. Overall, 71% (4,113) TB patients were successfully treated - 72% among tested versus 60% among non-tested. Patients who did not get tested at diagnosis had a 34% higher risk of unsuccessful outcomes as compared to those who got tested (aRR - 1.34; 95% CI 1.20-1.50) after adjusting for age, sex, HIV status and type of TB. Unfavourable outcomes (particularly failure and switched to category IV) were higher among INH-resistant patients (39%) as compared to INH-sensitive (29%). Offering DST at diagnosis improved the treatment outcomes among PT patients. However, even among tested, treatment outcomes remained suboptimal and were related to INH resistance and high loss-to-follow-up. These need to be addressed urgently

  18. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring antibiotic-resistant enterobacteria faecal levels is helpful in predicting antibiotic susceptibility of bacteraemia isolates in patients with haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerther, Paul-Louis; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Angebault, Cécile; Pasquier, Florence; Pilorge, Sylvain; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Gachot, Bertrand; Chachaty, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    Delay of active antimicrobial therapy in haematological patients with Gram-negative bacilli bacteraemia during profound neutropenia exposes them to increased morbidity and mortality. The digestive tract is the main source of enterobacteria causing bacteraemia in these patients. We thus evaluated the usefulness of broad-spectrum beta-lactam resistant enterobacteria (BSBL-RE) faecal shedding assessment in forecasting the susceptibility to BSBLs of the strains isolated from blood cultures. From 2002 to 2011, neutropenic haematological patients with bacteraemia caused by enterobacteria who had a stool culture during the previous 7 days were retrospectively included. BSBL-RE intestinal carriers were compared with non-carriers in terms of clinical and microbiological criteria. One hundred and four patients were included and 16 of them (15.4 %) were BSBL-RE carriers. Multivariate analysis showed that BSBL-RE carriage was independently associated with BSBL-RE identified in blood cultures (P < 0.001) and the use of carbapenems as empirical treatment of the bacteraemia (P = 0.008). Sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values of the test were 80 %, 91 %, 50 % and 98 %, respectively. Among the carriers, those with the highest level of BSBL-RE carriage were also those with the highest risk of bacteraemia due to BSBL-RE (P < 0.001). Close monitoring of BSBL-RE intestinal carriage may help to choose the most appropriate initial antimicrobial treatment for neutropenic haematological patients with bacteraemia.

  20. Comparative study on the antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profiles of Vibrio alginolyticus strains isolated from four Tunisian marine biotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnef, Rim; Snoussi, Mejdi; Romalde, Jesús López; Nozha, Cohen; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2012-12-01

    The antibiotic resistance patterns and the plasmids profiles of the predominant etiological agent responsible for vibriosis in Tunisia, V. alginolyticus were studied to contribute to control their spread in some Mediterranean aquaculture farms and seawater. The sixty-nine V. alginolyticus strains isolated from different marine Tunisian biotopes (bathing waters, aquaculture and conchylicole farms and a river connected to the seawater during the cold seasons) were multi-drug resistant with high resistance rate to ampicillin, kanamycin, doxycyclin, erythromycin, imipinem, and nalidixic acid. The multiple resistance index ranged from 0.3 to 0.7 for the isolates of Khenis, from 0.5 to 0.8 for those of Menzel Jmil, from 0.5 to 0.75 (Hergla) and from 0.3 to 0.7 for the isolates of Oued Soltane. The high value of antibiotic resistance index was recorded for the V. alginolyticus population isolated from the fish farm in Hergla (ARI = 0.672) followed by the population isolated from the conchylicole station of Menzel Jmil (ARI = 0.645). The results obtained by the MIC tests confirmed the resistance of the V. alginolyticus to ampicillin, erythromycin, kanamycin, cefotaxime, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Plasmids were found in 79.48 % of the strains analyzed and 30 different plasmid profiles were observed. The strains had a high difference in the size of plasmids varying between 0.5 and 45 kb. Our study reveals that the antibiotic-resistant bacteria are widespread in the aquaculture and conchylicole farm relatively to others strains isolated from seawater.

  1. Serratia marcescens: Biochemical, Serological, and Epidemiological Characteristics and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Strains Isolated at Boston City Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfert, James N.; Barrett, Fred F.; Ewing, W. H.; Finland, Maxwell; Kass, Edward H.

    1970-01-01

    The biochemical, serological, and epidemiological characteristics of 95 strains of Serratia marcescens isolated at the Boston City Hospital were examined. Several strains were shown to be endemic, and the majority of isolates were cultured from urine or respiratory secretions. Serratia species were highly resistant to polymyxin B and the cephalosporins, and various proportions were also resistant to other antibiotics including kanamycin, but all of the isolates were sensitive to gentamicin. The appearance of resistance to kanamycin and nalidixic acid among endemic strains was demonstrated. The nosocomial nature of Serratia infections, particularly those involving the urinary tract, was confirmed. Many clinical bacteriology laboratories currently fail to identify the nonpigmented strains. PMID:4314379

  2. Effects of clinical breakpoint changes in CLSI guidelines 2010/2011 and EUCAST guidelines 2011 on antibiotic susceptibility test reporting of Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of clinical breakpoint changes in CLSI 2010 and 2011 guidelines and EUCAST 2011 guidelines on antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) reports. In total, 3713 non-duplicate clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Acinetobacter baumannii were analysed. Inhibition zone diameters were determined for β-lactams, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. CLSI 2009-11 and EUCAST 2011 clinical breakpoints were applied. Changes in resistance as defined per the guidelines affected individual species and drug classes differently. The cefepime resistance rate in Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae increased from 2.1% and 1.3% to 8.2% and 6.9%, respectively, applying CLSI 2009-11 versus EUCAST 2011 guidelines. Ertapenem resistance rates in E. cloacae increased from 2.6% with CLSI 2009 to 7.2% for CLSI 2010 and 2011, and to 10.1% when applying EUCAST 2011. Cefepime and meropenem resistance rates in P. aeruginosa increased from 12.2% and 20.6% to 19.8% and 27.7%, respectively, comparing CLSI 2009-11 with EUCAST 2011. Tobramycin and gentamicin resistance rates in A. baumannii increased from 15.9% and 25.4% to 34.9% and 44.4% applying CLSI 2009-11 versus EUCAST 2011. Higher resistance rates reported due to breakpoint changes in CLSI and EUCAST guidelines will result in increasing numbers of Gram-negative bacilli reported as multidrug resistant. AST reports classifying amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefepime or carbapenem resistance will lead clinicians to use alternative agents. Upon implementation of the EUCAST guidelines, laboratories should be aware of the implications of modified drug susceptibility testing reports on antibiotic prescription policies.

  3. Efficiency of oxytetracycline treatment in rainbow trout experimentally infected with Flavobacterium psychrophilum strains having different in vitro antibiotic susceptibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Morten Sichlau; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2003-01-01

    The medication effect of oxytetracycline on groups of rainbow trout fry experimentally infected with three strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum was investigated. The infection model was based on intraperitoneal injection of the pathogen and treatment was done using medicated feed resulting...... in 100 mg oxytetracycline/kg fish for 10 days. The three F. psychrophilum strains had different antimicrobial susceptibilities and successful treatment was only obtained in the trial using a strain with a MICOTC of 0.25 mug/ml. No effect of treatment was seen in the group infected with a strain having...... MICOTC of 8.0 mug/ml and only little effect was seen when the strain MICOTC was 4.0 mug/ml. This shows that it is valid to predict the treatment efficiency of OTC from in vitro data facing an outbreak of rainbow trout fry syndrome. The importance of doing susceptibility testing is emphasized...

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with mastitis in eastern Poland and analysis of susceptibility of resistant strains to alternative nonantibiotic agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szweda, Piotr; Schielmann, Marta; Frankowska, Aneta; Kot, Barbara; Zalewska, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in the eastern part of Poland to a set of 20 antibiotics and three alternative agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B. Eighty-six out of 123 examined isolates were susceptible to all 20 tested antibiotics (70%). The highest percentage of resistance was observed in the case of β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin (n=22, 17.9%), ampicillin (n=28, 22.8%), penicillin (n=29, 23.6%) and streptomycin (n=13; 10.6%). Twenty-five of the penicillin-resistant strains were found to carry the blaZ gene coding for β-lactamases. Two strains were found to be mecA positive and a few strains were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), one of them was simultaneously resistant to six antibiotics. All strains, resistant to at least one antibiotic (n=37) and two control strains, were susceptible to lysostaphin with MIC values of 0.008-0.5 µg/ml (susceptibility breakpoint 32 µg/ml). Twenty-one (54%) isolates were susceptible to nisin. The MIC value of this agent for 17 (44%) strains was 51.2 µg/ml and was not much higher than the susceptibility breakpoint value (32 µg/ml). Polymyxin B was able to inhibit the growth of the strains only at a high concentration (32-128 µg/ml). The presented results confirmed the observed worldwide problem of spreading antibiotic resistance among staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis; on the other hand, we have indicated a high level of bactericidal activity of nisin and especially lysostaphin.

  5. Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Ready-to-Eat Foods: Detection of S. aureus Contamination and a High Prevalence of Virulence Genes

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    Suat Moi Puah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of food poisoning. Its pathogenicity results from the possession of virulence genes that produce different toxins which result in self-limiting to severe illness often requiring hospitalization. In this study of 200 sushi and sashimi samples, S. aureus contamination was confirmed in 26% of the food samples. The S. aureus isolates were further characterized for virulence genes and antibiotic susceptibility. A high incidence of virulence genes was identified in 96.2% of the isolates and 20 different virulence gene profiles were confirmed. DNA amplification showed that 30.8% (16/52 of the S. aureus carried at least one SE gene which causes staphylococcal food poisoning. The most common enterotoxin gene was seg (11.5% and the egc cluster was detected in 5.8% of the isolates. A combination of hla and hld was the most prevalent coexistence virulence genes and accounted for 59.6% of all isolates. Antibiotic resistance studies showed tetracycline resistance to be the most common at 28.8% while multi-drug resistance was found to be low at 3.8%. In conclusion, the high rate of S. aureus in the sampled sushi and sashimi indicates the need for food safety guidelines.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from fresh porcine skin xenografts: risk to recipients with thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Stacey-Ann; Robb, Andrew; Lang, Sue; Takeuchi, Yasu; Vesely, Pavel; Scobie, Linda

    2014-03-01

    The previous use of fresh porcine xenografts at the Prague Burn Centre had raised concerns over the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. This study examines the risk of zoonotic Staphylococcus aureus colonisation of burn patients from fresh porcine skin xenografts. Samples were collected from the nares, skin and perineum of commercial pigs (n=101) and were screened for methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The efficacy of the antibiotic wash used in decontamination of the pigskin was tested against planktonic- and biofilm-grown isolates. The spa type of each isolate was also confirmed. All pig swabs were negative for MRSA but 86% positive for MSSA. All planktonic-grown isolates of MSSA were sensitive to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin and 44% of isolates were resistant to streptomycin. Isolates grown as biofilm exhibited higher rates of antimicrobial resistance. Sequence analysis revealed three distinct spa types of the MRSA ST398 clonal type. This finding demonstrates the existence of a MSSA reservoir containing spa types resembling those of well-known MRSA strains. These MSSA exhibit resistance to antibiotics used for decontamination of the pigskin prior to xenograft. Amended use of procurement could allow the use of fresh pigskin xenografts to be reinstated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of a direct method for the identification and antibiotic susceptibility assessment of microrganisms isolated from blood cultures by automatic systems

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    Sergio Frugoni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of blood cultures in the septic patient is to address a correct therapeutic approach. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility test carried out directly from the bottle may give important information in short time.The introduction of the automatic instrumentation has improved the discovering of pathogens in the blood, however the elapsing time between the positive detection and the microbiological report is still along. Is the evaluation of this study a fast, easy, cheap method to be applied to the routine, which could reduce the response time in the bacteraemia diagnosis.The automatic systems Vitek Senior (bioMérieux, and Vitek 2 (bioMérieux were used at Pio Albergo Trivulzio (Centre1 and at Istituto dei Tumori (Centre2 respectivetly.To remove blood cells, 7 ml. of the culture has been moved by vacuum sampling in a test tube and centrifuged for 10 minutes at 1000 rpm the supernatant has been further centrifuged for 10 minutes at 3000 rpm.0.5 ml. of BHI has been added to the pellet o sediment.The concentration of bacterial suspension has been fit for the inoculation. At the same time has been prepared standard cultures in suitable culture media were carried out for comparison. In the centro1 and centro2 have been isolated and identify respectively 63 and 31 Gram negative, and, 32 and 40 gram positive microorganisms have been isolated and identify in the Centre1 and Centre2 respectively.The identification Gram-negative and Gram positive microorganisms showed an agreement of 100% and 86.2% and 93.3% and 65.78% respectively between the direct and the standard method. For antibiotic susceptibility tests, 903 (Centre1 and 491 (Centre2 and 396 and 509 compounds were totally assessed in Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria respectively.The analysis has highlighted that: Centre1 has reported 0.30% very major errors (GE, 0.92% major errors (EM, 1.23% minor errors (Em. Centre 2 showed 0.57% very major errors (GE, 0.09% major errors

  8. Differential expression of ompC and ompF in multidrug-resistant Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri by aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos, altering its susceptibility toward beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2008-07-01

    Steadily increasing resistance among Shigella to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and tetracycline has compromised the utility of these commonly used antimicrobial agents. Also, undesirable side effects of certain antibiotics have triggered immense interest in search of alternative therapies using medicinal plants. One such medicinal plant used since ancient times to cure diarrhea is Aegle marmelos. The present study exemplifies the susceptibility of beta-lactam-resistant Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella flexneri toward beta-lactam antibiotics, when grown in the presence of aqueous extract of A. marmelos (AEAM), by altering porin channels. This was demonstrated by antibiotic sensitivity test using disc diffusion method and MIC test. Susceptibility toward beta-lactam antibiotic is associated with changes in outer membrane porins OmpC (approximately 42 kDa) and OmpF (approximately 38 kDa) and cytosolic proteins of approximately 26 kDa, OmpR, a transcriptional regulator. Expression of ompF is increased in S. dysenteriae and S. flexneri grown in the presence of AEAM due to down-regulation of ompR, which is conformed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, AEAM influences susceptibility of beta-lactam-resistant Shigella toward beta-lactam antibiotics by altering porin channels. Hence, AEAM along with beta-lactam can be used for treatment of multidrug-resistant Shigella.

  9. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance and acquired susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients to temocillin, a revived antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub, Hussein; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Braun, Yvonne; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Plésiat, Patrick; Kahl, Barbara C; Denis, Olivier; Winterhalter, Mathias; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-01-16

    The β-lactam antibiotic temocillin (6-α-methoxy-ticarcillin) shows stability to most extended spectrum β-lactamases, but is considered inactive against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mutations in the MexAB-OprM efflux system, naturally occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates, have been previously shown to reverse this intrinsic resistance. In the present study, we measured temocillin activity in a large collection (n = 333) of P. aeruginosa CF isolates. 29% of the isolates had MICs ≤ 16 mg/L (proposed clinical breakpoint for temocillin). Mutations were observed in mexA or mexB in isolates for which temocillin MIC was ≤512 mg/L (nucleotide insertions or deletions, premature termination, tandem repeat, nonstop, and missense mutations). A correlation was observed between temocillin MICs and efflux rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (MexAB-OprM fluorescent substrate) and extracellular exopolysaccharide abundance (contributing to a mucoid phenotype). OpdK or OpdF anion-specific porins expression decreased temocillin MIC by ~1 two-fold dilution only. Contrarily to the common assumption that temocillin is inactive on P. aeruginosa, we show here clinically-exploitable MICs on a non-negligible proportion of CF isolates, explained by a wide diversity of mutations in mexA and/or mexB. In a broader context, this work contributes to increase our understanding of MexAB-OprM functionality and help delineating how antibiotics interact with MexA and MexB.

  10. Serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Marta; Aliberti, Stefano; Azzari, Chara; Moriondo, Maria; Nieddu, Francesco; Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia remain an important public health problem. The primary objective was to determine the proportion of community-acquired pneumonia that is attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection; secondary objectives were the description of community-acquired pneumonia attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae according to socio-demographic and clinical variables, the clinical evolution of community-acquired pneumonia and the description of the serotype distribution of vaccine-preventable disease and antibiotic resistance rate of pneumococcal infections. An observational, prospective study was conducted on consecutive patients coming from the community, who were hospitalized with pneumonia. Data on admission, at discharge and 30 days after discharge were collected. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the risk factors independently associated with pneumococcal pneumonia. Among the 193 patients enrolled in the study, the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 60 patients (33%) and 35 (18%) of evaluable patients had community-acquired pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Of all clinical characteristics, if no previous antibiotic treatment was performed, there was a 13-fold higher risk of presenting community-acquired pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio, 12.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-117.9). Moreover, the most frequent isolated serotypes were 35F, 3 and 24 (29%, 23% and 16%, respectively). The most frequent serotypes in pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia are 35F, 3, 24, 6 and 7A, and thus almost 50% of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains could be covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 in adult patients with risk factors for pneumococcal infections.

  11. Incidence, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Toxin Profiles of Bacillus cereus sensu lato Isolated from Korean Fermented Soybean Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hong-Seok; Choi, Da-Som; Choi, In-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Korean fermented soybean products, such as doenjang, kochujang, ssamjang, and cho-kochujang, can harbor foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sensu lato). The aim of this study was to characterize the toxin gene profiles, biochemical characteristics, and antibiotic resistance patterns of B. cereus sensu lato strains isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. Eighty-eight samples of Korean fermented soybean products purchased from retails in Seoul were tested. Thirteen of 26 doenjang samples, 13 of 23 kochujang samples, 16 of 30 ssamjang samples, and 5 of 9 cho-kochujang samples were positive for B. cereus sensu lato strains. The contamination level of all positive samples did not exceed 4 log CFU/g of food (maximum levels of Korea Food Code). Eighty-seven B. cereus sensu lato strains were isolated from 47 positive samples, and all isolates carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 34.5%, 98.9%, 57.5%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen strains (17.2%) harbored the emetic toxin gene. Most strains tested positive for salicin fermentation (62.1%), starch hydrolysis (66.7%), hemolysis (98.9%), motility test (100%), and lecithinase production (96.6%). The B. cereus sensu lato strains were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin, penicillin, cefepime, imipenem, and oxacillin. Although B. cereus sensu lato levels in Korean fermented soybean products did not exceed the maximum levels permitted in South Korea (<10(4) CFU/g), these results indicate that the bacterial isolates have the potential to cause diarrheal or emetic gastrointestinal diseases. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Bacterial etiologies, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and risk factors among patients with ear discharge at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Seble Worku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the etiologic agent, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and possible risk factors among patients who had ear infection. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 2014 and June 2014 at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia among patients with ear discharge. Data were collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Ear discharge was inoculated on blood agar, chocolate agar and MacConkey agar plates. Standard procedures were used for identification of etiologic agents. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on MuellerHinton agar. Data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 20 and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 167 patients, 97 (58.1% were males. The mean age of the study participants was 23.3 years with the age ranging form 4 months to 78 years. Among the 167 study participants with ear discharge, 154 (92.2% were showed bacterial growth. Gram-negative bacteria were commonly isolated from 100 (58.5% participants. Of the 167 ear infection cases, 68.9% and 31.1% were from patients with chronic and acute otitis media, respectively. A total of 125 (73.1% and 46 (24.9% bacterial isolates were recovered from patients with chronic otitis media and acute otits media, respectively. The most commonly isolated Grampositive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus [43 (25.1%]. Among the Gram-negative isolates, Proteus species [43 (25.1%] were the most common isolate. Age and sex had statically significant association with ear infection (P = 0.013. Multidrug resistances were observed in 100% and 88.4% Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The prevalence of Gram-negative bacteria was high. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and Pseudomonas species were the most predominant. Alarmingly high rates of multiple drug resistance to majority of the commonly used antimicrobial agents were found. Therefore, treatment of ear

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and erythromycin resistance mechanisms in beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from central Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Nien, Hao-Hsiang; Cheng, Ya-Yu; Su, Fang-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Information concerning antibiotics susceptibilities of beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) clinical isolates in central Taiwan was limited. Totally, 246 SDSE isolates were collected from mainly five regional hospitals, from February 2007 to August 2011. Disk diffusion method, broth microdilution method, and clindamycin induction test (D test) were respectively performed according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the corresponding erythromycin resistance genes. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin. The rate of erythromycin resistance was 24.0% (59/246), whereas that of clindamycin resistance was 12.2% (30/246). The resistance rates of isolates from different hospitals varied from 15.0% to 45.5% for erythromycin and from 7.1% to 36.4% for clindamycin. For erythromycin-resistant SDSE isolates, three different phenotypes with resistance to macrolides (M), lincosamides (L), and type B streptogramins (SB) were observed: M (49.2%), constitutive MLSB (cMLSB, 35.6%), and inducible MLSB (iMLSB, 15.3%). All M phenotypic isolates carried mefA. The most prevalent genotypes among cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypic isolates were ermB, followed by ermTR. One isolate with cMLSB phenotype carried both ermB and ermTR, whereas one isolate with iMLSB phenotype carried both ermB and ermC. This is the first trial investigating the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and erythromycin resistance mechanisms of beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates in central Taiwan. The resistance rates for both erythromycin and clindamycin varied significantly among hospitals located in this area and should be monitored continuously in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of 33 Prevotella strains isolated from Romanian patients with abscesses in head and neck spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancescu, Gabriela; Didilescu, Andreea; Bancescu, Adrian; Bari, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of a series of 33 Prevotella strains isolated from patients with abscesses in the head and neck spaces, presented to one Romanian hospital. The Etest was applied to determine the value of the minimum inhibitory concentrations for: penicillin G, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, metronidazole and clindamycin. In addition, the beta-lactamase activity was detected by the chromogenic cephalosporin disc method. The results indicated that 11 isolates were resistant to both penicillin G and ampicillin due to the beta-lactamase production. All the 33 Prevotella strains were susceptible to the other 3 antimicrobial agents tested, except for only one penicillin G - ampicillin resistant isolate of Prevotella buccae (MIC > 32 and MIC = 12 mg/L, respectively), which showed high resistance to clindamycin (MIC > 256 mg/L) too. Our data underline the necessity for antimicrobial testing including monitoring of beta-lactamase production in cases of oro-maxillo-facial mixed anaerobic infections where antimicrobial treatment is required in addition to the surgical drainage. The results of the study indicated that amoxicillin-clavulanate, like metronidazole, was fully active against the tested Prevotella strains. However, local and multicentre surveys on drug resistance among the clinically significant anaerobic isolates should be carried out periodically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation of Salmonella spp. from lettuce and evaluation of its susceptibility to novel bacteriocins of Bacillus thuringiensis and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Ramírez, Cristobal; Cortes-Rodríguez, Viridiana; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma; Bideshi, Dennis K; del Rincón-Castro, M Cristina; Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar

    2011-02-01

    In this study, 13% of fresh lettuce (Lactuca sativa) samples collected from markets and supermarkets in two cities of Mexico were contaminated with Salmonella spp. From those samples, amplicons of ∼300 base pairs (bp) were amplified, corresponding to the expected size of the invasion (invA) and internal transcribed spacer regions of the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of Salmonella spp. Additionally, Salmonella strains were isolated and harbored plasmids ranging from ∼9 to 16 kbp. From these strains, 91% were resistant to ampicillin and nitrofurantoin, whereas 55% were resistant to cephalothin and chloramphenicol. No resistance was detected to amikacin, carbenicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin, netilmicin, norfloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. When Salmonella isolates were tested against novel bacteriocins (morricin 269, kurstacin 287, kenyacin 404, entomocin 420, and tolworthcin 524) produced by five Mexican strains of Bacillus thuringiensis, 50% were susceptible to these antimicrobial peptides. This is the first report showing that Salmonella strains isolated from lettuce are susceptible to bacteriocins produced by the most important bioinsecticide worldwide, suggesting the potential use of these antibacterial peptides as therapeutic agents or food preservatives to reduce or destroy populations of Salmonella spp. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection

  16. Environmental Occurrence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Listeria monocytogenes at a Slaughterhouse Raw Processing Plant in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Claudia; Morar, Adriana; Tîrziu, Emil; Nichita, Ileana; Imre, Mirela; Imre, Kálmán

    2016-10-01

    This survey was conducted to investigate the occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in the environment of a pig slaughterhouse raw processing plant complex in western Romania. A total of 97 environmental samples from food contact (n = 60) and nonfood contact (n = 37) surfaces were examined with standard methods. The susceptibility of the isolates to 17 antimicrobial agents was determined with the VITEK 2 automated system. Overall, 25 (25.8%) samples were positive for L. monocytogenes , with recovery rates of 23.3% (n = 14) and 29.7% (n = 11) for food contact and nonfood contact surfaces, respectively. All 25 tested isolates were resistant to benzylpenicillin, imipenem, and fusidic acid. Resistance was observed to oxacillin (23 isolates; 92%), fosfomycin (23 isolates; 92%), clindamycin (22 isolates; 88%), rifampin (14 isolates; 56%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12 isolates; 48%), tetracycline (11 isolates; 44%), and ciprofloxacin (1 isolate; 4%). No resistance was found to seven tested agents: gentamicin, moxifloxacin, erythromycin, linezolid, teicoplanin, vancomycin, and tigecycline. All tested L. monocytogenes isolates were resistant to four to nine antimicrobial agents. These results indicate a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates in this pork-processing environment, providing baseline information for hygienists and public health specialists.

  17. Identification of staphylococci from bovine mastitis and an examination of their susceptibility to antibiotics and beta-lactamase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, T; Yoshida, T; Kamata, S; Uchida, K

    1990-12-01

    Strains of Staphylococcus species isolated from bovine mastitic milk at 66 dairy farms in Japan during the period from November 1988 to May 1989 were identified, and examined for their drug susceptibility and beta-lactamase production in order to clarify an epidemiological aspect of bovine mastitis caused by staphylococci. The results of bacteriological identification showed that the most predominant species was S. xylosus. Other major species isolated were S. aureus, S. sciuri and S. hyicus. Thirty-eight (71.7%) isolates of S. xylosus, 21 (45.7%) of S. aureus and 5 (71.4%) of S. epidermidis were positive for beta-lactamase production. Most of the beta-lactamase-producers of S. aureus were classified as high producers, although all of the beta-lactamase-positive S. xylosus isolates remained to be low producers. All isolates of S. aureus were sensitive to methicillin and cloxacillin at 6.25 micrograms/ml and 1.56 micrograms/ml, respectively, and none of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were detected. Isolates of other species were considered to be susceptible to 6 beta-lactams, in contrast to human isolates, but antibacterial activities of penicillin G and ampicillin were affected more strongly by beta-lactamase than those of methicillin, cloxacillin, cefazolin and cefoperazone.

  18. Endothelial Cells Are Susceptible to Rapid siRNA Transfection and Gene Silencing Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Chopra, Atish; Monahan, Thomas S.; Malek, Junaid Y.; Jain, Monica; Pradhan, Leena; Ferran, Christiane; LoGerfo, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endothelial gene silencing via small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection represents a promising strategy for the control of vascular disease. Here, we demonstrate endothelial gene silencing in human saphenous vein using three rapid siRNA transfection techniques amenable for use in the operating room. MATERIALS AND METHODS Control siRNA, Cy5 siRNA, or siRNA targeting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) or endothelial specific nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were applied to surplus human saphenous vein for 10 minutes by (i) soaking, (ii) applying 300 mmHg hyperbaric pressure, or (iii) 120 mmHg luminal distending pressure. Transfected vein segments were maintained in organ culture. siRNA delivery and gene silencing were assessed by tissue layer using confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Distending pressure transfection yielded the highest levels of endothelial siRNA delivery (22% pixels fluorescing) and gene silencing (60% GAPDH knockdown, 55% eNOS knockdown) as compared to hyperbaric (12% pixels fluorescing, 36% GAPDH knockdown, 30% eNOS knockdown) or non-pressurized transfections (10% pixels fluorescing, 30% GAPDH knockdown, 25% eNOS knockdown). Cumulative endothelial siRNA delivery (16% pixels fluorescing) and gene silencing (46% GAPDH knockdown) exceeded levels achieved in the media/adventitia (8% pixels fluorescing, 24% GAPDH knockdown) across all transfection methods. CONCLUSION Endothelial gene silencing is possible within the timeframe and conditions of surgical application without the use of transfection reagents. The high sensitivity of endothelial cells to siRNA transfection marks the endothelium as a promising target of gene therapy in vascular disease. PMID:20801607

  19. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Hee Lee; Ill Hwan Cho; Byeong Chul Jeong; Chang-Ro Lee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic r...

  20. Comparison of E.test and Disk Diffusion Agar in Detection of Antibiotic Susceptibility of E.coli Isolated from Patients with Urinary Tract Infection in Tehran Shariati Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Erfani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: UTI is one of the most common bacterial infections and Ecoli is known as an important cause of UTIs. Since bacterial resistances of antibiotics are increasing, reliable methods of antimicrobial resistance detection are of paramount importance in treatment and management of UTIs. The objective of the present study is to compare and to evaluate the performance of disk diffusion agar (Iranian and Italian and E.test (Epsilometer test (Sweden for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Ecoli isolated from UTI.Materials & Methods: This study was done on 250 Isolates of Ecoli from patients with UTI in Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2004. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method using Iranian and Italian disk for Trimetoprim sulfamethoxazole, Gentamysin, Ceftazidim, Nitrofurantoin and Ciprofluxacin and Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC determination was performed by E.test for the same set of antimicrobial. All tests were performed on muller hinton agar. Results: Comparison of E.test and Iranian disk diffusion agar showed that paramount differences in antibiotic agreement (Max 37.8 % those differences in case of Ceftazidim and Gentamysin were respectively 76.8% and 62.2% whereas comparison of E.test and Italian disk diffusion agar showed less difference of antibiotics agreement (Max 11.2%.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that Iranian disk diffusion agar may be used as a preliminary screen for antibiotic susceptibility testing of E.coli and is less sensitive than Italian disk diffusion and E.test. Comparison of 3 mentioned methods have showed that E.test is the most sensitive and shows the effective dose of antibiotic for treatment and prevention of antibiotic resistance.

  1. Rapid generation of hydrogen peroxide contributes to the complex cell death induction by the angucycline antibiotic landomycin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchuk, Rostyslav R; Lehka, Lilya V; Terenzi, Alessio; Matselyukh, Bohdan P; Rohr, Jürgen; Jha, Amit K; Downey, Theresa; Kril, Iryna J; Herbacek, Irene; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Heffeter, Petra; Stoika, Rostyslav S; Berger, Walter

    2017-05-01

    Landomycin E (LE) is an angucycline antibiotic produced by Streptomyces globisporus. Previously, we have shown a broad anticancer activity of LE which is, in contrast to the structurally related and clinically used anthracycline doxorubicin (Dx), only mildly affected by multidrug resistance-mediated drug efflux. In the present study, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer activity of landomycin E towards Jurkat T-cell leukemia cells were dissected focusing on the involvement of radical oxygen species (ROS). LE-induced apoptosis distinctly differed in several aspects from the one induced by Dx. Rapid generation of both extracellular and cell-derived hydrogen peroxide already at one hour drug exposure was observed in case of LE but not found before 24h for Dx. In contrast, Dx but not LE induced production of superoxide radicals. Mitochondrial damage, as revealed by JC-1 staining, was weakly enhanced already at 3h LE treatment and increased significantly with time. Accordingly, activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway initiator caspase-9 was not detectable before 12h exposure. In contrast, cleavage of the down-stream caspase substrate PARP-1 was clearly induced already at the three hour time point. Out of all caspases tested, only activation of effector caspase-7 was induced at this early time points paralleling the LE-induced oxidative burst. Accordingly, this massive cleavage of caspase-7 at early time points was inhibitable by the radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Additionally, only simultaneous inhibition of multiple caspases reduced LE-induced apoptosis. Specific scavengers of both H2O2 and OH(•) effectively decreased LE-induced ROS production, but only partially inhibited LE-induced apoptosis. In contrast, NAC efficiently blocked both parameters. Summarizing, rapid H2O2 generation and a complex caspase activation pattern contribute to the antileukemic effects of LE. As superoxide generation is considered as the main

  2. Isolation of Streptococci from milk samples of normal, acute and subclinical mastitis cows and determination of their antibiotic susceptibility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Nikookhah, Farzaneh; Nikpour, Saeed; Majiian, Farya; Gholami, Masoud

    2008-01-01

    Streptococci are frequently isolated from bovine mastitis in dairy cows with only limited information available on the antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms. A total of 42 Streptococci isolated from 148 milk samples of normal, sub acute and acute bovine mastitis cases. Overall, 35% of the strains tested were Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae 26%, Streptococcus uberis 18 and 4% were Enterococcus sp. Differences between the number of isolations in acute and sub acute groups were statistically significant, (ppenicillin, clindamycin, cloxaciline, gentamicin, streptomycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, kanamycin, oxytetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and erythromycin. S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, S. uberis and Enterococci demonstrated high level of resistance against streptomycin, penicillin and cloxaciline. Low level of sensitivity to other tested antimicrobials was demonstrated.

  3. History and evolution of antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci: Susceptibility profiles of new anti-staphylococcal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Joseph F; Harvin, Alexander M

    2007-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a heterogenous group of Gram-positive cocci that are widespread commensals among mammalia. Unlike their coagulase-positive counterpart, Staphylococcus aureus, CNS produce few virulence patterns and normally refrain from invading tissue. Yet, not only can CNS cause infections in normal host tissue, but modern medicine has also seen their rise as opportunists that display adherence to medical device materials to produce a protective biofilm. CNS have historically been more resistant to antimicrobials, including the beta-lactam antibiotics, than S. aureus and some hospitals reveal rates of oxacillin resistance in CNS approaching 90%. Cross resistance to non-beta-lactam agents has been a recurrent theme over the past 40 years in the CNS. Thus, there has been a pressing need for newer antimicrobial agents with good antistaphylococcal activity. Those new agents tend to have excellent antistaphylococcal activity include daptomycin, linezolid, oritavancin, telavancin, tigecycline, dalbavancin, new quinolones, and ceftibiprole, several of which have unique mechanisms of action. The MIC₉₀ for these new compounds typically ranges from 0.5-4 mug/mL. Staphylococcal biofilm formation is quite common in CNS infections and markedly increases the MIC for most older antimicrobials. Several of the newer agents offer some promise of penetration of biofilm to inhibit or kill adherent staphylococci. CNS will likely remain a major cause of infections in the modern age, evolve further antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and require development of newer antimicrobials for curative therapy.

  4. Evaluating an audit and feedback intervention for reducing antibiotic prescribing behaviour in general dental practice (the RAPiD trial): a partial factorial cluster randomised trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prescribing in dentistry accounts for 9% of total antibiotic prescriptions in Scottish primary care. The Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme (SDCEP) published guidance in April 2008 (2nd edition, August 2011) for Drug Prescribing in Dentistry, which aims to assist dentists to make evidence-based antibiotic prescribing decisions. However, wide variation in prescribing persists and the overall use of antibiotics is increasing. Methods RAPiD is a 12-month partial factorial cluster randomised trial conducted in NHS General Dental Practices across Scotland. Its aim is to compare the effectiveness of individualised audit and feedback (A&F) strategies for the translation into practice of SDCEP recommendations on antibiotic prescribing. The trial uses routinely collected electronic healthcare data in five aspects of its design in order to: identify the study population; apply eligibility criteria; carry out stratified randomisation; generate the trial intervention; analyse trial outcomes. Eligibility was determined on contract status and a minimum level of recent NHS treatment provision. All eligible dental practices in Scotland were simultaneously randomised at baseline either to current audit practice or to an intervention group. Randomisation was stratified by single-handed/multi-handed practices. General dental practitioners (GDPs) working at intervention practices will receive individualised graphical representations of their antibiotic prescribing rate from the previous 14 months at baseline and an update at six months. GDPs could not be blinded to their practice allocation. Intervention practices were further randomised using a factorial design to receive feedback with or without: a health board comparator; a supplementary text-based intervention; additional feedback at nine months. The primary outcome is the total antibiotic prescribing rate per 100 courses of treatment over the year following delivery of the baseline

  5. The Influence of the Route of Antibiotic Administration, Methicillin Susceptibility, Vancomycin Duration and Serum Trough Concentration on Outcomes of Pediatric Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremic Osteoarticular Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J Chase; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Vallejo, Jesus G

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is often one factor used in deciding the need for prolonged intravenous antimicrobial therapy in osteoarticular infections (OAIs). We examined treatment practices and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremic osteoarticular infections (BOAIs) evaluated at Texas Children's Hospital. Cases of acute hematogenous OAI in children with positive blood cultures for S. aureus at Texas Children's Hospital between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed. Orthopedic complications included chronic osteomyelitis, growth arrest, pathologic fracture, avascular necrosis and chronic dislocation. Acute kidney injury was defined as a doubling of the baseline creatinine. One hundred and ninety-two cases of S. aureus OAI were identified with 102 cases of BOAI included [35 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)]. Twenty-five patients were discharged home on oral antibiotics. Patients discharged on oral antibiotics had a shorter duration of fever, had a more rapid decline in C-reactive protein and were less likely to have MRSA. The frequency of orthopedic complications did not increase in patients who received early transition to oral antibiotics. For patients with MRSA bacteremia, the rates of complications between those who received ≥7 days versus 15 µg/mL were not associated with a decreased duration of fever, bacteremia or hospitalization, need for repeat operation or orthopedic complications but were associated with acute kidney injury. S. aureus BOAIs are associated with substantial morbidity. Early transition to oral therapy may be a safe option for select patients with S. aureus BOAI, including those due to MRSA. Prolonged courses of vancomycin and vancomycin troughs >15 μg/mL were not associated with improved outcomes for MRSA OAI.

  6. [Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from keratitis and intraocular infections at Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL), Floridablanca, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Guerra, Alfredo; Acuña, María Fernanda; Villarreal, Donaldo

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial resistance is critical for the selection of antibiotics in the treatment of infections, so it is vital to know its current status in our geographical area. To determine in vitro antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates obtained from keratitis and intraocular infections. A retrospective study of microbiological tests in Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL) was carried out between June, 2011, and January, 2012. A total of 92 samples were examined and 110 bacteria, 27 fungi and 12 free-living amoebae were identified. Polymicrobial infections constituted 50% of the total; 1.1%, 0%, 1.1%, 16.9%, 29.3% and 85% of Gram-positive bacteria were resistant to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, respectively, while 0%, 8.3%, 0%, 0%, 18.2% and 27.3% of Gram-negative bacteria were resistant to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, respectively. For methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci, resistance percentages to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were 0%, 0%, 0%, 7%, 17% and 100%, respectively. For methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci, resistance percentages to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were 3%, 0%, 0%, 24%, 44% and 100%, respectively. Overall bacterial resistance to imipenem, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative, was 1%, 1%, 1%, 15.1%, 28% and 64.5%, respectively. The levels of bacterial resistance to imipenem, moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were lower than for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin. The levels of resistance to tobramycin were very high, which calls into question its usefulness in this region of our country.

  7. Prevalence of bovine subclinical mastitis and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of major mastitis pathogens isolated in Unguja island of Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, T S; Karimuribo, E D; Mdegela, R H

    2018-02-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted between January and July 2014 in Unguja island of Zanzibar to establish prevalence of subclinical mastitis (SCM) in smallholder dairy cows and patterns of antibacterial susceptibility of major mastitis pathogens isolated. A total of 416 dairy cows from 201 farmers were randomly selected from three districts of Unguja Island to participate in the study. Questionnaire interview, field observation, individual cow examination, California Mastitis Test (CMT) and bacteriological examination were carried out. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was used to test drug sensitivity for common bacteria isolated. Based on CMT results, the overall prevalence of SCM was 28.6, 48.8 and 64.7% at quarter, cow and farm level, respectively. Prevalence of bacterial infection was recorded at 42.9, 70.9 and 78.6% at quarter, cow and farm examined, respectively. The common bacteria isolated included Staphylococcus aureus (36.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17.8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (16.1%), Klebsiella spp. (9.5%), Micrococcus spp. (6.3%) and Escherichia coli (4.9%). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated high level of subclinical mastitis at farms, cows and quarters levels with both contagious and environmental bacterial pathogen involved. Therefore, efforts should be directed to the decreased subclinical mastitis by improving sanitary measures and proper milking practice.

  8. Susceptibility of frequent urinary pathogens to fosfomycin trometamol and eight other antibiotics: results of an Italian multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schito, G C; Chezzi, C; Nicoletti, G; Moreddu, M; Arcangeletti, M C; Stefani, S; Albini, E; Del Bono, G P

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the resistance profile for fosfomycin trometamol after several years of clinical use in Italy, this study has explored the susceptibility to fosfomycin and eight other antibacterial drugs of 6,021 strains isolated from 23,816 urines during 1990 in three teaching hospitals located in Genoa, Parma and Catania. Gram-negative strains, notably Escherichia coli (41.6%), were primarily involved. Amoxicillin was the least active compound with resistance in 41.4% of the isolates. Fosfomycin showed the lowest rate of resistance in both gram-negative (2.8%) and gram-positive (2.1%) pathogens. This was followed by norfloxacin with a resistance rate of 11.8% and netilmicin with 12.2%. These results indicate that fosfomycin-trometamol may continue to be used in single-dose treatment of urinary tract infections even in the absence of microbiological data since the prevalence of resistance to the drug is, at present, so low that therapeutic failure is highly improbable.

  9. Indoor air bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms and surgical wards at jimma university specialized hospital, southwest ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Tsegaye, Wondewosen

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infection is the second most common health care associated infection. One of the risk factors for such infection is bacterial contamination of operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. In view of that, the microbiological quality of air can be considered as a mirror of the hygienic condition of these rooms. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. A cross sectional study was conducted to measure indoor air microbial quality of operating rooms and surgical wards from October to January 2009/2010 on 108 indoor air samples collected in twelve rounds using purposive sampling technique by Settle Plate Method (Passive Air Sampling following 1/1/1 Schedule). Sample processing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done following standard bacteriological techniques. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and interpreted according to scientifically determined baseline values initially suggested by Fisher. The mean aerobic colony counts obtained in OR-1(46cfu/hr) and OR-2(28cfu/hr) was far beyond the set 5-8cfu/hr acceptable standards for passive room. Similarly the highest mean aerobic colony counts of 465cfu/hr and 461cfu/hr were observed in Female room-1 and room-2 respectively when compared to the acceptable range of 250-450cfu/hr. In this study only 3 isolates of S. pyogenes and 48 isolates of S. aureus were identified. Over 66% of S. aureus was identified in Critical Zone of Operating rooms. All isolates of S. aureus showed 100% and 82.8% resistance to methicillin and ampicillin respectively. Higher degree of aerobic bacterial load was measured from operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. Reducing foot trafficking, improving the ventilation system and routine cleaning has to be made to maintain the aerobic bacteria load with in optimal level.

  10. Systematic review and meta-analysis: susceptibility-guided versus empirical antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Góngora, Sheila; Puig, Ignasi; Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert; Baylina, Mireia; Muñoz, Neus; Sanchez-Delgado, Jordi; Suarez, David; García-Hernando, Victor; Gisbert, Javier P

    2015-09-01

    The cure rate of standard triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection is unacceptably low. Susceptibility-guided therapies (SGTs) have been proposed as an alternative to standard empirical treatments. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of SGTs. A systematic search was performed in multiple databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing cure rates of SGTs versus those of empirical therapy were selected and analysed separately for first- and second-line treatments. A meta-analysis was performed using risk ratio (RR) and number needed to treat (NNT) to measure the effect. Twelve studies were included in the meta-analysis. In first-line treatment, SGT was more efficacious than empirical 7-10 day triple therapy (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.10-1.23, I (2) = 33%; NNT = 8). Most studies used a 7-10 day triple therapy and randomized the patients after endoscopy and/or culture, thus precluding the comparison of SGT versus non-invasive testing and empirical treatment in clinical practice. For second-line therapy, only four studies were found. Results were highly heterogeneous and no significant differences were found (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.82-1.51, I (2) = 87%). Once endoscopy and culture have been performed, SGT is superior to empirical 7 or 10 day triple therapy for first-line treatment. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of SGT in clinical practice, especially when compared with currently recommended first-line quadruple therapies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive blood cultures using MALDI-TOF MS and a modification of the standardised disc diffusion test: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, C

    2016-04-27

    In an era when clinical microbiology laboratories are under increasing financial pressure, there is a need for inexpensive, yet effective, rapid microbiology tests. The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel modification of standard methodology for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of pathogens in positive blood cultures, reducing the turnaround time of laboratory results by 24 h.

  12. Genomic analysis of an emerging multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus strain rapidly spreading in cystic fibrosis patients revealed the presence of an antibiotic inducible bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Recent reports show that the prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients is increasing. In 2006 in Marseille, France, we have detected an atypical MRSA strain with a specific antibiotic susceptibility profile and a unique growth phenotype. Because of the clinical importance of the spread of such strain among CF patients we decided to sequence the genome of one representative isolate (strain CF-Marseille to compare this to the published genome sequences. We also conducted a retrospective epidemiological analysis on all S. aureus isolated from 2002 to 2007 in CF patients from our institution. Results CF-Marseille is multidrug resistant, has a hetero-Glycopeptide-Intermediate resistance S. aureus phenotype, grows on Cepacia agar with intense orange pigmentation and has a thickened cell wall. Phylogenetic analyses using Complete Genome Hybridization and Multi Locus VNTR Assay showed that CF-Marseille was closely related to strain Mu50, representing vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Analysis of CF-Marseille shows a similar core genome to that of previously sequenced MRSA strains but with a different genomic organization due to the presence of specific mobile genetic elements i.e. a new SCCmec type IV mosaic cassette that has integrated the pUB110 plasmid, and a new phage closely related to phiETA3. Moreover this phage could be seen by electron microscopy when mobilized with several antibiotics commonly used in CF patients including, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, or imipenem. Phylogenetic analysis of phenotypically similar h-GISA in our study also suggests that CF patients are colonized by polyclonal populations of MRSA that represents an incredible reservoir for lateral gene transfer. Conclusion In conclusion, we demonstrated the emergence and

  13. A rapid method for testing in vivo the susceptibility of different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi to active chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leny S. Filardi

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is described which permits to determine in vivo an in a short period of time (4-6 hours the sensitivity of T. cruzo strains to known active chemotherapeutic agents. By using resistant- and sensitive T. cruzi stains a fairly good correlation was observed between the results obtained with this rapid method (which detects activity against the circulating blood forms and those obtained with long-term schedules which involve drug adminstration for at least 20 consecutive days and a prolonged period of assessment. This method may be used to characterize susceptibility to active drugs used clinically, provide infomation on the specific action against circulating trypomastigotes and screen active compounds. Differences in the natural susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi strains to active drugs have been already reported using different criteria, mostly demanding long-term study of the animal (Hauschka, 1949; Bock, Gonnert & Haberkorn, 1969; Brener, Costa & Chiari, 1976; Andrade & Figueira, 1977; Schlemper, 1982. In this paper we report a method which detects in 4-6 hours the effect of drugs on bloodstream forms in mice with established T. cruzi infections. The results obtained with this method show a fairly good correlation with those obtained by prolonged treatment schedules used to assess the action of drugs in experimental Chagas' disease and may be used to study the sensitivity of T. cruzi strains to active drugs.No presente trabalho descreve-se um metodo que permite determinar in vivo e em curto espaço de tempo (4-6 horas a sensibilidade de cepas de T. cruzi a agentes terapeuticos ativos na doença de Chagas. Usando-se cepas sensíveis e resistentes aos medicamentos foi possível observar uma boa correlação entre os resultados obtidos com o método rápido (que detecta atividade contra as formas circulantes do parasita e aqueles obtidos com esquema de acao prolongada que envolve a administração da droga por 20 dias e posterior avalia

  14. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of vibrio cholerae 01 strains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... Literature on the antibiotic susceptibility of cholera organisms from most developing countries is patchy. Worldwide, V. cholerae 01 strains resistant to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and ampicillin are common(6-10). In many of these studies, the main reasons for the rapid rise in antimicrobial ...

  15. Infusion-Compatible Antibiotic Formulations for Rapid Administration to Improve Outcomes in Cancer Outpatients With Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: The Sepsis STAT Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jason D; Gallaher, Amelia; Jain, Rupali; Stednick, Zach; Menon, Manoj; Boeckh, Michael J; Pottinger, Paul S; Schwartz, Stephen M; Casper, Corey

    2017-04-01

    Background: Patients with cancer are at high risk for severe sepsis and septic shock (SS/SSh), and a delay in receiving effective antibiotics is strongly associated with mortality. Delays are due to logistics of clinic flow and drug delivery. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, combination therapy may be superior to monotherapy for patients with SS/SSh. Patients and Methods: At the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, we implemented the Sepsis STAT Pack (SSP) program to simplify timely and effective provision of empiric antibiotics and other resuscitative care to outpatients with cancer with suspected SS/SSh before hospitalization. Over a 49-month period from January 1, 2008, through January 31, 2012, a total of 162 outpatients with cancer received the intervention. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to determine outcomes, including mortality and adverse events associated with the use of a novel care bundle designed for compatibility of broad-spectrum antibiotics and other supportive care administered concurrently via rapid infusion at fixed doses. Results: Of 162 sequential patients with cancer and suspected SS/SSh who received the SSP, 71 (44%) were diagnosed with SS/SSh. Median age was 53 years and 65% were men; 141 (87%) had hematologic malignancies, 77 (48%) were transplant recipients, and 80 (49%) were neutropenic. Median time to completion of antibiotics was 111 minutes (interquartile range, 60-178 minutes). A total of 71 patients (44%) had bacteremia and 17% of 93 isolates were multidrug-resistant. Possibly related nephrotoxicity occurred in 7 patients, and 30-day mortality occured in 6 of 160 patients (4%), including 3 of 71 (4%) with SS/SSh. Risk of developing SSh or death within 30 days increased 18% (95% CI, 4%-34%) for each hour delay to completion of antibiotics ( P =.01). Conclusions: Rapidly administered combination antibiotics and supportive care delivered emergently to ambulatory patients with cancer with suspected SS/SSh was well

  16. Reproducible measurement of vancomycin MICs within the susceptible range in Staphylococcus aureus by a broth microdilution method with a "quasi-continuum" gradient of antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, R; Mateo, E M; Talaya, A; Giménez, E; Vinuesa, V; Clari, M Á; Navarro, D

    2017-12-01

    The availability of reproducible broth microdilution (BMD) methods including inter log 2 antibiotic dilutions for measuring Staphylococcus aureus (SA) vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) within the susceptible range is needed to elucidate the impact of vancomycin MICs on clinical outcomes of invasive SA infections. Here, we report on the development of a very precise BMD method that incorporates the following incremental antibiotic concentrations: 0.50, 0.62, 0.75, 0.87, 1.0, 1.25, 1.40, 1.50, 1.60, 1.75, and 2.0 μg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation of this method were around 20%. The mean of the differences in MIC values for all isolates obtained across two independent runs performed at one center was 0.04 μg/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.011-0.07 μg/mL] and that for ten isolates measured at two different centers was 0.04 μg/mL (95% CI, 0-13 μg/mL). Vancomycin MIC values differed by less than 0.1 μg/mL between runs for most isolates. Storage of isolates at -20 °C for up to 3 months had no impact on the vancomycin MIC values. The mean vancomycin MIC values obtained by the Etest using a standard inoculum (0.5 McFarland) were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.001) than those measured by BMD and the MIC values measured by the two methods correlated poorly (Rho, 0.319; p = 0.148). Nevertheless, the mean MIC values measured by the Etest using lower inocula (10 7 or 10 6  CFU/mL) and those measured by BMD were comparable and correlated significantly (p = 0.004 for 10 7  CFU/mL and p = 0.029 for 10 6  CFU/mL).

  17. Real-Time Optical Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus R.; Jørgensen, Erik; Droce, Aida; Olesen, Tom; Jensen, Bent B.; Rosenvinge, Flemming S.; Sondergaard, Teis E.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing is in high demand in health care fields as antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains emerge and spread. Here, we describe an optical screening system (oCelloScope) which, based on time-lapse imaging of 96 bacteria-antibiotic combinations at a time, introduces real-time detection of bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility with imaging material to support the automatically generated graphs. Automated antibiotic susceptibility tests of a monoculture showed statistically significant antibiotic effects within 6 min and within 30 min in complex samples from pigs suffering from catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The oCelloScope system provides a fast high-throughput screening method for detecting bacterial susceptibility that might entail an earlier diagnosis and introduction of appropriate targeted therapy and thus combat the threat from multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The oCelloScope system can be employed for a broad range of applications within bacteriology and might present new vistas as a point-of-care instrument in clinical and veterinary settings. PMID:23596243

  18. Antibiotic resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from gonorrhoeae patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bokaeian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility and penicillinase production by Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated from gonorrhoeae patients in Zahedan.Materials and methods: In a descriptive study during 2005-2008 years, 400 suspected patients were studied by history review, medical examination, gram staining and culture in Thayer-Martin medium. Antibiotic susceptibility and penicillinase tests of isolated strains were done by disk diffusion method and aciodometric method, respectively.Results: Cultures were positive in 77(19.2% patients. The resistanat rate against antibiotics were as follow: penicillin (79.2%, ciprofloxacin (53.2%, ceftriaxone(3.8%, spectinomycin(2.5%, cefixime(12.9%, co-trimoxazole(93.5%, tetracycline(88.3% and gentamicin(29.8%. In the meanwhile, 83.1 percent of penicillin re