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Sample records for rapid amplitude fluctuations

  1. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  2. Cosmophysical Factors in the Fluctuation Amplitude Spectrum of Brownian Motion

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    Kaminsky A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of the regular variability of the fine structure of the fluctuation in the am- plitude distributions (shapes of related histograms for the case of Brownian motion was investigated. We took an advantage of the dynamic light scattering method (DLS to get a stochastically fluctuated signal determined by Brownian motion. Shape of the histograms is most likely to vary, synchronous, in two proximally located independent cells containing Brownian particles. The synchronism persists in the cells distant at 2 m from each other, and positioned meridionally. With a parallel-wise positioning of the cells, high probability of the synchronous variation in the shape of the histograms by local time has been observed. This result meets the previous conclusion about the dependency of histogram shapes (“fluctuation amplitudes” of the spectra of stochastic processes upon rotation of the Earth.

  3. RAPID FLUCTUATIONS IN THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

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    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M., E-mail: john.lawrence@csun.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-10

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (I{sub G} ) and Ca II K-line intensity (I{sub K} ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 {+-} 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ('UHF') range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis {kappa}, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of I{sub G} , I{sub K} , UHF power, and {kappa} reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal I{sub G} maxima in either state. For State 1, I{sub K} shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after I{sub G} maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the I{sub K} and I{sub G} maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  4. Rapid Fluctuations in the Lower Solar Atmosphere

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    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (IG ) and Ca II K-line intensity (IK ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 ± 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ("UHF") range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis κ, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of IG , IK , UHF power, and κ reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal IG maxima in either state. For State 1, IK shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after IG maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the IK and IG maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  5. Correlation between night time VLF amplitude fluctuations and seismic events in Indian sub-continent

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    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    We present the results of an analysis of yearlong (2007) monitoring of night time data of the VLF signal amplitude. We use the VLF signals, transmitted from the Indian Navy station VTX (latitude 8.43(°) N, longitude 77.73(°) E) at 18.2 kHz and received at the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata (latitude 22.5(°) N, 87.5(°) E). We analyzed this data to find out the correlation between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual earthquakes (with magnitudes >5) as well as from statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5), that night time fluctuation of the signal amplitude has the highest probability to be beyond the 2σ levels about three days prior to the seismic events. Recently an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 occurred at South-western Pakistan (latitude 28.9(°) N, 64(°) E). We analyze the night time VLF signals for two weeks around this earthquake day to see if there were any precursory effects of this earthquake. We find that the amplitude of the night time VLF signals anomalously fluctuated four days before this earthquake. Thus, the night time fluctuation could be considered as a precursor to enhanced seismic activities.

  6. Unusual Fluctuations of the Nighttime VLF Signal Amplitude before Seismic Events

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    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Mondal, Sushanta Kumar

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of an analysis of yearlong (2007) monitoring of nighttime data of the VLF signal amplitude. We use the VLF signals, transmitted from the Indian Navy station VTX (latitude 8.43° N, longitude 77.73° E) at 18.2 kHz and received at the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata (latitude 22.5° N, 87.5° E). We analyzed this data to find out the correlation between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual earthquakes (with magnitudes greater than 5) as well as from statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5), that nighttime fluctuation of the signal amplitude has the highest probability to be beyond the 2σ levels about three days prior to the seismic events. Recently an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 occurred at Southwestern Pakistan (latitude 28.9° N, longitude 64° E). We analyze the nighttime VLF signals for two weeks around this earthquake day to see if there were any precursory effects of this earthquake. We find that the amplitude of the nighttime VLF signals anomalously fluctuated four days before this earthquake. Thus, the nighttime fluctuation could be considered as a precursor to enhanced seismic activities.

  7. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

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    Mueller, A.H. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Munier, S., E-mail: Stephane.Munier@polytechnique.edu [Centre de physique théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-10-07

    Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  8. Rapidly fluctuating anosmia: A clinical sign for unilateral smell impairment.

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    Negoias, Simona; Friedrich, Hergen; Caversaccio, Marco D; Landis, Basile N

    2016-02-01

    Reports about fluctuating olfactory deficits are rare, as are reports of unilateral olfactory loss. We present a case of unilateral anosmia with contralateral normosmia, presenting as rapidly fluctuating anosmia. The olfactory fluctuation occurred in sync with the average nasal cycle duration. Examination after nasal decongestion, formal smell testing, and imaging revealed unilateral, left-sided anosmia of sinonasal cause, with right-sided normosmia. We hypothesize that the nasal cycle induced transient anosmia when blocking the normosmic side. Fluctuating olfactory deficits might hide a unilateral olfactory loss and require additional unilateral testing and thorough workup. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Nonperturbative renormalization group treatment of amplitude fluctuations for |φ| 4 topological phase transitions

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    Defenu, Nicolò; Trombettoni, Andrea; Nándori, István; Enss, Tilman

    2017-11-01

    The study of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in two-dimensional |φ| 4 models can be performed in several representations, and the amplitude-phase (AP) Madelung parametrization is a natural way to study the contribution of density fluctuations to nonuniversal quantities. We introduce a functional renormalization group scheme in AP representation where amplitude fluctuations are integrated first to yield an effective sine-Gordon model with renormalized superfluid stiffness. By a mapping between the lattice X Y and continuum |φ| 4 models, our method applies to both on equal footing. Our approach correctly reproduces the existence of a line of fixed points and of universal thermodynamics and it allows to estimate universal and nonuniversal quantities of the two models, finding good agreement with available Monte Carlo results. The presented approach is flexible enough to treat parameter ranges of experimental relevance.

  10. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

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    A.H. Mueller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching–diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole–dipole scattering.

  11. Frustration, specific sequence dependence, and nonlinearity in large-amplitude fluctuations of allosteric proteins.

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    Li, Wenfei; Wolynes, Peter G; Takada, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have often evolved sequences so as to acquire the ability for regulation via allosteric conformational change. Here we investigate how allosteric dynamics is designed through sequences with nonlinear interaction features. First, for 71 allosteric proteins of which two, open and closed, structures are available, a statistical survey of interactions using an all-atom model with effective solvation shows that those residue contact interactions specific to one of the two states are significantly weaker than are the contact interactions shared by the two states. This interaction feature indicates there is underlying sequence design to facilitate conformational change. Second, based on the energy landscape theory, we implement these interaction features into a new atomic-interaction-based coarse-grained model via a multiscale simulation protocol (AICG). The AICG model outperforms standard coarse-grained models for predictions of the native-state mean fluctuations and of the conformational change direction. Third, using the new model for adenylate kinase, we show that intrinsic fluctuations in one state contain rare and large-amplitude motions nearly reaching the other state. Such large-amplitude motions are realized partly by sequence specificity and partly by the nonlinear nature of contact interactions, leading to cracking. Both features enhance conformational transition rates.

  12. Femtosecond measurements of electric fields: from classical amplitudes to quantum fluctuations

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    Riek, Claudius; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Ultrabroadband electro-optic sampling is presented as an extremely sensitive technique to detect electric field amplitudes in free space. The temporal resolution provided by few-femtosecond laser pulses results in a bandwidth exceeding 100 THz, potentially covering the entire infrared spectral range. A pedagogic introduction to the operational principle of the method is given along the lines of a classical coherent input field and a zincblende-type electro-optic sensor. We then show that even the bare vacuum fluctuations of the electric field in the quantum ground state may be detected. This time-domain approach to quantum physics operates directly on sub-cycle scales where no local energy conservation holds. Therefore, signals may be obtained from purely virtual photons without amplification to finite intensity.

  13. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuation abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction.

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    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available The majority of previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and task-related functional abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction (OGA. However, few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies focused on the regional intensity of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD during the resting state and fewer studies investigated the relationship between the abnormal resting-state properties and the impaired cognitive control ability. In the present study, we employed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in adolescents with OGA and healthy controls during resting-state. Eighteen adolescents with OGA and 18 age-, education- and gender-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with OGA showed a significant increase in ALFF values in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left precuneus, the left supplementary motor area (SMA, the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG and the bilateral middle cingulate cortex (MCC. The abnormalities of these regions were also detected in previous addiction studies. More importantly, we found that ALFF values of the left medial OFC and left precuneus were positively correlated with the duration of OGA in adolescents with OGA. The ALFF values of the left medial OFC were also correlated with the color-word Stroop test performance. Our results suggested that the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of OGA.

  14. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuation abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction.

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    Yuan, Kai; Jin, Chenwang; Cheng, Ping; Yang, Xuejuan; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; von Deneen, Karen M; Yu, Dahua; Liu, Junyu; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Tingting; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The majority of previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and task-related functional abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction (OGA). However, few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focused on the regional intensity of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) during the resting state and fewer studies investigated the relationship between the abnormal resting-state properties and the impaired cognitive control ability. In the present study, we employed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in adolescents with OGA and healthy controls during resting-state. Eighteen adolescents with OGA and 18 age-, education- and gender-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with OGA showed a significant increase in ALFF values in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the left precuneus, the left supplementary motor area (SMA), the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and the bilateral middle cingulate cortex (MCC). The abnormalities of these regions were also detected in previous addiction studies. More importantly, we found that ALFF values of the left medial OFC and left precuneus were positively correlated with the duration of OGA in adolescents with OGA. The ALFF values of the left medial OFC were also correlated with the color-word Stroop test performance. Our results suggested that the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of OGA.

  15. Mind-Body Practice Changes Fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations in Intrinsic Control Networks.

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    Wei, Gao-Xia; Gong, Zhu-Qing; Yang, Zhi; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive control impairment is a typical symptom largely reported in populations with neurological disorders. Previous studies have provided evidence about the changes in cognitive control induced by mind-body training. However, the neural correlates underlying the effect of extensive mind-body practice on cognitive control remain largely unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we characterized dynamic fluctuations in large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks associated with mind-body practice, and examined their differences between healthy controls and Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practitioners. Compared with a control group, the TCC group revealed significantly decreased fractional Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (fALFF) in the bilateral frontoparietal network, default mode network and dorsal prefrontal-angular gyri network. Furthermore, we detected a significant association between mind-body practice experience and fALFF in the default mode network, as well as an association between cognitive control performance and fALFF of the frontoparietal network. This provides the first evidence of large-scale functional connectivity in brain networks associated with mind-body practice, shedding light on the neural network changes that accompany intensive mind-body training. It also highlights the functionally plastic role of the frontoparietal network in the context of the "immune system" of mental health recently developed in relation to flexible hub theory.

  16. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in bipolar disorder: a resting state fMRI study.

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    Xu, Ke; Liu, Hu; Li, Huanhuan; Tang, Yanqing; Womer, Fay; Jiang, Xiaowei; Chen, Kaiyuan; Zhou, Yifang; Jiang, Wenyan; Luo, Xingguang; Fan, Guoguang; Wang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The spontaneous low frequency fluctuations (LFF) of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in resting state have been identified as a biological measure of baseline spontaneous activity in the brain. Increasingly, studies of spontaneous resting state functional connectivity have demonstrated neural network abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). This study used the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to explore the regional functional changes in BD during resting state. Twenty-nine BD participants and 29 matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited to undergo resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan on a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging system. The ALFF of BOLD signal in gray matter for each participant was calculated, and then was compared between BD and HC using ALFF maps. Compared to the HC group, the BD group showed increased ALFF in ventral prefrontal cortex, dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye field, insula, and putamen with extension into the ventral striatum, as well as decreased ALFF in the lingual gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Although we observed differences in ALFF between BD and HC, we cannot conclusively state that these differences are caused by the pathophysiology of BD since most of BD participants were being treated with medications at the time of scanning. Our results revealed altered regional brain activity in BD during resting state. The affected regions have been associated with BD pathophysiology. This suggests that methods using ALFF method may potentially be useful in further studies of this disorder. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency-Specific Alternations in the Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Chronic Tinnitus

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    Yu-Chen eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, a phantom ringing, buzzing or hissing sensation with potentially debilitating consequences, is thought to arise from aberrant spontaneous neural activity at one or more sites within the central nervous system; however, the location and specific features of these oscillations are poorly understood with respect to specific tinnitus features. Recent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies suggest that aberrant fluctuations in spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFO of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal may be an important factor in chronic tinnitus; however, the role that frequency-specific components of LFO play in subjective tinnitus remains unclear. A total of 39 chronic tinnitus patients and 41 well-matched healthy controls participated in the resting-state fMRI scans. The LFO amplitudes were investigated using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF and fractional ALFF (fALFF in two different frequency bands (slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz and slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz. We observed significant differences between tinnitus patients and normal controls in ALFF/fALFF in the two bands (slow-4 and slow-5 in several brain regions including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG, inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and middle occipital gyrus. Across the entire subject pool, significant differences in ALFF/fALFF between the two bands were found in the midbrain, basal ganglia, hippocampus and cerebellum (Slow 4>Slow 5, and in the middle frontal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus (Slow 5>Slow 4. We also observed significant interaction between frequency bands and patient groups in the orbitofrontal gyrus. Furthermore, tinnitus distress was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in right SFG and the magnitude of fALFF slow-4 band in left SFG, whereas tinnitus duration was positively correlated with the magnitude of ALFF in

  18. RESCALE: Voxel-specific task-fMRI scaling using resting state fluctuation amplitude

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    Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland N.; Huf, Wolfgang; Biswal, Bharat B.; Baldinger, Pia; Sailer, Uta; Filzmoser, Peter; Kasper, Siegfried; Lamm, Claus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Moser, Ewald; Windischberger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The BOLD signal measured in fMRI studies depends not only on neuronal activity, but also on other parameters like tissue vascularization, which may vary between subjects and between brain regions. A correction for variance from vascularization effects can thus lead to improved group statistics by reducing inter-subject variability. The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) as determined in a resting-state scan has been shown to be dependent on vascularization. Here we present a correction method termed RESCALE (REsting-state based SCALing of parameter Estimates) that uses local information to compute a voxel-wise scaling factor based on the correlation structure of fALFF and task activation parameter estimates from within a cube of 3 × 3 × 3 surrounding that voxel. The scaling method was used on a visuo-motor paradigm and resulted in a consistent increase in t-values in all task-activated cortical regions, with increases in peak t-values of 37.0% in the visual cortex and 12.7% in the left motor cortex. The RESCALE method as proposed herein can be easily applied to all task-based fMRI group studies provided that resting-state data for the same subject group is also acquired. PMID:23266702

  19. Effects of the amplitude and frequency of salinity fluctuations on antioxidant responses in juvenile tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis

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    Khairnar, S.A.; Tian, X.; Dong, S.; Fang, Z.; Solanki, B.V.; Shanthanagouda, H.A.

    2016-11-01

    To understand the tolerance of tongue sole, Cynoglossus semilaevis, to varying salinities, the effects of the amplitude (2, 4, 6 and 8 g/L) and frequency (2, 4 and 8 days) of salinity fluctuations on the activities of antioxidant responses, including acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from antioxidant system in liver, muscle, gills and kidney were investigated in this study. The results showed that the antioxidant responses of tongue sole were highly tissue-specific during the varying salinity fluctuations. In all tissues, ACP and AKP activity was found to be highest at moderate salinity fluctuations compared to the control, low and high salinity treatments (p<0.05). SOD and CAT activities had significant effect due to salinity fluctuations in all tissues (p<0.05), except in hepatic and renal tissues. Variations in branchial SOD activity proved that salinity fluctuations had greater impact on tongue sole at moderate and high fluctuating salinities compared to the control and low fluctuating salinities, whereas the branchial CAT activities showed contrasting trend. Further, cortisol levels were significantly affected in lower and higher salinity fluctuations. However, plasma cortisol levels remained low in moderate salinity fluctuations and control (p<0.05). Taken together, the results indicated that salinity fluctuations could effectively stimulate and enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, kidney, gills and muscle of the juvenile tongue sole, thus effectively eliminating the excessive reactive oxygen species and minimizing the body damage in tongue sole or could be for any other euryhaline teleosts. (Author)

  20. Finite-temperature magnetism of Ni monolayers: Interplay between flips and amplitude fluctuations of the local moments

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    Garibay-Alonso, R.; Dorantes-Dávila, J.; Pastor, G. M.

    2012-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetization and spin fluctuation energies in Ni bulk and monolayers are determined in the framework of a functional-integral itinerant-electron theory. The electronic structure is obtained in the static approximation from a realistic spd-band model by using a real-space recursive expansion of the local Green's functions. The statistical averages of the spin fluctuations are performed by treating disorder within the coherent potential approximation. Results for the magnetization M(T) and spin fluctuation energies of (001) fcc monolayers are presented for several values of the nearest-neighbor distance. Local environmental effects are discussed by comparison with bulk results. An interesting transition from simple spin flips to amplitude fluctuations of the local exchange fields is revealed as a function of dimensionality and bond length. Important qualitative differences in the spin fluctuation energies of Ni are observed as compared to Fe, which reflect different mechanisms of the dominant spin excitations in these itinerant-electron ferromagnets. The effects of sp electrons and sp-d hybridizations are discussed.

  1. Stomatal control and leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances under rapid environmental fluctuations.

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    Stanislaus J Schymanski

    Full Text Available Leaves within a canopy may experience rapid and extreme fluctuations in ambient conditions. A shaded leaf, for example, may become exposed to an order of magnitude increase in solar radiation within a few seconds, due to sunflecks or canopy motions. Considering typical time scales for stomatal adjustments, (2 to 60 minutes, the gap between these two time scales raised the question whether leaves rely on their hydraulic and thermal capacitances for passive protection from hydraulic failure or over-heating until stomata have adjusted. We employed a physically based model to systematically study effects of short-term fluctuations in irradiance on leaf temperatures and transpiration rates. Considering typical amplitudes and time scales of such fluctuations, the importance of leaf heat and water capacities for avoiding damaging leaf temperatures and hydraulic failure were investigated. The results suggest that common leaf heat capacities are not sufficient to protect a non-transpiring leaf from over-heating during sunflecks of several minutes duration whereas transpirative cooling provides effective protection. A comparison of the simulated time scales for heat damage in the absence of evaporative cooling with observed stomatal response times suggested that stomata must be already open before arrival of a sunfleck to avoid over-heating to critical leaf temperatures. This is consistent with measured stomatal conductances in shaded leaves and has implications for water use efficiency of deep canopy leaves and vulnerability to heat damage during drought. Our results also suggest that typical leaf water contents could sustain several minutes of evaporative cooling during a sunfleck without increasing the xylem water supply and thus risking embolism. We thus submit that shaded leaves rely on hydraulic capacitance and evaporative cooling to avoid over-heating and hydraulic failure during exposure to typical sunflecks, whereas thermal capacitance provides

  2. Individual differences in the attentional blink: Evidence from the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in non-blinkers and blinkers.

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    Wang, Lijun; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Zhengyu; Liu, Congcong; Deng, Zhou; Chen, Antao

    2016-02-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a deficit in reporting the second target (T2) when it is presented within 500ms of the first target (T1) as part of a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). Despite the considerable number of imaging studies having investigated the neural correlates of the AB, differences in the spontaneous neural activity of non-blinkers and blinkers remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated this issue using the RSVP task in 43 participants. The results revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in occipitotemporal regions and the cerebellum region was higher in blinkers than in non-blinkers. In contrast, the ALFF in frontoparietal regions was higher in non-blinkers than in blinkers. These findings suggest that the AB is due to an overinvestment of attentional resources in distractors as well as a weakness of attentional control in targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying the core components of emotional intelligence: evidence from amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations during resting state.

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    Weigang Pan

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence (EI is a multi-faceted construct consisting of our ability to perceive, monitor, regulate and use emotions. Despite much attention being paid to the neural substrates of EI, little is known of the spontaneous brain activity associated with EI during resting state. We used resting-state fMRI to investigate the association between the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs and EI in a large sample of young, healthy adults. We found that EI was significantly associated with ALFFs in key nodes of two networks: the social emotional processing network (the fusiform gyrus, right superior orbital frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule and the cognitive control network (the bilateral pre-SMA, cerebellum and right precuneus. These findings suggest that the neural correlates of EI involve several brain regions in two crucial networks, which reflect the core components of EI: emotion perception and emotional control.

  4. Filtering effect of temporal niche fluctuation and amplitude of environmental variations on the trait-related flowering patterns: lesson from sub-Mediterranean grasslands.

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    Catorci, Andrea; Piermarteri, Karina; Penksza, Károly; Házi, Judit; Tardella, Federico Maria

    2017-09-20

    Timing of flowering is a critical component of community assembly, but how plant traits respond to heterogeneity of resources has been identified mostly through observations of spatial variations. Thus, we performed a trait-based phenological study in sub-Mediterranean grasslands to assess the importance of temporal variation of resources in the species assemblage processes. We found that early flowering species have traits allowing for slow resource acquisition and storage but rapid growth rate. Instead, mid- and late-flowering species exhibited sets of strategies devoted to minimizing water loss by evapotranspiration or aimed at maximizing the species' competitive ability, thanks to slow growth rate and more efficient resource acquisition, conservation and use. Our findings were consistent with the fluctuation niche theory. We observed that the amplitude of the environmental fluctuations influences the type and number of strategies positively filtered by the system. In fact, in the most productive grasslands, we observed the highest number of indicator trait states reflecting strategies devoted to the storage of resources and competition for light. Results seem also indicate that temporal variation of resources plays a role in trait differentiation and richness within a plant community, filtering traits composition of grasslands in the same direction, as formerly proved for spatial heterogeneity of resources.

  5. Altered amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in early and late mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

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    Liang, Peipeng; Xiang, Jie; Liang, Hong; Qi, Zhigang; Li, Kuncheng; Alzheimer's Disease NeuroImaging Initiative

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that the strength of the low frequency fluctuation in the medial-line brain areas are abnormally reduced in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the functional brain changes in early MCI (EMCI) and late MCI (LMCI) patients by measuring the amplitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signals at rest. 35 elderly normal controls (NC), 24 EMCI, 29 LMCI, and 14 AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI2) were included in this study. Resting state fMRI and 3D structural MRI data were acquired. The spatial patterns of spontaneous brain activity were measured by examining the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of BOLD signal during rest. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was then performed on ALFF maps, with age, sex and regional atrophy as covariates. There were widespread ALFF differences among the four groups. As compared with controls, AD, LMCI and EMCI patients showed decreased ALFF mainly in the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, right lingual gyrus and thalamus (with a linear trend: NC>EMCI>LMCI>AD), while there was increased activity in the right parahippocampal gyrus (with a linear trend: NCmental state examination scores (MMSE) and the emotion states as measured by Geriatric Depression Scale (GD scale) for EMCI, LMCI and AD patients, but not for controls. Our results indicated that the significantly altered ALFF activities can be detected at EMCI stage, independent of age, sex and regional atrophy. The present study thus suggests ALFF abnormalities as a potential biomarker for the early diagnosis of AD and further provides insights into biological mechanisms of the diseases.

  6. Amplitude Sensing below the Zero-Point Fluctuations with a Two-Dimensional Trapped-Ion Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, K. A.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Britton, J. W.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a technique to measure the amplitude of a center-of-mass (c.m.) motion of a two-dimensional ion crystal of ˜100 ions. By sensing motion at frequencies far from the c.m. resonance frequency, we experimentally determine the technique's measurement imprecision. We resolve amplitudes as small as 50 pm, 40 times smaller than the c.m. mode zero-point fluctuations. The technique employs a spin-dependent, optical-dipole force to couple the mechanical oscillation to the electron spins of the trapped ions, enabling a measurement of one quadrature of the c.m. motion through a readout of the spin state. We demonstrate sensitivity limits set by spin projection noise and spin decoherence due to off-resonant light scattering. When performed on resonance with the c.m. mode frequency, the technique demonstrated here can enable the detection of extremely weak forces (electric fields (<1 nV /m ), providing an opportunity to probe quantum sensing limits and search for physics beyond the standard model.

  7. Ionospheric anomaly due to seismic activities-III: correlation between night time VLF amplitude fluctuations and effective magnitudes of earthquakes in Indian sub-continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ray

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an analysis of year-long (2007 monitoring of night time data of the VLF signal amplitude from the Indian Navy station VTX at 18.2 kHz, received by the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata. We analyzed this data to find out the correlation, if any, between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual cases (with magnitudes >5 as well as statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5, that night time fluctuation of the signal amplitude has the highest probability to be beyond the 2σ level about three days prior to seismic events. Thus, the night time fluctuation could be considered as a precursor to enhanced seismic activities.

  8. Effects of rapid temperature fluctuations prior to breeding on reproductive efficiency in replacement gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we determined that rapidly cooling pigs after acute heat stress (HS) resulted in a pathological condition, and because rapid temperature fluctuations are often associated with reduced reproductive success in sows it lends itself to the hypothesis that these conditions may be linked. Study ...

  9. Multi-particle long-range rapidity correlations from fluctuation of the fireball longitudinal shape

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdak, Adam; Bozek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the genuine long-range multi-particle rapidity correlation functions, $C_{n}(y_1,...,y_n)$ for $n=3,4,5,6$, originating from fluctuations of the fireball longitudinal shape. In these correlation functions any contribution from the short-range two-particle correlations, and in general up to $(n-1)$-particle in $C_n$, is suppressed. The information about the fluctuating fireball shape in rapidity is encoded in the cumulants of coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial expansion of ...

  10. [Study of fraction amplitude of low frequency fluctuation on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in adultperipheral facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y J; Ma, G L; Song, T B; Du, L; Guo, R C; Sun, S L; Li, H; Sun, L G

    2017-07-18

    Objective: To analysis the change of brain functional activity in the left and right peripheral facial paralysis by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) of fraction amplitude of low frequency fluctuation(fALFF) measurement technique, and research the abnormal brain region with different side patients whether there are differences. Methods: A total of 43 patients with peripheral facial paralysis patients (patient groups, divided into left / right two subgroups) and 21 healthy volunteers (control group) in this study.Resting-state fMRI were acquired for each volunteer and patient. The fALFF approach was used to compare the peripheral facial paralysis groups to healthy group.Functional analysis was performed with brain function analysis software REST and DPARSFA , and then analysis the difference of two groups of patients and control group in two sample t test.At the same time, the correlation analysis between fALFF parameters map of the left and right side of two groups of patients and corresponding facial nerve grading TFGS score.Ultimately obtain a statistically significant brain regions. Results: Compared to healthy group, the decreased fALFF areas in the left side facial paralysis were showed in the right superior temporal gyrus , the pole of the right temporal, right middle temporal gyrus, the left occipital gyrus, and left medial cingulate gyrus, left paracentral lobule, and the left supplementary motor area; while the increased brain regions have the right superior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, the right precentral gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus.Compared to healthy group, the decreased fALFF areas in the right side facial paralysis were showed in the right inferior temporal gyrus and fusiform gyrus, the left inferior occipital gyrus, the left superior parietalgyrus, the left inferior parietalgyrus, left precuneus, left paracentral lobule, the left supplementary motor area; while the

  11. Denitrification in the banks of fluctuating rivers: The effects of river stage amplitude, sediment hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity, and ambient groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Pin; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Bennett, Philip C.; Neilson, Bethany T.

    2017-09-01

    Hyporheic exchange induced by periodic river fluctuations leads to important biogeochemical processes, particularly nitrogen cycling, in riparian zones (RZs) where chemically distinct surface water and groundwater mix. We developed a two-dimensional coupled flow, reactive transport model to study the role of bank storage induced by river fluctuations on removing river-borne nitrate. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to quantify the effects of river amplitude, sediment hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity, and ambient groundwater flow on nitrate removal rate. The simulations showed that nitrification occurred in the shallower zone adjacent to the bank where oxic river water and groundwater interacted while denitrification occurred deeper into the aquifer and in the riverbed sediments where oxygen was depleted. River fluctuations greatly increased the amount of nitrate being removed; the nitrate removal rate increased as river amplitude increased. Similarly, increasing hydraulic conductivity increased overall nitrate removal since it expanded the denitrifying zone but decreased efficiency. In contrast, increasing sediment dispersivity increased the removal efficiency of nitrate because it promoted mixing between electron acceptors and donors. The presence and direction of ambient groundwater flow had a significant impact on nitrate removal rate when compared to neutral conditions. A losing river showed a larger nitrate removal rate, whereas a gaining river showed a smaller nitrate removal rate. Our results demonstrated that daily river fluctuations created denitrification hot spots within the RZ that would not otherwise exist under naturally neutral or gaining conditions.

  12. The Complexity of H-wave Amplitude Fluctuations and Their Bilateral Cross-Covariance Are Modified According to the Previous Fitness History of Young Subjects under Track Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Ceballos-Villegas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hoffmann reflex (H-wave is produced by alpha-motoneuron activation in the spinal cord. A feature of this electromyography response is that it exhibits fluctuations in amplitude even during repetitive stimulation with the same intensity of current. We herein explore the hypothesis that physical training induces plastic changes in the motor system. Such changes are evaluated with the fractal dimension (FD analysis of the H-wave amplitude-fluctuations (H-wave FD and the cross-covariance (CCV between the bilateral H-wave amplitudes. The aim of this study was to compare the H-wave FD as well as the CCV before and after track training in sedentary individuals and athletes. The training modality in all subjects consisted of running three times per week (for 13 weeks in a concrete road of 5 km. Given the different physical condition of sedentary vs. athletes, the running time between sedentary and athletes was different. After training, the FD was significantly increased in sedentary individuals but significantly reduced in athletes, although there were no changes in spinal excitability in either group of subjects. Moreover, the CCV between bilateral H-waves exhibited a significant increase in athletes but not in sedentary individuals. These differential changes in the FD and CCV indicate that the plastic changes in the complexity of the H-wave amplitude fluctuations as well as the synaptic inputs to the Ia-motoneuron systems of both legs were correlated to the previous fitness history of the subjects. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that the FD and CCV can be employed as indexes to study plastic changes in the human motor system.

  13. Atypical Miller Fisher Syndrome with Anisocoria and Rapidly Fluctuating Pupillary Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller Fisher syndrome is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome characterized by the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Pupillary involvement is common in MFS and has been reported in 35–42% of MFS patients. Although case reports have discussed isolated ophthalmoplegia as a presentation of MFS, anisocoria and rapid fluctuation of pupillary diameter have not been reported in anti-GQ1b antibody positive individuals. Here we describe an individual who presented with diplopia and was found to have progressive internal and external ophthalmoplegia with frequent fluctuations in pupillary diameter and anisocoria. These exam findings are not commonly described even in atypical presentations of MFS. The onset of symptoms was preceded by an upper respiratory infection but no gastrointestinal symptoms. Imaging and CSF studies were unremarkable; however serum levels of immunoglobulin G anti-GQ1b antibody and anti-GAD antibody were elevated confirming the diagnosis of MFS. The patient was treated with IVIG and intravenous steroids with mild resolution of external ophthalmoplegia. He did not go on to develop more typical features of MFS such as ataxia or areflexia. This demonstrates that isolated external and internal ophthalmoparesis with rapidly fluctuating pupillary diameter and associated anisocoria can be the sole manifestation of atypical MFS.

  14. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  15. Large amplitude spatial fluctuations in the boundary region of the Bose-Einstein condensate in the Gross-Pitaevskii regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuszynski, J. A.; Middleton, J.; Portet, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii regime of a Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated using a fully non-linear approach. The confining potential first adopted is that of a linear ramp. An infinite class of new analytical solutions of this linear ramp potential approximation to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation...... is found which are characterised by pronounced large-amplitude oscillations close to the boundary of the condensate. The limiting case within this class is a nodeless ground state which is known from recent investigations as an extension of the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We have found the energies...... as well as a linear perturbation approach. Both these techniques demonstrate stability against small perturbations. Finally, we have discussed the relevance of these quasi-one-dimensional solutions in the context of the fully three-dimensional condensates. This has been argued on the basis of numerical...

  16. Wavelet analysis on transient behaviour of tidal amplitude fluctuations observed by meteor radar in the lower thermosphere above Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pancheva

    Full Text Available On the basis of bispectral analysis applied to the hourly data set of neutral wind measured by meteor radar in the MLT region above Bulgaria it was demonstrated that nonlinear processes are frequently and regularly acting in the mesopause region. They contribute significantly to the short-term tidal variability and are apparently responsible for the observed complicated behavior of the tidal characteristics. A Morlet wavelet transform is proposed as a technique for studying nonstationary signals. By simulated data it was revealed that the Morlet wavelet transform is especially convenient for analyzing signals with: (1 a wide range of dominant frequencies which are localized in different time intervals; (2 amplitude and frequency modulated spectral components, and (3 singular, wave-like events, observed in the neutral wind of the MLT region and connected mainly with large-scale disturbances propagated from below. By applying a Morlet wavelet transform to the hourly values of the amplitudes of diurnal and semidiurnal tides the basic oscillations with periods of planetary waves (1.5-20 days, as well as their development in time, are obtained. A cross-wavelet analysis is used to clarify the relation between the tidal and mean neutral wind variability. The results of bispectral analysis indicate which planetary waves participated in the nonlinear coupling with the atmospheric tides, while the results of cross-wavelet analysis outline their time intervals if these interactions are local.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides - Radio science (nonlinear phenomena

  17. Apomorphine: a rapid rescue agent for the management of motor fluctuations in advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolls, Brad J; Stacy, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases in the United States, and the number of late stage patients is rising. In advance-stage disease, fluctuations in motor function, variability in response to dopaminergic therapy, and dyskinesias related to increasing doses of dopamine agonists and levodopa, present a variety of challenges to a managing physician. Traditional methods of treatment have concentrated on therapies to anticipate or prevent states of poor motor function. With the approval of apomorphine as a rapid-acting, subcutaneous injectable anti-Parkinson disease therapy, these off periods may now be treated with apomorphine as a "rescue" medication when they occur. This article reviews the pharmacology of apomorphine, the clinical data that support its use and suggest dosing and methods for initiating therapy in this challenging population of patients with Parkinson disease.

  18. Rapid fluctuation of the vaginal microbiota measured by Gram stain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M; Ravel, Jacques; Cone, Richard A; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2010-08-01

    The aetiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains unknown. To describe longitudinal changes in vaginal microbiota. Thirty-nine women (mean age 36.8 years; 22 (56.4%) African-American) self-collected vaginal specimens twice weekly for 16 weeks as part of a vaginal douching cessation study. In an analysis where each woman serves as her own control, conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate daily, time-varying factors associated with a woman's incident BV episode(s) as compared with her persistently BV-negative sample(s). BV was defined by a Nugent's Gram stain score >or=7. 46.2% of participants had BV in the first 4 weeks of observation. Rapid fluctuation of vaginal microbiota was observed in 226 transitions to BV or spontaneous remission. Duration of BV was often short: 51% of the episodes lasted for only one sample interval (3 days). Among women who had at least one BV episode, the median number of episodes per woman was 8.7 (SD 7.4, range 1-22). Lubricant use 1 day before specimen collection (adjusted OR (aOR)=11.75, 95% CI 1.96 to 70.27) and rectal sex 2 days before (aOR=4.48, 95% CI 2.79 to 7.17) were associated with BV onset. Rapid fluctuation of the vaginal microbiota was seen. Longitudinal studies with long intervals between sampling are likely to miss episodes of BV. Recent report of lubricant use and rectal sex were associated with incident BV.

  19. Dual lattice functional renormalization group for the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition: Irrelevance of amplitude and out-of-plane fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Jan; Kopietz, Peter

    2017-10-01

    We develop a functional renormalization group (FRG) approach for the two-dimensional X Y model by combining the lattice FRG proposed by Machado and Dupuis [Phys. Rev. E 82, 041128 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.041128] with a duality transformation that explicitly introduces vortices via an integer-valued field. We show that the hierarchy of FRG flow equations for the infinite set of relevant and marginal couplings of the model can be reduced to the well-known Kosterlitz-Thouless renormalization group equations for the renormalized temperature and the vortex fugacity. Within our approach it is straightforward to include weak amplitude as well as out-of-plane fluctuations of the spins, which lead to additional interactions between the vortices that do not spoil the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. This demonstrates that previous failures to obtain a line of true fixed points within the FRG are a mathematical artifact of insufficient truncation schemes.

  20. Novel configuration of finite-impulse-response filters tolerant to carrier-phase fluctuations in digital coherent optical receivers for higher-order quadrature amplitude modulation signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yojiro; Zhang, Chao; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2012-11-19

    We propose a novel configuration of the finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter adapted by the phase-dependent decision-directed least-mean-square (DD-LMS) algorithm in digital coherent optical receivers. Since fast carrier-phase fluctuations are removed from the error signal which updates tap coefficients of the FIR filter, we can achieve stable adaptation of filter-tap coefficients for higher-order quadrature-amplitude modulation (QAM) signals. Computer simulations show that our proposed scheme is much more tolerant to the phase noise and the frequency offset than the conventional DD-LMS scheme. Such theoretical predictions are also validated experimentally by using a 10-Gsymbol/s dual-polarization 16-QAM signal.

  1. Intrinsic patterns of coupling between correlation and amplitude of low-frequency fMRI fluctuations are disrupted in degenerative dementia mainly due to functional disconnection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Mascali

    Full Text Available Low frequency fluctuations (LFFs of the BOLD signal are a major discovery in the study of the resting brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Two fMRI-based measures, functional connectivity (FC, a measure of signal synchronicity, and the amplitude of LFFs (ALFF, a measure of signal periodicity, have been proved to be sensitive to changes induced by several neurological diseases, including degenerative dementia. In spite of the increasing use of these measures, whether and how they are related to each other remains to be elucidated. In this work we used voxel-wise FC and ALFF computed in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and full-band: 0.01-0.073 Hz, in order to assess their relationship in healthy elderly as well as the relevant changes induced by Alzheimer's Disease (AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI. We found that in healthy elderly subjects FC and ALFF are positively correlated in anterior and posterior cingulate cortex (full-band, slow-4 and slow-5, temporal cortex (full-band and slow-5, and in a set of subcortical regions (full-band and slow-4. These correlation patterns between FC and ALFF were absent in either AD or MCI patients. Notably, the loss of correlation between FC and ALFF in the AD group was primarily due to changes in FC rather than in ALFF. Our results indicate that degenerative dementia is characterized by a loss of global connection rather than by a decrease of fluctuation amplitude.

  2. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the amplitudes of fluctuations in the 2dFGRS and the CMB, and implications for galaxy biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Ofer; Bridle, Sarah L.; Percival, Will J.; Peacock, John A.; Efstathiou, George; Baugh, Carlton M.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; de Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren S.; Moody, Stephen; Norberg, Peder; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2002-07-01

    We compare the amplitudes of fluctuations probed by the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and by the latest measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. By combining the 2dFGRS and CMB data, we find the linear-theory rms mass fluctuations in 8 h-1Mpc spheres to be σ8m=0.73+/-0.05 (after marginalization over the matter density parameter Ωm and three other free parameters). This normalization is lower than the COBE normalization and previous estimates from cluster abundance, but it is in agreement with some revised cluster abundance determinations. We also estimate the scale-independent bias parameter of present-epoch Ls=1.9L* APM-selected galaxies to be b(Ls,z=0)=1.10+/-0.08 on comoving scales of 0.02marginalizing over other free parameters and fixing the spectral index n=1 and the optical depth due to reionization τ=0. We also study the best-fitting pair (Ωm, b), and the robustness of the results to varying n and τ. Various modelling corrections can each change the resulting b by 5-15 per cent. The results are compared with other independent measurements from the 2dFGRS itself, and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), cluster abundance and cosmic shear.

  3. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    both direct exposure to at least -24 °C and the rapid and large temperature fluctuations. These results suggest that the studied polar soil invertebrate community may be robust to at least one important predicted consequence of projected climate change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluctuations of multiplicities in rapidity windows in sulphur-sulphur collisions at 200 A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bächler, J; Runge, K; Schmoetten, E; Bartke, Jerzy; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kowalski, M; Stefanski, P; Bialkowska, H; Böck, R K; Brockmann, R; Sandoval, A; Buncic, P; Ferenc, D; Kadija, K; Ljubicic, A; Vranic, D; Chase, S I; Harris, J W; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Pugh, Howel G; Rai, G; Teitelbaum, L; Tonse, S R; Derado, I; Eckardt, V; Gebauer, H J; Rauch, W; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Seyerlein, J; Vesztergombi, G; Eschke, J; Heck, W; Kabana, S; Kühmichel, A; Lahanas, L; Lee, Y; Le Vine, M J; Margetis, S; Renfordt, R E; Röhrich, D; Rothard, H; Schmidt, E; Schneider, I; Stock, Reinhard; Ströbele, H; Wenig, S; Fleischmann, B; Fuchs, M; Gazdzicki, M; Kosiec, J; Skrzypczak, E; Keidel, R; Piper, A; Pühlhofer, F; Nappi, E; Posa, F; Paic, G; Panagiotou, A D; Petridis, A; Vasileiadis, G; Pfennig, J

    1992-01-01

    Multiplicity distributions and their second moments fornegatively charged particles produced in32S-S central and minimum bias interactions at 200A GeV are studied in various rapidity intervals. Fritiof and Venus models mostly describe the dependence of second moments on rapidity intervals in minimum bias interactions, but not in central collisions. For central collisions the behaviour of second moments might indicate enhanced multiplicity fluctuations.

  5. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-12-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  6. Disturbed spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,* Yu-Lin Zhong,1,* Xian-Jun Zeng,2 Fuqing Zhou,2 Xin-Hua Liu,1 Pei-Hong Hu,1 Chong-Gang Pei,1 Yi Shao,1 Xi-Jian Dai21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: The aim of this study is to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF as a method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in patients with primary angle -closure glaucoma (PACG and ALFFs relationship with the behavioral performances.Methods: A total of twenty one patients with PACG (eight males and 13 females, and twenty one healthy subjects (nine males and twelve females closely matched in age, sex, and education, each underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The ALFF method was used to assess the local features of spontaneous brain activity. The correlation analysis was used to explore the relationships between the observed mean ALFF signal values of the different areas in PACG patients and the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. Results: Compared with the healthy subjects, patients with PACG had significant lower ALFF areas in the left precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus, and right angular gyrus, and higher areas in the right precentral gyrus. In the PACG group, there were significant negative correlations between the mean ALFF signal value of the right middle frontal gyrus and the left mean RNFL thickness (r=-0.487, P=0.033, and between the mean ALFF signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus and the right mean RNFL thickness (r=-0.504, P=0.020. Conclusion: PACG mainly involved in the dysfunction in the frontal lobe, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism of PACG.Keywords: angle-closure glaucoma, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, functional

  7. The neural basis of trait self-esteem revealed by the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and resting state functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weigang; Liu, Congcong; Yang, Qian; Gu, Yan; Yin, Shouhang; Chen, Antao

    2016-03-01

    Self-esteem is an affective, self-evaluation of oneself and has a significant effect on mental and behavioral health. Although research has focused on the neural substrates of self-esteem, little is known about the spontaneous brain activity that is associated with trait self-esteem (TSE) during the resting state. In this study, we used the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) to identify TSE-related regions and networks. We found that a higher level of TSE was associated with higher ALFFs in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and lower ALFFs in the left cuneus/lingual gyrus and right lingual gyrus. RSFC analyses revealed that the strengths of functional connectivity between the left vmPFC and bilateral hippocampus were positively correlated with TSE; however, the connections between the left vmPFC and right inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal sulcus were negatively associated with TSE. Furthermore, the strengths of functional connectivity between the left cuneus/lingual gyrus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex were positively related to TSE. These findings indicate that TSE is linked to core regions in the default mode network and social cognition network, which is involved in self-referential processing, autobiographical memory and social cognition. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD): a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanming; Liu, Chen; Yin, Xuntao; Yang, Jun; Gui, Li; Wei, Luqing; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) allowed researchers to detect intrinsic brain activity during rest and has been considered an analytical tool for evaluation of dementia. Previously, subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) has been found decreased amplitude low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in a widely frequency range (0.01-0.08Hz) in the bilateral precuneus and increased ALFF values in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left insula and hippocampus, which showed significant correlations with the cognitive performance. In this study we analyzed the ALFF of 30 patients with SIVD in two different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz). In the slow-5 band, SIVD patients compared with controls exhibited significant higher ALFF in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, right putamen and right supplementary motor area, while lower ALFF in the right precuneus and right angular gyrus. A close correlation was found between the ALFF value of the right angular gyrus and ADL scores. In the slow-4 band, SIVD patients only exhibited increased ALFF in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, right putamen, left fusiform gyrus, and no correlation with cognitive scores was found. Our data demonstrate that SIVD patients have widespread abnormal intrinsic neural oscillations, which are dependent on specific frequency bands. ALFF of right angular gyrus at slow-5 band is more specific for SIVD and may be a useful tool to help SIVD diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Warburg effect as an adaptation of cancer cells to rapid fluctuations in energy demand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Epstein

    Full Text Available To maintain optimal fitness, a cell must balance the risk of inadequate energy reserve for response to a potentially fatal perturbation against the long-term cost of maintaining high concentrations of ATP to meet occasional spikes in demand. Here we apply a game theoretic approach to address the dynamics of energy production and expenditure in eukaryotic cells. Conventionally, glucose metabolism is viewed as a function of oxygen concentrations in which the more efficient oxidation of glucose to CO2 and H2O produces all or nearly all ATP except under hypoxic conditions when less efficient (2 ATP/ glucose vs. about 36ATP/glucose anaerobic metabolism of glucose to lactic acid provides an emergency backup. We propose an alternative in which energy production is governed by the complex temporal and spatial dynamics of intracellular ATP demand. In the short term, a cell must provide energy for constant baseline needs but also maintain capacity to rapidly respond to fluxes in demand particularly due to external perturbations on the cell membrane. Similarly, longer-term dynamics require a trade-off between the cost of maintaining high metabolic capacity to meet uncommon spikes in demand versus the risk of unsuccessfully responding to threats or opportunities. Here we develop a model and computationally explore the cell's optimal mix of glycolytic and oxidative capacity. We find the Warburg effect, high glycolytic metabolism even under normoxic conditions, is represents a metabolic strategy that allow cancer cells to optimally meet energy demands posed by stochastic or fluctuating tumor environments.

  10. Rapid change of multiplicity fluctuations in system size dependence at SPS energies arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Recent preliminary results on multiplicity fluctuations in p+p, Be+Be and Ar+Sc collisions from the NA61/SHINE collaboration are presented. The scaled variance of charged hadron multiplicity changes little when going from p+p to Be+Be collisions and drops dramatically from Be+Be to Ar+Sc interactions. The centrality selection procedure and the influence of volume fluctuations are discussed. Comparisons with the EPOS event generator are shown.

  11. Altered fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation associated with cognitive dysfunction in first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Manli; Lu, Shaojia; Yu, Liang; Li, Lingjiang; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Jianbo; Zhou, Weihua; Hu, Shaohua; Wei, Ning; Huang, Jinwen; Weng, Jian; Xu, Yi

    2017-01-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that abnormities of both resting-state brain activity and cognitive dysfunction are frequently observed in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, the underlying relationship between these two aspects is less investigated. In this context, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cognitive dysfunction and altered resting-state brain function in first-episode drug-naïve MDD patients. Twenty-five drug-naïve MDD patients and twenty-six age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls were recruited in this study. Cognitive function was evaluated by using a series of validated test procedures. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained on a Philips 3.0 Tesla scanner and analysed using the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) method. Correlations of fALFF values with cognitive dysfunction were further analysed. Compared with healthy controls, MDD patients showed significantly fewer completed categories in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and decreased scores in the first and second subtests of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT). However, the two groups did not differ in their performance on the Stroop Colour Word Test and Trail-making Test. MDD patients exhibited significantly decreased fALFF values in the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG), left middle frontal gyrus, and left inferior frontal gyrus, as well as increased fALFF values in the left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and the right caudate. Finally, the correlation analyses revealed that fALFF values in the left SFG and left ITG were associated with the number of WSCT completed categories and scores on the second subtest of the CPT in MDD, respectively. The present findings suggest that there is little evidence of an association between regional abnormalities in resting-state brain function and cognitive deficits in MDD.

  12. Abnormal amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and functional connectivity of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with leukoaraiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongchuan; Qi, Honglin; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Shifu; Li, Chuanming; Liu, Chen; Zheng, Jian

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cerebral function deficits in patients with leukoaraiosis (LA) and the correlation with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) using functional MRI (fMRI) technology. Twenty-eight patients with LA and 30 volunteers were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent structural MRI and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) scanning. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of rs-fMRI signals for the two groups was compared using two-sample t tests. A one-sample t test was performed on the individual z-value maps to identify the functional connectivity of each group. The z values were compared between the two groups using a two-sample t test. Partial correlations between ALFF values and functional connectivity of the brain regions that showed group differences and Fazekas scores of the WMH were analyzed. Compared with the control group, the LA group showed a significant decrease in the ALFF in the left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and an increased ALFF in the left inferior semi-lunar lobule and right superior orbital frontal gyrus (SOFG). The patients with LA showed an increased functional connectivity between the right insular region and the right SOFG and between the right calcarine cortex and the left PHG. After the effects of age, gender, and years of education were corrected as covariates, the functional connectivity strength of the right insular and the right SOFG showed close correlations with the Fazekas scores. Our results enhance the understanding of the pathomechanism of LA. Leukoaraiosis is associated with widespread cerebral function deficits, which show a close correlation with WMH and can be measured by rs-fMRI.

  13. Altered baseline brain activity in experts measured by amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF: a resting state fMRI study using expertise model of acupuncturists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao eDong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that expertise modulates evoked brain activity in response to specific stimuli. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate how expertise influences the resting brain. Among these studies, most focused on the connectivity features within/across regions, i.e. connectivity patterns/strength. However, little concern has been given to a more fundamental issue whether or not expertise modulates baseline brain activity. We investigated this question using amplitude of low-frequency (<0.08Hz fluctuation (ALFF as the metric of brain activity and a novel expertise model, i.e. acupuncturists, due to their robust proficiency in tactile perception and emotion regulation. After the psychophysical and behavioral expertise screening procedure, 23 acupuncturists and 23 matched non-acupuncturists (NA were enrolled. Our results explicated higher ALFF for acupuncturists in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC and the contralateral hand representation of the primary somatosensory area (SI (corrected for multiple comparisons. Additionally, ALFF of VMPFC was negatively correlated with the outcomes of the emotion regulation task (corrected for multiple comparisons. We suggest that our study may reveal a novel connection between the neuroplasticity mechanism and resting state activity, which would upgrade our understanding of the central mechanism of learning. Furthermore, by showing that expertise can affect the baseline brain activity as indicated by ALFF, our findings may have profound implication for functional neuroimaging studies especially those involving expert models, in that difference in baseline brain activity may either smear the spatial pattern of activations for task data or introduce biased results into connectivity-based analysis for resting data.

  14. Whole Earth Telescope discovery of a strongly distorted quadrupole pulsation in the largest amplitude rapidly oscillating Ap star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.; Kurtz, D. W.; Saio, H.; Provencal, J. L.; Letarte, B.; Sefako, R. R.; Petit, V.; Smalley, B.; Thomsen, H.; Fletcher, C. L.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star, 2MASS J19400781 - 4420093 (J1940; V = 13.1). The star was discovered using SuperWASP broad-band photometry to have a frequency of 176.39 d-1 (2041.55 μHz; P = 8.2 min; Holdsworth et al. 2014a) and is shown here to have a peak-to-peak amplitude of 34 mmag. J1940 has been observed during three seasons at the South African Astronomical Observatory, and has been the target of a Whole Earth Telescope campaign. The observations reveal that J1940 pulsates in a distorted quadrupole mode with unusual pulsational phase variations. A higher signal-to-noise ratio spectrum has been obtained since J1940's first announcement, which allows us to classify the star as A7 Vp Eu(Cr). The observing campaigns presented here reveal no pulsations other than the initially detected frequency. We model the pulsation in J1940 and conclude that the pulsation is distorted by a magnetic field of strength 1.5 kG. A difference in the times of rotational maximum light and pulsation maximum suggests a significant offset between the spots and pulsation axis, as can be seen in roAp stars.

  15. An fMRI study of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with different pathological basis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WEI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the distinction of abnormal brain activity in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS or other pathogical basis, and to discuss their underlying pathophysiological mechanism in mTLE.  Methods Thirty mTLE patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS and 30 mTLE patients with occupying lesion in unilateral temporal lobe (mTLE-OL were investigated by comparing with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. MRI data were collected using a Siemens 3.0T scanner, and all of the participants were studied using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF analysis of resting state fMRI. A cost-function modification was used for image preprocessing, then the difference of extratemporal mALFF changes between the two groups of mTLE patients were analyzed with two-sample t test, and the correlation between mALFF and epilepsy duration of mTLE were also investigated.  Results In the resting state, mTLE-HS patients and mTLE-OL patients all showed significant changes in mALFF in extratemporal structures, but the distribution patterns of changes in brain were different. Compared with mTLE-HS, the mTLE-OL patients showed increased mALFF in bilateral inferior parietal lobes, precuneus, angular gyrus, middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and contralateral middle temporal gyrus, while mALFF reducing was observed in contralateral postcentral gyrus, bilateral middle occipital gyrus and cerebellum (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected, that is to say, the default mode network (DMN in mTLE-HS were inhibited more seriously than in mTLE-OL patients. Correlation analysis showed that no significant correlation was found between mALFF and epilepsy duration in mTLE-HS patients; mALFF in bilateral middle and posterior cingulate gyrus was positively correlated with epilepsy duration in mTLE-OL patients (r = 0.687, P = 0.000, while mALFF in bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus was negatively correlated with epilepsy duration (r

  16. Altered intrinsic brain activities in patients with acute eye pain using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Z

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Ming Pan,1 Hai-Jun Li,1 Jing Bao,1 Nan Jiang,1 Qing Yuan,1 Shelby Freeberg,2 Pei-Wen Zhu,1 Lei Ye,1 Ming-Yang Ma,1 Xin Huang,1 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology and Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Objective: Many previous studies have reported that pain symptoms can lead to significant brain function and anatomical changes, whereas the intrinsic brain activity changes in acute eye pain (EP patients remain unknown. Using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method, this study aimed to evaluate the spontaneous brain activity alterations and their relationships with clinical features in acute EP patients.Participants and methods: A total of 20 patients with EP (15 males and 5 females and 20 healthy controls (HCs; 15 males and 5 females closely matched in age, sex, and education underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ALFF method was applied to assess spontaneous brain activity changes. The ALFF values of the EP patients were distinguished from those of the HCs using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the mean ALFF signal values from many brain regions and the clinical features in EP patients.Results: Compared with the HCs, acute EP patients had significantly lower ALFF in the left and right precentral/postcentral gyrus and left precuneus. In contrast, acute EP patients showed higher ALFF values in the right and left parahippocampal gyri and left caudate. However, no relationship was observed between the mean ALFF signal values from the different areas and clinical manifestations in the acute EP patients.Conclusion: We demonstrated that acute EP patients showed abnormal intrinsic brain activities in the precentral/postcentral gyrus and limbic system

  17. Altered spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with high myopia using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Fu-Qing Zhou,3,* Yu-Xiang Hu,1 Xiao-Xuan Xu,1 Xiong Zhou,4 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Jun Wang,4 Xiao-Rong Wu1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang City, Jiujiang, 3Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Medical Imaging Research Institute, 4Second Department of Respiratory Disease, Jiangxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Many previous reports have demonstrated significant neural anatomy changes in the brain of high myopic (HM patients, whereas the spontaneous brain activity changes in the HM patients at rest are not well studied. Our objective was to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method to investigate the changes in spontaneous brain activity in HM patients and their relationships with clinical features. Methods: A total of 38 patients with HM (17 males and 21 females and 38 healthy controls (HCs (17 males and 21 females closely matched in age, sex, and education underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ALFF method was used to assess local features of spontaneous brain activity. The relationship between the mean ALFF signal values in many brain regions and the clinical features in HM patients was calculated by correlation analysis. Results: Compared with HCs, the HM patients had significantly lower ALFF in the right inferior and middle temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus/putamen, right inferior frontal gyrus/putamen/insula, right middle frontal gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobule and higher ALFF values in the bilateral midcingulate cortex, left postcentral gyrus, and left precuneus/inferior parietal lobule. However, no relationship was found between the mean ALFF

  18. Influence of the quark-gluon string fusion mechanism on long-range rapidity correlations and fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    Multiparticle production in soft hadronic interactions can be successfully described in the framework of the color-string approach, which will probably be derived from the first principles of chromodynamics in the future. A fundamental property of this approach is the translation invariance of the rapidity spectrum of charged particles produced by one source at high energies. This symmetry results in the appearance of long-range rapidity correlations through event-by-event fluctuations of the number and/or type of strings. We describe the behavior of correlations between multiplicities ( n-n) and between the transverse momentum and multiplicities ( pt-n) of charged particles with the mechanism of forming sources of two types taken into account. We obtain an exact analytic expression for the ( n-n)-correlation coefficient. Because no exact solution can be obtained for the ( pt-n)-correlation coefficient, we propose an effective approximation that significantly simplifies numerical computations. We verify all these results by direct simulation using the Monte Carlo method. We also investigate how the fusion mechanism influences the behavior of strongly intensive variables characterizing the multiplicity fluctuations in two rapidity windows.

  19. A sodium-activated potassium channel supports high-frequency firing and reduces energetic costs during rapid modulations of action potential amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Michael R; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Zakon, Harold H

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the ionic mechanisms that allow dynamic regulation of action potential (AP) amplitude as a means of regulating energetic costs of AP signaling. Weakly electric fish generate an electric organ discharge (EOD) by summing the APs of their electric organ cells (electrocytes). Some electric fish increase AP amplitude during active periods or social interactions and decrease AP amplitude when inactive, regulated by melanocortin peptide hormones. This modulates signal amplitude and conserves energy. The gymnotiform Eigenmannia virescens generates EODs at frequencies that can exceed 500 Hz, which is energetically challenging. We examined how E. virescens meets that challenge. E. virescens electrocytes exhibit a voltage-gated Na(+) current (I(Na)) with extremely rapid recovery from inactivation (τ(recov) = 0.3 ms) allowing complete recovery of Na(+) current between APs even in fish with the highest EOD frequencies. Electrocytes also possess an inwardly rectifying K(+) current and a Na(+)-activated K(+) current (I(KNa)), the latter not yet identified in any gymnotiform species. In vitro application of melanocortins increases electrocyte AP amplitude and the magnitudes of all three currents, but increased I(KNa) is a function of enhanced Na(+) influx. Numerical simulations suggest that changing I(Na) magnitude produces corresponding changes in AP amplitude and that K(Na) channels increase AP energy efficiency (10-30% less Na(+) influx/AP) over model cells with only voltage-gated K(+) channels. These findings suggest the possibility that E. virescens reduces the energetic demands of high-frequency APs through rapidly recovering Na(+) channels and the novel use of KNa channels to maximize AP amplitude at a given Na(+) conductance.

  20. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode

    2015-01-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditio...... polar soil invertebrate community may be robust to at least one important predicted consequence of projected climate change....... may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering...... microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow...

  1. Increased heterozygosity at the Mdh-B locus in fish inhabiting a rapidly fluctuating thermal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, E.G.; Richmond, M.C.

    1981-05-01

    Populations of a common forage fish, red shiner Notropis lutrensis, were sampled from four localities on the Brazos River, Texas, affected by cold-water discharge from a hydroelectric dam and from unaltered sites in the same region. Polymorphism at the Mdh-B locus, encoding supernatant malate dehydrogenase, indicates that populations within 57 km of the dam are distinctive from other regional populations and possess a unique Mdh-B allele, have significantly higher levels of heterozygosity at the Mdh-B locus, represent a homogeneous set that have significantly different Mdh-B zygotic frequencies from other regional populations, and have significantly different Mdh-B zygotic proportions than would be expected under a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Increased levels of heterozygosity in fish within 57 km of the dam were correlated with discharge-associated fluctuations in water temperature at sampling stations.

  2. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  3. Rapid in-focus corrections on quantitative amplitude and phase imaging using transport of intensity equation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X; Tian, X; Kong, Y; Sun, A; Yu, W; Qian, W; Song, X; Cui, H; Xue, L; Liu, C; Wang, S

    2017-06-01

    Transport of intensity equation (TIE) method can acquire sample phase distributions with high speed and accuracy, offering another perspective for cellular observations and measurements. However, caused by incorrect focal plane determination, blurs and halos are induced, decreasing resolution and accuracy in both retrieved amplitude and phase information. In order to obtain high-accurate sample details, we propose TIE based in-focus correction technique for quantitative amplitude and phase imaging, which can locate focal plane and then retrieve both in-focus intensity and phase distributions combining with numerical wavefront extraction and propagation as well as physical image recorder translation. Certified by both numerical simulations and practical measurements, it is believed the proposed method not only captures high-accurate in-focus sample information, but also provides a potential way for fast autofocusing in microscopic system. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.

  5. Capturing amplitude changes of low-frequency fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging signal: a pilot acupuncture study on NeiGuan (PC6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Yin, Hao; Zhou, You-Long; Han, Hong-Yan; Wu, Yun-Hu; Xing, Wei; Xu, Hong-Zhou; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to examine amplitude changes of low-frequency oscillations (fALFF) in the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal associated with acupuncture on NeiGuan (PC6). Ten (10) healthy adults participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., nuclear medicine; fMRI) study. During the brain-imaging procedure, the participants were instructed to lie quietly; they did not perform any cognitive task. Three (3) fMRI scans were conducted for each participant: a first resting-state scan (R1), a stimulating-acupoint scan (AP), and a second resting-state scan (R2) after AP. Individual fALFF maps were calculated for each scan. During R1, consistent with previous studies, the default network regions showed significantly detectable fALFF amplitudes. Acupuncture on PC6 increased fALFF amplitudes within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), occipital fusiform gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus (PCC/PCU). In contrast, during R2, fALFF within PCC is still significantly higher than R1 while ACC and cerebellum showed decreased fALFF. These findings imply that stimulating PC6 can change the amplitude of the intrinsic cortical activity of the brain. In particular, a continuous and temporally consistent effect of acupuncture within PCC not the common brain circuit of pain including ACC and cerebellum was observed. Considering the cognitive functions and deficits of the relevant areas in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease, acupuncture on PC6 could potentially affect both psychiatric and neurological disorders. Thus, stimulating PC6 may be a candidate method for improving cognitive impairment.

  6. The slow roll condition and the amplitude of the primordial spectrum of cosmic fluctuations: Contrasts and similarities of standard account and the "collapse scheme"

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    The inflationary paradigm enjoys a very wide acceptance in the cosmological community, due in large part to the fact that it is said to "naturally account" for a nearly scale independent power primordial spectrum of fluctuations which is in very good agreement with the observations. The expected overall scale of the fluctuations in most models, turns out to be too large, because it is inversely proportional to the slow roll parameter, which is expected to be very small. This fact requires the fine tuning of the inflaton potential. In series of recent works it has been argued that the success of the inflationary picture is not fully justified in terms of the rules of quantum theory as applied to the cosmological setting and that an extra element, something akin to a self induced collapse of the wave function is required. There, it was suggested that the incorporation of such collapse in the treatment might avoid the need for fine tuning of the potential that afflicts most inflationary models. In this article w...

  7. Rapid transport of nano-particles having a fractional elementary charge on average in capacitively-coupled rf discharges by amplitude-modulating discharge voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Iwashita, Shinya; Nunomura, Syota

    2008-01-01

    We have observed transport of nano-particles having, on average, a fractional elementary charge in single pulse and double pulse capacitively-coupled rf discharges both without and with an Amplitude Modulation (AM) of the discharge voltage, using a two-dimensional laser-light scattering method. Rapid transport of nano-particles towards the grounded electrode is realized using rf discharges with AM. Two important parameters for the rapid transport of nano-particles are the discharge voltage and the period of AM. An important key of the rapid transport is fast redistribution of ion current over the whole discharge region; that is, fast change of spatial distribution of forces exerted on nano-particles. The longer period of the modulation is needed for rapid transport for the larger nano-particles. The higher discharge voltage of the modulation is needed for rapid transport of nano-particles having a smaller mean charge. Local perturbation of electric potential using a probe does not bring about global rapid transport of nano-particles, whereas it leads to their local transport near the probe.

  8. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in tokamaks and RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiksel, G.; Hartog, D.D.; Cekic, M.; Prager, S.C. [and others

    1996-08-01

    It has long been recognized that fluctuations in the magnetic field are a potent mechanism for the anomalous transport of energy in confined plasmas. The energy transport process originates from particle motion along magnetic fields, which have a fluctuating component in the radial direction (perpendicular to the confining equilibrium magnetic surfaces). A key feature is that the transport can be large even if the fluctuation amplitude is small. If the fluctuations are resonant with the equilibrium magnetic field (i.e., the fluctuation amplitude is constant along an equilibrium field line) then a small fluctuation can introduce stochasticity to the field line trajectories. Particles following the chaotically wandering field lines can rapidly carry energy across the plasma.

  9. Distribution of Pressure Fluctuations in a Prototype Pump Turbine at Pump Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuekun Sun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure fluctuations are very important characteristics in pump turbine's operation. Many researches have focused on the characteristics (amplitude and frequencies of pressure fluctuations at specific locations, but little researches mentioned the distribution of pressure fluctuations in a pump turbine. In this paper, 3D numerical simulations using SSTk − ω turbulence model were carried out to predict the pressure fluctuations distribution in a prototype pump turbine at pump mode. Three operating points with different mass flow rates and different guide vanes’ openings were simulated. The numerical results show how pressure fluctuations at blade passing frequency (BPF and its harmonics vary along the whole flow path direction, as well as along the circumferential direction. BPF is the first dominant frequency in vaneless space. Pressure fluctuation component at this frequency rapidly decays towards upstream (to draft tube and downstream (to spiral casing. In contrast, pressure fluctuations component at 3BPF spreads to upstream and downstream with almost constant amplitude. Amplitude and frequencies of pressure fluctuations also vary along different circumferential locations in vaneless space. When the mass flow and guide vanes’ opening are different, the distribution of pressure fluctuations along the two directions is different basically.

  10. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2–6 s) increased (30–70 μM or 6–14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (−20–40 μM or 5–10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  11. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-09-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2-6 s) increased (30-70 μM or 6-14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (-20-40 μM or 5-10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  12. Detection of the Earth rotation response to a rapid fluctuation of Southern Ocean circulation in November 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, S. L.; Dickey, J. O.; Fukumori, I.; de Viron, O.

    2012-02-01

    At seasonal and shorter periods the solid Earth and its overlying geophysical fluids form a closed dynamical system, which (except for tidal forcing) conserves its total angular momentum. While atmospheric effects dominate changes in the Earth's rate of rotation and hence length-of-day (LOD) on these time scales, the addition of oceanic angular momentum (OAM) estimates has been shown to improve closure of the LOD budget in a statistical sense. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the signature of a specific, sub-monthly ocean current fluctuation on the Earth's rotation rate, coinciding with recently-reported anomalies which developed in southeast Pacific surface temperature and bottom pressure fields during late 2009. Our results show that concurrent variations in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which saw a sharp drop and recovery in zonal transport during a two-week period in November, were strong enough to cause a detectable change in LOD following the removal of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) computed from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) database. The strong OAM variations driving the LOD-AAM changes were diagnosed from ocean state estimates of the Consortium for Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) and involved roughly equal contributions from the current and pressure terms, with in situ confirmation for the latter provided by tide-corrected bottom pressure recorder data from the South Drake Passage site of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current Levels by Altimetry and Island Measurements (ACCLAIM) network.

  13. Particle density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishcuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Loehner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhayay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soederstroem, K.; Sood, G.; Soerensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Eijinhoven, N. van; Niewenhuizen, G.J. van; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voeroes, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R

    2003-03-10

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  14. Particle density fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Bedangadas; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lohne, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Phatak, S.C.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voros, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R.; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2003-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  15. Rapid fluctuations in flow and water-column properties in Asan Bay, Guam: implications for selective resilience of coral reefs in warming seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Cheriton, O.M.; Presto, M.K.; Logan, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and water-column properties were investigated off west-central Guam from July 2007 through January 2008. Rapid fluctuations, on time scales of 10s of min, in currents, temperature, salinity, and acoustic backscatter were observed to occur on sub-diurnal frequencies along more than 2 km of the fore reef but not at the reef crest. During periods characterized by higher sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), weaker wind forcing, smaller ocean surface waves, and greater thermal stratification, rapid decreases in temperature and concurrent rapid increases in salinity and acoustic backscatter coincided with onshore-directed near-bed currents and offshore-directed near-surface currents. During the study, these cool-water events, on average, lasted 2.3 h and decreased the water temperature 0.57 °C, increased the salinity 0.25 PSU, and were two orders of magnitude more prevalent during the summer season than the winter. During the summer season when the average satellite-derived SST anomaly was +0.63 °C, these cooling events, on average, lowered the temperature 1.14 °C along the fore reef but only 0.11 °C along the reef crest. The rapid shifts appear to be the result of internal tidal bores pumping cooler, more saline, higher-backscatter oceanic water from depths >50 m over cross-shore distances of 100 s of m into the warmer, less saline waters at depths of 20 m and shallower. Such internal bores appear to have the potential to buffer shallow coral reefs from predicted increases in SSTs by bringing cool, offshore water to shallow coral environments. These cooling internal bores may also provide additional benefits to offset stress such as supplying food to thermally stressed corals, reducing stress due to ultraviolet radiation and/or low salinity, and delivering coral larvae from deeper reefs not impacted by surface thermal stress. Thus, the presence of internal bores might be an important factor locally in the resilience of select coral reefs facing increased

  16. Fluctuations in solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. (Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States))

    1993-11-01

    We present an analytical treatment of (i) the incorporation of thermal noise in the basic continuum models of solidification, (ii) fluctuations about nonequilibrium steady states, and (iii) the amplification of noise near the onset of morphological instability. In (i), we find that the proper Langevin formalism, consistent with both bulk and interfacial equilibrium fluctuations, consists of the usual bulk forces and an extra stochastic force on the interface associated with its local kinetics. At sufficiently large solidification rate, this force affects interfacial fluctuations on scales where they are macroscopically amplified and, thus, becomes relevant. An estimate of this rate is given. In (ii), we extend the Langevin formalism outside of equilibrium to characterize the fluctuations of a stationary and a directionally solidified planar interface in a temperature gradient. Finally, in (iii), we derive an analytic expression for the linear growth of the mean-square amplitude of fluctuations slightly above the onset of morphological instability. The amplitude of the noise is found to be determined by the small parameter [ital k][sub [ital B]T[ital E]d0][sup [ital c]l][sub [ital T

  17. Turbulent Fluctuations in G-band and K-line Intensities Observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Rapid Oscillation in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope we have found that the spectra of fluctuations of the G-band (cadence 1.05 s) and Ca II K-line (cadence 4.2 s) intensities show correlated fluctuations above white noise out to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and up to 70 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum presents a scaling range (Ultra High Frequency “UHF”) for f = 25-100 mHz, with an exponent consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. The UHF power, is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes, it is highly intermittent in time and characterized by a positive kurtosis κ. Combining values of G-band and K-line intensities, the UHF power, and κ, reveals two distinct “states” of the internetwork solar atmosphere. State 1, with κ ≍ 6, which includes almost all the data, is characterized by low intensities and low UHF power. State 2, with κ ≍ 3, including a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high intensities and high UHF power. Superposed epoch analysis shows that for State 1, the K-line intensity presents 3.5 min chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after G-band intensity maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. For State 2, the G-band and K-line intensity maxima are simultaneous, suggesting that in the highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together. Analysis of observations obtained with Hinode/SOT confirm a scaling range in the G-band spectrum up to 53 mHz also consistent with turbulent motions as well as the identification of two distinct states in terms of the H-line intensity and G-band power as functions of G-band intensity.

  18. Refractive-index and absorption fluctuations in the infrared caused by temperature, humidity, and pressure fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R. J.; Clifford, S. F.; Lawrence, R. S.

    1980-10-01

    The dependence of fluctuations in atmospheric absorption and refraction upon fluctuations in temperature, humidity, and pressure is found for infrared frequencies. This dependence has contributions from line and continuum absorption and from anomalous refraction by water vapor. The functions that relate these fluctuations are necessary for evaluating degradation of electromagnetic radiation by turbulence. They are computed for a given choice of mean atmospheric conditions and graphed as functions of frequency in the wavelength range 5.7 microns to radio waves. It is found that turbulent fluctuations in total pressure give a negligible contribution to absorption and refraction fluctuations. Humidity fluctuations dominate absorption fluctuations, but contributions by temperature and humidity affect refraction fluctuations. Sufficiently strong humidity fluctuations can dominate the refraction fluctuations for some infrared frequencies but not for visible frequencies. The variance of log amplitude is examined for scintillation of infrared light to determine whether absorption or refraction fluctuations dominate under several conditions.

  19. Fluctuations in catalytic surface reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Imbihl, R

    2003-01-01

    The internal reaction-induced fluctuations which occur in catalytic CO oxidation on a Pt field emitter tip have been studied using field electron microscopy (FEM) as a spatially resolving method. The structurally heterogeneous Pt tip consists of facets of different orientations with nanoscale dimensions. The FEM resolution of roughly 2 nm corresponds to a few hundred reacting adsorbed particles whose variations in the density are imaged as brightness fluctuations. In the bistable range of the reaction one finds fluctuation-induced transitions between the two stable branches of the reaction kinetics. The fluctuations exhibit a behaviour similar to that of an equilibrium phase transition, i.e. the amplitude diverges upon approaching the bifurcation point terminating the bistable range of the reaction. Simulations with a hybrid Monte Carlo/mean-field model reproduce the experimental observations. Fluctuations on different facets are typically uncorrelated but within a single facet a high degree of spatial cohere...

  20. Speech production in amplitude-modulated noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Ewen N; Raufer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    the consequences of temporally fluctuating noise. In the present study, 20 talkers produced speech in a variety of noise conditions, including both steady-state and amplitude-modulated white noise. While listening to noise over headphones, talkers produced randomly generated five word sentences. Similar...... to previous studies, talkers raised the level of their voice in steady-state noise. While talkers also increased the level of their voice in amplitude-modulated noise, the increase was not as large as that observed in steady-state noise. Importantly, for the 2 and 4 Hz amplitude-modulated noise conditions...

  1. Shape of Pion Distribution Amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly

    2009-11-01

    A scenario is investigated in which the leading-twist pion distribution amplitude $\\varphi_\\pi (x)$ is approximated by the pion decay constant $f_\\pi$ for all essential values of the light-cone fraction $x$. A model for the light-front wave function $\\Psi (x, k_\\perp)$ is proposed that produces such a distribution amplitude and has a rapidly decreasing (exponential for definiteness) dependence on the light-front energy combination $ k_\\perp^2/x(1-x)$. It is shown that this model easily reproduces the fit of recent large-$Q^2$ BaBar data on the photon-pion transition form factor. Some aspects of scenario with flat pion distribution amplitude are discussed.

  2. OCT Amplitude and Speckle Statistics of Discrete Random Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almasian, Mitra; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2017-01-01

    Speckle, amplitude fluctuations in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images, contains information on sub-resolution structural properties of the imaged sample. Speckle statistics could therefore be utilized in the characterization of biological tissues. However, a rigorous theoretical framework

  3. Superlinear Amplitude Amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Lov K.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum search/amplitude amplification algorithms are designed to be able to amplify the amplitude in the target state linearly with the number of operations. Since the probability is the square of the amplitude, this results in the success probability rising quadratically with the number of operations. This paper presents a new kind of quantum search algorithm in which the amplitude of the target state, itself increases quadratically with the number of operations. However, the domain of appl...

  4. An amplitude modulated radio frequency plasma generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fan; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Yanming; Liu, Donglin; Yang, Min; Xie, Kai; Yao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    A glow discharge plasma generator and diagnostic system has been developed to study the effects of rapidly variable plasmas on electromagnetic wave propagation, mimicking the plasma sheath conditions encountered in space vehicle reentry. The plasma chamber is 400 mm in diameter and 240 mm in length, with a 300-mm-diameter unobstructed clear aperture. Electron densities produced are in the mid 1010 electrons/cm3. An 800 W radio frequency (RF) generator is capacitively coupled through an RF matcher to an internally cooled stainless steel electrode to form the plasma. The RF power is amplitude modulated by a waveform generator that operates at different frequencies. The resulting plasma contains electron density modulations caused by the varying power levels. A 10 GHz microwave horn antenna pair situated on opposite sides of the chamber serves as the source and detector of probe radiation. The microwave power feed to the source horn is split and one portion is sent directly to a high-speed recording oscilloscope. On mixing this with the signal from the pickup horn antenna, the plasma-induced phase shift between the two signals gives the path-integrated electron density with its complete time dependent variation. Care is taken to avoid microwave reflections and extensive shielding is in place to minimize electronic pickup. Data clearly show the low frequency modulation of the electron density as well as higher harmonics and plasma fluctuations.

  5. Gaussian fluctuations in chaotic eigenstates

    CERN Document Server

    Srednicki, M A; Srednicki, Mark; Stiernelof, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We study the fluctuations that are predicted in the autocorrelation function of an energy eigenstate of a chaotic, two-dimensional billiard by the conjecture (due to Berry) that the eigenfunction is a gaussian random variable. We find an explicit formula for the root-mean-square amplitude of the expected fluctuations in the autocorrelation function. These fluctuations turn out to be O(\\hbar^{1/2}) in the small \\hbar (high energy) limit. For comparison, any corrections due to scars from isolated periodic orbits would also be O(\\hbar^{1/2}). The fluctuations take on a particularly simple form if the autocorrelation function is averaged over the direction of the separation vector. We compare our various predictions with recent numerical computations of Li and Robnik for the Robnik billiard, and find good agreement. We indicate how our results generalize to higher dimensions.

  6. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    (2). Hence, small amplitude waves are also called linear waves. Most of the aspects of the ocean waves can be explained by the small amplitude wave theory. Let us now see the water particle motion due to waves. While wave energy is carried by the wave as it progresses forward, the water particles oscillate up and down.

  7. Amplitudes, acquisition and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloor, Robert

    1998-12-31

    Accurate seismic amplitude information is important for the successful evaluation of many prospects and the importance of such amplitude information is increasing with the advent of time lapse seismic techniques. It is now widely accepted that the proper treatment of amplitudes requires seismic imaging in the form of either time or depth migration. A key factor in seismic imaging is the spatial sampling of the data and its relationship to the imaging algorithms. This presentation demonstrates that acquisition caused spatial sampling irregularity can affect the seismic imaging and perturb amplitudes. Equalization helps to balance the amplitudes, and the dealing strategy improves the imaging further when there are azimuth variations. Equalization and dealiasing can also help with the acquisition irregularities caused by shot and receiver dislocation or missing traces. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Fluctuating Selection in the Moran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Antony M; Lehman, Clarence; Yi, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    Contrary to classical population genetics theory, experiments demonstrate that fluctuating selection can protect a haploid polymorphism in the absence of frequency dependent effects on fitness. Using forward simulations with the Moran model, we confirm our analytical results showing that a fluctuating selection regime, with a mean selection coefficient of zero, promotes polymorphism. We find that increases in heterozygosity over neutral expectations are especially pronounced when fluctuations are rapid, mutation is weak, the population size is large, and the variance in selection is big. Lowering the frequency of fluctuations makes selection more directional, and so heterozygosity declines. We also show that fluctuating selection raises dn /ds ratios for polymorphism, not only by sweeping selected alleles into the population, but also by purging the neutral variants of selected alleles as they undergo repeated bottlenecks. Our analysis shows that randomly fluctuating selection increases the rate of evolution by increasing the probability of fixation. The impact is especially noticeable when the selection is strong and mutation is weak. Simulations show the increase in the rate of evolution declines as the rate of new mutations entering the population increases, an effect attributable to clonal interference. Intriguingly, fluctuating selection increases the dn /ds ratios for divergence more than for polymorphism, a pattern commonly seen in comparative genomics. Our model, which extends the classical neutral model of molecular evolution by incorporating random fluctuations in selection, accommodates a wide variety of observations, both neutral and selected, with economy. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. Real topological string amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narain, K.S. [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, 34151 (Italy); Piazzalunga, N. [Simons Center for Geometry and Physics, State University of New York,Stony Brook, NY, 11794-3636 (United States); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Sez. di Trieste,via Bonomea 265, Trieste, 34136 (Italy); Tanzini, A. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) and INFN, Sez. di Trieste,via Bonomea 265, Trieste, 34136 (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    We discuss the physical superstring correlation functions in type I theory (or equivalently type II with orientifold) that compute real topological string amplitudes. We consider the correlator corresponding to holomorphic derivative of the real topological amplitude G{sub χ}, at fixed worldsheet Euler characteristic χ. This corresponds in the low-energy effective action to N=2 Weyl multiplet, appropriately reduced to the orientifold invariant part, and raised to the power g{sup ′}=−χ+1. We show that the physical string correlator gives precisely the holomorphic derivative of topological amplitude. Finally, we apply this method to the standard closed oriented case as well, and prove a similar statement for the topological amplitude F{sub g}.

  10. Measurement of the amplitude of a spinodal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, M. G.; Hyde, J. M.; Miller, M. K.; Smith, G. D. W.

    1991-04-01

    One of the strengths of the atom-probe is its ability to measure the amplitude of composition fluctuations on a very fine scale. In previous papers, calculation of the amplitude of a spinodal using a sinusoidal composition distribution has been reported. In this paper, a comparison is made between the fit of experimental data from the atom-probe to a sinusoidal distribution and also to the amplitude of the composition variations expected from non-linear theories of the spinodal decomposition. It is shown that, in general, the Langer, Bar-on and Miller (LBM) non-linear theory provides better fits to the data. In particular, the non-linear theory is able to describe the asymmetry of the distribution functions for mean compositions far from the critical composition.

  11. Thermal Fluctuations in Electroweak Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, T.; Morikawa, M.; Yokoyama, J.

    1995-11-01

    We estimate the amplitude of thermal fluctuations by calculating the typical size of subcritical bubbles in cosmological electroweak phase transition and show that this thermal fluctuation effect drastically changes dynamics of the phase transition from the ordinary first order type with supercooling. From this fact, we conclude that the standard electroweak baryogenesis scenario associated with such a first order transition does not work in the minimal standard model in certain conditions.

  12. Semiclassical form factor of matrix element fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Eckhardt, B; Eckhardt, Bruno; Main, Joerg

    1995-01-01

    We analyze within a semiclassical approximation the form factor for the fluctuations of quantum matrix elements around their classical average. We find two contributions: one is proportional to the form factor for the density of states, with an amplitude determined by the squared average of the matrix elements. The other is constant and related to the fluctuations of finite time classical trajectory segments around the phase space average. The results are illustrated for an observable in the quadratic Zeeman effect.

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation alterations of Alternanthera philoxeroides in natural and manipulated habitats: implications for epigenetic regulation of rapid responses to environmental fluctuation and phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lexuan; Geng, Yupeng; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Yang, Ji

    2010-11-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) is an invasive weed that can colonize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Individuals growing in different habitats exhibit extensive phenotypic variation but little genetic differentiation in its introduced range. The mechanisms underpinning the wide range of phenotypic variation and rapid adaptation to novel and changing environments remain uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the epigenetic variation and its correlation with phenotypic variation in plants exposed to natural and manipulated environmental variability. Genome-wide methylation profiling using methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism (MSAP) revealed considerable DNA methylation polymorphisms within and between natural populations. Plants of different source populations not only underwent significant morphological changes in common garden environments, but also underwent a genome-wide epigenetic reprogramming in response to different treatments. Methylation alterations associated with response to different water availability were detected in 78.2% (169/216) of common garden induced polymorphic sites, demonstrating the environmental sensitivity and flexibility of the epigenetic regulatory system. These data provide evidence of the correlation between epigenetic reprogramming and the reversible phenotypic response of alligator weed to particular environmental factors. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for large fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Zhuravlev, V.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

    1992-12-31

    One of the main problems which has been present in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually produce ``fringe jumps`` in the phase signal. In such a situation the ``history`` of the phase evolution is lost and big errors can arise in the determination of the density profile. This problem will become more severe in large fusion devices, operating at high densities with high magnetic field: the cutoff wavelength becomes shorter and the phase delays involved become larger as well as the effect of the broadband fluctuations. Amplitude modulation reflectometry performs a time delay measurement by the determination of the phase delay of the modulating envelope of a millimeter wave beam reflected at the plasma. The phase delays involved are in the range <2{pi} and the measurement is not negatively affected by the broadband fluctuations. The phase readout can be directly obtained without complicated fringe counters: the method provides a promising possibility for real time determination of the plasma position and density profile, which will be very important for the next step devices (ITER-NET). (author) 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Ramped-amplitude NOVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T. V.; Weber, R. T.; Walish, J. J.; Swager, T. M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2017-04-01

    We present a pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) study using a ramped-amplitude nuclear orientation via electron spin locking (RA-NOVEL) sequence that utilizes a fast arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to modulate the microwave pulses together with samples doped with narrow-line radicals such as 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA), sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA), and trityl-OX063. Similar to ramped-amplitude cross polarization in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, RA-NOVEL improves the DNP efficiency by a factor of up to 1.6 compared to constant-amplitude NOVEL (CA-NOVEL) but requires a longer mixing time. For example, at τmix = 8 μs, the DNP efficiency reaches a plateau at a ramp amplitude of ˜20 MHz for both SA-BDPA and trityl-OX063, regardless of the ramp profile (linear vs. tangent). At shorter mixing times (τmix = 0.8 μs), we found that the tangent ramp is superior to its linear counterpart and in both cases there exists an optimum ramp size and therefore ramp rate. Our results suggest that RA-NOVEL should be used instead of CA-NOVEL as long as the electronic spin lattice relaxation T1e is sufficiently long and/or the duty cycle of the microwave amplifier is not exceeded. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a time domain DNP experiment that utilizes modulated microwave pulses. Our results also suggest that a precise modulation of the microwave pulses can play an important role in optimizing the efficiency of pulsed DNP experiments and an AWG is an elegant instrumental solution for this purpose.

  16. Thickness fluctuations in turbulent soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, O; Amarouchene, Y; Kellay, H

    2002-05-13

    Rapidly flowing soap films provide a simple and attractive system to study two-dimensional hydrodynamics and turbulence. By measuring the rapid fluctuations of the thickness of the film in the turbulent regime, we find that the statistics of these fluctuations closely resemble those of a passive scalar field in a turbulent flow. The scalar spectra are well described by Kolmogorov-like scaling while the high-order moments show clear deviations from regular scaling just like dye or temperature fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows.

  17. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens; Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line...

  18. Variable Amplitude Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Narayanaswami; Joly, Damien; Leroy, René

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of selected aluminum alloys under variable amplitude loading is discussed in this study, based principally on experimental observations. The tests include single overloads tests in different environments, block load tests and tests using an aircraft wing loading spectrum. It is shown that conditions favoring a planar slip behavior lead to very high delays as opposed to conditions leading to multiple slip behavior. The Aluminium Liithium alloy studied here, has the best fatigue crack growth resistance in almost all test conditions studied here as compared to other conventional alloys. Under the spectrum loading studied here, the same alloy exhibits a change in micromechanism leading to a four fould acceleration of growth rates. Acceptable life predictions can be made, by taking into account this crack acceleration effect.

  19. External drive to inhibitory cells induces alternating episodes of high- and low-amplitude oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar J Avella Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Electrical oscillations in neuronal network activity are ubiquitous in the brain and have been associated with cognition and behavior. Intriguingly, the amplitude of ongoing oscillations, such as measured in EEG recordings, fluctuates irregularly, with episodes of high amplitude alternating with episodes of low amplitude. Despite the widespread occurrence of amplitude fluctuations in many frequency bands and brain regions, the mechanisms by which they are generated are poorly understood. Here, we show that irregular transitions between sub-second episodes of high- and low-amplitude oscillations in the alpha/beta frequency band occur in a generic neuronal network model consisting of interconnected inhibitory and excitatory cells that are externally driven by sustained cholinergic input and trains of action potentials that activate excitatory synapses. In the model, we identify the action potential drive onto inhibitory cells, which represents input from other brain areas and is shown to desynchronize network activity, to be crucial for the emergence of amplitude fluctuations. We show that the duration distributions of high-amplitude episodes in the model match those observed in rat prefrontal cortex for oscillations induced by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Furthermore, the mean duration of high-amplitude episodes varies in a bell-shaped manner with carbachol concentration, just as in mouse hippocampus. Our results suggest that amplitude fluctuations are a general property of oscillatory neuronal networks that can arise through background input from areas external to the network.

  20. Investigation of the Ionospheric Fluctuations Caused by Space Weather Effects Using GNSS TEC Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Cherniak, Iurii; Ephishov, Ivan; Zakharenkova, Irina; Yakimova, Galina

    2013-04-01

    It is known that GPS radio signals passing through the ionosphere suffer varying degrees of rapid variations of their amplitude and phase - signal scintillations. The scintillations are caused by the presence of wide range of scale size irregularities in the ionosphere. It is very important to estimate scintillation and phase fluctuation effects on GNSS navigation system (GPS/GLONASS) performance and consequently on the precession of the obtained position. Effects of the ionospheric irregularities on the GPS signals can be evaluated by measurements of the differential phase time rate of dual frequency GPS signals. GPS observations carried out at the Arctic IGS (International GNSS Service) stations were used to study the development of TEC fluctuations in the high latitude ionosphere. Standard GPS measurements with 30s sampling rate allow the detection of middle- and large-scale ionospheric irregularities. For detection of ionospheric fluctuations the rate of TEC (ROT, in the unit of TECU/min) at 1 min interval was used. The temporal occurrence of TEC fluctuations is clearly observed in time variations in the dual frequency carrier phase along satellite passes. As a measure of the fluctuation activity level the Rate of TEC Index (ROTI) based on standard deviation of ROT was also used. ROTI was estimated in 10-minute interval. These techniques and IGS data were used to study the occurrence of TEC fluctuations at the northern latitude ionosphere for selected geomagnetic storms occurred at the end of 23rd and beginning of new 24th solar cycles. Results demonstrate that fluctuation activity of GPS signals in the high latitude ionosphere is depended on geomagnetic conditions. Intensity of fluctuations essentially increases during geomagnetic storms. The strongest TEC fluctuations occurred as short time rate of TEC enhancements of a factor of 2-5 relative to the quiet time. During geomagnetic disturbed conditions strong phase fluctuations can register at latitudes low

  1. Fluctuation functions in aqueous NaCl and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, David; Koga, Yoshikata

    2005-09-08

    We earlier devised a set of fluctuation functions that provide relative qualitative differences of the amplitude (intensity) and the wavelength (extensity) of fluctuations in entropy and volume and the entropy-volume cross fluctuations. We discuss the mixing schemes in aqueous NaCl and urea using these fluctuation functions. Our earlier studies by using the second and third derivatives of Gibbs energy indicated that their effects on H2O are qualitatively different. An NaCl hydrates 7.5 molecules of H2O but leaves the bulk H2O away from the hydration shell unperturbed. Urea, on the other hand, connects onto the hydrogen bond network of H2O but retards the degree of fluctuation inherent in H2O. The behavior of the fluctuation functions calculated here are consistent with the above mixing schemes. Furthermore, urea was found to reduce the wavelength of fluctuation more strongly than NaCl.

  2. Quantum Fluctuation Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Ligabò, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    We present here a set of lecture notes on exact fluctuation relations. We prove the Jarzynski equality and the Crooks fluctuation theorem, two paradigmatic examples of classical fluctuation relations. Finally we consider their quantum versions, and analyze analogies and differences with the classical case.

  3. Graviton amplitudes from collinear limits of gauge amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Stieberger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We express all tree-level graviton amplitudes in Einstein's gravity as the collinear limits of a linear combination of pure Yang–Mills amplitudes in which each graviton is represented by two gauge bosons, each of them carrying exactly one half of graviton's momentum and helicity.

  4. Periodic amplitude variations as precursors of plumes of equatorial ionospheric irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobuchar, J. A.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Periodic amplitude fluctuations of VHF signals from a geostationary satellite monitored from near the magnetic equator have been observed in the evening hours as precursors of strong Rayleigh fading associated with plumes of irregularities. These periodic fluctuations called amplitude waves exhibit amplitude changes of only 1 to 2 dB and have been observed for up to 30 minutes before the onset of strong scintillations. Individual fades are correlated over distances of at least 120 km in the magnetic east-west direction. The velocity of these wavelike disturbances has been found to be approximately 140 m/s eastward with a corresponding wavelength of 25 km.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF THE DAILY FLUCTUATIONS OF OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE ON THE INDOOR CLIMATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zakharevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone (habitable zone induced by the periodic changes of outdoor air temperature was carried out with the use of numerical simulation of heat transfer processes in the heated room. The developed and programme-implemented two-dimensional physical and mathematical model takes into account unsteady nature of the complex conjugate heat transfer in building envelopes and indoor air spaces when using different types of heating devices. The design features of building structures and windows are considered. The model includes the equations of radiative heat transfer between indoor surfaces, window panes and outdoor environment. In the study, the harmonic changes of outside temperature are specified by the cosine law with the twenty-four-hour period. Two types of heaters are examined: radiator and underfloor heating. Heating output of the devices is specified time-invariable according to the thermal balance defined by the traditional method. Simulations are performed for the three combinations of heat-transfer properties of building structures. The quantitative characteristics of the induced indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone depending on the building envelope thermal inertia and the type of used heater were found out. The analysis of results yielded the following conclusions. Reducing inertia of glazing leads to more rapid penetration of outdoor temperature wave into the room. While the amplitude of the indoor air temperature fluctuations within the occupied zone remains constant by reason of the unchanged thermal inertia of the main building structures. The significant increase in the amplitude of harmonic changes of indoor air temperature within the occupied zone is observed when reducing inertia of walls and floors whereas the delay with respect to outside air temperature fluctuations remains almost invariable.

  6. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Roy, Victor [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  7. Probing short-lived fluctuations in hadrons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Stéphane [Centre de physique théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-04-10

    We develop a picture of dipole-nucleus (namely dilute-dense) and dipole-dipole (dilute-dilute) scattering in the high-energy regime based on the analysis of the fluctuations in the quantum evolution. We emphasize the difference in the nature of the fluctuations probed in these two processes respectively, which, interestingly enough, leads to observable differences in the scattering amplitude profiles.

  8. Current regulation of universal conductance fluctuations in bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Zhimin; Han Binghong; Zhou Yangbo; Zhao Qing; Yu Dapeng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Hongzhou, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.c, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.c [School of Physics and Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-08-15

    We report experimental results on the universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) in the bilayer graphene system. The UCF properties under different temperatures, magnetic fields and current bias were investigated. An anomalous current-dependent UCF was observed: the rms amplitude of the conductance fluctuations is inversely proportional to the current bias. The detailed physical mechanisms were discussed by involving the confined scattering of chiral fermions in graphene.

  9. Kinetic Simulations of the Interruption of Large-Amplitude Shear-Alfvén Waves in a High-β Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Kunz, M. W.; Quataert, E.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    Using two-dimensional hybrid-kinetic simulations, we explore the nonlinear "interruption" of standing and traveling shear-Alfvén waves in collisionless plasmas. Interruption involves a self-generated pressure anisotropy removing the restoring force of a linearly polarized Alfvénic perturbation, and occurs for wave amplitudes δ B⊥/B0≳β-1 /2 (where β is the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure). We use highly elongated domains to obtain maximal scale separation between the wave and the ion gyroscale. For standing waves above the amplitude limit, we find that the large-scale magnetic field of the wave decays rapidly. The dynamics are strongly affected by the excitation of oblique firehose modes, which transition into long-lived parallel fluctuations at the ion gyroscale and cause significant particle scattering. Traveling waves are damped more slowly, but are also influenced by small-scale parallel fluctuations created by the decay of firehose modes. Our results demonstrate that collisionless plasmas cannot support linearly polarized Alfvén waves above δ B⊥/B0˜β-1 /2. They also provide a vivid illustration of two key aspects of low-collisionality plasma dynamics: (i) the importance of velocity-space instabilities in regulating plasma dynamics at high β , and (ii) how nonlinear collisionless processes can transfer mechanical energy directly from the largest scales into thermal energy and microscale fluctuations, without the need for a scale-by-scale turbulent cascade.

  10. Strings 2017 Amplitudes Review Talk

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, John Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Amplitudes review talk I gave at Strings 2017 in Tel Aviv. Broad audience, introducing color-kinematics/double copy, geometric picture, playful constructions (Z-theory), and applications to classical gravity solutions.2 files. PDF and Apple Keynote source.

  11. Amplitude damping of vortex modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An interferometer, mimicking an amplitude damping channel for vortex modes, is presented. Experimentally the action of the channel is in good agreement with that predicted theoretically. Since we can characterize the action of the channel on orbital...

  12. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henn, Johannes M

    2014-01-01

    At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge.   These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum ...

  13. Superstring amplitudes and the associator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drummond, J M; Ragoucy, E

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a pattern in the α′ expansion of tree-level open superstring amplitudes which correlates the appearance of higher depth multiple zeta values with that of simple zeta values in a particular way...

  14. Amplitude requirements, visual information, and the spatial structure of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Andrew B; Eder, Jeffrey R

    2012-08-01

    Studies using a variety of experimental tasks have established that when humans repeatedly produce an action, the amount of variability in system output is distributed across a range of time scales or frequencies. A finding of particular interest is that fluctuations in the output of cognitive systems are the highest at the lowest frequencies with fluctuation magnitude (power) systematically declining as frequency increases. Such time-series structure--captured by spectral analysis--is termed pink noise. However, the appearance of pink noise seems to be limited to tasks where action is executed in the absence of external, task-related feedback. In contrast, a few studies have demonstrated that when action was executed in the presence of external, task-related feedback, power was evenly distributed across all spectral frequencies--that is, a white-noise time-series structure was revealed. Here, we sought to determine if the time-series structure of movement amplitude values would change when movement amplitude requirements increased (6.35, 12.70, 25.40, 50.80, and 101.60 mm) under conditions of full visual feedback. Given that increases in movement amplitude requirements are known to induce increased reliance on the available visual feedback, we predicted an amplitude-requirement-induced shift in time-series structure from pink to white noise. Indeed, those results were revealed. Last, the main findings were captured by a computer simulation that was based on established principles of motor control.

  15. Amplitude Noise Reduction of Ion Lasers with Optical Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    A reduction in amplitude noise on the output of a multi-mode continuous-wave Ar-ion laser was previously demonstrated when a fraction of the output power was retroreflected back into the laser cavity. This result was reproduced in the present work and a Fabry-Perot etalon was used to monitor the longitudinal mode structure of the laser. A decrease in the number of operating longitudinal cavity modes was observed simultaneously with the introduction of the optical feedback and the onset of the amplitude noise reduction. The noise reduction is a result of a reduced number of lasing modes, resulting in less mode beating and amplitude fluctuations of the laser output power.

  16. Tempo and amplitude in growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Growth is defined as an increase of size over time with time usually defined as physical time. Yet, the rigid metric of physical time is not directly relevant to the internal dynamics of growth. Growth is linked to maturation. Children and adolescents differ in the tempo at which they mature. One calendar year differs in its meaning in a fast maturing, and in a slow maturing child. The slow child needs more calendar years for completing the same stage of maturity. Many characteristics in the human growth curve are tempo characteristics. Tempo - being fast or slow maturing - has to be carefully separated from amplitude - being tall or short. Several characteristic phenomena such as catch-up growth after periods of illness and starvation are largely tempo phenomena, and do usually not affect the amplitude component of growth. Applying Functional Data Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, the two main sources of height variance: tempo and amplitude can statistically be separate and quantified. Tempo appears to be more sensitive than amplitude to nutrition, health and environmental stress. An appropriate analysis of growth requires disentangling its two major components: amplitude and tempo. The assessment of the developmental tempo thus is an integral part of assessing child and adolescent growth. Though an Internet portal is currently available to process small amounts of height data (www.willi-will-wachsen.com) for separately determining amplitude and tempo in growth, there is urgent need of better and practical solutions for analyzing individual growth.

  17. Positive amplitudes in the amplituhedron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Hodges, Andrew [Wadham College, University of Oxford,Oxford OX1 3PN (United Kingdom); Trnka, Jaroslav [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology,Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The all-loop integrand for scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 SYM is determined by an “amplitude form' with logarithmic singularities on the boundary of the amplituhedron. In this note we provide strong evidence for a new striking property of the superamplitude, which we conjecture to be true to all loop orders: the amplitude form is positive when evaluated inside the amplituhedron. The statement is sensibly formulated thanks to the natural “bosonization' of the superamplitude associated with the amplituhedron geometry. However this positivity is not manifest in any of the current approaches to scattering amplitudes, and in particular not in the cellulations of the amplituhedron related to on-shell diagrams and the positive grassmannian. The surprising positivity of the form suggests the existence of a “dual amplituhedron' formulation where this feature would be made obvious. We also suggest that the positivity is associated with an extended picture of amplituhedron geometry, with the amplituhedron sitting inside a co-dimension one surface separating “legal' and “illegal' local singularities of the amplitude. We illustrate this in several simple examples, obtaining new expressions for amplitudes not associated with any triangulations, but following in a more invariant manner from a global view of the positive geometry.

  18. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  19. The correlation between the Nernst effect and fluctuation diamagnetism in strongly fluctuating superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kingshuk; Banerjee, Sumilan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study the Nernst effect in fluctuating superconductors by calculating the transport coefficient {α }{xy} in a phenomenological model where the relative importance of phase and amplitude fluctuations of the order parameter is tuned continuously to smoothly evolve from an effective XY model to the more conventional Ginzburg-Landau description. To connect with a concrete experimental realization we choose the model parameters appropriate for cuprate superconductors and calculate {α }{xy} and the magnetization {M} over the entire range of experimentally accessible values of field, temperature and doping. We argue that {α }{xy} and {M} are both determined by the equilibrium properties of the superconducting fluctuations (and not their dynamics) despite the former being a transport quantity. Thus, the experimentally observed correlation between the Nernst signal and the magnetization arises primarily from the correlation between {α }{xy} and {M}. Further, there exists a dimensionless ratio {M}/(T{α }{xy}) that quantifies this correlation. We calculate, for the first time, this ratio over the entire phase diagram of the cuprates and find it agrees with previous results obtained in specific parts of the phase diagram. We conclude that there appears to be no sharp distinction between the regimes dominated by phase fluctuations and Gaussian fluctuations for this ratio in contrast to {α }{xy} and {M} individually. The utility of this ratio is that it can be used to determine the extent to which superconducting fluctuations contribute to the Nernst effect in different parts of the phase diagram given the measured values of magnetization.

  20. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emerge...

  1. Doping dependence of fluctuation diamagnetism in high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kingshuk; Banerjee, Sumilan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2016-02-01

    Using a recently proposed Ginzburg-Landau-like lattice free energy functional due to Banerjee et al. (2011) we calculate the fluctuation diamagnetism of high-Tc superconductors as a function of doping, magnetic field and temperature. We analyse the pairing fluctuations above the superconducting transition temperature in the cuprates, ranging from the strong phase fluctuation dominated underdoped limit to the more conventional amplitude fluctuation dominated overdoped regime. We show that a model where the pairing scale increases and the superfluid density decreases with underdoping produces features of the observed magnetization in the pseudogap region, in good qualitative and reasonable quantitative agreement with the experimental data. In particular, we explicitly show that even when the pseudogap has a pairing origin the magnetization actually tracks the superconducting dome instead of the pseudogap temperature, as seen in experiment. We discuss the doping dependence of the 'onset' temperature for fluctuation diamagnetism and comment on the role of vortex core-energy in our model.

  2. Modeling multiphase flow using fluctuating hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Garcia, Alejandro L; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics provides a model for fluids at mesoscopic scales where thermal fluctuations can have a significant impact on the behavior of the system. Here we investigate a model for fluctuating hydrodynamics of a single-component, multiphase flow in the neighborhood of the critical point. The system is modeled using a compressible flow formulation with a van der Waals equation of state, incorporating a Korteweg stress term to treat interfacial tension. We present a numerical algorithm for modeling this system based on an extension of algorithms developed for fluctuating hydrodynamics for ideal fluids. The scheme is validated by comparison of measured structure factors and capillary wave spectra with equilibrium theory. We also present several nonequilibrium examples to illustrate the capability of the algorithm to model multiphase fluid phenomena in a neighborhood of the critical point. These examples include a study of the impact of fluctuations on the spinodal decomposition following a rapid quench, as well as the piston effect in a cavity with supercooled walls. The conclusion in both cases is that thermal fluctuations affect the size and growth of the domains in off-critical quenches.

  3. On amplitude zeros at threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Argyres, E N; Kleiss, R H

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of zeros of 2 to n amplitudes at threshold in scalar theories is studied. We find a differential equation for the scalar potential, which incorporates all known cases where the 2 to n amplitudes at threshold vanish for all sufficiently large $n$, in all space-time dimensions, $d\\ge 1$. This equation is related to the reflectionless potentials of Quantum Mechanics and to integrable theories in 1+1 dimensions. As an application, we find that the sine-Gordon potential and its hyperbolic version, the sinh-Gordon potential, also have amplitude zeros at threshold, ${\\cal A}(2\\to n)=0$, for $n\\ge 4$ and $d\\ge 2$, independently of the mass and the coupling constant.

  4. Nonsinglet pentagons and NMHV amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scattering amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric gauge theory receive a dual description in terms of the expectation value of the super Wilson loop stretched on a null polygonal contour. This makes the analysis amenable to nonperturbative techniques. Presently, we elaborate on a refined form of the operator product expansion in terms of pentagon transitions to compute twist-two contributions to NMHV amplitudes. To start with, we provide a novel derivation of scattering matrices starting from Baxter equations for flux-tube excitations propagating on magnon background. We propose bootstrap equations obeyed by pentagon form factors with nonsinglet quantum numbers with respect to the R-symmetry group and provide solutions to them to all orders in 't Hooft coupling. These are then successfully confronted against available perturbative calculations for NMHV amplitudes to four-loop order.

  5. Large amplitude oscillatory elongation flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Laillé, Philippe; Yu, Kaijia

    2008-01-01

    with a molecular weight of 145 kg/ mol was subjected to the oscillative flow. The onset of the steady periodic regime is reached at the same Hencky strain as the onset of the steady elongational viscosity ( Lambda = 0). The integral molecular stress function formulation within the 'interchain pressure' concept......A filament stretching rheometer (FSR) was used for measuring the elongation flow with a large amplitude oscillative elongation imposed upon the flow. The large amplitude oscillation imposed upon the elongational flow as a function of the time t was defined as epsilon(t) =(epsilon) over dot(0)t...... + Lambda[1 - cos( 2 pi Omega(epsilon) over dot(0)t)] where epsilon is the Hencky strain, (epsilon) over dot(0) is a constant elongational rate for the base elongational flow, Lambda the strain amplitude ( Lambda >= 0), and Omega the strain frequency. A narrow molecular mass distribution linear polystyrene...

  6. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  7. Subjective vs Objective Accommodative Amplitude: Preschool to Presbyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Heather A.; Stuebing, Karla K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study compared subjective and objective accommodative amplitudes to characterize changes from preschool to presbyopia. Methods Monocular accommodative amplitude was measured with three techniques in random order (subjective push-up, objective minus lens stimulated, and objective proximal stimulated) on 236 subjects 3–64 years using a 1.5mm letter. Subjective push-up amplitudes were the dioptric distance at which the target first blurred along a near-point rod. Objective minus lens stimulated amplitudes were the greatest accommodative response obtained by Grand Seiko autorefraction as subjects viewed the stimulus at 33cm through increasing minus lens powers. Objective proximal stimulated amplitudes were the greatest accommodative response obtained by Grand Seiko autorefraction as subjects viewed the stimulus at increasing proximity from 40cm up to 3.33cm. Results In comparison with subjective push-up amplitudes, objective amplitudes were lower at all ages, with the most dramatic difference occurring in the 3–5 year group (subjective push-up = 16.00 ± 4.98D versus objective proximal stimulated = 7.94 ± 2.37D and objective lens stimulated = 6.20 ± 1.99D). Objective proximal and lens stimulated amplitudes were largest in the 6–10 year group (8.81 ± 1.24D and 8.05 ± 1.82D, respectively) and gradually decreased until the fourth decade of life when a rapid decline to presbyopia occurred. There was a significant linear relationship between objective techniques (y = 0.74 + 0.96x, R2 = 0.85, p<0.001) with greater amplitudes measured for the proximal stimulated technique (mean difference = 0.55D). Conclusions Objective measurements of accommodation demonstrate that accommodative amplitude is substantially less than that measured by the subjective push-up technique, particularly in young children. These findings have important clinical implications for the management of uncorrected hyperopia. PMID:25602235

  8. Subjective versus objective accommodative amplitude: preschool to presbyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Heather A; Stuebing, Karla K

    2014-11-01

    This study compared subjective and objective accommodative amplitudes to characterize changes from preschool to presbyopia. Monocular accommodative amplitude was measured with three techniques in random order (subjective push-up, objective minus lens stimulated, and objective proximal stimulated) on 236 subjects aged 3 to 64 years using a 1.5-mm letter. Subjective push-up amplitudes were the dioptric distance at which the target first blurred along a near-point rod. Objective minus lens stimulated amplitudes were the greatest accommodative response obtained by Grand Seiko autorefraction as subjects viewed the stimulus at 33 cm through increasing minus lens powers. Objective proximal stimulated amplitudes were the greatest accommodative response obtained by Grand Seiko autorefraction as subjects viewed the stimulus at increasing proximity from 40 cm up to 3.33 cm. In comparison with subjective push-up amplitudes, objective amplitudes were lower at all ages, with the most dramatic difference occurring in the 3- to 5-year group (subjective push-up, 16.00 ± 4.98 diopters [D] vs. objective proximal stimulated, 7.94 ± 2.37 D, and objective lens stimulated, 6.20 ± 1.99 D). Objective proximal and lens stimulated amplitudes were largest in the 6- to 10-year group (8.81 ± 1.24 D and 8.05 ± 1.82 D, respectively) and gradually decreased until the fourth decade of life when a rapid decline to presbyopia occurred. There was a significant linear relationship between objective techniques (y = 0.74 + 0.96x, R2 = 0.85, p < 0.001) with greater amplitudes measured for the proximal stimulated technique (mean difference, 0.55 D). Objective measurements of accommodation demonstrate that accommodative amplitude is substantially less than that measured by the subjective push-up technique, particularly in young children. These findings have important clinical implications for the management of uncorrected hyperopia.

  9. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Johannes M. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Plefka, Jan C. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2014-03-01

    First monographical text on this fundamental topic. Course-tested, pedagogical and self-contained exposition. Includes exercises and solutions. At the fundamental level, the interactions of elementary particles are described by quantum gauge field theory. The quantitative implications of these interactions are captured by scattering amplitudes, traditionally computed using Feynman diagrams. In the past decade tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of and computational abilities with regard to scattering amplitudes in gauge theories, going beyond the traditional textbook approach. These advances build upon on-shell methods that focus on the analytic structure of the amplitudes, as well as on their recently discovered hidden symmetries. In fact, when expressed in suitable variables the amplitudes are much simpler than anticipated and hidden patterns emerge. These modern methods are of increasing importance in phenomenological applications arising from the need for high-precision predictions for the experiments carried out at the Large Hadron Collider, as well as in foundational mathematical physics studies on the S-matrix in quantum field theory. Bridging the gap between introductory courses on quantum field theory and state-of-the-art research, these concise yet self-contained and course-tested lecture notes are well-suited for a one-semester graduate level course or as a self-study guide for anyone interested in fundamental aspects of quantum field theory and its applications. The numerous exercises and solutions included will help readers to embrace and apply the material presented in the main text.

  10. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L; Hernandez-Saldana, H; Izrailev, F M; Leyvraz, F; Seligman, T H

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  11. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  12. Thrombelastography Early Amplitudes in bleeding and coagulopathic trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas H; Meyer, Martin A S; Meyer, Anna Sina P

    2017-01-01

    variables in a large multicenter cohort of moderately to severely injured trauma patients admitted at three North European level 1 Trauma Centers. METHODS: Prospective observational study of 404 trauma patients with clinical suspicion of severe injury from London, UK, Copenhagen, Denmark and Oslo, Norway...... amplitude. CONCLUSIONS: We found strong associations between TEG early amplitudes A5/A10 and maximum amplitude in rapid TEG, kaolin TEG and TEG Functional Fibrinogen across trauma patients with coagulopathy and massive transfusion requirements. Introducing the use of early amplitudes can reduce time...... to diagnosis of coagulopathy and may be used in TEG-monitoring of trauma patient. Further randomized controlled trials evaluating the role of TEG in guiding hemostatic resuscitation are warranted. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic and diagnostic study, level III....

  13. Electromyogram amplitude estimation with adaptive smoothing window length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, E A

    1999-06-01

    Typical electromyogram (EMG) amplitude estimators use a fixed window length for smoothing the amplitude estimate. When the EMG amplitude is dynamic, previous research suggests that varying the smoothing length as a function of time may improve amplitude estimation. This paper develops optimal time-varying selection of the smoothing window length using a stochastic model of the EMG signal. Optimal selection is a function of the EMG amplitude and its derivatives. Simulation studies, in which EMG amplitude was changed randomly, found that the "best" adaptive filter performed as well as the "best" fixed-length filter. Experimental studies found the advantages of the adaptive processor to be situation dependent. Subjects used real-time EMG amplitude estimates to track a randomly-moving target. Perhaps due to task difficulty, no differences in adaptive versus fixed-length processors were observed when the target speed was fast. When the target speed was slow, the experimental results were consistent with the simulation predictions. When the target moved between two constant levels, the adaptive processor responded rapidly to the target level transitions and had low variance while the target dwelled on a level.

  14. Periodic amplitude variations as precursors of plumes of equatorial ionospheric irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klobuchar, J.A.; Lee, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Periodic amplitude fluctuations of VHF signals from a geostationary satellite monitored from near the magnetic equator have been observed in the evening hours as precursors of strong Rayleigh fading associated with plumes and irregularities. These periodic fluctuations called amplitude waves exhibit amplitude changes of only 1 to 2 dB and have been observed for up to 30 minutes before the onset of strong scintillations. Individual fades are correlated over distances of at least 120 km in the magnetic east-west direction. The velocity of these wavelike disturbances has been found to be approximately 140 ms-1 eastward with a corresponding wavelength of 25 km. No wavelike behavior of Faraday rotation, a measure of the background changes in TEC, was observed during these times. Several mechanisms are examined as the cause of these amplitude waves; however, none was found to be completely satisfactory in explaining the observations. Reprints.

  15. Gearbox Vibration Signal Amplitude and Frequency Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakher Chaari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gearboxes usually run under fluctuating load conditions during service, however most of papers available in the literature describe models of gearboxes under stationary load conditions. Main task of published papers is fault modeling for their detection. Considering real situation from industry, the assumption of stationarity of load conditions cannot be longer kept. Vibration signals issued from monitoring in maintenance operations differ from mentioned models (due to load non-stationarity and may be difficult to analyze which lead to erroneous diagnosis of the system. The objective of this paper is to study the influence of time varying load conditions on a gearbox dynamic behavior. To investigate this, a simple spur gear system without defects is modeled. It is subjected to a time varying load. The speed-torque characteristic of the driving motor is considered. The load variation induces speed variation, which causes a variation in the gearmesh stiffness period. Computer simulation shows deep amplitude modulations with sidebands that don't differ from those obtained when there is a defective tooth. In order to put in evidence the time varying load effects, Short Time Fourier Transform and then Smoothed Wigner-Ville distribution are used. Results show that the last one is well suited for the studied case.

  16. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient ρDCCA has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ρDCCA works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ρDCCA that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ρq not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ρq works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q -dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation.

  17. Critical thermal limits affected differently by developmental and adult thermal fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salachan, Paul Vinu; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2017-12-01

    Means and variances of the environmental thermal regime play an important role in determining the fitness of terrestrial ectotherms. Adaptive phenotypic responses induced by heterogeneous temperatures have been shown to be mediated by molecular pathways independent of the classic heat shock responses; however, an in-depth understanding of plasticity induced by fluctuating temperatures is still lacking. We investigated high and low temperature acclimation induced by fluctuating thermal regimes at two different mean temperatures, at two different amplitudes of fluctuation and across the developmental and adult life stages of Drosophila melanogaster For developmental acclimation, we found mildly detrimental effects of high-amplitude fluctuations for critical thermal minima, while the critical thermal maxima showed a beneficial response to higher amplitude fluctuations. For adult acclimation involving shifts between fluctuating and constant regimes, cold tolerance was shown to be dictated by developmental temperature conditions irrespective of the adult treatments, while the acquired heat tolerance was readily lost when flies developed at fluctuating temperature were shifted to a constant regime as adults. Interestingly, we also found that the effect of fluctuations at any life stage was gradually lost with prolonged adult maintenance, suggesting a more prominent effect of fluctuations during developmental compared with adult acclimation in D.melanogaster. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  19. On Statistics of Electric Field Amplitudes in the Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Voshchepynets, A.; Volokitin, A.; Krafft, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic study of the properties of the Langmuir wave turbulence generated by bump-on-tail instability in strongly non-homogeneous plasma. This type of turbulence occurs in numerous processes involving electrons beams in space plasmas. We analyse the synthetic data obtained in the numerical simulation based on two different approaches: the Hamiltonian model, and so-called probabilistic model. The Hamiltonian model describes in the self-consistent manner the wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas. The model enables us to study the general properties of the distributions of the amplitudes of the Langmuir waves driven by the high-velocity electron beams in the fluctuating plasma. We pay special attention to the study of statistics of Languir waves under conditions when the decay instability, involving ion-sound waves, is developed. The probabilistic model, being modified version of the standard quasi-linear theory requires much less computational resources. Due to this it enables us to performed a detailed analysis of the statistics of the amplitudes of the Langmuir waves in the plasma with density fluctuations. To analyze data obtained in both numerical models, a Pearson technique was used to classify the probability distribution functions (PDF) of the logarithm of wave intensity. It was shown that core parts the PDF's belong to Pearson types I,IV and VI, depending on the spatial profiles of the density fluctuations, rather than to the normal distribution. The study also showed that the high-amplitude parts of the distributions follow power-low or exponential decay, depending on the type of core distribution.

  20. Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G. A.; Wilson, L. B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Shane, N.; Zhang, T. L.; Moore, T. E.; Coates, A. J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first observation of magnetic fluctuations consistent with Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) in the foreshock of the planet Venus. Three monolithic magnetic field spikes were observed by the Venus Express on the 11th of April 2009. The structures were approx.1.5->11s in duration, had magnetic compression ratios between approx.3->6, and exhibited elliptical polarization. These characteristics are consistent with the SLAMS observed at Earth, Jupiter, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner, and thus we hypothesize that it is possible SLAMS may be found at any celestial body with a foreshock.

  1. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  2. Microcanonical quantum fluctuation theorems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Morillo, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Previously derived expressions for the characteristic function of work performed on a quantum system by a classical external force are generalized to arbitrary initial states of the considered system and to Hamiltonians with degenerate spectra. In the particular case of microcanonical initial states, explicit expressions for the characteristic function and the corresponding probability density of work are formulated. Their classical limit as well as their relations to the corresponding canonical expressions are discussed. A fluctuation theorem is derived that expresses the ratio of probabilities of work for a process and its time reversal to the ratio of densities of states of the microcanonical equilibrium systems with corresponding initial and final Hamiltonians. From this Crooks-type fluctuation theorem a relation between entropies of different systems can be derived which does not involve the time-reversed process. This entropy-from-work theorem provides an experimentally accessible way to measure entropies.

  3. Control of the floating potential fluctuations via limiter biasing in the Saskatchewan Torus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Xiao, C.; Zhang, L.; Hirose, A.

    1994-11-01

    Limiter biasing experiments have been performed in the STOR-M tokamak (Saskatchewan Torus-Modified) [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3277 (1992)]. It is found that the floating potential fluctuation amplitudes in the scrape-off layer (SOL) depend mainly on the limiter potential and this potential determines the current flowing toward the limiter. The dependence of the fluctuation amplitude on the potential gradient in the SOL is rather weak. For positive limiter bias, a strong suppression of the floating potential fluctuation is observed, while for negative limiter biasing the floating potential fluctuations are significantly enhanced. The observed phenomena are consistent with recent theoretical studies [Phys. Fluids B 5, 3191 (1993)].

  4. Positive amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in auroral plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S. S.; Lakhina, G. S.

    Rapidly moving positive potential pulses have been observed by FAST and POLAR satellites in downward current region of auroral plasma. They are characterized by their high velocities (> 1000 km/s) which are of the order of the electron drift velocities and are found to be associated with electron beams. Interestingly, it is observed that the width of such electron mode solitary waves increases with the amplitude [Ergun et al. (1998)]. Theoretically, they are interpreted as BGK electron phase space holes. However, Berthomier et al. (2000) have shown that a positive amplitude solitary wave may well exist for an electron acoustic mode. According to a weakly nonlinear theory, the width of such an electron acoustic solitary wave is expected to decrease with increasing amplitude which contradicts the observation. On the other hand, in our previous work, we have shown that the width of a large amplitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary wave increases with an increasing amplitude [Ghosh et al. (2004)]. In the present work, we have extended our analysis to an electron acoustic solitary wave. A fully nonlinear solution of positive amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves (electron acoustic solitary holes) has been obtained by adopting the Sagdeev pseudopotetial technique. The plasma is assumed to be magnetized and traversed by the electron beam. The existence domain of such electron acoustic solitary holes is studied in detail. It is found that the width of electron acoustic solitary holes increases with increasing amplitude. Theoretically estimated width-amplitude variation profiles have been compared with recent satellite observations. It is proposed that a model based on electron acoustic mode may well interpret the fast moving solitary holes for an appropriate parameter space. References:Berthomier et al., Phys. Plasma, 7, 2987 (2000).Ergun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 81, 826, (1998).Ghosh and Lakhina,, Nonlin. Process. Geophys, (2004), (to be appeared).

  5. Quasispecies evolution on a fitness landscape with a fluctuating peak

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin; Snoad, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    A quasispecies evolving on a fitness landscape with a single peak of fluctuating height is studied. In the approximation that back mutations can be ignored, the rate equations can be solved analytically. It is shown that the error threshold on this class of dynamic landscapes is defined by the time average of the selection pressure. In the case of a periodically fluctuating fitness peak we also study the phase-shift and response amplitude of the previously documented low-pass filter effect. T...

  6. Dynamic photosynthesis under a fluctuating environment: a modelling-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    In their natural environment, leaves are exposed to rapid fluctuations of irradiance. Research on CO2 assimilation under fluctuating irradiance often relies on measurements of gas exchange during transients where irradiance is rapidly increased or decreased, after the leaf has adapted to a

  7. On the saturation amplitude of the f-mode instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kastaun, Wolfgang; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2010-01-01

    We investigate strong nonlinear damping effects which occur during high amplitude oscillations of neutron stars, and the gravitational waves they produce. For this, we use a general relativistic nonlinear hydrodynamics code in conjunction with a fixed spacetime (Cowling approximation) and a polytropic equation of state (EOS). Gravitational waves are estimated using the quadrupole formula. Our main interest are $l=m=2$ $f$-modes subject to the CFS (Chandrasekhar, Friedman, Schutz) instability, but we also investigate axisymmetric and quasi-radial modes. We study various models to determine the influence of rotation rate and EOS. We find that axisymmetric oscillations at high amplitudes are predominantly damped by shock formation, while the non-axisymmetric $f$-modes are mainly damped by wave breaking and, for rapidly rotating models, coupling to non-axisymmetric inertial modes. From the observed nonlinear damping, we derive upper limits for the saturation amplitude of CFS-unstable $f$-modes. Finally, we estima...

  8. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  9. Fluctuation relations for anisotropic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villavicencio-Sanchez, R.; Harris, R. J.; Touchette, H.

    2014-02-01

    Currents of particles or energy in driven non-equilibrium steady states are known to satisfy certain symmetries, referred to as fluctuation relations, determining the ratio of the probabilities of positive fluctuations to negative ones. A generalization of these fluctuation relations has been proposed recently for extended non-equilibrium systems of dimension greater than one, assuming, crucially, that they are isotropic (Hurtado P. I., Pérez-Espigares C., del Pozo J. J. and Garrido P. L., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 7704). Here we relax this assumption and derive a fluctuation relation for d-dimensional systems having anisotropic bulk driving rates. We test the validity of this anisotropic fluctuation relation by calculating the particle current fluctuations in the 2d anisotropic zero-range process, using both exact and fluctuating hydrodynamic approaches.

  10. Grassmannian geometry of scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cachazo, Freddy; Goncharov, Alexander; Postnikov, Alexander; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Outlining a revolutionary reformulation of the foundations of perturbative quantum field theory, this book is a self-contained and authoritative analysis of the application of this new formulation to the case of planar, maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory. The book begins by deriving connections between scattering amplitudes and Grassmannian geometry from first principles before introducing novel physical and mathematical ideas in a systematic manner accessible to both physicists and mathematicians. The principle players in this process are on-shell functions which are closely related to certain sub-strata of Grassmannian manifolds called positroids - in terms of which the classification of on-shell functions and their relations becomes combinatorially manifest. This is an essential introduction to the geometry and combinatorics of the positroid stratification of the Grassmannian and an ideal text for advanced students and researchers working in the areas of field theory, high energy physics, and the...

  11. Phase-amplitude coupling and infraslow (fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Garth J.; Pan, Wen-Ju; Billings, Jacob C. W.; Grooms, Joshua K.; Shakil, Sadia; Jaeger, Dieter; Keilholz, Shella D.

    2014-01-01

    Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can identify network alterations that occur in complex psychiatric diseases and behaviors, but its interpretation is difficult because the neural basis of the infraslow BOLD fluctuations is poorly understood. Previous results link dynamic activity during the resting state to both infraslow frequencies in local field potentials (LFP) (1 Hz). To investigate the relationship between these frequencies, LFPs were recorded from rats under two anesthetics: isoflurane and dexmedetomidine. Signal phases were calculated from low-frequency LFP and compared to signal amplitudes from high-frequency LFP to determine if modulation existed between the two frequency bands (phase-amplitude coupling). Isoflurane showed significant, consistent phase-amplitude coupling at nearly all pairs of frequencies, likely due to the burst-suppression pattern of activity that it induces. However, no consistent phase-amplitude coupling was observed in rats that were anesthetized with dexmedetomidine. fMRI-LFP correlations under isoflurane using high frequency LFP were reduced when the low frequency LFP's influence was accounted for, but not vice-versa, or in any condition under dexmedetomidine. The lack of consistent phase-amplitude coupling under dexmedetomidine and lack of shared variance between high frequency and low frequency LFP as it relates to fMRI suggests that high and low frequency neural electrical signals may contribute differently, possibly even independently, to resting state fMRI. This finding suggests that researchers take care in interpreting the neural basis of resting state fMRI, as multiple dynamic factors in the underlying electrophysiology could be driving any particular observation. PMID:24904325

  12. Amplitude distribution in the right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H R; Amir, R; Lenaers, A; Vandevivere, J

    1985-01-01

    Amplitude distribution in the right ventricle obtained from ECG-gated ventriculography has been reviewed and six amplitude distribution patterns were identified. Homogeneous distribution was rarely observed even in patients without any cardiac or pulmonary diseases. Furthermore, there was no difference in frequency distribution of the amplitude distribution patterns between the control group, patients with coronary diseases, and those with recent inferior myocardial infarction. It was concluded that amplitude distribution could not be used to detect hypokinetic areas in the right ventricle.

  13. Amplitude distribution in the right ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, H.R.; Amir, R.; Lenaers, A.; Vandevivere, J.

    1985-01-01

    Amplitude distribution in the right ventricle obtained from ECG-gated ventriculography has been reviewed and six amplitude distribution patterns were identified. Homogeneous distribution was rarely observed even in patients without any cardiac or pulmonary diseases. Furthermore, there was not difference in frequency distribution of the amplitude distribution patterns between the control group, patients with coronary diseases, and those with recent inferior myocardial infarction. It was concluded that amplitude distribution could not be used to detect hypokinetic areas in the right ventricle.

  14. Probability distribution functions for intermittent scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorsen, A.; Garcia, O. E.

    2018-03-01

    A stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas has been constructed based on a super-position of uncorrelated pulses arriving according to a Poisson process. In the most common applications of the model, the pulse amplitudes are assumed exponentially distributed, supported by conditional averaging of large-amplitude fluctuations in experimental measurement data. This basic assumption has two potential limitations. First, statistical analysis of measurement data using conditional averaging only reveals the tail of the amplitude distribution to be exponentially distributed. Second, exponentially distributed amplitudes leads to a positive definite signal which cannot capture fluctuations in for example electric potential and radial velocity. Assuming pulse amplitudes which are not positive definite often make finding a closed form for the probability density function (PDF) difficult, even if the characteristic function remains relatively simple. Thus estimating model parameters requires an approach based on the characteristic function, not the PDF. In this contribution, the effect of changing the amplitude distribution on the moments, PDF and characteristic function of the process is investigated and a parameter estimation method using the empirical characteristic function is presented and tested on synthetically generated data. This proves valuable for describing intermittent fluctuations of all plasma parameters in the boundary region of magnetized plasmas.

  15. Kinetic Simulations of the Interruption of Large-Amplitude Shear-Alfvén Waves in a High-β Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Kunz, M W; Quataert, E; Schekochihin, A A

    2017-10-13

    Using two-dimensional hybrid-kinetic simulations, we explore the nonlinear "interruption" of standing and traveling shear-Alfvén waves in collisionless plasmas. Interruption involves a self-generated pressure anisotropy removing the restoring force of a linearly polarized Alfvénic perturbation, and occurs for wave amplitudes δB_{⊥}/B_{0}≳β^{-1/2} (where β is the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure). We use highly elongated domains to obtain maximal scale separation between the wave and the ion gyroscale. For standing waves above the amplitude limit, we find that the large-scale magnetic field of the wave decays rapidly. The dynamics are strongly affected by the excitation of oblique firehose modes, which transition into long-lived parallel fluctuations at the ion gyroscale and cause significant particle scattering. Traveling waves are damped more slowly, but are also influenced by small-scale parallel fluctuations created by the decay of firehose modes. Our results demonstrate that collisionless plasmas cannot support linearly polarized Alfvén waves above δB_{⊥}/B_{0}∼β^{-1/2}. They also provide a vivid illustration of two key aspects of low-collisionality plasma dynamics: (i) the importance of velocity-space instabilities in regulating plasma dynamics at high β, and (ii) how nonlinear collisionless processes can transfer mechanical energy directly from the largest scales into thermal energy and microscale fluctuations, without the need for a scale-by-scale turbulent cascade.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Pressure Fluctuation around the Tongue Region in a Centrifugal Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. L.; Dou, H.-S.; Chen, X. P.; Zhu, Z. C.; Cui, B. L.

    2016-11-01

    Pressure fluctuation near the tongue is one of the primary sources of pump vibration and noise. In order to investigate the effect of pressure fluctuation near the tongue, the RANS equations and the RNG k-epsilon turbulence model are employed to simulate the flow in the pump. The SIMPLE algorithm is applied to couple the solutions of the system of equations. Flow field within the centrifugal pump under different flow rates are obtained by simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data to verify the reliability of the calculation model. It is found that the pressure fluctuation at each monitor point is a periodic wave but non-uniform under small flow rate. When the flow rate is larger than the design flow rate, average pressure and standard deviation at monitor points is relative uniform. The dominate frequency of pressure fluctuation is the blade passing frequency and the amplitude of pressure fluctuation is regular. At small flow rate, complex unstable flow makes average pressure and standard deviation at monitor points increasing obviously. Amplitude of pressure fluctuation is larger than that of design flow rate conditions and the maximum amplitude of pressure fluctuation in frequency domain exists at the monitor point just behind the tongue along the impeller rotation direction.

  17. Regional amplitude of the low-frequency fluctuations at rest predicts word reading skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, M.; De Beuckelaer, A.; Wang, X; Liu, L.; Song, Y.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals’ reading skills are critical for their educational development, but variation in reading skills is known to be large. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the role of spontaneous brain activity at rest in individual differences in reading skills

  18. Evolution of concentration fluctuation during phase separation of polystyrene/poly (vinyl methyl ether) blend in the presence of nanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qi; Zuo, Min; Yang, Ruiquan

    2017-01-01

    and the linearized Cahn–Hilliard theory could describe the amplitude evolution of concentration fluctuation at the early stage of phase separation. Hydrophilic nanosilica A200 dispersed in PVME-rich phase behaved an obvious inhibition effect on the concentration fluctuation of blend matrix, while hydrophobic...

  19. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  20. Force fluctuations and polymerization dynamics of intracellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangwynne, Clifford

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are dynamic biopolymers within the cytoskeleton of living cells. They play a central role in many biological processes including cell division, migration, and cargo transport. Microtubules are significantly more rigid than other cytoskeletal biopolymers, such as actin filaments, and are insensitive to thermal fluctuations on cellular length scales. However, we show that intracellular microtubules exhibit bending amplitudes with a surprisingly thermal-like wavevector dependence, but with an apparent persistence length about 100 times smaller than that measured in vitro. By studying the time-dependent bending fluctuations of individual filaments, we find that the thermal-like bends are fluctuating significantly only on short length scales, while they are frozen-in on longer length scales [1], reminiscent of non-ergodic behavior seen in systems far from equilibrium. Long wavelength bends are suppressed by the surrounding elastic cytoskeleton, which confines bending to short length scales on the order of a few microns [2]. These short wavelength bending fluctuations naturally cause fluctuations in the orientation of the microtubule tip. Tip fluctuations result in a persistent random walk trajectory of microtubule growth, but with a small non-equilibrium persistence length, explaining the origin of quenched thermal-like bends. These results suggest that intracellular motor activity has a highly fluctuating character that dominates over thermal fluctuations, with important consequences for fundamental biological processes. [1] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, DA Weitz, PNAS, 104:16128 (2007). [2] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, S Kumar, NA Geisse, J Talbot, L. Mahadevan, KK Parker, DE Ingber, DA Weitz, JCB, 173:733 (2006).

  1. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, Jaroslaw; Drozdz, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, non-stationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analogue of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: MFDFA and MFCCA, respectively. The resulting new coefficient $\\rho_q$ not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations, but ...

  2. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiban, Radu; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2011-11-01

    This issue aims to serve as an introduction to our current understanding of the structure of scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, an area which has seen particularly rapid advances in recent years following decades of steady progress. The articles contained herein provide a snapshot of the latest developments which we hope will serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and other scientists wishing to learn about the current state of the field, even if our continually evolving understanding of the subject might soon render this compilation incomplete. Why the fascination with scattering amplitudes, which have attracted the imagination and dedicated effort of so many physicists? Part of it stems from the belief, supported now by numerous examples, that unexpected simplifications of otherwise apparently complicated calculations do not happen by accident. Instead they provide a strong motivation to seek out an underlying explanation. The insight thereby gained can subsequently be used to make the next class of seemingly impossible calculations not only possible, but in some cases even trivial. This two-pronged strategy of exploring and exploiting the structure of gauge theory amplitudes appeals to a wide audience from formal theorists interested in mathematical structure for the sake of its own beauty to more phenomenologically-minded physicists eager to speed up the next generation of analysis software. Understandably it is the maximally supersymmetric 𝒩 = 4 Yang-Mills theory (SYM) which has the simplest structure and has correspondingly received the most attention. Rarely in theoretical physics are we fortunate enough to encounter a toy model which is simple enough to be solved completely yet rich enough to possess interesting non-trivial structure while simultaneously, and most importantly, being applicable (even if only as a good approximation) to a wide range of 'real' systems. The canonical example in quantum mechanics is of course the harmonic

  3. SOL width and intermittent fluctuations in KSTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.E. Garcia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radial profiles of the ion saturation current and its fluctuation statistics are presented from probe measurements in L-mode, neutral beam heated plasmas at the outboard mid-plane region of KSTAR. The results are consistent with the familiar two-layer structure, seen elsewhere in tokamak L-mode discharges, with a steep near-SOL profile and a broad far-SOL profile. The profile scale length in the far-SOL increases drastically with line-averaged density, thereby enhancing plasma interactions with the main chamber walls. Time series from the far-SOL region are characterised by large-amplitude bursts attributed to the radial motion of blob-like plasma filaments. Analysis of a data time series of several seconds duration under stationary plasma conditions reveals the statistical properties of these fluctuations, including the rate of level crossings and the average duration of periods spent above a given threshold level. This is shown to be in excellent agreement with predictions of a stochastic model, giving novel predictions of plasma–wall interactions due to transient transport events.

  4. SOL width and intermittent fluctuations in KSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, O E; Theodorsen, A; Bak, J -G; Hong, S -H; Kim, H -S; Pitts, R A

    2016-01-01

    Radial profiles of the ion saturation current and its fluctuation statistics are presented from probe measurements in L-mode, neutral beam heated plasmas at the outboard mid-plane region of KSTAR. The familiar two-layer structure, seen elsewhere in tokamak L-mode discharges, with a steep near-SOL profile and a broad far-SOL profile, is observed. The profile scale length in the far-SOL increases drastically with line-averaged density, thereby enhancing plasma interactions with the main chamber walls. Time series from the far-SOL region are characterised by large-amplitude bursts attributed to the radial motion of blob-like plasma filaments. Analysis of a data time series of several seconds duration under stationary plasma conditions reveals the statistical properties of these fluctuations, including the rate of level crossings and the average duration of periods spent above a given threshold level. This is shown to be in excellent agreement with predictions of a stochastic model, giving novel predictions of pl...

  5. Study on the Effect of Inlet Fluctuation on Cavitation in a Cone Flow Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Liu; Shuping, Cao; Xiaohui, Luo

    2015-05-01

    A mathematical method was conducted to investigate the mechanism of formation of cavitation cloud, while the inlet stream contains a fluctuating flow. Based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and the static pressure distribution in a cone flow channel, parameters related to cavitation cloud are estimated, and the collapse pressure of the cavitation cloud is obtained by solving the equation of Mørch's model. Moreover, the effect of the amplitude and frequency of inlet fluctuation on cavitation is studied. Results revealed that the smaller the amplitude, the smaller the cloud and the lower the collapse pressure. And frequency of fluctuating stream was found to have a relative great effect on frequency of peak pressure but not so significant on peak collapse pressure and size of cloud. It is concluded that limiting the inlet fluctuation reduces the erosion and noise generated by cavitation collapse.

  6. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.

    1987-06-04

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are not terms in the perturbative expansion of physical S-matrix elements: These can be defined only with massless external states. Consistent massive amplitudes repuire an off-shell formalism.

  7. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  8. Fluctuating attention in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Aarsland, Dag; Janvin, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Lewy body dementia (DLB), which share many clinical and pathological features with Parkinson’s disease (PD), is charac- terised by marked fluctuations in cognition and consciousness. Fluctuating cognition has not been formally studied in PD, although some studies indicate that PD patients show...

  9. Quantum Correction of Fluctuation Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Monnai, T.; Tasaki, S.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum analogues of the transient fluctuation theorem(TFT) and steady-state fluctuation theorem(SSFT) are investigated for a harmonic oscillator linearly coupled with a harmonic reservoir. The probability distribution for the work done externally is derived and quantum correction for TFT and SSFT are calculated.

  10. Fluctuation conductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    superconducting layers in each unit cell is also not adequate. We suggest the fluctuation conductivity to be reduced due to the reduction in the density of states (DOS) of the quasiparticles which results due to the formation of Cooper pairs at the onset of the fluctuations. The data agrees with the theory proposed by Dorin et al ...

  11. Pressure Fluctuations in Nonideal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankin, A.; Norman, G.; Saitov, I.

    Fluctuations of pressure of singly ionized nonideal plasma are studied using the fluctuation approach which provides the self-consistent joint description of free and weakly bound electron states. The classical molecular dynamics method is used. The electron-ion interaction is described by the

  12. Nonmotor Fluctuations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Christiana; Storch, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The advanced stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor complications such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesias induced by long-term levodopa treatment. Recent clinical research provides growing evidence that various nonmotor symptoms such as neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sensory symptoms (particularly pain) also show fluctuations in patients with motor fluctuations (called nonmotor fluctuations or NMF). However, NMF have not yet been adequately considered in routine care of advanced PD patients and only few therapeutic studies are available. Since the pathophysiology of NMF remains largely unknown, innovative therapeutic concepts are largely missing. The close connection of NMF and motor fluctuations, however, strongly suggests that the strategies used to treat motor complications-namely continuous dopaminergic stimulation-also apply for the therapy of NMF. Future controlled clinical trials specifically addressing NMF are urgently warranted. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Staggered Schemes for Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balboa, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Donev, A; Fai, T; Griffith, B; Peskin, C S

    2011-01-01

    We develop numerical schemes for solving the isothermal compressible and incompressible equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics on a grid with staggered momenta. We develop a second-order accurate spatial discretization of the diffusive, advective and stochastic fluxes that satisfies a discrete fluctuation-dissipation balance, and construct temporal discretizations that are at least second-order accurate in time deterministically and in a weak sense. Specifically, the methods reproduce the correct equilibrium covariances of the fluctuating fields to third (compressible) and second (incompressible) order in the time step, as we verify numerically. We apply our techniques to model recent experimental measurements of giant fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids in a micro-gravity environment [A. Vailati et. al., Nature Communications 2:290, 2011]. Numerical results for the static spectrum of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations are in excellent agreement between the compressible and incompressible simula...

  14. Rapidity Density Fluctuations in Hadron-Nucleus Interactions: Spikes, Intermittency, and Fractal Properties of Multiple Production in Ag, Au, and Mg Targets with p, $\\bar{p}$, and π- Projectiles at 100 and 320 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, Margarita Claudia Krieghoff [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The space-time development of hadron-nucleus interactions is examined using bubble chamber and downstream particle identifier data from the hybrid spectrometer of Fermilab experiment E597. 5583 events representing 12 interactions are studied with conventional and fractal techniques. Comparisons are made to simulated events from the Lund Monte Carlo FRITIOF 1.6. Multiplicities are studied conventionally. Negative binomial descriptions of produced particle multiplicities are interpreted in terms of clusters and cascading and in terms of partial stimulated emission; forwardbackward correlations, in terms of short- and long-range correlations and multiple scattering. Multiplicities are consistent with a multiple collision view of multiparticle production mechanisms and are investigated in terms of the number of collisions v. Rapidity density fluctuations are studied fractally. The possibility of new dynamics is considered on the basis of event-by-event studies of spike phenomena, intermittency, and fractal dimensions. Results from these exploratory studies are consistent with predictions made for quark-gluon plasma transitions. 131 spike events are analyzed; intermittency is investigated with normalized factorial moments and cumulants; and fractal dimensions and correlations dimensions are calculated. ··Seagull effects and production region sizes from Bose-Einstein pion interferometry are also considered.

  15. Effects of turbulent fluctuations on density measurements with microwave reflectometry in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.

    1994-08-01

    The short-scale turbulence of tokamak plasmas has deleterious effects on the measurement of plasma density with microwave reflectometry. Density fluctuations may lead to large amplitude and phase modulations of the reflected wave which can impair the measurement of the wave group delay, and hence the determination of the plasma density. The role played by different types of turbulent fluctuations and the limitations imposed on microwave reflectometry are discussed in this paper.

  16. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  17. Fluctuations of Bacteria-laden Microbeads in a Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Vural; Lissandrello, Charles; O'Connor, Joan; Romero Rodriguez, Jose Alberto; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    The motion of bacteria adhered on surfaces may lead to powerful approaches for novel diagnostic tests. Examples were recently shown using microcantilevers on which bacteria were adhered using surface chemistry. In these experiments, the presence of bacteria led to an increase in the fluctuations of the microcantilevers in the frequency range 1-100 Hz. After administering antibiotics, the fluctuations returned to their control value. Here, we build on these studies by monitoring the fluctuations of micro-beads with bacteria adhered on their surfaces. We coat the micro-beads with Poly D Lysine (PDL) in order to attach Escherichia coli. We measure the fluctuations of the beads in motility buffer media using an optical microscope with and without bacteria. We calculate the diffusion coefficients from the mean square displacements (MSD) and correlate these with the presence of bacteria on the beads. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test based on bacterial activity.

  18. Interannual water-level fluctuations and the vegetation of prairie potholes: Potential impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Valk, Arnold; Mushet, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Mean water depth and range of interannual water-level fluctuations over wet-dry cycles in precipitation are major drivers of vegetation zone formation in North American prairie potholes. We used harmonic hydrological models, which require only mean interannual water depth and amplitude of water-level fluctuations over a wet–dry cycle, to examine how the vegetation zones in a pothole would respond to small changes in water depth and/or amplitude of water-level fluctuations. Field data from wetlands in Saskatchewan, North Dakota, and South Dakota were used to parameterize harmonic models for four pothole classes. Six scenarios in which small negative or positive changes in either mean water depth, amplitude of interannual fluctuations, or both, were modeled to predict if they would affect the number of zones in each wetland class. The results indicated that, in some cases, even small changes in mean water depth when coupled with a small change in amplitude of water-level fluctuations can shift a prairie pothole wetland from one class to another. Our results suggest that climate change could alter the relative proportion of different wetland classes in the prairie pothole region.

  19. Rapidity dependence of multiplicity fluctuations and correlations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-02

    nucleus and hadron–nucleus interactions at accelerator energies. They have been interpreted in terms of several models: as a possible indication of hadronic phase transition, as Cherenkov radi- ation or simply originating from ...

  20. Quantum fluctuations from thermal fluctuations in Jacobson formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Ashour, Amani; Alcheikh, Mohammad [Damascus University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Alasfar, Lina [Universite Clermont Auvergne, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Alsaleh, Salwa; Mahroussah, Ahmed [King Saud University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-09-15

    In the Jacobson formalism general relativity is obtained from thermodynamics. This is done by using the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. However, as a black hole gets smaller, its temperature will increase. This will cause the thermal fluctuations to also increase, and these will in turn correct the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area relation. Furthermore, with the reduction in the size of the black hole, quantum effects will also start to dominate. Just as the general relativity can be obtained from thermodynamics in the Jacobson formalism, we propose that the quantum fluctuations to the geometry can be obtained from thermal fluctuations. (orig.)

  1. Secondary threshold amplitudes for sinuous streak breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Carlo; Brandt, Luca; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan S.

    2011-07-01

    The nonlinear stability of laminar sinuously bent streaks is studied for the plane Couette flow at Re = 500 in a nearly minimal box and for the Blasius boundary layer at Reδ*=700. The initial perturbations are nonlinearly saturated streamwise streaks of amplitude AU perturbed with sinuous perturbations of amplitude AW. The local boundary of the basin of attraction of the linearly stable laminar flow is computed by bisection and projected in the AU - AW plane providing a well defined critical curve. Different streak transition scenarios are seen to correspond to different regions of the critical curve. The modal instability of the streaks is responsible for transition for AU = 25%-27% for the considered flows, where sinuous perturbations of amplitude below AW ≈ 1%-2% are sufficient to counteract the streak viscous dissipation and induce breakdown. The critical amplitude of the sinuous perturbations increases when the streamwise streak amplitude is decreased. With secondary perturbations amplitude AW ≈ 4%, breakdown is induced on stable streamwise streaks with AU ≈ 13%, following the secondary transient growth scenario first examined by Schoppa and Hussain [J. Fluid Mech. 453, 57 (2002)]. A cross-over, where the critical amplitude of the sinuous perturbation becomes larger than the amplitude of streamwise streaks, is observed for streaks of small amplitude AU < 5%-6%. In this case, the transition is induced by an initial transient amplification of streamwise vortices, forced by the decaying sinuous mode. This is followed by the growth of the streaks and final breakdown. The shape of the critical AU - AW curve is very similar for Couette and boundary layer flows and seems to be relatively insensitive to the nature of the edge states on the basin boundary. The shape of this critical curve indicates that the stability of streamwise streaks should always be assessed in terms of both the streak amplitude and the amplitude of spanwise velocity perturbations.

  2. Theory of amplitude quantization of random signals

    OpenAIRE

    Knyshev, I. P.

    2008-01-01

    Conditions of ideal amplitude quantization of random signal with exact restoration of two-dimension probability density distribution function are defined. Interrelation of time discretization interval and amplitude quantization is shown. As an example transformation of normal random process is considered.

  3. On the singularities of massive superstring amplitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foda, O.

    1987-01-01

    Superstring one-loop amplitudes with massive external states are shown to be in general ill-defined due to internal on-shell propagators. However, we argue that since any massive string state (in the uncompactified theory) has a finite lifetime to decay into massless particles, such amplitudes are

  4. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    Feynman diagrams. The study of multiloop scattering amplitudes is crucial for the new era of precision phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Loop-level scattering amplitudes can be reduced to a basis of linearly independent integrals whose coefficients are extracted from generalized...

  5. Singularity Structure of Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Cachazo, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic ...

  6. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  7. Photoprotection of photosystems in fluctuating light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-05-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms experience strong fluctuations in light intensity in their natural terrestrial and aquatic growth environments. Recent studies with both plants and cyanobacteria have revealed that Photosystem (PS) I is the potential target of damage upon abrupt changes in light intensity. Photosynthetic organisms have, however, developed powerful mechanisms in order to protect their photosynthetic apparatus against such potentially hazardous light conditions. Although the electron transfer chain has remained relatively unchanged in both plant chloroplasts and their cyanobacterial ancestors, the photoprotective and regulatory mechanisms of photosynthetic light reactions have experienced conspicuous evolutionary changes. In cyanobacteria, the specific flavodiiron proteins (Flv1 and Flv3) are responsible for safeguarding PSI under rapidly fluctuating light intensities, whilst the thylakoid located terminal oxidases are involved in the protection of PSII during 12h diurnal cycles involving abrupt, square-wave, changes from dark to high light. Higher plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana have evolved different protective mechanisms. In particular, the PGR5 protein controls electron flow during sudden changes in light intensity by allowing the regulation mostly via the Cytochrome b6f complex. Besides the function of PGR5, plants have also acquired other dynamic regulatory mechanisms, among them the STN7-related LHCII protein phosphorylation that is similarly responsible for protection against rapid changes in the light environment. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as an evolutionary intermediate between cyanobacteria and higher plants, probably possesses both protective mechanisms. In this review, evolutionarily different photoprotective mechanisms under fluctuating light conditions are described and their contributions to cyanobacterial and plant photosynthesis are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  8. Skewness of elliptic flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Giuliano; Yan, Li; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Using event-by-event hydrodynamic calculations, we find that the fluctuations of the elliptic flow (v2) in the reaction plane have a negative skew. We compare the skewness of v2 fluctuations to that of initial eccentricity fluctuations. We show that skewness is the main effect lifting the degeneracy between higher-order cumulants, with negative skew corresponding to the hierarchy v2{4 } >v2{6 } observed in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We describe how the skewness can be measured experimentally and show that hydrodynamics naturally reproduces its magnitude and centrality dependence.

  9. Fluctuation theorem: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Mansour, M.; Baras, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production is revisited in the framework of stochastic processes. The applicability of the fluctuation theorem to physico-chemical systems and the resulting stochastic thermodynamics were analyzed. Some unexpected limitations are highlighted in the context of jump Markov processes. We have shown that these limitations handicap the ability of the resulting stochastic thermodynamics to correctly describe the state of non-equilibrium systems in terms of the thermodynamic properties of individual processes therein. Finally, we considered the case of diffusion processes and proved that the fluctuation theorem for entropy production becomes irrelevant at the stationary state in the case of one variable systems.

  10. Density fluctuations in traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Yukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Density fluctuations in traffic current are studied by computer simulations using the deterministic coupled map lattice model on a closed single-lane circuit. By calculating a power spectral density of temporal density fluctuations at a local section, we find a power-law behavior, \\sim 1/f^{1.8}, on the frequency f, in non-congested flow phase. The distribution of the headway distance h also shows the power law like \\sim 1/h^{3.0} at the same time. The power law fluctuations are destroyed by the occurence of the traffic jam.

  11. Model for calcium-mediated reduction of structural fluctuations in epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2015-08-01

    We propose a reaction-advection-diffusion model of epidermis consisting of two variables, the degree of differentiation and the calcium ion concentration, where calcium ions enhance differentiation. By analytically and numerically investigating this system, we show that a calcium localization layer formed beneath the stratum corneum helps reduce spatiotemporal fluctuations of the structure of the stratum corneum. In particular, spatially or temporally small-scale fluctuations in the lower structure are suppressed and do not affect the upper structure, due to acceleration of differentiation by calcium ions. Analytical expressions for the reduction rate of fluctuation amplitudes are shown.

  12. Research proposal on : amplitude modulated reflectometry system for JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, T.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la

    1992-12-31

    Amplitude Modulated reflectrometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been presented in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps` in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2 pi. The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad-band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectrometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectrometry, used for ionospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasma. the main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts (approx 2 pi). (author)

  13. Research proposal on : amplitude modulated reflectometry system for JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, T.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la.

    1992-01-01

    Amplitude Modulated reflectrometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been presented in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps' in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2 pi. The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad-band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectrometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectrometry, used for ionospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasma. the main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts (approx 2 pi). (author)

  14. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular evolution under fitness fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, Ville; Lässig, Michael

    2008-03-14

    Molecular evolution is a stochastic process governed by fitness, mutations, and reproductive fluctuations in a population. Here, we study evolution where fitness itself is stochastic, with random switches in the direction of selection at individual genomic loci. As the correlation time of these fluctuations becomes larger than the diffusion time of mutations within the population, fitness changes from an annealed to a quenched random variable. We show that the rate of evolution has its maximum in the crossover regime, where both time scales are comparable. Adaptive evolution emerges in the quenched fitness regime (evidence for such fitness fluctuations has recently been found in genomic data). The joint statistical theory of reproductive and fitness fluctuations establishes a conceptual connection between evolutionary genetics and statistical physics of disordered systems.

  16. Quantum entanglement and temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider entanglement in a system out of equilibrium, adopting the viewpoint given by the formalism of superstatistics. Such an approach yields a good effective description for a system in a slowly fluctuating environment within a weak interaction between the system and the environment. For this purpose, we introduce an alternative version of the formalism within a quantum mechanical picture and use it to study entanglement in the Heisenberg XY model, subject to temperature fluctuations. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic cases and explore the effect of different temperature fluctuations (χ^{2}, log-normal, and F distributions). Our results suggest that particular fluctuations may enhance entanglement and prevent it from vanishing at higher temperatures than those predicted for the same system at thermal equilibrium.

  17. Critical thermal limits affected differently by developmental and adult thermal fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salachan, Paul Vinu; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2017-01-01

    Means and variances of the environmental thermal regime play an important role in determining the fitness of terrestrial ectotherms. Adaptive phenotypic responses induced by heterogeneous temperatures have been shown to be mediated by molecular pathways independent of the classic heat shock...... responses, however, an in-depth understanding of plasticity induced by fluctuating temperatures is still lacking. We investigated high and low temperature acclimation induced by fluctuating thermal regimes at two different mean temperatures, at two different amplitudes of fluctuation and across...... fluctuating and constant regimes, cold tolerance was shown to be dictated by developmental temperature conditions irrespective of the adult treatments, while the acquired heat tolerance was readily lost when flies developed at fluctuating temperature were shifted to a constant regime as adults. Interestingly...

  18. Prediction of pressure fluctuation of a hydraulic turbine at no-load condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. J.; Wu, X. J.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study characteristics of pressure fluctuation of a turbine during the starting period, a turbine with guide vanes device at no-load condition was investigated using RNG k-epsilon turbulence model. The inner flow distribution and pressure fluctuation characteristics were analyzed. Results show that the pressure fluctuations in the region between the runner and guide vanes are different around the runner inlet. The dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation in the vaneless space close to the casing outlet is the blade passing frequency, while the dominant frequency at the rest region is the twice of the blade passing frequency. The increase of amplitude of pressure fluctuation close to the casing outlet can be attribute to the large scale stall at suction side of the runner inlet.

  19. Holographic corrections to meson scattering amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armoni, Adi; Ireson, Edwin, E-mail: 746616@swansea.ac.uk

    2017-06-15

    We compute meson scattering amplitudes using the holographic duality between confining gauge theories and string theory, in order to consider holographic corrections to the Veneziano amplitude and associated higher-point functions. The generic nature of such computations is explained, thanks to the well-understood nature of confining string backgrounds, and two different examples of the calculation in given backgrounds are used to illustrate the details. The effect we discover, whilst only qualitative, is re-obtainable in many such examples, in four-point but also higher point amplitudes.

  20. The influence of temperature dynamics and dynamic finite ion Larmor radius effects on seeded high amplitude plasma blobs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Held, Magnus; Wiesenberger, M.; Madsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Thermal effects on the perpendicular convection of seeded pressure blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetised fusion plasmas are investigated. Our numerical study is based on a four field full-F gyrofluid model, which entails the consistent description of high fluctuation amplitudes and dynamic...

  1. Spin amplitudes for NN → N Δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Lombard, R. J.; Kloet, W. M.

    1982-06-01

    The scattering amplitude for NN → N Δ is decomposed into sixteen independent spin-space operators Oi, where the corresponding coefficients Ai only depend on scattering angle, incoming energy, and the Δ -mass. In addition to the commonly used vector spin-transition matrix, it is necessary to also employ a tensor spin-transition matrix. The Oi can be chosen in two ways, either to facilitate discussion of underlying dynamical mechanisms or to simplify the antisymmetrization with respect to the initial nucleons. Relations between the Ai(θ) and the ( LSJ) partial-wave amplitudes are given. We evaluate the Ai using partial-wave amplitudes calculated elsewhere in a unitary three-body model with one-pion-exchange driving terms. Many amplitudes are of competing importance after antisymmetrization, and they are strongly dependent upon incident energy and Δ invariant mass.

  2. Spin amplitudes for NN. -->. N. delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbar, R.R. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA). Theoretical Div.); Lombard, R.J. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique); Kloet, W.M. (Rutgers - the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1982-06-21

    The scattering amplitude for NN..-->..N..delta.. is decomposed into sixteen independent spin-space operators Osub(i), where the corresponding coefficients Asub(i) only depend on scattering angle, incoming energy, and the ..delta..-mass. In addition to the commonly used vector spin-transition matrix, it is necessary to also employ a tensor spin-transition matrix. The Osub(i) can be chosen in two ways, either to facilitate discussion of underlying dynamical mechanisms or to simplify the antisymmetrization with respect to the initial nucleons. Relations between the Asub(i) (THETA) and the (LSJ) partial-wave amplitudes are given. We evaluate the Asub(i) using partial-wave amplitudes calculated elsewhere in a unitary three-body model with one-pion-exchange driving terms. Many amplitudes are of competing importance after antisymmetrization, and they are strongly dependent upon incident energy and ..delta.. invariant mass.

  3. Amplitude-Integrated EEG in the Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Th value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG in the newborn is explored by researchers at Washington University, St Louis; Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, Utrecht, Netherlands; and Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.

  4. Temperature-amplitude coupling for stable biological rhythms at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Gen; Fujioka, Atsuko; Koinuma, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi

    2017-06-01

    Most biological processes accelerate with temperature, for example cell division. In contrast, the circadian rhythm period is robust to temperature fluctuation, termed temperature compensation. Temperature compensation is peculiar because a system-level property (i.e., the circadian period) is stable under varying temperature while individual components of the system (i.e., biochemical reactions) are usually temperature-sensitive. To understand the mechanism for period stability, we measured the time series of circadian clock transcripts in cultured C6 glioma cells. The amplitudes of Cry1 and Dbp circadian expression increased significantly with temperature. In contrast, other clock transcripts demonstrated no significant change in amplitude. To understand these experimental results, we analyzed mathematical models with different network topologies. It was found that the geometric mean amplitude of gene expression must increase to maintain a stable period with increasing temperatures and reaction speeds for all models studied. To investigate the generality of this temperature-amplitude coupling mechanism for period stability, we revisited data on the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC) period, which is also stable under temperature variation. We confirmed that the YMC amplitude increased at higher temperatures, suggesting temperature-amplitude coupling as a common mechanism shared by circadian and 4 h-metabolic rhythms.

  5. [Role of ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürmer, J P E; Kniestedt, C

    2015-02-01

    The ocular pulse amplitude is defined as the difference between diastolic and systolic intraocular pressure. The ocular pulse is generated by the pulsatile ocular blood flow in the choroid. It is dependent on the dynamics of the cardiovascular system, the rigidity of the ocular vessels on one side and the biomechanical properties of the eye on the other side. In addition the influence of outflow facility of the aqueous humor, the level of the intraocular pressure itself and last but not least the rigidity of the sclera on the ocular pulse amplitude is until now not clear. Dynamic contour tonometry (Pascal®) does not only measure intraocular pressure almost independent of corneal thickness and curvature but also allows easy and fast measurement of ocular pulse amplitude on the slit lamp. The ocular pulse amplitude in healthy subjects is between 1.2 and 4 mmHg. If the ocular pulse amplitude is larger than 1.2 mmHg spontaneous pulsations of the central retinal vein are visible on fundoscopy. In patients with ocular hypertension the ocular pulse amplitude is larger than in normal subjects but this is mainly due to higher IOP levels. In patients with manifest open-angle glaucoma the ocular pulse amplitude stays initially within the normal range. In more advanced stages of the disease and especially in patients with ocular perfusion pressure dependent optic neuropathy the ocular pulse amplitude is gradually reduced. Due to the various factors influencing ocular pulse amplitude a direct correlation between reduced ocular pulse amplitude and reduced ocular perfusion pressure has not been established as yet. New approaches investigating the variations of the ocular pressure Fourier spectral analysis are promising, especially when simultaneous analysis of the arterial blood pressure is performed. These techniques may allow a fast and easy discrimination between healthy and glaucomatous patients in the near future. If ocular pulse amplitude exhibits a massive inter

  6. Topological Open String Amplitudes On Orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, Vincent; Marino, M; Bouchard, Vincent; Florea, Bogdan; Marino, Marcos

    2005-01-01

    We study topological open string amplitudes on orientifolds without fixed planes. We determine the contributions of the untwisted and twisted sectors as well as the BPS structure of the amplitudes. We illustrate our general results in various examples involving D-branes in toric orientifolds. We perform the computations by using both the topological vertex and unoriented localization. We also present an application of our results to the BPS structure of the coloured Kauffman polynomial of knots.

  7. Effective gluon interactions from superstring disk amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oprisa, D.

    2006-05-15

    In this thesis an efficient method for the calculation of the N-point tree-level string amplitudes is presented. Furthermore it is shown that the six-gluon open-superstring disk amplitude can be expressed by a basis of six triple hypergeometric functions, which encode the full {alpha}' dependence. In this connection material for obtaining the {alpha}' expansion of these functions is derived. Hereby many Euler-Zagier sums are calculated including multiple harmonic series. (HSI)

  8. Gluon Amplitudes as 2d Conformal Correlators

    OpenAIRE

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Shao, Shu-Heng; Strominger, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Recently, spin-one wavefunctions in four dimensions that are conformal primaries of the Lorentz group SL(2,C) were constructed. We compute low-point, tree-level gluon scattering amplitudes in the space of these conformal primary wavefunctions. The answers have the same conformal covariance as correlators of spin-one primaries in a 2d CFT. The BCFW recursion relation between three- and four-point gluon amplitudes is recast into this conformal basis.

  9. Nucleon distribution amplitudes from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Kaltenbrunner, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (DE). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    We calculate low moments of the leading-twist and next-to-leading twist nucleon distribution amplitudes on the lattice using two flavors of clover fermions. The results are presented in the MS scheme at a scale of 2 GeV and can be immediately applied in phenomenological studies. We find that the deviation of the leading-twist nucleon distribution amplitude from its asymptotic form is less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of amplitude modulated control features for ECoG neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Justin C; Carney, Paul R; Principe, Jose C

    2006-01-01

    Electrocorticogram recordings for neuroprosthetics provide an intermediate level of abstraction between EEG and microwire single neuron recordings. For adaptive filtering methodologies used in neuroprosthetics, extraction of spatio-control parameters remains a difficulty. Since amplitude modulation in extracellular recordings plays a key role in both neuronal activation and rate coding, seeking spatial pattern classification and temporally intermittent population synchronization in terms of increased voltage may provide viable control signals. This study seeks to explore preprocessing modalities that emphasize amplitude modulation in the ECoG above the level of noise and background fluctuations in order to derive the commands for complex control tasks. The decoding performance of the amplitude modulation across the recording spectra was found to be spatially specific in the cortex.

  11. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation of dust grains on the small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves, in an unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma which contains negative ions, positive ions and electrons, are studied in this paper. A Burgers equation and its stationary ...

  12. Real gas effects on receptivity to kinetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Edwards, Luke

    2016-11-01

    Receptivity of high-speed boundary layers is considered within the framework of fluctuating hydrodynamics where stochastic forcing is introduced through fluctuating shear stress and heat flux stemming from kinetic fluctuations (thermal noise). The forcing generates unstable modes whose amplification downstream and may lead to transition. An example of high-enthalpy (16 . 53 MJ / kg) boundary layer at relatively low wall temperatures (Tw = 1000 K - 3000 K), free stream temperature (Te = 834 K), and low pressure (0 . 0433 atm) is considered. Dissociation at the chosen flow parameters is still insignificant. The stability and receptivity analyses are carried out using a solver for calorically perfect gas with effective Prandtl number and specific heats ratio. The receptivity phenomenon is unchanged by the inclusion of real gas effects in the mean flow profiles. This is attributed to the fact that the mechanism for receptivity to kinetic fluctuations is localized near the upper edge of the boundary layer. Amplitudes of the generated wave packets are larger downstream in the case including real gas effects. It was found that spectra in both cases include supersonic second Mack unstable modes despite the temperature ratio Tw /Te > 1 . Supported by AFOSR.

  13. Biotic and abiotic controls on diurnal fluctuations in labile soil phosphorus of a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecar, Karen L; Lawrence, Deborah; Wood, Tana; Oberbauer, Steven F; Das, Rishiraj; Tully, Katherine; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2009-09-01

    The productivity of many tropical wet forests is generally limited by bioavailable phosphorus (P). Microbial activity is a key regulator of P availability in that it determines both the supply of P through organic matter decomposition and the depletion of bioavailable P through microbial uptake. Both microbial uptake and mineralization occur rapidly, and their net effect on P availability varies with soil moisture, temperature, and soil organic matter quantity and quality. Exploring the mechanisms driving P availability at fine temporal scales can provide insight into the coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient cycles, and ultimately, the response of tropical forests to climate change. Despite the recognized importance of P cycling to the dynamics of wet tropical forests and their potential sensitivity to short-term fluctuations in bioavailable P, the diurnal pattern of P remains poorly understood. This study quantifies diurnal fluctuations in labile soil P and evaluates the importance of biotic and abiotic factors in driving these patterns. To this end, measurements of labile P were made every other hour in a Costa Rican wet tropical forest oxisol. Spatial and temporal variation in Bray-extractable P were investigated in relation to ecosystem carbon flux, soil CO2 efflux, soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation, and sap-flow velocity. Spatially averaged bi-hourly (every two hours) labile P ranged from 0.88 to 2.48 microg/g across days. The amplitude in labile P throughout the day was 0.61-0.82 microg/g (41-54% of mean P concentrations) and was characterized by a bimodal pattern with a decrease at midday. Labile P increased with soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature and declined with increasing sap flow and solar radiation. Together, soil CO2 efflux, soil temperature, and sap flow explained 86% of variation in labile P.

  14. Slow electrostatic fluctuations generated by beam-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pommois, Karen; Pezzi, Oreste; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Eulerian simulations of the Vlasov-Poisson equations have been employed to analyze the excitation of slow electrostatic fluctuations (with phase speed close to the electron thermal speed), due to a beam-plasma interaction, and their propagation in linear and nonlinear regime. In 1968, O'Neil and Malmberg [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 11}, 1754 (1968)] dubbed these waves "beam modes". In the present paper, it is shown that, in the presence of a cold and low density electron beam, these beam modes can become unstable and then survive Landau damping unlike the Langmuir waves. When an electron beam is launched in a plasma of Maxwellian electrons and motionless protons and this initial equilibrium is perturbed by a monochromatic density disturbance, the electric field amplitude grows exponentially in time and then undergoes nonlinear saturation, associated with the kinetic effects of particle trapping and phase space vortex generation. Moreover, if the initial density perturbation is setup in the form of a low amplitude rand...

  15. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  16. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that for a specific class of generalized measurements, which include projective measurements, unitality replaces microreversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  17. Fluctuation theorems for stochastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. J.; Schütz, G. M.

    2007-07-01

    Fluctuation theorems make use of time reversal to make predictions about entropy production in many-body systems far from thermal equilibrium. Here we review the wide variety of distinct, but interconnected, relations that have been derived and investigated theoretically and experimentally. Significantly, we demonstrate, in the context of Markovian stochastic dynamics, how these different fluctuation theorems arise from a simple fundamental time-reversal symmetry of a certain class of observables. Appealing to the notion of Gibbs entropy allows for a microscopic definition of entropy production in terms of these observables. We work with the master equation approach, which leads to a mathematically straightforward proof and provides direct insight into the probabilistic meaning of the quantities involved. Finally, we point to some experiments that elucidate the practical significance of fluctuation relations.

  18. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that for a specific class of generalized measurements, which include projective measurements, unitality replaces microreversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  19. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  20. Transverse eV Ion Heating by Random Electric Field Fluctuations in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Blum, L.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2-3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse heating of H+ and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. The essential element of the proposed model of ion heating is the presence of trains of random whistler (hiss) wave packets, with significant amplitude modulations produced by strong wave damping, rapid wave growth, or a superposition of wave packets of different frequencies, phases, and amplitudes. Such characteristics correspond to measured characteristics of hiss waves in this region. Using test particle simulations with typical wave and plasma parameters, we demonstrate that the corresponding stochastic transverse ion heating reaches 0.07-0.2 eV/h for protons and 0.007-0.015 eV/h for O+ ions. This global temperature increase of the Maxwellian ion population from an initial Ti approx. 0.3 eV could potentially explain the observations.

  1. Transverse eV ion heating by random electric field fluctuations in the plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Blum, L.

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2-3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse heating of H+ and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. The essential element of the proposed model of ion heating is the presence of trains of random whistler (hiss) wave packets, with significant amplitude modulations produced by strong wave damping, rapid wave growth, or a superposition of wave packets of different frequencies, phases, and amplitudes. Such characteristics correspond to measured characteristics of hiss waves in this region. Using test particle simulations with typical wave and plasma parameters, we demonstrate that the corresponding stochastic transverse ion heating reaches 0.07-0.2 eV/h for protons and 0.007-0.015 eV/h for O+ ions. This global temperature increase of the Maxwellian ion population from an initial Ti˜0.3 eV could potentially explain the observations.

  2. Scattering amplitudes in open superstring theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlotterer, Oliver

    2011-07-15

    The present thesis deals with the theme field of the scattering amplitudes in theories of open superstrings. Especially two different formalisms for the handling of superstrings are introduced and applied for the calaculation of tree-level amplitudes - the Ramond- Neveu-Schwarz (RNS) and the Pure-Spinor (PS) formalism. The RNS approach is proved as flexible in order to describe compactification of the initially ten flat space-time dimensions to four dimensions. We solve the technical problems, which result from the interacting basing world-sheet theory with conformal symmetry. This is used to calculate phenomenologically relevant scattering amplitudes of gluons and quarks as well as production rates of massive harmonic vibrations, which were already identified as virtual exchange particles on the massless level. In the case of a low string mass scale in the range of some Tev the string-specific signatures in parton collisions can be observed in the near future in the LHC experiment at CERN and indicated as first experimental proof of the string theory. THose string effects occur universally for a wide class of string ground states respectively internal geometries and represent an elegant way to avoid the so-called landscape problem of the string theory. A further theme complex in this thesis is based on the PS formalism, which allows a manifestly supersymmetric treatment of scattering amplitudes in ten space-time dimension with sixteen supercharges. We introduce a family of superfields, which occur in massless amplitudes of the open string and can be naturally identified with diagrams of three-valued knots. Thereby we reach not only a compact superspace representation of the n-point field-theory amplitude but can also write the complete superstring n-point amplitude as minimal linear combination of partial amplitudes of the field theory as well as hypergeometric functions. The latter carry the string effects and are analyzed from different perspectives, above all

  3. Direct amplitude detuning measurement with ac dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S.; Maclean, E.; Tomás, R.

    2013-07-01

    In circular machines, nonlinear dynamics can impact parameters such as beam lifetime and could result in limitations on the performance reach of the accelerator. Assessing and understanding these effects in experiments is essential to confirm the accuracy of the magnetic model and improve the machine performance. A direct measurement of the machine nonlinearities can be obtained by characterizing the dependency of the tune as a function of the amplitude of oscillations (usually defined as amplitude detuning). The conventional technique is to excite the beam to large amplitudes with a single kick and derive the tune from turn-by-turn data acquired with beam position monitors. Although this provides a very precise tune measurement it has the significant disadvantage of being destructive. An alternative, nondestructive way of exciting large amplitude oscillations is to use an ac dipole. The perturbation Hamiltonian in the presence of an ac dipole excitation shows a distinct behavior compared to the free oscillations which should be correctly taken into account in the interpretation of experimental data. The use of an ac dipole for direct amplitude detuning measurement requires careful data processing allowing one to observe the natural tune of the machine; the feasibility of such a measurement is demonstrated using experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider. An experimental proof of the theoretical derivations based on measurements performed at injection energy is provided as well as an application of this technique at top energy using a large number of excitations on the same beam.

  4. Color-Kinematics Duality for QCD Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We show that color-kinematics duality is present in tree-level amplitudes of quantum chromodynamics with massive flavored quarks. Starting with the color structure of QCD, we work out a new color decomposition for n-point tree amplitudes in a reduced basis of primitive amplitudes. These primitives, with k quark-antiquark pairs and (n-2k) gluons, are taken in the (n-2)!/k! Melia basis, and are independent under the color-algebra Kleiss-Kuijf relations. This generalizes the color decomposition of Del Duca, Dixon, and Maltoni to an arbitrary number of quarks. The color coefficients in the new decomposition are given by compact expressions valid for arbitrary gauge group and representation. Considering the kinematic structure, we show through explicit calculations that color-kinematics duality holds for amplitudes with general configurations of gluons and massive quarks. The new (massive) amplitude relations that follow from the duality can be mapped to a well-defined subset of the familiar BCJ relations for gluo...

  5. Measuring Body Wave Amplitudes of Shallow Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigloch, K.; Nolet, G.

    2004-05-01

    We present and evaluate a method to measure body wave amplitudes of shallow earthquakes. Compared to deep events the measurement is complicated by crustal echoes and more complex source time functions, but the effort of processing this data is very worthwhile since shallow events are far more abundant than deep ones. We use a linear model that inverts for source time function, moment tensor and amplitudes in an iterative least squares procedure. The waveform fitting is tested on digital broadband seismograms from the temporary PASSCAL line array LA RISTRA and on global GSN data. We find that robust and reproducible amplitude measurements can be obtained. Signal-to-noise ratios are adequate for fitting waveforms of shallow earthquakes with magnitude of 5.9 and higher. Waveform fits to seismograms from the same event routinely achieve a coherence of 90%-98%. Observed amplitude anomalies are on the order of ± 20%, with outliers being as large as ± 60%. The accuracy is estimated from a limited set of doublet eartquakes and was ± 3% in the best case, for time series lowpassed at 16 second period. Along the 1000-km-long RISTRA array we find several smooth amplitude trends on the scale of hundreds of kilometers. At least one of these trends changes sign depending on the event azimuth, which may indicate that the effect is caused by refraction in the mantle.

  6. Direct amplitude detuning measurement with ac dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In circular machines, nonlinear dynamics can impact parameters such as beam lifetime and could result in limitations on the performance reach of the accelerator. Assessing and understanding these effects in experiments is essential to confirm the accuracy of the magnetic model and improve the machine performance. A direct measurement of the machine nonlinearities can be obtained by characterizing the dependency of the tune as a function of the amplitude of oscillations (usually defined as amplitude detuning. The conventional technique is to excite the beam to large amplitudes with a single kick and derive the tune from turn-by-turn data acquired with beam position monitors. Although this provides a very precise tune measurement it has the significant disadvantage of being destructive. An alternative, nondestructive way of exciting large amplitude oscillations is to use an ac dipole. The perturbation Hamiltonian in the presence of an ac dipole excitation shows a distinct behavior compared to the free oscillations which should be correctly taken into account in the interpretation of experimental data. The use of an ac dipole for direct amplitude detuning measurement requires careful data processing allowing one to observe the natural tune of the machine; the feasibility of such a measurement is demonstrated using experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider. An experimental proof of the theoretical derivations based on measurements performed at injection energy is provided as well as an application of this technique at top energy using a large number of excitations on the same beam.

  7. Chromodynamic Fluctuations in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Fluctuations of chromodynamic fields in the collisionless quark-gluon plasma are found as a solution of the initial value linearized problem. The plasma initial state is on average colorless, stationary and homogeneous. When the state is stable, the initial fluctuations decay exponentially and in the long-time limit a stationary spectrum of fluctuations is established. For the equilibrium plasma it reproduces the spectrum which is provided by the fluctuation-dissipation relation. Fluctuations...

  8. Phase Fluctuations and the Absence of Topological Defects in Photo-excited Charge Ordered Nickelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moore, R.G.; Zhu, Y.; Patthey, L.; Trigo, M.; Lu, D.H.; Kirchmann, P.S.; Krupin, O.; Yi, M.; Langner, M.; Huse, N.; Robinson, J.S.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, S.Y.; Coslovich, G.; Huber, B.; Reis, D.A.; Kaindl, R.A.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Doering, D.

    2012-05-15

    The dynamics of an order parameter's amplitude and phase determines the collective behaviour of novel states emerging in complex materials. Time- and momentum-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, by virtue of measuring material properties at atomic and electronic time scales out of equilibrium, can decouple entangled degrees of freedom by visualizing their corresponding dynamics in the time domain. Here we combine time-resolved femotosecond optical and resonant X-ray diffraction measurements on charge ordered La{sub 1.75}Sr{sub 0.25}NiO{sub 4} to reveal unforeseen photoinduced phase fluctuations of the charge order parameter. Such fluctuations preserve long-range order without creating topological defects, distinct from thermal phase fluctuations near the critical temperature in equilibrium. Importantly, relaxation of the phase fluctuations is found to be an order of magnitude slower than that of the order parameter's amplitude fluctuations, and thus limits charge order recovery. This new aspect of phase fluctuations provides a more holistic view of the phase's importance in ordering phenomena of quantum matter.

  9. Phase-shift ambiguities for analytic amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Itzykson, C

    1973-01-01

    Ambiguities in reconstructing a unitary elastic amplitude at fixed energy are investigated given the differential cross-section when one assumes analyticity in the cos theta plane. Strong hints are given that not more than a twofold nontrivial ambiguity is present. This is demonstrated for genuine entire functions of finite order. Moreover it is found that within a class of amplitudes which includes polynomials as well as entire functions of order zero, (i) the difference between the two amplitudes with the same cross-section must be a polynomial, (ii) if the cross-section is smaller than 1.38 (4 pi /k/sup 2/) there is no ambiguity. Indications are given on directions for future work. (10 refs).

  10. Multiphoton amplitude in a constant background field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Corradini, Olindo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Schubert, Christian

    2018-01-01

    In this contribution, we present our recent compact master formulas for the multiphoton amplitudes of a scalar propagator in a constant background field using the worldline fomulation of quantum field theory. The constant field has been included nonperturbatively, which is crucial for strong external fields. A possible application is the scattering of photons by electrons in a strong magnetic field, a process that has been a subject of great interest since the discovery of astrophysical objects like radio pulsars, which provide evidence that magnetic fields of the order of 1012G are present in nature. The presence of a strong external field leads to a strong deviation from the classical scattering amplitudes. We explicitly work out the Compton scattering amplitude in a magnetic field, which is a process of potential relevance for astrophysics. Our final result is compact and suitable for numerical integration.

  11. Scattering Amplitudes and Worldsheet Models of QFTs

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    I will describe recent progress on the study of scattering amplitudes via ambitwistor strings and the scattering equations. Ambitwistor strings are worldsheet models of quantum field theories, inspired by string theory. They naturally lead to a representation of amplitudes based on the scattering equations. While worldsheet models and related ideas have had a wide-ranging impact on the modern study of amplitudes, their direct application at loop level is a very recent success. I will show how a major difficulty in the loop-level story, the technicalities of higher-genus Riemann surfaces, can be avoided by turning the higher-genus surface into a nodal Riemann sphere, with the nodes representing the loop momenta. I will present new formulas for the one-loop integrands of gauge theory and gravity, with or without supersymmetry, and also some two-loop results.

  12. Amplitude-modulated fiber-ring laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caputo, J. G.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2000-01-01

    Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self-starting......Soliton pulses generated by a fiber-ring laser are investigated by numerical simulation and perturbation methods. The mathematical modeling is based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with perturbative terms. We show that active mode locking with an amplitude modulator leads to a self......-starting of stable solitonic pulses from small random noise, provided the modulation depth is small. The perturbative analysis leads to a nonlinear coupled return map for the amplitude, phase, and position of the soliton pulses circulating in the fiber-ring laser. We established the validity of this approach...

  13. Nonlinear (super)symmetries and amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallosh, Renata [Physics Department, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2017-03-07

    There is an increasing interest in nonlinear supersymmetries in cosmological model building. Independently, elegant expressions for the all-tree amplitudes in models with nonlinear symmetries, like D3 brane Dirac-Born-Infeld-Volkov-Akulov theory, were recently discovered. Using the generalized background field method we show how, in general, nonlinear symmetries of the action, bosonic and fermionic, constrain amplitudes beyond soft limits. The same identities control, for example, bosonic E{sub 7(7)} scalar sector symmetries as well as the fermionic goldstino symmetries. We present a universal derivation of the vanishing amplitudes in the single (bosonic or fermionic) soft limit. We explain why, universally, the double-soft limit probes the coset space algebra. We also provide identities describing the multiple-soft limit. We discuss loop corrections to N≥5 supergravity, to the D3 brane, and the UV completion of constrained multiplets in string theory.

  14. Spinfoam cosmology with the proper vertex amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilensky, Ilya

    2017-11-01

    The proper vertex amplitude is derived from the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex by restricting to a single gravitational sector in order to achieve the correct semi-classical behaviour. We apply the proper vertex to calculate a cosmological transition amplitude that can be viewed as the Hartle-Hawking wavefunction. To perform this calculation we deduce the integral form of the proper vertex and use extended stationary phase methods to estimate the large-volume limit. We show that the resulting amplitude satisfies an operator constraint whose classical analogue is the Hamiltonian constraint of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. We find that the constraint dynamically selects the relevant family of coherent states and demonstrate a similar dynamic selection in standard quantum mechanics. We investigate the effects of dynamical selection on long-range correlations.

  15. Turbulent transport reduction induced by transition on radial electric field shear and curvature through amplitude and cross-phase in torus plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Itoh, K; Ido, T; Kamiya, K; Itoh, S-I; Miura, Y; Nagashima, Y; Fujisawa, A; Inagaki, S; Ida, K

    2017-11-02

    Spatiotemporal evolutions of radial electric field and turbulence are measured simultaneously in the H-mode transition, which is a prototypical example of turbulence structure formation in high-temperature plasmas. In the dynamical phase where transport barrier is established abruptly, the time-space-frequency-resolved turbulent particle flux is obtained. Here we report the validation of the mechanism of transport barrier formation quantitatively. It is found that the particle flux is suppressed predominantly by reducing density fluctuation amplitude and cross phase between density fluctuation and potential fluctuation. Both radial electric field shear and curvature are responsible for the amplitude suppression as was predicted by theory. Turbulence amplitude reduction immediately responds to the growth of the radial electric field non-uniformity and saturates, while cross phase continuously approaches zero.

  16. Linear modeling of glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution a linear first-order differential equation is used to model glacier length fluctuations. This equation has two parameters describing the physical characteristics of a glacier: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier length depends on the climatic state,

  17. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States); Wickham, Logan [Department of Computer Science, Washington State University, Richland, 99354 (United States); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos, E-mail: n.voulgarakis@wsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Washington State University, Pullman, 99163 (United States)

    2017-04-25

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau–Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids. - Highlights: • A new fluctuating hydrodynamics method for ionic liquids. • Description of ionic liquid morphology in bulk and near electrified surfaces. • Direct comparison with experimental measurements.

  18. Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Reaction rates when barriers fluctuate : a path integral approach / P. Hänggi and P. Reimann. - In: International Conference on Path Integrals from peV to TeV : Proceedings of the ... / eds.: R. Casalbuoni ... - Singapore u.a. : World Scientific, 1999. - S. 407-409

  19. Secondary threshold amplitudes for sinuous streak breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Cossu, Carlo; Brandt, Luca; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan S.

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of laminar sinuously bent streaks is studied for the plane Couette flow at Re=500 in a nearly minimal box and for the Blasius boundary layer at Re_d*= 700. The initial perturbations are nonlinearly saturated streamwise streaks of amplitude AU perturbed with sinuous perturbations of amplitude AW. The local boundary of the basin of attraction of the linearly stable laminar flow is computed by bisection and projected in the AU – AW plane providing a well defined critical ...

  20. Amplitude Models for Discrimination and Yield Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This seminar presentation describes amplitude models and yield estimations that look at the data in order to inform legislation. The following points were brought forth in the summary: global models that will predict three-component amplitudes (R-T-Z) were produced; Q models match regional geology; corrected source spectra can be used for discrimination and yield estimation; three-component data increase coverage and reduce scatter in source spectral estimates; three-component efforts must include distance-dependent effects; a community effort on instrument calibration is needed.

  1. Towards NMHV amplitudes at strong coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belitsky, A.V., E-mail: andrei.belitsky@asu.edu

    2016-10-15

    Pentagon Operator Product Expansion provides a non-perturbative framework for analysis of scattering amplitudes in planar maximally supersymmetric gauge theory building up on their duality to null polygonal superWilson loop and integrability. In this paper, we construct a systematic expansion for the main ingredients of the formalism, i.e., pentagons, at large 't Hooft coupling as a power series in its inverse value. The calculations are tested against relations provided by the so-called Descent Equation which mixes transitions at different perturbative orders. We use leading order results to have a first glimpse into the structure of scattering amplitude at NMHV level at strong coupling.

  2. Mobile tablet audiometry in fluctuating autoimmune ear disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlert, Scott; Bromwich, Matthew

    2017-03-07

    Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a rare condition characterized by bilateral fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The labile nature of this hearing loss makes it difficult to accurately quantify with conventional methods, and therefore it is challenging to rehabilitate. Over a 9-month period one pediatric patient with severe AIED was monitored and conducted home audiograms using a previously validated testing system (Shoebox Audiometry). During this period he also underwent several clinical audiograms. The correlation between clinical and home audiograms was analyzed with a Pearson coefficient, and the range and frequency of fluctuations was recorded. Sixty-four automated home audiograms and nine clinical audiograms were conducted. When tested at home using a calibrated system the pure tone average (PTA) fluctuated between 12 dB and 72 dB indicating large variability in hearing. Fluctuations were frequent: on 28 occasions the PTA varied by at least 5 dB when retested within 4 days. The mean PTA was 50 dB and 95% of the thresholds were within 36 dB of the mean. Clinical audiograms obtained on the same day or within 1 day of home testing were highly concordant (with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93). AIED can result in significant fluctuations in hearing over short periods of time. Home testing enables a more granular look at variations over time and correlates well with clinical testing, and thus facilitates rapid action and informed rehabilitation.

  3. Specific frequency bands of amplitude low-frequency oscillation encodes personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luqing; Duan, Xujun; Zheng, Chunyan; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Qing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Huafu

    2014-01-01

    The biological model of extraversion and neuroticism identified by Eysenck has stimulated increasing interest in uncovering neurobiological substrate of the two fundamental dimensions. Here we aim to explore brain disturbances underlying extraversion and neuroticism in 87 healthy individuals using fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (LFF) on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two different frequency bands, Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) exhibiting higher power and involving larger brain regions, and Slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) exhibiting less power and emerging locally, were analyzed. Our results showed a positive correlation between LFF amplitude at Slow-5 and extraversion in medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, important portions of the default mode network, thus suggesting a link between default network activity and personality traits. LFF amplitude at Slow-5 was correlated positively with neuroticism in right posterior portion of the frontal lobe, further validating neuroticism with frontal lateralization. In addition, LFF amplitude at Slow-4 was negatively associated with extraversion and neuroticism in left hippocampus (HIP) and bilateral superior temporal cortex (STC) respectively, supporting the hypothesized (inverse) relationship between extraversion and resting arousal, also implying neural circuit underlying emotional process influencing on personality. Overall, these findings suggest the important relationships, between personality and LFF amplitude dynamic, depend on specific frequency bands. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Amplitude ratios in ρ0 leptoproductions and GPDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goloskokov S.V.

    2017-01-01

    Using the model results we calculate the ratio of different helicity amplitudes for a transversely polarized proton target to the leading twist longitudinal amplitude. Our results are close to the amplitude ratios measured by HERMES.

  5. The effects of amplitude normalization and EMG targets on cVEMP interaural amplitude asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Devin L; Jacobson, Gary P; Hatton, Kelsey; Fowler, Andrea P; DeLong, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the use of visual feedback of tonic electromyographic (EMG) activity, or the use of amplitude normalization techniques would reduce significantly the variability in cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) P13-N23 interaural amplitude asymmetry data in otologically and neurologically intact children and adults. There were 97 subjects, both pediatric and adult, from whom the authors recorded cVEMPs with and without the use of an EMG target and amplitude normalization techniques. The four conditions were: (1) conventional recording (condition 1), (2) conventional recording with an EMG target (condition 2), (3) same as condition 1, with the addition of postacquisition amplitude normalization techniques, and (4) same as condition 2, with the addition of postacquisition amplitude normalization techniques. The absolute peak to peak amplitude of positive-negative response (P13-N23), absolute latency of P13, and the left or right amplitude asymmetry of P13-N23 were measured. Neither P13-N23 amplitudes nor latencies, neither mean root mean square (RMS) of the full wave rectified EMG activity, nor the standard deviation of the RMS EMG activity differed significantly when subjects were, and were not, asked to ensure their tonic EMG activity exceeded a visual target (i.e., representing >50 µV RMS EMG). Amplitude normalization of the cVEMP waveforms failed to reduce significantly the variability in the amplitude asymmetry data. Activating the sternocleidomastoid muscle with the patient in a semirecumbent position, with head turned away from the stimulated ear and head elevated (i.e., an optimal activation technique) was sufficient to produce the highest amplitude cVEMPs with an acceptable amount of variability in subjects of all ages. Group data suggested that the use of visual targets and amplitude normalization routines did not reduce significantly the variability in cVEMP interaural amplitude asymmetry

  6. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available of a previously reported OAM sorting device. A Mech-Zehnder interferometer with a Dove prism in each arm is used to sort OAM states according to their parity. The authors extend this concept to implement an amplitude damping channel, and prove its...

  7. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  8. Fatigue Reliability under Multiple-Amplitude Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talreja, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method to determine the fatigue of structures subjected to multiple-amplitude loads is presented. Unlike the more common cumulative damage methods, which are usually based on fatigue life data, the proposed method is based on tensile strength data. Assuming the Weibull distribution for the init...

  9. Connected formulas for amplitudes in standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Song [CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,No. 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yong [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-03-17

    Witten’s twistor string theory has led to new representations of S-matrix in massless QFT as a single object, including Cachazo-He-Yuan formulas in general and connected formulas in four dimensions. As a first step towards more realistic processes of the standard model, we extend the construction to QCD tree amplitudes with massless quarks and those with a Higgs boson. For both cases, we find connected formulas in four dimensions for all multiplicities which are very similar to the one for Yang-Mills amplitudes. The formula for quark-gluon color-ordered amplitudes differs from the pure-gluon case only by a Jacobian factor that depends on flavors and orderings of the quarks. In the formula for Higgs plus multi-parton amplitudes, the massive Higgs boson is effectively described by two additional massless legs which do not appear in the Parke-Taylor factor. The latter also represents the first twistor-string/connected formula for form factors.

  10. Audio steganography by amplitude or phase modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Kaliappan; Wenndt, Stanley J.; Adams, Scott F.; Haddad, Darren M.

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents the results of embedding short covert message utterances on a host, or cover, utterance by modifying the phase or amplitude of perceptually masked or significant regions of the host. In the first method, the absolute phase at selected, perceptually masked frequency indices was changed to fixed, covert data-dependent values. Embedded bits were retrieved at the receiver from the phase at the selected frequency indices. Tests on embedding a GSM-coded covert utterance on clean and noisy host utterances showed no noticeable difference in the stego compared to the hosts in speech quality or spectrogram. A bit error rate of 2 out of 2800 was observed for a clean host utterance while no error occurred for a noisy host. In the second method, the absolute phase of 10 or fewer perceptually significant points in the host was set in accordance with covert data. This resulted in a stego with successful data retrieval and a slightly noticeable degradation in speech quality. Modifying the amplitude of perceptually significant points caused perceptible differences in the stego even with small changes of amplitude made at five points per frame. Finally, the stego obtained by altering the amplitude at perceptually masked points showed barely noticeable differences and excellent data recovery.

  11. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the Measurement of Turbulent Fluctuations in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Mazzucato

    2004-02-19

    This article describes a numerical study of microwave reflectometry for the measurement of turbulent fluctuations in tokamak-like plasmas with a cylindrical geometry. Similarly to what was found previously in plane-stratified plasmas, the results indicate that the characteristics of density fluctuations cannot be uniquely determined from the reflected waves if the latter are allowed to propagate freely to the point of detection, as in standard reflectometry. Again, we find that if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold that is set by the spectrum of poloidal wave numbers, the local characteristics of density fluctuations can be obtained from the phase of reflected waves when these are collected with a wide aperture antenna, and an image of the cutoff is formed onto an array of phase-sensitive detectors.

  12. The Effect of Fluctuating Temperatures During Development on Fitness-Related Traits of Scatophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kjærsgaard, Anders; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker; Wolf U. Blanckenhorn

    2013-01-01

    Development of ectotherms is highly temperature dependent. Studies using variable thermal environments can improve ecological relevance of data because organisms naturally face day-to-day stochastic temperature fluctuations as well as seasonal changes in the amplitude of such daily fluctuations. The objective of this study was to investigate if, and to what extent, the use of constant temperatures is justified in studies of the model species, yellow dung fly, Scatophaga stercoraria (L.). We e...

  13. Critical fluctuations and the rates of interstate switching near the excitation threshold of a quantum parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z R; Nakamura, Y; Dykman, M I

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a nonlinear oscillator near the critical point where period-two vibrations are first excited with the increasing amplitude of parametric driving. Above the threshold, quantum fluctuations induce transitions between the period-two states over the quasienergy barrier. We find the effective quantum activation energies for such transitions and their scaling with the difference of the driving amplitude from its critical value. We also find the scaling of the fluctuation correlation time with the quantum noise parameters in the critical region near the threshold. The results are extended to oscillators with nonlinear friction.

  14. Cosmological density fluctuations and large-scale structure From N-point correlation functions to the probability distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of N-point correlation functions for all N allows one to invert and obtain the probability distribution of mass fluctuations in a fixed volume. The hierarchical sequence of higher order is applied to correlations with dimensionless amplitudes suggested by the BBGKY equations. The resulting distribution is significantly non-Gaussian, even for quite small mean square fluctuations. The qualitative and to some degree quantitative results are to a large degree independent of the exact sequence of amplitudes. An ensemble of such models compared with N-body simulations fails in detail to account for the low-density frequency distribution.

  15. Large time-asymmetric quantum fluctuations in amplitude–intensity correlation measurements of V-type three-level atom resonance fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Castro-Beltrán, H. M.; Román-Ancheyta, R.; Horvath, L.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show that the scattered field of a bichromatically driven V-type three-level atom exhibit asymmetry and large violation of classical bounds in amplitude-intensity correlations. These features result from the noncommutativity of amplitude and intensity field operators, and the strong non-Gaussian fluctuations in this system. The amplitude-intensity correlations of resonance fluorescence, with its large third-order fluctuations, describe the nonclassical features of the emitted field more accurately than the second-order measure related to squeezing. Spectra and variances of these correlations, along intensity-intensity correlations, provide a wealth of supporting information.

  16. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  17. Parity fluctuations in stellar dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D. L.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of the solar butterfly diagram from sunspot records suggest persistent fluctuations in parity, away from the overall, approximately dipolar pattern. A simple mean-field dynamo model is used with a solar-like rotation law and perturbed α effect. The parity of the magnetic field relative to the rotational equator can demonstrate can be described as resonance behavior, while the magnetic energy behaves in a more or less expected way. Possible applications of this effect are discussed in the context of various deviations of the solar magnetic field from dipolar symmetry, as reported from analyses of archival sunspot data. The model produces fluctuations in field parity, and hence in the butterfly diagram, that are consistent with observed fluctuaions in solar behavior.

  18. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  19. Observations of rapid-fire event tremor at Lascar volcano, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rademacher

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Proyecto de Investigaciòn Sismològica de la Cordillera Occidental (PISCO '94 in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile, a continuously recording broadband seismic station was installed to the NW of the currently active volcano, Lascar. For the month of April, 1994, an additional network of three, short period, three-component stations was deployed around the volcano to help discriminate its seismic signals from other local seismicity. During the deployment, the volcanic activity at Lascar appeared to be limited mainly to the emission of steam and SO2. Tremor from Lascar is a random, «rapid-fire» series of events with a wide range of amplitudes and a quasi-fractal structure. The tremor is generated by an ensemble of independent elementary sources clustered in the volcanic edifice. In the short-term, the excitation of the sources fluctuates strongly, while the long-term power spectrum is very stationary.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulations of broadband fluctuations near interplanetary shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agim, Y.Z.; Vinas, A.F.; Goldstein, M.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We present results of a theoretical study of evolution of a spectrum of finite amplitude right-hand elliptically polarized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The analysis includes use of one-and-a-half-dimensional solutions of the equations that describe compressible MHD together with one-and-a-half-dimensional hybrid simulation of the phenomenon. The motivation of the study is to understand the origin and properties of finite amplitude waves often observed in the vicinity of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. The solutions of the MHD equations are compared with both the results of the hybrid simulations and observations previously reported by Vinas et al. in the vicinity of a quasi-parallel interplanetary shock. The initial conditions of the MHD solutions were constructed to model the observed spectrum of magnetic and velocity fluctuations; plasma parameters were also chosen to replicate the observed parameters. For the typical parameters of {beta} = 0.5, {sigma}B/B{sub 0} = 0.25 and a spectrum of parallel propagating, circularly polarized dispersive waves, initially the density and magnetic energy density correlations grow due to the (nonlinear) ponderomotive effect. The spectral features below the ion cyclotron frequency are established quickly on the Alfvenic timescale but then persist and match closely the observed fluctuations. The parametric decay instabilities that subsequently appear further enhance the density fluctuations and produce a high-frequency magnetic power spectrum consistent with the spacecraft observation. The MHD and hybrid simulations extend the previous picture of wave generation by a beam-driven ion cyclotron instability to the fully nonlinear stage. 64 refs., 24 figs.

  1. Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    These results provide quantitative formulation on canalization and genetic assimilation, in terms of fluctuations of gene expression levels. [Kaneko K 2009 Relationship among phenotypic plasticity, phenotypic fluctuations, robustness, and evolvability; Waddington's legacy revisited under the spirit of Einstein; J. Biosci.

  2. Some comments to the quantum fluctuation theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzovlev, Yu. E.

    2011-01-01

    It is demonstrated that today's quantum fluctuation theorems are component part of old quantum fluctuation-dissipation relations [Sov.Phys.-JETP 45, 125 (1977)], and typical misunderstandings in this area are pointed out.

  3. Correlated interaction fluctuations in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaming, Sebastiaan M

    2011-01-01

    The functioning and efficiency of natural photosynthetic complexes is strongly influenced by their embedding in a noisy protein environment, which can even serve to enhance the transport efficiency. Interactions with the environment induce fluctuations of the transition energies of and interactions between the chlorophyll molecules, and due to the fact that different fluctuations will partially be caused by the same environmental factors, correlations between the various fluctuations will occur. We argue that fluctuations of the interactions should in general not be neglected, as these have a considerable impact on population transfer rates, decoherence rates and the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes. Furthermore, while correlations between transition energy fluctuations have been studied, we provide the first quantitative study of the effect of correlations between interaction fluctuations and transition energy fluctuations, and of correlations between the various interaction fluctuations. It is shown t...

  4. Differential equations, associators, and recurrences for amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Puhlfürst

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide new methods to straightforwardly obtain compact and analytic expressions for ϵ-expansions of functions appearing in both field and string theory amplitudes. An algebraic method is presented to explicitly solve for recurrence relations connecting different ϵ-orders of a power series solution in ϵ of a differential equation. This strategy generalizes the usual iteration by Picard's method. Our tools are demonstrated for generalized hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we match the ϵ-expansion of specific generalized hypergeometric functions with the underlying Drinfeld associator with proper Lie algebra and monodromy representations. We also apply our tools for computing ϵ-expansions for solutions to generic first-order Fuchsian equations (Schlesinger system. Finally, we set up our methods to systematically get compact and explicit α′-expansions of tree-level superstring amplitudes to any order in α′.

  5. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for density profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V.; Sanchez, J.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B.; Frances, M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Hartfuss, H.J. [Max Plank Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Ass, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hanson, G.R.; Wilgen, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8072 (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) reflectometry is a technique for density profile measurements in magnetic fusion plasmas based on the measurement of the phase delay of the modulation in the amplitude of a microwave beam launched and reflected at the plasma. Results from AM experiments in the PBX-M tokamak and the W7-AS stellarator are presented. A general analysis of the capabilities of the technique is performed, particularly centered in the effects of spatial turbulence. Simulations of the effects of two-dimensional turbulence have been performed for medium size (W7-AS) and large devices (LHD stellarator, ITER), showing the capability of the AM technique to operate in turbulent plasmas. Finally, possible solutions to the problem of parasitic reflections in AM systems are presented as development options. (orig.) 4 refs.

  6. Amplitude dependent shift of betatron oscillation center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Shoji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have analytically calculated and measured the amplitude-dependent shift of the betatron oscillation center at the electron storage ring, NewSUBARU. The shift is due to nonzero average horizontal deflections at the normal sextupole magnets. The shifted center forms a displaced closed orbit and is measured by a closed orbit distortion measurement system, although no single electron runs on this orbit. The measured shifts by betatron oscillations agreed with the theoretical calculation except the variation of data points, which did not obey the ring symmetry. Additional measurements, whose results included the effect of the circumference shift, experimentally proved the amplitude dependent circumference shift for the first time. We also discuss some applications of the shift, which has never been previously analyzed.

  7. Large amplitude free vibrations of tapered beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, L. S.; Raju, K. K.; Rao, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    The Galerkin method is used to investigate the large-amplitude free vibrations of simply supported and clamped tapered beams of rectangular cross-section which are frequently encountered in practical structures. Two types of linear tapers are considered: breadth and depth tapers. Two solutions are obtained for each type of taper, using trigonometric and polynomial displacement distributions. Frequency-amplitude relationships are obtained for all these cases for the fundamental flexural mode. The results indicate good agreement between trigonometric and polynomial solutions for all cases. The nonlinearity is noted to be always of the hardening type and, as expected, it is severe for beams with depth taper as compared with beams with breadth taper.

  8. Integrable spin chains and scattering amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, J.; Prygarin, A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Sankt-Peterburgskij Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    In this review we show that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in N=4 SYM at large N{sub c} and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the complex angular momentum plane of the corresponding t-channel partial waves. These Mandelstam cuts or Regge cuts are resulting from gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(N{sub c}). In the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) their contribution to the six point amplitude is in full agreement with the known two-loop result. The Hamiltonian for the Mandelstam states constructed from n gluons in LLA coincides with the local Hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wave functions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach. (orig.)

  9. Is DAMAs modulation amplitude changing with time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Chris

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter is composed of weakly interacting particles, Earth's orbital motion induces a small annual variation in the rate at which these particles interact in a terrestrial detector. The DAMA collaboration has identified at a 9.3σ confidence level (CL) such an annual modulation in their event rate over two detector iterations, DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA, each with about 7 years of observations. We examine the nature of this modulation signal and find the modulation amplitude for the two detectors is inconsistent at the 3σ CL over 2-6 keVee. Such a time-dependence in the modulation amplitude is unexpected behavior for a dark matter signal, at least for dark matter halo morphologies consistent with the DAMA signal. We also find unusual behavior over the 5-6 keVee energy range that might indicate problems with the data.

  10. A brief introduction to modern amplitude methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Lance J.

    2014-12-10

    I provide a basic introduction to modern helicity amplitude methods, including color organization, the spinor helicity formalism, and factorization properties. I also describe the BCFW (on-shell) recursion relation at tree level, and explain how similar ideas - unitarity and on-shell methods - work at the loop level. These notes are based on lectures delivered at the 2012 CERN Summer School and at TASI 2013.

  11. Semiclassical scattering amplitudes of dressed gravitons

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Kyungsik; Kondrashuk, Igor

    2004-01-01

    We consider effective action for the Einstein gravity and show that dressed mean fields are actual variables of the effective action. Kernels of this effective action expressed in terms of dressed effective fields are constituent parts of scattering amplitudes for gravitons. Possible applications to the graviton scattering and black hole formation are discussed at the semiclassical level. In particular, we consider graviton scattering in four dimensions based on the Lipatov effective action f...

  12. Scattering Amplitudes via Algebraic Geometry Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Mads

    unitarity cuts. We take advantage of principles from algebraic geometry in order to extend the notion of maximal cuts to a large class of two- and three-loop integrals. This allows us to derive unique and surprisingly compact formulae for the coefficients of the basis integrals. Our results are expressed...... in terms of certain linear combinations of multivariate residues and elliptic integrals computed from products of tree-level amplitudes. Several explicit examples are provided...

  13. Fluctuation theory of luminance and chromaticity discrimination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.A.; Vos, J.J.; Walraven, P.L.

    1963-01-01

    An attempt has been made to describe brightness and color discrimination in the framework of a fluctuation theory. The fluctuation theory states that a difference between two stimuli will be just noticeable if it exceeds, by some factor, the average of the fluctuations in the stimuli. If the

  14. Cascaded Amplitude Modulations in Sound Texture Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McWalter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound textures, such as crackling fire or chirping crickets, represent a broad class of sounds defined by their homogeneous temporal structure. It has been suggested that the perception of texture is mediated by time-averaged summary statistics measured from early auditory representations. In this study, we investigated the perception of sound textures that contain rhythmic structure, specifically second-order amplitude modulations that arise from the interaction of different modulation rates, previously described as “beating” in the envelope-frequency domain. We developed an auditory texture model that utilizes a cascade of modulation filterbanks that capture the structure of simple rhythmic patterns. The model was examined in a series of psychophysical listening experiments using synthetic sound textures—stimuli generated using time-averaged statistics measured from real-world textures. In a texture identification task, our results indicated that second-order amplitude modulation sensitivity enhanced recognition. Next, we examined the contribution of the second-order modulation analysis in a preference task, where the proposed auditory texture model was preferred over a range of model deviants that lacked second-order modulation rate sensitivity. Lastly, the discriminability of textures that included second-order amplitude modulations appeared to be perceived using a time-averaging process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the inclusion of second-order modulation analysis generates improvements in the perceived quality of synthetic textures compared to the first-order modulation analysis considered in previous approaches.

  15. Coding stimulus amplitude by correlated neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzen, Michael G; Ávila-Åkerberg, Oscar; Chacron, Maurice J

    2015-04-01

    While correlated activity is observed ubiquitously in the brain, its role in neural coding has remained controversial. Recent experimental results have demonstrated that correlated but not single-neuron activity can encode the detailed time course of the instantaneous amplitude (i.e., envelope) of a stimulus. These have furthermore demonstrated that such coding required and was optimal for a nonzero level of neural variability. However, a theoretical understanding of these results is still lacking. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework explaining these experimental findings. Specifically, we use linear response theory to derive an expression relating the correlation coefficient to the instantaneous stimulus amplitude, which takes into account key single-neuron properties such as firing rate and variability as quantified by the coefficient of variation. The theoretical prediction was in excellent agreement with numerical simulations of various integrate-and-fire type neuron models for various parameter values. Further, we demonstrate a form of stochastic resonance as optimal coding of stimulus variance by correlated activity occurs for a nonzero value of noise intensity. Thus, our results provide a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by which correlated but not single-neuron activity can code for stimulus amplitude and how key single-neuron properties such as firing rate and variability influence such coding. Correlation coding by correlated but not single-neuron activity is thus predicted to be a ubiquitous feature of sensory processing for neurons responding to weak input.

  16. Amplitude analysis for hypercharge exchange reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, V

    1972-01-01

    The s channel helicity non-flip amplitudes for the line reversed reactions pi N to K( Sigma , Lambda ) and KN to pi ( Sigma , Lambda ) are determined directly from cross-section and polarization data at 4 GeV/c. Rigorous bounds are obtained on the magnitudes of the flip amplitudes, whose phases are assumed to be given by an exchange degenerate K*-K** Regge trajectory. The solution for the non-flip amplitude is unique and shows the following characteristics: (i) Im K* ( Delta lambda =0) has a 'cross-over' zero at t approximately=-0.15 in both Sigma and Lambda reactions, (ii) Im K** ( Delta lambda =0) has an approximate double zero near t approximately=-0.6 in Sigma reactions and a positive minimum there in Lambda reactions, (iii) Re K* ( Delta lambda =0) and Re K** ( Delta lambda =0) are less peripheral in character than their imaginary counter-part and have similar behaviour at alpha =0 to simple Regge poles. (12 refs).

  17. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock: Reinterpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Vinas, A. F.; Smith, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock were previously interpreted as arising from a resonant electromagnetic ion beam instability. That interpretation was based on the conclusion that the observed fluctuations were predominantly right elliptically polarized in the solar wind rest frame. Because it was noted that the fluctuations are, in fact, left elliptically polarized, a reanalysis of the observations was necessary. Several mechanisms for producing left hand polarized MHD waves in the observed frequency range were investigated. Instabilities excited by protons appear unlikely to account for the observations. A resonant instability excited by relativistic electrons escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere is a likely source of free energy consistent with the observations. Evidence for the existence of such a population of electrons was found in both the Low Energy Charged Particle experiments and Cosmic Ray experiments on Voyager 2.

  18. Large-amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock Reinterpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Vinas, A. F.; Smith, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock were previously interpreted as arising from a resonant electromagnetic ion beam instability. That interpretation was based on the conclusion that the observed fluctuations were predominantly right elliptically polarized in the solar wind rest frame. Because it was noted that the fluctuations are, in fact, left elliptically polarized, a reanalysis of the observations was necessary. Several mechanisms for producing left hand polarized MHD waves in the observed frequency range were investigated. Instabilities excited by protons appear unlikely to account for the observations. A resonant instability excited by relativistic electrons escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere is a likely source of free energy consistent with the observations. Evidence for the existence of such a population of electrons was found in both the Low Energy Charged Particle experiments and Cosmic Ray experiments on Voyager 2.

  19. Temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuation due to development of weak localization in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, D.; Fukuda, A.; Fujimoto, A.; Ohno, Y.; Matsumoto, K.

    2017-11-01

    The temperature effect of quantum interference on resistivity is examined in monolayer graphene, with experimental results showing that the amplitude of the conductance fluctuation increases as temperature decreases. We find that this behavior can be attributed to the decrease in the inelastic scattering (dephasing) rate, which enhances the weak localization (WL) correction to resistivity. Following a previous report that explained the relationship between the universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) and WL regarding the gate voltage dependence (Terasawa et al., 2017) [19], we propose that the temperature dependence of the UCF in monolayer graphene can be interpreted by the WL theory.

  20. Scaling behavior of EEG amplitude and frequency time series across sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Tismer, Sebastian; Gans, Fabian; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Penzel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We study short-term and long-term persistence properties (related with auto-correlations) of amplitudes and frequencies of EEG oscillations in 176 healthy subjects and 40 patients during nocturnal sleep. The amplitudes show scaling from 2 to 500 seconds (depending on the considered band) with large fluctuation exponents during (nocturnal) wakefulness (0.73-0.83) and small ones during deep sleep (0.50-0.69). Light sleep is similar to deep sleep, while REM sleep (0.64-0.76) is closer to wakefulness except for the EEG γ band. Some of the frequency time series also show long-term scaling, depending on the selected bands and stages. Only minor deviations are seen for patients with depression, anxiety, or Parkinson's disease.

  1. Numerical simulation of pressure fluctuation of a pump-turbine with MGV at no-load condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. T.; Liu, S. H.; Sun, Y. K.; Wu, Y. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    In order to analyse the pressure fluctuation caused by misaligned guide vanes (MGV) during starting period at no-load condition, 3-D (three dimensional), unsteady flows in a pump-turbine were numerically studied. Pressure fluctuations of different points at no-load condition are obtained. Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) was used to analyse the frequency spectrum of pressure fluctuations. The amplitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation at vaneless space between the runner and guide vane, as well as the inlet of draft tube, was investigated. The amplitude of pressure fluctuation of the pump-turbine with MGV device is twice that of synchronous vanes. This might be caused by the non-uniform flow in the pump-turbine due to the pre-opened guide vanes. The pump-turbine with synchronous vanes has a low frequency which is 0.33fn, while the low frequency changes into 0.63fn when the MGV device is used. The vortex rope in the draft tube is large than that of synchronize vanes. Resultsof pressure fluctuations with synchronous vanes agree with each other between computational and testing results. The numerical study of pressure fluctuations with MGV can provide a basic understanding for the improvement of the instability of a pump-turbine.

  2. Investigating the amplitude of interactive footstep sounds and soundscape reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Serafin, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the perception of amplitude of soundscapes and interactively generated footstep sounds provided both through headphones and a surround sound system. In particular, we investigate whether there exists a value for the amplitude of soundscapes and footstep sounds which...... of soundscapes does not significantly affect the selected amplitude of footstep sounds. Similarly, the perception of the soundscapes amplitude is not significantly affected by the selected amplitude of footstep sounds....

  3. Attenuation of ground-motion spectral amplitudes in southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T.I.; Cummins, P.R.; Dhu, T.; Schneider, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    A dataset comprising some 1200 weak- and strong-motion records from 84 earthquakes is compiled to develop a regional ground-motion model for southeastern Australia (SEA). Events were recorded from 1993 to 2004 and range in size from moment magnitude 2.0 ??? M ??? 4.7. The decay of vertical-component Fourier spectral amplitudes is modeled by trilinear geometrical spreading. The decay of low-frequency spectral amplitudes can be approximated by the coefficient of R-1.3 (where R is hypocentral distance) within 90 km of the seismic source. From approximately 90 to 160 km, we observe a transition zone in which the seismic coda are affected by postcritical reflections from midcrustal and Moho discontinuities. In this hypocentral distance range, geometrical spreading is approximately R+0.1. Beyond 160 km, low-frequency seismic energy attenuates rapidly with source-receiver distance, having a geometrical spreading coefficient of R-1.6. The associated regional seismic-quality factor can be expressed by the polynomial: log Q(f) = 3.66 - 1.44 log f + 0.768 (log f)2 + 0.058 (log f)3 for frequencies 0.78 ??? f ??? 19.9 Hz. Fourier spectral amplitudes, corrected for geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation, are regressed with M to obtain quadratic source scaling coefficients. Modeled vertical-component displacement spectra fit the observed data well. Amplitude residuals are, on average, relatively small and do not vary with hypocentral distance. Predicted source spectra (i.e., at R = 1 km) are consistent with eastern North American (ENA) Models at low frequencies (f less than approximately 2 Hz) indicating that moment magnitudes calculated for SEA earthquakes are consistent with moment magnitude scales used in ENA over the observed magnitude range. The models presented represent the first spectral ground-motion prediction equations develooed for the southeastern Australian region. This work provides a useful framework for the development of regional ground-motion relations

  4. Beam Energy and System Size Dependence of Dynamical Net Charge Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2008-07-21

    We present measurements of net charge fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 19.6, 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV, Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4, 200 GeV, and p + p collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV using the dynamical net charge fluctuations measure {nu}{sub {+-},dyn}. We observe that the dynamical fluctuations are non-zero at all energies and exhibit a modest dependence on beam energy. A weak system size dependence is also observed. We examine the collision centrality dependence of the net charge fluctuations and find that dynamical net charge fluctuations violate 1/N{sub ch} scaling, but display approximate 1/N{sub part} scaling. We also study the azimuthal and rapidity dependence of the net charge correlation strength and observe strong dependence on the azimuthal angular range and pseudorapidity widths integrated to measure the correlation.

  5. Chaotic fluctuations in mathematical economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki, E-mail: yoshida.hiroyuki@nihon-u.ac.jp [College of Economics, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8360 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we examine a Cournot duopoly model, which expresses the strategic interaction between two firms. We formulate the dynamic adjustment process and investigate the dynamic properties of the stationary point. By introducing a memory mechanism characterized by distributed lag functions, we presuppose that each firm makes production decisions in a cautious manner. This implies that we have to deal with the system of integro-differential equations. By means of numerical simulations we show the occurrence of chaotic fluctuations in the case of fixed delays.

  6. Noise and fluctuations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, D K C

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of fluctuations and their role is both useful and fundamental to the study of physics. This concise study of random processes offers graduate students and research physicists a survey that encompasses both the relationship of Brownian Movement with statistical mechanics and the problem of irreversible processes. It outlines the basics of the physics involved, without the strictures of mathematical rigor.The three-part treatment starts with a general survey of Brownian Movement, including electrical Brownian Movement and ""shot-noise,"" Part two explores correlation, frequency

  7. Electrostatic fluctuations in soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D S; Horgan, R R

    2002-06-01

    A field theory to describe electrostatic interactions in soap films, described by electric multilayers with a generalized thermodynamic surface-charging mechanism, is studied. In the limit where the electrostatic interactions are weak, this theory is exactly soluble. The theory incorporates in a consistent way, the surface-charging mechanism and the fluctuations in the electrostatic field that correspond to the zero-frequency component of the van der Waals force. It is shown that these terms lead to a Casimir-like attraction that can be sufficiently large to explain the transition between the common black film to a Newton black film.

  8. Confidence intervals for concentration and brightness from fluorescence fluctuation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryse, Kenneth M; Rong, Xi; Whisler, Jordan A; McConnaughey, William B; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Melnykov, Artem V; Elson, Elliot L; Genin, Guy M

    2012-09-05

    The theory of photon count histogram (PCH) analysis describes the distribution of fluorescence fluctuation amplitudes due to populations of fluorophores diffusing through a focused laser beam and provides a rigorous framework through which the brightnesses and concentrations of the fluorophores can be determined. In practice, however, the brightnesses and concentrations of only a few components can be identified. Brightnesses and concentrations are determined by a nonlinear least-squares fit of a theoretical model to the experimental PCH derived from a record of fluorescence intensity fluctuations. The χ(2) hypersurface in the neighborhood of the optimum parameter set can have varying degrees of curvature, due to the intrinsic curvature of the model, the specific parameter values of the system under study, and the relative noise in the data. Because of this varying curvature, parameters estimated from the least-squares analysis have varying degrees of uncertainty associated with them. There are several methods for assigning confidence intervals to the parameters, but these methods have different efficacies for PCH data. Here, we evaluate several approaches to confidence interval estimation for PCH data, including asymptotic standard error, likelihood joint-confidence region, likelihood confidence intervals, skew-corrected and accelerated bootstrap (BCa), and Monte Carlo residual resampling methods. We study these with a model two-dimensional membrane system for simplicity, but the principles are applicable as well to fluorophores diffusing in three-dimensional solution. Using simulated fluorescence fluctuation data, we find the BCa method to be particularly well-suited for estimating confidence intervals in PCH analysis, and several other methods to be less so. Using the BCa method and additional simulated fluctuation data, we find that confidence intervals can be reduced dramatically for a specific non-Gaussian beam profile. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society

  9. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  10. A comparison of small-scale magnetic fluctuations in the Region 1 and 2 field-aligned current systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Bryant, M. S.; Ridley, C. G.; Shen, Y.; Yang, L.; Clausen, L. B. N.; McWilliams, K. A.; Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L. G.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Waters, C. L.

    2017-03-01

    By determining the location and size of the Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) from Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment data, we are able to study the small-scale magnetic fluctuations observed by the Swarm satellites embedded within the large-scale FACs. A statistical comparison of R1 and R2 high-frequency fluctuations is presented in terms of different solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities. We find that (1) the amplitude of high-frequency fluctuations in both R1 and R2 increases as the large-scale R1 and R2 FACs intensify; (2) high-frequency fluctuations in R1 peak near dayside dawn and dusk, while those in R2 peak around noon; (3) the location of the largest high-frequency fluctuations in R1 shifts in local time in response to IMF By, indicating a connection between the R1 fluctuation and the driving solar wind most likely explained by magnetic reconnection; and (4) high-frequency fluctuations in R2 are enhanced in a small region near local noon and respond clearly to nightside drivers, as characterized by the auroral electrojet index. Our analysis shows that the intensity of R1 and R2 high-frequency magnetic fluctuations is directly connected to the intensity of FACs, which implies that the magnetic fluctuations are closely related to the magnetospheric processes that drive them.

  11. Multifractal conductance fluctuations in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Rafsanjani Amin, Kazi; Pal, Nairita; Sankar Ray, Samriddhi; Pandit, Rahul

    A multifractal (MF) system is characterized by scaling laws involving an infinite number of exponents. In condensed-matter systems, signatures of multifractality have typically been found in the structure of the critical wave functions at localization delocalization (LD) transitions. We report here the first experimental observation of MF statistics in the transport coefficients of a quantum-condensed matter system. We unearth this through a careful investigation of the magneto-conductance fluctuations in ultra-high mobility single layer graphene at ultra-low temperatures. We obtain the MF spectra over a wide range of temperature and doping levels and show that the multifractality decreases as the temperature increases or as the doping moves the system away from the Dirac point. We show that the fractal exponents are a universal function of the phase coherence length of the carriers. We propose that a probable origin of the MF magneto-conductance fluctuations observed by us is an incipient Anderson LD transition in graphene near the charge neutrality point - a phenomenon predicted but never observed in single layer graphene. We also explore alternate possibilities of the origin of the multifractality namely relativistic quantum scars. AB acknowledges funding from Nanomission, DST, Govt. of India and SERB, DST, Govt. of India.

  12. Protrusion Fluctuations Direct Cell Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Many physiological phenomena involve directional cell migration. It is usually attributed to chemical gradients in vivo. Recently, other cues have been shown to guide cells in vitro, including stiffness/adhesion gradients or micropatterned adhesive motifs. However, the cellular mechanism leading to these biased migrations remains unknown, and, often, even the direction of motion is unpredictable. In this study, we show the key role of fluctuating protrusions on ratchet-like structures in driving NIH3T3 cell migration. We identified the concept of efficient protrusion and an associated direction index. Our analysis of the protrusion statistics facilitated the quantitative prediction of cell trajectories in all investigated conditions. We varied the external cues by changing the adhesive patterns. We also modified the internal cues using drug treatments, which modified the protrusion activity. Stochasticity affects the short- and long-term steps. We developed a theoretical model showing that an asymmetry in the protrusion fluctuations is sufficient for predicting all measures associated with the long-term motion, which can be described as a biased persistent random walk. PMID:24988339

  13. Entropic fluctuations in DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Dimitrios; Li, Wentian; Provata, Astero

    2018-03-01

    The Local Shannon Entropy (LSE) in blocks is used as a complexity measure to study the information fluctuations along DNA sequences. The LSE of a DNA block maps the local base arrangement information to a single numerical value. It is shown that despite this reduction of information, LSE allows to extract meaningful information related to the detection of repetitive sequences in whole chromosomes and is useful in finding evolutionary differences between organisms. More specifically, large regions of tandem repeats, such as centromeres, can be detected based on their low LSE fluctuations along the chromosome. Furthermore, an empirical investigation of the appropriate block sizes is provided and the relationship of LSE properties with the structure of the underlying repetitive units is revealed by using both computational and mathematical methods. Sequence similarity between the genomic DNA of closely related species also leads to similar LSE values at the orthologous regions. As an application, the LSE covariance function is used to measure the evolutionary distance between several primate genomes.

  14. Consistency of detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvsletten, O.

    2017-07-01

    The scaling function F (s ) in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scales as F (s ) ˜sH for stochastic processes with Hurst exponent H . This scaling law is proven for stationary stochastic processes with 0 DFA is equal in expectation to (i) a weighted sum of the ACF and (ii) a weighted sum of the second-order structure function. These results enable us to compute the exact finite-size bias for signals that are scaling and to employ DFA in a meaningful sense for signals that do not exhibit power-law statistics. The usefulness is illustrated by examples where it is demonstrated that a previous suggested modified DFA will increase the bias for signals with Hurst exponents 1 application of these developments, an estimator F ̂(s ) is proposed. This estimator can handle missing data in regularly sampled time series without the need of interpolation schemes. Under mild regularity conditions, F ̂(s ) is equal in expectation to the fluctuation function F (s ) in the gap-free case.

  15. Transverse Momentum Fluctuations in Nuclear Collisions at 158 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Behler, M.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, A.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Filip, P.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kollegger, T.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Markert, C.; Mateev, M.; Mayes, B.W.; Melkumov, G.L.; Meurer, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, S.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Panayotov, D.; Perl, K.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Puhlhofer, F.; Reid, J.G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Trainor, T.A.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Zaranek, J.; Zimanyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations in transverse momentum of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in p+p, C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at 158 AGeV. Three different characteristics are discussed: the average transverse momentum of the event, the Phi_pT fluctuation measure and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. In the kinematic region explored, the dynamical fluctuations are found to be small. However, a significant system size dependence of Phi_pT is observed, with the largest value measured in peripheral Pb+Pb interactions. The data are compared with predictions of several models.

  16. Optical twists in phase and amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    beams, the far field projection of the twisted optical beam maintains a high photon concentration even at higher values of topological charge. Optical twisters have therefore profound applications to fundamental studies of light and atoms such as in quantum entanglement of the OAM, toroidal traps......Light beams with helical phase profile correspond to photons having orbital angular momentum (OAM). A Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam is an example where its helical phase sets a phase-singularity at the optical axis and forms a ring-shaped transverse amplitude profile. Here, we describe a unique beam...

  17. Towards satisfactory scattering amplitudes for dual fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, D

    1973-01-01

    The authors find the modified Lorentz invariant propagator which, when used on Neveu-Schwarz meson lines joining fermion lines, guarantees the coupling of just the ghost-free transverse spectrum of meson states. The modification is necessary to take account of the new form of reflected Ward identity valid for such lines. Thus they can write down dual amplitudes for processes involving four external fermions which possess a high degree of inner consistency, no-ghost theorems and Lorentz invariance, but they have not yet been able to evaluate them. (13 refs).

  18. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  19. Quantum information reclaiming after amplitude damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memarzadeh, Laleh; Cafaro, Carlo; Mancini, Stefano, E-mail: laleh.memarzadeh@unicam.it, E-mail: carlo.cafaro@unicam.it, E-mail: stefano.mancini@unicam.it [School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2011-01-28

    We design an effective method to investigate the quantum information reclaim from the environment after amplitude damping has occurred. In particular, we address the question of optimal measurement on the environment to perform the best possible correction on two- and three-dimensional quantum systems. While for qubits we show that the entanglement fidelity is the same for all possible measurements, for qutirits we find that different measurements give rise to different values of the entanglement fidelity. By searching over all possible measurements on the environment we uncover the optimal one leading to the maximum entanglement fidelity.

  20. Blade Section Design of Marine Propellers with Minimum Cavitation Induced Pressure Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhibo; Kuiper, Gert

    2015-12-01

    To minimize cavitation induced pressure fluctuations by marine propellers with minimum efficiency loss, the paper presents a new design and optimization method using a blade section design method. The sheet cavity volume variation on a two-dimensional blade section in quasi-steady condition has been simplified to a relation with only a limited number of non-dimensional parameters. This results in a fast prediction method of the cavity volume of a blade section passing a wake peak, using a pre-calculated database. This makes optimization feasible. The optimization method was applied to the propeller of a container ship. Extensive tests in a towing tank and a cavitation channel validated the reduction of pressure fluctuations: 33% reduction in the first blade frequency amplitude and 18% reduction in the second blade frequency amplitude, with the same open water efficiency.

  1. Fluctuations of hi-hat timing and dynamics in a virtuoso drum track of a popular music recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Otto; Virtanen, Tuomas; Zollner, Manfred; Hennig, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Long-range correlated temporal fluctuations in the beats of musical rhythms are an inevitable consequence of human action. According to recent studies, such fluctuations also lead to a favored listening experience. The scaling laws of amplitude variations in rhythms, however, are widely unknown. Here we use highly sensitive onset detection and time series analysis to study the amplitude and temporal fluctuations of Jeff Porcaro's one-handed hi-hat pattern in "I Keep Forgettin'"-one of the most renowned 16th note patterns in modern drumming. We show that fluctuations of hi-hat amplitudes and interbeat intervals (times between hits) have clear long-range correlations and short-range anticorrelations separated by a characteristic time scale. In addition, we detect subtle features in Porcaro's drumming such as small drifts in the 16th note pulse and non-trivial periodic two-bar patterns in both hi-hat amplitudes and intervals. Through this investigation we introduce a step towards statistical studies of the 20th and 21st century music recordings in the framework of complex systems. Our analysis has direct applications to the development of drum machines and to drumming pedagogy.

  2. The Construction of Spin Foam Vertex Amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Bianchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin foam vertex amplitudes are the key ingredient of spin foam models for quantum gravity. These fall into the realm of discretized path integral, and can be seen as generalized lattice gauge theories. They can be seen as an attempt at a 4-dimensional generalization of the Ponzano-Regge model for 3d quantum gravity. We motivate and review the construction of the vertex amplitudes of recent spin foam models, giving two different and complementary perspectives of this construction. The first proceeds by extracting geometric configurations from a topological theory of the BF type, and can be seen to be in the tradition of the work of Barrett, Crane, Freidel and Krasnov. The second keeps closer contact to the structure of Loop Quantum Gravity and tries to identify an appropriate set of constraints to define a Lorentz-invariant interaction of its quanta of space. This approach is in the tradition of the work of Smolin, Markopoulous, Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine.

  3. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Argonov, V. Yu.; Makarov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the...

  4. Numerical Investigation of Pressure Fluctuation Characteristics in a Centrifugal Pump with Variable Axial Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance flows in the sidewall gaps of centrifugal pumps are unsteady as well as main flows in the volute casing and impeller, which may cause vibration and noise, and the corresponding pressure fluctuations are related to the axial clearance size. In this paper, unsteady numerical simulations were conducted to predict the unsteady flows within the entire flow passage of a centrifugal pump operating in the design condition. Pressure fluctuation characteristics in the volute casing, impeller, and sidewall gaps were investigated with three axial clearance sizes. Results show that an axial clearance variation affects the pressure fluctuation characteristics in each flow domain by different degree. The greatest pressure fluctuation occurs at the blade pressure surface and is almost not influenced by the axial clearance variation which has a certainly effect on the pressure fluctuation characteristics around the tongue. The maximum pressure fluctuation amplitude in the sidewall gaps is larger than that in the volute casing, and different spectrum characteristics show up in the three models due to the interaction between the clearance flow and the main flow as well as the rotor-stator interaction. Therefore, clearance flow should be taken into consideration in the hydraulic design of centrifugal pumps.

  5. Numerical study of universal conductance fluctuations in three-dimensional topological semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yayun; Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Xie, X. C.

    2017-10-01

    We study the conductance fluctuation in topological semimetals. Through statistical distribution of energy levels of topological semimetals, we determine the dominant parameters of the universal conductance fluctuation (UCF), i.e., the number of uncorrelated bands k , the level degeneracy s , and the symmetry parameter β . These parameters allow us to predict the zero-temperature intrinsic UCF of topological semimetals using the Altshuler-Lee-Stone theory. Then, we obtain numerically the conductance fluctuations for topological semimetals of quasi-one-dimensional geometry. We find that for Dirac (Weyl) semimetals, the theoretical prediction coincides with the numerical results. However, a nonuniversal conductance fluctuation behavior is found for topological nodal line semimetals; that is, the conductance fluctuation amplitude increases with the enlargement of spin-orbit-coupling strength. We find that such unexpected parameter-dependent phenomena of conductance fluctuation are related to the Fermi-surface shape of three-dimensional (3D) topological semimetals. These results will help us to understand the existing and future experimental results of UCF in 3D topological semimetals.

  6. Effects of vole fluctuations on the population dynamics of the barn owl Tyto alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Chris; de Roos, Andre M

    2007-01-01

    Many predator species feed on prey that fluctuates in abundance from year to year. Birds of prey can face large fluctuations in food abundance i.e. small mammals, especially voles. These annual changes in prey abundance strongly affect the reproductive success and mortality of the individual predators and thus can be expected to influence their population dynamics and persistence. The barn owl, for example, shows large fluctuations in breeding success that correlate with the dynamics in voles, their main prey species. Analysis of the impact of fluctuations in vole abundance (their amplitude, peaks and lows, cycle length and regularity) with a simple predator prey model parameterized with literature data indicates population persistence is especially affected by years with low vole abundance. In these years the population can decline to low owl numbers such that the ensuing peak vole years cannot be exploited. This result is independent of the length and regularity of vole fluctuations. The relevance of this result for conservation of the barn owl and other birds of prey that show a numerical response to fluctuating prey species is discussed.

  7. Fluctuations in plasma oestradiol levels in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicóvíc, P M; Luisi, M; Cortés-Prieto, J; Franchi, F

    1980-01-01

    Plasma levels of oestradiol were measured in blood samples obtained from 6 normal men every 12 minutes for two 4-hour periods: between 08.00 and 12.00h and between 18.00 and 22.00h. Circulating oestradiol was measured by radioimmunoassay after chromatographic separation on microcolumns of Sephadex LH-20. Mean values of oestradiol concentrations and coefficients of variation for two 4-hour periods were calculated for each subject and for the whole group. Data were statistically evaluated by means of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Rapid fluctuations in plasma oestradiol levels were observed in all subjects. The pattern of the fluctuations was found to be irregular and different in each subject. The mean concentration and coefficient of variation were significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in the morning, suggesting the possibility of a circadian rhythm in the secretion of oestradiol in men.

  8. An entropy-based stability analysis of extreme fluctuations in a system featuring a 1/ f spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokov, V. N.; Koverda, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    Extreme fluctuations are modeled by a point system of stochastic equations, in which power spectra inversely proportional to the frequency are produced under the effect of white noise. The distribution of extreme fluctuations corresponds to the maximum of statistical entropy, which points to their stability in nature. By calculating the spectral entropy of random processes, it becomes possible to investigate their stability directly from power spectra without the need to calculate the amplitude distribution functions. The spectral entropy as a function of white noise amplitude has a minimum. The position of the spectral entropy minimum corresponds to the critical state of the system in which the spectra of fluctuating quantities are inversely proportional to the frequency.

  9. Bet Hedging against Demographic Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, BingKan; Leibler, Stanislas

    2017-09-01

    Biological organisms have to cope with stochastic variations in both the external environment and the internal population dynamics. Theoretical studies and laboratory experiments suggest that population diversification could be an effective bet-hedging strategy for adaptation to varying environments. Here we show that bet hedging can also be effective against demographic fluctuations that pose a trade-off between growth and survival for populations even in a constant environment. A species can maximize its overall abundance in the long term by diversifying into coexisting subpopulations of both "fast-growing" and "better-surviving" individuals. Our model generalizes statistical physics models of birth-death processes to incorporate dispersal, during which new populations are founded, and can further incorporate variations of local environments. In this way, we unify different bet-hedging strategies against demographic and environmental variations as a general means of adaptation to both types of uncertainties in population growth.

  10. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales.

  11. Fluctuations in strongly coupled cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonometto, Silvio A. [Department of Physics, Astronomy Unit, Trieste University, Via Tiepolo 11, I 34143 Trieste (Italy); Mainini, Roberto, E-mail: bonometto@oats.inaf.it, E-mail: mainini@mib.infn.it [Department of Physics G. Occhialini, Milano-Bicocca University, Piazza della Scienza 3, I 20126 Milano (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    In the early Universe, a dual component made of coupled CDM and a scalar field Φ, if their coupling β > (3){sup 1/2}/2, owns an attractor solution, making them a stationary fraction of cosmic energy during the radiation dominated era. Along the attractor, both such components expand ∝a{sup −4} and have early density parameters Ω{sub d} = 1/(4β{sup 2}) and Ω{sub c} = 2 Ω{sub d} (field and CDM, respectively). In a previous paper it was shown that, if a further component, expanding ∝a{sup −3}, breaks such stationary expansion at z ∼ 3–5 × 10{sup 3}, cosmic components gradually acquire densities consistent with observations. This paper, first of all, considers the case that this component is warm. However, its main topic is the analysis of fluctuation evolution: out of horizon modes are then determined; their entry into horizon is numerically evaluated as well as the dependence of Meszaros effect on the coupling β; finally, we compute: (i) transfer function and linear spectral function; (ii) CMB C{sub l} spectra. Both are close to standard ΛCDM models; in particular, the former one can be so down to a scale smaller than Milky Way, in spite of its main DM component being made of particles of mass < 1 keV. The previously coupled CDM component, whose present density parameter is O(10{sup −3}), exhibits wider fluctuations δρ/ρ, but approximately β-independent δρ values. We discuss how lower scale features of these cosmologies might ease quite a few problems that ΛCDM does not easily solve.

  12. QCD amplitudes with 2 initial spacelike legs via generalised BCFW recursion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutak, Krzysztof; Hameren, Andreas van; Serino, Mirko [The H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342, Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-02

    We complete the generalisation of the BCFW recursion relation to the off-shell case, allowing for the computation of tree level scattering amplitudes for full High Energy Factorisation (HEF), i.e. with both incoming partons having a non-vanishing transverse momentum. We provide explicit results for color-ordered amplitudes with two off-shell legs in massless QCD up to 4 point, continuing the program begun in two previous papers. For the 4-fermion amplitudes, which are not BCFW-recursible, we perform a diagrammatic computation, so as to offer a complete set of expressions. We explicitly show and discuss some plots of the squared 2→2 matrix elements as functions of the differences in rapidity and azimuthal angle of the final state particles.

  13. Physical modelling of temperature fluctuations in a high aspect ratio model of the Czochralski crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, J.; Cramer, A.; Grants, I.; Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.

    2015-12-01

    A low temperature liquid metal model of the Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth process is considered experimentally for a high aspect ratio. Temperature fluctuations close to the edge of the model crystal are studied under the action of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) and/or rotation of the model crystal. A rotation of thermal structures is observed which loses its periodicity at sufficiently high strengths of the RMF. This finding is in qualitative agreement with previous findings in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) cells. Opposing to that more generic case, the remaining amplitude of the temperature fluctuations stays significantly higher. I.e., the suppression of the fluctuations, which are detrimental to the growth of a mono-crystal, is weaker in the model under investigation.

  14. STATISTICAL AND SCALING FEATURES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN THE DISSIPATION RANGE DURING A RECONNECTION EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consolini, G.; Grandioso, S.; Marcucci, M. F.; Pallocchia, G. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Roma (Italy); Yordanova, E. [Swedish Institute for Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-05-01

    Reconnection events in space plasmas are accompanied by the occurrence of large-amplitude turbulent fluctuations of the magnetic and electric field, covering a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Here, we study the scaling and statistical features of magnetic and electric field fluctuations below the ion-gyroperiod (i.e., in the dissipation domain) by carefully investigating the occurrence of local or global scaling features during a reconnection event studied by Eastwood et al . Our results point toward the presence of a global scale invariance, i.e., a mono-fractal nature, of fluctuations above the ion-cyclotron frequency and at spatial scales near the ion-inertial length.

  15. Short-term stratospheric ozone fluctuations observed by GROMOS microwave radiometer at Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Lorena; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2018-01-01

    The ground-based millimeter wave ozone spectrometer (GROMOS) has been continually measuring middle atmospheric ozone volume mixing ratio profiles above Bern, Switzerland (46.95°N, 7.44°E, 577 m), since 1994 in the frame of NDACC. The high temporal resolution of GROMOS (30 min) allows the analysis of short-term fluctuations. The present study analyses the temporal perturbations, ranging from 1 to 8 h, observed in stratospheric ozone from June 2011 to May 2012. The short-term fluctuations of stratospheric ozone are within 5%, and GROMOS appears to have relative amplitudes stable over time smaller than 2% at 10 hPa (32 km). The strongest natural fluctuations of stratospheric ozone (about 1% at 10 hPa) above Bern occur during winter due to displacements and deformations of the polar vortex towards mid-latitudes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. The effect of fluctuating temperatures during development on fitness-related traits of Scatophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærsgaard, Anders; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U

    2013-10-01

    Development of ectotherms is highly temperature dependent. Studies using variable thermal environments can improve ecological relevance of data because organisms naturally face day-to-day stochastic temperature fluctuations as well as seasonal changes in the amplitude of such daily fluctuations. The objective of this study was to investigate if, and to what extent, the use of constant temperatures is justified in studies of the model species, yellow dung fly, Scatophaga stercoraria (L.). We examined the effect of temperature fluctuation on the expression of several life history traits and the effect on subsequent adult longevity. We used two fluctuating temperature treatments with the same mean but different amplitudes (15/21°C, 12/24°C; 12/12 h), and three constant temperature treatments spanning the wide temperature range faced in the wild (12, 18, and 24°C). Large temperature fluctuation was mostly detrimental (lower juvenile survival, slower growth, smaller body size, and longer development), whereas moderate temperature fluctuation usually gave responses similar to the constant regime. When developing in fluctuating temperatures, adult longevity (no effect), body size (lower), and wing shape (narrower wings) deviated from the expectations based on the constant temperature reaction norms, presumably because of acclimation responses. Contrary to some studies no obvious beneficial effects of moderate temperature fluctuation were observed. Instead, yellow dung flies seem to canalize development in the face of temperature fluctuation up to a point when detrimental effects become unavoidable. The relatively greater effects of extreme constant developmental temperatures question their biological relevance in experiments.

  17. Wind fluctuations over the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Pinson, Pierre; Giebel, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Climatological patterns in wind speed fluctuations with periods of 1 min to 10 h are analysed using data from a meteorological mast in the Danish North Sea. Fluctuations on these time scales are of particular relevance to the effective management of the power supply from large wind farms. The Hil......Climatological patterns in wind speed fluctuations with periods of 1 min to 10 h are analysed using data from a meteorological mast in the Danish North Sea. Fluctuations on these time scales are of particular relevance to the effective management of the power supply from large wind farms...

  18. Conformal basis for flat space amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasterski, Sabrina; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2017-09-01

    We study solutions of the Klein-Gordon, Maxwell, and linearized Einstein equations in R1 ,d +1 that transform as d -dimensional conformal primaries under the Lorentz group S O (1 ,d +1 ). Such solutions, called conformal primary wavefunctions, are labeled by a conformal dimension Δ and a point in Rd, rather than an on-shell (d +2 )-dimensional momentum. We show that the continuum of scalar conformal primary wavefunctions on the principal continuous series Δ ∈d/2 +i R of S O (1 ,d +1 ) spans a complete set of normalizable solutions to the wave equation. In the massless case, with or without spin, the transition from momentum space to conformal primary wavefunctions is implemented by a Mellin transform. As a consequence of this construction, scattering amplitudes in this basis transform covariantly under S O (1 ,d +1 ) as d -dimensional conformal correlators.

  19. Amplitude determinant coupled cluster with pairwise doubles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Luning

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) theory successfully reproduces doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI) with mean field cost. However, the projective nature of pCCD makes the method non-variational and thus hard to improve systematically. As a variational alternative, we explore the idea of coupled-cluster-like expansions based on amplitude determinants and develop a specific theory similar to pCCD based on determinants of pairwise doubles. The new ansatz admits a variational treatment through Monte Carlo methods while remaining size-consistent and, crucially, polynomial cost. In the dissociations of LiH, HF, H2O and N2, the method performs very similarly to pCCD and DOCI, suggesting that coupled-cluster-like ansatzes and variational evaluation may not be mutually exclusive.

  20. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    CERN Document Server

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive crosslinkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatiotemporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagell...

  1. Cascaded Amplitude Modulations in Sound Texture Perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McWalter, Richard Ian; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Sound textures, such as crackling fire or chirping crickets, represent a broad class of sounds defined by their homogeneous temporal structure. It has been suggested that the perception of texture is mediated by time-averaged summary statistics measured from early auditory representations....... In this study, we investigated the perception of sound textures that contain rhythmic structure, specifically second-order amplitude modulations that arise from the interaction of different modulation rates, previously described as "beating" in the envelope-frequency domain. We developed an auditory texture...... model that utilizes a cascade of modulation filterbanks that capture the structure of simple rhythmic patterns. The model was examined in a series of psychophysical listening experiments using synthetic sound textures-stimuli generated using time-averaged statistics measured from real-world textures...

  2. Subleading soft graviton theorem for loop amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2017-11-01

    Superstring field theory gives expressions for heterotic and type II string loop amplitudes that are free from ultraviolet and infrared divergences when the number of non-compact space-time dimensions is five or more. We prove the subleading soft graviton theorem in these theories to all orders in perturbation theory for S-matrix elements of arbitrary number of finite energy external states but only one external soft graviton. We also prove the leading soft graviton theorem for arbitrary number of finite energy external states and arbitrary number of soft gravitons. Since our analysis is based on general properties of one particle irreducible effective action, the results are valid in any theory of quantum gravity that gives finite result for the S-matrix order by order in perturbation theory without violating general coordinate invariance.

  3. Rank-ordered multifractal spectrum of intermittent fluctuations in the cusp : a case study with Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Herve; Echim, Marius; Chang, Tom

    Data from the four Cluster spacecraft on 26th of February 2001 show that the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) of B 2 in the cusp are non-Gaussian and have an intermittent behavior at scales smaller than about 1 minute. PDFs obtained at various scales cannot be collapsed onto a master curve based on a single monofractal index, except in the central regions. We present here a more geometrical approach based on the multifractal analysis of these intermittent fluctuations using both structure functions and the partition function. These traditional multifractal methods based on the statistics of the full set of fluctuations indicate that the spectrum of the scaling exponents is multifractal. However, the fractal characteristics of large amplitude fluctuations (the less frequent ones) might be masked by those with small amplitude which are by far the dominant population. Chang & Wu (2007) recently proposed a new method of multifractal analysis, based on rank-ordered fractal index of fluctuations. This method subdivides the fluctuations into groups according to the range of their scaled sizes. We show preliminary results of this new multifractal analysis applied to Cluster data in the cusp. T. Chang and C.C. Wu, Rank-Ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations, arXiv:0712.4256v1 [astro-ph] 27 December 2007.

  4. Phase fluctuations and the absence of topological defects in a photo-excited charge-ordered nickelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. D.; Moore, R. G.; Zhu, Y.; Patthey, L.; Trigo, M.; Lu, D. H.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Krupin, O.; Yi, M.; Langner, M.; Huse, N.; Robinson, J. S.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, S. Y.; Coslovich, G.; Huber, B.; Reis, D. A.; Kaindl, R. A.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Doering, D.; Denes, P.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Johnson, S. L.; Först, M.; Sasagawa, T.; Kung, Y. F.; Sorini, A. P.; Kemper, A. F.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Lee, D. -H.; Shen, Z. X.; Hussain, Z.

    2012-05-15

    The dynamics of an order parameter's amplitude and phase determines the collective behaviour of novel states emerging in complex materials. Time- and momentum-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, by virtue of measuring material properties at atomic and electronic time scales out of equilibrium, can decouple entangled degrees of freedom by visualizing their corresponding dynamics in the time domain. Here we combine time-resolved femotosecond optical and resonant X-ray diffraction measurements on charge ordered La1.75Sr0.25NiO4 to reveal unforeseen photoinduced phase fluctuations of the charge order parameter. Such fluctuations preserve long-range order without creating topological defects, distinct from thermal phase fluctuations near the critical temperature in equilibrium. Importantly, relaxation of the phase fluctuations is found to be an order of magnitude slower than that of the order parameter's amplitude fluctuations, and thus limits charge order recovery. This new aspect of phase fluctuations provides a more holistic view of the phase's importance in ordering phenomena of quantum matter.

  5. Tree-level gluon amplitudes on the celestial sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, Anders; Volovich, Anastasia; Zlotnikov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Pasterski, Shao and Strominger have recently proposed that massless scattering amplitudes can be mapped to correlators on the celestial sphere at infinity via a Mellin transform. We apply this prescription to arbitrary $n$-point tree-level gluon amplitudes. The Mellin transforms of MHV amplitudes are given by generalized hypergeometric functions on the Grassmannian $Gr(4,n)$, while generic non-MHV amplitudes are given by more complicated Gelfand $A$-hypergeometric functions.

  6. Complete N-point superstring disk amplitude II. Amplitude and hypergeometric function structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafra, Carlos R.; Schlotterer, Oliver; Stieberger, Stephan

    2013-08-01

    Using the pure spinor formalism in part I (Mafra et al., preprint [1]) we compute the complete tree-level amplitude of N massless open strings and find a striking simple and compact form in terms of minimal building blocks: the full N-point amplitude is expressed by a sum over (N-3)! Yang-Mills partial subamplitudes each multiplying a multiple Gaussian hypergeometric function. While the former capture the space-time kinematics of the amplitude the latter encode the string effects. This result disguises a lot of structure linking aspects of gauge amplitudes as color and kinematics with properties of generalized Euler integrals. In this part II the structure of the multiple hypergeometric functions is analyzed in detail: their relations to monodromy equations, their minimal basis structure, and methods to determine their poles and transcendentality properties are proposed. Finally, a Gröbner basis analysis provides independent sets of rational functions in the Euler integrals. In contrast to [1] here we use momenta redefined by a factor of i. As a consequence the signs of the kinematic invariants are flipped, e.g. |→|.

  7. GPR amplitude reflection coefficient estimates from reflected amplitude obtained from Common Mid-Point surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, A. A.; West, J. L.; Clark, R.

    2009-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar offers the potential to image individual rock fractures, and can potentially provide much-needed information on fracture aperture and hence permeability. However, estimation of fracture properties from radar requires determination of the reflection co-efficient (R) of individual fractures. The reflected amplitude measured at the receiver is related to reflection coefficient, but it is also affected by other factors including transmitter power and coupling with the ground, the antenna radiation pattern, incident angle, geometric spreading and intrinsic attenuation within the rock matrix (and hence the ray path length). Hence, obtaining absolute R values for fractures is a non-trivial exercise. Here we present an approach for the estimation of bedding plane fracture R based on the variation in reflection amplitude with incident angle and polarization determined in CMP (Common Mid-Point) surveys. A 500MHz radar Common Offset (CO) profile was acquired on Carboniferous Limestone in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. CMP data were acquired at specific points along the profile using both broadside (TE) and endfire (TM) acquisition modes. Attenuation characteristics for the limestone and antenna radiation pattern in this lithology were estimated from transillumination surveys. The variation in reflected amplitude with incident angle was determined for bedding plane fractures identified in the CMP data. After correcting these reflected amplitudes for attenuation, radiation pattern and geometric spreading, reflection amplitude versus incident angle curves were compared with theoretical predictions expected for thin water-filled parallel-sided fractures. Preliminary analysis indicate that TE and TM mode responses match theoretical predictions which suggests this approach can be used to obtain R values from CMP surveys.

  8. Influence of thermal fluctuations on Cherenkov radiation from fluxons in dissipative Josephson systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonov, A. A.; Pankratov, A. L.; Yulin, A. V.

    2000-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of fluxons in Josephson systems with dispersion and thermal fluctuations is analyzed using the "quasiparticle" approach to investigate the influence of noise on the Cherenkov radiation effect. Analytical expressions for the stationary amplitude of the emitted radiation...... and its spectral distribution have been obtained in an annular geometry. It is demonstrated that noise reduces the amplitude of the radiated wave and broadens its spectrum. The effect of the radiated wave on the fluxon dynamics leads to a considerably smaller linewidth than observed in the usual flux flow...... oscillator. A resonant behavior of both the mean amplitude and the linewidth as functions of bias current is found. The obtained results enable an optimization of the main parameters (power, tunability, and linewidth) of practical mm- and sub-mm wave Cherenkov flux flow oscillators....

  9. Broadband homodyne reflectometer devoted to density fluctuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Navarro, A.P. (Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain))

    1990-10-01

    A microwave reflectometer has been used in the TJ-I tomakak ({ital R}=0.30 m, {ital a}=0.10 m, {ital I}{sub {ital p}I{ital p}}{lt} 50 kA, {ital B}{sub {ital t}} {lt} 1.5 T) to monitor density fluctuations in the plasma bulk. Experiments were made in the range 33--50 GHz, {ital x} mode. The system uses a single antenna for launching and receiving the microwave beam. Since broadband operation usually requires homodyne detection, different techniques were used to overcome the limitations due to this detection scheme. Radial profiles of the density turbulence were taken and the behavior of the spectra analyzed. A slow frequency sweeping has been performed to provide a method to normalize the signals reflected from different radial positions. In addition this technique can be used to obtain information on the absolute value of the phase oscillation amplitude. Spectra of the edge density fluctuations obtained by reflectometry and by Langmuir probes are compared. By the use of two reflectometers in the same antenna, radial correlation experiments can be performed. Some discussions on the ability of homodyne reflectometry to determine coherence lengths are also presented. A slow sweeping of the frequency is proposed to overcome the lack on the information given by the homodyne system.

  10. Asymmetric noise-induced large fluctuations in coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Szwaykowska, Klimka; Carr, Thomas W.

    2017-10-01

    Networks of interacting, communicating subsystems are common in many fields, from ecology, biology, and epidemiology to engineering and robotics. In the presence of noise and uncertainty, interactions between the individual components can lead to unexpected complex system-wide behaviors. In this paper, we consider a generic model of two weakly coupled dynamical systems, and we show how noise in one part of the system is transmitted through the coupling interface. Working synergistically with the coupling, the noise on one system drives a large fluctuation in the other, even when there is no noise in the second system. Moreover, the large fluctuation happens while the first system exhibits only small random oscillations. Uncertainty effects are quantified by showing how characteristic time scales of noise-induced switching scale as a function of the coupling between the two coupled parts of the experiment. In addition, our results show that the probability of switching in the noise-free system scales inversely as the square of reduced noise intensity amplitude, rendering the virtual probability of switching an extremely rare event. Our results showing the interplay between transmitted noise and coupling are also confirmed through simulations, which agree quite well with analytic theory.

  11. Mountain frozen grounds as small amplitude thermal proxy in southern continental Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sebastian; Beriain, Eneko; Izagirre, Eñaut; Bockheim, James; Pedro, Cid-Agüero

    2015-04-01

    Frozen grounds are an important element of the cryosphere, covering between a 20-25% of the global area. Frozen grounds are becoming a relevant object of research in the southern hemisphere, being most studies focused mainly on Antarctica. With the exception of seasonally frozen grounds, perennially frozen ground is found in continental South America, for example, in high altitude terrains from 4.600m a.s.l. in central Chile. However, scarce or not information regarding permafrost on Southern Patagonia has been reported. One of the aims of this study was to establish mountain permafrost existence at 1.200m in the southern limit of the Southern Patagonian Ice-Field, a geographically active area surrounded by different kinds of glaciers on fast retreat. The area of study presents several features of past cryogenic activity such as undefined polygonal grounds with a thick clast border and sandy-loam interior. A scarce vegetal cover is limited to lichen and moss communities. The analyzed soil does not represent a thermal barrier that may avoid heat wave dynamic along the ground profile. There was neither significant snow-cover during winter nor a vegetation layer enough to consider as insulation for the analyzed ground. Oscillations above 0°C were evidenced down to 1.8m depth during winter of 2014, ruling out the existence of permafrost at that lower limit. Year round thermal dynamic down to 1.8m in the ground profile is presented as one result of the monitoring. Small amplitude temperature fluctuations were registered upon monitoring. These minimal amplitudes were stable throughout several months and as such serve as an interesting proxy for recent and long-term climatic thermal fluctuation. The influence of winds coming from nearby glaciers highly affects near-surface amplitude. This interaction was studied. The present work is part of an ongoing monitoring network along South America that intends to fill the gap between tropical Andes and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  12. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  13. Non-Gaussian probability distributions of solar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    Full Text Available The probability distributions of field differences ∆x(τ=x(t+τ-x(t, where the variable x(t may denote any solar wind scalar field or vector field component at time t, have been calculated from time series of Helios data obtained in 1976 at heliocentric distances near 0.3 AU. It is found that for comparatively long time lag τ, ranging from a few hours to 1 day, the differences are normally distributed according to a Gaussian. For shorter time lags, of less than ten minutes, significant changes in shape are observed. The distributions are often spikier and narrower than the equivalent Gaussian distribution with the same standard deviation, and they are enhanced for large, reduced for intermediate and enhanced for very small values of ∆x. This result is in accordance with fluid observations and numerical simulations. Hence statistical properties are dominated at small scale τ by large fluctuation amplitudes that are sparsely distributed, which is direct evidence for spatial intermittency of the fluctuations. This is in agreement with results from earlier analyses of the structure functions of ∆x. The non-Gaussian features are differently developed for the various types of fluctuations. The relevance of these observations to the interpretation and understanding of the nature of solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence is pointed out, and contact is made with existing theoretical concepts of intermittency in fluid turbulence.

  14. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, David U. L.; Conway, Patrick H.

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  15. Random fluctuation leads to forbidden escape of particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Christian S; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-08-01

    A great number of physical processes are described within the context of Hamiltonian scattering. Previous studies have rather been focused on trajectories starting outside invariant structures, since the ones starting inside are expected to stay trapped there forever. This is true though only for the deterministic case. We show however that, under finitely small random fluctuations of the field, trajectories starting inside Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) islands escape within finite time. The nonhyperbolic dynamics gains then hyperbolic characteristics due to the effect of the random perturbed field. As a consequence, trajectories which are started inside KAM curves escape with hyperboliclike time decay distribution, and the fractal dimension of a set of particles that remain in the scattering region approaches that for hyperbolic systems. We show a universal quadratic power law relating the exponential decay to the amplitude of noise. We present a random walk model to relate this distribution to the amplitude of noise, and investigate these phenomena with a numerical study applying random maps.

  16. Fluctuations in Urban Traffic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Dong; Li, Li; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jian-Ming; Jin, Xue-Xiang

    Urban traffic network is a typical complex system, in which movements of tremendous microscopic traffic participants (pedestrians, bicyclists and vehicles) form complicated spatial and temporal dynamics. We collected flow volumes data on the time-dependent activity of a typical urban traffic network, finding that the coupling between the average flux and the fluctuation on individual links obeys a certain scaling law, with a wide variety of scaling exponents between 1/2 and 1. These scaling phenomena can explain the interaction between the nodes' internal dynamics (i.e. queuing at intersections, car-following in driving) and changes in the external (network-wide) traffic demand (i.e. the every day increase of traffic amount during peak hours and shocking caused by traffic accidents), allowing us to further understand the mechanisms governing the transportation system's collective behavior. Multiscaling and hotspot features are observed in the traffic flow data as well. But the reason why the separated internal dynamics are comparable to the external dynamics in magnitude is still unclear and needs further investigations.

  17. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the

  18. temperature fluctuation inside inert atmosphere silos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was conducted to study temperature fluctuation inside the inert atmosphere silos loaded with wheat, compare the temperature fluctuation across the top, middle and bottom part of the silo in relation to the ambient temperature. Temperature readings of the ambient and at the top, middle and bottom part of the ...

  19. Nonconformal Fluctuations in Radiation Dominated Anisotropic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    the non-conformal quantum fluctuations (of expansion and shear) and axisymmetric singularity case in radiation dominated anisotropic cosmology. We show that near the classical singularity the quantum fluctuations tend to diverge. Key words. Quantum Cosmology—Anisotropic universes. 1. Introduction. It has been ...

  20. Pairing fluctuations in trapped Fermi gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Minguzzi, Anna; Rosario, F.

    2004-01-01

    A0530F- Fermion-systems-and-electron-gas-quantum-statistical-mechanics; A0540-Fluctuation-phenomena-random-processes-and-Brownian-motion......A0530F- Fermion-systems-and-electron-gas-quantum-statistical-mechanics; A0540-Fluctuation-phenomena-random-processes-and-Brownian-motion...

  1. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, P.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/339579951; Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X; Basagic, H.J.; Bushueva, I.; Cook, A.J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length

  2. The Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    Wind is a variable energy source whose fluctuations threaten electrical grid stability and complicate dynamical load balancing. The power generated by a wind turbine fluctuates due to the variable wind speed that blows past the turbine. Indeed, the spectrum of wind power fluctuations is widely believed to reflect the Kolmogorov spectrum; both vary with frequency f as f - 5 / 3. This variability decreases when aggregate power fluctuations from geographically distributed wind farms are averaged at the grid via a mechanism known as geographic smoothing. Neither the f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum nor the mechanism of geographic smoothing are understood. In this work, we explain the wind power fluctuation spectrum from the turbine through grid scales. The f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum results from the largest length scales of atmospheric turbulence of order 200 km influencing the small scales where individual turbines operate. This long-range influence spatially couples geographically distributed wind farms and synchronizes farm outputs over a range of frequencies and decreases with increasing inter-farm distance. Consequently, aggregate grid-scale power fluctuations remain correlated, and are smoothed until they reach a limiting f - 7 / 3 spectrum. This work was funded by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, Japan.

  3. Computer simulations of phospholipid - membrane thermodynamic fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Schröder, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports all-atom computer simulations of five phospholipid membranes, DMPC, DPPC, DMPG, DMPS, and DMPSH, with a focus on the thermal equilibrium fluctuations of volume, energy, area, thickness, and order parameter. For the slow fluctuations at constant temperature and pressure (defined...

  4. Response of Fusarium solani to Fluctuating Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure growth under a range of constant temperatures and under a series of fluctuating temperature regimes, and to determine if growth in the fluctuating temperiture regimes could be predicted satisfactorily from the growth data collected in the constant temperature experiments. Growth was measured on both agar and liquid culture to...

  5. Seasonal fluctuations in photochemical efficiency of Symbiodinium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. formosa and P. verucosa responded significantly to seasonal fluctuation in both solar radiation and sea surface temperature by regulating their Symbiodinium cells densities and photochemical efficiencies except P. cylindrica. However, such seasonal fluctuations in these environmental parameters are not accompanied ...

  6. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease severity via resting-awake EEG amplitude modulation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Fraga

    Full Text Available Changes in electroencephalography (EEG amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis, however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD, ii delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer's disease, but also to monitor its progression.

  7. Projectivity of planar zeros in field and string theory amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Medrano; Vera, Agustín Sabio; Vázquez-Mozo, Miguel Á.

    2017-05-01

    We study the projective properties of planar zeros of tree-level scattering amplitudes in various theories. Whereas for pure scalar field theories we find that the planar zeros of the five-point amplitude do not enjoy projective invariance, coupling scalars to gauge fields gives rise to tree-level amplitudes whose planar zeros are determined by homogeneous polynomials in the stereographic coordinates labelling the direction of flight of the outgoing particles. In the case of pure gauge theories, this projective structure is generically destroyed if string corrections are taken into account. Scattering amplitudes of two scalars with graviton emission vanish exactly in the planar limit, whereas planar graviton amplitudes are zero for helicity violating configurations. These results are corrected by string effects, computed using the single-valued projection, which render the planar amplitude nonzero. Finally, we discuss how the structure of planar zeros can be derived from the soft limit behavior of the scattering amplitudes.

  8. Effects of amplitude modulation on perception of wind turbine noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ki Seop; Lee, Soo Gab; Gwak, Doo Young [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Yeol Wan [Ammunition Engineering Team, Defense Agency for Technology and Quality, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hoon [Aerodynamics Research Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji Young [Transportation Environmental Research Team, Green Transport and Logistics Institute, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Wind turbine noise is considered to be easily detectable and highly annoying at relatively lower sound levels than other noise sources. Many previous studies attributed this characteristic to amplitude modulation. However, it is unclear whether amplitude modulation is the main cause of these properties of wind turbine noise. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to identify the relationship between amplitude modulation and these two properties of wind turbine noise. For this investigation, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, 12 participants determined the detection thresholds of six target sounds in the presence of background noise. In the second experiment, 12 participants matched the loudness of modified sounds without amplitude modulation to that of target sounds with amplitude modulation. The results showed that the detection threshold was lowered as the modulation depth increased; additionally, sounds with amplitude modulation had higher subjective loudness than those without amplitude modulation.

  9. Multiplicity Distributions and Charged-neutral Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Agnihotri, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Baldine, A.; Barabach, L.; Barlag, C.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bock, R.; Bohne, E.M.; Bucher, D.; Buijs, A.; Buis, E.J.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chalyshev, V.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chenawi, K.E.; Cherbatchev, R.; Chujo, T.; Claussen, A.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Djordjadze, V.; Donni, P.; Doubovik, I.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumda, M.R.; Eliseev, S.; Enosawa, K.; Feldmann, H.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Glasow, R.; Gupta, S.K.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Higuchi, R.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kato, S.; Kees, S.; Kim, H.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kumar, V.; Kurata, M.; Kurita, K.; Kuzmin, N.; Langbein, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Lohner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Maximov, A.; Mehdiyev, Rashid R.; Mgebrichvili, G.; Miake, Y.; Mikhalev, D.; Mishra, G.C.; Miyamoto, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, Douglas R.O.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Myalkovski, V.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Neumaier, S.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Obenshain, F.E.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Pachr, M.; Parfenov, A.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Raeven, B.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.R.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Solomey, N.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stuken, D.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Twenhofel, C.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; van Heeringen, W.H.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voros, S.; Vos, M.A.; Wyslouch, B.; Yagi, K.; Yokota, Y.; Young, G.R.; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2001-01-01

    Results from the multiplicity distributions of inclusive photons and charged particles, scaling of particle multiplicities, event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations, and charged-neutral fluctuations in 158$\\cdot A$ GeV Pb+Pb collisions are presented and discussed. A scaling of charged particle multiplicity as $N_{part}^{1.07\\pm 0.05}$ and photons as $N_{part}^{1.12\\pm 0.03}$ have been observed, indicating violation of naive wounded nucleon model. The analysis of localized charged-neutral fluctuation indicates a model-independent demonstration of non-statistical fluctuations in both charged particles and photons in limited azimuthal regions. However, no correlated charged-neutral fluctuations are observed.

  10. Israel L. Bershtein (1908-2000 — the Founder of the Theory of Fluctuations in Self-Oscillating Systems (In Commemorating the 100th Birthday Anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malykin G. B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Israel L. Bershtein (1908-2000 was one of the famous radio physicists in the world. He had constructed the theory of amplitude and frequency fluctuations for the electromagnetic wave generators working in the radio and optical scales. He also had developed numerous methods for precise measurement of the fluctuations, which also can be applied to ultimate small mechanical displacements. Besides these he was the first person among the scientists, who had registered the Sagnac effect at radiowaves.

  11. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriola, David; Gadêlha, Hermes; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatio-temporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagellum shape for different regimes of motor activity, medium viscosity and flagellum elasticity. Unstable modes saturate via the coupling of dynein kinetics and flagellum shape without the need of invoking a nonlinear axonemal response. Hence, our work reveals a novel mechanism for the saturation of unstable modes in axonemal beating.

  12. Open string topological amplitudes and gaugino masses

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Taylor, T R

    2005-01-01

    We show that the genus zero topological partition function $F^{(0,h)}$, on a world-sheet with $h$ boundaries, computes the moduli-dependent couplings of the higher derivative F-terms $(\\Tr W^2)^{h-1}$, where $W$ is the gauge N=1 chiral superfield. By string duality, these terms are also related to heterotic topological amplitudes studied in the past, with the topological twist applied only in the left-moving supersymmetric sector of the internal $N=(2,0)$ superconformal field theory. The holomorphic anomaly of these couplings relates them to terms of the form $\\Pi^n({\\rm Tr}W^2)^{h-2}$, where $\\Pi$'s represent chiral projections of non-holomorphic functions of chiral superfields. An important property of these couplings is that they violate R-symmetry for $h\\ge 3$. As a result, once supersymmetry is broken by D-term expectation values, $(\\Tr W^2)^2$ generates gaugino masses that can be hierarchically smaller than the scalar masses, behaving as $m_{1/2}\\sim m_0^4$ in string units. Similarly, $\\Pi{\\rm Tr}W^2$ g...

  13. Digital automatic regulator of seismic signal amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirin, V.V.; Kazanin, G.S.; Remizov, V.Ya.; Slutskovskiy, A.I.

    1978-05-05

    A digital automatic regulator of seismic signal amplitudes is suggested. It contains parallel connected chains consisting of a source of input information, control assembly, outlet recorder, as well as first shift and arithmetic recorders, summator, second and third shift recorders connected in series, and recorder for the order code also connected in series. In order to improve the quality of regulation and for fast response, the device has an additional transformer of the code for the stages of momentary automatic amplification regulator and frequency circuit. In this case the input information source is connected to the inlet of the shift recorder and through the transformer of the stage code to the inlet of the arithmetic recorder, and through the frequency circuit to the inlet of the control assembly. The summator outlet is connected to the second inlet of the latter. The outlet of the control assembly is connected to the inlets of the outlet recorder, as well as the second and third shift recorders, and by the recorder of the order code through the first shift and arithmetic recorders to the first inlet of the summator. Its second inlet is connected to the outlet of the second shift recorder. Its two inlets are connected to the outlets of the third shift recorder and the recorder of the order code.

  14. Casimir amplitudes in topological quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, M. A.; Continentino, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Topological phase transitions constitute a new class of quantum critical phenomena. They cannot be described within the usual framework of the Landau theory since, in general, the different phases cannot be distinguished by an order parameter, neither can they be related to different symmetries. In most cases, however, one can identify a diverging length at these topological transitions. This allows us to describe them using a scaling approach and to introduce a set of critical exponents that characterize their universality class. Here we consider some relevant models of quantum topological transitions associated with well-defined critical exponents that are related by a quantum hyperscaling relation. We extend to these models a finite-size scaling approach based on techniques for calculating the Casimir force in electromagnetism. This procedure allows us to obtain universal Casimir amplitudes at their quantum critical points. Our results verify the validity of finite-size scaling in these systems and confirm the values of the critical exponents obtained previously.

  15. Effective anisotropy through traveltime and amplitude matching

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-08-05

    Introducing anisotropy to seismic wave propagation reveals more realistic physics of our Earth\\'s subsurface as compared to the isotropic assumption. However wavefield modeling, the engine of seismic inverse problems, in anisotropic media still suffers from computational burdens, in particular with complex anisotropy such as transversely isotropic (TI) and Orthorhombic anisotropy. We develop effective isotropic velocity and density models to package the effects of anisotropy such that the wave propagation behavior using these effective models approximate those of the original anisotropic model. We build these effective models through the high frequency asymptotic approximation based on the eikonal and transport equations. We match the geometrical behavior of the wave-fields, given by traveltimes, from the anisotropic and isotropic eikonal equations. This matching yields the effective isotropic velocity that approximates the kinematics of the anisotropic wavefield. Equivalently, we calculate the effective densities by equating the anisotropic and isotropic transport equations. The effective velocities and densities are then fed into the isotropic acoustic variable density wave equation to obtain cheaper anisotropic wavefields. We justify our approach by testing it on an elliptical anisotropic model. The numerical results demonstrate a good matching of both traveltime and amplitude between anisotropic and effective isotropic wavefields.

  16. Research on the Voltage Fluctuation Rules of Power System Containing Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixi; Xu, Guchao; Ma, Gang; Li, Feng; Ju, Rong

    2017-05-01

    The global energy shortage and environmental problems have contributed to the rapid development of wind power. However, due to the randomness and volatility of wind power, large-scale access may cause voltage fluctuation in power grid. Therefore, the reactive power control of power system containing wind farms has become a hot research topic in recent years, in which finding key nodes of voltage fluctuation is a foundation work. In this paper, the power model of wind farm is established first. Then, the influence on nodes voltage when wind farms access simple power system is analysed, and promoted to complex power systems in order to reveal the fluctuation rules of nodes voltage, and to summarize the distribution characteristics of key nodes of voltage fluctuation, which can provide the basis for reactive power optimization. At last, the conclusions are verified by IEEE 30-node system.

  17. Transversity Amplitudes in Hypercharge Exchange Processes; Amplitudes de transversidad en procesos de intercambio de hipercarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar Benitez de Lugo, M.

    1979-07-01

    In this work we present several techniques developed for the extraction of the. Transversity amplitudes governing quasi two-body meson baryon reactions with hypercharge exchange. We review the methods used In processes having a pure spin configuration, as well as the more relevant results obtained with data from K{sup p} and Tp interactions at intermediate energies. The predictions of the additive quark model and the ones following from exchange degeneracy and etoxicity are discussed. We present a formalism for amplitude analysis developed for reactions with mixed spin configurations and discuss the methods of parametric estimation of the moduli and phases of.the amplitudes, as well as the various tests employed to check the goodness of the fits. The calculation of the generalized joint density matrices is given and we propose a method based on the generalization of the idea of multipole moments, which allows to investigate the structure of the decay angular correlations and establishes the quality of the fits and the validity of the simplifying assumptions currently used in this type of studies. (Author) 43 refs.

  18. Investigation of the spatial variability and possible origins of wind-induced air pressure fluctuations responsible for pressure pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Manuel; Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Zeeman, Matthias; Longdoz, Bernard; Schindler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The exchange of greenhouse gases between the soil and the atmosphere is highly relevant for the climate of the Earth. Recent research suggests that wind-induced air pressure fluctuations can alter the soil gas transport and therefore soil gas efflux significantly. Using a newly developed method, we measured soil gas transport in situ in a well aerated forest soil. Results from these measurements showed that the commonly used soil gas diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 30% during periods of strong wind-induced air pressure fluctuations. The air pressure fluctuations above the forest floor are only induced at high above-canopy wind speeds (> 5 m s-1) and lie in the frequency range 0.01-0.1 Hz. Moreover, the amplitudes of air pressure fluctuations in this frequency range show a clear quadratic dependence on mean above-canopy wind speed. However, the origin of these wind-induced pressure fluctuations is still unclear. Airflow measurements and high-precision air pressure measurements were conducted at three different vegetation-covered sites (conifer forest, deciduous forest, grassland) to investigate the spatial variability of dominant air pressure fluctuations, their origin and vegetation-dependent characteristics. At the conifer forest site, a vertical profile of air pressure fluctuations was measured and an array consisting of five pressure sensors were installed at the forest floor. At the grassland site, the air pressure measurements were compared with wind observations made by ground-based LIDAR and spatial temperature observations from a fibre-optic sensing network (ScaleX Campaign 2016). Preliminary results show that at all sites the amplitudes of relevant air pressure fluctuations increase with increasing wind speed. Data from the array measurements reveal that there are no time lags between the air pressure signals of different heights, but a time lag existed between the air pressure signals of the sensors distributed laterally on the forest floor

  19. Chaotic dynamic characteristics of pressure fluctuation signals in hydro-turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wen Tao; An, Shi [School of Management, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Li, Xiao Bin; Lan, Chao Feng; Li, Feng Chen [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Wang, Jian Sheng [Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin (China)

    2016-11-15

    The pressure fluctuation characteristics in a Francis hydro-turbine running at partial flow conditions were studied based on the chaotic dynamic methods. Firstly, the experimental data of pressure fluctuations in the draft tube at various flow conditions was de-noised using lifting wavelet transformation, then, for the de-noised signals, their spectrum distribution on the frequency domain, the energy variation and the energy partition accounting for the total energy was calculated. Hereby, for the flow conditions ranging from no cavitation to severe cavitation, the chaos dynamic features of fluctuation signals were analyzed, including the temporal-frequency distribution, phase trajectory, Lyapunov exponent and Poincaré map etc. It is revealed that, the main energy of pressure fluctuations in the draft tube locates at low-frequency region. As the cavitation grows, the amplitude of power spectrum at frequency domain becomes larger. For all the flow conditions, all the maximal Lyapunov exponents are larger than zero, and they increase with the cavitation level. Therefore, it is believed that there indeed exist the chaotic attractors in the pressure fluctuation signals for a hydro-turbine.

  20. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Markus; Croell, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A silicon crystal growth experiment has been accomplished using the floating-zone technique under microgravity on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 36). Measurements of temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone due to time dependent thermocapillary convection (Marangoni convection) and an observation of the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously performed during the experiment. Temperature fluctuations of about 0.5 - 0.7 C with a frequency range growth rate fluctuates considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: Growth rates up to 3 to 4mm/min, close to zero mm/min, as well as negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations, microscopic growth rates, and the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well, with main frequencies between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, and the characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies. At a position 3.4mm above the interface and 1.4mm inside the melt, equivalent to the sensor tip position in the experiment, temperature fluctuations up to 1.8 C and frequencies ? 0.25Hz were found in the simulations.

  1. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  2. Fluctuations of energy flux in a simple dissipative out-of-equilibrium system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Claudio; Falcon, Eric

    2009-04-01

    We report the statistical properties of the fluctuations of the energy flux in an electronic RC circuit driven with a stochastic voltage. The fluctuations of the power injected in the circuit are measured as a function of the damping rate and the forcing parameters. We show that its distribution exhibits a cusp close to zero and two asymmetric exponential tails, with the asymmetry being driven by the mean dissipation. This simple experiment allows one to capture the qualitative features of the energy flux distribution observed in more complex dissipative systems. We also show that the large fluctuations of injected power averaged on a time lag do not verify the fluctuation theorem even for long averaging time. This is in contrast to the findings of previous experiments due to their small range of explored fluctuation amplitude. The injected power in a system of N components either correlated or not is also studied to mimic systems with large number of particles, such as in a dilute granular gas.

  3. Characterization of broadband fluctuations in wide-pedestal QH-mode plasmas on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; McKee, G. R.; Tobias, B.

    2016-10-01

    Edge broadband fluctuations observed in wide pedestal quiescent H-mode plasmas may play an important role in driving transport necessary for stabilizing the edge to kink-peeling modes, thought to lead to ELMs. Density fluctuation measurements from BES and MIR independently observe periodic bursts in the pedestal that show up spectrally as broadband fluctuations. The period of the fluctuation bursts correlate with the period of enhanced bicoherence in the frequency range of the fluctuations, suggesting nonlinear coupling of turbulence. Time-delay estimation analysis of the 2D BES data shows strong evidence of a low-frequency zonal flow in the pedestal with a period matching that of the bursts. The carbon pressure gradient and E × B velocity, determined from CER, and ECE emission also oscillate with the same period. This behavior can be described as a quasi-stationary, limit-cycle oscillation and modeled by a set of predator-prey equations relating the zonal flow, equilibrium flow, and turbulence amplitude. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-99ER54531, DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun-Munzinger, P., E-mail: p.braun-munzinger@gsi.de [Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rustamov, A., E-mail: a.rustamov@cern.ch [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Stachel, J., E-mail: stachel@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase–space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  5. Density fluctuations in lattice-Boltzmann simulations of multiphase fluids in a closed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Basagaoglu; Paul Meakin

    2007-02-01

    A two-dimensional single component two-phase lattice Boltzmann model was used to simulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a closed system. Spatiotemporally variable densities were generated by gravity acting on the fluid density. The density fluctuations were triggered by rapid changes in the fluid velocity induced by changes in the interface geometry and impact of the dense fluid on the rigid lower boundary of the computational domain. The ratio of the maximum density fluctuations to the maximum fluid velocity increased more rapidly at low velocities than at high velocities. The ratio of the maximum density fluctuations in the dense phase to its maximum velocity was on the order of the inverse of the sound speed. The solution became unstable when the density-based maximum local Knudsen number exceeded 0.13.

  6. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  7. Multiperiodicity in the large-amplitude rapidly-rotating ß Cephei star HD 203664

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, C.; Cat, P. de; Ridder, J. de; Winckel, H. van; Raskin, G.; Davignon, G.; Uytterhoeven, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aims.We made a seismic study of the young massive beta Cephei star HD 203664 with the goal of constraining its interior structure.Methods.Our study is based on a time series of 328 new Geneva 7-colour photometric data of the star spread over 496.8 days.Results.The data confirm the frequency of the

  8. Rapid amplitude-phase reconstruction of femtosecond pulses from intensity autocorrelation and spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltuška, Andrius; Pugžlys, Audrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1999-01-01

    The retrieval of time-dependent intensity and phase of femtosecond laser pulses is a long standing problem. To date, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is probably the most trustworthy pulse measurement method. However, it requires a substantial experimental and numerical involvement. This

  9. Rapid amplitude-phase reconstruction of femtosecond pulses from intensity autocorrelation and spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Baltuška, Andrius; Pugžlys, Audrius; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1999-01-01

    The retrieval of time-dependent intensity and phase of femtosecond laser pulses is a long standing problem. To date, frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is probably the most trustworthy pulse measurement method. However, it requires a substantial experimental and numerical involvement. This motivates the quest for other simpler high-fidelity pulse measuring techniques. We present a new method of deciphering the pulse structure from the intensity autocorrelation trace and the intensity sp...

  10. Intraocular pressure fluctuation during microincision vitrectomy with constellation vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yoshimi; Okamoto, Fumiki; Okamoto, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Takahiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2013-11-01

    To investigate intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation during various vitrectomy maneuvers using the vitrectomy system (Alcon Constellation Vision System). An experimental study as laboratory investigation. In porcine eyes, 23- and 25-gauge vitrectomy was performed, and IOP fluctuations were evaluated in vitreous cutting mode, in aspiration mode, and during scleral compression. The measurements were performed with the IOP control setting turned on or off. Using the 23-gauge system with the IOP control setting turned on, IOP decreased from 30 to 23.7 mm Hg after starting vitreous cutting, and then returned to 30 mm Hg in 2.6 seconds. When the IOP control setting was turned off, IOP decreased to 19.1 mm Hg in 0.9 seconds, and remained at that pressure. Under aspiration at 650 mm Hg without cutting, IOP showed a sharp depression from 30 to 12.2 mm Hg, and then returned to 30.6 mm Hg in 2.6 seconds with the IOP control setting turned on. When the IOP control setting was turned off, IOP decreased to 2.2 mm Hg in 9.7 seconds, and did not recover. When the sclera was compressed without aspiration, IOP rapidly increased to 70-100 mm Hg, and then slowly decreased to 30 mm Hg in 3.5-4.0 seconds, with or without the IOP control system. Similar data were obtained with 25-gauge vitrectomy. The IOP control system can attenuate IOP fluctuations during vitrectomy maneuvers. There was no significant difference in IOP fluctuations between 23- and 25-gauge systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Science in the Sandbox: Fluctuations, Friction and Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Clement, Eric; Geng, Junfei; Kondic, Ljubinko; Metcalfe, Guy; Reydellet, Guillaume; Tennakoon, Sarath

    The study of granular materials is a novel and rapidly growing field. These materials are interest for a number of reasons, both practical and theoretical. They exhibit a rich of novel dyanamical states, and they exhibit 'phases'-solid, liquid, and gas-that resemble conventional thermodynamic phases. However, the presence of strong dissipation through friction and inelasticity places these systems well outside the usual class of systems that can be explained by equilibrium thermodynamics. Thus, there are important challenges to create new kinds of statistical physics and new analytical descriptions for the mean and fluctuating behavior of these materials. We explore recent work that focuses on several important issues. These include force propagation and fluctuations in static and driven systems. It is well known that forces propagate through granular structures along networks-force chains, whose structure is a function of history. It is much less clear how to describe this process, and even what kind of structures evolve in physical experiments. After a brief overview of the field, we consider models of force propagation and recent experiments to test these models. Among the latter are experiments that probe force profiles at the base of sandpiles, and experiments that determine the Green's function response to point perturbations in granular systems. We also explore the nature of force fluctuations in slowly evolving systems, particulary sheared granular systems. These can be very strong-with rms fluctuations in the force that are as strong as the mean force. Finally, we pursue the analogy between conventional phases of matter, where we particularly focus on the transition between fluid and solid granular states in the presence of sustained horizontal shaking.

  12. Fluctuating Asymmetry of Human Populations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Graham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry, the random deviation from perfect symmetry, is a widely used population-level index of developmental instability, developmental noise, and robustness. It reflects a population’s state of adaptation and genomic coadaptation. Here, we review the literature on fluctuating asymmetry of human populations. The most widely used bilateral traits include skeletal, dental, and facial dimensions; dermatoglyphic patterns and ridge counts; and facial shape. Each trait has its advantages and disadvantages, but results are most robust when multiple traits are combined into a composite index of fluctuating asymmetry (CFA. Both environmental (diet, climate, toxins and genetic (aneuploidy, heterozygosity, inbreeding stressors have been linked to population-level variation in fluctuating asymmetry. In general, these stressors increase average fluctuating asymmetry. Nevertheless, there have been many conflicting results, in part because (1 fluctuating asymmetry is a weak signal in a sea of noise; and (2 studies of human fluctuating asymmetry have not always followed best practices. The most serious concerns are insensitive asymmetry indices (correlation coefficient and coefficient of indetermination, inappropriate size scaling, unrecognized mixture distributions, inappropriate corrections for directional asymmetry, failure to use composite indices, and inattention to measurement error. Consequently, it is often difficult (or impossible to compare results across traits, and across studies.

  13. Daily Temperature Fluctuations Alter Interactions between Closely Related Species of Marine Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele De Meester

    Full Text Available In addition to an increase in mean temperature, climate change models predict decreasing amplitudes of daily temperature fluctuations. In temperate regions, where daily and seasonal fluctuations are prominent, such decreases in daily temperature fluctuations can have a pronounced effect on the fitness of species and on the outcome of species interactions. In this study, the effect of a temperature regime with daily fluctuations versus a constant temperature on the fitness and interspecific interactions of three cryptic species of the marine nematode species complex of Litoditis marina (Pm I, Pm III and Pm IV were investigated. In a lab experiment, different combinations of species (monospecific treatment: Pm I and Pm IV and Pm III alone; two-species treatment: Pm I + Pm IV; three-species treatment: Pm I + Pm IV + Pm III were subjected to two different temperature regimes: one constant and one fluctuating temperature. Our results showed that fluctuating temperature had minor or no effects on the population fitness of the three species in monocultures. In contrast, interspecific interactions clearly influenced the fitness of all three species, both positively and negatively. Temperature regime did have a substantial effect on the interactions between the species. In the two-species treatment, temperature regime altered the interaction from a sort of mutualism to commensalism. In addition, the strength of the interspecific interactions changed depending on the temperature regime in the three-species treatment. This experiment confirms that interactions between the species can change depending on the abiotic environment; these results show that it is important to incorporate the effect of fluctuations on interspecific interactions to predict the effect of climate change on biodiversity.

  14. Experimental demonstration and devices optimization of NRZ-DPSK amplitude regeneration scheme based on SOAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tong; Chen, Liao; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2014-12-29

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme which can simultaneously realize wavelength-preserving and phase-preserving amplitude noise compression of a 40 Gb/s distorted non-return-to-zero differential-phase-shift keying (NRZ-DPSK) signal. In the scheme, two semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are exploited. The first one (SOA1) is used to generate the inverted signal based on SOA's transient cross-phase modulation (T-XPM) effect and the second one (SOA2) to regenerate the distorted NRZ-DPSK signal using SOA's cross-gain compression (XGC) effect. In the experiment, the bit error ratio (BER) measurements show that power penalties of constructive and destructive demodulation at BER of 10-9 are -1.75 and -1.01 dB, respectively. As the nonlinear effects and the requirements of the two SOAs are completely different, quantum-well (QW) structures has been separately optimized. A complicated theoretical model by combining QW band structure calculation with SOA's dynamic model is exploited to optimize the SOAs, in which both interband effect (carrier density variation) and intraband effect (carrier temperature variation) are taken into account. Regarding SOA1, we choose the tensile strained QW structure and large optical confinement factor to enhance the T-XPM effect. Regarding SOA2, the compressively strained QW structure is selected to reduce the impact of excess phase noise induced by amplitude fluctuations. Exploiting the optimized QW SOAs, better amplitude regeneration performance is demonstrated successfully through numerical simulation. The proposed scheme is intrinsically stable comparing with the interferometer structure and can be integrated on a chip, making it a practical candidate for all-optical amplitude regeneration of high-speed NRZ-DPSK signal.

  15. Spin-fluctuation theory beyond Gaussian approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N B [Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Reser, B I; Grebennikov, V I, E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.s, E-mail: reser@imp.uran.r, E-mail: greben@imp.uran.r [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-14

    A characteristic feature of the Gaussian approximation in the functional-integral approach to the spin-fluctuation theory is the jump phase transition to the paramagnetic state. We eliminate the jump and obtain a continuous second-order phase transition by taking into account high-order terms in the expansion of the free energy in powers of the fluctuating exchange field. The third-order term of the free energy renormalizes the mean field, and the fourth-order term, responsible for the interaction of the fluctuations, renormalizes the spin susceptibility. The extended theory is applied to the calculation of magnetic properties of Fe-Ni Invar.

  16. Fluctuation theorems for quantum master equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Mukamel, Shaul

    2006-04-01

    A quantum fluctuation theorem for a driven quantum subsystem interacting with its environment is derived based solely on the assumption that its reduced density matrix obeys a closed evolution equation--i.e., a quantum master equation (QME). Quantum trajectories and their associated entropy, heat, and work appear naturally by transforming the QME to a time-dependent Liouville space basis that diagonalizes the instantaneous reduced density matrix of the subsystem. A quantum integral fluctuation theorem, a steady-state fluctuation theorem, and the Jarzynski relation are derived in a similar way as for classical stochastic dynamics.

  17. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  18. Spin-current noise from fluctuation relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jong Soo [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Sánchez, David; López, Rosa [Institut de Fisica Interdisciplinària i Sistemes Complexos IFISC (UIB-CSIC), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain and Departement de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-12-04

    We present fluctuation relations that connect spin-polarized current and noise in mesoscopic conductors. In linear response, these relations are equivalent to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates equilibrium current-current correlations to the linear conductance. More interestingly, in the weakly nonlinear regime of transport, these relations establish a connection between the leading-order rectification spin conductance, the spin noise susceptibility and the third cumulant of spin current fluctuations at equilibrium. Our results are valid even for systems in the presence of magnetic fields and coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes.

  19. Probability distribution of vertical longitudinal shear fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper discusses some recent measurements of third and fourth moments of vertical differences (shears) of longitudinal velocity fluctuations obtained in unstable air at the NASA 150 m meteorological tower site at Cape Kennedy, Fla. Each set of measurements consisted of longitudinal velocity fluctuation time histories obtained at the 18, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 m levels, so that 15 wind-shear time histories were obtained from each set of measurements. It appears that the distribution function of the longitudinal wind fluctuations at two levels is not bivariate Gaussian. The implications of the results relative to the design and operation of aerospace vehicles are discussed.-

  20. Macroscopic realism of quantum work fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattmann, Ralf; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    We study the fluctuations of the work performed on a driven quantum system, defined as the difference between subsequent measurements of energy eigenvalues. These work fluctuations are governed by statistical theorems with similar expressions in classical and quantum physics. We show that we can distinguish quantum and classical work fluctuations, as the latter can be described by a macrorealistic theory and hence obey Leggett-Garg inequalities. We show that these inequalities are violated by quantum processes in a driven two-level system and in a harmonic oscillator subject to a squeezing transformation.

  1. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, T.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    USA Several microgravity experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4 mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies ? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  2. Amplitudes and Ultraviolet Behavior of N=8 Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution we describe computational tools that permit the evaluation of multi-loop scattering amplitudes in N=8 supergravity, in terms of amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. We also discuss the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N=8 supergravity, which follows from these amplitudes, and is as good as that of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory through at least four loops.

  3. Ambitwistor strings and reggeon amplitudes in N=4 SYM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Bork

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider the description of reggeon amplitudes (Wilson lines form factors in N=4 SYM within the framework of four dimensional ambitwistor string theory. The latter is used to derive scattering equations representation for reggeon amplitudes with multiple reggeized gluons present. It is shown, that corresponding tree-level string correlation function correctly reproduces previously obtained Grassmannian integral representation of reggeon amplitudes in N=4 SYM.

  4. N >= 4 Supergravity Amplitudes from Gauge Theory at One Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Boucher-Veronneau, C.; /SLAC; Johansson, H.; /Saclay

    2011-08-19

    We expose simple and practical relations between the integrated four- and five-point one-loop amplitudes of N {ge} 4 supergravity and the corresponding (super-)Yang-Mills amplitudes. The link between the amplitudes is simply understood using the recently uncovered duality between color and kinematics that leads to a double-copy structure for gravity. These examples provide additional direct confirmations of the duality and double-copy properties at loop level for a sample of different theories.

  5. Amplitudes and Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 Supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Zvi; /UCLA; Carrasco, John Joseph; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC /CERN; Johansson, Henrik; /Saclay, SPhT; Roiban, Radu; /Penn State U.

    2011-05-20

    In this contribution we describe computational tools that permit the evaluation of multi-loop scattering amplitudes in N = 8 supergravity, in terms of amplitudes in N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. We also discuss the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which follows from these amplitudes, and is as good as that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory through at least four loops.

  6. Ambitwistor strings and reggeon amplitudes in N = 4 SYM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, L. V.; Onishchenko, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the description of reggeon amplitudes (Wilson lines form factors) in N = 4 SYM within the framework of four dimensional ambitwistor string theory. The latter is used to derive scattering equations representation for reggeon amplitudes with multiple reggeized gluons present. It is shown, that corresponding tree-level string correlation function correctly reproduces previously obtained Grassmannian integral representation of reggeon amplitudes in N = 4 SYM.

  7. Quantum amplitude amplification algorithm: an explanation of availability bias

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I show that a recent family of quantum algorithms, based on the quantum amplitude amplification algorithm, can be used to describe a cognitive heuristic called availability bias. The amplitude amplification algorithm is used to define quantitatively the ease of a memory task, while the quantum amplitude estimation and the quantum counting algorithms to describe cognitive tasks such as estimating probability or approximate counting.

  8. Detection of combined frequency and amplitude modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B C; Sek, A

    1992-12-01

    This article is concerned with the detection of mixed modulation (MM), i.e., simultaneously occurring amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). In experiment 1, an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice task was used to determine thresholds for detecting AM alone. Then, thresholds for detecting FM were determined for stimuli which had a fixed amount of AM in the signal interval only. The amount of AM was always less than the threshold for detecting AM alone. The FM thresholds depended significantly on the magnitude of the coexisting AM. For low modulation rates (4, 16, and 64 Hz), the FM thresholds did not depend significantly on the relative phase of modulation for the FM and AM. For a high modulation rate (256 Hz) strong effects of modulator phase were observed. These phase effects are as predicted by the model proposed by Hartmann and Hnath [Acustica 50, 297-312 (1982)], which assumes that detection of modulation at modulation frequencies higher than the critical modulation frequency is based on detection of the lower sideband in the modulated signal's spectrum. In the second experiment, psychometric functions were measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using modulation rates of 4 and 16 Hz. Results showed that, for each type of modulation, d' is approximately a linear function of the square of the modulation index. Application of this finding to the results of experiment 1 suggested that, at low modulation rates, FM and AM are not detected by completely independent mechanisms. In the third experiment, psychometric functions were again measured for the detection of AM alone and FM alone, using a 10-Hz modulation rate. Detectability was then measured for combined AM and FM, with modulation depths selected so that each type of modulation would be equally detectable if presented alone. Significant effects of relative modulator phase were found when detectability was relatively high. These effects were not correctly predicted by either a

  9. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  10. New relations for Einstein–Yang–Mills amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieberger, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.stieberger@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, 80805 München (Germany); Taylor, Tomasz R. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We obtain new relations between Einstein–Yang–Mills (EYM) amplitudes involving N gauge bosons plus a single graviton and pure Yang–Mills amplitudes involving N gauge bosons plus one additional vector boson inserted in a way typical for a gauge boson of a “spectator” group commuting with the group associated to original N gauge bosons. We show that such EYM amplitudes satisfy U(1) decoupling relations similar to Kleiss–Kuijf relations for Yang–Mills amplitudes. We consider a D-brane embedding of EYM amplitudes in the framework of disk amplitudes involving open and closed strings. A new set of monodromy relations is derived for mixed open–closed amplitudes with one closed string inserted on the disk world-sheet and a number of open strings at the boundary. These relations allow expressing the latter in terms of pure open string amplitudes and, in the field-theory limit, they yield the U(1) decoupling relations for EYM amplitudes.

  11. temperature fluctuation inside inert atmosphere silos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This research was conducted to study temperature fluctuation inside the inert atmosphere silos loaded with wheat, compare ... gases most especially carbondioxide (CO2) is due to safety of ... even to agriculture and resistance of pests to some.

  12. Fluctuations, Environment, Mutations Accumulation and Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecek, Przemysław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    We present a model of evolution of the age structured population based on the Monte Carlo method. We have assumed that the health status of an individual is described by variance of its fluctuations. Each expressed deleterious mutation increases the fluctuations. Additionally, the fluctuations of the environment are superimposed on the fluctuations of individuals in the population. An individual dies if the combination of both stochastic processes trespass the limit (level of homeostasis) set as the model parameter. The genes are switched on chronologically, what leads to accumulating defective genes expressed during the late periods of life in the genetic pool of the population. That results in the specific age structured population, in accordance with the predictions of Medawar's hypothesis of ageing and the results of the Penna model simulations. A decrease of the variation of the environmental noise increases the average expected lifespan of individuals.

  13. Fluctuations of Intensive Quantities in Statistical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur E. Ruuge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In phenomenological thermodynamics, the canonical coordinates of a physical system split in pairs, with each pair consisting of an extensive quantity and an intensive one. In the present paper, the quasithermodynamic fluctuation theory of a model system of a large number of oscillators is extended to statistical thermodynamics based on the idea of perceiving the fluctuations of intensive variables as the fluctuations of specific extensive ones in a “thermodynamically dual” system. The extension is motivated by the symmetry of the problem in the context of an analogy with quantum mechanics, which is stated in terms of a generalized Pauli problem for the thermodynamic fluctuations. The doubled Boltzmann constant divided by the number of particles plays a similar role as the Planck constant.

  14. A stochastic model of river discharge fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, V.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Kizner, Z.; Strygin, V.; Bunde, A.; Havlin, S.

    2003-12-01

    We study the daily river flow fluctuations of 30 international rivers. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis, we study the correlations in the magnitudes of river flow increments (volatilities), and find power-law correlations in volatilities for time scales less than 1 year; these correlations almost disappear for time scales larger than 1 year. Using surrogate data test for nonlinearity, we show that correlations in the magnitudes of river flow fluctuations are a measure for nonlinearity. We propose a simple nonlinear stochastic model for river flow fluctuations that reproduces the main scaling properties of the river flow series as well as the correlations and periodicities in the magnitudes of river flow increments. According to our model, the source of nonlinearity observed in the data is an interaction between a long-term correlated process and the river discharge itself.

  15. Fluctuating Asymmetry: Methods, Theory, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Graham

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry consists of random deviations from perfect symmetry in populations of organisms. It is a measure of developmental noise, which reflects a population’s average state of adaptation and coadaptation. Moreover, it increases under both environmental and genetic stress, though responses are often inconsistent. Researchers base studies of fluctuating asymmetry upon deviations from bilateral, radial, rotational, dihedral, translational, helical, and fractal symmetries. Here, we review old and new methods of measuring fluctuating asymmetry, including measures of dispersion, landmark methods for shape asymmetry, and continuous symmetry measures. We also review the theory, developmental origins, and applications of fluctuating asymmetry, and attempt to explain conflicting results. In the process, we present examples from the literature, and from our own research at “Evolution Canyon” and elsewhere.

  16. Fluctuation Diamagnetism in Two-Band Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed on iron selenide (FeSe) [S. Kasahara et al., unpublished]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data in FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach w...

  17. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  18. Quantum fluctuations of the superconducting cosmic string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoucheng

    1987-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the proposed superconducting string with Bose charge carriers are studied in terms of the vortices on the string world sheet. In the thermodynamical limit, it is found that they appear in the form of free vortices rather than as bound pairs. This fluctuation mode violates the topological conservation law on which superconductivity is based. However, this limit may not be reached. The critical size of the superconducting string is estimated as a function of the coupling constants involved.

  19. Kink fluctuation asymptotics and zero modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, A.A. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Matematica Aplicada and IUFFyM, Salamanca (Spain); Guilarte, J.M. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Fisica Fundamental and IUFFyM, Salamanca (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper we propose a refinement of the heat-kernel/zeta function treatment of kink quantum fluctuations in scalar field theory, further analyzing the existence and implications of a zero-energy fluctuation mode. Improved understanding of the interplay between zero modes and the kink heat-kernel expansion delivers asymptotic estimations of one-loop kink mass shifts with remarkably higher precision than previously obtained by means of the standard Gilkey-DeWitt heat-kernel expansion. (orig.)

  20. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  1. Event-by-event fluctuations of average transverse momentum in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Appelshauser, H.; Bailey, S.J.; Barna, D.; Barnby, L.S.; Bartke, J.; Barton, R.A.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blyth, C.O.; Bock, R.; Boimska, B.; Bormann, C.; Brady, F.P.; Brockmann, R.; Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Caines, H.L.; Carr, L.D.; Cebra, D.A.; Cooper, G.E.; Cramer, J.G.; Cristinziani, M.; Csato, P.; Dunn, J.; Eckardt, V.; Eckhardt, F.; Ferguson, M.I.; Fischer, H.G.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Fuchs, M.; Gabler, F.; Gal, J.; Ganz, R.; Gazdzicki, M.; Geist, Walter M.; Gladysz, E.; Grebieszkow, J.; Gunther, J.; Harris, J.W.; Hegyi, S.; Henkel, T.; Hill, L.A.; Hummler, H.; Igo, G.; Irmscher, D.; Jacobs, P.; Jones, P.G.; Kadija, K.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kowalski, M.; Lasiuk, B.; Levai, P.; Malakhov, A.I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mock, A.; Molnar, J.; Nelson, John M.; Oldenburg, M.; Odyniec, G.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Petridis, A.; Piper, A.; Porter, R.J.; Poskanzer, Arthur M.; Prindle, D.J.; Puhlhofer, F.; Reid, J.G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Ritter, H.G.; Rohrich, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, H.; Rybicki, A.; Sammer, T.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Semenov, A.Yu.; Schafer, E.; Schmischke, D.; Schmitz, N.; Schonfelder, S.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.; Sikler, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Snellings, R.; Squier, G.T.A.; Stock, R.; Strobele, H.; Struck, Chr.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Toy, M.; Trainor, T.A.; Trentalange, S.; Ullrich, T.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Voloshin, S.; Vranic, D.; Wang, F.; Weerasundara, D.D.; Wenig, S.; Whitten, C.; Wienold, T.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Yates, T.A.; Zimanyi, J.; Zhu, X.Z.; Zybert, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present first data on event-by-event fluctuations in the average transverse momentum of charged particles produced in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS. This measurement provides previously unavailable information allowing sensitive tests of microscopic and thermodynamic collision models and to search for fluctuations expected to occur in the vicinity of the predicted QCD phase transition. We find that the observed variance of the event-by-event average transverse momentum is consistent with independent particle production modified by the known two-particle correlations due to quantum statistics and final state interactions and folded with the resolution of the NA49 apparatus. For two specific models of non-statistical fluctuations in transverse momentum limits are derived in terms of fluctuation amplitude. We show that a significant part of the parameter space for a model of isospin fluctuations predicted as a consequence of chiral symmetry restoration in

  2. Amplitudes and Directions of Individual Saccades Can Be Adjusted by Corollary Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Wilsaan M.; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Wurtz, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the brain can use an internally generated copy of motor commands, a corollary discharge, to guide rapid sequential saccades. Much of this evidence comes from the double-step paradigm: after two briefly flashed visual targets have disappeared, the subject makes two sequential saccades to the targets. Recent studies on the monkey revealed that amplitude variations of the first saccade led to compensation by the second saccade, mediated by a corollary discharge. Here, we investigated whether such saccade-by-saccade compensation occurs in humans, and we made three new observations. First, we replicated previous findings from the monkey: following first saccade amplitude variations, the direction of the second saccade compensated for the error. Second, the change in direction of the second saccade followed variations in vertical as well as horizontal first saccades although the compensation following horizontal saccades was significantly more accurate. Third, by examining oblique saccades, we are able to show that first saccade variations are compensated by adjustment in saccade amplitude in addition to direction. Together, our results demonstrate that it is likely that a corollary discharge in humans can be used to adjust both saccade direction and amplitude following variations in individual saccades. PMID:20462323

  3. Large-amplitude undulatory fish swimming: fluid mechanics coupled to internal mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, T J; Hill, S J

    1999-12-01

    The load against which the swimming muscles contract, during the undulatory swimming of a fish, is composed principally of hydrodynamic pressure forces and body inertia. In the past this has been analysed, through an equation for bending moments, for small-amplitude swimming, using Lighthill's elongated-body theory and a 'vortex-ring panel method', respectively, to compute the hydrodynamic forces. Those models are outlined in this review, and a summary is given of recent work on large-amplitude swimming that has (a) extended the bending moment equation to large amplitude, which involves the introduction of a new (though probably usually small) term, and (b) developed a large-amplitude vortex-ring panel method. The latter requires computation of the wake, which rolls up into concentrated vortex rings and filaments, and has a significant effect on the pressure on the body. Application is principally made to the saithe (Pollachius virens). The calculations confirm that the wave of muscle activation travels down the fish much more rapidly than the wave of bending.

  4. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in thermostatted multiparticle collision dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, Humberto; Sutmann, Godehard

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the behavior of mesoscopic fluctuations of a fluid simulated by Multiparticle Collision Dynamics when this is applied together with a local thermostatting procedure that constrains the strength of temperature fluctuations. We consider procedures in which the thermostat interacts with the fluid at every simulation step as well as cases in which the thermostat is applied only at regular time intervals. Due to the application of the thermostat temperature fluctuations are forced to relax to equilibrium faster than they do in the nonthermostatted, constant-energy case. Depending on the interval of application of the thermostat, it is demonstrated that the thermodynamic state changes gradually from isothermal to adiabatic conditions. In order to exhibit this effect we compute from simulations diverse correlation functions of the hydrodynamic fluctuating fields. These correlation functions are compared with those predicted by a linearized hydrodynamic theory of a simple fluid in which a thermostat is applied locally. We find a good agreement between the model and the numerical results, which confirms that hydrodynamic fluctuations in Multiparticle Collision Dynamics in the presence of the thermostat have the properties expected for spontaneous fluctuations in fluids in contact with a heat reservoir.

  5. Multiscale temporal integrators for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Steven; Sun, Yifei; Griffith, Boyce E.; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Donev, Aleksandar

    2014-12-01

    Following on our previous work [S. Delong, B. E. Griffith, E. Vanden-Eijnden, and A. Donev, Phys. Rev. E 87, 033302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033302], we develop temporal integrators for solving Langevin stochastic differential equations that arise in fluctuating hydrodynamics. Our simple predictor-corrector schemes add fluctuations to standard second-order deterministic solvers in a way that maintains second-order weak accuracy for linearized fluctuating hydrodynamics. We construct a general class of schemes and recommend two specific schemes: an explicit midpoint method and an implicit trapezoidal method. We also construct predictor-corrector methods for integrating the overdamped limit of systems of equations with a fast and slow variable in the limit of infinite separation of the fast and slow time scales. We propose using random finite differences to approximate some of the stochastic drift terms that arise because of the kinetic multiplicative noise in the limiting dynamics. We illustrate our integrators on two applications involving the development of giant nonequilibrium concentration fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids. We first study the development of giant fluctuations in recent experiments performed in microgravity using an overdamped integrator. We then include the effects of gravity and find that we also need to include the effects of fluid inertia, which affects the dynamics of the concentration fluctuations greatly at small wave numbers.

  6. Net-Charge Fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fedunov, Anatoly; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Roberta; Festanti, Andrea; 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Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-04-10

    We report the first measurement of the net-charge fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV, measured with the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dynamical fluctuations per unit entropy are observed to decrease when going from peripheral to central collisions. An additional reduction in the amount of fluctuations is seen in comparison to the results from lower energies. We examine the dependence of fluctuations on the pseudo-rapidity interval, which may account for the dilution of fluctuations during the evolution of the system. We find that the ALICE data points are between the theoretically predicted values for a hadron gas and a Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  7. Source-Space Cross-Frequency Amplitude-Amplitude Coupling in Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zobay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD model has been influential in the development of theoretical explanations for the neurological mechanisms of tinnitus. It asserts that thalamocortical oscillations lock a region in the auditory cortex into an ectopic slow-wave theta rhythm (4–8 Hz. The cortical area surrounding this region is hypothesized to generate abnormal gamma (>30 Hz oscillations (“edge effect” giving rise to the tinnitus percept. Consequently, the model predicts enhanced cross-frequency coherence in a broad range between theta and gamma. In this magnetoencephalography study involving tinnitus and control cohorts, we investigated this prediction. Using beamforming, cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude coupling (AAC was computed within the auditory cortices for frequencies (f1,f2 between 2 and 80 Hz. We find the AAC signal to decompose into two distinct components at low (f1,f230 Hz frequencies, respectively. Studying the correlation of AAC with several key covariates (age, hearing level (HL, tinnitus handicap and duration, and HL at tinnitus frequency, we observe a statistically significant association between age and low-frequency AAC. Contrary to the TCD predictions, however, we do not find any indication of statistical differences in AAC between tinnitus and controls and thus no evidence for the predicted enhancement of cross-frequency coupling in tinnitus.

  8. Bispectral index and lower margin amplitude of the amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Olischar, Monika; Giordano, Vito; Czaba, Christine; Waldhoer, Thomas; Berger, Angelika; Pollak, Arnold; Deindl, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The lower margin amplitude (LMA) of the amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG) is suppressed in neonates during deep sedation, a feature that is attributed to the bispectral index (BIS) in adults. We compare the BIS and the LMA of the aEEG in neonates. Thirty neurologically healthy neonates between 37 and 44 weeks postmenstrual age were included in this study. Twenty patients received sedoanalgesic therapy for various reasons. BIS and aEEG recordings were performed simultaneously. The digital data were imported in the numerical software environment Matlab®. The LMA of the aEEG was computed on a 1-min time scale and synchronized with the BIS data. The correlation between the time-dependent variables BIS and LMA was estimated using the Spearman rank correlation index. The median correlation between BIS and LMA was 0.3. Inclusion of recordings of high signal quality only into analysis improved the median correlation index to 0.6. We found a light-to-moderate correlation between BIS and LMA in our study cohort and a good correlation in the subgroup with high signal quality. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Density profile measurements by amplitude modulation reflectometry on the TJ-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E. de la; Zhuravlev, V.; Branas, B.; Sanchez, J.; Estrada, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Segovia, J.; Oramas, J.L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    Amplitude Modulation (AM) reflectometry has been proposed as an alternative method to the more traditional swept frequency reflectometry systems which can be strongly affected by the presence of plasma density fluctuations. Compared to the time domain systems, the time measurements are replaced in AM reflectometry by much simpler phase delay measurements. In AM reflectometry, the time delay of the microwave beam propagating to the reflecting layer and back is directly obtained through the phase delay of the modulating envelope, which is directly measured in a linear (0-2{pi}) phase meter. This method avoids operation with multifringe counters and is a very attractive alternative for real time determination of the plasma position and density profile. In order to achieve real time density profile monitoring, fast analysis methods are necessary, first results of Neural Networks application to the problem of fast inversion of the density profile are shown. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Attention decreases phase-amplitude coupling, enhancing stimulus discriminability in cortical area MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein eEsghaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Local field potentials (LFPs in cortex reflect synchronous fluctuations in the activity of local populations of neurons. The power of high frequency (>30 Hz oscillations in LFPs is locked to the phase of low frequency (<30 Hz oscillations, an effect known as phase-amplitude coupling (PAC. While PAC has been observed in a variety of cortical regions and animal models, its functional role particularly in primate visual cortex is largely unknown. Here we document PAC for LFPs recorded from extra-striate area MT of macaque monkeys, an area specialized for the processing of visual motion. We further show that directing spatial attention into the receptive field of MT neurons decreases the coupling between the low frequency phase and high frequency power of LFPs. This attentional suppression of PAC increases neuronal discriminability for attended visual stimuli. Therefore we hypothesize that visual cortex uses PAC to regulate inter-neuronal correlations and thereby enhances the coding of relevant stimuli.

  11. Precursory effects in the nighttime VLF signal amplitude for the 18th January, 2011 Pakistan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Sasmal, S.

    2012-02-01

    We have presented the result of the analysis of the nighttime VLF signals transmitted from the Indian Navy station VTX (latitude 8.43°N, longitude 77.73°E) at 19.2 kHz and received at Kolkata (latitude 22.57°N, longitude 88.24°E). On 18th January, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 occurred at Southwestern Pakistan (latitude 28.9°N, longitude 64°E). We have analyzed the nighttime VLF signals for 2 weeks around 18th of January, 2011 to see if there have been any precursory effects of this earthquake. We have found that the amplitude of the nighttime VLF signals anomalously fluctuated 4 days before the earthquake. This agrees well with our previous findings based on the analysis of 1 year of earthquake data.

  12. Characteristic analysis on the pressure fluctuation in the impeller of a low specific speed mixed flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zhu, B. S.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the pressure fluctuation characteristics of a low speed specific speed mixed flow pump caused by rotor-stator interaction, the unsteady flow was simulated with CFX for the whole flow passage of a mixed flow pump with a specific speed of 148.8. The structured mesh of the computation domain was generated with ICEM CFD and TurboGrid, and mesh-independent analysis was done in the design condition. Through the comparison with the experiment data, the reliability of the simulation was verified. In different locations of the impeller passage, monitoring points were set. With Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), the characteristic analysis on the pressure fluctuation in the impeller passage was done for three flow rate conditions (0.75Qd, Qd, 1.25Qd). The results show that the pressure fluctuation amplitude increases from the inlet to the outlet. And the maximum values in different flow rates exist near the hub of the outlet; The pressure fluctuation is small in the design condition, but the largest in the small flow rate condition, accompanied by the secondary dominant frequencies with large amplitudes; In the small flow rate condition and design condition, the dominant frequency varies from the inlet to the outlet because the combine action of the impeller and guide vane; while in the large flow rate condition, the pressure fluctuation in the whole impeller passage is affected significantly by the guide vane, and the domain frequency is 8 times the rotational frequency of impeller. In addition, the change of pressure fluctuation from the pressure surface to the suction surface in the off-design conditions is investigated, and the results demonstrates that the intensity of the pressure fluctuation in the impeller passage is closely related with the impeller as well as the distribution of the vorticity and the pressure.

  13. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  14. Age, Amplitude of Accommodation and Near Addition Power of Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to determine the rela onship among age, amplitude of accommoda on (AA) and near addi onal add power in Nigerian adults. A cross sec onal study was undertaken in 297 adults comprising. 158 (53.3%) males and 139 (46.8%) females and aged 33 – 89 years. Amplitude of accommoda on ...

  15. Miracles in Scattering Amplitudes: from QCD to Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volovich, Anastasia [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-10-09

    The goal of my research project "Miracles in Scattering Amplitudes: from QCD to Gravity" involves deepening our understanding of gauge and gravity theories by exploring hidden structures in scattering amplitudes and using these rich structures as much as possible to aid practical calculations.

  16. Limitations in EXAFS Amplitude Transferability For Low-Z Scatterers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Pandya, K.I.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the transferability of EXAFS amplitudes between carbon and oxygen as backscattering atoms. EXAFS data were collected on model compounds of known structure. The empirical phase and amplitude functions derived from an oxygen coordination shell were used as references to analyze a

  17. Large amplitude forced vibration analysis of cross-beam system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    spatially dependent ordinary differential equation, which upon solution and application of the boundary conditions yielded a closed ...... To overcome this amplitude the reaction force ( R ) is assumed to be a fraction ( )q of the amplitude of harmonic excitation applied to the structure. At the start, the correct value of q. ( exact q. ) ...

  18. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  19. Numerical evaluation of one-loop QCD amplitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Simon David; Biedermann, Benedikt; Uwer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present the publicly available program NGluon allowing the numerical evaluation of primitive amplitudes at one-loop order in massless QCD. The program allows the computation of one-loop amplitudes for an arbitrary number of gluons. The focus of the present article is the extension to one...

  20. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted.

  1. Nitinol Fatigue Life for Variable Strain Amplitude Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z.; Pike, K.; Schlun, M.; Zipse, A.; Draper, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nitinol fatigue testing results are presented for variable strain amplitude cycling. The results indicate that cycles smaller than the constant amplitude fatigue limit may contribute to significant fatigue damage when they occur in a repeating sequence of large and small amplitude cycles. The testing utilized two specimen types: stent-like diamond specimens and Z-shaped wire specimens. The diamond specimens were made from nitinol tubing with stent-like manufacturing processes and the Z-shaped wire specimens were made from heat set nitinol wire. The study explored the hypothesis that duty cycling can have an effect on nitinol fatigue life. Stent-like structures were subjected to different in vivo loadings in order to create more complex strain amplitudes. The main focus in this study was to determine whether a combination of small and large amplitudes causes additional damage that alters the fatigue life of a component.

  2. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-05

    We derive scalar effective field theories-Lagrangians, symmetries, and all-from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist.

  3. Simplicity in the structure of QED and gravity amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Simon [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Vanhove, Pierre [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques IHES, Bures sur Yvette (France); CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France). Inst. de Physique Theorique

    2008-11-15

    We investigate generic properties of one-loop amplitudes in unordered gauge theories in four dimensions. For such theories the organisation of amplitudes in manifestly crossing symmetric expressions poses restrictions on their structure and results in remarkable cancellations. We show that one-loop multi-photon amplitudes in QED with at least eight external photons are given only by scalar box integral functions. This QED 'no-triangle' property is true for all helicity configurations and has similarities to the 'notriangle' property found in the case of maximal N=8 supergravity. Results are derived both via a world-line formalism as well as using on-shell unitarity methods. We show that the simple structure of the loop amplitude originates from the extremely good BCFW scaling behaviour of the QED tree-amplitude. (orig.)

  4. Conformal higher spin scattering amplitudes from twistor space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, Tim [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hähnel, Philipp; McLoughlin, Tristan [School of Mathematics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2017-04-04

    We use the formulation of conformal higher spin (CHS) theories in twistor space to study their tree-level scattering amplitudes, finding expressions for all three-point (MHV)-bar amplitudes and all MHV amplitudes involving positive helicity conformal gravity particles and two negative helicity higher spins. This provides the on-shell analogue for the covariant coupling of CHS fields to a conformal gravity background. We discuss the restriction of the theory to a ghost-free unitary subsector, analogous to restricting conformal gravity to general relativity with a cosmological constant. We study the flat-space limit and show that the restricted amplitudes vanish, supporting the conjecture that in the unitary sector the S-matrix of CHS theories is trivial. However, by appropriately rescaling the amplitudes we find non-vanishing results which we compare with chiral flat-space higher spin theories.

  5. Conformal higher spin scattering amplitudes from twistor space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Tim; Hähnel, Philipp; McLoughlin, Tristan

    2017-04-01

    We use the formulation of conformal higher spin (CHS) theories in twistor space to study their tree-level scattering amplitudes, finding expressions for all three-point \\overline{MHV} amplitudes and all MHV amplitudes involving positive helicity conformal gravity particles and two negative helicity higher spins. This provides the on-shell analogue for the covariant coupling of CHS fields to a conformal gravity background. We discuss the restriction of the theory to a ghost-free unitary subsector, analogous to restricting conformal gravity to general relativity with a cosmological constant. We study the flat-space limit and show that the restricted amplitudes vanish, supporting the conjecture that in the unitary sector the S-matrix of CHS theories is trivial. However, by appropriately rescaling the amplitudes we find non-vanishing results which we compare with chiral flat-space higher spin theories.

  6. Time-frequency analysis of Hilbert spectrum of pressure fluctuation time series in a Kenics Static Mixer based on empirical mode decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibo Meng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent flow in a Kenics Static Mixer (KSM was intensified under the mutual-coupling effect between the twisted leaves and the tube-wall. In order to understand the intrinsic features of turbulent flow in KSM, the Hilbert-Huang Transform based on Empirical Mode Decomposition were first introduced to describe the time-frequency features of the pressure fluctuation. The Hilbert spectra of pressure fluctuation time series were quantitatively evaluated under different Reynolds numbers, and different radial and axial positions, respectively. The experimental results showed that: the fluctuation frequencies of pressure signals in a KSM were mainly distributed below 40 Hz, and more than 68% of the energy of signals is concentrated within 10 Hz. Compared with the other IMFs, the pressure component of C6 in the range of 7.82~15.63 Hz has the maximum fluctuation energy ratio. As the flow rate increases, the energy of fluctuation of fluid micelles and the proportion of low-frequency energy increases. The pressure fluctuation with higher energy ratio of low frequency (0~10 Hz had lower amplitudes at r/R=0.3 because of the core of forced vortex. Nevertheless, the effect of the free vortex was that the pressure fluctuation with lower energy ratio of low frequency had higher amplitudes at r/R=0.8. The higher amplitudes of pressure fluctuation at cross sections of CS3 (z=420 mm and CS5 (z=620 mm proved that the transitions between the adjacent mixing element had better mixing performance.

  7. Asymptotics of QCD traveling waves with fluctuations and running coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuf, Guillaume

    2008-09-01

    Extending the Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation independently to running coupling or to fluctuation effects due to pomeron loops is known to lead in both cases to qualitative changes of the traveling-wave asymptotic solutions. In this paper we study the extension of the forward BK equation, including both running coupling and fluctuations effects, extending the method developed for the fixed coupling case [E. Brunet, B. Derrida, A.H. Mueller, S. Munier, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 056126, cond-mat/0512021]. We derive the exact asymptotic behavior in rapidity of the probabilistic distribution of the saturation scale.

  8. Quantum fluctuations and stability of vortex lattices in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Jheng, Shih-Da; Jiang, T F; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of an exciton-polariton condensate (EPC) subject to harmonic confinement can cause spontaneously formed vortices to arrange into a triangular vortex lattice. The stability of such a spontaneously formed vortex lattice is still unknown. We investigate the quantum fluctuations of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating EPC with a rotation frequency close to the harmonic trap. In such a large condensate, we find that a vortex lattice with a triangular structure is stable, whereas one with a square structure becomes unstable. This result indicates that a driven-dissipative vortex array with strong quantum fluctuations can occur in an EPC.

  9. Visual Perceptual Echo Reflects Learning of Regularities in Rapid Luminance Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Acer Y-C; Schwartzman, David J; VanRullen, Rufin; Kanai, Ryota; Seth, Anil K

    2017-08-30

    A novel neural signature of active visual processing has recently been described in the form of the "perceptual echo", in which the cross-correlation between a sequence of randomly fluctuating luminance values and occipital electrophysiological signals exhibits a long-lasting periodic (∼100 ms cycle) reverberation of the input stimulus (VanRullen and Macdonald, 2012). As yet, however, the mechanisms underlying the perceptual echo and its function remain unknown. Reasoning that natural visual signals often contain temporally predictable, though nonperiodic features, we hypothesized that the perceptual echo may reflect a periodic process associated with regularity learning. To test this hypothesis, we presented subjects with successive repetitions of a rapid nonperiodic luminance sequence, and examined the effects on the perceptual echo, finding that echo amplitude linearly increased with the number of presentations of a given luminance sequence. These data suggest that the perceptual echo reflects a neural signature of regularity learning.Furthermore, when a set of repeated sequences was followed by a sequence with inverted luminance polarities, the echo amplitude decreased to the same level evoked by a novel stimulus sequence. Crucially, when the original stimulus sequence was re-presented, the echo amplitude returned to a level consistent with the number of presentations of this sequence, indicating that the visual system retained sequence-specific information, for many seconds, even in the presence of intervening visual input. Altogether, our results reveal a previously undiscovered regularity learning mechanism within the human visual system, reflected by the perceptual echo.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT How the brain encodes and learns fast-changing but nonperiodic visual input remains unknown, even though such visual input characterizes natural scenes. We investigated whether the phenomenon of "perceptual echo" might index such learning. The perceptual echo is a

  10. Gravity Amplitudes as Generalized Double Copies of Gauge-Theory Amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Zvi; Carrasco, John Joseph; Chen, Wei-Ming; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2017-05-01

    Whenever the integrand of a gauge-theory loop amplitude can be arranged into a form where the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson duality between color and kinematics is manifest, a corresponding gravity integrand can be obtained simply via the double-copy procedure. However, finding such gauge-theory representations can be challenging, especially at high loop orders. Here, we show that we can, instead, start from generic gauge-theory integrands, where the duality is not manifest, and apply a modified double-copy procedure to obtain gravity integrands that include contact terms generated by violations of dual Jacobi identities. We illustrate this with three-, four- and five-loop examples in N =8 supergravity.

  11. GA-based Design Algorithms for the Robust Synthetic Genetic Oscillators with Prescribed Amplitude, Period and Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Sen Chen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, the development of synthetic gene networks has attracted much attention from many researchers. In particular, the genetic oscillator known as the repressilator has become a paradigm for how to design a gene network with a desired dynamic behaviour. Even though the repressilator can show oscillatory properties in its protein concentrations, their amplitudes, frequencies and phases are perturbed by the kinetic parametric fluctuations (intrinsic molecular perturbations and external disturbances (extrinsic molecular noises of the environment. Therefore, how to design a robust genetic oscillator with desired amplitude, frequency and phase under stochastic intrinsic and extrinsic molecular noises is an important topic for synthetic biology. In this study, based on periodic reference signals with arbitrary amplitudes, frequencies and phases, a robust synthetic gene oscillator is designed by tuning the kinetic parameters of repressilator via a genetic algorithm (GA so that the protein concentrations can track the desired periodic reference signals under intrinsic and extrinsic molecular noises. GA is a stochastic optimization algorithm which was inspired by the mechanisms of natural selection and evolution genetics. By the proposed GA-based design algorithm, the repressilator can track the desired amplitude, frequency and phase of oscillation under intrinsic and extrinsic noises through the optimization of fitness function. The proposed GA-based design algorithm can mimic the natural selection in evolutionary process to select adequate kinetic parameters for robust genetic oscillators. The design method can be easily extended to any synthetic gene network design with prescribed behaviours.

  12. Frequency-domain inversion using the amplitude of the derivative wavefield with respect to the angular frequency

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The instantaneous traveltime based inversion was developed to solve the phase wrapping problem, thus generating long-wavelength structures even for a high single-frequency. However, it required aggressive damping to insure proper convergence. A reason for that is the potential for unstable division in the calculation of the instantaneous traveltime for low damping factors. Thus, we propose an inversion algorithm using the amplitude of the derivative wavefield to avoid the unstable division process. Since the amplitude of the derivative wavefield contains the unwrapped-phase information, its inversion has the potential to provide robust inversion results. On the other hand, the damping term rapidly diminishes the amplitude of the derivative wavefield at far source-receiver offsets. As an alternative, we suggest using the logarithmic amplitude of the derivative wavefield. The gradient of this inversion algorithm is obtained by the back-propagation approach, based on the adjoint-state technique. Numerical examples show that the logarithmic-amplitude approach yields better convergent results than the instantaneous traveltime inversion, whereas the pure-amplitude approach does not show much convergence.

  13. Correlation length of magnetosheath fluctuations: Cluster statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gutynska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetosheath parameters are usually described by gasdynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models but these models cannot account for one of the most important sources of magnetosheath fluctuations – the foreshock. Earlier statistical processing of a large amount of magnetosheath observations has shown that the magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma flow fluctuations downstream of the quasiparallel shock are much larger than those at the opposite flank. These studies were based on the observations of a single spacecraft and thus they could not provide full information on propagation of the fluctuations through the magnetosheath. We present the results of a statistical survey of the magnetosheath magnetic field fluctuations using two years of Cluster observations. We discuss the dependence of the cross-correlation coefficients between different spacecraft pairs on the orientation of the separation vector with respect to the average magnetic field and plasma flow vectors and other parameters. We have found that the correlation length does not exceed ~1 RE in the analyzed frequency range (0.001–0.125 Hz and does not depend significantly on the magnetic field or plasma flow direction. A close connection of cross-correlation coefficients computed in the magnetosheath with the cross-correlation coefficients between a solar wind monitor and a magnetosheath spacecraft suggests that solar wind structures persist on the background of magnetosheath fluctuations.

  14. Direct verification of the fluctuation-dissipation relation in viscously coupled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Laskar, Abhrajit; Singh, Rajesh; Roy, Basudev; Adhikari, R.; Banerjee, Ayan

    2017-11-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation relation, a central result in nonequilibrium statistical physics, relates equilibrium fluctuations in a system to its linear response to external forces. Here we provide a direct experimental verification of this relation for viscously coupled oscillators, as realized by a pair of optically trapped colloidal particles. A theoretical analysis, in which interactions mediated by slow viscous flow are represented by nonlocal friction tensors, matches experimental results and reveals a frequency maximum in the amplitude of the mutual response which is a sensitive function of the trap stiffnesses and the friction tensors. This allows for its location and width to be tuned and suggests the utility of the trap setup for accurate two-point microrheology.

  15. Fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction regulates mitochondrial-network structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Wellman, Tyler J.; Martinez, Nuria; Allen, Philip G.; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2015-10-01

    Cells can be exposed to irregular mechanical fluctuations, such as those arising from changes in blood pressure. Here, we report that ATP production, assessed through changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, is downregulated in vascular smooth muscle cells in culture exposed to monotonous stretch cycles when compared with cells exposed to a variable cyclic stretch that incorporates physiological levels of cycle-by-cycle variability in stretch amplitude. Variable stretch enhances ATP production by increasing the expression of ATP synthase’s catalytic domain, cytochrome c oxidase and its tyrosine phosphorylation, mitofusins and PGC-1α. Such a fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction mechanism is mediated by motor proteins and by the enhancement of microtubule-, actin- and mitochondrial-network complexity. We also show that, in aorta rings isolated from rats, monotonous stretch downregulates--whereas variable stretch maintains--physiological vessel-wall contractility through mitochondrial ATP production. Our results have implications for ATP-dependent and mechanosensitive intracellular processes.

  16. Voltage fluctuation to current converter with Coulomb-coupled quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, F; Pfeffer, P; Höfling, S; Kamp, M; Worschech, L

    2015-04-10

    We study the rectification of voltage fluctuations in a system consisting of two Coulomb-coupled quantum dots. The first quantum dot is connected to a reservoir where voltage fluctuations are supplied and the second one is attached to two separate leads via asymmetric and energy-dependent transport barriers. We observe a rectified output current through the second quantum dot depending quadratically on the noise amplitude supplied to the other Coulomb-coupled quantum dot. The current magnitude and direction can be switched by external gates, and maximum output currents are found in the nA region. The rectification delivers output powers in the pW region. Future devices derived from our sample may be applied for energy harvesting on the nanoscale beneficial for autonomous and energy-efficient electronic applications.

  17. Scaling laws of turbulence and heating of fast solar wind: the role of density fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; Marino, R; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2009-08-07

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvénic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  18. Measurements of density, temperature, and their fluctuations in turbulent supersonic flow using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, and their turbulent fluctuation levels were obtained in the boundary layer of an unseeded, Mach 2 wind tunnel flow. The spectroscopic technique that was used to make the measurements is based on the combination of laser-induced oxygen fluorescence and Raman scattering by oxygen and nitrogen from the same laser pulse. Results from this demonstration experiment are compared with previous measurements obtained in the same facility using conventional probes and an earlier spectroscopic technique. Densities and temperatures measured with the current technique agree with the previous surveys to within 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The fluctuation amplitudes for both variables agree with the measurements obtained using the earlier spectroscopic technique and show evidence of an unsteady, weak shock wave that perturbs the boundary layer.

  19. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT. The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  20. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freethy, S. J., E-mail: simon.freethy@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Classen, I.; Vanovac, B. [FOM Institute DIFFER, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creely, A. J.; White, A. E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρ{sub tor} = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  1. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast SolarWind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, V; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Noullez, A; Bruno, R

    2010-01-01

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasms can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfv\\'enic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same dataset. Large scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, play thus a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can moreover supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  2. Cosmic birefringence fluctuations and cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokcheon Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, BICEP2 measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB B-mode polarization has indicated the presence of primordial gravitational waves at degree angular scales, inferring the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r=0.2 and a running scalar spectral index, provided that dust contamination is low. In this Letter, we show that the existence of the fluctuations of cosmological birefringence can give rise to CMB B-mode polarization that fits BICEP2 data with r<0.11 and no running of the scalar spectral index. When dust contribution is taken into account, we derive an upper limit on the cosmological birefringence, Aβ2<0.0075, where A is the amplitude of birefringence fluctuations that couple to electromagnetism with a coupling strength β.

  3. Shock induced ignition and DDT in the presence of mechanically driven fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentian; McDonald, James G.; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2015-11-01

    The present study addresses the problem of shock induced ignition and transition to detonation in the presence of mechanical and thermal fluctuations. These departures from a homogeneous medium are of significant importance in practical situations, where such fluctuations may promote hot-spot ignition and favor the flame transition to detonation. The problem is studied in 1D, where a piston-induced shock ignites the gas. The fluctuations in the shock-compressed medium are controlled by allowing the piston's speed to oscillate around a mean, with controllable frequency and amplitude. A Lagrangian numerical formulation is used, which allows to treat exactly the transient boundary condition at the piston head. The hydrodynamic solver is coupled with the reactive dynamics of the gas using Cantera. The code was verified by comparison with steady state ZND solutions and previous shock induced ignition results in homogeneous media. Results obtained for different fuels illustrate the strong relation of the DDT amplification length to mechanical fluctuations in systems with a high effective activation energy and fast rate of energy deposition, consistent with experiments performed on fast flame acceleration in the presence of strong mechanical perturbations. Financial support from NSERC and Shell, with A. Pekalski and M. Levin as technical monitors, are greatly acknowledged.

  4. Experimental measurement of three-wave coupling in plasma edge fluctuations in ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Sanchez, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Branas, B. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Ritz, Ch.P.; Wootton, A.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center; Uckan, T.; Harris, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Understanding the origin of the broad-band edge fluctuations remains as one of the key issues confronting fusion research. Many theoretical models explain the broadband fluctuation spectra on the basis of quadratically non-linear mechanisms (i.e. three-wave interactions) which redistribute the energy supplied to the fluctuation spectrum by multiple instabilities present in the edge plasma region. However, no experimental evidence of considerable wave-wave coupling of the broadband turbulence has been reported so far. Whereas the standard linear spectral analysis (power spectrum) provides experimental information on the amplitude and phase behaviour of the individual Fourier components and about the transport induced by fluctuations, it does not give any information about the coupling among different spectral components. The use of the bispectral analysis allows to discriminate between waves spontaneously excited by the plasma and those generated by the former by nonlinear coupling. Non-linear mode coupling of low m modes has been recently reported in the MST reversed field pinch and TEXT tokamak. (author) 10 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Capillary fluctuations of surface steps: An atomistic simulation study for the model Cu(111) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Rodrigo; Frolov, Timofey; Asta, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to investigate the capillary fluctuations of steps on the surface of a model metal system. The fluctuation spectrum, characterized by the wave number (k ) dependence of the mean squared capillary-wave amplitudes and associated relaxation times, is calculated for 〈110 〉 and 〈112 〉 steps on the {111 } surface of elemental copper near the melting temperature of the classical potential model considered. Step stiffnesses are derived from the MD results, yielding values from the largest system sizes of (37 ±1 ) meV/A ˚ for the different line orientations, implying that the stiffness is isotropic within the statistical precision of the calculations. The fluctuation lifetimes are found to vary by approximately four orders of magnitude over the range of wave numbers investigated, displaying a k dependence consistent with kinetics governed by step-edge mediated diffusion. The values for step stiffness derived from these simulations are compared to step free energies for the same system and temperature obtained in a recent MD-based thermodynamic-integration (TI) study [Freitas, Frolov, and Asta, Phys. Rev. B 95, 155444 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.95.155444]. Results from the capillary-fluctuation analysis and TI calculations yield statistically significant differences that are discussed within the framework of statistical-mechanical theories for configurational contributions to step free energies.

  6. Comparing density, electron temperature, and magnetic fluctuations with gyrokinetic simulations using new synthetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Bergerson, W.; Ennever, P.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Phillips, P.; Porkolab, M.; Rowan, W.; Terry, J. L.; Xu, P.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-10-01

    Three new synthetic turbulence diagnostics are implemented in GS2 and compared with measurements: phase contrast imaging, polarimetry, and electron-cyclotron (ECE) emission. Our new synthetic diagnostic framework is based on transforming to a real-space annulus in Cartesian coordinates. This allows straightforward convolution with diagnostic point-spread functions, or integration over viewing chords. Wavenumber spectra and fluctuation amplitudes, as well as transport fluxes, are compared with measurements. Both phase contrast imaging and newly observed ECE electron temperature fluctuations, closely follow the electron temperature in an internal transport barrier during on-axis heating pulses, consistent with the role of TEM turbulence. New C-Mod polarimetry measurements, showing strong broadband core magnetic fluctuations, will also be examined against gyrokinetic simulations. The new framework is readily extended to other fluctuation measurements such as two-color interferometry, beam emission spectroscopy, Doppler back-scattering, ECE imaging, and microwave imaging reflectometry. Supported by U.S. DoE awards DE-FC02-08ER54966, DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FG03-96ER54373.

  7. Temperature fluctuations underneath the ice in Diamond Lake, Hennepin County, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Fischer, Tomas; Mls, Jiří; DěDeček, Petr

    2013-06-01

    Diamond Lake in Minnesota is covered every winter with ice and snow providing a modified thermal insulation between water and air. Autonomous temperature sensors, data loggers, were placed in this lake so that hourly measurements could be obtained from the snow-covered ice and water. The sensors that became frozen measured damped and delayed thermal response from the air-temperature fluctuation. Those sensors that were deeper within the snow-covered ice measured continuous, almost constant, temperature values near freezing. Several of them were within the liquid water and responded with a fluctuation of 24 h periods of amplitudes up to 0.2°C. Our analysis of the vertical temperature profiles suggested that the source of periodic water heating comes from the lake bottom. Because of the absence of daily temperature variations of the snow-covered ice, the influence of the air-temperature fluctuation can be ruled out. We attribute the heating process to the periodic inflow of groundwater to the lake and the cooling to the heat diffusion to the overlying ice cover. The periodic groundwater inflow is interpreted due to solid Earth tides, which cause periodic fluctuations of the groundwater pressure head.

  8. How to resolve microsecond current fluctuations in single ion channels: The power of beta distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Indra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A main ingredient for the understanding of structure/function correlates of ion channels is the quantitative description of single-channel gating and conductance. However, a wealth of information provided from fast current fluctuations beyond the temporal resolution of the recording system is often ignored, even though it is close to the time window accessible to molecular dynamics simulations. This kind of current fluctuations provide a special technical challenge, because individual opening/closing or blocking/unblocking events cannot be resolved, and the resulting averaging over undetected events decreases the single-channel current. Here, I briefly summarize the history of fast-current fluctuation analysis and focus on the so-called “beta distributions.” This tool exploits characteristics of current fluctuation-induced excess noise on the current amplitude histograms to reconstruct the true single-channel current and kinetic parameters. A guideline for the analysis and recent applications demonstrate that a construction of theoretical beta distributions by Markov Model simulations offers maximum flexibility as compared to analytical solutions. PMID:26368656

  9. Effects of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process in turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsell, Guillaume; Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    The need for a thorough understanding of turbulence-combustion interactions in compressible flows is driven by recent technological developments in propulsion as well as renewed interest in the development of next generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. In such flows, pressure fluctuations displaying a wide range of length and timescales are present. These fluctuations are expected to impact the combustion process to varying degrees, depending amongst other things on the amplitude of the pressure variations and the timescales of the chemical reactions taking place in the flame. In this context, numerical simulations of these flows can provide insight into the impact of pressure fluctuations on the combustion process. In the present work, we analyze data from simulations of statistically-flat premixed n-heptane/air flames at high Karlovitz numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved exactly (DNS) and results obtained with both detailed kinetic modeling and one-step chemistry are considered. The effects of pressure fluctuations on the fuel burning rate are investigated. The findings are compared with results obtained from simulations of one-dimensional premixed flames subjected to various pressure waves.

  10. The amplitude spectrum area correctly predicts improved resuscitation and facilitated defibrillation with head cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Shan; Barbut, Denise; Guan, Jun; Bisera, Joe; Inderbitzen, Becky; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2008-11-01

    When systemic hypothermia was maintained before inducing cardiac arrest, the likelihood of successful defibrillation and meaningful survival was increased. When hypothermia is induced during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mortality is also improved. With the introduction of the amplitude spectrum area as a predictor of the success of electrical defibrillation, we investigated the effect of preferential head cooling initiated coincident with cardiopulmonary resuscitation on amplitude spectrum area as a predictor. We hypothesized that rapid head cooling initiated coincident with cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves amplitude spectrum area, and therefore is predictive of successful defibrillation. Prospective randomized controlled study. University-affiliated research institute. Domestic pigs. Sixteen pigs, weighing 40.6 +/- 1.4 kg, were randomized to the hypothermia (n = 8), or control (n = 8) group. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 10 mins. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was then initiated for 5 mins followed by attempted defibrillation with a biphasic 150-J electric shock. Coincident with starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hypothermia was induced with evaporative intranasal cooling using a perfluorochemical. If spontaneous circulation was not restored after defibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was resumed for 1 min before the next defibrillation attempt until the animal was either successfully resuscitated or for a total of 15 mins. The target core temperature was 34 degrees C. Control animals were identically treated except for hypothermia. Five seconds of ventricular fibrillation waveform were recorded immediately preceding delivery of a shock. The ventricular fibrillation waveforms were analyzed using the amplitude spectrum area algorithm. A smaller epinephrine dose (60 +/- 32.1 vs. 30 +/- 0 mg/mL, p = .01) and shorter cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration (365 +/- 42 sec vs. 600 +/- 243 sec, p = .01) were required to

  11. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Zhiguo eJiang; Peter eVuust; Sarael eAlcauter; Lene eVase; Erick ePasaye; Roberto eCavazos-Rodriguez; Elvira eBrattico; Troels Staehelin Jensen; Fernando Alejandro Barrios

    2015-01-01

    Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22) who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise) for 5 minutes without external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations...

  12. Functional and developmental significance of amplitude variance asymmetry in the BOLD resting-state signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ben; Jovicich, Jorge; Iacovella, Vittorio; Hasson, Uri

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the brain's resting-state activity (RSA) is organized in low frequency oscillations that drive network connectivity. Recent research has also shown that elements of RSA described by high-frequency and nonoscillatory properties are non-random and functionally relevant. Motivated by this research, we investigated nonoscillatory aspects of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) RSA using a novel method for characterizing subtle fluctuation dynamics. The metric that we develop quantifies the relative variance of the amplitude of local-maxima and local-minima in a BOLD time course (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). This metric reveals new properties of RSA activity, without relying on connectivity as a descriptive tool. We applied the AVA analysis to data from 3 different participant groups (2 adults, 1 child) collected from 3 different centers. The analyses show that AVA patterns a) identify 3 types of RSA profiles in adults' sensory systems b) differ in topology and pattern of dynamics in adults and children, and c) are stable across magnetic resonance scanners. Furthermore, children with higher IQ demonstrated more adult-like AVA patterns. These findings indicate that AVA reflects important and novel dimensions of brain development and RSA.

  13. Detection thresholds for amplitude modulations of tones in budgerigar, rabbit, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Laurel H; Ketterer, Angela D; Abrams, Kristina S; Schwarz, Douglas M; Idrobo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is -essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can -sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal -models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation -frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, -especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency -modulations of wideband noise (O'Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37-43, 2011). Rats and -chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude -modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98-105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, -1177-1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low -modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65-71, 1981). A -one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM -detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation -frequencies (4-256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented.

  14. Research proposal on: amplitude modulated reflectometry system for the JET divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.; Branas, B.; Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la

    1992-07-01

    Amplitude Modulated reflectometry is presented here as a tool for density profile measurements in the JET divertor plasmas. One of the main problems which has been present in most reflectometers during the last years is the need for a coherent tracking of the phase delay: fast density fluctuations and strong modulation on the amplitude of the reflected signal usually bring to fringe jumps in the phase signal, which are a big problem when the phase values are much larger than 2{pi} The conditions in the JET divertor plasmas: plasma geometry, access and long oversized broad- band waveguide paths makes very difficult the phase measurements at the millimeter wave range. AM reflectometry is to some extension an intermediate solution between the classical phase delay reflectometry, so far applied to small distances, and the time domain reflectometry, used for onospheric studies and recently also proposed for fusion plasmas. The main advantage is to allow the use of millimeter wave reflectometry with moderate phase shifts ( {approx} 2{pi} ). (Author) 2 refs.

  15. Effect of ion suprathermality on arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Mayout, Saliha; Amour, Rabia

    2009-04-01

    Arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic waves in a high energy-tail ion distribution are investigated. The effects of charge variation and ion suprathermality on the large amplitude dust acoustic (DA) soliton are then considered. The correct suprathermal ion charging current is rederived based on the orbit motion limited approach. In the adiabatic case, the variable dust charge is expressed in terms of the Lambert function and we take advantage of this transcendental function to show the existence of rarefactive variable charge DA solitons involving cusped density humps. The dust charge variation leads to an additional enlargement of the DA soliton, which is less pronounced as the ions evolve far away from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. In the nonadiabatic case, the dust charge fluctuation may provide an alternate physical mechanism causing anomalous dissipation the strength of which becomes important and may prevail over that of dispersion as the ion spectral index κ increases. Our results may provide an explanation for the strong spiky waveforms observed in auroral electric field measurements by Ergun et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 2025 (1998)].

  16. Quantification of the effect of toxicants on the motility of mammary organoid by OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Fuller, Ashley M.; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2017-03-01

    OCT fluctuation spectroscopy provides a quantitative and non-invasive tool to monitor 3D mammary epithelial cell (MEC) models which recapitulate features of breast cancer in vivo. Cellular dynamic fluctuation measurements allow for assessing drug responses due to different mechanisms of inhibition in 3D models in vitro. Here we report on pre-malignant MEC responses to two toxicants: Taxol, which stabilizes microtubules against depolymerization, and has emerged as an important chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of breast cancer, and blebbistatin, a small molecule inhibitor with high affinity and selectivity toward Myosin II. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring toxicant responses of MECs in 3D cultures from OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. OCT fluctuation spectra were quantified within the 9-440 mHz band, from which the inverse power-law exponent (α) and the fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted. Pre-malignant MECs treated with Taxol (0, 10 μM and 20 μM) exhibit an increase (p0.05) in α, since myosin II isn't highly expressed in non-migratory pre-malignant MECs. We demonstrated the feasibility of OCT fluctuation spectroscopy to quantify MEC toxicant response. Microtubule stabilization was found to be a major contributor to pre-malignant MEC fluctuation signals, while myosin II inhibition was not.

  17. Correlation between diurnal variation of intraocular pressure, ocular pulse amplitude and corneal structural properties Correlação entre a variação diurna da pressão intraocular, amplitude de pulso e propriedades estruturais corneanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Silva Villas-Bôas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluctuation of intraocular pressure measurements obtained by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry, and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry during office hours in glaucoma and healthy participants. This study also aims at correlating the intraocular pressure fluctuations with fluctuations of corneal hysteresis, central corneal thickness, mean central corneal curvature and ocular pulse amplitude. METHODS: A total of 12 controls (24 eyes and 21 patients (38 eyes with open-angle glaucoma were recruited. Intraocular pressure measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry, dynamic contour tonometry and corneal compensated non-contact tonometry, ocular pulse amplitude, central corneal curvature and thickness, corneal hysteresis, and resistance factor were obtained at intervals of 2 hours, between 9 AM and 5 PM. RESULTS: Intraocular pressure fluctuated significantly throughout the day in controls and glaucoma individuals with all tonometers (POBJETIVO: Avaliar a flutuação das medidas da pressão intraocular obtidas pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e pela tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana durante o período ambulatorial, em participantes com glaucoma e saudáveis. Esse estudo também correlacionou as flutuações da pressão intraocular com as flutuações da histerese corneana, espessura corneana central, média da curvatura corneana central e amplitude de pulso ocular. MÉTODOS: Um total de 12 controles (24 olhos e 21 pacientes com glaucoma de ângulo aberto (38 olhos foram selecionados. A pressão intraocular medida pela tonometria de aplanação de Goldmann, tonometria de contorno dinâmico e tonometria de não-contato com compensação corneana, amplitude de pulso ocular, a curvatura central e espessura corneanas, a histerese corneana e o fator de resistência foram medidos em intervalos de 2 horas, entre 9

  18. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zeng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM. In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold–Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified.

  19. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-09-12

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography.

  20. Quantifying the range of cross-correlated fluctuations using a q- L dependent AHXA coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Yuming

    2018-03-01

    Recently, based on analogous height cross-correlation analysis (AHXA), a cross-correlation coefficient ρ×(L) has been proposed to quantify the levels of cross-correlation on different temporal scales for bivariate series. A limitation of this coefficient is that it cannot capture the full information of cross-correlations on amplitude of fluctuations. In fact, it only detects the cross-correlation at a specific order fluctuation, which might neglect some important information inherited from other order fluctuations. To overcome this disadvantage, in this work, based on the scaling of the qth order covariance and time delay L, we define a two-parameter dependent cross-correlation coefficient ρq(L) to detect and quantify the range and level of cross-correlations. This new version of ρq(L) coefficient leads to the formation of a ρq(L) surface, which not only is able to quantify the level of cross-correlations, but also allows us to identify the range of fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two given signals. Applications to the classical ARFIMA models and the binomial multifractal series illustrate the feasibility of this new coefficient ρq(L) . In addition, a statistical test is proposed to quantify the existence of cross-correlations between two given series. Applying our method to the real life empirical data from the 1999-2000 California electricity market, we find that the California power crisis in 2000 destroys the cross-correlation between the price and the load series but does not affect the correlation of the load series during and before the crisis.

  1. Fluctuation diamagnetism in two-band superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Ryusuke

    2016-04-01

    Anomalously large fluctuation diamagnetism around the superconducting critical temperature has been recently observed in iron selenide (FeSe) [Kasahara et al. (unpublished)]. This indicates that superconducting fluctuations (SCFs) play a more significant role in FeSe, which supposedly has a two-band structure, than in the familiar single-band superconductors. Motivated by the data on FeSe, SCF-induced diamagnetism is examined in a two-band system, on the basis of a phenomenological approach with a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The obtained results indicate that the SCF-induced diamagnetism may be more enhanced than that in a single-band system due to the existence of two distinct fluctuation modes. Such enhancement of diamagnetism unique to a two-band system seems consistent with the large diamagnetism observed in FeSe, though still far from a quantitative agreement.

  2. Exchange fluctuation theorem for correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry; Jennings, David; Hirono, Yuji; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-10-01

    We extend the exchange fluctuation theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the nonequilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. In addition, a more abstract approach leads us to a "correlation fluctuation theorem". Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semiclassical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations. We also present a toy example of qubit-qudit heat exchange, and find that non-classical behaviour such as deterministic energy transfer and anomalous heat flow are reflected in our exchange fluctuation theorem.

  3. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  4. Low Mach Number Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for Electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2016-01-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids (A. Donev, et al., Physics of Fluids, 27, 3, 2015), we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm...

  5. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  6. Mesoscale wind fluctuations over Danish waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, C.L.

    2010-12-15

    Mesoscale wind fluctuations affect the large scale integration of wind power because they undermine the day-ahead predictability of wind speed and power production, and because they can result in large fluctuations in power generation that must be balanced using reserve power. Large fluctuations in generated power are a particular problem for offshore wind farms because the typically high concentration of turbines within a limited geographical area means that fluctuations can be correlated across large numbers of turbines. Furthermore, organised mesoscale structures that often form over water, such as convective rolls and cellular convection, have length scales of tens of kilometers, and can cause large wind fluctuations on a time scale of around an hour. This thesis is an exploration of the predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations using observations from the world's first two large offshore wind farms - Horns Rev I in the North Sea, and Nysted in the Baltic Sea. The thesis begins with a climatological analysis of wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-10 hours at the two sites. A novel method for calculating conditional climatologies of spectral information is proposed, based on binning and averaging the time axis of the Hilbert spectrum. Results reveal clear patterns between wind fluctuations and locally observed meteorological conditions. The analysis is expanded by classifying wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-3 hours according to synoptic patterns, satellite pictures and wind classes. Results indicate that cold air outbreaks and open cellular convection are a significant contributor to mesoscale wind variability at Horns Rev. The predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations is tested by implementing standard statistical models that relate local wind variability to parameters based on a large scale weather analysis. The models show some skill, but only achieve a 15% improvement on a persistence forecast. The possibility of explicitly modelling

  7. RSA fluctuation in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Jonathan; Clift, April; Bolden, Sarah; Salomon, Kristen

    2007-05-01

    Cardiac vagal control, as measured by indices of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), has been investigated as a marker of impaired self-regulation in mental disorders, including depression. Past work in depressed samples has focused on deficits in resting RSA levels, with mixed results. This study tested the hypothesis that depression involves abnormal RSA fluctuation. RSA was measured in depressed and healthy control participants during rest and during two reactivity tasks, each followed by a recovery period. Relative to controls, depressed persons exhibited lower resting RSA levels as well as less RSA fluctuation, primarily evidenced by a lack of task-related vagal suppression. Group differences in RSA fluctuation were not accounted for by differences in physical health or respiration, whereas group differences in resting RSA level did not survive covariate analyses. Depression may involve multiple deficits in cardiac vagal control.

  8. Task performance changes the amplitude and timing of the BOLD signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhrif Atae

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Translational studies comparing imaging data of animals and humans have gained increasing scientific interests. With this upcoming translational approach, however, identifying harmonized statistical analysis as well as shared data acquisition protocols and/or combined statistical approaches is necessary. Following this idea, we applied Bayesian Adaptive Regression Splines (BARS, which have until now mainly been used to model neural responses of electrophysiological recordings from rodent data, on human hemodynamic responses as measured via fMRI. Forty-seven healthy subjects were investigated while performing the Attention Network Task in the MRI scanner. Fluctuations in the amplitude and timing of the BOLD response were determined and validated externally with brain activation using GLM and also ecologically with the influence of task performance (i.e. good vs. bad performers. In terms of brain activation, bad performers presented reduced activation bilaterally in the parietal lobules, right prefrontal cortex (PFC and striatum. This was accompanied by an enhanced left PFC recruitment. With regard to the amplitude of the BOLD-signal, bad performers showed enhanced values in the left PFC. In addition, in the regions of reduced activation such as the parietal and striatal regions, the temporal dynamics were higher in bad performers. Based on the relation between BOLD response and neural firing with the amplitude of the BOLD signal reflecting gamma power and timing dynamics beta power, we argue that in bad performers, an enhanced left PFC recruitment hints towards an enhanced functioning of gamma-band activity in a compensatory manner. This was accompanied by reduced parieto-striatal activity, associated with increased and potentially conflicting beta-band activity.

  9. Tooth-meshing-harmonic static-transmission-error amplitudes of helical gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, William D.

    2018-01-01

    The static transmission errors of meshing gear pairs arise from deviations of loaded tooth working surfaces from equispaced perfect involute surfaces. Such deviations consist of tooth-pair elastic deformations and geometric deviations (modifications) of tooth working surfaces. To a very good approximation, the static-transmission-error tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes of helical gears are herein expressed by superposition of Fourier transforms of the quantities: (1) the combination of tooth-pair elastic deformations and geometric tooth-pair modifications and (2) fractional mesh-stiffness fluctuations, each quantity (1) and (2) expressed as a function of involute ;roll distance.; Normalization of the total roll-distance single-tooth contact span to unity allows tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes to be computed for different shapes of the above-described quantities (1) and (2). Tooth-meshing harmonics p = 1, 2, … are shown to occur at Fourier-transform harmonic values of Qp, p = 1, 2, …, where Q is the actual (total) contact ratio, thereby verifying its importance in minimizing transmission-error tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes. Two individual shapes and two series of shapes of the quantities (1) and (2) are chosen to illustrate a wide variety of shapes. In most cases representative of helical gears, tooth-meshing-harmonic values p = 1, 2, … are shown to occur in Fourier-transform harmonic regions governed by discontinuities arising from tooth-pair-contact initiation and termination, thereby showing the importance of minimizing such discontinuities. Plots and analytical expressions for all such Fourier transforms are presented, thereby illustrating the effects of various types of tooth-working-surface modifications and tooth-pair stiffnesses on transmission-error generation.

  10. MHV Rules for Higgs Plus Multi-Gluon Amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, L.

    2004-11-09

    We use tree-level perturbation theory to show how non-supersymmetric one-loop scattering amplitudes for a Higgs boson plus an arbitrary number of partons can be constructed, in the limit of a heavy top quark, from a generalization of the scalar graph approach of Cachazo, Svrcek and Witten. The Higgs boson couples to gluons through a top quark loop which generates, for large top mass, a dimension-5 operator H tr G{sup 2}. This effective interaction leads to amplitudes which cannot be described by the standard MHV rules; for example, amplitudes where all of the gluons have positive helicity. We split the effective interaction into the sum of two terms, one holomorphic (selfdual) and one anti-holomorphic (anti-selfdual). The holomorphic interactions give a new set of MHV vertices--identical in form to those of pure gauge theory, except for momentum conservation--that can be combined with pure gauge theory MHV vertices to produce a tower of amplitudes with more than two negative helicities. Similarly, the anti-holomorphic interactions give anti-MHV vertices that can be combined with pure gauge theory anti-MHV vertices to produce a tower of amplitudes with more than two positive helicities. A Higgs boson amplitude is the sum of one MHV-tower amplitude and one anti-MHV-tower amplitude. We present all MHV-tower amplitudes with up to four negative-helicity gluons and any number of positive-helicity gluons (NNMHV). These rules reproduce all of the available analytic formulae for Higgs + n-gluon scattering (n {le} 5) at tree level, in some cases yielding considerably shorter expressions.

  11. Scale invariance and universality of economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Amaral, L. A. N.; Gopikrishnan, P.; Plerou, V.

    2000-08-01

    In recent years, physicists have begun to apply concepts and methods of statistical physics to study economic problems, and the neologism “econophysics” is increasingly used to refer to this work. Much recent work is focused on understanding the statistical properties of time series. One reason for this interest is that economic systems are examples of complex interacting systems for which a huge amount of data exist, and it is possible that economic time series viewed from a different perspective might yield new results. This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk that was designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena - scale invariance and universality - can be useful in guiding research on economics. We shall see that while scale invariance has been tested for many years, universality is relatively less frequently discussed. This article reviews the results of two recent studies - (i) The probability distribution of stock price fluctuations: Stock price fluctuations occur in all magnitudes, in analogy to earthquakes - from tiny fluctuations to drastic events, such as market crashes. The distribution of price fluctuations decays with a power-law tail well outside the Lévy stable regime and describes fluctuations that differ in size by as much as eight orders of magnitude. (ii) Quantifying business firm fluctuations: We analyze the Computstat database comprising all publicly traded United States manufacturing companies within the years 1974-1993. We find that the distributions of growth rates is different for different bins of firm size, with a width that varies inversely with a power of firm size. Similar variation is found for other complex organizations, including country size, university research budget size, and size of species of bird populations.

  12. Controlling quantum interference in phase space with amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yinghong; Li, Tingyu; Kasai, Katsuyuki; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Zhang, Yun

    2017-05-23

    We experimentally show a quantum interference in phase space by interrogating photon number probabilities (n = 2, 3, and 4) of a displaced squeezed state, which is generated by an optical parametric amplifier and whose displacement is controlled by amplitude of injected coherent light. It is found that the probabilities exhibit oscillations of interference effect depending upon the amplitude of the controlling light field. This phenomenon is attributed to quantum interference in phase space and indicates the capability of controlling quantum interference using amplitude. This remarkably contrasts with the oscillations of interference effects being usually controlled by relative phase in classical optics.

  13. Color dual form for gauge-theory amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Z; Dennen, T

    2011-08-19

    Recently a duality between color and kinematics has been proposed, exposing a new unexpected structure in gauge theory and gravity scattering amplitudes. Here we propose that the relation goes deeper, allowing us to reorganize amplitudes into a form reminiscent of the standard color decomposition in terms of traces over generators, but with the role of color and kinematics swapped. By imposing additional conditions similar to Kleiss-Kuijf relations between partial amplitudes, the relationship between the earlier form satisfying the duality and the current one is invertible. We comment on extensions to loop level. © 2011 American Physical Society

  14. Scattering Amplitudes: The Most Perfect Microscopic Structures in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Lance J.; /CERN /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    This article gives an overview of many of the recent developments in understanding the structure of relativistic scattering amplitudes in gauge theories ranging from QCD to N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, as well as (super)gravity. I also provide a pedagogical introduction to some of the basic tools used to organize and illuminate the color and kinematic structure of amplitudes. This article is an invited review introducing a special issue of Journal of Physics A devoted to 'Scattering Amplitudes in Gauge Theories'.

  15. Variations of the amplitude of the Chandler wobble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaczek, B.; Kosek, W.

    Amplitude variations of the Chandler wobble of polar motion in 1846 - 1988 were analyzed on the basis of the IERS97 C01 pole coordinate data. The Chandler wobble was filtered by the Fourier Transform Band Pass Filter. Periodic oscillations with periods of about 75, 40, 30 and 20 years were detected in amplitude variations of the Chandler wobble. The deep minimum of the Chandler wobble amplitude, similar to the minimum on turn of the decades 1920 and 1930 was predicted for the beginning of the next century.

  16. Amplitude Modulation in the δ Sct star KIC 7106205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Dominic. M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The δ Sct star KIC 7106205 showed amplitude modulation in a single p mode, whilst all other p and g modes remained stable in amplitude and phase over 1470 d of the Kepler dataset. The data were divided into 30 time bins of equal length and a series of consecutive Fourier transforms was calculated. A fixed frequency, calculated from a least-squares fit of all data, allowed amplitude and phase for every mode in each time bin to be tracked. The missing p mode energy was not transferred to any other visible modes.

  17. Fluctuations and localization in mesoscopic electron

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The quantum phenomena of tunneling and interference show up not only in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, but also in cold materials of the real world, such as metals and semiconductors. Though not fully macroscopic, such mesoscopic systems contain a huge number of particles, and the holistic nature of quantum mechanics becomes evident already in simple electronic measurements. The measured quantity fluctuates as a function of applied fields in an unpredictable, yet reproducible way. Despite this fingerprint character of fluctuations, their statistical properties are universal, i.e

  18. Chiral edge fluctuations of colloidal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Leroy; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir; Pelcovits, Robert; Powers, Thomas

    Using experiments and theory we study chiral fluctuations of the edge of a nearly flat colloidal membrane, consisting of rod-like viruses held together by the depletion interaction. Our measurements show an anomalous peak in the power spectrum around 1 inverse micron. Using an effective theory to describe the liquid crystal degrees of freedom by geometric properties of the edge, such as length, geodesic torsion, and curvature, we calculate the spectrum of out-of-plane edge fluctuations. The peak arises for sufficiently strong chirality, and corresponds to the instability of a flat membrane to a shape with helical, rippled edges.

  19. Fluctuation theorems for continuously monitored quantum fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Michele; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that quantum fluctuation theorems remain unaffected if measurements of any kind and number of observables are performed during the action of a force protocol. That is, although the backward and forward probabilities entering the fluctuation theorems are both altered by these measurements, their ratio remains unchanged. This observation allows us to describe the measurement of fluxes through interfaces and, in this way, to bridge the gap between the current theory, based on only two measurements performed at the beginning and end of the protocol, and experiments that are based on continuous monitoring.

  20. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand–Levitan–Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes

  1. Two beam surface fluctuation specular reflection spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudsepp, Allan; Fretigny, Christian; Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    In surface fluctuation specular reflection spectroscopy (SFSRS) deflections of a specularly reflected laser beam are used to characterize thermally excited surface waves. Here we report on a new two beam version of SFSRS in which the deflections of two reflected laser beams from separate locations on a surface are correlated. We demonstrate that this new two beam SFSRS technique can be used to determine directly the power spectrum of height fluctuation of thermally excited surface waves over a large range of both frequencies and wavevectors. In addition, we show that the technique is well suited for materials ranging from simple liquids to complex liquids and soft solids, including turbid materials.

  2. Quantum Fluctuation Theorems, Contextuality, and Work Quasiprobabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lostaglio, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the role of contextuality within quantum fluctuation theorems, in the light of a recent no-go result by Perarnau-Llobet et al. We show that any fluctuation theorem reproducing the two-point-measurement scheme for classical states either admits a notion of work quasiprobability or fails to describe protocols exhibiting contextuality. Conversely, we describe a protocol that smoothly interpolates between the two-point-measurement work distribution for projective measurements and Allahverdyan's work quasiprobability for weak measurements, and show that the negativity of the latter is a direct signature of contextuality.

  3. Acute intermittent porphyria with SIADH and fluctuating dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabin, A; Thapa, L J; Paudel, R; Rana, P V S

    2012-01-01

    Three cases of acute intermittent porphyria are reported. While in first case severe pain in abdomen with intermittent exacerbation was the only presentation, the second patient presented as accelerated hypertension and acute abdominal crises in whom the clinical course was characterized by development of deep coma due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone before she made complete recovery. The third patient, initially manifested as acute encephalitic syndrome. After initial improvement, she developed features of acute intermittent porphyria i.e. acute abdomen, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and rapidly progressing acute motor neuropathy leading to respiratory and bulbar paralysis. In addition, she developed severe and fluctuating dysautonomia leading to cardiac arrest and fatal termination. The importance of early diagnosis, recognition of autonomic disturbances, prompt treatment and counseling for avoidance of precipitating factors is stressed.

  4. Characterization of initial fluctuations for the hydrodynamical description of heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the initial conditions for a hydrodynamical description of heavy-ion collisions are characterized. We propose a Bessel-Fourier decomposition with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane and rapidity. This allows for a complete characterization of fluctuations in all hydrodynamical fields including energy density, pressure, fluid velocity, shear stress and bulk viscous pressure. It has the advantage that fluctuations can be ordered with respect to their wave length and that they can be propagated mode-by-mode within the hydrodynamical formalism. Event ensembles can then be characterized in terms of a functional probability distribution. For the event ensemble of a Monte Carlo Glauber model, we provide evidence that the latter is close to Gaussian form, thus allowing for a particularly simple characterization of the event distribution.

  5. Relationship between frequency power spectra and intermittent, large-amplitude bursts in the Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorsen, A.; Garcia, O. E.; Kube, R.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    Fluctuations in the boundary region of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have been analyzed using gas puff imaging data from a set of Ohmically heated plasma density scan experiments. It is found that the relative fluctuation amplitudes are modest and close to normally distributed at the separatrix but become increasingly larger and skewed towards the main chamber wall. The frequency power spectra are nevertheless similar for all radial positions and line-averaged densities. Predictions of a stochastic model, describing the plasma fluctuations as a super-position of uncorrelated pulses, are shown to be in excellent agreement with the measurements. This implies that the pulse duration is the same, while the degree of pulse overlap decreases radially outwards in the scrape-off layer. The universal frequency power spectral density is thus determined by the shape and duration of the large-amplitude bursts associated with blob-like structures. The model also describes the rate of threshold level crossings, for which the exponential tails underline the intermittency of the fluctuations in the far scarpe-off layer.

  6. Geometric fluctuation theorem for a spin-boson system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kota L; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2017-08-01

    We derive an extended fluctuation theorem for geometric pumping of a spin-boson system under periodic control of environmental temperatures by using a Markovian quantum master equation. We obtain the current distribution, the average current, and the fluctuation in terms of the Monte Carlo simulation. To explain the results of our simulation we derive an extended fluctuation theorem. This fluctuation theorem leads to the fluctuation dissipation relations but the absence of the conventional reciprocal relation.

  7. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  8. Accounting for Large Amplitude Protein Deformation during in Silico Macromolecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Prévost

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA.We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  9. Macroalgae may mitigate ocean acidification effects on mussel calcification by increasing pH and its fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Wahl, M.

    2017-06-26

    Ocean acidification (OA) is generally assumed to negatively impact calcification rates of marine organisms. At a local scale however, biological activity of macrophytes may generate pH fluctuations with rates of change that are orders of magnitude larger than the long-term trend predicted for the open ocean. These fluctuations may in turn impact benthic calcifiers in the vicinity. Combining laboratory, mesocosm and field studies, such interactions between OA, the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus, the sea grass Zostera marina and the blue mussel Mytilus edulis were investigated at spatial scales from decimetres to 100s of meters in the western Baltic. Macrophytes increased the overall mean pH of the habitat by up to 0.3 units relative to macrophyte-free, but otherwise similar, habitats and imposed diurnal pH fluctuations with amplitudes ranging from 0.3 to more than 1 pH unit. These amplitudes and their impact on mussel calcification tended to increase with increasing macrophyte biomass to bulk water ratio. At the laboratory and mesocosm scales, biogenic pH fluctuations allowed mussels to maintain calcification even under acidified conditions by shifting most of their calcification activity into the daytime when biogenic fluctuations caused by macrophyte activity offered temporal refuge from OA stress. In natural habitats with a low biomass to water body ratio, the impact of biogenic pH fluctuations on mean calcification rates of M. edulis was less pronounced. Thus, in dense algae or seagrass habitats, macrophytes may mitigate OA impact on mussel calcification by raising mean pH and providing temporal refuge from acidification stress.

  10. An amplitude suppression method based on the decibel criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xuan-Lin; Chen, Hui; Wang, Jin-Long; Hu, Zhi-quan; Xu, Dan; Li, Lu-Ming

    2017-09-01

    To suppress the strong noise in seismic data with wide range of amplitudes, commonly used methods often yield unsatisfactory denoising results owing to inappropriate thresholds and require parametric testing as well as iterations to achieve the anticipated results. To overcome these problems, a data-driven strong amplitude suppression method based on the decibel criterion in the wavelet domain (ISANA) is proposed. The method determines the denoising threshold based on the decibel criterion and statistically analyzes the amplitude index rather than the abnormally high amplitudes. The method distinguishes the frequency band distributions of the valid signals in the time-frequency domain based on the wavelet transformation and then calculates thresholds in selected time windows, eventually achieving frequency-divided noise attenuation for better denoising. Simulations based on theoretical and real-world data verify the adaptability and low dependence of the method on the size of the time window. The method suppresses noise without energy loss in the signals.

  11. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2004-05-01

    Music performance places stringent temporal and cognitive demands on individuals that should yield large speed/accuracy tradeoffs. Skilled piano performance, however, shows consistently high accuracy across a wide variety of rates. Movement amplitude may affect the speed/accuracy tradeoff, so that high accuracy can be obtained even at very fast tempi. The contribution of movement amplitude changes in rate (tempo) is investigated with motion capture. Cameras recorded pianists with passive markers on hands and fingers, who performed on an electronic (MIDI) keyboard. Pianists performed short melodies at faster and faster tempi until they made errors (altering the speed/accuracy function). Variability of finger movements in the three motion planes indicated most change in the plane perpendicular to the keyboard across tempi. Surprisingly, peak amplitudes of motion before striking the keys increased as tempo increased. Increased movement amplitudes at faster rates may reduce or compensate for speed/accuracy tradeoffs. [Work supported by Canada Research Chairs program, HIMH R01 45764.

  12. Stora's fine notion of divergent amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Várilly, Joseph C., E-mail: joseph.varilly@ucr.ac.cr [Escuela de Matemática, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José 11501 (Costa Rica); Gracia-Bondía, José M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro 11501 (Costa Rica)

    2016-11-15

    Stora and coworkers refined the notion of divergent quantum amplitude, somewhat upsetting the standard power-counting recipe. This unexpectedly clears the way to new prototypes for free and interacting field theories of bosons of any mass and spin.

  13. Mimicking an amplitude damping channel for Laguerre Gaussian Modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available An amplitude damping channel for Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes is presented. Experimentally the action of the channel on LG modes is in good agreement with that predicted theoretically....

  14. N >= 4 Supergravity Amplitudes from Gauge Theory at Two Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher-Veronneau, C.; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    We present the full two-loop four-graviton amplitudes in N = 4, 5, 6 supergravity. These results were obtained using the double-copy structure of gravity, which follows from the recently conjectured color-kinematics duality in gauge theory. The two-loop four-gluon scattering amplitudes in N = 0, 1, 2 supersymmetric gauge theory are a second essential ingredient. The gravity amplitudes have the expected infrared behavior: the two-loop divergences are given in terms of the squares of the corresponding one-loop amplitudes. The finite remainders are presented in a compact form. The finite remainder for N = 8 supergravity is also presented, in a form that utilizes a pure function with a very simple symbol.

  15. High Amplitude (delta)-Scutis in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A; Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Becker, A C; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Suntzeff, N B; Welch, D L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2010-01-25

    The authors present 2323 High-Amplitude {delta}-Scutis (HADS) candidates discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the SuperMACHO survey (Rest et al. 2005). Frequency analyses of these candidates reveal that several are multimode pulsators, including 119 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the fundamental (F) mode and 19 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the first overtone (FO) mode. Using Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, they find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the FO pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the F pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. They also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax (Poretti et al. 2008).

  16. Gauge and Gravity Amplitudes from Trees to Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Rijun

    This thesis describes two subjects that I mainly work on during my PhD study. They are both about scattering amplitudes, covering gravity and gauge theories, tree and loop level, with or without supersymmetry. The rst subject is Kawai-Lewellen-Tye(KLT) relation in field theory, which mysteriously...... a special type of two-loop and three-loop diagrams where equations of maximal unitarity cut de ne complex curve. Geometry genus of complex curve is a topological invariant, and characterizes the property of curve. We compute the genus of complex curve for some two-loop and three-loop diagrams from...... for vanishing identities of Yang-Mills amplitudes as violation of linear symmetry groups based on KLT relation argument. The second subject is integrand reduction of multi-loop amplitude. The recent methods based on computational algebraic geometry make it possible to systematically study multi-loop amplitude...

  17. Amplitudes, recursion relations and unitarity in the Abelian Higgs model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiss, Ronald; Luna, Oscar Boher

    2017-12-01

    The Abelian Higgs model forms an essential part of the electroweak standard model: it is the sector containing only Z0 and Higgs bosons. We present a diagram-based proof of the tree-level unitarity of this model inside the unitary gauge, where only physical degrees of freedom occur. We derive combinatorial recursion relations for off-shell amplitudes in the massless approximation, which allows us to prove the cancellation of the first two orders in energy of unitarity-violating high-energy behaviour for any tree-level amplitude in this model. We describe a deformation of the amplitudes by extending the physical phase space to at least 7 spacetime dimensions, which leads to on-shell recursion relations à la BCFW. These lead to a simple proof that all on-shell tree amplitudes obey partial-wave unitarity.

  18. Some tree-level string amplitudes in the NSR formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University,4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Melnikov, Ilarion V. [Department of Mathematics, Harvard University,One Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Robbins, Daniel; Royston, Andrew B. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University,4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2015-12-02

    We calculate tree level scattering amplitudes for open strings using the NSR formalism. We present a streamlined symmetry-based and pedagogical approach to the computations, which we first develop by checking two-, three-, and four-point functions involving bosons and fermions. We calculate the five-point amplitude for massless gluons and find agreement with an earlier result by Brandt, Machado and Medina. We then compute the five-point amplitudes involving two and four fermions respectively, the general form of which has not been previously obtained in the NSR formalism. The results nicely confirm expectations from the supersymmetric F{sup 4} effective action. Finally we use the prescription of Kawai, Lewellen and Tye (KLT) to compute the amplitudes for the closed string sector.

  19. Gauge and Gravity Amplitudes from Trees to Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Rijun

    This thesis describes two subjects that I mainly work on during my PhD study. They are both about scattering amplitudes, covering gravity and gauge theories, tree and loop level, with or without supersymmetry. The rst subject is Kawai-Lewellen-Tye(KLT) relation in field theory, which mysteriously...... for vanishing identities of Yang-Mills amplitudes as violation of linear symmetry groups based on KLT relation argument. The second subject is integrand reduction of multi-loop amplitude. The recent methods based on computational algebraic geometry make it possible to systematically study multi-loop amplitude...... with generalized unitarity cut. Using Grobner basis and primary decomposition, we thoroughly study integrand basis and solution space of equations from maximal unitarity cut for all 4-dimensional two-loop topologies. Algorithm and examples of this computation are illustrated in this thesis. We also study...

  20. Amplitude analysis of the charmed decay D0 to KKpipi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    An amplitude analysis of the 4-body charmed decay D0 -> KKππ is presented using data collected from electron-positron collisions at the CLEO experiment. Both flavour tagged and CP tagged data are utilized in the analysis making it unique from amplitude analyses performed at other colliders and providing extra sensitivity to the phases of the amplitude components. The amplitude model is used to search for CP violation in the D0 decay by analysing D0 and D0 decays separately. The model is also crucial input for a model-dependent measurement of the CP-violating phase γ using B+/- ->D0(-> KKππ) K+/- decays, which remains one of the least constrained parameters of the Standard Model. Forum on International Physics Distinguished Student Seminar Program, and European Research Council