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Sample records for raphe nucleus dr

  1. The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus studied with dual-probe microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus was investigated by means of dual-probe microdialysis in conscious rats. The release of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) after inhibition or stimulation of locus cocruleus and dorsal raphe activity was sampled in both

  2. Nicotinic modulation of serotonergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Garduño, Julieta; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic receptors has been associated to a large number of physiological and behavioral processes such as learning, memory, attention, food-intake and mood disorders. Although it is well established that many nicotinic actions are mediated through an increase in serotonin (5-HT) release, the physiological mechanisms by which nicotine produces these effects are still unclear. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains the major amount of 5-HT neurons projecting to different parts of the brain. DRN also contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at somatic and presynaptic elements. Nicotine produces both inhibitory and excitatory effects on different subpopulations of 5-HT DRN neurons. In this review, we describe the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms by which nicotine increases the excitability of DRN neurons as well as the subtypes of nAChRs involved. We also describe the inhibitory effects of nicotine and the role of 5-HT1A receptors in this effect. These nicotinic actions modulate the activity of different neuronal subpopulations in the DRN, changing the 5-HT tone in the brain areas where these groups of neurons project. Some of the physiological implications of nicotine-induced 5-HT release are discussed.

  3. Effects of damage to median raphe nucleus on ingestive behavior and wheel running activity.

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    Shahid Salles, M S; Heym, J; Gladfelter, W E

    1979-01-01

    The effects of damage to the median raphe nucleus on the ingestive behavior and wheel running activity of rats were studied. This nucleus was damaged by the placement of either electrolytic or chemical (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine) lesions. After the placement of either type of lesion, wheel running activity was significantly decreased for the duration of the 8 week post-operative period. Although there were transient decreases in both food and water intakes after damage to the median raphe nucleus, these decreases did not appear to result from impairments in neuro-regulatory mechanisms. Rather, the decrease in food intake seemed to be related to the decrease in locomotor activity, and the decrease in water intake appeared to be linked to the decrease in food intake. In some rats with electrolytic lesions in the median raphe nucleus, the decrease in water intake was followed by a transient period of hyperdipsia.

  4. Reward Processing by the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: 5-HT and Beyond

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    Luo, Minmin; Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of…

  5. Evidence for involvement of the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus in urine storage and penile erection in decerebrate rats.

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    Sugaya, K; Ogawa, Y; Hatano, T; Koyama, Y; Miyazato, T; Oda, M

    1998-06-01

    Micturition and male sexual activity require the lower urinary tract to function. During the sexual act, micturition must be inhibited and urine stored in the bladder. We studied the role of the brainstem in relation to both micturition/urine storage and penile erection in rats. Wire electrodes were placed on the dorsal nerve of the penis and microelectrodes for stimulation were introduced into the brainstem in decerebrate male rats. Electrical stimulation was used to locate optimally responding sites by monitoring the isovolumetric intravesical pressure and intracavernous pressure. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis, the subcoeruleus nucleus in the rostral pons, and the nucleus raphe magnus in the caudal pons increased intracavernous pressure, but inhibited rhythmic bladder contractions. Electrical stimulation of Barrington's nucleus (the pontine micturition center in the rat) in the rostral pons induced bladder contraction. Stimulation of the pontine reticular formation did not increase intracavernous pressure. Acute transection of the thoracic spinal cord eliminated rhythmic bladder contractions, but gave rise to sporadic increments of intracavernous pressure. This electrophysiological study demonstrated that the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus are involved in both urine storage and penile erection, and that their physiological functions are reciprocally controlled; so that erection leads to inhibition of micturition.

  6. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Liu Dongjuan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM. Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated

  7. Nitric oxide in the nucleus raphe magnus modulates cutaneous blood flow in rats during hypothermia

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    Masoumeh Kourosh Arami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nucleus Raphe Magnus (NRM that is involved in the regulation of body temperature contains nitric oxide (NO synthase. Considering the effect of NO on skin blood flow control, in this study, we assessed its thermoregulatory role within the raphe magnus. Materials and Methods: To this end, tail blood flow of male Wistar rats was measured by laser doppler following the induction of hypothermia. Results: Intra-NRM injection of SNP (exogenous NO donor, 0.1- 0.2 μl, 0.2 nM increased the blood flow. Similarly, unilateral microinjection of glutamate (0.1- 0.2 μl, 2.3 nM into the nucleus increased the blood flow. This effectof L-glutamate was reduced by prior intra NRM administrationof NO synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-L-arginine or NG-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 µl, 100 nM. Conclusion: It is concluded that NO modulates the thermoregulatory response of NRM to hypothermia and may interactwith excitatory amino acids in central skin blood flow regulation.

  8. Regulation of the release of serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus by alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the modulation of serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) by alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptors, dual-probe microdialysis was performed in conscious rats. The specific alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists were locally infused into the DRN via

  9. Disconnectivity between Dorsal Raphe Nucleus and Posterior Cingulate Cortex in Later Life Depression

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    Toshikazu Ikuta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN has been repeatedly implicated as having a significant relationship with depression, along with its serotoninergic innervation. However, functional connectivity of the DRN in depression is not well understood. The current study aimed to isolate functional connectivity of the DRN distinct in later life depression (LLD compared to a healthy age-matched population. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data from 95 participants (33 LLD and 62 healthy were collected to examine functional connectivity from the DRN to the whole brain in voxel-wise fashion. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC bilaterally showed significantly smaller connectivity in the LLD group than the control group. The DRN to PCC connectivity did not show any association with the depressive status. The findings implicate that the LLD involves disruption of serotoninergic input to the PCC, which has been suggested to be a part of the reduced default mode network in depression.

  10. More tryptophan hydroxylase in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus in depressed suicides.

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    Boldrini, Maura; Underwood, Mark D; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2005-04-11

    Deficient serotonin neurotransmission in suicide is indicated by reduced brainstem serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), fewer 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors and reduced cortical serotonin transporter binding in suicide victims. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of 5-HT, and alterations in TPH could explain some of these findings. We sought to determine the amount of TPH immunoreactivity (TPH-IR) in the dorsal (DRN) and median (MRN) raphe nuclei in suicides and controls. Brainstems of suicide victims and controls (n = 11 pairs) were collected at autopsy, matched for age, sex and postmortem interval, frozen and sectioned (20 microm). Immunoautoradiography, using an antibody to label TPH, was performed, slides exposed to film and autoradiograms quantified by a computer-based image analysis system. We examined sections every 1000 microm throughout the whole length of the nucleus, performing statistical analysis only on those subjects for whom the raphe was complete (n = 8 pairs). TPH-IR (microCi/g) was higher in suicides than controls (S: 300.8 +/- 70.8 vs. C: 259.6 +/- 40.7, t = 2.57, df = 7, P = 0.04) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and not different between suicides and controls (S: 251.3 +/- 44.2 vs. C: 235.9 +/- 27.4, t = 1.49, df = 7, P = 0.18) in the MRN. DRN TPH-IR was higher in male suicide victims (MS) compared to male controls (MC; MS: 318.4 +/- 54.4 vs. MC: 271.9 +/- 22.5, t = 2.66, df = 6, P = 0.03). The analysis of TPH-IR area and density at each DRN rostrocaudal levels showed higher area and density in suicides compared to controls in the rostral DRN and lower area and density in the caudal DRN. TPH-IR, an index of the amount of TPH enzyme, in the DRN is higher in depressed suicides. More TPH may be an upregulatory homeostatic response to impaired serotonin release or less autoreceptor activation. Alternatively, the serotonin impairment in suicide may be due to hypofunctional serotonin

  11. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

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    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  12. How does early maternal separation and chronic stress in adult rats affect the immunoreactivity of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus?

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    Pollano, Antonella; Trujillo, Verónica; Suárez, Marta M

    2018-01-01

    Vulnerability to emotional disorders like depression derives from interactions between early and late environments, including stressful conditions. The serotonin (5HT) system is strongly affected by stress and chronic unpredictable stress can alter the 5HT system. We evaluated the distribution of active serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) through immunohistochemistry in maternally separated and chronically stressed rats treated with an antidepressant, tianeptine, whose mechanism of action is still under review. Male Wistar rats were subjected to daily maternal separation (MS) for 4.5 h between postnatal days (PND) 1-21, or to animal facility rearing (AFR). Between (PND) days 50-74, rats were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress and were treated daily with tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. We found an interaction between the effects of MS and chronic unpredictable stress on Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells at mid-caudal level of the DR. MS-chronically stressed rats showed an increase of Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells compared with AFR-chronically stressed rats. The ventrolateral (DRL/VLPAG) and dorsal (DRD) subdivisions of the DR were significantly more active than the ventral part (DRV). At the rostral level of the DR, tianeptine decreased the number of Fos-5HT cells in DR in the AFR groups, both unstressed and stressed. Overall, our results support the idea of a match in phenotype exhibited when the early and the adult environment correspond.

  13. Increased mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase in dorsal raphe nucleus of depressive suicide victims

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    A Sanchez-Bahillo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Sanchez-Bahillo1, V Bautista-Hernandez1, Carlos Barcia Gonzalez1, R Bañon2, A Luna2, EC Hirsch3, Maria-Trinidad Herrero11Clinical and Experimental Neuroscience, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED; 2Department of Legal Medicine, Department of Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, Murcia 30100, Spain; 3INSERM U679 Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Suicidal behavior is a problem with important social repercussions. Some groups of the population show a higher risk of suicide; for example, depression, alcoholism, psychosis or drug abuse frequently precedes suicidal behavior. However, the relationship between metabolic alterations in the brain and premorbid clinical symptoms of suicide remains uncertain. The serotonergic and noradrenergic systems have frequently been, implicated in suicidal behavior and the amount of serotonin in the brain and CSF of suicide victims has been found to be low compared with normal subjects. However, there are contradictory results regarding the role of noradrenergic neurons in the mediation of suicide attempts, possibly reflecting the heterogeneity of conditions that lead to a common outcome. In the present work we focus on the subgroup of suicide victims that share a common diagnosis of major depression. Based on post-mortem studies analyzing mRNA expression by in situ hybridization, serotonergic neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN from depressive suicide victims are seen to over-express cytochrome oxidase mRNA. However, no corresponding changes were found in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA in the noradrenergic neurons of the Locus Coeruleus (LC. These results suggest that, despite of the low levels of serotonin described in suicide victims, the activity of DRN neurons could increase in the suicidally depressed, probably due to the over activation of

  14. Distinct Contributions of Median Raphe Nucleus to Contextual Fear Conditioning and Fear-Potentiated Startle

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    Silva, R. C. B.; Cruz, A. P. M.; Avanzi, V.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Brandão, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Ascending 5-HT projections from the median raphe nucleus (MRN), probably to the hippocampus, are implicated in the acquisition of contextual fear (background stimuli), as assessed by freezing behavior. Foreground cues like light, used as a conditioned stimulus (CS) in classical fear conditioning, also cause freezing through thalamic transmission to the amygdala. As the MRN projects to the hippocampus and amygdala, the role of this raphe nucleus in fear conditioning to explicit cues remains to be explained. Here we analyzed the behavior of rats with MRN electrolytic lesions in a contextual conditioning situation and in a fear-potentiated startle procedure. The animals received MRN electrolytic lesions either before or on the day after two consecutive training sessions in which they were submitted to 10 conditioning trials, each in an experimental chamber (same context) where they. received foot-shocks (0.6 mA, 1 sec) paired to a 4-sec light CS. Seven to ten days later, the animals were submitted to testing sessions for assessing conditioned fear when they were placed for five shocks, and the duration of contextual freezing was recorded. The animals were then submitted to a fear-potentiated startle in response to a 4-sec light-CS, followed by white noise (100 dB, 50 ms). Control rats (sham) tested in the same context showed more freezing than did rats with pre- or post-training MRN lesions. Startle was clearly potentiated in the presence of light CS in the sham-lesioned animals. Whereas pretraining lesions reduced both freezing and fear-potentiated startle, the post-training lesions reduced only freezing to context, without changing the fear-potentiated startle. In a second experiment, neurotoxic lesions of the MRN with local injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate or the activation of 5-HT1A somatodendritic auto-receptors of the MRN by microinjections of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy- 2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) before the training sessions also

  15. Anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine mediates its effect in the median raphe nucleus.

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    An, Yan; Inoue, Takeshi; Kitaichi, Yuji; Izumi, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Song, Ning; Chen, Chong; Li, XiaoBai; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-11-15

    Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), blocks the α2-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which are responsible for controlling noradrenaline and 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) release. Though preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mirtazapine exerts an anxiolytic action, its precise brain target sites remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the brain area(s) in which mirtazapine exerts its anxiolytic-like effects on the expression of contextual conditioned freezing in rats. Mirtazapine (3 μg/site) was directly injected into three brain structures, the median raphe nucleus (MRN), hippocampus and amygdala. Freezing behavior tests were carried out 10 min after injections. Our results showed that the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine reduced freezing significantly, whereas injections into the hippocampus or the amygdala did not. In addition, the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine did not affect locomotor activity. These results suggest that the anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine might be mediated by its action on the MRN.

  16. Increased mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase in dorsal raphe nucleus of depressive suicide victims

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    Sanchez-Bahillo, A; Bautista-Hernandez, V; Barcia Gonzalez, Carlos; Bañon, R; Luna, A; Hirsch, EC; Herrero, Maria-Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a problem with important social repercussions. Some groups of the population show a higher risk of suicide; for example, depression, alcoholism, psychosis or drug abuse frequently precedes suicidal behavior. However, the relationship between metabolic alterations in the brain and premorbid clinical symptoms of suicide remains uncertain. The serotonergic and noradrenergic systems have frequently been, implicated in suicidal behavior and the amount of serotonin in the brain and CSF of suicide victims has been found to be low compared with normal subjects. However, there are contradictory results regarding the role of noradrenergic neurons in the mediation of suicide attempts, possibly reflecting the heterogeneity of conditions that lead to a common outcome. In the present work we focus on the subgroup of suicide victims that share a common diagnosis of major depression. Based on post-mortem studies analyzing mRNA expression by in situ hybridization, serotonergic neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) from depressive suicide victims are seen to over-express cytochrome oxidase mRNA. However, no corresponding changes were found in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA in the noradrenergic neurons of the Locus Coeruleus (LC). These results suggest that, despite of the low levels of serotonin described in suicide victims, the activity of DRN neurons could increase in the suicidally depressed, probably due to the over activation of serotonin re-uptake. No alteration was found in noradrenergic neurons, suggesting that they play no crucial role in the suicidal behavior of depressive patients. PMID:18728743

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor in the dorsal raphe nucleus: Linking stress coping and addiction.

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    Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2010-02-16

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of the dorsal raphé nucleus in reward-seeking behavior

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    Kae eNakamura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological experiments have shown that the modulation of brain serotonin levels has a strong impact on value-based decision making. Anatomical and physiological evidence also revealed that the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN, a major source of serotonin, and the dopamine system receive common inputs from brain regions associated with appetitive and aversive information processing. The serotonin and dopamine systems also have reciprocal functional influences on each other. However, the specific mechanism by which serotonin affects value-based decision making is not clear.To understand the information carried by the DRN for reward-seeking behavior, we measured single neuron activity in the primate DRN during the performance of saccade tasks to obtain different amounts of a reward. We found that DRN neuronal activity was characterized by tonic modulation that was altered by the expected and received reward value. Consistent reward-dependent modulation across different task periods suggested that DRN activity kept track of the reward value throughout a trial. The DRN was also characterized by modulation of its activity in the opposite direction by different neuronal subgroups, one firing strongly for the prediction and receipt of large rewards, with the other firing strongly for small rewards. Conversely, putative dopamine neurons showed positive phasic responses to reward-indicating cues and the receipt of an unexpected reward amount, which supports the reward prediction error signal hypothesis of dopamine.I suggest that the tonic reward monitoring signal of the DRN, possibly together with its interaction with the dopamine system, reports a continuous level of motivation throughout the performance of a task. Such a signal may provide reward context information to the targets of DRN projections, where it may be integrated further with incoming motivationally salient information.

  19. Chronic excitotoxic lesion of the dorsal raphe nucleus induces sodium appetite

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    Cavalcante-Lima H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined if the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN exerts tonic control of basal and stimulated sodium and water intake. Male Wistar rats weighing 300-350 g were microinjected with phosphate buffer (PB-DRN, N = 11 or 1 µg/0.2 µl, in a single dose, ibotenic acid (IBO-DRN, N = 9 to 10 through a guide cannula into the DRN and were observed for 21 days in order to measure basal sodium appetite and water intake and in the following situations: furosemide-induced sodium depletion (20 mg/kg, sc, 24 h before the experiment and a low dose of dietary captopril (1 mg/g chow. From the 6th day after ibotenic acid injection IBO-DRN rats showed an increase in sodium appetite (12.0 ± 2.3 to 22.3 ± 4.6 ml 0.3 M NaCl intake whereas PB-DRN did not exceed 2 ml (P < 0.001. Water intake was comparable in both groups. In addition to a higher dipsogenic response, sodium-depleted IBO-DRN animals displayed an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake compared to PB-DRN (37.4 ± 3.8 vs 21.6 ± 3.9 ml 300 min after fluid offer, P < 0.001. Captopril added to chow caused an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake during the first 2 days (IBO-DRN, 33.8 ± 4.3 and 32.5 ± 3.4 ml on day 1 and day 2, respectively, vs 20.2 ± 2.8 ml on day 0, P < 0.001. These data support the view that DRN, probably via ascending serotonergic system, tonically modulates sodium appetite under basal and sodium depletion conditions and/or after an increase in peripheral or brain angiotensin II.

  20. PROJECTIONS OF DORSAL AND MEDIAN RAPHE NUCLEI TO DORSAL AND VENTRAL STRIATUM

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    G. R. Hassanzadeh G. Behzadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascending serotonergic projections are derived mainly from mesencephalic raphe nuclei. Topographical projections from mesencephalic raphe nuclei to the striatum were examined in the rat by the retrograde transport technique of HRP (horseradish peroxidase. In 29 rats stereotaxically injection of HRP enzyme were performed in dorsal and ventral parts of striatum separately. The extent of the injection sites and distribution of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies were drawed on representative sections using a projection microscope. Following ipsilateral injection of HRP into the dorsal striatum, numerous labeled neurons were seen in rostral portion of dorsal raphe (DR nucleus. In the same level the cluster of labeled neurons were hevier through caudal parts of DR. A few neurons were also located in lateral wing of DR. More caudally some labeled neurons were found in lateral, medial line of DR. In median raphe nucleus (MnR the labeled neurons were scattered only in median portion of this nucleus. The ipsilateral injection of HRP into the ventral region of striatum resulted on labeling of numerous neurons in rostral, caudal and lateral portions of DR. Through the caudal extension of DR on 4th ventricle level, a large number of labeled neurons were distributed along the ventrocaudal parts of DR. In MnR, labeled neurons were observed only in median part of this nucleus. These findings suggest the mesencephalic raphe nuclei projections to caudo-putamen are topographically organized. In addition dorsal and median raphe nuclei have a stronger projection to the ventral striatum.

  1. Computational modeling of spike generation in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Tuckwell, Henry C; Penington, Nicholas J

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus, with their extensive innervation of limbic and higher brain regions and interactions with the endocrine system have important modulatory or regulatory effects on many cognitive, emotional and physiological processes. They have been strongly implicated in responses to stress and in the occurrence of major depressive disorder and other psychiatric disorders. In order to quantify some of these effects, detailed mathematical models of the activity of such cells are required which describe their complex neurochemistry and neurophysiology. We consider here a single-compartment model of these neurons which is capable of describing many of the known features of spike generation, particularly the slow rhythmic pacemaking activity often observed in these cells in a variety of species. Included in the model are 11 kinds of ion channels: a fast sodium current INa, a delayed rectifier potassium current IKDR, a transient potassium current IA, a slow non-inactivating potassium current IM, a low-threshold calcium current IT, two high threshold calcium currents IL and IN, small and large conductance potassium currents ISK and IBK, a hyperpolarization-activated cation current IH and a leak current ILeak. In Sections 3-8, each current type is considered in detail and parameters estimated from voltage clamp data where possible. Three kinds of model are considered for the BK current and two for the leak current. Intracellular calcium ion concentration Cai is an additional component and calcium dynamics along with buffering and pumping is discussed in Section 9. The remainder of the article contains descriptions of computed solutions which reveal both spontaneous and driven spiking with several parameter sets. Attention is focused on the properties usually associated with these neurons, particularly long duration of action potential, steep upslope on the leading edge of spikes, pacemaker-like spiking, long-lasting afterhyperpolarization

  2. Short-term cold exposure activates TRH neurons exclusively in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and raphe pallidus.

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    Cabral, Agustina; Valdivia, Spring; Reynaldo, Mirta; Cyr, Nicole E; Nillni, Eduardo A; Perello, Mario

    2012-06-19

    The neuropeptide thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is necessary for adequate cold-induced thermogenesis. TRH increases body temperature via both neuroendocrine and autonomic mechanisms. TRH neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulate thermogenesis through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during cold exposure. However, little is known about the role that TRH neurons play in mediating the sympathetic response to cold exposure. Here, we examined the response of TRH neurons of rats to cold exposure in hypothalamic regions including the PVN, the dorsomedial nucleus and the lateral hypothalamus along with areas of the ventral medulla including raphe obscurus, raphe pallidus (RPa) and parapyramidal regions. Our results using a double immunohistochemistry protocol to identify TRH and c-Fos (as a marker of cellular activity) followed by analysis of preproTRH gene expression demonstrate that only TRH neurons located in the PVN and the RPa are activated in animals exposed to short-term cold conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Upregulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus-prefrontal cortex serotonin system by chronic treatment with escitalopram in hyposerotonergic Wistar-Kyoto rats

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    Yamada, Makiko; Kawahara, Yukie; Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sotogaku, Naoki; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Folgering, Joost H. A.; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats are sensitive to chronic stressors and exhibit depression-like behavior. Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons projecting to the prefrontal cortex (PFC) comprise the important neurocircuitry underlying the pathophysiology of depression. To evaluate the DRN-PFC

  4. Projections from the raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

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    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)......Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)...

  5. TrkB Signaling in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus is Essential for Antidepressant Efficacy and Normal Aggression Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Megumi; Autry, Anita E; Mahgoub, Melissa; Suzuki, Kanzo; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), have important roles in neural plasticity and are required for antidepressant efficacy. Studies examining the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in depression and antidepressant efficacy have largely focused on the limbic system, leaving it unclear whether this signaling is important in other brain regions. BDNF and TrkB are both highly expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a brain region that has been suggested to have a role in depression and antidepressant action, although it is unknown whether BDNF and TrkB in the dorsal raphe nucleus are involved in these processes. We combined the adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system to selectively knock down either Bdnf or TrkB in the DRN. These mice were then characterized in several behavioral paradigms including measures of depression-related behavior and antidepressant efficacy. We show that knockdown of TrkB, but not Bdnf, in the DRN results in loss of antidepressant efficacy and increased aggression-related behavior. We also show that knockdown of TrkB or Bdnf in this brain region does not have an impact on weight, activity levels, anxiety, or depression-related behaviors. These data reveal a critical role for TrkB signaling in the DRN in mediating antidepressant responses and normal aggression behavior. The results also suggest a non-cell autonomous role for BDNF in the DRN in mediating antidepressant efficacy.

  6. The role of lateral habenula-dorsal raphe nucleus circuits in higher brain functions and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Yang, Shao-Jun; Rusak, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) play an important role in regulation of many physiological functions. The lateral nucleus of the habenular complex (LHb) is closely connected to the DRN both morphologically and functionally. The LHb is a key regulator of the activity of DRN serotonergic neurons, and it also receives reciprocal input from the DRN. The LHb is also a major way-station that receives limbic system input via the stria medullaris and provides output to the DRN and thereby indirectly connects a number of other brain regions to the DRN. The complex interactions of the LHb and DRN contribute to the regulation of numerous important behavioral and physiological mechanisms, including those regulating cognition, reward, pain sensitivity and patterns of sleep and waking. Disruption of these functions is characteristic of major psychiatric illnesses, so there has been a great deal of interest in how disturbed LHb-DRN interactions may contribute to the symptoms of these illnesses. This review summarizes recent research related to the roles of the LHb-DRN system in regulation of higher brain functions and the possible role of disturbed LHb-DRN function in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Biophysical properties and computational modeling of calcium spikes in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, Henry C

    2013-06-01

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nuclei, with their extensive innervation of nearly the whole brain have important modulatory effects on many cognitive and physiological processes. They play important roles in clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders. In order to quantify the effects of serotonergic transmission on target cells it is desirable to construct computational models and to this end these it is necessary to have details of the biophysical and spike properties of the serotonergic neurons. Here several basic properties are reviewed with data from several studies since the 1960s to the present. The quantities included are input resistance, resting membrane potential, membrane time constant, firing rate, spike duration, spike and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude, spike threshold, cell capacitance, soma and somadendritic areas. The action potentials of these cells are normally triggered by a combination of sodium and calcium currents which may result in autonomous pacemaker activity. We here analyse the mechanisms of high-threshold calcium spikes which have been demonstrated in these cells the presence of TTX (tetrodotoxin). The parameters for calcium dynamics required to give calcium spikes are quite different from those for regular spiking which suggests the involvement of restricted parts of the soma-dendritic surface as has been found, for example, in hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lê, A.D.; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but ...

  9. The hippocampus and dorsal raphe nucleus are key brain areas associated with the antidepressant effects of lithium augmentation of desipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussotto, Sofia; Cryan, John F; O'Leary, Olivia F

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 50% of depressed individuals fail to achieve remission with first-line antidepressant drugs and a third remain treatment-resistant. When first-line antidepressant treatment is unsuccessful, second-line strategies include dose optimisation, switching to another antidepressant, combination with another antidepressant, or augmentation with a non-antidepressant medication. Much of the evidence for the efficacy of augmentation strategies comes from studies using lithium to augment the effects of tricyclic antidepressants. The neural circuitry underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium augmentation is not yet fully understood. Recently, we reported that chronic treatment with a combination of lithium and the antidepressant desipramine, exerted antidepressant-like behavioural effects in a mouse strain (BALB/cOLaHsd) that did not exhibit an antidepressant-like behavioural response to either drug alone. In the present study, we used this model in combination with ΔFosB/FosB immunohistochemistry to identify brain regions chronically affected by lithium augmentation of desipramine when compared to either treatment alone. The data suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and the CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus are key nodes in the neural circuitry underlying antidepressant action of lithium augmentation of desipramine. These data give new insight into the neurobiology underlying the mechanism of lithium augmentation in the context of treatment-resistant depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep deprivation reduces the citalopram-induced inhibition of serotoninergic neuronal firing in the nucleus raphe dorsalis of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, E; Maudhuit, C; Le Poul, E; Hamon, M; Adrien, J

    1996-12-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) for one night induces mood improvement in depressed patients. However, relapse often occurs on the day after deprivation subsequently to a sleep episode. In light of the possible involvement of central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurotransmission in both depression and sleep mechanisms, we presently investigated, in the rat, the effects of SD and recovery sleep on the electrophysiological response of 5-HT neurons in the nucleus raphe dorsalis (NRD) to an acute challenge with the 5-HT reuptake blocker citalopram. In all rats, citalopram induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the firing of NRD neurons recorded under chloral hydrate anaesthesia. After SD, achieved by placing rats in a slowly rotating cylinder for 24 h, the inhibitory action of citalopram was significantly reduced (with a concomitant 53% increase in its ED50 value). After a recovery period of 4 h, a normal susceptibility of the firing to citalopram was restored. The decreased sensitivity of 5-HT neuronal firing to the inhibitory effect of citalopram after SD probably results in an enhancement of 5-HT neurotransmission. Such an adaptive phenomenon (similar to that reported after chronic antidepressant treatment), and its normalization after recovery sleep, parallel the mood improvement effect of SD and the subsequent relapse observed in depressed patients. These data suggest that the associated changes in 5-HT autocontrol of the firing of NRD serotoninergic neurons are relevant to the antidepressant action of SD.

  11. The effect of continuous ELF-MFs on the level of 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Shiri, Leila; Alaei, Hojjatollah; Naghdi, Naser

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of continuous extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) with a frequency of 10 Hz and an intensity of 690-720 μT on the level of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in adult male Wistar rats. A total of 24 adult Wistar male rats were used, and after exposure with an ELF-MF for 15 successive days, all rats in each test were anesthetized with chloral hydrate. Then, they were placed in a stereotaxic frame for surgery and a microdialysis process. Dialysate samples were analyzed to measure the amount of 5-HIAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Results showed that ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 1 h daily, was not effective in altering the level of 5-HIAA. However, ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 3 h daily, decreased the level of the 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus. It can be concluded that ELF-MFs affect the serotonergic system and may be used to treat nervous system diseases. This study is an initial step towards helping cure depression using ELF-MFs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. Analysis of serotonin, dopamine and their metabolites in the caudate putamen, the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the median raphe nucleus of euthermic and torpid deermice, Peromyscus maniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L H; Pivorun, E B

    1989-06-01

    Deermice, subjected to food rationing and low ambient temperature, were sacrificed in normothermia or during daily torpor. Levels of monoamines and their metabolites in the caudate putamen (CPN), the suprachiasmatic nuclear area (SCN), and the median raphe nucleus (MRN) were quantified through the use of HPLC with electrochemical detection. Significant elevations in levels (pg/mg protein) of the serotonin (5-HT) metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were noted in torpid individuals in all nuclei examined. The dopamine (DA) metabolite, homovanillic acid (HVA) was significantly elevated in the CPN and MRN of torpid individuals. Moreover, a significant increase in the HVA to DA ratio was also noted in the CPN and the MRN. In the SCN, the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), 5-HT, DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were also increased significantly during torpor. These significant elevations suggest that an increase in the activity of the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems occurs in these nuclei during daily torpor in the deermouse.

  13. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores.

  14. GABAA receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice: escalation of aggression after alcohol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Kwa, Carolyn; DeBold, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the origin for serotonin (5-HT) in forebrain areas, has been implicated in the neural control of escalated aggression. Gamma aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) and type-B (GABAB) receptors are expressed in the DRN and modulate 5-HT neuronal activity, and both play a role in the behavioral effect of alcohol. Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between drugs acting on GABA receptors in the DRN and alcohol in their effects on aggressive behaviors. Method Male CFW mice, housed with a female, were trained to self-administer ethanol (1.0 g/kg) or water via an operant conditioning panel in their home cage. Immediately after they drank either ethanol or water, the animals were microinfused with a GABAergic drug into the DRN, and their aggressive behaviors were assessed 10 min later. Muscimol (0.006 nmol), a GABAA receptor agonist, escalated alcohol-heightened aggression but had no effect in the absence of ethanol. This effect of muscimol was prominent in the animals that showed alcohol-heightened aggression, but not the animals that reduced or did not change aggressive behavior after ethanol infusion compared to water. On the other hand, the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.06 nmol) increased aggressive behavior similarly in both water and ethanol conditions. Antagonists of the GABAA and GABAB receptors, bicuculline (0.006 nmol) and phaclofen (0.3 nmol) respectively, did not suppress heightened-aggressive behavior induced by ethanol self-administration. Conclusion GABAA receptors in the DRN are one of the neurobiological targets of alcohol-heightened aggression. Activation of the GABAB receptors in the DRN also produced escalated aggression, but that is independent of the effect of alcohol. PMID:20589493

  15. GABA(A) receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice: escalation of aggression after alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Kwa, Carolyn; Debold, Joseph F; Miczek, Klaus A

    2010-09-01

    The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the origin for serotonin (5-HT) in forebrain areas, has been implicated in the neural control of escalated aggression. Gamma aminobutyric acid type-A (GABA(A)) and type-B (GABA(B)) receptors are expressed in the DRN and modulate 5-HT neuronal activity, and both play a role in the behavioral effect of alcohol. The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between drugs acting on GABA receptors in the DRN and alcohol in their effects on aggressive behaviors. Male CFW mice, housed with a female, were trained to self-administer ethanol (1.0 g/kg) or water via an operant conditioning panel in their home cage. Immediately after they drank either ethanol or water, the animals were microinfused with a GABAergic drug into the DRN, and their aggressive behaviors were assessed 10 min later. Muscimol (0.006 nmol), a GABA(A) receptor agonist, escalated alcohol-heightened aggression but had no effect in the absence of ethanol. This effect of muscimol was prominent in the animals that showed alcohol-heightened aggression, but not the animals that reduced or did not change aggressive behavior after ethanol infusion compared to water. On the other hand, the GABA(B) agonist baclofen (0.06 nmol) increased aggressive behavior similarly in both water and ethanol conditions. Antagonists of the GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors, bicuculline (0.006 nmol) and phaclofen (0.3 nmol) respectively, did not suppress heightened-aggressive behavior induced by ethanol self-administration. GABA(A) receptors in the DRN are one of the neurobiological targets of alcohol-heightened aggression. Activation of the GABA(B) receptors in the DRN also produced escalated aggression, but that is independent of the effect of alcohol.

  16. Effects of sleep deprivation on serotonergic neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the freely moving cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J P; Fornal, C A; Jacobs, B L

    1997-08-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) for one or more nights produces a rapid antidepressant response in humans. Since most pharmacological treatments for depression increase brain serotonin neurotransmission, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether TSD increases the activity of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in cats. Cats were prevented from sleeping by the experimenter, who monitored the behavioral state of each animal on a polygraph. Firing rates during quiet waking (QW) and active waking (AW) were obtained throughout a 24-h sleep deprivation period and subsequent 6-h recovery period. During the experiments, unit activity was also recorded during exposure to loud white noise, which elicited strong behavioral arousal. The inhibitory response of serotonergic DRN neurons to systemic administration of the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) was determined before and after TSD to assess possible changes in 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity. TSD increased mean firing rates by as much as 18% during both AW and white noise exposure. Maximal effects were observed after 15 h of TSD for AW, and after 18 h for white noise. QW firing rates also tended to be elevated throughout TSD. Firing rates for all conditions during the recovery period were not significantly different from baseline. The neuronal inhibition produced by 8-OH-DPAT was significantly diminished after TSD. Overall, these results indicate that TSD increases the firing rate of serotonergic DRN neurons during AW and arousal. This effect may be attributable to a decrease in the sensitivity of 5-HT1A autoreceptors. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that TSD exerts its antidepressant action, at least in part, through an activation of brain serotonergic neurons.

  17. Exposure to an open-field arena increases c-Fos expression in a subpopulation of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus, including neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hale, M.W.; Hay-Schmidt, A.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonergic systems in the dorsal raphe nucleus are thought to play an important role in the regulation of anxiety states. To investigate responses of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus to a mild anxiety-related stimulus, we exposed rats to an open-field, under low-light or high-light conditions...... of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex that projects to forebrain circuits regulating anxiety states, we used cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) as a retrograde tracer to identify neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) in combination with c-Fos immunostaining to identify cells...... that activated neurons were serotonergic, non-serotonergic, or both. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to anxiogenic stimuli activates a subset of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex projecting to amygdala anxiety circuits Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/10...

  18. Serotonergic projections from the raphe nuclei to the subthalamic nucleus; a retrograde- and anterograde neuronal tracing study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reznitsky, Martin; Plenge, Per; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A not were present. Retrograde tracer FluoroGold or Choleratoxin subunit B were iontophoretically delivered in the STN and combined with immunohistochemistry for 5-HT in order to map the topographic organization in the dorsal raphe system. The study showed that approximately 320...

  19. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus is implicated in the anxiolytic-like effects of Cinnamomum cassia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yang-Hee; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hong, Sa-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ok; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2012-12-01

    Previously we reported that the 50% EtOH extract of Cinnamomum cassia (C. cassia) possesses anxiolytic-like activity in the mouse elevated plus maze (EPM) test. This activity was blocked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY 100635. Therefore, in order to investigate the effect of C. cassia on 5-HT(1A) receptor binding, quantitative autoradiography of 5-HT(1A) receptors was carried out in brains of mice treated acutely and repeatedly with C. cassia. Binding of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to the 5-HT(1A) receptor was investigated in the mouse brain. After a single treatment of C. cassia (750 mg/kg, p.o.), [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding showed a significant increase in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). After repeated treatment with C. cassia (100mg/kg, once a day for 5 days, p.o.), [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding showed no significant change in any brain region. Taken together, the anxiolytic-like effect of the 50% EtOH extract of C. cassia might be mediated by region specific change of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Dania V.; Burke, Teresa F.; Hensler, Julie G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTPγS binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10μM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G-proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram. PMID:18289523

  1. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  2. Effect of acupuncture on Lipopolysaccharide-induced anxiety-like behavioral changes: involvement of serotonin system in dorsal Raphe nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tae Young; Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Gyu Won; Lee, Eun Byeol; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Jong Han; Koo, Jin Suk; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Hee Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been used as a common therapeutic tool in many disorders including anxiety and depression. Serotonin transporter (SERT) plays an important role in the pathology of anxiety and other mood disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety-like behaviors and SERT in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Methods Rats were given acupuncture at ST41 (Jiexi), LI11 (Quchi) or SI3 (Houxi) acupoint in LPS-treated ...

  3. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, A D; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-05-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but had no effect on yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake during ongoing self-administration. Results indicate an important role of MRN CRF receptors in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but not yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-05

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of acupuncture on Lipopolysaccharide-induced anxiety-like behavioral changes: involvement of serotonin system in dorsal Raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae Young; Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Gyu Won; Lee, Eun Byeol; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Jong Han; Koo, Jin Suk; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Hee Young

    2017-12-11

    Acupuncture has been used as a common therapeutic tool in many disorders including anxiety and depression. Serotonin transporter (SERT) plays an important role in the pathology of anxiety and other mood disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety-like behaviors and SERT in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Rats were given acupuncture at ST41 (Jiexi), LI11 (Quchi) or SI3 (Houxi) acupoint in LPS-treated rats. Anxiety-like behaviors of elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT) were measured and expressions of SERT and/or c-Fos were also examined in the DRN using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that 1) acupuncture at ST41 acupoint, but neither LI11 nor SI3, significantly attenuated LPS-induced anxiety-like behaviors in EPM and OFT, 2) acupuncture at ST41 decreased SERT expression increased by LPS in the DRN. Our results suggest that acupuncture can ameliorate anxiety-like behaviors, possibly through regulation of SERT in the DRN.

  6. The vigilance promoting drug modafinil modulates serotonin transmission in the rat prefrontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus. Possible relevance for its postulated antidepressant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Luca; Antonelli, Tiziana; Beggiato, Sarah; Cristina Tomasini, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell; Tanganelli, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide derivative (Modiodal, Provigil), is a vigilance-promoting agent which reduces sleep episodes by improving wakefulness. It is approved by the USA FDA for narcolepsy, shiftwork sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea with residual excessive sleepiness despite optimal use of continuous positive airway pressure. Unlike classical psychostimulants such as amphetamine and amphetamine-like compounds, the awaking effect of modafinil is not associated with a disturbance of nighttime sleep, tolerance, and sensitization. Its precise mechanism of action is still unclear. In animal studies, modafinil and its analogues have been shown to modify dopaminergic, noradrenergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, orexinergic, and histaminergic pathways. Besides the approved use in sleep disorders, modafinil has been investigated for the treatment of fatigue, impaired cognition and some symptoms in a number of other disorders. In particular, clinical studies seem to indicate that the drug could be particularly successful in the treatment of depression and its use in major depressive and bipolar disorders, has been suggested. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this possible effect are still unknown. The present review firstly summarizes the structure-activity relationship studies and the mechanism of action of modafinil and its related compounds. Then, it focuses on data demonstrating that modafinil interacts with serotonin neuronal activity in rat frontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus, two brain areas linked together and involved in depression. Preclinical and clinical evidence of a positive interaction between modafinil and classical antidepressant drugs, is also summarized.

  7. Chronic social defeat up-regulates expression of the serotonin transporter in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and projection regions in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Fan, Yan; Li, Ying; Zhu, Hobart; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Chronic stress and dysfunction of the serotonergic system in the brain have been considered two of the major risks for development of depression. In this study, adult Fischer 344 rats were subjected to a regimen of chronic social defeat (CSD). To mimic stressful conditions, some rats were not exposed to CSD, but instead treated with corticosterone (CORT) in oral solution while maintained in their home cage. Protein levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), hippocampus, frontal cortex, and amygdala were examined by Western blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The results showed that CSD up-regulated SERT protein levels in the DRN, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and amygdala regions. This up-regulation was abolished or prevented by adrenalectomy, or treatment with antagonists of corticosteroid receptors mifepristone and spironolactone, alone or in combination. Similarly, up-regulated SERT protein levels in these brain regions were also observed in rats treated with oral CORT ingestion, which was analogously prevented by treatment with mifepristone and spironolactone. Furthermore, both CSD- and CORT-induced up-regulation of SERT protein levels in the DRN and three brain regions were attenuated by simultaneous treatment with fluoxetine, an antidepressant that specifically inhibits serotonin reuptake. The results indicate that up-regulation in SERT protein levels in the DRN and forebrain limbic structures caused by CSD regimen was mainly motivated by CORT through corticosteroid receptors. The present findings demonstrate that chronic stress is closely correlated with the serotonergic system by acting on the regulation of the SERT expression in the DRN and its projection regions, which may contribute to the development of depression. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Excitatory amino acid receptor blockade within the caudal pressor area and rostral ventrolateral medulla alters cardiovascular responses to nucleus raphe obscurus stimulation in rats

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    Silva N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressor responses elicited by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO depend on the integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. Therefore, to test the participation of excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors in the cardiovascular responses evoked by NRO stimulation (1 ms, 100 Hz, 40-70 µA, for 10 s, the EAA antagonist kynurenic acid (Kyn was microinjected at different sites in the ventrolateral medullar surface (2.7 nmol/200 nl of male Wistar rats (270-320 g, N = 39 and NRO stimulation was repeated. The effects of NRO stimulation were: hypertension (deltaMAP = +43 ± 1 mmHg, P<0.01, bradycardia (deltaHR = -30 ± 7 bpm, P<0.01 and apnea. Bilateral microinjection of Kyn into the RVLM, which did not change baseline parameters, almost abolished the bradycardia induced by NRO stimulation (deltaHR = -61 ± 3 before vs -2 ± 3 bpm after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. Unilateral microinjection of Kyn into the CVLM did not change baseline parameters or reduce the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 5 before vs +48 ± 5 mmHg after Kyn, N = 6. Kyn bilaterally microinjected into the caudal pressor area reduced blood pressure and heart rate and almost abolished the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 4 mmHg before vs +4 ± 2 mmHg after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. These results indicate that EAA receptors on the medullary ventrolateral surface play a role in the modulation of the cardiovascular responses induced by NRO stimulation, and also suggest that the RVLM participates in the modulation of heart rate responses and that the caudal pressor area modulates the pressor response following NRO stimulation.

  9. Herniated Nucleus Pulposus in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung Indonesia

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    Annisa Ikhsanawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP is one of the most common diseases of the spine. For an optimal management and prevention, there’s a need for data on factors related to the onset of complaints because this disease lowers the quality of life and increases morbidity. This study is aimed to see the scale and pattern of the HNP in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung. Methods: This is a descriptive study with the design of case series, data was obtained from medical records of patients with the diagnosis of HNP in the inpatient care of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in the period of 2007–2011. Results: According to the study on 79 patients, with 43 men and 36 women, the highest incidence was at the age group of 51–60 years old (31.6% and most common occupation was civil servant (11.4%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9%. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level of L5–S1 (58.2%. Trauma was found to be the highest relatable history in the patients (39.2%. Therapy of choice was primarily conservative (58.2% and most patients went home after the progression (84.8%. The year 2007 showed the highest prevalence of HNP at 25.3%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9% Conclusions: The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica and low back pain. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level L5–S1.

  10. Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Katsidoni, Vicky; Anagnostou, Ilektra; Panagis, George

    2013-03-01

    Cannabidiol is a non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa, which induces central effects in rodents. It has been shown that cannabidiol attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. However, to the best of our knowledge, its effects on brain stimulation reward and the reward-facilitating effects of drugs of abuse have not yet been examined. Therefore, we investigated the effects of cannabidiol on brain reward function and on the reward-facilitating effect of morphine and cocaine using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. Rats were prepared with a stimulating electrode into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and a guide cannula into the dorsal raphe (microinjection experiments), and were trained to respond for electrical brain stimulation. A low dose of cannabidiol did not affect the reinforcing efficacy of brain stimulation, whereas higher doses significantly elevated the threshold frequency required for MFB ICSS. Both cocaine and morphine lowered ICSS thresholds. Cannabidiol inhibited the reward-facilitating effect of morphine, but not cocaine. This effect was reversed by pre-treatment with an intra-dorsal raphe injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. The present findings indicate that cannabidiol does not exhibit reinforcing properties in the ICSS paradigm at any of the doses tested, while it decreases the reward-facilitating effects of morphine. These effects were mediated by activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe. Our results suggest that cannabidiol interferes with brain reward mechanisms responsible for the expression of the acute reinforcing properties of opioids, thus indicating that cannabidiol may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of opioids. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

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    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Extrasynaptic glycine receptors of rodent dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons: a sensitive target for ethanol.

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    Maguire, Edward P; Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Greig, Scott J; Corteen, Nicole; Balfour, David J K; Swinny, Jerome D; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant medical and social problem. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in ethanol's actions, with certain receptors and ion channels emerging as putative targets. The dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus is associated with the behavioral actions of alcohol, but ethanol actions on these neurons are not well understood. Here, using immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology we characterize DR inhibitory transmission and its sensitivity to ethanol. DR neurons exhibit inhibitory 'phasic' post-synaptic currents mediated primarily by synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) and, to a lesser extent, by synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR). In addition to such phasic transmission mediated by the vesicular release of neurotransmitter, the activity of certain neurons may be governed by a 'tonic' conductance resulting from ambient GABA activating extrasynaptic GABAARs. However, for DR neurons extrasynaptic GABAARs exert only a limited influence. By contrast, we report that unusually the GlyR antagonist strychnine reveals a large tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GlyRs, which dominates DR inhibition. In agreement, for DR neurons strychnine increases their input resistance, induces membrane depolarization, and consequently augments their excitability. Importantly, this glycinergic conductance is greatly enhanced in a strychnine-sensitive fashion, by behaviorally relevant ethanol concentrations, by drugs used for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and by taurine, an ingredient of certain 'energy drinks' often imbibed with ethanol. These findings identify extrasynaptic GlyRs as critical regulators of DR excitability and a novel molecular target for ethanol.

  13. Injections of the of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin into the median raphe nucleus increase food intake and Fos expression in orexin neurons of free-feeding rats.

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    Silva, Eduardo Simão da; Flores, Rafael Appel; Ribas, Anderson Savaris; Taschetto, Ana Paula; Faria, Moacir Serralvo; Lima, Leandro Bueno; Metzger, Martin; Donato, José; Paschoalini, Marta Aparecida

    2017-05-01

    Previously, we showed that the blockade of α1-adrenoreceptors in the median raphe nucleus (MnR) increased food intake in free-feeding rats, indicating that adrenergic mechanisms in the MnR participate in the regulation of food intake. However, the impact of such a pharmacological manipulation on other neural circuits related to food intake remains unknown. In the current study, we sought to identify forebrain regions which are responsive to α1-adrenergic receptor blockade and presumably involved in the modulation of the feeding response. For this purpose, we examined the induction of c-Fos immunoreactivity in forebrain structures following injections of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin into the MnR of free-feeding rats. To determine the chemical identity of hypothalamic c-Fos-positive cells, we then conducted double-label immunohistochemistry for Fos/orexin (OX) or Fos/melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). Finally, we combined anterograde tracing from the MnR with immunohistochemical detection of orexin. Prazosin injections into the MnR significantly increased food intake. The ingestive response was accompanied by an increase in Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). In the LHA, Fos expression occurred in neurons expressing OX, but not MCH. Combined anterograde tracing experiments revealed that LHA OX neurons are prominently targeted by MnR axons. These findings suggest that intra-MnR injection of prazosin, via activation of orexinergic neurons in the LHA and non-orexinergic neurons in the BLA, evoked a motivational response toward food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Hydro Alcoholic Extraction of Valeriana on Astrocyte Raphe Magnus in Adult Rats

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    sajad Hatami joni

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Oral administration of hydro alcoholic extract of valerian increases astrocytes number and decreases their size in nucleus of raphe Magna, which indicated the effect of this extraction on proliferation of astrocytes increasing.

  15. Deep brain stimulation of the dorsal raphe inhibits avoidance and escape reactions and activates forebrain regions related to the modulation of anxiety/panic.

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    Wscieklica, Tatiana; Silva, Mariana S C F; Lemes, Jéssica A; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Céspedes, Isabel C; Viana, Milena B

    2017-03-15

    One of the main neurochemical systems associated with anxiety/panic is the serotonergic system originating from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Previous evidence suggests that the DR is composed of distinct subpopulations of neurons, both morphologically and functionally distinct. It seems that mainly the dorsal region of the DR (DRD) regulates anxiety-related reactions, while lateral wings DR (lwDR) serotonin (5-HT) neurons inhibit panic-related responses. In this study we used the technique of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to investigate the role played by the DRD and lwDR in defense. Male Wistar rats were submitted to high-frequency stimulation (100μA, 100Hz) in one of the two DR regions for 1h and immediately after tested in the avoidance or escape tasks of the elevated T-maze (ETM). In clinical terms, these responses have been related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. After being submitted to the ETM, animals were placed in an open field for locomotor activity assessment. An additional group of rats was submitted to DBS of the DRD or the lwDR and used for quantification of c-Fos immunoreactive (Fos-ir) neurons in brain regions related to the modulation of defense. Results showed that stimulation of the DRD decreased avoidance latencies, an anxiolytic-like effect. DRD stimulation also led to increases in Fos-ir in the medial amygdala, lateral septum and cingulate cortex. DBS applied to the lwDR increased escape latencies, a panicolytic-like effect. This data highlights the importance of raphe topography and the potential benefit of the DBS technique for the treatment of anxiety-related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Central and peripheral chemoreceptors evoke distinct responses in simultaneously recorded neurons of the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network

    OpenAIRE

    Nuding, Sarah C.; Segers, Lauren S.; Shannon, Roger; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F.; Lindsey, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    The brainstem network for generating and modulating the respiratory motor pattern includes neurons of the medullary ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC), dorsolateral pons (PRG) and raphé nuclei. Midline raphé neurons are proposed to be elements of a distributed brainstem system of central chemoreceptors, as well as modulators of central chemoreceptors at other sites, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Stimulation of the raphé system or peripheral chemoreceptors can induce a long-term fa...

  17. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed.

  18. Estradiol Valerate and Remifemin ameliorate ovariectomy-induced decrease in a serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway in rats.

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    Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Guangxia; Jin, Biao; Wang, Ke; Chen, Xing; Sun, Yu; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2016-11-01

    Perimenopausal syndromes begin as ovarian function ceases and the most common symptoms are hot flushes. Data indicate that the projections of serotonin to hypothalamus may be involved in the mechanism of hot flushes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of the serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway for hot flushes in an animal model of menopause. We determined the changes in serotonin expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and preoptic anterior hypothalamus (POAH) in ovariectomized rats. We also explored the therapeutical effects of estradiol valerate and Remifemin in this model. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated (SHAM) group, ovariectomy (OVX) group with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate treatment (OVX+E) group and ovariectomy with Remifemin (OVX+ICR) group. Serotonin expression was evaluated in the DR and POAH using immunofluorescence and quantified in the DR using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Apoptosis was analyzed in the DR by TUNEL assay. The number of serotonin immunoreactive neurons and the level of serotonin expression in the DR decreased significantly following OVX compared to the SHAM group. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the DR in any group. In addition, following OVX, the number of serotonin-positive fibers decreased significantly in the ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), especially in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). Treatment with either estradiol or Remifemin for 4 weeks countered the OVX-induced decreases in serotonin levels in both the DR and the hypothalamus, with levels in the treated rats similar to those in the SHAM group. A fluorescently labeled retrograde tracer was injected into the VLPO at the 4-week time point. A significantly lower percentage of serotonin with CTB double-labeled neurons in CTB-labeled neurons was demonstrated after ovariectomy, and both estradiol and Remifemin countered this OVX

  19. Motherhood and infant contact regulate neuroplasticity in the serotonergic midbrain dorsal raphe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschbach, M Allie; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2017-02-01

    The adult brain shows remarkable neuroplasticity in response to hormones and the socioemotional modifications that they influence. In females with reproductive and maternal experience, this neuroplasticity includes the birth and death of cells in several forebrain regions involved in maternal caregiving and postpartum affective state. Such plasticity in midbrain sites critical for these behavioral and emotional processes has never been examined, though. By visualizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotic cells, NeuroD for neuronal precursors, and TUNEL to identify dying cells, we found that the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DR, the source of most ascending serotoninergic projections) exhibited significant neuroplasticity in response to motherhood. Specifically, BrdU analyses revealed that DR newborn cell survival (but not proliferation) was regulated by reproductive state, such that cells born early postpartum were less likely to survive 12 days to reach the late postpartum period compared to cells born during late pregnancy that survived 12 days to reach the early postpartum period. Many of the surviving cells in the DR were NeuN immunoreactive, suggesting a neuronal phenotype. Consistent with these findings, late postpartum rats had fewer NeuroD-immunoreactive DR cells than early postpartum rats. Maternal experience contributed to the late postpartum reduction in DR newborn cell survival because removing the litter at parturition increased cell survival as well as reduced cell death. Unlike cytogenesis in the maternal hippocampus, which is reduced by circulating glucocorticoids, DR newborn cell survival was unaffected by postpartum adrenalectomy. These effects of reproductive state and motherhood on DR plasticity were associated with concurrent changes in DR levels of serotonin's precursor, 5-HTP, and its metabolite, 5-HIAA. Our results demonstrate for the first time that cytogenesis occurs in the midbrain DR of any adult mammal, that DR plasticity is

  20. Adaptive Control of Dorsal Raphe by 5-HT4 in the Prefrontal Cortex Prevents Persistent Hypophagia following Stress

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    Alexandra Jean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient reduced food intake (hypophagia following high stress could have beneficial effects on longevity, but paradoxically, hypophagia can persist and become anorexia-like behavior. The neural underpinnings of stress-induced hypophagia and the mechanisms by which the brain prevents the transition from transient to persistent hypophagia remain undetermined. In this study, we report the involvement of a network governing goal-directed behavior (decision. This network consists of the ascending serotonergic inputs from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Specifically, adult restoration of serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4R expression in the mPFC rescues hypophagia and specific molecular changes related to depression resistance in the DR (5-HT release elevation, 5-HT1A receptor, and 5-HT transporter reductions of stressed 5-HT4R knockout mice. The adult mPFC-5-HT4R knockdown mimics the null phenotypes. When mPFC-5-HT4Rs are overexpressed and DR-5-HT1ARs are blocked in the DR, hypophagia following stress persists, suggesting an antidepressant action of early anorexia.

  1. Median raphe cyst: report of two cases.

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    Kumar, Piyush; Das, Anupam; Savant, Sushil S; Barkat, Rizwana

    2017-02-15

    Median raphe cysts are rare congenital lesions ofthe male genitalia that occur as a result of alteredembryologic development. We report two such casesof median raphe cysts in the pediatric age group. Inaddition, we review the literature.

  2. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Talboom, Joshua S; Hewitt, Lauren T; Lavery, Courtney N; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  3. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V.; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Talboom, Joshua S.; Hewitt, Lauren T.; Lavery, Courtney N.; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  4. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  5. Involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei in the feeding behavior of rats

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    Takase L.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei (raphe pallidus, RPa; raphe magnus, RMg, and raphe obscurus, ROb in feeding behavior of adult rats was studied by measuring c-Fos protein expression, in animals submitted to the "meal-feeding" model of food restriction in which the rats were fed ad libitum only from 7:00 to 9:00 h, for 15 days. The experimental groups submitted to chronic fasting, named 'search for food' (SF, 'ingestion of food' (IF and 'satiety of food' (SaF were scheduled after a previous study in which the body weight and the general and feeding behaviors were evaluated by daily monitoring. Acute, 48-h fasting (AF was used as control. In the chronic group, the animals presented a 16% reduction in body weight in the first week, followed by a continuous, slow rise in weight over the subsequent days. Entrainment of the sleep-wake cycle to the schedule of food presentation was also observed. The RPa was the most Fos immunopositive nucleus in the chronic fasting group, followed by the RMg. The ANOVA and Tukey test (P<0.05 confirmed these results. The IF group was significantly different from the other three groups, as also was the number of labeled cells in the RPa in SF and IF groups. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed between RMg and RPa, or RMg and ROb in the SaF and AF. However, it is interesting to observe that the groups in which the animals were more active, searching for or ingesting food, presented a larger number of labeled cells. These results suggest a different involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei in the somatic and autonomic events of feeding behavior, corroborating the functions reported for them earlier.

  6. Dorsal Raphe Serotonin Neurons Mediate CO2-Induced Arousal from Sleep.

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    Smith, Haleigh R; Leibold, Nicole K; Rappoport, Daniel A; Ginapp, Callie M; Purnell, Benton S; Bode, Nicole M; Alberico, Stephanie L; Kim, Young-Cho; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2018-02-21

    Arousal from sleep in response to CO 2 is a critical protective phenomenon. Dysregulation of CO 2 -induced arousal contributes to morbidity and mortality from prevalent diseases, such as obstructive sleep apnea and sudden infant death syndrome. Despite the critical nature of this protective reflex, the precise mechanism for CO 2 -induced arousal is unknown. Because CO 2 is a major regulator of breathing, prevailing theories suggest that activation of respiratory chemo- and mechano-sensors is required for CO 2 -induced arousal. However, populations of neurons that are not involved in the regulation of breathing are also chemosensitive. Among these are serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) that comprise a component of the ascending arousal system. We hypothesized that direct stimulation of these neurons with CO 2 could cause arousal from sleep independently of enhancing breathing. Dialysis of CO 2 -rich acidified solution into DRN, but not medullary raphe responsible for modulating breathing, caused arousal from sleep. Arousal was lost in mice with a genetic absence of 5-HT neurons, and with acute pharmacological or optogenetic inactivation of DRN 5-HT neurons. Here we demonstrate that CO 2 can cause arousal from sleep directly, without requiring enhancement of breathing, and that chemosensitive 5-HT neurons in the DRN critically mediate this arousal. Better understanding mechanisms underlying this protective reflex may lead to interventions to reduce disease-associated morbidity and mortality. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although CO 2 -induced arousal is critical to a number of diseases, the specific mechanism is not well understood. We previously demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) neurons are important for CO 2 -induced arousal, as mice without 5-HT neurons do not arouse to CO 2 Many have interpreted this to mean that medullary 5-HT neurons that regulate breathing are important in this arousal mechanism. Here we found that direct application of CO 2

  7. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hsin Chiu

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+ were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB, and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  8. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for delayed rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Doya, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    The forebrain serotonergic system is a crucial component in the control of impulsive behaviors. We previously reported that the activity of serotonin neurons in the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus increased when rats performed a task that required them to wait for delayed rewards. However, the causal relationship between serotonin neural activity and the tolerance for the delayed reward remained unclear. Here, we test whether the inhibition of serotonin neural activity by the local application of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin in the dorsal raphe nucleus impairs rats' tolerance for delayed rewards. Rats performed a sequential food-water navigation task that required them to visit food and water sites alternately via a tone site to get rewards at both sites after delays. During the short (2 s) delayed reward condition, the inhibition of serotonin neural activity did not significantly influence the numbers of reward choice errors (nosepoke at an incorrect reward site following a conditioned reinforcer tone), reward wait errors (failure to wait for the delayed rewards), or total trials (sum of reward choice errors, reward wait errors, and acquired rewards). By contrast, during the long (7-11 s) delayed reward condition, the number of wait errors significantly increased while the numbers of total trials and choice errors did not significantly change. These results indicate that the activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for long delayed rewards and suggest that elevated serotonin activity facilitates waiting behavior when there is the prospect of forthcoming rewards.

  9. Normal levels of tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the dorsal raphe of depressed suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkale, Willy L; Murdock, Shayna; Janosky, Janine E; Austin, Mark C

    2004-02-01

    A variety of evidence suggests that serotonin neurotransmission is altered in the brain of suicide victims and depressed patients. While numerous post-mortem studies have investigated serotonin transporters and receptors, few studies have examined the biosynthetic integrity of the rate-limiting enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), in post-mortem specimens of depressed suicide subjects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the levels of TPH immunoreactivity (IR) are altered in specific subnuclei of the dorsal raphe (DR) in depressed suicide victims. Suicide victims with a confirmed diagnosis of major depression were matched with non-psychiatric controls based on age, gender and post-mortem interval. Frozen tissue sections containing the DR were selected from two anatomical levels and processed for TPH radioimmunocytochemistry. The optical density corresponding to the regional levels of TPH-IR was quantified in specific subnuclei of the DR from the film autoradiographic images. No significant differences in the levels of TPH-IR were found in any DR subnuclei between depressed suicide victims and control subjects. The lack of change in TPH-IR levels does not necessarily imply that serotonin synthesis or neurotransmission is not altered in the brain of depressed subjects. Many factors influence and regulate serotonin synthesis, and it is conceivable that alterations exist at other levels of regulation of serotonin biosynthesis in depression. Our findings indicate that TPH biosynthesis, at least at the protein level, is not significantly altered in the DR of depressed suicide victims.

  10. Activity of Raphé Serotonergic Neurons Controls Emotional Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Teissier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-established role of serotonin signaling in mood regulation, causal relationships between serotonergic neuronal activity and behavior remain poorly understood. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find that selectively increasing serotonergic neuronal activity in wild-type mice is anxiogenic and reduces floating in the forced-swim test, whereas inhibition has no effect on the same measures. In a developmental mouse model of altered emotional behavior, increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors correlate with reduced dorsal raphé and increased median raphé serotonergic activity. These mice display blunted responses to serotonergic stimulation and behavioral rescues through serotonergic inhibition. Furthermore, we identify opposing consequences of dorsal versus median raphé serotonergic neuron inhibition on floating behavior, together suggesting that median raphé hyperactivity increases anxiety, whereas a low dorsal/median raphé serotonergic activity ratio increases depression-like behavior. Thus, we find a critical role of serotonergic neuronal activity in emotional regulation and uncover opposing roles of median and dorsal raphé function.

  11. Central and peripheral chemoreceptors evoke distinct responses in simultaneously recorded neurons of the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Shannon, Roger; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2009-09-12

    The brainstem network for generating and modulating the respiratory motor pattern includes neurons of the medullary ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC), dorsolateral pons (PRG) and raphé nuclei. Midline raphé neurons are proposed to be elements of a distributed brainstem system of central chemoreceptors, as well as modulators of central chemoreceptors at other sites, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Stimulation of the raphé system or peripheral chemoreceptors can induce a long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve activity; central chemoreceptor stimulation does not. The network mechanisms through which each class of chemoreceptor differentially influences breathing are poorly understood. Microelectrode arrays were used to monitor sets of spike trains from 114 PRG, 198 VRC and 166 midline neurons in six decerebrate vagotomized cats; 356 were recorded during sequential stimulation of both receptor classes via brief CO(2)-saturated saline injections in vertebral (central) and carotid arteries (peripheral). Seventy neurons responded to both stimuli. More neurons were responsive only to peripheral challenges than those responsive only to central chemoreceptor stimulation (PRG, 20 : 4; VRC, 41 : 10; midline, 25 : 13). Of 16 474 pairs of neurons evaluated for short-time scale correlations, similar percentages of reference neurons in each brain region had correlation features indicative of a specific interaction with at least one target neuron: PRG (59.6%), VRC (51.0%) and raphé nuclei (45.8%). The results suggest a brainstem network architecture with connectivity that shapes the respiratory motor pattern via overlapping circuits that modulate central and peripheral chemoreceptor-mediated influences on breathing.

  12. Differential role of serotonin projections from the dorsal and median raphe nuclei in phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion and fos-like immunoreactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusljic, Snezana; Van Den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-10-01

    Altered brain serotonin activity is implicated in schizophrenia. We have previously shown differential involvement of serotonergic projections from the dorsal or median raphe nucleus in phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats, a behavioral model of aspects of schizophrenia. Here we further investigated the effects of serotonergic lesions of the raphe nuclei on phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion by parallel assessment of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI), a marker of neuronal activation in the brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with pentobarbitone and stereotaxically microinjected with 5 μg of the serotonergic neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), into either the dorsal raphe (DRN) or median raphe nucleus (MRN). Two weeks after the surgery, rats with lesions of the MRN, but not those with lesions of the DRN, showed significant enhancement of the hyperlocomotion induced by injection of 2.5 mg/kg of phencyclidine. Rats with MRN lesions also showed significantly higher levels of FLI in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus in the dorsal hippocampus (PoDG) when compared with sham-operated controls. Rats with lesions of the DRN showed significantly higher levels of FLI in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These results indicate that FLI in the PoDG, but not the NAcc, correlates with enhanced phencyclidine-induced locomotor hyperactivity in MRN-lesioned rats. These results support our previous studies suggesting a role of serotonergic projections from the MRN to the dorsal hippocampus in some of the symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dissociations between the effects of LSD on behavior and raphe unit activity in freely moving cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulson, M E; Jacobs, B L

    1979-08-03

    The hypothesis that the action of hallucinogenic drugs is mediated by a depression of the activity of brain serotonergic (raphe) neurons was tested by examining the behavioral effects of d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) while studying the activity of raphe neurons in freely moving cats. Although the results provide general support for the hypothesis, there were several important dissociations. (i) Low doses of LSD produced only small decreases in raphe unit activity but significant behavoiral changes; (ii) LSD-induced behavioral changes outlasted the depression of raphe unit activity; and (iii) raphe neurons were at least as responsive to LSD during tolerance as they were in the nontolerant condition.

  14. Cerebello-cortical heterotopia in dentate nucleus, and other microdysgeneses in trisomy D1 (Patau) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, A; Peiffer, J; Pfeiffer, R A; Iizuka, R

    1980-01-01

    Several new histological findings in six cases of the trisomy D1 syndrome are described: hyperplasia of fetal structures (indusium griseum, median raphe of the medulla oblongata) and completely developed cerebellar cortical heterotopia in the dentate nucleus. In one case, a heterotopic pontine nucleus was found within the cerebellar white matter. The coexistence of overdeveloped and remaining fetal structures is emphasized. Several hypotheses regarding cerebellar dysgenesis are discussed.

  15. Activation of raphe nuclei triggers rapid and distinct effects on parallel olfactory bulb output channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vikrant; Provost, Allison C; Agarwal, Prateek; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-02-01

    The serotonergic raphe nuclei are involved in regulating brain states over timescales of minutes and hours. We examined more rapid effects of raphe activation on two classes of principal neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb, mitral and tufted cells, which send olfactory information to distinct targets. Brief stimulation of the raphe nuclei led to excitation of tufted cells at rest and potentiation of their odor responses. While mitral cells at rest were also excited by raphe activation, their odor responses were bidirectionally modulated, leading to improved pattern separation of odors. In vitro whole-cell recordings revealed that specific optogenetic activation of raphe axons affected bulbar neurons through dual release of serotonin and glutamate. Therefore, the raphe nuclei, in addition to their role in neuromodulation of brain states, are also involved in fast, sub-second top-down modulation similar to cortical feedback. This modulation can selectively and differentially sensitize or decorrelate distinct output channels.

  16. Cadherin-13 Deficiency Increases Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neuron Density and Prefrontal Cortex Innervation in the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Forero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During early prenatal stages of brain development, serotonin (5-HT-specific neurons migrate through somal translocation to form the raphe nuclei and subsequently begin to project to their target regions. The rostral cluster of cells, comprising the median and dorsal raphe (DR, innervates anterior regions of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex. Differential analysis of the mouse 5-HT system transcriptome identified enrichment of cell adhesion molecules in 5-HT neurons of the DR. One of these molecules, cadherin-13 (Cdh13 has been shown to play a role in cell migration, axon pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of Cdh13 to the development of the murine brain 5-HT system.Methods: For detection of Cdh13 and components of the 5-HT system at different embryonic developmental stages of the mouse brain, we employed immunofluorescence protocols and imaging techniques, including epifluorescence, confocal and structured illumination microscopy. The consequence of CDH13 loss-of-function mutations on brain 5-HT system development was explored in a mouse model of Cdh13 deficiency.Results: Our data show that in murine embryonic brain Cdh13 is strongly expressed on 5-HT specific neurons of the DR and in radial glial cells (RGCs, which are critically involved in regulation of neuronal migration. We observed that 5-HT neurons are intertwined with these RGCs, suggesting that these neurons undergo RGC-guided migration. Cdh13 is present at points of intersection between these two cell types. Compared to wildtype controls, Cdh13-deficient mice display increased cell densities in the DR at embryonic stages E13.5, E17.5, and adulthood, and higher serotonergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex at E17.5.Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence for a role of CDH13 in the development of the serotonergic system in early embryonic stages. Specifically, we indicate that Cdh13 deficiency affects the cell

  17. Cytomorphometric changes in the dorsal raphe neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation are mediated by noradrenalin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the effect of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS deprivation (REMSD on the cytomorphology of the dorsal raphe (DR neurons and to evaluate the possible role of REMSD-induced increased noradrenalin (NA in mediating such effects. Methods Rats were REMS deprived by the flowerpot method; free moving normal home cage rats, large platform and post REMS-deprived recovered rats were used as controls. Further, to evaluate if the effects were induced by NA, separate sets of experimental rats were treated (i.p. with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (PRZ. Histomorphometric analysis of DR neurons in stained brain sections were performed in experimental and control rats; neurons in inferior colliculus (IC served as anatomical control. Results The mean size of DR neurons was larger in REMSD group compared to controls, whereas, neurons in the recovered group of rats did not significantly differ than those in the control animals. Further, mean cell size in the post-REMSD PRZ-treated animals was comparable to those in the control groups. IC neurons were not affected by REMSD. Conclusions REMS loss has been reported to impair several physiological, behavioral and cellular processes. The mean size of the DR neurons was larger in the REMS deprived group of rats than those in the control groups; however, in the REMS deprived and prazosin treated rats the size was comparable to the normal rats. These results showed that REMSD induced increase in DR neuronal size was mediated by NA acting on α1-adrenoceptor. The findings suggest that the sizes of DR neurons are sensitive to REMSD, which if not compensated could lead to neurodegeneration and associated disorders including memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Serotonergic versus Nonserotonergic Dorsal Raphe Projection Neurons: Differential Participation in Reward Circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. McDevitt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN contains the largest group of serotonin-producing neurons in the brain and projects to regions controlling reward. Although pharmacological studies suggest that serotonin inhibits reward seeking, electrical stimulation of the DRN strongly reinforces instrumental behavior. Here, we provide a targeted assessment of the behavioral, anatomical, and electrophysiological contributions of serotonergic and nonserotonergic DRN neurons to reward processes. To explore DRN heterogeneity, we used a simultaneous two-vector knockout/optogenetic stimulation strategy, as well as cre-induced and cre-silenced vectors in several cre-expressing transgenic mouse lines. We found that the DRN is capable of reinforcing behavior primarily via nonserotonergic neurons, for which the main projection target is the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Furthermore, these nonserotonergic projections provide glutamatergic excitation of VTA dopamine neurons and account for a large majority of the DRN-VTA pathway. These findings help to resolve apparent discrepancies between the roles of serotonin versus the DRN in behavioral reinforcement.

  19. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Cellular adaptations of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons associated with the development of active coping in response to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Reyes, Beverly A S; Lee, Catherine S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Valentino, Rita J

    2013-06-01

    Social stress is a risk factor for affective disorders for certain vulnerable individuals. Stress and depression are linked in part through regulation of the dorsal raphe (DR)-serotonin (5-HT) system by the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). We used a rat social stress model that shows individual differences in coping strategies to determine whether differences in CRF-5-HT interactions underlie individual differences in the vulnerability to social stress. Rats were exposed to the resident-intruder model of social stress for 5 days. In vivo single-unit recordings assessed DR-5-HT neuronal responses to CRF and immunoelectron microscopy assessed CRF1 and CRF2 cellular localization 24 hours after the last stress. Rats responded to social stress passively, assuming defeat with short latencies (48%), or actively, with proactive behaviors and longer defeat latencies (LL, 52%). Whereas CRF (30 ng, intra-DR) inhibited 5-HT neuronal activity of control and SL rats, it activated 5-HT neurons of LL rats, an effect that was CRF2-mediated. Consistent with this, social stress promoted CRF1 internalization together with CRF2 recruitment to the plasma membrane of DR neurons selectively in LL rats. These data suggest that a proactive coping strategy toward social stress is associated with a redistribution of CRF1 and CRF2 in DR-5-HT neurons that primes the system to be activated by subsequent stress. The lack of this adaptation in passive coping rats may contribute to their depressive-like phenotype. These studies provide a cellular mechanism for individual differences in stress responses and consequences. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monorail/Foxa2 regulates floorplate differentiation and specification of oligodendrocytes, serotonergic raphé neurones and cranial motoneurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Will H.; Mangoli, Maryam; Lele, Zsolt; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Diamond, Brianne; Mercurio, Sara; Russell, Claire; Teraoka, Hiroki; Stickney, Heather L.; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Houart, Corinne; Schilling, Thomas F.; Frohnhoefer, Hans-Georg; Rastegar, Sepand; Neumann, Carl J.; Gardiner, R. Mark; Strähle, Uwe; Geisler, Robert; Rees, Michelle; Talbot, William S.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In this study, we elucidate the roles of the winged-helix transcription factor Foxa2 in ventral CNS development in zebrafish. Through cloning of monorail (mol), which we find encodes the transcription factor Foxa2, and phenotypic analysis of mol-/- embryos, we show that floorplate is induced in the absence of Foxa2 function but fails to further differentiate. In mol-/- mutants, expression of Foxa and Hh family genes is not maintained in floorplate cells and lateral expansion of the floorplate fails to occur. Our results suggest that this is due to defects both in the regulation of Hh activity in medial floorplate cells as well as cell-autonomous requirements for Foxa2 in the prospective laterally positioned floorplate cells themselves. Foxa2 is also required for induction and/or patterning of several distinct cell types in the ventral CNS. Serotonergic neurones of the raphé nucleus and the trochlear motor nucleus are absent in mol-/- embryos, and oculomotor and facial motoneurones ectopically occupy ventral CNS midline positions in the midbrain and hindbrain. There is also a severe reduction of prospective oligodendrocytes in the midbrain and hindbrain. Finally, in the absence of Foxa2, at least two likely Hh pathway target genes are ectopically expressed in more dorsal regions of the midbrain and hindbrain ventricular neuroepithelium, raising the possibility that Foxa2 activity may normally be required to limit the range of action of secreted Hh proteins. PMID:15677724

  2. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccot, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  3. Pontine-ventral respiratory column interactions through raphe circuits detected using multi-array spike train recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Solomon, Irene C; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2009-06-01

    Recently, Segers et al. identified functional connectivity between the ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC) and the pontine respiratory group (PRG). The apparent sparseness of detected paucisynaptic interactions motivated consideration of other potential functional pathways between these two regions. We report here evidence for "indirect" serial functional linkages between the PRG and VRC via intermediary brain stem midline raphé neurons. Arrays of microelectrodes were used to record sets of spike trains from a total of 145 PRG, 282 VRC, and 340 midline neurons in 11 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated cats. Spike trains of 13,843 pairs of neurons that included at least one raphé cell were screened for respiratory modulation and short-time scale correlations. Significant correlogram features were detected in 7.2% of raphé-raphé (291/4,021), 4.3% of VRC-raphé (292/6,755), and 4.0% of the PRG-raphé (124/3,067) neuron pairs. Central peaks indicative of shared influences were the most common feature in correlations between pairs of raphé neurons, whereas correlated raphé-PRG and raphé-VRC neuron pairs displayed predominantly offset peaks and troughs, features suggesting a paucisynaptic influence of one neuron on the other. Overall, offset correlogram features provided evidence for 33 VRC-to-raphé-to-PRG and 45 PRG-to-raphé-to-VRC correlational linkage chains with one or two intermediate raphé neurons. The results support a respiratory network architecture with parallel VRC-to-PRG and PRG-to-VRC links operating through intervening midline circuits, and suggest that raphé neurons contribute to the respiratory modulation of PRG neurons and shape the respiratory motor pattern through coordinated divergent actions on both the PRG and VRC.

  4. Multiple serotonin receptors: regional distribution and effect of raphe lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackshear, M.A.; Sanders-Bush, E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA). School of Medicine); Steranka, L.R. (Indiana University, Northwest Center for Medical Education, Gary, IN, USA)

    1981-12-17

    These studies confirm and extend the recent work suggesting that (/sup 3/H)lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) labels two distinct binding sites in rat brain resembling serotonin (5HT) receptors. Although Scatchard analyses of (/sup 3/H)LSD binding to membranes prepared from cortex/hippocampus were linear, the heterogeneity of the (/sup 3/H)LSD binding sites was clearly demonstrated in displacement studies. The displacement curves for both 5HT and spiperone were bisigmoidal with the concentration required to saturate the high affinity components nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations necessary to saturate the low affinity components. Additivity studies suggested that the sites with high affinity for 5HT and spiperone are different, independent sites. These sites are referred to as 5HT/sub 1/ and 5HT/sub 2/ respectively. Regional analyses showed, that in the frontal cortex, the density of the 5HT/sub 2/ site was slightly greater than the 5HT/sub 1/ site whereas the 5HT/sub 1/ site was predominant in all other brain areas, including the spinal cord. The pharmacological properties of the two sites have features in common with 5HT receptors; however, electrolytic lesions of the midbrain raphe nuclei did not change the densities or binding constants of the two apparent 5HT receptor subtypes, even though the number of high affinity 5HT uptake sites was markedly reduced.

  5. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  6. Drømmejobbet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Medarbejdere vil i fremtiden også kunne arbejde, mens de sover. Virksomheder tilbyder snart deres ansatte interne kurser i ‘lucid dreaming’. Disse giver mulighed for, at man i sine drømme bliver bevidst om, at man drømmer og således kan manipulere dem. Det skal nu udnyttes. Management...

  7. Dr. Dampe - Doctor Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    2009-01-01

    On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings......On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings...

  8. Dr. Daniel Carter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  9. Visit of Dr. Stoltenberg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1966-01-01

    During a visit of Dr. Stoltenberg, Minister for Scientific Research of the Federal Republic of Germany (centre), Professor Paul explains a point, whilst standing by are (left to right) Dr. Schulte-Meermann, Chairman of the Finance Committee, professor Weisskopf, former Director-General, and professor Gregory Director-General.

  10. Obituary: Dr Dimitri Tassiopoulos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... closely together with Prof. Phaswana-Mafuya, managed to bring the journal under the Taylor & Francis Online stable with Routledge. Press. SAHARAJ's impact factor has risen during his leadership. Dr Tassiopoulos also managed the SAHARA Conference. Dr Tassiopoulos was involved in collaborating in ...

  11. Galande, Dr Sanjeev

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Galande, Dr Sanjeev Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 20 September 1967. Specialization: Epigenetics, Chromatin Biology, Gene Regulation, Genomics and Proteomics Address: Centre for Excellence in Epigenetics, Indian Institute of Science Education, & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  12. Control of breathing by raphe obscurus serotonergic neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy; Coates, Melissa B; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2011-02-09

    We used optogenetics to determine the global respiratory effects produced by selectively stimulating raphe obscurus (RO) serotonergic neurons in anesthetized mice and to test whether these neurons detect changes in the partial pressure of CO(2), and hence function as central respiratory chemoreceptors. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was selectively (∼97%) incorporated into ∼50% of RO serotonergic neurons by injecting AAV2 DIO ChR2-mCherry (adeno-associated viral vector double-floxed inverse open reading frame of ChR2-mCherry) into the RO of ePet-Cre mice. The transfected neurons heavily innervated lower brainstem and spinal cord regions involved in autonomic and somatic motor control plus breathing but eschewed sensory related regions. Pulsed laser photostimulation of ChR2-transfected serotonergic neurons increased respiratory frequency (fR) and diaphragmatic EMG (dEMG) amplitude in relation to the duration and frequency of the light pulses (half saturation, 1 ms; 5-10 Hz). dEMG amplitude and fR increased slowly (half saturation after 10-15 s) and relaxed monoexponentially (tau, 13-15 s). The breathing stimulation was reduced ∼55% by methysergide (broad spectrum serotonin antagonist) and potentiated (∼16%) at elevated levels of inspired CO(2) (8%). RO serotonergic neurons, identified by their entrainment to short light pulses (threshold, 0.1-1 ms) were silent (nine cells) or had a low and regular level of activity (2.1 ± 0.4 Hz; 11 cells) that was not synchronized with respiration. These and nine surrounding neurons with similar characteristics were unaffected by adding up to 10% CO(2) to the breathing mixture. In conclusion, RO serotonergic neurons activate breathing frequency and amplitude and potentiate the central respiratory chemoreflex but do not appear to have a central respiratory chemoreceptor function.

  13. Median raphe stimulation-induced motor inhibition concurrent with suppression of type 1 and type 2 hippocampal theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Brian H; Bland, Cheryl E; MacIver, M Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological effects produced by electrical stimulation of posterior hypothalamic (PH) or median raphe (MR) nuclei, independently and during combined stimulation of both PH and MR. These three stimulation conditions were applied during spontaneous behavior in an open field and during PH stimulation-induced wheel running, while simultaneously recording hippocampal (HPC) field activity. An additional objective was to determine the effects of MR stimulation on Type 1 movement related theta and Type 2 sensory processing related theta. To achieve the latter, when behavioral studies were completed we studied the same rats under urethane anesthesia and then during urethane anesthesia with the addition of atropine sulfate (ATSO4). Here we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of a localized region of the MR nucleus resulted in a profound inhibition of both spontaneously occurring theta related motor behaviors and the theta related motor behaviors induced by electrical stimulation of the PH nucleus. Furthermore, this motor inhibition occurred concurrently with strong suppression of hippocampal theta field oscillations in the freely moving rat, a condition where the theta recorded is Type 2 sensory processing theta occurring coincidently with Type 1 movement related theta (Bland, 1986). Our results indicate that motor inhibition resulted from stimulation of neurons located in the mid central region of the MR, while stimulation in adjacent regions produced variable responses, including movements and theta activity. The present study provided evidence that the pharmacological basis of the suppression of Type 2 sensory processing HPC theta was cholinergic. However, MR inhibition of PH-induced wheel running was not affected by cholinergic blockade, which blocks Type 2 theta, indicating that MR stimulation-induced motor inhibition also requires the suppression of Type 1 theta. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The DR-2 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Povl Lebeck

    2003-01-01

    DR-2 was a 5 MW tank type, water moderated and cooled research reactor, which was operated at the Risø National Laboratory from 1959 to 1975. After the close-down in1975 the DR-2 has been kept in safe enclosure until now. The aim of the DR-2 projectreported here was to characterize the present...... their activity had been measured. The activity of the radiation shield of the reactor was measured in three different ways: By drilling two cored holes through the shield, by thermo-luminescence dosimeter measurements in vertical tubes in theconcrete shield and by measurements through an open beam hole...

  15. Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian Ph.D. (IIT, Madras). Date of birth: 4 June 1964. Specialization: Water Splitting, Materials Science, Surface Science, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Spectroscopy Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  16. Deshpande, Dr A A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 1989–1993. Deshpande, Dr A A . Date of birth: 23 January 1958. Specialization: Observational Radio Astronomy Address during Associateship: Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar P.O, Bangalore 560 080.

  17. Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran Ph.D. (Banaras and British Columbia). Date of birth: 5 October 1941. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry , Organocatalysis Address: Honorary Scientist, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science &, Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala

  18. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam Ph.D. (Rice), FNASc. Date of birth: 9 November 1948. Specialization: Distributed Probabilistic Systems, Hybrid Systems and Computational Systems Biology Address: Laboratory of System Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, ...

  19. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1993 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan Ph.D. (Delaware). Date of birth: 6 December 1947. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Address: Managing Director, Techcellence Consultancy Services, Pvt. Ltd., 5, Pushkaraj, ...

  20. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 5 September 1939. Specialization: Molecular Rearrangements, Carbohydrate Chemistry, Organic Electrophotochemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Heterocyclic Chemistry Address: No.

  1. Mistry, Dr Kekshushroo Bamanshaw

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. (Delhi). Date of birth: 13 January 1936. Specialization: Soil Science, Fertilizers and Agrochemicals Address: 52, Sunshine, Dr Rajaballi Patel Lane, Mumbai 400 026, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2351 7387, (022) 2351 0564

  2. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the career of Theodor Seuss Geisel and suggests activities to celebrate his birthday. Lists selected children's books by Dr. Seuss, selected Seuss videos, Web sites, biographical resources, and biographical videos. (LRW)

  3. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Chemistry. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 25 May 1964. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry, Dendrimer Chemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  4. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1979 Section: Plant Sciences. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 9 February 1923. Date of death: 10 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Physiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  5. Ciliated Median Raphe Cyst of Perineum Presenting as Perianal Polyp: A Case Report with Immunohistochemical Study, Review of Literature, and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh Sagar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Median raphe cyst is a very rare, benign congenital lesion occurring mainly on the ventral aspect of the penis, but can develop anywhere in the midline between the external urethral meatus and anus. We report a case of median raphe cyst in the perineum presenting as a perianal polyp in a 65-year-old, English white male with exceptionally rare ciliated epithelium. According to our knowledge, this is the third such case of ciliated median raphe cyst in the English literature. This case, also the first case of ciliated median raphe cyst in the perineum location, focuses on pathogenesis of median raphe cyst.

  6. Functional analysis of a novel human serotonin transporter gene promoter in immortalized raphe cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Thomassen, M; Larsen, M B

    1999-01-01

    were found to possess the additional 379 bp fragment. The integrity of the promoter was furthermore confirmed by genomic Southern blotting. The promoter activity was analyzed by reporter gene assays in neuronal and non-neuronal serotonergic cell lines. In immortalized serotonergic raphe neurons, RN46A...

  7. Median raphe cysts in men. Presentation of our experience and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalón-Monllor, V; Ordoño-Saiz, M V; Ordoño-Domínguez, F; Sabater-Marco, V; Pallás-Costa, Y; Navalón-Verdejo, P

    2017-04-01

    To present our experience with the diagnosis and treatment of median raphe cysts treated in our department in the last 25years. We conducted a retrospective study of 28men with median raphe cysts who underwent surgery in our department from June 1990 to March 2015. We analysed the age of presentation, reason for consultation, clinical manifestations, histological findings, treatment and outcome after exeresis. The majority of the patients (22; 79%) were asymptomatic and consulted for the aesthetic defect. Four cases (14%) presented urinary abnormalities, and 2 cases (7%) reported discomfort during sexual intercourse. In all cases, the treatment consisted of surgical extirpation of the cysts, with excellent aesthetic and functional results and no lesion recurrence in any of the patients during a mean follow-up of more than 10years. The most common histological type was the transitional cell type in 15 cases (54%), followed by the mixed type (transitional and squamous) in 11 cases (39%). One case (6%) was pure squamous type, and in another case (6%) the epithelium was glandular. Median raphe cysts are an uncommon type of disembryoplasia that can occur in any location of the median raphe, from the balanic meatus to the edges of the anus. These cysts are generally asymptomatic and their treatment of choice is surgical extirpation. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Multifractal analysis of nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, K.; Cherry, M.L.; Jones, W.V.; Wefel, J.P. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)); Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kawiory 26 A, 30-055, Krakow (Poland)); Freier, P.S.; Waddington, C.J. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)); (KLM Collaboration)

    1993-10-01

    We have performed a multifractal ([ital G]-moment) analysis of 14.6--200 GeV/nucleon nucleus-nucleus and 200--800 GeV proton-nucleus interactions from KLM and Fermilab E-90 and E-508 emulsion data, including explicit corrections for the finite statistical sample. The corrected slopes of the [ital G] moments for protons, [sup 16]O, [sup 28]Si, and [sup 32]S nuclei show only slight evidence for departures from random behavior, while the normalized entropies appear to show a more consistent departure from randomness, particularly for protons. Given the size of the uncertainties, the results of the fractal analysis are not consistent either with results of intermittency analyses for nucleus-nucleus collisions or with the nonrandom behavior previously reported for leptonic and hadronic collisions. However, because of the effects of statistical noise, the fractal analysis is not as sensitive as the intermittency analysis for detecting nonrandom fluctuations.

  9. Infralimbic and dorsal raphé microinjection of the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP-93,129: attenuation of aggressive behavior in CFW male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccidomo, S; Quadros, IMH; Takahashi, A; Fish, EW; Miczek, KA

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Aggressive behavior and impaired impulse control have been associated with dysregulations in the serotonergic system and with impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex. 5-HT1B receptors have been shown to specifically modulate several types of offensive aggression. Objective To characterize the relative importance of 2 populations of 5-HT1B receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and infralimbic cortex (ILC) in the modulation of aggressive behavior. Methods Male CFW mice were conditioned on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement to self-administer a 6% (w/v) alcohol solution. Mice repeatedly engaged in 5 min aggressive confrontations until aggressive behavior stabilized. Next, a cannula was implanted into either the DRN or the ILC. After recovery, mice were tested for aggression after self-administration of either 1.0 g/kg alcohol or water prior to a microinjection of the 5-HT1B agonist, CP-93,129 (0–1.0 µg/infusion). Results In both the DRN and ILC, CP-93,129 reduced aggressive behaviors after both water and alcohol self-administration. Intra-raphé CP-93,129 dose-dependently reduced both aggressive and locomotor behaviors. However, the anti-aggressive effects of intra-cortical CP-93,129 were behaviorally specific. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of the serotonergic system in the modulation of aggression and suggest that the behaviorally specific effects of 5-HT1B receptor agonists are regionally selective. 5-HT1B receptors in a medial subregion of the prefrontal cortex, the ILC, appear to be critically involved in the attenuation of species-typical levels of aggression. PMID:22222863

  10. Infralimbic and dorsal raphé microinjection of the 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist CP-93,129: attenuation of aggressive behavior in CFW male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccidomo, S; Quadros, I M H; Takahashi, A; Fish, E W; Miczek, K A

    2012-07-01

    Aggressive behavior and impaired impulse control have been associated with dysregulations in the serotonergic system and with impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex. 5-HT(1B) receptors have been shown to specifically modulate several types of offensive aggression. This study aims to characterize the relative importance of two populations of 5-HT(1B) receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and infralimbic cortex (ILC) in the modulation of aggressive behavior. Male CFW mice were conditioned on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement to self-administer a 6% (w/v) alcohol solution. Mice repeatedly engaged in 5-min aggressive confrontations until aggressive behavior stabilized. Next, a cannula was implanted into either the DRN or the ILC. After recovery, mice were tested for aggression after self-administration of either 1.0 g/kg alcohol or water prior to a microinjection of the 5-HT(1B) agonist, CP-93,129 (0-1.0 μg/infusion). In both the DRN and ILC, CP-93,129 reduced aggressive behaviors after both water and alcohol self-administration. Intra-raphé CP-93,129 dose-dependently reduced both aggressive and locomotor behaviors. However, the anti-aggressive effects of intra-cortical CP-93,129 were behaviorally specific. These findings highlight the importance of the serotonergic system in the modulation of aggression and suggest that the behaviorally specific effects of 5-HT(1B) receptor agonists are regionally selective. 5-HT(1B) receptors in a medial subregion of the prefrontal cortex, the ILC, appear to be critically involved in the attenuation of species-typical levels of aggression.

  11. Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath Ph.D. (Bangalore), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 August 1951. Specialization: Nonlinear Phenomena, Chaos and Statistical Physics Address: Visiting Professor, Institute of Infrastructure, Technology, Research, and Management (IITRAM), Near Khokhara Circle, Ahmedabad 380 026, Gujarat Contact ...

  12. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar Ph.D. (Karnatak). Date of birth: 23 January 1959. Specialization: Biological Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Marine Biology Address: Chief Scientist, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula 403 004, ...

  13. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 30 October 1911. Date of death: 4 January 2000. Specialization: Statistics, Public Health and Demography Address: 'Sri Kripa', 79/3, Benson Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  14. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: General Biology. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 1 January 1944. Specialization: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology and Microbial Genetics Address: FD-426, Sector 3, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  15. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Section: Plant Sciences. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Pollen Biology, Reproductive Ecology and Conservation Biology Address: Odekar Farms, Nandihalli, via Thovinakere, Tumkur 572 138, Karnataka Contact:

  16. Sengupta, Dr Sagar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Sengupta, Dr Sagar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 June 1968. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Cell Signalling, Mytochondrial Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3786

  17. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop Ph.D. (Basel), FNA. Date of birth: 10 July 1937. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Mineralogy and Precambrian Geology Address: 70/36, Pratapnagar, Sector 7, Sanganer (RHB), Jaipur 302 033, Rajasthan

  18. Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc. Date of birth: 8 February 1946. Specialization: Planetary Sciences, High Pressure Physics, Electron States and Dense Plasma Physics Address: 28, Creekview Co-operative Housing Society, Plot No. 33, Sector 9A, Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 703, Maharashtra Contact:

  19. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1978 Section: Medicine. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila Ph.D. (McGill). Date of birth: 24 May 1913. Date of death: 28 May 1993. Specialization: Physiology, Neurophysiology and Placental Physiology Last known address: Sitaramanilayam, Plot No. 9, Doctors Co-Operative Housing Colony, Waltair, Visakhapatnam ...

  20. Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 25 August 1934. Specialization: Cancer & Basic Immunology, Cell Biology and Genetic Diseases Address: 4, Mahavishnu Apartments, Dahanukar Colony A, Kothrud, Pune 411 029, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 2538 4382, ...

  1. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath Ph.D. (Washington), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 25 October 1950. Specialization: Physical Oceanography Address: Yashoda, C-14/162, Tonca, Caranzalem, Panaji 403 002, Goa

  2. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2007 Section: Physics. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar Ph.D. (Heriot Watt University), FNASc. Date of birth: 16 August 1954. Specialization: Lasers, Biomedical Applications of Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, Laser Materials Address: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, ...

  3. Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar Ph.D. (Utkal). Date of birth: 27 December 1931. Specialization: Extractive Metallurgy, Mineral Processing, Environmental Engineering and Materials Processing Address: Chairman, Institute of Advance Technology and Environmental Studies, 80A-831A Lewis Road, Bhubaneswar 751 002, Orissa

  4. Krishnan, Dr Raghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Monsoon & Climate Dynamics, Atmosphere-Ocean-Land System, Monsoon Hydrological Cycle Address: Acting Director, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 4301. Residence: (020) 2589 8886. Mobile: 98817 37976

  5. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE. Date of birth: 14 November 1950. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Intellectual Property Address: Emeritus Scientist, Unit for R&D of Information Products, Tapovan, NCL Campus, Pashan Road, Pune ...

  6. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Physics. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas Ph.D. (Southampton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 October 1940. Specialization: Lasers and laser Instrumentation Address: 26, Paramanu Nagar, Indore 452 013, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0731) 232 2707. Residence: (0731) 232 0031. Mobile: 93032 ...

  7. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Medicine. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy MBBS (Madras), MS (Minneapolis), FRCS. Date of birth: 16 August 1906. Date of death: 22 September 1973. Specialization: Experimental Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology Address: 5-C, Lavelle Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  8. Amarjit Singh, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarjit Singh, Dr Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 November 1924. Specialization: Millimeter Wave Tubes, Microwave Tubes and Microwave Electronics Address: 12, Auburn Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-847) 247 9260. Email: amarjitsingh@ieee.org. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  9. Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 15 May 1930. Date of death: 5 April 1999. Specialization: Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Agrochemicals, Plantation Crops and Environmental Hygiene Last known address: 18/1, First Cross, First Main, Jayamahal Extension, Bengaluru 560 016. YouTube; Twitter ...

  10. David, Dr Joy Caesarina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1982 Section: Medicine. David, Dr Joy Caesarina M.B.B.S., M.S. (Madras). Date of birth: 3 May 1927. Date of death: 20 April 2004. Specialization: Neuropharmacology Last known address: 292, 4th Main, 1st Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  11. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 2 February 1952. Specialization: Virology, Molecular Biology, Vaccine, Hepatitis Viruses, Emerging-Reemerging Viruses Address: IRSHA, Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Katraj, Pune 411 043, Maharashtra Contact:

  12. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: General Biology. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc. Date of birth: 11 May 1954. Specialization: Enzyme Biotechnology, Transcription, Molecular Virology and Oxidative Stress Response Address: Vice Chancellor, Amity University, New Town, Kolkata 700 135, W.B.

  13. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: General Biology. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 10 November 1946. Specialization: Nucleic Acid Enzymology, Protein Chemistry, Parasitology and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, ...

  14. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2016–2019. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo Ph.D. (Connecticut). Date of birth: 1 September 1983. Specialization: Propulsion,Turbulent Combustion, Energy Address: Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  15. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Engineering & Technology. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan Ph.D. (Wales), F.R.Engg. (UK), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, D.Engg. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.) Council Service: 1983-85. Date of birth: 10 November 1935. Specialization: Materials Science & Engineering, Energy Technologies, ...

  16. Mohan, Dr Viswanathan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (Madras), FNASc, FNA, FRCP (London, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Ireland), FTWAS. Date of birth: 10 April 1954. Specialization: Diabetes and its Complications, Epidemiology, Genomic Studies Address: Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, No. 6B, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai 600 086, T.N.. Contact:

  17. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Animal Sciences. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam Ph.D. (Kentucky). Date of birth: 10 August 1947. Specialization: Analysis of Clinical Trials, Non-parametric Inference and Statistical Ecology Address: Bakul, 40, Empress Garden Society, Sopan Baug, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra Contact:

  18. Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao Ph.D. (Nagpur and London), FNASc. Date of birth: 28 August 1952. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry and Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Director, R&D, Emcure Pharmaceuticals Limited, P2, ITBT Park Phase II, Hinjwadi, Pune 411 057, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 3982 1350, ...

  19. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Section: Medicine. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 20 January 1941. Specialization: Environmental Carcinogenesis and Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer, Occupational Hazards

  20. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2005 Section: General Biology. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra Ph.D. (Udaipur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 15 August 1947. Specialization: Immunology and Cell Biology Address: NASI Senior Scientist, National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact:

  1. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Medicine. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra Ph.D. (AIIMS), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1956. Specialization: Dengue Subunit Vaccine, Dengue Botanical Drug, Recombinant Proteins of Medical Use Address: International Centre for Genetic Engineering, and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi ...

  2. Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 8 April 1980. Specialization: Membrane Protein Biophysics, Protein Folding, Spectroscopy Address during Associateship: MBL, Dept. of Biological Sci., Indian Institute of Science Edn. &, Research, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0755) 669 2562

  3. Dasgupta, Dr Somnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dasgupta, Dr Somnath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 13 October 1951. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Geochemistry and Precambrian Geology Address: Chair Professor, Department of Geography, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110 025, U.T.

  4. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar Ph.D. (AIIMS), MD (PGIMER, Chandigarh), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 22 February 1951. Specialization: Environmental Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Address: B-5/3, B Block, Sector 13, RK ...

  5. Mukerji, Dr Mitali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Medicine. Mukerji, Dr Mitali Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 13 November 1967. Specialization: Functional Genomics, Population Genomics, Ayurgenomics Address: Sr Principal Scientist, Genomics & Molecualr Medicine, Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Sukhdev Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi ...

  6. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 June 1958. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry, Photobiology, Biophysical Chemistry, Organic Photochemistry Address: Director, North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785 006, Assam

  7. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2003 Section: Engineering & Technology. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula Ph.D. (IISc), FNAE. Date of birth: 9 November 1944. Specialization: Finite Element Methods, Structural Analysis (Linear & Nonlinear) and Smart Structures Address: No. 502, Reliance Mariam Villa, Street No. 6, Plot No.

  8. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan D.Sc. (MIT). Date of birth: 17 August 1930. Specialization: Alloy & Stainless Steel Making and Process Metallurgical Design & Development Address: 'Vidya Theertha Kripa', No. 1, Siva Sundar Avenue, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai 600 041, T.N.

  9. Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 7 October 1925. Date of death: 10 July 2010. Specialization: Medical Research (Cancer) & Ultrastructural Pathology and Hospice Care of the Dying Last known address: Bhagirathi Sadan, 17th Road, Khar, Mumbai 400 052. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  10. Paranjape, Dr Aseem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Paranjape, Dr Aseem Ph.D. (TIFR). Date of birth: 26 January 1983. Specialization: Cosmology, Large Scale Structure, Gravitation Address: Inter-University Centre for, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4100, 2560 4224

  11. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Medicine. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad M.B.B.S. and M.S. (Indore), D.Sc. (S. Gujarat), FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 7 June 1950. Specialization: Human Anatomy, Clinical Anatomy and Biomechanics of Spine Address: FASI Director, Modern Institute of Medical Sciences, Kanadia, Near Bypass ...

  12. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2013 Section: Medicine. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita Ph.D. (Utkal), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 January 1966. Specialization: Immunology, Cell Signalling, Communicable Diseases Address: Group Leader, Molecular Cell Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting & Diagnostics, Nampally, Hyderabad 500 001, A.P.. Contact ...

  13. Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar Ph.D. (Michigan State), FNASc. Date of birth: 18 June 1958. Specialization: Nuclear & High Energy Physics Experiment, QCD Phase Transition & Quark, Gluon Plasma, Phases of Nuclear Matter Address: Head, EHEP Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, ...

  14. Jameel, Dr Shahid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jameel, Dr Shahid Ph.D. (Washington State Univ.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 8 August 1957. Specialization: Molecular Biology and Molecular Virology Address: Chief Executive Officer, The Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance, 8-2-684/3/K/19, Kaushik Society, Road NO. 12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.. Contact:

  15. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander M.R.C.S.. Date of birth: 8 January 1911. Date of death: 18 October 1996. Specialization: Pharmacology, Toxicology and Indian Medicinal Plants Last known address: C-116, Defence Colony, New Delhi 110 024. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. Chakraborty, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakraborty, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (JNU). Date of birth: 25 September 1964. Specialization: Nutritional & Stress Genomics, Plant proteomics, Molecular Biology, Biotechnology Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2673 5186

  17. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Plant Sciences. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra D.Phil. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Biosystematics, Ecology and Population Genetics Address: Professor Emeritus, CEMDE, School of Environmental Studies, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact:

  18. Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish Ph.D. (Annamalai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 5 January 1954. Specialization: Clinical Microbiology, Molecular Epidemiology, Diarrhoeal Diseases Address: Ag. Regional Adviser, World Health Organisation, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Indraprastha Estate, New Delhi 110 002, U.T.. Contact:

  19. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Plant Sciences. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 2 June 1937. Specialization: Environmental Microbiology Address: Flat No. 103, Ushodaya Apartments, Sri Venkateswara Officers' Colony, Ramakrishnapuram, Secunderabad 500 056, A.P.

  20. Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE Council Service: 2016. Date of birth: 15 October 1963. Specialization: Multiphase Flows & Reactors, Computational Flow Modelling, Process Intensification Address: School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, ...

  1. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 October 1975. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, RNA Biology Address: Molecular & Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, ...

  2. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1959 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 21 November 1920. Date of death: 13 April 2017. Specialization: Analysis and Theory of Numbers Last known address: Professor Emertius, Eidg. Technische Hochschule, Mathematik, ETH Zentrum, 8092 ...

  3. Mandal, Dr Asit Baran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandal, Dr Asit Baran Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FRSC. Date of birth: 13 January 1952. Specialization: Electrochemistry, Thermodynamics, Ionic Liquids, Biophysical Chemistry, Organised Self-Assemblies and Nanomaterials Address: Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja SC Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 ...

  4. Bhakuni, Dr Vinod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakuni, Dr Vinod Ph.D. (Lucknow), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 May 1962. Date of death: 15 July 2011. Specialization: Protein Folding and Molecular Biophysics Last known address: Division of Molecular & Structural Biology, Central Drug Research Institute, P.B. No. 173, Lucknow 226 001. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  5. Das, Dr Amitava

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Das, Dr Amitava Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 December 1959. Specialization: Molecular Reactions, Supramolecular Chemistry, Assembly Photo-included Processes Address: Director, Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute, GB Marg, Bhavnagar 364 002, ...

  6. Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNASc. Date of birth: 2 May 1937. Specialization: Allergy, Immunology and Biochemistry Address: Lakshmi Niwas, Opp. Santoshi Mata Temple (B Cabin), Sane Guruji Path, Naupada, Thane 400 602, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2537 6961. Mobile: 93249 24307

  7. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  8. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K Ph.D. (Visva Bharati), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 7 November 1956. Specialization: Biochemistry and Molecular Microbiology, Prokaryotic Signal Transduction. Address: Chief Scientist, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.

  9. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama Ph.D. (Andhra). Date of birth: 15 February 1938. Specialization: Space Physics, Radiowave Propagation and Radar Systems Address: Member, ADCOS-DOS, National Remote Sensing Centre, Bldg No. 10, Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 037, A.P.

  10. Mishra, Dr Rakesh K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mishra, Dr Rakesh K Ph.D. (Allahabad), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 14 April 1961. Specialization: Genomics, Chromatin, Epigenetics Address: Director, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2719 2600. Residence: (040) 2720 6400. Mobile: 94419 02188

  11. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1972 Section: Chemistry. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan Ph.D. (Delhi and Cantab), D.Sc. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.), FNA, FNAE, FTWAS Council Service:1974-88; Vice-President: 1977-79; President: 1980-82. Date of birth: 31 March 1928. Specialization: Organic & Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Engineering Design ...

  12. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji Ph.D. (Michigan). Date of birth: 25 September 1929. Specialization: Process Design of Organic Chemical Plants Address: Chairman and Managing Director, Gharda Chemical Limited, Jer Mansion, W.P. Warde Road, Off Turner Road, Bandra, Mumbai 400 050, ...

  13. Jana, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Jana, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur). Date of birth: 22 March 1981. Specialization: Catalysis, Spectroscopy, Experimental Materials Science Address: Dept. of CBM Sciences, SN Bose Natl. Centre for, Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  14. Ghosh, Dr Amit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Medicine. Ghosh, Dr Amit Ph.D. (Calcutta), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 November 1944. Specialization: Molecular Biology of V.cholerae and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, JICA Building, CIT Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata ...

  15. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Plant Sciences. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 31 July 1925. Specialization: Plant Breeding & Genetics, Research Management and Cotton Development Address: 'Shri Abhirami', 107, Venkataswamy Road West, R S Puram Post, Coimbatore 641 002, T.N.. Contact:

  16. Rai, Dr Shyam Sundar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 March 1954. Specialization: Geophysics, Data Analysis & Modelling Deep Earth Exploration Address: Chair, Earth & Climate Science, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharasdhtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8255. Mobile: 98903 22705

  17. Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla Ph.D. (Andhra), FNA. Date of birth: 10 October 1955. Specialization: Marine Geology, Authigenic Minerals and Palaeoclimate, Palaeo-sea-levels. Address: Emeritus Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Vignan's University, Vadlamudi 522 213, A.P.. Contact: Office: (0863) 234 4761

  18. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 31 December 1946. Specialization: Fuel Cycle, Advanced Ceramics, Powder Metallurgy and Uranium, Thorium & Plutonium Fuels Address: Caladia 703, The Botanika, Kondapur, ...

  19. Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 1 May 1930. Date of death: 1 December 2003. Specialization: Physical Metallurgy and Structural & Mechanical Properties of Materials Last known address: Consulting Metallurgist, No. 44, 'VIBHA', Ramakrishna Paramahamsa Marg, Bandra East, Mumbai 400 ...

  20. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao Ph.D. (Nagpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 December 1927. Date of death: 13 November 2007. Specialization: Geology, Hydrogeology, Seismology and Mining & Environment Last known address: Millennium Shopping Mall, ...

  1. Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli M.D. (Opthal.) (AIIMS), FAMS, FACS, FRCS, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 September 1945. Specialization: Cornea, Community Eye Health and Eye Care Policy & Planning Address: Distinguished Chair of Eye Health, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.

  2. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1983 Section: Chemistry. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh Ph.D. and D.Sc. (London), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 December 1930. Specialization: Natural Products, Bio-organic, Biosynthesis, Nucleosides and Medicinal Chemistry Address: C-132, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.

  3. Anand, Dr Nitya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry. Anand, Dr Nitya Ph.D. (Mumbai and Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1980-82. Date of birth: 1 January 1925. Specialization: Medicinal Chemistry Address: Lumbini, B-62, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.. Contact: Residence: (0522) 278 8587, (0522) 404 3229

  4. Kumar, Dr Praveen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 2016–2019. Kumar, Dr Praveen Ph.D. (Uni. South Calif.) Date of birth: 14 September 1982. Specialization: Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Electromigration, Microelectronic packages. Address: Dept. of Materials Engg., Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 3369

  5. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Medicine. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc. Date of birth: 20 November 1965. Specialization: Cancer Biology & Stem Cells Address: National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2570 8089

  6. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Medicine. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNA. Date of birth: 3 April 1961. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Vaccine Development for Malaria and Molecular & Cell Biology Address: Head, Malaria Parasite Biology & Vaccine, Institut Pasteur, 28, ...

  7. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar Ph.D. (Roorkee). Date of birth: 26 September 1966. Specialization: Seismology, Tectonic Geodesy, Geodynamics Address: National Centre for Seismology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, IMD Complex, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110 003, U.T.. Contact:

  8. Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim Ph.D. (Agra), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 14 May 1961. Specialization: Immunology, Vaccine, Drug Discovery Address: Chief Scientist, Immunology Laboratory, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.. Contact: Office: (0172) 666 5261. Residence: (0172) 666 5514

  9. Chandy, Dr Jacob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Section: Medicine. Chandy, Dr Jacob MBBS (Madras), FRCS (c) Council Service: 1962-70. Date of birth: 23 January 1910. Date of death: 23 June 2007. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Education Address: Paarra, Matteethra, Kottayam 686 004.

  10. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 15 January 1940. Specialization: Structural Geology, Tectonics of Himalayan Geology and Active Tectonics Address: 9/12 (Lane 9), Ashirwad Eclave, Dehra Dun 248 001, Uttarakhand Contact:

  11. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan B.E., Ph.D. (Manchester). Date of birth: 10 July 1933. Specialization: Electronics, Controls and Nuclear Power Address: F-3, Rajkunj Co-op. Housing Society, Wadhavli, Chembur, Mumbai 400 074., Maharashtra Contact:

  12. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Chemistry. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 1 January 1956. Specialization: Bio-inorganic Chemistry, Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: Senior Professor, School of Chemical Sciences, ...

  13. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1997 Section: Physics. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar Ph.D.(Mumbai), FNASc. Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 12 December 1951. Specialization: Magnetism & Superconductivity, Vortex State Studies in Superconductors, Strongly Correlated Systems Address: Vice Chancellor, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 ...

  14. Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra Ph.D. (IIT, Delhi), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 3 February 1955. Specialization: Renewable Energy, Nanoscale Systems, Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity and Magnetism Address: Department of Physics, Lasers & Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 ...

  15. Anil Kumar, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: Chemistry. Anil Kumar, Dr Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 31 December 1955. Specialization: Chemical Thermodynamics, Physical Organic Chemistry and ... Office: (020) 2590 2278. Residence: (020) 2588 8712. Mobile: 98220 74509. Fax: (020) 2590 2636

  16. Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu Ph.D. (ANU, Canberra), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 March 1960. Specialization: Molecular Virology, Vaccinology and Biotechnology Address: Executive Director, Regional Centre for Biotechnology, NCR Biotech Science Cluster, III Mailstone, Fairadabad-Gurgaon Expressway, Faridabad 121 001, Haryana

  17. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Animal Sciences. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash Ph.D. (nagpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 May 1961. Specialization: Animal Biotechnology, Transgenic Animals, Endocrinology Address: Director, National Institute of Animal Biotechnology, Gopan Pally, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  18. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami M.D. (Madras), FRCP. Date of birth: 25 October 1919. Date of death: 22 July 2000. Specialization: Neuropathology, Experimental Pathology and Oncopathology Last known address: T36/2, 14, First Avenue, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090.

  19. Watve, Dr Milind Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 12 December 1957. Specialization: Wildlife Ecology & Animal Cognition, Evolutionary Biology, Computational Biology and Microbial Diversity Address: Professor, Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  20. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1998 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 30 March 1955. Specialization: Geometry and Mathematical Physics Address: Professor, Chennai Mathematical Institute, H-1, SIPCOT IT Park, Siruseri, Kelambakkam, Chennai 603 103

  1. Abrol, Dr Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abrol, Dr Yash Pal Ph.D. (Chicago), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 December 1935. Specialization: Agriculture: Crop Physiology, Environmental Sciences Address: Chief Patron, Society for Conservation of Nature, Room No. F4, A Block, NASC Complex, Dev Prakash Shastry Marg, P.O. Pusa, New Delhi 110 012, ...

  2. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar Ph.D. (BHU), FNAE. Date of birth: 8 June 1957. Specialization: Phase Transformations in Metals & Alloys, Electron Microscopy and Metallic Glasses & Nanocrystalline Materials Address: Head, Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research ...

  3. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: General Biology. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 July 1955. Specialization: Structural Biology, Macromolecular Crystallography and Immunology Address: Director, International Centre for Genetic Engineering, & Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf ...

  4. Relevance of dorsal raphe nucleus firing in serotonin 5-HT2C receptor blockade-induced augmentation of SSRIs effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotty, Florence; Folgering, Joost H. A.; Brennum, Lise T.; Hogg, Sandra; Mork, Arne; Hertel, Peter; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressant drugs. However, they exhibit a slow onset of action, putatively due to the initial decrease in serotonin cell firing mediated via somato-dendritic autoreceptors. Interestingly, blockade of 5-HT2C receptors

  5. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    The first, second and third sacral segments of 59 human spinal cords were examined in order to localize and describe Onuf's nucleus X. The nucleus was found to be situated in the ventral horn of the segments S2 and S3; only in very few spinal cords did it extend into S1. A significant variation...... in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well...... as between cell bodies and large dendrites were observed. Characteristic findings in the neuropil surrounding the nucleus were the sparsity of myelinated fibers and the presence of dendritic bundles. The present observations are compared to the descriptions of a morphologically similar nucleus...

  6. Role of the Oxytocin Receptor Expressed in the Rostral Medullary Raphe in Thermoregulation During Cold Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Tateishi, Yuko; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Otsuka, Ayano; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Sato, Keisuke; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent papers have reported that oxytocin (Oxt) and the oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) may be involved in the regulation of food intake in mammals. We therefore suspected the Oxt/Oxtr system to be involved in energy homeostasis. In previous studies, we found a tendency toward obesity in Oxtr-deficient (Oxtr ?/?) mice, as well as impaired thermoregulation when these mice were exposed to cold conditions. In the present study, we observed the expression of Oxtr in the rostral medullary raphe (RMR), th...

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 and Its Analogs Act in the Dorsal Raphe and Modulate Central Serotonin to Reduce Appetite and Body Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Eerola, Kim; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Banke, Elin; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Berqquist, Filip; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Lamy, Christophe M; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2017-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and serotonin play critical roles in energy balance regulation. Both systems are exploited clinically as antiobesity strategies. Surprisingly, whether they interact in order to regulate energy balance is poorly understood. Here we investigated mechanisms by which GLP-1 and serotonin interact at the level of the central nervous system. Serotonin depletion impaired the ability of exendin-4, a clinically used GLP-1 analog, to reduce body weight in rats, suggesting that serotonin is a critical mediator of the energy balance impact of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. Serotonin turnover and expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors in the hypothalamus were altered by GLP-1R activation. We demonstrate that the 5-HT2A, but surprisingly not the 5-HT2C, receptor is critical for weight loss, anorexia, and fat mass reduction induced by central GLP-1R activation. Importantly, central 5-HT2A receptors are also required for peripherally injected liraglutide to reduce feeding and weight. Dorsal raphe (DR) harbors cell bodies of serotonin-producing neurons that supply serotonin to the hypothalamic nuclei. We show that GLP-1R stimulation in DR is sufficient to induce hypophagia and increase the electrical activity of the DR serotonin neurons. Finally, our results disassociate brain metabolic and emotionality pathways impacted by GLP-1R activation. This study identifies serotonin as a new critical neural substrate for GLP-1 impact on energy homeostasis and expands the current map of brain areas impacted by GLP-1R activation. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  8. DR og musikken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    1991-01-01

    Musikken i radioen er et af de mange underbelyste temaer inden for me- dieforskningen i Danmark. Forfatteren til den følgende artikel har gennem nogle år arbejdet som musik-medarbejder i Danmarks Radio - med base i Østjyllands Radio. I artiklen fokuserer han på produktionsaspektet. Hvilke funktio...... rejses spørgsmålet om musikkens rolle i DR som aktiverende eller registrerende i forhold til det musikliv, som findes uden for institutionen....

  9. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  10. Dr Math at your service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available in the fraction you have Pupil: 1 ova 15 Dr Math: so do the actual division what is one divided by 15 Pupil: is 15 Dr Math: no use a calcluator Pupil: 0,06 Dr Math: well it is 0,0666666 recurring right? Pupil: yes it is Dr Math...: now for a percentage, move the decimal 2 points to the right so it is 6.666% recurring then round to 6.67% MXit: drmath.sa Google Chat: dr.math.rsa (at) gmail.com More Info: http://drmath.meraka.csir.co.za/drmath Photographs...

  11. Gaia DR1 documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Arenou, F.; Comoretto, G.; Eyer, L.; Farras Casas, M.; Hambly, N.; Hobbs, D.; Salgado, J.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vogt, S.; van Leeuwen, M.; Abreu, A.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Busso, G.; Butkevich, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castañeda, J.; Charnas, J.; Cheek, N.; Clementini, G.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Evans, D.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Guy, L.; Helmi, A.; Hernandez, J.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Klioner, S.; Lammers, U.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Messineo, R.; Michalik, D.; Mignard, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mora, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Pancino, E.; Panem, C.; Portell, J.; Rimoldini, L.; Riva, A.; Robin, A.; Siddiqui, H.; Smart, R.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Vallenari, A.; Voss, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7 in the white-light photometric band G of Gaia. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) processed the raw measurements collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 14 months of the mission, and turned these into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. Gaia DR1 consists of three parts: an astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues (the primary astrometric data set) and the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources (the secondary astrometric data set). The primary set forms the realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). The second part of Gaia DR1 is the photometric data set, which contains the mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The third part consists of the G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole. The positions and proper motions in the astrometric data set are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to the ICRF to within 0.03 mas yr^-1. For the primary astrometric data set, the typical standard error for the positions and parallaxes is about 0.3 mas, while for the proper motions the typical standard error is about 1 mas yr^-1. Whereas it has been suggested in Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016a) that a systematic component of ∼0.3 mas should be 'added' (in quadrature) to the parallax uncertainties, Brown (2017) clarifies that reported parallax standard errors already include local systematics as a result of the calibration of the TGAS parallax uncertainties by comparison to Hipparcos parallaxes. For the subset of

  12. Deviation of the penoscrotal median raphe: Is it a normal finding or within the spectrum of hypospadias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Hypospadias is the most common congenital abnormality of the penis, and is most commonly diagnosed during the postnatal physical examination. However, milder forms of the condition can be difficult to detect, leading to delayed referral to specialist teams. We aim to determine whether there is an association between hypospadias and the position of the penoscrotal raphe. Materials and Methods: A case - control study was performed where clinical photographs from children undergoing hypospadias correction were compared with a control group of children without the condition. The position of the penoscrotal raphe was documented as midline, left or right. Pearson′s chi squared test was used to determine significance. Results: Images for 80 children undergoing hypospadias correction were compared with 80 normal children in the maternity ward. 88.8% of the children with hypospadias had a penoscrotal raphe deviated from the midline compared with only 13.8% in the control group (P < 0.0003. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a significant association between hypospadias and deviation of the penoscrotal raphe from the midline. Consideration should be given to whether to include this finding within the spectrum of abnormalities seen in hypospadias. Examination of the penoscrotal raphe is simple to perform and could aid in the early diagnosis in children with milder forms of the condition.

  13. Deficiency of Serotonin in Raphe Neurons and Altered Behavioral Responses in Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2-Knockout Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Washio, Youhei; Sato, Kenji; Kinoshita, Masato

    2017-12-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a bioactive monoamine that acts as a neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous system of animals. Teleost fish species have serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem; however, the role of 5-HT in the raphe neurons in teleost fish remains largely unknown. Here, we established a medaka (Oryzias latipes) strain with targeted disruption of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (tph2) gene that is involved in the 5-HT synthesis in the raphe nuclei. Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the homozygous mutants (tph2Δ13/Δ13) lacked the ability to synthesize 5-HT in the raphe neurons. To investigate the effects of 5-HT deficiency in adult behaviors, the mutant fish were subjected to five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and two-fish social interaction). The homozygous mutation caused a longer duration of freezing response in all examined paradigms and reduced the number of entries to the top area in the diving test. In addition, the mutants exhibited a decreased number of mirror-biting in the males and an increased contact time in direct social interaction between the females. These results indicate that this tph2-knockout medaka serves as a good model to analyze the effects of 5-HT deficiency in the raphe neurons.

  14. Administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin into rat supramammillary nucleus induces c-Fos in reward-related brain structures. Supramammillary picrotoxin and c-Fos expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Rick

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picrotoxin blocks GABAA receptors, whose activation typically inhibits neuronal firing activity. We recently found that rats learn to selectively self-administer picrotoxin or bicuculline, another GABAA receptor antagonist, into the supramammillary nucleus (SuM, a posterior hypothalamic structure localized anterior to the ventral tegmental area. Other drugs such as nicotine or the excitatory amino acid AMPA are also self-administered into the SuM. The SuM appears to be functionally linked with the mesolimbic dopamine system and is closely connected with other brain structures that are implicated in motivational processes, including the prefrontal cortex, septal area, preoptic area, lateral hypothalamic area and dorsal raphe nucleus. Here, we hypothesized that these brain structures are activated by picrotoxin injections into the SuM. Results Picrotoxin administration into the SuM markedly facilitated locomotion and rearing. Further, it increased c-Fos expression in this region, suggesting blockade of tonic inhibition and thus the disinhibition of local neurons. This manipulation also increased c-Fos expression in structures including the ventral tegmental area, medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex, septal area, preoptic area, lateral hypothalamic area and dorsal raphe nucleus. Conclusions Picrotoxin administration into the SuM appears to disinhibit local neurons and recruits activation of brain structures associated with motivational processes, including the mesolimbic dopamine system, prefrontal cortex, septal area, preoptic area, lateral hypothalamic area and dorsal raphe nucleus. These regions may be involved in mediating positive motivational effects triggered by intra-SuM picrotoxin.

  15. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education.

  16. Leptin receptor immunoreactivity is present in ascending serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Helboe, Lone; Larsen, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines......Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines...

  17. From Mxit to Dr Math

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Laurie Butgereit, a researcher at the CSIR Meraka Institute, started to use Mxit as a communication channel to tutor her son in mathematics. Her son and a number of his friends logged in, and Dr Math was born. At the inception of Dr Math...

  18. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  19. Respiratory and Mayer wave-related discharge patterns of raphé and pontine neurons change with vagotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K F; Nuding, S C; Segers, L S; Baekey, D M; Shannon, R; Lindsey, B G; Dick, T E

    2010-07-01

    Previous models have attributed changes in respiratory modulation of pontine neurons after vagotomy to a loss of pulmonary stretch receptor "gating" of an efference copy of inspiratory drive. Recently, our group confirmed that pontine neurons change firing patterns and become more respiratory modulated after vagotomy, although average peak and mean firing rates of the sample did not increase (Dick et al., J Physiol 586: 4265-4282, 2008). Because raphé neurons are also elements of the brain stem respiratory network, we tested the hypotheses that after vagotomy raphé neurons have increased respiratory modulation and that alterations in their firing patterns are similar to those seen for pontine neurons during withheld lung inflation. Raphé and pontine neurons were recorded simultaneously before and after vagotomy in decerebrated cats. Before vagotomy, 14% of 95 raphé neurons had increased activity during single respiratory cycles prolonged by withholding lung inflation; 13% exhibited decreased activity. After vagotomy, the average index of respiratory modulation (eta(2)) increased (0.05 +/- 0.10 to 0.12 +/- 0.18 SD; Student's paired t-test, P waves. These "Mayer wave-related oscillations" (MWROs) were coupled with central respiratory drive and became synchronized with the central respiratory rhythm after vagotomy (7 of 10 animals). Cross-correlation analysis identified functional connectivity in 52 of 360 pairs of neurons with MWROs. Collectively, the results suggest that a distributed network participates in the generation of MWROs and in the coordination of respiratory and vasomotor rhythms.

  20. Prenatal stress alters diazepam withdrawal syndrome and 5HT1A receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehayli, S; Said, N; El Khachibi, M; El Ouahli, M; Nadifi, S; Hakkou, F; Tazi, A

    2016-08-25

    Early-life events have long-term effects on brain structures and cause behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. The present experiments were designed to investigate the effects of prenatal stress on diazepam-induced withdrawal syndrome and serotonin-1A (5HT1A) receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. The results of the present study reveal that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress increased the anxiety-like behavior in the prenatally stressed (PS) animals withdrawn from chronic diazepam (2.5mg/kg/day i.p for 1week). Moreover, prenatal stress induced a down-regulation of 5HT1A mRNA in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress enhances diazepam withdrawal symptoms and alters 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. Thus, more studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the decrease of 5HT1A receptors expression in the raphe nuclei of PS rats. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell-Type-Specific Modulation of Sensory Responses in Olfactory Bulb Circuits by Serotonergic Projections from the Raphe Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunert, Daniela; Tsuno, Yusuke; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T; Wachowiak, Matt

    2016-06-22

    Serotonergic neurons in the brainstem raphe nuclei densely innervate the olfactory bulb (OB), where they can modulate the initial representation and processing of olfactory information. Serotonergic modulation of sensory responses among defined OB cell types is poorly characterized in vivo Here, we used cell-type-specific expression of optical reporters to visualize how raphe stimulation alters sensory responses in two classes of GABAergic neurons of the mouse OB glomerular layer, periglomerular (PG) and short axon (SA) cells, as well as mitral/tufted (MT) cells carrying OB output to piriform cortex. In PG and SA cells, brief (1-4 s) raphe stimulation elicited a large increase in the magnitude of responses linked to inhalation of ambient air, as well as modest increases in the magnitude of odorant-evoked responses. Near-identical effects were observed when the optical reporter of glutamatergic transmission iGluSnFR was expressed in PG and SA cells, suggesting enhanced excitatory input to these neurons. In contrast, in MT cells imaged from the dorsal OB, raphe stimulation elicited a strong increase in resting GCaMP fluorescence with only a slight enhancement of inhalation-linked responses to odorant. Finally, optogenetically stimulating raphe serotonergic afferents in the OB had heterogeneous effects on presumptive MT cells recorded extracellularly, with an overall modest increase in resting and odorant-evoked responses during serotonergic afferent stimulation. These results suggest that serotonergic afferents from raphe dynamically modulate olfactory processing through distinct effects on multiple OB targets, and may alter the degree to which OB output is shaped by inhibition during behavior. Modulation of the circuits that process sensory information can profoundly impact how information about the external world is represented and perceived. This study investigates how the serotonergic system modulates the initial processing of olfactory information by the

  2. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  3. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180 with Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  4. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180. From l to r: Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  5. How Dr. Pierce Promoted Himself

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This article is about Dr. Raymond V Pierce who owned St. Vincent Island before it became a refuge. The doctor painted advertisements for his famous “Woman’s Tonic”...

  6. Intense Activity of the Raphe Spinal Pathway Depresses Motor Activity via a Serotonin Dependent Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Jørgensen, Lone K

    2018-01-01

    Motor fatigue occurring during prolonged physical activity has both peripheral and central origins. It was previously demonstrated that the excitability of motoneurons was decreased when a spillover of serotonin could activate extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS......) of motoneurons. Here we investigated the impact of massive synaptic release of serotonin on motor behavior in an integrated preparation of the adult turtle performing fictive scratching behaviors. We found that a prolonged electrical stimulation of the raphe spinal pathway induced a reversible inhibition...... of the motor behavior that lasted several tens of seconds. The effect disappeared when the spinal cord was perfused with an antagonist for 5-HT1A receptors. By demonstrating a direct impact of serotonin on motor behavior, we suggest a central role of this monoamine behind central fatigue....

  7. Study of Relativistic Nucleus - Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to survey the reaction mechanisms involved in the collision of 60~GeV/nucleon and 200~GeV/nucleon light ions ($^{16}$0 and $^{32}$S provided by a new GSI-LBL injector) with different nuclei, to determine the stopping power of nuclear matter and to search for evidence of the formation of quark matter by comparison to hadron-nucleus reactions at the same incident energies. \\\\ The experimental set-up consists of a 2 m Streamer Chamber in the Vertex Magnet used to detect all the charged particles emerging from the interaction as well as the neutral strange particles that decay inside the chamber. The high energy of the forward-going particles are detected by four sets of calorimeters. A highly segmented Photon Position Detector (PPD) backed up by a 240 segment Ring Calorimeter will cover one unit of rapidity around mid-rapidity. An Intermediate Calorimeter will cover the rest of the forward phase space except for the region around beam rapidity, where a Veto Calorimeter will detect be...

  8. A pomeron approach to hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus 'soft' interaction at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S; Levin, E; Maor, U

    2001-01-01

    We formulate a generalization of the Glauber formalism for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the pomeron approach to high-energy interaction. Our treatment is based on two physical assumptions (i.e. two small parameters): (i) that only sufficiently small distances contribute to the pomeron structure; and (ii) the triple-pomeron vertex G sub 3 sub P /g sub P sub N <<1 (where g sub P sub N is the pomeron-nucleon vertex) is small. A systematic method is developed for calculating the total, elastic and diffractive dissociation cross sections as well as the survival probability of large rapidity gap processes and inclusive observables, both for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Our approach suggests saturation of the density of the produced hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions, the value of the saturation density turns out to be large.

  9. Diabetic retinopathy (DR: everybody's business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is on the increase worldwide, due mainly to the rise in the number of people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common because:* People are living longer, and diabetes is more prevalent in older people.* As people increasingly migrate to urban areas, exercise less, eat more, and eat less healthy food, more people are becoming obese – a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, including cataract, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR. DR usually develops between ten and twenty years after the onset of diabetes, and develops faster when diabetes is undiagnosed and untreated.People with DR whose sight is at risk can be treated, most commonly with laser, to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sadly, there is no treatment that can restore vision that has already been lost.

  10. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only the for...... muscle. Since maximal strength is an important determinant of neuromuscular fatigue during hiking, combined strength and endurance training should be incorporated in the training program of dinghy sailors.......% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. Although useful in exercise testing, prediction of hiking endurance capacity based on the changes in surface EMG in thigh and trunk muscles during a hiking maintenance task is not reliable. This could probably be explained by the varying exercise...

  11. Dr. von Braun With Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

  12. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  13. DR. MIKA MAJALE MEMORIAL LECTURE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tuberculosis and polio. The first indigenous orthopaedic surgeon was. Dr. Mika Majale. ... but was posted to Kisii then Mombasa where he spent all his orthopaedic life. The other orthopaedic surgeons were in .... dissertations done by some of the post graduate students are excellent, but they are simply left in the hard cover.

  14. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1981 Section: Animal Sciences. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj Ph.D. (Rajasthan), D.Sc. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 18 June 1936. Date of death: 26 January 2010. Specialization: Human Reproduction Last known address: Chairman, Hope Infertility Clinic & Research Foundation, 33/1, Aga Abbas Ali Road, ...

  15. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2007–2010. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.. Date of birth: 25 May 1976. Address during Associateship: Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai - 400 076. Contact: Email: anand@math.iitb.ac.in. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  16. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  17. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA. Date of birth: 4 November 1928. Specialization: Cytogenetics, Taxonomy, Plant Breeding and Rice Development Address: 'Ashoka', 204, Gautami Apartments, Barkatpura, Hyderabad 500 027, A.P.

  18. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah Ph.D. Ahmedabad. Date of birth: 24 May 1961. Specialization: Atmospheric Sciences, Global Change & Atmospheric Environment, Urban Air Pollution & Chemical-Climate Change, 2-D & 3-D Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modelling

  19. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Animal Sciences. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim D.Sc. (Andhra), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA. Date of birth: 12 November 1896. Date of death: 20 June 1987. Specialization: Ecology, Zoogeography, Nature Conservation, Ornithology Last known address: No. 46, Pali Hill, Bombay 400 050.

  20. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2002 Section: Engineering & Technology. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna Ph.D. (Adelaide). Date of birth: 11 February 1944. Specialization: Optical Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Electro-Optical Instrumentation and Atmospheric Science Technologies Address: 848, 8th B Main, 17th Cross, ISRO Layout, ...

  1. In Memoriam Dr. M. Jacobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Marius Jacobs, a senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, died suddenly on 28 April 1983, following a heart attack some days earlier. He was only 53 years old and his death came as a great shock, not only to his colleagues at our institute. Jacobs was a many-sided man with interests in many

  2. Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba Ph.D. (Baroda), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 September 1958. Specialization: Synthetic Peptides, Cell Signalling, Biology of Tuberculosis Infection, Systems Biology Address: Head, DDRC, Translational Health Science & Technbology Institute, NCR Biotech, Science Cluster, Faridabad 121 ...

  3. Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh Ph.D. (Chandigarh), FNASc. Date of birth: 25 May 1963. Specialization: Bioinformatics, Cancer Genomics, Immunoinformatics, Drug Design, Subunit Vaccine Design Address: Head, Centre for Computational Biology, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, Okhla, Phase 3, New ...

  4. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  5. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  6. A pilot study on predictors of brainstem raphe abnormality in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Milutin; Munjiza, Ana; Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Novakovic, Ivana; Dobricic, Valerija; Tosevski, Dusica Lecic; Mijajlovic, Milija

    2017-02-01

    Hypo/anechogenicity of the brainstem raphe (BR) structures has been suggested as a possible transcranial parenchymal sonography (TCS) marker associated with depression. The aim of this study was to analyze possible association of the abnormal BR echogenicity in patients with major depression when compared to healthy controls, and to evaluate its clinical and genetic correlates. TCS was performed in 53 patients diagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD) without psychotic symptoms and in 54 healthy matched controls. The TCS detected BR abnormalities were significantly more frequent in MDD patients (35 out of 53; 66%) in comparison to matched controls (5 out of 56; 9%). The prevalence of short allele (s) homozygocity in the length polymorphism of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was significantly higher in MDD patients relative to those with normal BR echogenicity. A stepwise statistical discriminant analysis revealed statistically significant separation between MDD patients with and without BR abnormalities groups based on the four predictors combined: the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale item 5 ("difficulty in concentration, poor memory"), presence of social phobia, s allele homozygocity of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and presence of generalized anxiety disorder. Cross-sectional design and heterogenous treatment of depressed patients. Reduced BR echogenicity in at least a subgroup of MDD patients may reflect a particular phenotype, characterized by more prevalent comorbid anxiety disorders, associated with particular genetic polymorphisms and neurotransmitter(s) deficits, most probably altered serotonergic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of the oxytocin receptor expressed in the rostral medullary raphe in thermoregulation during cold conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKasahara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent papers have reported that oxytocin (Oxt and the oxytocin receptor (Oxtr may be involved in the regulation of food intake in mammals. We therefore suspected the Oxt/Oxtr system to be involved in energy homeostasis. In previous studies, we found a tendency toward obesity in Oxtr-deficient mice, as well as impaired thermoregulation when these mice were exposed to cold conditions. In the present study, we observed the expression of Oxtr in the rostral medullary raphe (RMR, the brain region known to control thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Through immunohistochemistry, we detected neurons expressing Oxtr and c-Fos in the RMR of mice exposed to cold conditions. Up to 40% of Oxtr-positive neurons in RMR were classified as glutamatergic neurons, as shown by immunostaining using anti-VGLUT3 antibody. In addition, mice with exclusive expression of Oxtr in the RMR were generated by injecting an AAV-Oxtr vector into the RMR region of Oxtr-deficient mice. We confirmed the recovery of thermoregulatory ability in the manipulated mice during exposure to cold conditions. Moreover, mice with RMR-specific expression of Oxtr lost the typical morphological change in brown adipose tissue observed in Oxtr-deficient mice. Additionally, increased expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene, Adrb3 was observed in brown adipose tissue. These results are the first to show the critical role of RMR Oxtr expression in thermoregulation during cold conditions.

  8. Different actions for acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmission associated with raphe nuclei and their innervation cortical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Satoshi; Abe, Masao; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ochi, Shinichiro; Ueno, Shu-ichi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-03-01

    The atypical antidepressant, mirtazapine enhances noradrenergic transmission, but its effects on serotonergic transmission remain to be clarified. The present study determined the effects of acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmissions in raphe nuclei and their innervation regions, frontal and entorhinal cortex, using multiple-probes microdialysis with real-time PCR and western blotting. Acute administration of mirtazapine did not affect extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei or cortex; however, chronic administration increased extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei without affecting that in cortex. Blockade of 5-HT1A receptor, but not that of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor, enhanced the effects of acute administration of mirtazapine on extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei. Chronic mirtazapine administration reduced the inhibitory function associated with somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but enhanced postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor in serotonergic innervated cortical regions. Chronic administration reduced the expression of mRNA and protein of serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but not in the cortices. These results suggested that acute administration of mirtazapine probably activated serotonergic transmission, but its stimulatory action was abolished by activated inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor. Chronic administration of mirtazapine resulted in increased extracellular serotonin level via reduction of serotonin transporter with reduction of somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptor function in raphe nuclei. These pharmacological actions of mirtazapine include its serotonergic profiles as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Importin β1 protein-mediated nuclear localization of death receptor 5 (DR5) limits DR5/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death of human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Nishina, Takashi; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Koyanagi, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Yagita, Hideo

    2011-12-16

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/death receptor 5 (DR5)-mediated cell death plays an important role in the elimination of tumor cells and transformed cells. Recently, recombinant TRAIL and agonistic anti-DR5 monoclonal antibodies have been developed and applied to cancer therapy. However, depending on the type of cancer, the sensitivity to TRAIL has been reportedly different, and some tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Using confocal microscopy, we found that large amounts of DR5 were localized in the nucleus in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Moreover, these tumor cells were resistant to TRAIL, whereas DU145 cells, which do not have nuclear DR5, were highly sensitive to TRAIL. By means of immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis, we found that DR5 and importin β1 were physically associated, suggesting that the nuclear DR5 was transported through the nuclear import pathway mediated by importin β1. Two functional nuclear localization signals were identified in DR5, the mutation of which abrogated the nuclear localization of DR5 in HeLa cells. Moreover, the nuclear transport of DR5 was also prevented by the knockdown of importin β1 using siRNA, resulting in the up-regulation of DR5 expression on the cell surface and an increased sensitivity of HeLa and HepG2 cells to TRAIL. Taken together, our findings suggest that the importin β1-mediated nuclear localization of DR5 limits the DR5/TRAIL-induced cell death of human tumor cells and thus can be a novel target to improve cancer therapy with recombinant TRAIL and anti-DR5 antibodies.

  10. Sproglige drømmerier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farø, Ken Joensen

    2015-01-01

    blev tidligere brugt i Danmarks Radio som pausesignal, afspillet på en spilledåse. Ak ja, det var dengang. Gå ind på nettet og lyt til den, hvis du ikke kender melodien. Det er national kulturarv. Mange bevingede ord indeholder en form af ”drøm(me)”, fx Martin Luther Kings ”I have a Dream”. Eller...

  11. Rescattering effects and intermittent exponents in nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajares, C. (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Particulas Elementales)

    1991-04-11

    It is shown that the rescattering in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides a natural branching mechanism which explains the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the energy, projectile and target. The possibility of finding some new coherent phenomena by studying the dependence of the intermittent exponents on the number of collisions is discussed. (orig.).

  12. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director Past Issues / ... for NIH and for science in this country." "Dr. Collins is one of our generation's great scientific ...

  13. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  14. The intercalatus nucleus of Staderini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rutilio Staderini was one of the leading Italian anatomists of the twentieth century, together with some scientists, such as Giulio Chiarugi, Giovanni Vitali, and others. He was also a member of a new generation of anatomists. They had continued the tradition of the most famous Italian scientists, which started from the Renaissance up until the nineteenth century. Although he carried out important studies of neuroanatomy and comparative anatomy, as well as embryology, his name is rarely remembered by most medical historians. His name is linked to the nucleus he discovered: the Staderini nucleus or intercalated nucleus, a collection of nerve cells in the medulla oblongata located lateral to the hypoglossal nucleus. This article focuses on the biography of the neuroanatomist as well as the nucleus that carries his name and his other research, especially on comparative anatomy and embryology.

  15. Impacts of brain serotonin deficiency following Tph2 inactivation on development and raphe neuron serotonergic specification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Gutknecht

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT is implicated in a wide range of functions from basic physiological mechanisms to complex behaviors, including neuropsychiatric conditions, as well as in developmental processes. Increasing evidence links 5-HT signaling alterations during development to emotional dysregulation and psychopathology in adult age. To further analyze the importance of brain 5-HT in somatic and brain development and function, and more specifically differentiation and specification of the serotonergic system itself, we generated a mouse model with brain-specific 5-HT deficiency resulting from a genetically driven constitutive inactivation of neuronal tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2. Tph2 inactivation (Tph2-/- resulted in brain 5-HT deficiency leading to growth retardation and persistent leanness, whereas a sex- and age-dependent increase in body weight was observed in Tph2+/- mice. The conserved expression pattern of the 5-HT neuron-specific markers (except Tph2 and 5-HT demonstrates that brain 5-HT synthesis is not a prerequisite for the proliferation, differentiation and survival of raphe neurons subjected to the developmental program of serotonergic specification. Furthermore, although these neurons are unable to synthesize 5-HT from the precursor tryptophan, they still display electrophysiological properties characteristic of 5-HT neurons. Moreover, 5-HT deficiency induces an up-regulation of 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(1B receptors across brain regions as well as a reduction of norepinephrine concentrations accompanied by a reduced number of noradrenergic neurons. Together, our results characterize developmental, neurochemical, neurobiological and electrophysiological consequences of brain-specific 5-HT deficiency, reveal a dual dose-dependent role of 5-HT in body weight regulation and show that differentiation of serotonergic neuron phenotype is independent from endogenous 5-HT synthesis.

  16. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G

    2015-01-01

    implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined...

  17. The Alteration of Neonatal Raphe Neurons by Prenatal-Perinatal Nicotine. Meaning for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpa, Verónica J; Aylwin, María de la Luz O; Beltrán-Castillo, Sebastián; Bravo, Eduardo U; Llona, Isabel R; Richerson, George B; Eugenín, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine may link maternal cigarette smoking with respiratory dysfunctions in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure blunts ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and reduces central respiratory chemoreception in mouse neonates at Postnatal Days 0 (P0) to P3. This suggests that raphe neurons, which are altered in SIDS and contribute to central respiratory chemoreception, may be affected by nicotine. We therefore investigated whether prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure affects the activity, electrical properties, and chemosensitivity of raphe obscurus (ROb) neurons in mouse neonates. Osmotic minipumps, implanted subcutaneously in 5- to 7-day-pregnant CF1 mice, delivered nicotine bitartrate (60 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or saline (control) for up to 28 days. In neonates, ventilation was recorded by head-out plethysmography, c-Fos (neuronal activity marker), or serotonin autoreceptors (5HT1AR) were immunodetected using light microscopy, and patch-clamp recordings were made from raphe neurons in brainstem slices under normocarbia and hypercarbia. Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure decreased the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses at P1-P5, reduced both the number of c-Fos-positive ROb neurons during eucapnic normoxia at P1-P3 and their hypercapnia-induced recruitment at P3, increased 5HT1AR immunolabeling of ROb neurons at P3-P5, and reduced the spontaneous firing frequency of ROb neurons at P3 without affecting their CO2 sensitivity or their passive and active electrical properties. These findings reveal that prenatal-perinatal nicotine reduces the activity of neonatal ROb neurons, likely as a consequence of increased expression of 5HT1ARs. This hypoactivity may change the functional state of the respiratory neural network leading to breathing vulnerability and chemosensory failure as seen in SIDS.

  18. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  19. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  20. Interview with Dr. Damian Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Dr Damian Milton is one of the pre-eminent thinkers and presenters in the autism field in the UK and is gaining an increasing reputation internationally. He is a member of the scientific and advisory committee of Research Autism and is Head of Autism Knowledge and Expertise at the National Autistic Society. Damian is also a researcher for London South Bank University. He has worked on a number of projects for the Autism Education Trust, as well as autistic-led ventures such as the Theorising ...

  1. Snca and Bdnf gene expression in the VTA and raphe nuclei of midbrain in chronically victorious and defeated male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia N Kudryavtseva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn is a small neuronal protein that has been found to be expressed throughout the brain. It has been shown that α-Syn regulates the homeostasis of monoamine neurotransmitters and is involved in various degenerative and affective disorders. There is indication that α-Syn may regulate expression of the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF which plays an important role in the mood disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study aimed to analyze the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and raphe nuclei of the midbrain in male mice that had each won or defeated 20 encounters (20-time winners and 20-time losers, respectively in daily agonistic interactions. Groups of animals that had the same winning and losing track record followed by a no-fight period for 14 days (no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers were also studied. Snca mRNA levels were increased in the raphe nuclei in the 20-time losers and in the VTA of the 20-time winners. After no-fight period Snca mRNA levels decreased in both groups. Snca mRNA levels were similar to the control level in the VTA of the 20-time losers and in the raphe nuclei of the 20-time winners. However Snca gene expression increased in these areas in the no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers in comparison with respective mRNA levels in animals before no-fight period. Bdnf mRNA levels increased in VTA of 20-time winners. Significant positive correlations were found between the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the raphe nuclei. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Social experience affects Snca gene expression depending on brain areas and functional activity of monoaminergic systems in chronically victorious or defeated mice. These findings may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of forming different alpha-synucleinopathies.

  2. NMDA receptors trigger neurosecretion of 5-HT within dorsal raphé nucleus of the rat in the absence of action potential firing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Cornelisse, L.N.; Burnashev, N.; Lodder, J.C.; Timmerman, A.J.; Couey, J.J.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Brussaard, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Activity and calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitters from the somatodendritic compartment is an important signalling mechanism between neurones throughout the brain. NMDA receptors and vesicles filled with neurotransmitters occur in close proximity in many brain areas. It is unknown whether

  3. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Xu, Qi; Yuan, Xiang-Shan; Cherasse, Yoan; Schiffmann, Serge N; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Qu, Wei-Min; Urade, Yoshihiro; Lazarus, Michael; Huang, Zhi-Li; Li, Rui-Xi

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC) and shell (AcbSh) of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  4. Projections of nucleus accumbens adenosine A2A receptor neurons in the mouse brain and their implications in mediating sleep-wake regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping eZhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs in the nucleus accumbens (Acb have been demonstrated to play an important role in the arousal effect of adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, and may be involved in physiological sleep. To better understand the functions of these receptors in sleep, projections of A2AR neurons were mapped utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV encoding humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP as a tracer for long axonal pathways. The Cre-dependent AAV was injected into the core (AcbC and shell (AcbSh of the Acb in A2AR-Cre mice. Immunohistochemistry was then used to visualize hrGFP, highlighting the perikarya of the A2AR neurons in the injection sites, and their axons in projection regions. The data revealed that A2AR neurons exhibit medium-sized and either round or elliptic perikarya with their processes within the Acb. Moreover, the projections from the Acb distributed to nuclei in the forebrain, diencephalon, and brainstem. In the forebrain, A2AR neurons from all Acb sub-regions jointly projected to the ventral pallidum, the nucleus of the diagonal band, and the substantia innominata. Heavy projections from the AcbC and the ventral AcbSh, and weaker projections from the medial AcbSh, were observed in the lateral hypothalamus and lateral preoptic area. In the brainstem, the Acb projections were found in the ventral tegmental area, while AcbC and ventral AcbSh also projected to the median raphe nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray. The results supply a solid base for understanding the roles of the A2AR and A2AR neurons in the Acb, especially in the regulation of sleep.

  5. Role of VMH ketone bodies in adjusting caloric intake to increased dietary fat content in DIO and DR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henry M; Levin, Barry E

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential role of astrocyte-derived ketone bodies in regulating the early changes in caloric intake of diet induced-obese (DIO) versus diet-resistant (DR) rats fed a 31.5% fat high-energy (HE) diet. After 3 days on chow or HE diet, DR and DIO rats were assessed for their ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) ketone bodies levels and neuronal ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) sensing using microdialysis coupled to continuous food intake monitoring and calcium imaging in dissociated neurons, respectively. DIO rats ate more than DR rats over 3 days of HE diet intake. On day 3 of HE diet intake, DR rats reduced their caloric intake while DIO rats remained hyperphagic. Local VMH astrocyte ketone bodies production was similar between DR and DIO rats during the first 6 h after dark onset feeding but inhibiting VMH ketone body production in DR rats on day 3 transiently returned their intake of HE diet to the level of DIO rats consuming HE diet. In addition, dissociated VMN neurons from DIO and DR rats were equally sensitive to the largely excitatory effects of β-hydroxybutyrate. Thus while DR rats respond to increased VMH ketone levels by decreasing their intake after 3 days of HE diet, this is not the case of DIO rats. These data suggest that DIO inherent leptin resistance prevents ketone bodies inhibitory action on food intake.

  6. The subthalamic nucleus, Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    Part I. Development, cytology, topography and connections. This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology

  7. Heavy flavors in nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step setup for heavy-flavor studies in high-energy nucleus-nucleus (AA and proton-nucleus (pA collisions is presented. The propagation of the heavy quarks in the medium is described in a framework provided by the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow parameter of the final Dmesons both in AA and in pA collisions and compare our results to experimental data.

  8. Dr House, TV, and reality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Montois, Sylvie; Alhéritière, Armelle; De Stefano, Carla; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Adnet, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Medical practice in the media is usually far from reality. Thus, the viewer may be led astray. The world-famous fictional Dr House has to face a difficult diagnosis every week. His practice does not seem to reflect reality. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnosis strategy involved in this television program. An observer has previewed the 2011 season. The episode running time, the patient's age and sex, the list of all investigations and interventions, the final diagnosis, and the patient's outcome were collected. Number and proportion of French viewers for each episode were recorded. We analyzed 18 episodes. The median running time was 42.5 (42.1-43.2) minutes. Main patient characters were 12 men (66%) and 6 women (33%); the average age was 31 (22-38) years. There were 225 investigations or interventions reported, averaging 14 (9-15) per episode, representing one examination every 3.1 (2.9-4.8) minutes. The most frequently prescribed investigations were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 13; 72%), blood sample (11; 61%), and biopsy (10; 56%). The most frequent interventions were surgery, anti-infectious treatments, and steroid treatments (9 each; 50%). Two patients (11%) died. The median number of spectators was 8.4 (8.1-8.7) million, corresponding to 33% (33%-34%) of the French national audience. The population and the examination strategies used by Dr House were unrealistic. Because of this distortion, patients may not understand, nor accept the delay, the investigation choices, the intervention costs, risks, nor failures of a daily medical practice. Physicians should be aware of this "information bias." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  10. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  11. The occurrence and regional distribution of DR4 on herniated disc cells: a potential apoptosis pathway in lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Niu, Tao; Yang, Shang-You; Lu, Zhenhua; Chen, Bohua

    2008-02-15

    Intervertebral discs surgically obtained from 60 herniated patients and 5 normal individuals were examined to correlate the regional distribution of DR4-receptor and apoptosis. To explore the role of a tumor necrosis factor superfamily member DR4 and the TRAIL/DR4 mediated apoptosis in the human lumbar intervertebral disc. The pathogenesis of lumbar degenerative intervertebral discs remains not completely understood. In herniated lumbar disc tissues, increased apoptosis and higher expression of Fas/Fas ligand and caspase-3 have been reported, suggesting a pivotal role of apoptotic mechanisms in intervertebral disc degeneration. However, it is not clear that apoptosis mediators such as TRAIL and Death Receptor 4 (DR4), which often represent different apoptosis signal pathways, contribute to the apoptosis process during the development of the degenerated intervertebral discs. Apoptosis was determined by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) p85 immunohistochemistry. Expression of DR4 was revealed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Statistical difference among groups was analyzed using one-way ANOVA with LSD post hoc multiple comparisons and the bivariate correlations. Apoptotic cells were detected in the nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus of all samples. However, the number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in the nucleus compared with the anulus. Further, there were significantly more apoptotic cells in the herniated discs compared with the normal discs. Within herniated discs, a remarkably higher percentage of positive staining cells were detected in the uncontained discs than the contained ones. Strong expression of DR4 was detected in all samples of degenerative herniated discs, whereasmuch weaker expression was sporadically identified in normal discs. In addition, the prevalence of apoptosis positively correlated with the severity of disc degeneration. The concomitant increase of DR4 expression in the regions of heavy apoptotic cell aggregation suggests

  12. dr. andries albertus odendaal snr., evangeliedraer in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sy tesis wat na Nederland gepos word nie. Deur middel van 'n vriend is by Dr. Bergema navraag gedoen hieroor. Dit blyk dat Dr. Bergema ewe ontsteld was omdat A.A. nie reageer op sy briewe en aanbevelings nie. Dringende navraag by die plaaslike poskantoor en hulle ondersoek het aan die lig gebring dat die.

  13. Dr Andrea Granelli, Vice President, Telecom Italia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 06: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (second from right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi , F. Gagliardi and G. Cavallari. Photo 15: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (left) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi and G. Cavallari.

  14. Dr. Zakir Husain on Education and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Radha Gayathri, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Zakir Husain is known as a self-less nationalist leader and also as an educationist "par excellence." Taking a cue from his educational ideas like the "Nai Talim," this article brings into focus his views on the medium-conundrum. Dr. Husain was very clear about the role of Indian languages and the relevance of mother…

  15. Interview with Dr. Claudio Rama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Rama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trayendo un breve curriculum vitae del Prof. Dr. Claudio Rama, destacaremos su formación académica, su trayectoria académico-profesional y su producción bibliográfica. Nuestro entrevistado se graduó en Economía por la Universidad Central de Venezuela en 1982. En 2003 concluyó el máster en Administración Educacional en la Universidad José María Vargas, Venezuela. Terminó el Doctorado en Ciencias de la Educación en la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, Venezuela en 2006 y el Doctorado en Derecho, en la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2009. Claudio Rama hizo pos-doctorado: en el Centro de Postgrados de la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Faculdade de Educação da UNICAMP, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Universidade Federal Fluminense, en 2011-2012; y en el Programa de Postdoctorado de la Facultad de Derecho, de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2013-2015. Nuestro entrevistado recibió también el título de Doctor “honoris causa” de cuatro universidades peruanas.

  16. Fast mixing condensation nucleus counter

    OpenAIRE

    Flagan, Richard C.; Wang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    A fast mixing condensation nucleus counter useful for detecting particles entrained in a sample gas stream is provided. The fast mixing condensation nucleus counter comprises a detector and a mixing condensation device having a mixing chamber adapted to allow gas to flow from an inlet to an outlet, wherein the outlet directs the gas flow to the detector. The mixing chamber has an inlet for introducing vapor-laden gas into the chamber and at least one nozzle for introducing a sample gas having...

  17. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...

  18. Modulation of the subthalamic nucleus activity by serotonergic agents and fluoxetine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristieta, A; Morera-Herreras, T; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Miguelez, C; Vidaurrazaga, I; Arrue, A; Zumarraga, M; Ugedo, L

    2014-05-01

    Within the basal ganglia, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the only glutamatergic structure and occupies a central position in the indirect pathway. In rat, the STN receives serotonergic input from the dorsal raphe nucleus and expresses serotonergic receptors. This study examined the consequences of serotonergic neurotransmission modulation on STN neuron activity. In vivo single-unit extracellular recordings, HPLC determination, and rotarod and bar test were performed in control, 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride- (pCPA, a serotonin synthesis inhibitor) and chronically fluoxetine-treated rats. The pCPA treatment and the administration of serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists increased number of bursting neurons in the STN. The systemic administration of the 5-HT(1A) agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, decreased the firing rate and increased the coefficient of variation of STN neurons in pCPA-treated rats but not in control animals. Additionally, microinjection of 8-OH-DPAT into the STN reduced the firing rate of STN neurons, while microinjection of the 5-HT(2C) agonist, Ro 60-0175, increased the firing rate in both control and fluoxetine-treated animals. Finally, the fluoxetine challenge increased the firing rate of STN neurons in fluoxetine-treated rats and induced catalepsy. Our results indicate that the depletion and the blockage of 5-HT modify STN neuron firing pattern. STN neuron activity is under the control of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors located both inside and outside the STN. Finally, fluoxetine increases STN neuron activity in chronically fluoxetine-treated rats, which may explain the role of this nucleus in fluoxetine-induced extrapyramidal side effects.

  19. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  20. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...... and because patients with only two miscarriages were included in many studies; this is defined as repeated miscarriage. The odds ratios of repeated miscarriage for the HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens were calculated for the individual studies and subsequently the pooled odds ratios for the studies were calculated...

  1. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  2. Targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) projections from the oval nucleus of the BNST using cell-type specific neuronal tracing studies in mouse and rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, Joanna; Martinon, Daisy; Moaddab, Mahsa; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is known to play a critical role in mediating the behavioral and autonomic responses to stressors. The oval nucleus of the BNST (BNSTov) contains cell bodies that synthesize the stress hormone, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Although afferent fibers originating from the BNSTov have been shown to innervate several key structures of the neuroendocrine and central autonomic system, the question remains as to whether, some of these fibers are CRF-positive. To directly address this question, we injected a “floxed” anterograde tracer (rAAV5/EF1a-DIO-mCherry) into the BNSTov of CRFp3.0CreGFP transgenic mice, which express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the CRF promoter. Serial sections were then analyzed for the presence of double-labeled fibers in potential projection sites. To determine whether CRF neurons in the rat BNSTov send comparable projections, we infused rat BNSTov with an AAV in which the human synapsin promoter drives enhanced GFP expression. We then used CRF immunoreactivity to examine double-labeled fluorescent fibers and axon terminals in projection sites from brain sections of the AAV-infused rats. We have observed several terminal fields in the mouse and rat brain with double-labeled fibers in the Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD), the Paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and to a lesser extent in the Ventral tegmental area. We found double-labeled terminal boutons in the nucleus accumbens shell, prelimbic cortex, and posterior basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. The most intense double-labeling was found in midbrain, including substantia nigra pars compacta, red nucleus, periaqueductal gray, pontine nuclei, as well as DRD. The results of our study indicate that CRF neurons are the output neurons of the BNSTov and they send projections to the centers of neuroendocrine and autonomic regulation, but also regions modulating reward and motivation, vigilance, motor function

  3. Heavy-ion nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, M A; Haque, S

    2003-01-01

    Heavy ion-nucleus scattering is an excellent laboratory to probe high spin phenomena, exotic nuclei and for the analysis of various exit channels. The Strong Absorption Model or the generalized diffraction models, which are semi-classical in nature, have been employed in the description of various heavy ion-nucleus scattering phenomena with reasonable success. But one needs to treat the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically in the Wave Mechanical picture for the appropriate description of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering phenomena. We have brought the mathematics for the cross-section of the heavy-ion nucleus scattering to an analytic expression taking account of the deflection function (scattering angles) quantum mechanically. sup 9 Be, sup 1 sup 6 O, sup 2 sup 0 Ne and sup 3 sup 2 S heavy-ion beams elastic scattering from sup 2 sup 8 Si, sup 2 sup 4 Mg and sup 4 sup 0 Ca target nuclei at various projectile energies over the range 20-151 MeV have been analysed in terms of the 2-paramet...

  4. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  5. Serotonergic systems associated with arousal and vigilance behaviors following administration of anxiogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, J K; Johnson, P L; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2005-01-01

    drugs on topographically organized subpopulations of serotonergic neurons using double immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos and tryptophan hydroxylase combined with topographical analysis of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Anxiogenic drugs with diverse pharmacological properties including...... nucleus, a forebrain structure important for emotional appraisal and modulation of anxiety-related physiological and behavioral responses. Together these findings support the hypothesis that there is a functional topographical organization in the DR and are consistent with the hypothesis that anxiogenic...

  6. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  7. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  8. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Engineering & Technology. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE, FNAAS. Specialization: Food Engineering, Biotechnology Address: Chief Scientist, Department of Food Engineering, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 020, Karnataka

  9. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  10. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells: Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Elisabeth GE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5. Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether agonistic DR4 or DR5 antibodies could be used to circumvent rhTRAIL resistance, alone or in combination with various chemotherapies. Methods Our study was performed in an isogenic model comprised of the SW948 human colon carcinoma cell line and its rhTRAIL resistant sub-line SW948-TR. Effects of rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4/DR5 antibodies on cell viability were measured using MTT assays and identification of morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, after acridine orange staining. Sensitivity to the different death receptor ligands was stimulated using pretreatment with the cytokine IFN-gamma and the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the changes in rhTRAIL sensitivity, alterations in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Western blot analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to determine the composition of the death-inducing signalling complex at the cell membrane. Results SW948 cells were sensitive to all three of the DR-targeting agents tested, although the agonistic DR5 antibody induced only weak caspase 8 cleavage and limited apoptosis. Surprisingly, agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies induced equivalent DISC formation and caspase 8 cleavage at the level of their individual receptors, suggesting impairment of further caspase 8 processing upon DR5 stimulation. SW948-TR cells were cross-resistant to all DR-targeting agents as a result of decreased caspase 8 expression levels. Caspase 8 protein expression was restored by MG-132 and IFN-gamma pretreatment, which also re-established sensitivity to rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4 antibody in SW948-TR. Surprisingly, MG-132 but not IFN

  11. Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5 monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Chunxia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10 and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

  12. Adaptive Changes in the Sensitivity of the Dorsal Raphe and Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nuclei to Acute Exercise, and Hippocampal Neurogenesis May Contribute to the Antidepressant Effect of Regular Treadmill Running in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Nishii

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing clinical evidence suggests that regular physical exercise can prevent or reduce the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders including depressive symptoms. Antidepressant effect of regular exercise may be implicated in monoaminergic transmission including serotonergic transmission, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and hippocampal neurogenesis, but few general concepts regarding the optimal exercise regimen for stimulating neural mechanisms involved in antidepressant properties have been developed. Here, we examined how 4 weeks of treadmill running at different intensities (0, 15, 25 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 times/week alters neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN, which is the major source of serotonin (5-HT neurons in the central nervous system, and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, in which corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF neurons initiate the activation of the HPA axis, during one session of acute treadmill running at different speeds (0, 15, 25 m/min, 30 min in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. We also examined neurogenesis in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry for doublecortin (DCX and assessed depressive-like behavior using the forced swim test after regular exercise for 4 weeks. In the pre-training period, acute treadmill running at low speed, but not at high speed, increased c-Fos positive nuclei in the DRN compared with the sedentary control. The number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN during acute treadmill running was increased in a running speed-dependent manner. Regular exercise for 4 weeks, regardless of the training intensity, induced an enhancement of c-Fos expression in the DRN during not only low-speed but also high-speed acute running, and generally reduced c-Fos expression in the PVN during acute running compared with pre-training. Furthermore, regular treadmill running for 4 weeks enhanced DCX immunoreactivity in the

  13. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  14. Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Projections from the Oval Nucleus of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Using Cell-Type Specific Neuronal Tracing Studies in Mouse and Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, J; Martinon, D; Moaddab, M; Rainnie, D G

    2016-12-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is known to play a critical role in mediating the behavioural and autonomic responses to stressors. The oval nucleus of the BNST (BNSTov) contains cell bodies that synthesise the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Although afferent fibres originating from the BNSTov have been shown to innervate several key structures of the neuroendocrine and central autonomic system, the question remains as to whether some of these fibres are CRF-positive. To directly address this question, we injected a 'floxed' anterograde tracer (rAAV5/EF1a-DIO-mCherry) into the BNSTov of CRFp3.0CreGFP transgenic mice, which express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the CRF promoter. Serial sections were then analysed for the presence of double-labelled fibres in potential projection sites. To determine whether CRF neurons in the rat BNSTov send comparable projections, we infused rat BNSTov with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) in which the human synapsin promoter drives enhanced GFP expression. We then used CRF immunoreactivity to examine double-labelled fluorescent fibres and axon terminals in projection sites from brain sections of the AAV-infused rats. We have observed several terminal fields in the mouse and rat brain with double-labelled fibres in the Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and, to a lesser extent, in the ventral tegmental area. We found double-labelled terminal boutons in the nucleus accumbens shell, prelimbic cortex and posterior basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. The most intense double-labelling was found in midbrain, including substantia nigra pars compacta, red nucleus, periaqueductal grey and pontine nuclei, as well as DRD. The results of the present study indicate that CRF neurons are the output neurons of the BNSTov and they send projections not only to the centres of neuroendocrine and autonomic regulation, but also regions modulating

  15. Nitric oxide producing neurones in the rat medulla oblongata that project to nucleus tractus solitarii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, F O; McWilliam, P N; Batten, T F

    2000-11-01

    The production of nitric oxide in neurones of the rat medulla oblongata that project to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) was examined by simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and of cholera toxin B-subunit (CTb), which was injected into the caudal zone of the NTS. Neurones immunoreactive for CTb and neurones immunoreactive for NOS were widely co-distributed and found in almost all the anatomical divisions of the medulla. Dual-labelled cells, containing both CTb and NOS immunoreactivities were more numerous ipsilaterally to the injection sites. They were concentrated principally in the more rostral zone of the NTS, raphé nuclei, dorsal, intermediate and lateral reticular areas, spinal trigeminal and paratrigeminal nuclei and the external cuneate and medial vestibular nuclei. Isolated dual-labelled neurones were also scattered throughout most of the divisions of the reticular formation. These observations indicate that many areas of the medulla that are known to relay somatosensory and viscerosensory inputs contain NOS immunoreactive neurones that project to the NTS, and may, therefore, contribute to the dense NOS-immunoreactive innervation of the NTS. The release of nitric oxide from the axon terminals of these neurones may modulate autonomic responses generated by NTS neurones in relation to peripheral sensory stimuli, and thus ultimately regulate sympathetic and/or parasympathetic outflow.

  16. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  17. Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"......Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"...

  18. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells : Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Pennarun, Bodvael; Le, Phuong T. K.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Background: rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether

  19. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr. David Syz (left) with Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes.Photo 02: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book, with Prof. Roger Cashmore.Photo 03: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book.Photo 04: Handshake between Dr. David Syz (left) and Prof. Roger Cashmore.

  20. Focal warming in the nucleus of the solitary tract prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex in decerebrate piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L; Damon, T A; Leiter, J C; Bartlett, D

    2007-01-01

    The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR), elicited by a drop of water in the larynx, is exaggerated by mild hyperthermia (body temperature = 40-41 degrees C) in neonatal piglets. We tested the hypothesis that thermal prolongation of the LCR results from heating the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), where laryngeal afferents first form synapses in the brain stem. Three- to 13-day-old piglets were decerebrated and vagotomized and studied without anesthesia while paralyzed and ventilated. Phrenic nerve activity and rectal temperature were recorded. A thermode was placed in the medulla, and the brain tissue temperature was recorded with a thermistor approximately 1 mm from the tip of the thermode. When the thermode was inserted into the brain stem, respiratory activity was arrested or greatly distorted in eight animals. However, the thermode was inserted in nine animals without disrupting respiratory activity, and in these animals, warming the medullary thermode (thermistor temperature = 40-41 degrees C) while holding rectal temperature constant reversibly exaggerated the LCR. The caudal raphé was warmed focally by approximately 2 degrees C in four additional animals; this did not alter the duration of the LCR in these animals. Thermodes placed in the NTS did not disrupt respiratory activity, but they did prolong the LCR when warmed. Thermodes that were placed deep to the NTS in the region of the nucleus ambiguus disrupted respiratory activity, which precluded any analysis of the LCR. We conclude that prolongation of the laryngeal chemoreflex by whole body hyperthermia originates from the elevation of brain tissue temperature within in the NTS.

  1. A Tribute to Dr. Willy Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Willy Lens, born on December 10th, 1943, passed away on August 29th, 2014. With his passing, the motivation community has lost a seminal member, a mentor, and a friend. Dr. Lens – a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and Founding Fellow of the American Educational Research Association – made fundamental contributions to the study of motivation both through his own work and through his caring and thoughtful mentorship of a large community of scholars. With this tribute, we want to honor Dr. Willy Lens’ significance to psychology and education as well as his positive influence, both personally and professionally, on the lives of dozens of scholars. With his contagious enthusiasm and caring mentorship, Willy was an example for our academic community and with this tribute we express our gratitude for the privilege to have collaborated with him.

  2. Absence of jet quenching in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizides, Constantin; Morsch, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Medium effects on the production of high-pT particles in nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions are generally quantified by the nuclear modification factor (RAA), defined to be unity in absence of nuclear effects. Modeling particle production including a nucleon-nucleon impact parameter dependence, we demonstrate that RAA at midrapidity in peripheral AA collisions can be significantly affected by event selection and geometry biases. Even without jet quenching and shadowing, these biases cause an apparent suppression for RAA in peripheral collisions, and are relevant for all types of hard probes and all collision energies. Our studies indicate that calculations of jet quenching in peripheral AA collisions should account for the biases, or else they will overestimate the relevance of parton energy loss. Similarly, expectations of parton energy loss in light-heavy collision systems based on comparison with apparent suppression seen in peripheral RAA should be revised. Our interpretation of the peripheral RAA data would unify observations for lighter collision systems or lower energies where significant values of elliptic flow are observed despite the absence of strong jet quenching.

  3. The habenulo-raphe serotonergic circuit encodes an aversive expectation value essential for adaptive active avoidance of danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Ryunosuke; Fredes, Felipe; Kinoshita, Masae; Aoki, Ryo; Aizawa, Hidenori; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Aoki, Tazu; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Kakinuma, Hisaya; Matsuda, Masaru; Yamazaki, Masako; Takahoko, Mikako; Tsuboi, Takashi; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Koide, Tetsuya; Yabuki, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2014-12-03

    Anticipation of danger at first elicits panic in animals, but later it helps them to avoid the real threat adaptively. In zebrafish, as fish experience more and more danger, neurons in the ventral habenula (vHb) showed tonic increase in the activity to the presented cue and activated serotonergic neurons in the median raphe (MR). This neuronal activity could represent the expectation of a dangerous outcome and be used for comparison with a real outcome when the fish is learning how to escape from a dangerous to a safer environment. Indeed, inhibiting synaptic transmission from vHb to MR impaired adaptive avoidance learning, while panic behavior induced by classical fear conditioning remained intact. Furthermore, artificially triggering this negative outcome expectation signal by optogenetic stimulation of vHb neurons evoked place avoidance behavior. Thus, vHb-MR circuit is essential for representing the level of expected danger and behavioral programming to adaptively avoid potential hazard. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biography of Dr. Simao Nascimento de Sousa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.^red.

    International 32 (2006) 148 www.elsevier.com/locate/envint The International workshop on marine pollution and ecotoxicology (2004) was organized to felicitate our colleague Dr. Sima˜o Nascimento de Sousa, Deputy Director, NIO who superannuated on 29th February..., 2004. Dr. de Sousa was born on the 26th of February, 1944 at Corlim, Ilhas, Goa. He graduated with BSc (Hons.) in 1969 and MSc with Physical Chemistry in 1971 from the University of Bombay (Mumbai), India. He began his career with studies in the Mandovi...

  5. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  6. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama Ph.D. (Andhra), FNAE. Date of birth: 20 January 1939. Specialization: Petroleum Refining and Heterogeneous Catalysis Address: SFS Flat No. 600, DDA/HIG Flats, Sector 13, Phase 2, Pocket B, Dwaraka, New Delhi 110 045, U.T.

  7. The Contributions of Dr. Alfred Gysi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Rodney D; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-11-24

    This article is a historical overview of Dr. Alfred Gysi's contributions to the profession in the areas of denture tooth and articulator design. His understanding of occlusion and mandibular movement resulted in denture tooth designs and occlusal concepts still in widespread use. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. The Years of Dr. Robert Eugene Marshak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Luke W.

    I am honored and privileged to make a brief statement in memory of Dr. Marshak's distinguished achievement in science, his kindness and great humanity. I will concentrate on the part of his career at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University …

  9. Prof Dr.Farida Habib Shah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ranjeetha

    Women in Leadership Roles in Science. dR h Pl i th L k Pi li ... Employment – job entry. M i th l dd. • Moving up the ladder. • Decision making committees. • Leadership Positions. • Women in Technopreneurship- corporate level .... Organize more training programmes for communication and presentation skills for their ...

  10. Dr Tedros Adhanom: New WHO Director General

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... five other candidates to the post. His accomplishments both in Ethiopia and the global stage catapult him to this remarkable success. ... Dr Tedros is a change agent, and a reformist in the health sector. His election as the Director General of WHO brings along a lot of expectations for a better health agenda ...

  11. In Memoriam- Prof. Dr. Andries Willem Lategan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Ligthelm

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie Curriculum Vitae sou voorgelees gewees het met die inougurele rede van wyle prof. dr. A. W. Lategan met die aanvaarding van 'n ereprofessoraat aan die P.U. vir C.H.O. op 29 Oktober 1965. Prof. Lategan is op 23 Oktober 1965 oor- lcde. Sy inougurele rede verskyn as ’n bylaag in hierdie uit- gawe.

  12. Stop words for “Dr Math”

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available “Dr Math” is a facility where primary and secondary school pupils can use MXit on their cell phones to get help with their mathematics homework. Pupils use an abbreviated “MXit lingo” leaving out most vowels and substituting various numerals...

  13. The great neurosis of Dr. Joseph Gerard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Rouillon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The Great Neurosis, of Dr. Joseph Gerard, was published in 1889 in Paris. The book, intended for the general public, shows the different varieties of neuroses through picturesque and instructive examples. Its scientific and medical value is poor, but provides us with the various meanings of the word 'neurosis' in the late nineteenth century. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Confessions of a Dr Math tutor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics look different on a small 3-inch screen of an inexpensive cell phone when compared to a 3-meter whiteboard in a mathematics classroom. Dr Math uses cell phone or mobile data "chat" technologies to assist primary and secondary school...

  15. Hadron-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    A new type of nuclear spectroscopy to study hadron-nucleus bound states is described. The first successful experiment was to search for deeply bound pi sup - states in heavy nuclei using the sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb(d, sup 3 He) reaction at GSI, in which a narrow peak arising from the 2p pi sup - orbital coupled with the neutron-hole states was observed at 135 MeV excitation energy. An improved experiment has just been carried out to separately identify the 1s and 2p pi sup - states. These experiments provide important information on the local potential strength, from which the effective mass of pi sup - is deduced to be 20 MeV. This method will be extended to search for eta and omega bound states as well as for K sup - bound states. The advantage of the bound-state spectroscopy versus invariant mass spectroscopy is emphasized.

  16. Impaired orexin receptor expression in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus in sudden infant death syndrome: possible involvement of this nucleus in arousal pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Ferrero, Stefano; Roncati, Luca; Matturri, Luigi; Pusiol, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    As well known, the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is characterized by the sudden death of a seemingly healthy infant during sleep, frequently resulted from a deficit in arousal phase. Awakening from sleep requires a fully developed and functioning neuronal respiratory network to modulate the ventilation as needed. The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN) plays a pivotal role in breathing control, thanks to its interconnections with the widespread serotonin and noradrenaline neurons in the brainstem. Numerous studies to date have focused on the implication of orexin, a neuropeptide synthesized by neurons of the lateral hypothalamus, with major projections to the brainstem raphé nuclei and locus coeruleus, in arousal, a neurobiological process closely linked to breathing modifications. The aim of our research has been to demonstrate that also the KFN is a fundamental component of the orexin system, actively involved in arousal. We have evaluated the expression and distribution of the orexin receptors (orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptors) particularly in the rostral pons, where the KFN is located, of 25 SIDS cases and 18 controls. An intense orexin-1 innervation around the KF neurons has been detected in almost all the controls and only in 20% of SIDS cases. On the basis of these results, we believe that: (1) the KFN plays a leading role not only in providing a regular breathing rhythm but also in the coordination of the sleep-to-wake transition; (2) a defective orexin expression in the KFN could prevent arousal, thus assuming a crucial importance in causing SIDS.

  17. Dorsal-to-Ventral Shift in Midbrain Dopaminergic Projections and Increased Thalamic/Raphe Serotonergic Function in Early Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Seppänen, Marko; Noponen, Tommi; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2015-07-01

    Loss of nigrostriatal neurons leading to dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum is the pathologic hallmark of Parkinson disease contributing to the primary motor symptoms of the disease. However, Parkinson pathology is more widespread in the brain, affecting also other dopaminergic pathways and neurotransmitter systems, but these changes are less well characterized. This study aimed to investigate the mesencephalic striatal and extrastriatal dopaminergic projections together with extrastriatal serotonin transporter binding in Parkinson disease. Two hundred sixteen patients with Parkinson disease and 204 control patients (patients without neurodegenerative parkinsonism syndromes and normal SPECT imaging) were investigated with SPECT using the dopamine/serotonin transporter ligand (123)I-N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ((123)I-FP-CIT) in the clinical setting. The group differences and midbrain correlations were analyzed voxel by voxel over the entire brain. We found that Parkinson patients had lower (123)I-FP-CIT uptake in the striatum and ventral midbrain but higher uptake in the thalamus and raphe nuclei than control patients. In patients with Parkinson disease, the correlation of the midbrain tracer uptake was shifted from the putamen to widespread corticolimbic areas. All findings were highly significant at the voxel level familywise error-corrected P value of less than 0.05. Our findings show that Parkinson disease is associated not only with the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurotransmission, but also with a parallel shift toward mesolimbic and mesocortical function. Furthermore, Parkinson disease patients seem to have upregulation of brain serotonin transporter function at the early phase of the disease. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Action potentials: to the nucleus and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ramendra N; Dudek, Serena M

    2008-04-01

    The neuronal nucleus is now widely accepted as playing a vital role in maintaining long-term changes in synaptic effectiveness. To act, however, the nucleus must be appropriately relayed with information regarding the latest round of synaptic plasticity. Several constraints of doing so in a neuron pertain to the often significant spatial distance of synapses from the nucleus and the number of synapses required for such a signal to reach functional levels in the nucleus. Largely based on the sensitivity of transcriptional responses to NMDA receptor antagonists, it has been postulated that the signals are physically relayed by biochemical messengers from the synapse to the nucleus. Alternatively, a second, less often considered but equally viable method of signal transduction may be initiated by action potentials generated proximal to the nucleus, wherefrom the signal can be relayed directly by calcium or indirectly by biochemical second messengers. We consider action potential-dependent signaling to the nucleus to have its own computational advantages over the synapse-to-nucleus signal for some functions. This minireview summarizes the logic and experimental support for these two modes of signaling and attempts to validate the action potential model as playing an important role in transcriptional regulation relating specifically to long-term synaptic plasticity.

  19. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2006-01-15

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  20. Prof dr FJ van Zyl as sendingteoloog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J.C. vanWyk

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof Dr FJ van Zyl as mission theologian In this article, the theology of mission of Prof dr FJ van Zyl is being explored. This is done by way of his lectures in the Science of Mission at the University of Pretoria during 1960-1978 and also from articles in the magazines of the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk dating back approximately forty years. It is found that almost none of his dictions is outdated. The radical cataclysm in the theology of mission, especially after 1961, he sharply detected and exposed. His theology of mission is built on a very broad theological base which can be described as theology of the Word. To him mission is proclamation.

  1. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, G

    1996-05-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  2. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  3. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  4. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  5. Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Prostate Enlargement Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH Past Issues / Winter 2017 ... Articles Treating the Problem Prostate / Understanding Prostate Enlargement / Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH Winter 2017 Issue: Volume ...

  6. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  7. Dr. Norman Bethune as a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, I B

    1996-02-01

    Dr. Norman Bethune's recognition as a Canadian of renown resulted from his devoted work in China during the late 1930s. He had received a general surgical training, but his personal illness with tuberculosis led him to specialize in thoracic surgery. A surgical program at McGill University under Dr. Edward Archibald, a pioneer thoracic surgeon, was initially successful, but by the mid-1930s Bethune was rejected by McGill and Dr. Archibald. He became chief of thoracic surgery at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur outside Montreal. H developed thoracic surgical instruments and wrote numerous scientific papers. The outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1937 attracted Bethune to oppose what he viewed as fascist aggression. He went to Spain, where he established the value of mobile blood banking. On his return to Canada in 1937 he became aware of the escalating war between China and Japan. He joined the Chinese communist forces in northern China and spent 18 months doing Herculean mobile war surgery, while improving the state of medical services in primitive, depressing conditions. He died in 1939 at the age of 49 years of septicemia as a result of accidental laceration of his finger during surgery. The Chinese have venerated Norman Bethune and stimulated his memorialization in Canada. His surgical record can be viewed as mixed in quality, but overall his performance remains impressive for its achievement.

  8. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    -DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  9. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  10. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland, toured the assembly hall of the ATLAS experiment on a recent visit to CERN.Photos 01, 02: Dr. Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment (second from left), explains to Dr. David Syz (fourth from left) and accompanying visitors the process of integration of a 26-metre-long coil of the barrel toroid magnet system into its coil casing.Photo 03: Dr. Peter Jenni (extreme right) with Dr. David Syz (front row, fourth from right) behind a stack of 26-metre-long 'racetrack' coils awaiting integration into their coil casings.

  11. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Selyuzhenkov, I; Klochkov, V; Herve, A E; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Matulewicz, T N; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Mills, G B; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Mathes, H; Roehrich, D; Marcinek, A J; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Koziel, M E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Strikhanov, M; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Blondel, A P P; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Ereditato, A; Paolone, V; Damyanova, A; Gazdzicki, M; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  12. Nucleus accumbens surgery for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xue-lian; Chang, Chong-wang; Ge, Shun-nan; Gao, Li; Wu, He-ming; Zhao, Hai-kang; Geng, Ning; Gao, Guo-dong

    2013-01-01

    Opiate addiction remains intractable in a large percentage of patients, and relapse is the biggest hurdle to recovery because of psychological dependence. Multiple studies identify a central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in addiction; several studies note decreased addictive behavior after interventions in this area. Based on animal experiments, our institute started the clinical trial for the treatment of drug addicts' psychological dependence by making lesions in the bilateral NAc with stereotactic surgery from July 2000. The short-term outcomes were encouraging and triggered rapid application of this treatment in China from 2003 to 2004. However, lack of long-term outcomes and controversy eventually led to halting the surgery for addiction by the Ministry of Health of China in November 2004 and a nationwide survey about it later. Our institute had performed this surgery in 272 patients with severe heroin addiction. The follow-up study showed that the 5-year nonrelapse rate was 58% and the quality of life was significantly improved. Patients had several kinds of side effects, but the incidence rate was relatively low. The patients gradually recovered more than 5 years after the surgery. The side effects did not severely influence an individual's life or work. Nationwide surgery showed that the nonrelapse rate was 50% in the sample of 150 cases, from 1167 patients overall who underwent stereotactic surgery in China. Although sometimes accompanied by neuropsychological adverse events, stereotactic ablation of NAc may effectively treat opiate addiction. Lesion location has a significant impact on treatment efficacy and requires further study. Because ablation is irreversible, the NAc surgery for addiction should be performed with cautiousness, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an ideal alternative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Waterink

    1955-03-01

    Full Text Available Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterinkter gelegendheid van die verlening aan hem van de graad Doctor Educationis, honoris causa, door de Universiteit voor Christelijk Hoger Onderwijs te Potchefstroom op Zaterdag, 26 Maart 1955, en op die dag voorgelezen door de heer Jan van den Berg, Buitengewoon en Gevolmachtigd Ambassadeur van Hare Mi iesteit de Koningin der Nederlanden. Mijnheer, de Kanselier, Mijnheer de Voorzitter van de Raad, Mijnheer deVice-Kanselier en Rector, overige Heren ambtsdragers, en gij alien,die herwaarts kwaanit ter gelegenheid van deze Gradendag,zeer geachte en zeer gewenste toehoorders.

  14. The retrograde connections and anatomical segregation of the Göttingen minipig nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Christian Meidahl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleus accumbens (NAcc has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders such as treatment resistant depression (TRD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and has been an ongoing experimental target for deep brain stimulation (DBS in both rats and humans. In order to translate basic scientific results from rodents to the human setting a large animal model is needed to thoroughly study the effect of such therapeutic interventions. The aim of the study was, accordingly, to describe the basic anatomy of the Göttingen minipig NAcc and its retrograde connections.Tracing was carried out by MRI-guided stereotactic unilateral fluorogold injections in the NAcc of Göttingen minipigs. After two weeks the brains were sectioned and subsequently stained with Nissl-, autometallographic (AMG development of myelin, and DARPP-32 and calbindin immunohistochemistry.The minipig NAcc was divided in a central core and an outer medial, ventral and lateral shell. We confirmed the NAcc to be a large and well-segregated structure towards its medial, ventral and lateral borders. The fluorogold tracing revealed inputs to NAcc from the medial parts of the prefrontal cortex, BA 25 (subgenual cortex, insula bilaterally, amygdala, the CA1-region of hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, paraventricular and anterior parts of thalamus, dorsomedial parts of hypothalamus, substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, the retrorubral field and the dorsal and median raphe nuclei.In conclusion the Göttingen minipig NAcc is a large ventral striatal structure that can be divided into a core and shell with prominent afferent connections from several subrhinal and infra-/prelimbic brain areas.

  15. Large philipsite crystal as ferromanganese nodule nucleus

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    We report here the occurrence of, to date, the largest (21 x 10 x 8 mm) phillipsite crystal forming the nucleus of a diagenetically formed ferromanganese nodule from the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Assuming an average rate of ferromanganese...

  16. Role of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus in paradoxical (rapid eye movement) sleep generation: a combined electrophysiological and anatomical study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, R; Luppi, P-H; Salvert, D; Lapray, D; Gervasoni, D; Fort, P

    2008-03-27

    It is well known that noradrenergic locus coeruleus neurons decrease their activity during slow wave sleep and are quiescent during paradoxical sleep. It was recently proposed that their inactivation during paradoxical sleep is due to a tonic GABAergic inhibition arising from neurons located into the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi). However, the discharge profile of DPGi neurons across the sleep-waking cycle as well as their connections with brain areas involved in paradoxical sleep regulation remain to be described. Here we show, for the first time in the unanesthetized rat that the DPGi contained a subtype of neurons with a tonic and sustained firing activation specifically during paradoxical sleep (PS-on neurons). Noteworthy, their firing rate increase anticipated for few seconds the beginning of the paradoxical sleep bout. By using anterograde tract-tracing, we further showed that the DPGi, in addition to locus coeruleus, directly projected to other areas containing wake-promoting neurons such as the serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus and hypocretinergic neurons of the posterior hypothalamus. Finally, the DPGi sent efferents to the ventrolateral part of the periaqueductal gray matter known to contain paradoxical sleep-suppressing neurons. Taken together, our original results suggest that the PS-on neurons of the DPGi may have their major role in simultaneous inhibitory control over the wake-promoting neurons and the permissive ventrolateral part of the periaqueductal gray matter as a means of influencing vigilance states and especially PS generation.

  17. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Advances in hard nucleus cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Security and perfect vision and fewer complications are our goals in cataract surgery, and hard-nucleus cataract surgery is always a difficulty one. Many new studies indicate that micro-incision phacoemulsification in treating hard nucleus cataract is obviously effective. This article reviews the evolution process of hard nuclear cataract surgery, the new progress in the research of artificial intraocular lens for microincision, and analyse advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods.

  19. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  20. Dr. Seuss Is on the Loose! Planning Month-Long Activities Using Dr. Seuss Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten-Puckett, Katharyn

    This paper contains activities for classes and small groups using 24 Dr. Seuss stories. The rhymes and illustrations can spark creative writing and inspire imaginative bulletin board displays. The ideas and activities presented are useful with most elementary grades by making adjustments for student abilities. Many of the titles contain political…

  1. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Amorim

    Full Text Available Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH by galanin (GAL induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt, a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH and control (SHAM animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i one relays in the DRt and (ii the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways.

  2. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  3. VIP Visit Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite President Republic of Lithuania. Wednesday 20 January 2016. General introduction to CERN’s activities by CERN Director-General F. Gianotti. CERN Director-General introduces CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson K. Borras and CMS Lithuanians A. Rinkevicius with V. Rapsevicius. Met by J. Shiers, IT Department Data Preservation Project Leader, and walk to 1st floor Data Centre Visit Point. CERN Data Centre Visit Point, 1st floor, building 513. View the robotic arms of the CERN IT data centre automated libraries (J. Shiers) CERN Computer Centre, building 513, level -1. Physics hands-on and virtual visit with a High School class in Lithuania (S. Schmeling) CERN S’cool Lab, building 143. Meeting with the Lithuanian community at CERN. Signature of the Guest Book with CERN Director-General witnessed by the Lithuanian community at CERN. Family photograph with the Lithuanian community at CERN.

  4. Dr. Solco Tromp and the Tromp Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. Scott; Rietveld, Wop J.

    2017-09-01

    The Tromp Award is the highest honor awarded by the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB). The award acknowledges outstanding research in biometeorology by a scientist under the age of 35 and was established in conjunction with the Tromp Foundation and the ISB. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the ISB, this article will provide a brief summary of the life of Dr. Solco Tromp and of the six awardees of the Tromp Award since the inaugural issuance of the award in 1999. The Tromp Award was established in part to recognize and support the efforts of young biometeorological professionals. As the brief summary of the awardees and a few of their selected subsequent publications have shown, the ISB and the Tromp Award has proven effective at identifying and supporting promising young scientists.

  5. Decommissioning of DR 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strufe, N.

    2009-02-15

    This report describes the work of dismantling and demolishing reactor DR 2, the waste volumes generated, the health physical conditions and the clearance procedures used for removed elements and waste. Since the ultimate goal for the decommissioning project was not clearance of the building, but downgrading the radiological classification of the building with a view to converting it to further nuclear use, this report documents how the lower classification was achieved and the known occurrence of remaining activity. The report emphasises some of the deliberations made and describes the lessons learned through this decommissioning project. The report also intends to contribute towards the technical basis and experience basis for further decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Denmark. (au)

  6. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he

  7. A-Dependence of $\\pi^0$-Meson Production in Proton-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V; Dedovich, T G

    2000-01-01

    The A-dependence of pi^0-meson production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at a high transverse momentum is studied. The concept of z-scaling reflecting the general features of particle interactions is developed for the description of pi^0-meson production. Experimental data on the cross section obtained at ISR, SpS and Tevatron are usen in the analysis. The A-dependence of scale transformation z to alpha cdot z, psi to alpha^-1 cdot psi is established. An indication of the power law, psi (z) approx z^-beta, at high p_T > 4 GeV/c is found. Based on the properties of z-scaling, the dependence of the cross section of pi^0-mesons produced in pA and AA collisions on transverse momentum over the central rapidity range at RHIC energies is predicted.

  8. Open heavy-flavour production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mischke, A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy quarks (charm and bottom) provide sensitive penetrating probes of hot quark matter produced in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Due to their large mass, heavy quarks are believed to be predominantly produced in the initial state of the collision by gluon fusion processes. The study

  9. Observation of high energy gamma rays in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beard, K.B.; Benenson, W.; Bloch, C.; Kashy, E.; Stevenson, J.; Morrissey, D.J.; Plicht, J. van der; Sherrill, B.; Winfield, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    High energy electrons and positrons observed in medium energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are shown to be primarily due to the external conversion of high energy gamma rays. The reaction 14N+Cu was studied at E/A=40 MeV, and a magnetic spectrograph was used with a specially constructed multiwire

  10. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  11. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    In 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) the rectal epithelial cells were analyzed for HLA-DR antigens by an immunohistochemical technique. The clinical, rectoscopic, and histologic stages were also determined. The investigations were carried out at the beginning of the study and 2 weeks......-DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  13. Disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A Heteroreceptor Complexes in the Raphe-Hippocampal 5-HT System Develop in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes are involved in neuroplasticity in the rat hippocampus and in the mesencephalic raphe 5-HT nerve cells. There exists a 5-HT1A protomer enhancement of FGFR1 protomer signaling. Acute and 10 day treatment with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT produced enhanced antidepressant effects in the forced swim test (FST. We studied in the current work the disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heterocomplexes in a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders sensitive line (FSL rats of Sprague-Dawley (SD origin, by means of neurochemical, neurophysiological and behavioral techniques. In control SD rats, the FGFR1 agonist SUN11602 and FGF2 produced a significant reduction of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK currents induced by 8-OH-DPAT in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In FSL rats, only i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT alone treatment produced a significant reduction in the immobility time. The combined i.c.v. treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT in FSL rats did not cause a significant decrease in immobility time in the FST. However, in the SD rats this combined treatment produced a significant reduction. Furthermore, in the FSL rat a significant increase in the density of FGFR1-5-HT1A proximity ligation assay (PLA positive clusters was only found after i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT treatment alone in the CA2 and CA3 areas. In the SD rat a significant increase in the density of specific PLA clusters was only observed in the CA2 area of the i.c.v. combined treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT group. No treatment led to significant changes in the PLA clusters of the dorsal raphe in the FSL rat. However, significant changes in the density of specific PLA clusters were only found in the dorsal raphe of SD rats after combined treatment and treatment with 8-OH-DPAT alone. The results indicate that in FSL rats compared with SD rats alterations may develop in the ability of 8-OH-DPAT and combined FGFR1 and 5-HT1A

  14. Disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A Heteroreceptor Complexes in the Raphe-Hippocampal 5-HT System Develop in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; DuPont, Caitlin M; Li, Xiang; Savelli, David; Lattanzi, Davide; Srivastava, Ipsit; Narváez, Manuel; Di Palma, Michael; Barbieri, Elisa; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Cuppini, Riccardo; Odagaki, Yuji; Palkovits, Miklos; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Lindskog, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    The FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes are involved in neuroplasticity in the rat hippocampus and in the mesencephalic raphe 5-HT nerve cells. There exists a 5-HT1A protomer enhancement of FGFR1 protomer signaling. Acute and 10 day treatment with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT produced enhanced antidepressant effects in the forced swim test (FST). We studied in the current work the disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heterocomplexes in a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats of Sprague-Dawley (SD) origin, by means of neurochemical, neurophysiological and behavioral techniques. In control SD rats, the FGFR1 agonist SUN11602 and FGF2 produced a significant reduction of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (GIRK) currents induced by 8-OH-DPAT in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In FSL rats, only i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT alone treatment produced a significant reduction in the immobility time. The combined i.c.v. treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT) in FSL rats did not cause a significant decrease in immobility time in the FST. However, in the SD rats this combined treatment produced a significant reduction. Furthermore, in the FSL rat a significant increase in the density of FGFR1-5-HT1A proximity ligation assay (PLA) positive clusters was only found after i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT treatment alone in the CA2 and CA3 areas. In the SD rat a significant increase in the density of specific PLA clusters was only observed in the CA2 area of the i.c.v. combined treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT) group. No treatment led to significant changes in the PLA clusters of the dorsal raphe in the FSL rat. However, significant changes in the density of specific PLA clusters were only found in the dorsal raphe of SD rats after combined treatment and treatment with 8-OH-DPAT alone. The results indicate that in FSL rats compared with SD rats alterations may develop in the ability of 8-OH-DPAT and combined FGFR1 and 5-HT1A agonist

  15. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  16. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  17. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  18. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  19. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  20. Dr Murray's case of ligation of the abdominal aorta - Somerset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reference provided by Dr Rob was to a brief description entitled 'Dr Murray's case of ligature of the abdominal aona', which had appeared in the Annals of che Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1984.2 The original description of this operation is to be found in both the first (1839) and second editions (1850) of ...

  1. Dr. E. Kits van Waveren (1906—1995)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bas, C.

    1996-01-01

    With the death on 3 September 1995 of Dr. E. Kits van Waveren, the Dutch mycologists lost one of their most prominent, internationally known amateurs, a specialist on the taxonomy of the genus Psathyrella and an ardent collector. Dr. Kits van Waveren, honorary staff member of the Rijksherbarium at

  2. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  3. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  4. Reexamining the Writings of Dr. Seuss To Promote Character Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dave F.; Varady, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of children's literature by Dr. Seuss in the middle school classroom to help students explore issues of their character and social development, adult expectations, and changes in their personal environment. Discusses themes addressed in selected Dr. Seuss books, and how these can be used as thematic units for classroom…

  5. Differential stress induced c-Fos expression and identification of region-specific miRNA-mRNA networks in the dorsal raphe and amygdala of high-responder/low-responder rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua L; Ata, Anooshah E; Jackson, Nateka L; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2017-02-15

    Chronic stress triggers a variety of physical and mental health problems, and how individuals cope with stress influences risk for emotional disorders. To investigate molecular mechanisms underlying distinct stress coping styles, we utilized rats that were selectively-bred for differences in emotionality and stress reactivity. We show that high novelty responding (HR) rats readily bury a shock probe in the defensive burying test, a measure of proactive stress coping behavior, while low novelty responding (LR) rats exhibit enhanced immobility, a measure of reactive coping. Shock exposure in the defensive burying test elicited greater activation of HR rats' caudal dorsal raphe serotonergic cells compared to LRs, but lead to more pronounced activation throughout LRs' amygdala (lateral, basolateral, central, and basomedial nuclei) compared to HRs. RNA-sequencing revealed 271 mRNA transcripts and 33 microRNA species that were differentially expressed in HR/LR raphe and amygdala. We mapped potential microRNA-mRNA networks by correlating and clustering mRNA and microRNA expression and identified networks that differed in either the HR/LR dorsal raphe or amygdala. A dorsal raphe network linked three microRNAs which were down-regulated in LRs (miR-206-3p, miR-3559-5p, and miR-378a-3p) to repression of genes related to microglia and immune response (Cd74, Cyth4, Nckap1l, and Rac2), the genes themselves were up-regulated in LR dorsal raphe. In the amygdala, another network linked miR-124-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-3068-3p, miR-380-5p, miR-539-3p, and miR-7a-1-3p with repression of chromatin remodeling-related genes (Cenpk, Cenpq, Itgb3bp, and Mis18a). Overall this work highlights potential drivers of gene-networks and downstream molecular pathways within the raphe and amygdala that contribute to individual differences in stress coping styles and stress vulnerabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  7. Two-photon physics in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, J.; Klein, S.

    1998-09-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  8. Ultrahigh-resolution CT and DR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Gupta, Vivek; Zou, Ping; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Zeman, Herbert D.; Sebes, Jeno I.

    1999-05-01

    A new technique called Variable-Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection that dramatically increases the spatial resolution in computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR) is presented. The technique is based on a principle called 'projective compression' that allows the resolution element of a CT detector to scale with the subject or field size. For very large (40 - 50 cm) field sizes, resolution exceeding 2 cy/mm is possible and for very small fields, microscopy is attainable with resolution exceeding 100 cy/mm. Several effects that could limit the performance of VRX detectors are considered. Experimental measurements on a 16-channel, CdWO4 scintillator + photodiode test array yield a limiting MTF of 64 cy/mm (8(mu) ) in the highest-resolution configuration reported. Preliminary CT images have been made of small anatomical specimens and small animals using a storage phosphor screen in the VRX mode. Measured detector resolution of the CT projection data exceeds 20 cy/mm (less than 25 (mu) ); however, the final, reconstructed CT images produced thus far exhibit 10 cy/mm (50 (mu) ) resolution because of non-flatness of the storage phosphor plates, focal spot effects and the use of a rudimentary CT reconstruction algorithm. A 576-channel solid-state detector is being fabricated that is expected to achieve CT image resolution in excess of that of the 26-channel test array.

  9. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  10. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 3: Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Klioner, S.; Hernandez, J.; Lammers, U.; Bombrun, A.; Mignard, F.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Davidson, M.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter presents the models and processing steps used for Gaia's core solution, namely, the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). The inputs to this solution rely heavily on the basic observables (or astrometric elementaries) which have been pre-processed and discussed in Chapter 2, the results of which have been published in Fabricius et al. (2016). The models consist of reference systems and time scales; assumed linear stellar motion and relativistic light deflection; in addition to fundamental constants and the transformation of coordinate systems. Higher level inputs such as: planetary and solar system ephemeris; Gaia tracking and orbit information; initial quasar catalogues and BAM data are all needed for the processing described here. The astrometric calibration models are outlined followed by the details processing steps which give AGIS its name. The final Section 3.5 represents a basic quality assessment and validation of the scientific results which has also been published in detail in Lindegren et al. (2016). However, the validation of the science products was not restricted to just this, a more independent catalogue consolidation and validation of the science results for Gaia DR1 was also performed and are documented in Chapter 7 and have been published in Arenou et al. (2017).

  11. A Tribute to Prof Dr Da Ruan

    CERN Document Server

    Kerre, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    This volume is a tribute to Professor Dr Da Ruan, who passed away suddenly on July 31, 2011, aged 50. The flood of emails that spread throughout the fuzzy logic research community with the tragic news was testimony to the respect and liking felt for this remarkable man. Da was a hardworking , highly productive scientist who, during his short life, published 35 books and more than 250 research papers in highly ranked journals and conference proceedings. He established two successful conferences, FLINS and ISKE, as well as the international journal, JCIS. This book is a collection of contributions from 88 of Da's academic friends from 47 institutes, presented in 60 chapters and over 70 pictures. A Foreword by Lotfi Zadeh begins Da's story. Section 1 provides an overview of Da's funeral on August 6, 2011. Part II outlines Da’s scientific life, his education, scientific career, publications and keynote talks. Part III presents testimonials by Da's colleagues of academic activities, including guest professorship...

  12. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as Spiritual Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pierce

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s spiritual leadership through his “I Have a Dream” speech. The paper explores the three characteristics of spiritual leadership as posed by Fry’s (2003 spiritual leadership theory: vision, hope/faith and altruistic love. The research draws upon these characteristics through qualitative content analysis of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech to illustrate Dr. King’s leadership as that of a spiritual leader. The research advances the spiritual leadership theory by establishing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a spiritual leader. Through the illustration of Dr. King’s spiritual leadership, the characteristics of a spiritual leader are given tangible understanding.

  13. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE RAT MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIEM, RSB; COPRAY, JCVM; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    The subcellular morphology of the mesencephalic trigeminal (Me5) nucleus in the rat was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Most neurons in the thin rostral as well as in the major caudal part of Me5 appeared as large (40-50-mu-m), round-to ovoid-shaped unipolar cells. A few neurons

  14. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia. E-mail: kanchanp@magnum.barc.ernet.in. Abstract. We locate resonances in η-light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the t-matrices and hence ...

  15. Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction.

  16. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic ...

  17. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  18. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  19. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi Nuclear...

  20. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Frederik N.; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; León-Mercado, Luis; Basualdo, Mari Carmen; Escobar, Carolina; Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2017-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively

  1. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Anchishkin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions are derived which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before a freeze-out.

  2. The production of strangeness and charmonium in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Geiss, J

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present theis is to study the space-time evolution of highly relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in a microscopic purely hadronic transport theory. Especially the production of strangeness in nucleus-nucleus collisions over a large energy range from SIS- (E sub l sub a sub b =1-2 A.GeV) up to SPS-energies (E sub l sub a sub b +200 A.GeV) for many different systems are studied, whereby for the elementary production cross sections as conservative assumptions as possible are made. The aim is to obtain an excitation function for the production of strangeness over the whole energy range. Furthermore the production of J/psi particles at SPS energies is studied for different systems, whereby a new absorption mechanism of the c anti c pairs is tested.

  3. Demonstration of decreased gray matter concentration in the midbrain encompassing the dorsal raphe nucleus and the limbic subcortical regions in major depressive disorder: an optimized voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Tae, Woo Suk; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Byeong-Taek; Paik, Jong-Woo; Son, Kyu-Ri; Oh, Yu-Whan; Lee, Min-Soo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2011-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have reported changes in several brain areas, such as the medial and dorsolateral orbital cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent, and relatively few studies have been conducted using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to detect gray matter concentration (GMC) abnormalities in patients with MDD. We examined 47 MDD patients and 51 healthy controls to investigate structural abnormalities using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system, which was normalized to a customized T1 template and segmented with optimized VBM. Analysis of covariance with age and gender as covariates was adopted for the VBM statistics; the level of statistical significance was set at Pemotion regulation was lower in MDD patients. In particular, we found decreased GMC in the DRN. These findings may provide a better understanding of the anatomical properties of the neural mechanisms underlying the etiology of MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ob osemdesetletnici zaslužnega rednega prof. dr., dr. h. c. Mirka Paka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Rebernik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Slavljenca dr. Mirka Paka, ki je 12. novembra 2016 dopolnil osemdeset let, širši geografski javnosti verjetno ni potrebno podrobno predstavljati. S svojim pedagoškim, znanstveno-raziskovalnim, strokovnim in društvenim delovanjem se je uveljavil kot eden vodilnih slovenskih urbanih, socialnih in regionalnih geografov. Odlikuje se z izjemno bogato bibliografijo in mednarodno znanstveno-raziskovalno dejavnostjo. Njegov znanstveni opus obsega več kot 150 znanstvenih razprav, predvsem s področja urbane, socialne in regionalne geografije.

  5. [Dr. Halfdan Mahler's speech in Guatemala].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1989-12-01

    A major focus of Dr. Mahler throughout his life has been the war against female discrimination and to reduce the extreme inequalities between men and women. The Latin American Region of IPPF selected the participation of women as its goal for the decade of the 90's. It is known that fertility is inversely related to female education and occupation, and that the poorest homes worldwide are those headed by poor and illiterate women. The number of female-headed households is increasing and in Barbados, Dominica, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama and Uruguay these have increased by 31% Married women often find that their husbands are the main obstacles to family planning services. Violence against women takes many forms including physical abuse, adolescent pregnancy, psychological and economic stress, the "machismo" syndrome, and having unwanted pregnancies. Latin America and the Caribbean pregnancy and illegal abortion account for the high mortality rates among those 15-19. Men must face the consequences of the socioeconomic conditions that they have created for women. For example if FPP were designed to really reflect a women's perspective such programs would have reached the goals of success. He recommends that IPPF's goal for the Year 2000 will be to have 9 women to each man in Committees of 10. He suggests that changes towards women must begin with the men themselves so that policies and programs reflect these new attitudes. If society wants a less aggressive and materialistic world, then the role of women must be raised so that her contribution can be felt worldwide.

  6. Dr. Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r.: Dr Austin Ball, Deputy Technical Coordinator, CMS experiment; Dr Roland Horisberger, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment; Dr Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand; Dr Michel Della Negra, Spokesman, CMS experiment and Dr Alick Macpherson, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment, in the CMS Silicon Tracker assembly hall.

  7. Interview with Dr Ghassan K Abou-Alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Alfa, G K

    2016-11-01

    Ghassan K Abou-Alfa joined the Gastrointestinal Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College in New York back in 2001. Dr Abou-Alfa specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Dr Abou-Alfa received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and completed his post-doctoral training at Yale University School of Medicine. His research is dedicated to finding novel therapies and improving the effectiveness of the current therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, while continuing to understand the basic mechanisms of the diseases and its therapy. Dr Abou-Alfa has invested several years in helping develop multi-tyrosine kinases and more immune-modulator therapies. Dr Abou-Alfa has many publications in the field. He led on many occasions international teams of investigators. Dr Abou-Alfa serves as the chair of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Task Force for Hepatobiliary Cancers and the chair of the AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) Non-AIDS Defining Malignancies (NADC) Liver/GI Task Force. Dr Abou-Alfa also co-chairs the hepatobiliary cancers subgroup of the Alliance cooperative group, and is a cadre member of both the gastrointestinal cancers and pharmacogenomics and population pharmacology committees. Dr Abou-Alfa who has lectured worldwide on the subject on gastrointestinal malignancies, is also a strong advocate for raising awareness and support for improving the outcome of patients with this disease, and enhancing oncologic education worldwide.

  8. INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve visiting Athena experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 1: R. Landua showing ATHENA to INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve. Photo 2: Visiting ATHENA are Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, Rolf Landus Spokesman, INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve and D.O. Williams. Photo 3: Visiting ATHENA are Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, Rolf Landua Spokesman, INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve and D.O. Williams. INTAS is an independent International Association formed by the European Community, European Union´s Member States and like minded countries acting to preserve and promote the valuable scientific potential of the NIS partner countries through East-West Scientific co-operation.

  9. Antibodies and Derivatives Targeting DR4 and DR5 for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Dubuisson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutics that induce apoptosis in cancer cells has become an increasingly attractive approach for the past 30 years. The discovery of tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily members and more specifically TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, the only cytokine of the family capable of eradicating selectively cancer cells, led to the development of numerous TRAIL derivatives targeting death receptor 4 (DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5 for cancer therapy. With a few exceptions, preliminary attempts to use recombinant TRAIL, agonistic antibodies, or derivatives to target TRAIL agonist receptors in the clinic have been fairly disappointing. Nonetheless, a tremendous effort, worldwide, is being put into the development of novel strategic options to target TRAIL receptors. Antibodies and derivatives allow for the design of novel and efficient agonists. We summarize and discuss here the advantages and drawbacks of the soar of TRAIL therapeutics, from the first developments to the next generation of agonistic products, with a particular insight on new concepts.

  10. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  11. Strangeness production in antiproton-nucleus annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosel U.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the microscopic transport calculations of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus interactions within a GiBUU model are presented. The dominating mechanism of hyperon production is the strangeness exchange processes K¯N $ar KN$ → γπ and K¯N $ar KN$ → ΞK. The calculated rapidity spectra of Ξ hyperons are significantly shifted to forward rapidities with respect to the spectra of S = −1 hyperons. We argue that this shift should be a sensitive test for the possible exotic mechanisms of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus annihilation. The production of the double Λ-hypernuclei by Ξ− interaction with a secondary target is calculated.

  12. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  13. Cell Biology of the Plant Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Iris; Richards, Eric J; Evans, David E

    2017-04-28

    The eukaryotic nucleus is enclosed by the nuclear envelope, which is perforated by the nuclear pores, the gateways of macromolecular exchange between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. The nucleoplasm is organized in a complex three-dimensional fashion that changes over time and in response to stimuli. Within the cell, the nucleus must be viewed as an organelle (albeit a gigantic one) that is a recipient of cytoplasmic forces and capable of morphological and positional dynamics. The most dramatic reorganization of this organelle occurs during mitosis and meiosis. Although many of these aspects are less well understood for the nuclei of plants than for those of animals or fungi, several recent discoveries have begun to place our understanding of plant nuclei firmly into this broader cell-biological context.

  14. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  15. Systematics of $\\alpha$--nucleus optical potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, P; Abele, H.; Atzrott, U.; Staudt, G.; Bieber, R; Grün, K.; Oberhummer, H.; Rauscher, T.; Somorjai, E.

    1994-01-01

    Double--folded optical $\\alpha$--nucleus potentials can be used to calculate elastic scattering cross sections in a wide mass-- and energy region. Because of the systematic behavior of the potential parameters we are able to obtain reliable optical potentials for astrophysically relevant reactions even without scattering data in low--energy region. As example we analyze the capture reaction ${^{144}{\\rm Sm}}(\\alpha,\\gamma){^{148}{\\Gd}}$.

  16. Improved Neuroimaging Atlas of the Dentate Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Naying; Langley, Jason; Huddleston, Daniel E; Ling, Huawei; Xu, Hongmin; Liu, Chunlei; Yan, Fuhua; Hu, Xiaoping P

    2017-07-01

    The dentate nucleus (DN) of the cerebellum is the major output nucleus of the cerebellum and is rich in iron. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) provides better iron-sensitive MRI contrast to delineate the boundary of the DN than either T2-weighted images or susceptibility-weighted images. Prior DN atlases used T2-weighted or susceptibility-weighted images to create DN atlases. Here, we employ QSM images to develop an improved dentate nucleus atlas for use in imaging studies. The DN was segmented in QSM images from 38 healthy volunteers. The resulting DN masks were transformed to a common space and averaged to generate the DN atlas. The center of mass of the left and right sides of the QSM-based DN atlas in the Montreal Neurological Institute space was -13.8, -55.8, and -36.4 mm, and 13.8, -55.7, and -36.4 mm, respectively. The maximal probability and mean probability of the DN atlas with the individually segmented DNs in this cohort were 100 and 39.3%, respectively, in contrast to the maximum probability of approximately 75% and the mean probability of 23.4 to 33.7% with earlier DN atlases. Using QSM, which provides superior iron-sensitive MRI contrast for delineating iron-rich structures, an improved atlas for the dentate nucleus has been generated. The atlas can be applied to investigate the role of the DN in both normal cortico-cerebellar physiology and the variety of disease states in which it is implicated.

  17. For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Dr. Nancy Snyderman helped her parents, Joy and Dr. ...

  18. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of ... Recently, he discussed progress on high cholesterol research. Dr. Michael Lauer and his wife, Dr. Robin Avery, ...

  19. D&R Siding Co., LLC Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    D&R Siding Co., LLC (the Company) is located in Shelbyville, Tennessee. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

  20. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  1. Dr Abraham Pais, 82, physicist and science historian dies

    CERN Multimedia

    Glanz, J

    2000-01-01

    Obituary of Dr. Pais who died of heart failure in Copenhagen. He helped build the conceptual foundations of particle physics and then became a science historian, writing a critically acclaimed biography of Einstein (1 pg).

  2. Glaucoma: Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past ... nerves are pale and cupped—signs of advanced glaucoma. Yet the patient wasn't aware of any ...

  3. [Career and work of Dr. Jiro Tsuboi, a hygienist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, H

    1992-09-01

    The author recorded the career and work of Dr. Jiro Tsuboi, a hygienist and the first dean of the medical school, Kyoto Imperial University. He was born in 1862 as a son of Dr. Tameharu Tsuboi, a famous medical educator. After graduation from Tokyo University Medical School, he entered the Department of Hygienics of his mother school. In 1890, he went to Germany, and studied under Dr. Max von Pettenkofer at Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich. He also learned tuberculin therapy for tuberculosis from Dr. Robert Koch in Berlin. After he returned to Japan, he worked as a hygienist for various social needs, including serving as a committee member for mineral pollution at Ashio copper mine. In 1899, he was appointed Dean of the medical school, Kyoto Imperial University. Though he exerted himself for the school, he died at the age of 41 in 1903. His scientific contribution comprises both hygienics and bacteriology. Because of his early death, his attainment remained limited.

  4. Dr. Omalu Talks Childhood, Concussions, and CTE | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Bennet Omalu, the famed forensic pathologist who discovered Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), recently spoke at NCI at Frederick about his upbringing as well as the trials he faced while working to educate the NFL about CTE.

  5. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  6. Rent ubehandlet grundvand - kan vi bevare drømmen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Vi drømmer om at drikke rent ubehandlet grundvand, et sundt naturprodukt uden menneskelig indgriben. Men kan drømmen opretholdes i vores komplicerede samfund, hvor alt skal være effektivt, og hvor der ikke må være kalkpletter på glasset? Jeg har arbejdet for rent drikkevand i mere end 30 år. Det...

  7. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland is seen here (seventh from right) visiting the assembly hall for the ATLAS experiment during his recent visit to CERN. To his right is Dr. Peter Jenni (blue shirt), spokesperson for the ATLAS Collaboration. The horizontal metal cylinder behind the group is one of the eight vacuum vessels for the superconducting coils of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet system.

  8. The research contributions of Dr. Paul Van Deusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Francis A. Roesch; John Paul McTague; Jeffrey H. Gove; Gregory A. Reams; Aaron R. Weiskittel

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Paul Van Deusen’s recent passing concluded a rich 30+-year research career dedicated to development and implementation of quantitative methods for forestry and natural resources. Since the early part of his career as a biometrician with the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station in the 1980s-1990s and continuing with his later employment at NCASI, Dr. Van...

  9. Low P sub T hadron-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holynski, R.; Wozniak, K.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of describing hadron-nucleus (hA) interactions is discussed in terms of a number of independent collisions of the projectile inside the target nucleus. This multiple rescattering may occur on a particle or quark parton level. To investigate the characteristics of hA interactions as a function of antineutrinos advantage is taken of the correlation between the average number antineutrinos of collisions of the projectile inside the nucleus and the number Ng of fast protons ejected from the struck nucleus. The relation antineutrinos vs Ng obtained in antineutrinos was used. For a given target nucleus this allows the selection of interactions occurring at different impact parameters.

  10. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  11. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruti Modi

    Full Text Available The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA, has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  12. The Missing Manuscript of Dr. Jose Delgado's Radio Controlled Bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzullo, Timothy C

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience systems level courses teach: 1) the role of neuroanatomical structures of the brain for perception, movement, and cognition; 2) methods to manipulate and study the brain including lesions, electrophysiological recordings, microstimulation, optogenetics, and pharmacology; 3) proper interpretation of behavioral data to deduce brain circuit operation; and 4) the similarities, differences, and ethics of animal models and their relation to human physiology. These four topics come together quite dramatically in Dr. Jose Delgado's 1960s famous experiments on the neural correlates of aggression in which he stopped bulls in mid-charge by electrically stimulating basal ganglia and thalamic structures. Technical documentation on these experiments is famously difficult to find. Here I translate and discuss a Spanish language article written by Dr. Delgado in 1981 for an encyclopedia on bull fighting published in Madrid. Here Dr. Delgado appears to give the most complete explanation of his experiments on microstimulation of bovine brains. Dr. Delgado's motivations, methods, and his interpretation of the bull experiments are summarized, as well as some accompanying information from his 1970 English language book: "Physical Control of the Mind." This review of Dr. Delgado's written work on the bull experiments can provide a resource to educators and students who desire to learn more about and interpret the attention-calling experiments that Dr. Delgado did on a ranch in Andalucía over 50 years ago.

  13. [Sexuality education on the Internet : From Dr. Sommer to Dr. Google].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    2017-07-24

    Female and male adolescents in Germany are increasingly using the Internet to find information about sexuality and sexual health. This review paper summarizes what we know about the status quo of online sexuality education in Germany.Based on a systematic literature review including 40 papers from international, peer-reviewed journals spanning 2010-2017, this paper first describes different aspects of the sexuality-related online search behavior of adolescents: its prevalence, predictors, topics and contexts. One main finding is the fact that adolescents use a computer or smartphone to type their sexuality-related questions into the search engine Google or the search engine of the video platform YouTube.Based on 54 online searches, this paper subsequently presents the kind of sexuality-related online content adolescents find if they ask "Dr. Google" for sexual advice; a collection of 1236 authentic sexuality-related questions of adolescents was used for this analysis. It turned out that online sexuality education offered by leading professional organizations like the BZgA ("Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung") or pro familia was nearly invisible, while numerous other providers of online sex education consistently appeared in the top Google search results. Among them were the "Dr. Sommer" team of the youth magazine Bravo; online healthcare and advice portals; online forums; the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and, above all, sex education channels on YouTube. In this paper, the latter are presented in more detail for the first time.The third part of the paper addresses the quality of online sexual education over four main areas of quality evaluation. The presentation of the status quo ends with some recommendations both for future research and for sexuality education in practice.

  14. J/$\\psi$ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The NA38 and NA50 experiments at the CERN SPS have measured charmonium production in different colliding systems with the aim of observing a phase transition from ordinary hadronic matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined (quark-gluon plasma, QGP). This experimental research is based on the prediction that the J/ psi yield should be suppressed in deconfined matter. The analysis of the data collected by the NA50 experiment with Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon shows that the J/ psi is anomalously suppressed with respect to the pattern observed in proton-nucleus and light ion reactions. (9 refs).

  15. Volume celebrating the 60th birthday of Professor Dr. Franz Fie; Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler zum 60. Geburtstag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheng, K.D. [ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report was compiled in honor of Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler on the occasion of his 60th birthday on 7 January 1998. Its contributions deal with mesoscale modelling, the propagation of air pollutants, measurements of precipitation using radar, and prediction models. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht wurde aus Anlass des 60. Geburtstags von Herrn Prof. Dr. Franz Fiedler am 7. Januar 1998 zusammengestellt. Die Beitraege behandeln mesoskalige Modellierung, Ausbreitung von Luftschadstoffen, Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar und Vorhersagemodelle. (orig.)

  16. Meson-nucleus potentials and the search for meson-nucleus bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Paryev, E. Ya.

    2017-11-01

    Recent experiments studying the meson-nucleus interaction to extract meson-nucleus potentials are reviewed. The real part of the potentials quantifies whether the interaction is attractive or repulsive while the imaginary part describes the meson absorption in nuclei. The review is focused on mesons which are sufficiently long-lived to potentially form meson-nucleus quasi-bound states. The presentation is confined to meson production off nuclei in photon-, pion-, proton-, and light-ion induced reactions and heavy-ion collisions at energies near the production threshold. Tools to extract the potential parameters are presented. In most cases, the real part of the potential is determined by comparing measured meson momentum distributions or excitation functions with collision model or transport model calculations. The imaginary part is extracted from transparency ratio measurements. Results on K+ ,K0 ,K- , η ,η‧ , ω, and ϕ mesons are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The interaction of K+ and K0 mesons with nuclei is found to be weakly repulsive, while the K- , η ,η‧ , ω and ϕ meson-nucleus potentials are attractive, however, with widely different strengths. Because of meson absorption in the nuclear medium the imaginary parts of the meson-nucleus potentials are all negative, again with a large spread. An outlook on planned experiments in the charm sector is given. In view of the determined potential parameters, the criteria and chances for experimentally observing meson-nucleus quasi-bound states are discussed. The most promising candidates appear to be the η and η‧ mesons.

  17. Aspects of Coulomb dissociation and interference in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystrand, Joakim; Baltz, Anthony; Klein, Spencer R.

    2001-10-21

    Coherent vector meson production in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions is discussed. These interactions may occur for impact parameters much larger than the sum of the nuclear radii. Since the vector meson production is always localized to one of the nuclei, the system acts as a two-source interferometer in the transverse plane. By tagging the outgoing nuclei for Coulomb dissociation it is possible to obtain a measure of the impact parameter and thus the source separation in the interferometer. This is of particular interest since the life-time of the vector mesons are generally much shorter than the impact parameters of the collisions.

  18. An exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Mateo, Mario; Fich, Michel; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies.

  19. Lectures on the theory of the nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, Aleksej Grigorevich

    1975-01-01

    Provides an advanced and up-to-date account of the theory of nuclear structure and discusses in considerable detail both the superfluid and collective models of the nucleus, in addition to earlier complementary models and theories. The book also examines other important topics such as the rotational and vibrational spectra of nuclei which have not previously been treated in such depth. To summarize, it covers a large amount of theoretical ground in one volume and attempts to fill a serious gap in the literature. Many problems are included

  20. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  1. Systemic administration of 6-OHDA to rhesus monkeys upregulates HLA-DR expression in brain microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joers V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Joers,1,2 Scott Vermilyea,1,2 Kristine Dilley,1 Marina E Emborg1–3 1Preclinical Parkinson's Research Program, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, 2Neuroscience Training Program, 3Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA Background: We recently developed a nonhuman primate model of cardiac dysautonomia by systemic dosing of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. The aim of this study was to assess whether systemic 6-OHDA affects the central nervous system of nonhuman primates, in particular the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Methods: Brain sections from adult rhesus monkeys that received systemic 6-OHDA (50 mg/kg intravenously; n=5 and were necropsied 3 months later, as well as normal controls (n=5 were used in this study. Tissue was cut frozen at 40 µm on a sliding microtome, processed for immunohistochemistry, and blindly evaluated. Results: Neither the optical density of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir; a dopaminergic neuronal marker in the caudate and putamen nucleus nor the TH-ir cell number and volume in the substantia nigra showed significant differences between groups. Yet within groups, statistical analysis revealed significant individual differences in the 6-OHDA-treated group, with two animals showing a lower cell count and volume. Optical density quantification of α-synuclein-ir in the substantia nigra did not show differences between groups. As α-synuclein intracellular distribution was noted to vary between animals, it was further evaluated with a semiquantitative scale. A greater intensity and presence of α-synuclein-positive nigral cell bodies was associated with larger TH-positive nigral cell volumes. Increased human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR; a microglial marker expression was observed in 6-OHDA-treated animals compared with controls. HLA-DR-ir was primarily localized in endothelial cells and perivascular spaces throughout

  2. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibarra José M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D; genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]. This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09 and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93. The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35] and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19] were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2. Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility

  3. Evaluasi Integritas Sistem Struktur Jembatan Dr. Ir. Soekarno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ady Wijayanto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge is the long span bridge which to be the Manado city landmark. To calculate the Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge’s feasibility, integrated evaluation need to know the bridge physical condition reliability. The purpose of this analysis is for reviewing and evaluating the entire Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge integrity. Every structure has natural frequency characteristic, which describes the structure strength, stiffness and integrity. The vibration record data sources are dynamic loading test and accelerometer sensor records. Perception and comfortable level the bridge users evaluated by the vibration record data. Perception and comfortable level the bridge users evaluated by the vibration record data. The accelerometer sensors records on X, Y, and Z directions. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT analysis carries out to exchange time domain to frequency domain. The frequency domain graphics filtered by ISO 2631-1 formula. Perception and comfortable level the Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge users are still in the comfort condition, so this bridge is proper to pass through the vehicles. Based on the Weibull Distribution, Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge has service life until 100 years as long as the plan service life.

  4. Multivalent DR5 peptides activate the TRAIL death pathway and exert tumoricidal activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavet, V.; Beyrath, J.D.; Pardin, C.; Morizot, A.; Lechner, M.C.; Briand, J.P.; Wendland, M.; Maison, W.; Fournel, S.; Micheau, O.; Guichard, G.; Gronemeyer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are exploring anticancer approaches based on signaling by TRAIL, a ligand for the cell death receptors DR4 and DR5. In this study, we report on the selective apoptotic effects of multivalent DR5 binding peptides (TRAIL(mim/DR5)) on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Surface

  5. Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

  6. Tun Dr. Mahathir’s Leadership Communication: The Confucian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Joyce Lynn-Sze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have provided valuable insights into the impact of culture on the concept of leadership communication. However, only a few studies that focused on exploring and understanding the values of Confucianism and its impact on the Chinese culture, especially in Malaysia. Thus, this study is among the first study to examine the leadership communication from the perspective of Confucianism towards the leadership of Dr. Mahathir from the perspective of the Chinese community in Malaysia. This study aims to assess the role of Confucian values in Dr. Mahathir’s leadership communication. This study interviewed 15 Chinese leaders. The findings reveal that three main Confucian values are relevant to Dr. Mahathir’s leadership communication. The Confucian values are Zhi (wisdom, Xin (trust and Xiao (filial piety. This study provides a new perspective on leadership communication from the context of cultural diversity in Malaysia which emphasizes on Confucian values.

  7. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human

    OpenAIRE

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla, and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (a...

  8. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lingling, E-mail: liulingling2012@163.com; Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn; Sun, Jinghui, E-mail: sunjhemail@163.com; Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  9. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  10. Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-α (α), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the α-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B antimatter nuclei and a benchmark for possible future observations of 4He in cosmic radiation.

  11. Calcium microdomains in mitochondria and nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, María Teresa; Villalobos, Carlos; Chamero, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; García-Sancho, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Endomembranes modify the progression of the cytosolic Ca(2+) wave and contribute to generate Ca(2+) microdomains, both in the cytosol and inside the own organella. The concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol ([Ca(2+)](C)), the mitochondria ([Ca(2+)](M)) and the nucleus ([Ca(2+)](N)) are similar at rest, but may become very different during cell activation. Mitochondria avidly take up Ca(2+) from the high [Ca(2+)](C) microdomains generated during cell activation near Ca(2+) channels of the plasma membrane and/or the endomembranes and prevent propagation of the high Ca(2+) signal to the bulk cytosol. This shaping of [Ca(2+)](C) signaling is essential for independent regulation of compartmentalized cell functions. On the other hand, a high [Ca(2+)](M) signal is generated selectively in the mitochondria close to the active areas, which tunes up respiration to the increased local needs. The progression of the [Ca(2+)](C) signal to the nucleus may be dampened by mitochondria, the nuclear envelope or higher buffering power inside the nucleoplasm. On the other hand, selective [Ca(2+)](N) signals could be generated by direct release of stored Ca(2+) into the nucleoplasm. Ca(2+) release could even be restricted to subnuclear domains. Putative Ca(2+) stores include the nuclear envelope, their invaginations inside the nucleoplasm (nucleoplasmic reticulum) and nuclear microvesicles. Inositol trisphosphate, cyclic ADP-ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate have all been reported to produce release of Ca(2+) into the nucleoplasm, but contribution of these mechanisms under physiological conditions is still uncertain.

  12. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  13. Dr Jacob van der Land, marine biologist extraordinary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution is an attempt to sketch the life and works of Dr Jacob van der Land, curator of worms and chief marine biologist of the National Museum of Natural History, on the occasion of his official retirement. Born in 1935, Jacob van der Land read biology at Leiden University (1958-1964),

  14. 2250-IJBCS-Article-Dr Mahbou Somo Toukam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    154, February 2015. ISSN 1997-342X ..... Cette information est capitale. L'igname se reproduisant essentiellement par des tubercules, la ... Foundation) pour l'aide financière et en particulier son Président Dr Paul. KAMMOGNE FOKAM et son ...

  15. DR. H. BERKHOF, en VertfacAtiny, Holland Uitgevers maatschappij ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    DR. H. BERKHOF, en VertfacAtiny, Holland Uitgevers maatschappij Amsterdam, 1948, 194 bis., prys 12/6. Die vererende versoek om bogenoemde boek in hierdie kolomme te bespreek het my in nie geringe verleentheid gebring nie, want om die waarheid te sê, kan ek feitlik niks as goeds daarvan getuig nie, met ander ...

  16. Page 1 DIAMAGNETISM OF COPPER. BY DR. S. RAMACHANDRA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1935-08-20

    DIAMAGNETISM OF COPPER. BY DR. S. RAMACHANDRA RAO,. Aananalai University. Received August 20, 1935. 1. Introduction. IN a recent paper, the author has reviewed at Some length the present position of our knowledge regarding the magnetic properties of colloidal particles of metals. A few general conclusions ...

  17. Shepard Award Winners, Part 1: Dr. Stephen Thacker

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Stephen Thacker, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/22/2009.

  18. Highlight: Dr David Butler-Jones on fighting pandemics | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    10 févr. 2015 ... Dr David Butler-Jones, professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba and former Chief Medical Health Officer of Canada, delivered a lecture on lessons learned from the 2009 flu pandemic in Canada. He also commented on India's draft National Health Policy 2015 at the India ...

  19. Researcher Profile: An Interview With Dr. Rebecca J. Travnichek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Travnichek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Dr. Rebecca Travnichek is a Family Financial Education Specialist with University of Missouri Extension. Dr. Travnichek currently serves as the Annual Conference Program Chair. She is also very active in the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education, where she serves on the Board of Directors. Dr. Travnichek has participated in leadership development programs at the state and national levels. She was involved in the initial proposal development of the Financial Security for All Community of Practice with eXtension and continues to be involved through several roles. She is active in the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences at the national and state levels, serving in multiple leadership roles. For the past three years, Dr. Travnichek has also served as the Editor of the Journal of the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. She represents the type of person who makes the Financial Therapy Association a dynamic organization linking practitioners and academicians.

  20. Shepard Award Winners, Part 3: Dr. Larissa Roux

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Larissa Roux, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 9/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/22/2009.

  1. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  2. The Effects of Dr. Oz on Health Behaviors and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Elizabeth; Dickes, Lori A.; Davis, Amanda; Zarandy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumption of social media has quickly evolved into a primary source of health information for many consumers. This seems to be particularly true for individuals seeking to modify chronic health conditions like weight loss, obesity, and obesity-related diseases. Purpose: This study explores whether watching Dr. Oz weight loss episodes…

  3. Improving College Students English Learning with Dr. Eye Android Mid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Yin; Che, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates college students' English language learning through use of Dr. Eye Android handheld mobile Internet device (MID). Compared to related studies, students' English learning using MIDs has not been evaluated and fully understood in the field of higher education. Quantitatively, the researchers used TOEIC pretest and posttest to…

  4. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  5. Unlikely reformer: Dr Henry Calvert Barnett (1832-1897).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyr, Philippa

    2017-10-01

    To provide a brief biography of Western Australian colonial lunacy superintendent Dr Henry Calvert Barnett. A range of primary sources were consulted. Barnett was a complex man: a caring and forward-thinking practitioner who had a colourful and turbulent private life. Barnett's contribution to mental health service development in Western Australia was genuine and worthwhile, and should be recognised.

  6. Dr. Y. Zverev, Physiology Department, College of Medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 1 January 2001. VENTILATORY CAPACITY INDICES IN MALAWIAN CHILDREN. Y. Zverev, MD, PhD, and M. Gondwe, BSc, Physiology Department, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Private Bag 360, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi. Request for reprints to: Dr. Y. Zverev, ...

  7. You CAN Teach a Sneetch! Peace Education with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Irma K.

    This lesson plan, for grades 4 to 6 and up, incorporates the Dr. Seuss story about Sneetches to teach children about sources of prejudice. The lesson also can be used to incorporate writing in the social studies. Six writing prompts are included. (EH)

  8. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  9. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  10. Go, Class, Go: Using Dr. Seuss in Early Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Tamby

    2004-01-01

    As more and more reading programs make the move from the basal reading series to authentic text, teachers are asking the same question: How do I choose appropriate books for my class? Teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are no exception. In this article, the author describes her use of Dr. Seuss books in early reading instruction.

  11. Obituary Dr A. W. Kloos (1880—1952)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooststroom, van S.J.

    1952-01-01

    At the end of the previous number of “Blumea” could just be inserted the death notice of one of the honorary collaborators of the Rijksherbarium, Dr Ir A. W. Kloos, who passed away in his home at Dordrecht on June 3rd, 1952. A more detailed obituary may follow here. Abraham Willem Kloos was born at

  12. Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, 81, authority on the subatomic

    CERN Multimedia

    Lavietes, S

    2002-01-01

    "Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, a Yale physicist whose investigation of particles called muons poked holes in standard subatomic theory and provided evidence for the existence of previously undetected matter, died at Yale-New Haven Hospital last Tuesday" (1/2 page).

  13. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  14. NOGMAALS dr. G. D. SCHOLTZ SE GESKIEDENIS VAN DIE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    Statenvertaling de gezaghebbende kerk- en huisbijbel gebleven.” Dr. Scholtz beweer in sy boek op bis. 4 dat die Heidelbergse Kategis- mus reeds vóór 1559 toe die Franse konfessie vervaardig is, opgestel is deur „die Duitse Protestante”. Ek het hom op die volkome foutiewiteit van hierdie bewering gewys, maar hy hou vol ...

  15. 2166-IJBCS-Article- Dr Odette Kabena Ngandu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Science and Medicine, 70(3):392–400. Kabena NO, Lukoki LF, Mpiana TP, Ngombe. KN, Fatiany RP, Baholy R, Ngbolua KN. 2014. Phytochemical Screening of some medicinal plants traditionally used by. African Women in Kinshasa city (DR. Congo) for their intimate hygiene and. Evaluation of the pH of derived recipes.

  16. Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Traci

    Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2…

  17. Dr. Kenneth Sudduth: A giant pioneering precision agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Ken Sudduth is nationally and internationally recognized for his precision agriculture research and leadership, especially in the areas of soil sensing and assessment of spatial variability for site-specific management. His many noteworthy contributions include novel techniques and methodology f...

  18. Profile Interview: Dr Lucinda Manda-Taylor | Molynuex | Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profile Interview: Dr Lucinda Manda-Taylor. M. Molynuex. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v28i3.1 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  19. Experimental and phenomenological investigations of QCD matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, Anton

    2014-07-15

    This thesis is heterogeneous, comprising experimental papers at low energies (SIS-18 at GSI) and at the LHC, papers on phenomenology of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions, and papers on detectors. The overview covers the experimental papers and those on phenomenology. I have chosen to write it in a general manner, intended to be accessible to non-experts. It emphasizes recent measurements and their understanding at the LHC. The detector papers, which address many principle aspects of gaseous detectors, are summarized and placed in context in the review I co-wrote and which closes the stack. The detector papers included here are the outcome of an R and D program for the Transition Radiation Detector of ALICE.

  20. Dynamical and statistical aspects in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, B.; Bocage, F.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Assenard, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees; Auger, G.; Benlliure, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Bacri, C.O.; Borderie, B. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bisquer, E. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at low incident energy are mainly governed by statistical dissipative processes, fusion and deep inelastic reactions being the most important ones. Conversely, in the relativistic energy regime, dynamical effects play a dominant role and one should apply a participant-spectator picture in order to understand the data. In between, the intermediate energy region is a transition one in which it is necessary to disentangle dynamics from statistical effects. Moreover, the Fermi energy region corresponds to available energies comparable with nuclear binding energies and one may except to observe phase transition effects. Experiments performed recently with 4{pi} devices have given quite new data and a much better insight into involved mechanisms and hot nuclear matter properties. INDRA data related to reaction mechanisms and multifragmentation are presented. (author) 53 refs.

  1. A versatile dielectron trigger for nucleon-nucleon and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Schicker, R; Tsertos, H

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach for a versatile first level dielectron trigger is presented. This trigger operates in the low multiplicity environment of nucleon-nucleon reactions as well as in the high multiplicity situation of nucleus-nucleus collisions. For optimal trigger performance, time of flight conditions for the two fastest particles of the event are combined with event multiplicity requirements. The dielectron trigger efficiency is given. The event reduction factor of such a trigger approach is studied for a low, a medium and a high multiplicity environment. The impact parameter dependence of the event reduction is given. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  2. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, N.; /Saclay; Csengeri, T.; /Saclay; Bontemps, S.; /OASU, Floirac; Motte, F.; /Saclay; Simon, R.; /Cologne U.; Hennebelle, P.; /Paris Observ.; Federrath, C.; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows

  3. New quasibound states of the compound nucleus in α -particle capture by the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P.; Zhang, Peng-Ming; Zou, Li-Ping

    2017-07-01

    We generalize the theory of nuclear decay and capture of Gamow that is based on tunneling through the barrier and internal oscillations inside the nucleus. In our formalism an additional factor is obtained, which describes distribution of the wave function of the the α particle inside the nuclear region. We discover new most stable states (called quasibound states) of the compound nucleus (CN) formed during the capture of α particle by the nucleus. With a simple example, we explain why these states cannot appear in traditional calculations of the α capture cross sections based on monotonic penetrabilities of a barrier, but they appear in a complete description of the evolution of the CN. Our result is obtained by a complete description of the CN evolution, which has the advantages of (1) a clear picture of the formation of the CN and its disintegration, (2) a detailed quantum description of the CN, (3) tests of the calculated amplitudes based on quantum mechanics (not realized in other approaches), and (4) high accuracy of calculations (not achieved in other approaches). These peculiarities are shown with the capture reaction of α +44Ca . We predict quasibound energy levels and determine fusion probabilities for this reaction. The difference between our approach and theory of quasistationary states with complex energies applied for the α capture is also discussed. We show (1) that theory does not provide calculations for the cross section of α capture (according to modern models of the α capture), in contrast with our formalism, and (2) these two approaches describe different states of the α capture (for the same α -nucleus potential).

  4. Role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Amitabha; Saha, Kaushik; Jash, Debraj; Banerjee, Sourindra Nath; Biswas, Nirendra Mohan; Dey, Atin

    2013-01-01

    Context: A good proportion of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion (PE) turn into malignancy over a period of time. Identification of positive biomarker may help in selecting the individuals who require close follow-up. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of DR-70 immunoassay in suspected malignant PE. Settings and Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 89 patients of suspected malignant PE and 50 normal subjects (NS) were taken as control. Materials and Methods: Patients with exudative PE; who had pleural fluid lymphocyte count greater than 50% and adenosine deaminase less than 30 U/L were taken as cases. We had selected NSs among relatives of patients having normal blood chemistry and radiological investigations. Sensitivity and specificity of the test to differentiate malignant and non-malignant PE and also to identify PE with underlying malignancy was analyzed. Results: Mean value of DR-70 in NS was found to be 0.83 ± 0.273 mg/L without any significant difference between males (0.82 mg/L) and females (0.85 mg/L). Mean value of DR-70 in PE with underlying cancer was 5.03 ± 3.79 mg/L. Sensitivity (80%) and specificity (77.78%) of the test was maximum in PE with underlying cancer using cut-off value of 2 mg/L. Mean value DR-70 in malignant PE was 5.18 ± 3.75 mg/L and in non-malignant PE was 3.73 ± 3.74 mg/L without any statistically significant difference (P = 0.08). Conclusions: DR-70 assay has high sensitivity in detecting underlying lung cancer, but has no role in differentiating malignant PE from non-malignant PE. PMID:24339491

  5. The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

  6. Lateral geniculate nucleus histopathology in the rat experimental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although trypanosomosis has a well knownaetiology, histopathological studies on brain regions involved in the control of circadian rhythms are scanty. Lateral geniculate nucleus works in conjunction with the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master circadian rhythm pacemaker, in regulating circadian rhythms. The purpose of ...

  7. HLA-DRB4 gene encoded HLA-DR53 specificity segregating with the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotype: unusual association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, N M; van der Horst, A R; van de Weerd, M J; de Waal, L P; Bontrop, R E

    1998-02-01

    HLA phenotyping of a leukemia patient of Caucasoid origin revealed the presence of the serological HLA-DR53 specificity. Comprehensive pedigree analysis demonstrated that the HLA-DR53 specificity segregated with the HLA-DR7, -DQ3 haplotype. High resolution PCR- SSP genotyping of the HLA class II genes revealed the presence of the HLA-DRB4*0101101 allele segregating together with the HLA-DRB1*0701, -DQA1*0201 and DQB1*03032 alleles. This finding is in contrast to known linkages in that thus far, the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotype has only been described in association with the non-expressed HLA-DRB4*0103102N allele. The existence of this "novel" haplotype may be explained by a homologous recombinational event that occurred between the HLA-DR7, -DR53, -DQ2 and the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotypes.

  8. HLA-DR-expressing cells and T-lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Olsson, T; Solders, G

    1988-01-01

    was confirmed. HLA-DR expression was found in all biopsies and thus was not restricted to any particular type of neuropathy. The HLA-DR expression appeared to correlate with severity and activity of the neuropathy. HLA-DR-expressing macrophages wrapping myelinated fibers were prominent in primary demyelinating......Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures...

  9. Data and computing intensive applications in GENESI-DR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Roberto; Pacini, Fabrizio; Gonçalves, Pedro; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. GENESI-DR provides a framework where data repositories can be easily integrated and users are given a single access point for discovery and access to heterogeneous data and processing resources. Processing services can be easily integrated as well so supporting the users in the analysis of the data. Coupled with high-performance and sizeable computing resources managed by Grid technologies, GENESI-DR provides indeed the necessary flexibility for building a virtual environment that gives transparent, fast, and easy access to data (even heterogeneous and dispersed among different archives), processing services, computing resources, and results. These characteristics make GENESI-DR an ideal platform for processing large amounts of heterogeneous data (e.g., satellite and in-situ data), developing services which require fast production and delivery of results, comparing approaches and fully validating algorithms. Security solutions adopted in GENESI-DR guarantee that only authorized users can access data, processing services and processing resources. GENESI-DR is designed to support the need for an effective exploitation of the large archives. Among the different applications already integrated in GENESI-DR, in this presentation we will describe some results related to

  10. Regulation of Hippocampal 5-HT Release by P2X7 Receptors in Response to Optogenetic Stimulation of Median Raphe Terminals of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flóra Gölöncsér

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic and glutamatergic neurons of median raphe region (MRR play a pivotal role in the modulation of affective and cognitive functions. These neurons synapse both onto themselves and remote cortical areas. P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 are ligand gated ion channels expressed by central presynaptic excitatory nerve terminals and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. P2rx7s are implicated in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. Here we investigated whether 5-HT release released from the hippocampal terminals of MRR is subject to modulation by P2rx7s. To achieve this goal, an optogenetic approach was used to selectively activate subpopulation of serotonergic terminals derived from the MRR locally, and one of its target area, the hippocampus. Optogenetic activation of neurons in the MRR with 20 Hz was correlated with freezing and enhanced locomotor activity of freely moving mice and elevated extracellular levels of 5-HT, glutamate but not GABA in vivo. Similar optical stimulation (OS significantly increased [3H]5-HT and [3H]glutamate release in acute MRR and hippocampal slices. We examined spatial and temporal patterns of [3H]5-HT release and the interaction between the serotonin and glutamate systems. Whilst [3H]5-HT release from MRR neurons was [Ca2+]o-dependent and sensitive to TTX, CNQX and DL-AP-5, release from hippocampal terminals was not affected by the latter drugs. Hippocampal [3H]5-HT released by electrical but not OS was subject to modulation by 5- HT1B/D receptors agonist sumatriptan (1 μM, whereas the selective 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (0.1 μM was without effect. [3H]5-HT released by electrical and optical stimulation was decreased in mice genetically deficient in P2rx7s, and after perfusion with selective P2rx7 antagonists, JNJ-47965567 (0.1 μM, and AZ-10606120 (0.1 μM. Optical and electrical stimulation elevated the extracellular level of ATP. Our results demonstrate for the

  11. A description of the lumbar interfascial triangle and its relation with the lateral raphe: anatomical constituents of load transfer through the lateral margin of the thoracolumbar fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenke, M D; Vleeming, A; Van Hoof, T; Willard, F H

    2012-01-01

    rib to the iliac crest. This triangle results in the unification of different fascial sheaths along the lateral border of the TLF, creating a ridged-union of dense connective tissue that has been termed the lateral raphe (Spine, 9,1984, 163). This triangle may function in the distribution of laterally mediated tension to balance different viscoelastic moduli, along either the middle or posterior layers of the TLF. PMID:22582887

  12. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, John H.; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St. John, Peter C.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bales, Benjamin B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2016-04-04

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  13. Subthalamic nucleus detects unnatural android movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masayuki; Kasaki, Masashi; Alimardani, Maryam; Matsushita, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2017-12-19

    An android, i.e., a realistic humanoid robot with human-like capabilities, may induce an uncanny feeling in human observers. The uncanny feeling about an android has two main causes: its appearance and movement. The uncanny feeling about an android increases when its appearance is almost human-like but its movement is not fully natural or comparable to human movement. Even if an android has human-like flexible joints, its slightly jerky movements cause a human observer to detect subtle unnaturalness in them. However, the neural mechanism underlying the detection of unnatural movements remains unclear. We conducted an fMRI experiment to compare the observation of an android and the observation of a human on which the android is modelled, and we found differences in the activation pattern of the brain regions that are responsible for the production of smooth and natural movement. More specifically, we found that the visual observation of the android, compared with that of the human model, caused greater activation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). When the android's slightly jerky movements are visually observed, the STN detects their subtle unnaturalness. This finding suggests that the detection of unnatural movements is attributed to an error signal resulting from a mismatch between a visual input and an internal model for smooth movement.

  14. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  16. Parity Measurements in the 70Ga Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas Vargas, D. C.; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Jones, K. D.; Le, K. Q.; Harbin, B. L.; Döring, J.; Abromeit, B.; Dungan, R.; Lubna, R.; Tabor, S. L.; Tai, P.-L.; Tripati, Vandana; Vonmoss, J. M.; Morrow, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The odd-odd 70Ga nucleus was studied at high spin after being produced at Florida State University using the 62Ni(14C,αpn) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The resulting γ rays were detected in coincidence using an array of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The linear polarizations of eight γ-ray transitions in 70Ga were measured by comparing their scattering yields within a Clover detector in the parallel and perpendicular directions relative to the beam axis, under the requirement that at least one other γ ray in 70Ga was recorded by a single-crystal detector in the array. As a result of these measurements, the parities of six states were confirmed and those of two other states were established for the first time based on a comparison of the experimental polarizations with the predicted ones determined from known spin assignments. The resulting level spectrum of 70Ga shows both similarities and differences with the predictions of previous shell-model calculations. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Ohio Wesleyan University Summer Science Research Program.

  17. Restoring Segmental Biomechanics Through Nucleus Augmentation: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Matthew H; Cohen, Charles S; Ducheyne, Paul; Walsh, William R

    2016-12-01

    In vitro biomechanical laboratory study. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a mechanical treatment to create a degenerative motion segment and the ability of nucleus augmentation to restore biomechanics. In cases with an intact annulus fibrosus, the replacement or augmentation of the nucleus pulposus alone may provide a less invasive option to restore normal biomechanics and disk height when compared with spinal fusion or total disk replacement. Laboratory testing allows these changes to be fully characterized. However, without preexisting pathology, nucleus augmentation therapies are difficult to evaluate in vitro. The present study evaluated pure moment bending and compressive biomechanics in 3 states (n=6): (1) intact, (2) after creep loading and nucleus disruption to induce degenerative biomechanical changes, and (3) after nucleus augmentation through an injectable polymer (DiscCell). Neutral zone and ROM were increased in all modes of bending after the degenerative treatment. The most sensitive mode of bending was lateral bending, with intact ROM (20.0±2.9 degrees) increased to 22.3±2.6 degrees after degenerative treatment and reduced to 18.4±1.6 degrees after injection of the polymer. All bending ROM and NZ changes induced by the degenerative treatment were reversed by nucleus augmentation. This material was shown to be effective at altering motion segment biomechanics and restoring disk height during time zero tests. This technique may provide a model to examine the time zero performance of a nucleus augmentation device/material.

  18. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects...... affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated...... include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform...

  19. Pulmonary and pleural pathology: Contributions of Dr. Louis "Pepper" Dehner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Jon H; Hill, D Ashley

    2016-11-01

    Dr. Louis Dehner is an internationally renowned surgical pathologist who has published multiple textbooks and has authored or co-authored nearly 400 original articles in the medical literature. While many think of him as a pediatric pathologist, he has contributed to the literature across virtually the entire breadth of surgical pathology, and the lung and pleura is no exception. This review will highlight Dr. Dehner׳s contributions to the pulmonary and pleural pathology literature in the areas of infectious disease, medical lung disease and transplant pathology, and a number of neoplasms of the lung and pleura, with the remainder of this manuscript dedicated to the still evolving story of the pleuropulmonary blastoma as the signature contribution of his long and distinguished career. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. N2R vs. DR Network Infrastructure Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Roost, Lars Jessen; Toft, Per Nesager

    2007-01-01

    Recent development of Internet-based services has set higher requirements to network infrastructures in terms of more bandwidth, lower delays and more reliability. Theoretical research within the area of Structural Quality of Service (SQoS) has introduced a new type of infrastructure which meet...... these requirements: N2R infrastructures. This paper contributes to the ongoing research with a case study from North Jutland. An evaluation of three N2R infrastructures compared to a Double Ring (DR) infrastructure will provide valuable information of the practical applicability of N2R infrastructures. In order...... to study if N2R infrastructures perform better than the DR infrastructure, a distribution network was established based on geographical information system (GIS) data. Nodes were placed with respect to demographic and geographical factors. The established distribution network was investigated with respect...

  1. INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve visiting Athena experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 1: INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve, N. Koulberg, Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, D.O.Williams and Rolf Landua visiting ATHENA. Photo 2: Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, INTAS Secretary General J. Sinnaeve and Rolf Landua visiting ATHENA. Photo 3: In the control room of ATHENA, Rolf Landua, Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS and INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve. INTAS is an independent International Association formed by the European Community, European Union´s Member States and like minded countries acting to preserve and promote the valuable scientific potential of the NIS partner countries through East-West Scientific co-operation.

  2. Optimization on scoliosis examination on Canons DR system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To develop my knowledge concerning the sensitivity of different scintilators when these are inter-joined with Canon’s DR receptor, specifically for exams of scoliosis. Problem Scoliosis patients are typically girls from 11 years of age and upwards that are checked repeatedly through x...... recordings of scoliosis today are carried out on CR systems even though most radiological departments have DR systems available. Theoretically speaking the two modalities are similar regarding dose and image quality. In this project consequently, the focus will be to obtain images of equal dose and quality...... are provided with the prospect for examining the following hypothesis: A Canon receptor with CsI scintilator is able to give an acceptable image quality with a lower dosage at a scoliosis recording than Canon’s receptor with a GOS scintilator. Materials and method The project relies on an empirical study...

  3. Tun Dr. Mahathir’s Leadership Communication: The Confucian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah Joyce Lynn-Sze; Yusof Norhafezah; Ahmad Mohd Khairie

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have provided valuable insights into the impact of culture on the concept of leadership communication. However, only a few studies that focused on exploring and understanding the values of Confucianism and its impact on the Chinese culture, especially in Malaysia. Thus, this study is among the first study to examine the leadership communication from the perspective of Confucianism towards the leadership of Dr. Mahathir from the perspective of the Chinese community in Malaysia...

  4. In memoriam dr. Anne van Wijngaarden (1925-2004)

    OpenAIRE

    Broekhuizen, S.; Laar, van, V.

    2005-01-01

    Op 4 oktober 2004 overleed Dr. Anne van Wijngaarden op 78-jarige leeftijd in zijn huis bij Millac- Carlux, Frankrijk. Hij was een van de Nederlandse oprichters van de Vereniging voor Zoogdierkunde en Zoogdierbescherming. Nadat zijn eindexamen op de middelbare school wilde Anne aanvankelijk geologie studeren, maar toen de verplichte excursies te duur bleken, werd het biologie. Nog voordat hij doctoraal-examen had gedaan, kreeg hij een baan bij de Plantenziektenkundige Dienst. Zijn eerste opdra...

  5. HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA TREATMENT OF NEONATUS IN DR. SOETOMO HOSPITAL SURABAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Hosea, Mellisa Kristanti; Etika, Risa; Lestari, Pudji

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a condition of high levels bilirubin accumulating in blood and known as jaundice, a yellow coloration of the skin, sclera and nails. Hyperbilirubinemia is a problem that often occurs in newborns. Patients with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are treated with phototerapy and exchange transfusion. The purpose of this study was to identify the hyperbilirubinemia treatments on neonatal in Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. Medical records were used to collect information on hyperbil...

  6. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  7. DR services in Fiji: attitudes, barriers and screening practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Kool

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the attitudes and perceptions of primary health care doctors in Fiji regarding the importance of eye care in diabetes mellitus (DM management, to explore current eye care practice, and to investigate awareness and use of relevant clinical practice guidelines. The study builds on earlier research conducted in Fiji that identified a rapid increase of late-stage DR patients presenting for treatment, at a time when surgery was the only option.

  8. Postdoctoral Fellowship for Dr. Lindholm, Underwater Physiology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    been obtained, it can be maintained with a lower intensity "maintenance training". Preliminary results in runners , in our laboratory, suggest that...in divers are supported by previous studies in runners , cyclists and rowers. The current study demonstrates that respiratory muscle fatigue may be the...G.A., Pendergast, D.R. Co-activation of the Tongue Protrudor and Retractor Muscles is not Altered in Obese Zucker Rats. American Thoraxic Annual

  9. Dr. Michael DeBakey "is a magician of the heart…"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Then & Now Dr. Michael DeBakey "is a magician of the heart…" ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Dr. DeBakey with NLM's David Nash and admiring students ...

  10. Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Dr. Jerry Gale, LMFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Gale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Jerry Gale is an Associate Professor and the Clinical Director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Doctoral Program at the University of Georgia. He is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and an approved supervisor of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. He earned a B.A. from the University of Michigan, a MEd from the University of Arizona, and a Ph.D. from Texas Tech University. Over the course of his career, Dr. Gale has authored three books and over 60 articles and book chapters. He is a co-developer of a relational financial therapy approach that combines financial counseling with family therapy and has extensive training in clinical hypnosis, couples therapy, and family therapy, as well as mindfulness meditation. He is the recipient of the American Family Therapy Academy 2006 Outstanding Research Award. In addition to his work at the University of Georgia, Dr. Gale conducts therapy at Athens Associates for Counseling and Psychotherapy.

  11. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place.

  12. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  13. Curriculum Vitae of Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN and Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’s Impressions About Him Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN’in Özgeçmişi ve Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’in Onun Hakkındaki İzlenimleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür AY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum Vitae of Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN and Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’s Impressions About Him Prof. Dr. Gürer GÜLSEVİN’in Özgeçmişi ve Prof. Dr. Ayşe İLKER’in Onun Hakkındaki İzlenimleri

  14. The nucleus retroambiguus control of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hari H; Holstege, Gert

    2009-03-25

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using d, l-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory effect via simultaneous measurement of tracheal pressure and electromyograms of diaphragm, internal intercostal (IIC), cricothyroid (CT), and external oblique abdominal (EO) muscles. NRA-stimulation 0-1 mm caudal to the obex resulted in recruitment of IIC muscle and reduction in respiratory frequency. NRA-stimulation 1-3 mm caudal to the obex produced vocalization along with CT activation and slight increase in tracheal pressure, but no change in respiratory frequency. NRA-stimulation 3-5 mm caudal to the obex produced CT muscle activation and an increase in respiratory frequency, but no vocalization. NRA-stimulation 5-8 mm caudal to the obex produced EO muscle activation and reduction in respiratory frequency. A change to the inspiratory effort was never observed, regardless of which NRA part was stimulated. The results demonstrate that NRA does not control eupneic inspiration but consists of topographically separate groups of premotor interneurons each producing detailed motor actions. These motor activities have in common that they require changes to eupneic breathing. Different combination of activation of these premotor neurons determines the final outcome, e.g., vocalization, vomiting, coughing, sneezing, mating posture, or child delivery. Higher brainstem regions such as the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) decides which combination of NRA neurons are excited. In simple terms, the NRA is the piano, the PAG one of the piano players.

  15. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 (``DR4...

  16. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  17. 75 FR 51869 - CAFTA-DR Consultation Request Regarding Guatemala's Apparent Failure to Effectively Enforce its...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...] CAFTA-DR Consultation Request Regarding Guatemala's Apparent Failure to Effectively Enforce its Labor... States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR), the United States requested consultations with the Government of...-agreements/free-trade-agreements/cafta-dr-dominican-republic-central-america-fta/kirk-solis-le . USTR invites...

  18. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Majmaah University, Physics Department, College of Science, Al-Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyuez-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 70}Ge and {sup 28}Si + {sup 100}Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Formation and identification of Centauro and Strangelets in nucleus- nucleus collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, Aris L S; Bogolyubsky, M Yu; Filippov, S N; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Kharlov, Yu V; Kurepin, A B; Maevskaya, A I; Mavromanolakis, G; Panagiotou, A D; Sadovsky, S A; Stefanski, P; Wlodarczyk, Z

    1999-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model for the formation and decay of a cosmic ray Centauro fireball in the baryon-rich projectile fragmentation rapidity region in nucleus-nucleus interactions. Our model naturally incorporates the $9 possibility of strangelet formation, Strangelets being conjectured to be the "strongly penetrating component" observed in hadron-rich cosmic ray events. Based on this model we have performed Monte-Carlo simulations to study the $9 Centauro and strangelet dynamic and kinematic characteristics in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energies, as well as their identification by the detector system CASTOR. CASTOR is being developed for the ALICE heavy ion experiment at $9 the LHC and will probe the very forward pseudorapidity region 5.6

  20. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.