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Sample records for raphe dorsalis nrd

  1. Sleep deprivation reduces the citalopram-induced inhibition of serotoninergic neuronal firing in the nucleus raphe dorsalis of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, E; Maudhuit, C; Le Poul, E; Hamon, M; Adrien, J

    1996-12-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) for one night induces mood improvement in depressed patients. However, relapse often occurs on the day after deprivation subsequently to a sleep episode. In light of the possible involvement of central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurotransmission in both depression and sleep mechanisms, we presently investigated, in the rat, the effects of SD and recovery sleep on the electrophysiological response of 5-HT neurons in the nucleus raphe dorsalis (NRD) to an acute challenge with the 5-HT reuptake blocker citalopram. In all rats, citalopram induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the firing of NRD neurons recorded under chloral hydrate anaesthesia. After SD, achieved by placing rats in a slowly rotating cylinder for 24 h, the inhibitory action of citalopram was significantly reduced (with a concomitant 53% increase in its ED50 value). After a recovery period of 4 h, a normal susceptibility of the firing to citalopram was restored. The decreased sensitivity of 5-HT neuronal firing to the inhibitory effect of citalopram after SD probably results in an enhancement of 5-HT neurotransmission. Such an adaptive phenomenon (similar to that reported after chronic antidepressant treatment), and its normalization after recovery sleep, parallel the mood improvement effect of SD and the subsequent relapse observed in depressed patients. These data suggest that the associated changes in 5-HT autocontrol of the firing of NRD serotoninergic neurons are relevant to the antidepressant action of SD.

  2. NrdI Essentiality for Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reduction in Streptococcus pyogenes▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Ignasi; Torrents, Eduard; Sahlin, Margareta; Gibert, Isidre; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The Streptococcus pyogenes genome harbors two clusters of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase genes, nrdHEF and nrdF*I*E*, and a second stand-alone nrdI gene, designated nrdI2. We show that both clusters are expressed simultaneously as two independent operons. The NrdEF enzyme is functionally active in vitro, while the NrdE*F* enzyme is not. The NrdF* protein lacks three of the six highly conserved iron-liganding side chains and cannot form a dinuclear iron site or a tyrosyl radical. In vivo, on the other hand, both operons are functional in heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli. The nrdF*I*E* operon requires the presence of the nrdI* gene, and the nrdHEF operon gained activity upon cotranscription of the heterologous nrdI gene from Streptococcus pneumoniae, while neither nrdI* nor nrdI2 from S. pyogenes rendered it active. Our results highlight the essential role of the flavodoxin NrdI protein in vivo, and we suggest that it is needed to reduce met-NrdF, thereby enabling the spontaneous reformation of the tyrosyl radical. The NrdI* flavodoxin may play a more direct role in ribonucleotide reduction by the NrdF*I*E* system. We discuss the possibility that the nrdF*I*E* operon has been horizontally transferred to S. pyogenes from Mycoplasma spp. PMID:18502861

  3. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) is a unique and powerful database designed to support various types of analyses of national readmission rates for all...

  4. Median raphe cyst: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Piyush; Das, Anupam; Savant, Sushil S; Barkat, Rizwana

    2017-02-15

    Median raphe cysts are rare congenital lesions ofthe male genitalia that occur as a result of alteredembryologic development. We report two such casesof median raphe cysts in the pediatric age group. Inaddition, we review the literature.

  5. superciliosus and Clinus dorsalis (Perciformes: Clinidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    superciliosus and Clinus dorsalis (Perciformes: Clinidae). W.J. Veith and D.A. Cornish. Department of Zoology, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch. The anatomy and histology of the ovaries of C. superciliosus and C. dorsalis are described. The ovaries are extensively modified as trophic organs since embryos of.

  6. Using the Tg(nrd:egfp/albino zebrafish line to characterize in vivo expression of neurod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Thomas

    Full Text Available In this study, we used a newly-created transgenic zebrafish, Tg(nrd:egfp/albino, to further characterize the expression of neurod in the developing and adult retina and to determine neurod expression during adult photoreceptor regeneration. We also provide observations regarding the expression of neurod in a variety of other tissues. In this line, EGFP is found in cells of the developing and adult retina, pineal gland, cerebellum, olfactory bulbs, midbrain, hindbrain, neural tube, lateral line, inner ear, pancreas, gut, and fin. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we compare the expression of the nrd:egfp transgene to that of endogenous neurod and to known retinal cell types. Consistent with previous data based on in situ hybridizations, we show that during retinal development, the nrd:egfp transgene is not expressed in proliferating retinal neuroepithelium, and is expressed in a subset of retinal neurons. In contrast to previous studies, nrd:egfp is gradually re-expressed in all rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration in adult zebrafish, in situ hybridization reveals that neurod is not expressed in Müller glial-derived neuronal progenitors, but is expressed in photoreceptor progenitors as they migrate to the outer nuclear layer and differentiate into new rod photoreceptors. During photoreceptor regeneration, expression of the nrd:egfp matches that of neurod. We conclude that Tg(nrd:egfp/albino is a good representation of endogenous neurod expression, is a useful tool to visualize neurod expression in a variety of tissues and will aid investigating the fundamental processes that govern photoreceptor regeneration in adults.

  7. A new type NRD-guide receiving front-end in Ka-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Qi, Lanfen

    1995-10-01

    A new type millimeter-wave receiving frond-end using NRD-guide as internal transmission line is presented in this paper. The receiving frond-end consists of a NRD-guide crossbar balanced mixer, a NRD-guide LSE mode local oscillator and two impedance-converters at two input ports of the mixer circuit. Firstly, the propagation characteristics of some transmission modes often used in NRD-guide are given, and the conditions which these modes are applied as the operating modes are discussed. Secondly, the principle of the balanced mixed which is regarded as the key circuit unit in the receiving frond-end is analysed by using vector Green's function, and the conversion loss of the mixer is computed with an equivalent circuit in Ka-band. And then, from the view of obtaining the optimum performances of the whole receiving frond-end, some methods of designing local oscillator are expound. Some experimental results of the receiving frond-end at Kaband are given in the paper lastly. Because the frond-end have the impedance matching and converting circuits, it possesses better electrical performance. The integrated frond-end which have compact size and excellent shock strength is suitable for varied millimeter-wave system.

  8. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  9. Analysis of the roles of NrdR and DnaB from Streptococcus pyogenes in response to host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Okada, Ryo; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2015-03-01

    Toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) is a re-emerging infectious disease. Many virulence-associated proteins play important roles in its pathogenesis and the production of these proteins is controlled by many regulatory factors. CovS is one of the most important two-component sensor proteins in S. pyogenes, and it has been analyzed extensively. Our recent analyses revealed the existence of a transposon between covS and nrdR in several strains, and we speculated that this insertion has some importance. Hence, we examined the significances of the NrdR stand-alone regulator and DnaB, which is encoded by the gene located immediately downstream of nrdR in S. pyogenes infection. We established an nrdR-only knockout strain, and both nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain. These established knockout strains exhibited a deteriorated response to H2 O2 exposure. nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain was more easily killed by human polynuclear blood cells, but the nrdR-only knockout strain had no significant difference compared to wild type in contrast to the combined knockout strain. In addition, the mouse infection model experiment illustrated that nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain, but not the nrdR-only knockout strain, was less virulent compared with the parental strain. These results suggest that DnaB is involved in response to host defense. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. superciliosus and Clinus dorsalis (Perciformes: Clinidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anatomy and histology of the ovaries of C. superciliosus and ... structure and association with embryonic tissues in the two clinid species. ... length, being the length in mm from the tip of the snout to the base of the tail. Results. General anatomy. The general anatomy of both C. superciliosus and C. dorsalis is essentially ...

  11. Electrophysiological study of supraspinal input and spinal output of cat's subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Velo

    Full Text Available This work addressed the study of subnucleus reticularis dorsalis (SRD neurons in relation to their supraspinal input and the spinal terminating sites of their descending axons. SRD extracellular unitary recordings from anesthetized cats aimed to specifically test, 1 the rostrocaudal segmental level reached by axons of spinally projecting (SPr neurons collateralizing or not to or through the ipsilateral nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc, 2 whether SPr fibers bifurcate to the thalamus, and 3 the effects exerted on SRD cells by electrically stimulating the locus coeruleus, the periaqueductal grey, the nucleus raphe magnus, and the mesencephalic locomotor region. From a total of 191 SPr fibers tested to cervical 2 (Ce2, thoracic 5 (Th5 and lumbar5 (Lu5 stimulation, 81 ended between Ce2 and Th5 with 39 of them branching to or through the NRGc; 21/49 terminating between Th5 and Lu5 collateralized to or through the same nucleus, as did 34/61 reaching Lu5. The mean antidromic conduction velocity of SPr fibers slowed in the more proximal segments and increased with terminating distance along the cord. None of the 110 axons tested sent collaterals to the thalamus; instead thalamic stimulation induced long-latency polysynaptic responses in most cells but also short-latency, presumed monosynaptic, in 7.9% of the tested neurons (18/227. Antidromic and orthodromic spikes were elicited from the locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus, but exclusively orthodromic responses were observed following stimulation of the periaqueductal gray or mesencephalic locomotor region. The results suggest that information from pain-and-motor-related supraspinal structures converge on SRD cells that through SPr axons having conduction velocities tuned to their length may affect rostral and caudal spinal cord neurons at fixed delays, both directly and in parallel through different descending systems. The SRD will thus play a dual functional role by simultaneously

  12. Proposed diagnostic reference levels (DRLs)in complex explorations; Propuesta de niveles de referencia para diagnostico (NRD) en exploraciones complejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio Freijo, M.; Vigil Gimenez, A.; Coll Pujol, A.

    2011-07-01

    Obtaining reference levels for radiodiagnostic (NRD) in complex explorations (tract, urography, etc..) With remote control equipment is an important step for the optimization of radiation protection of patients. In recent years in Catalonia digital remote controls have been implemented that have transmission chamber (internal or external) that provide the values of dose-area product (DAP).

  13. Etude de la dynamique de Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Au Sénégal, la filière mangue contribue à la lutte contre la pauvreté et l'insécurité alimentaire en milieu rural. Toutefois, elle est confrontée à des contraintes phytosanitaires notamment celles liées à Bactrocera dorsalis. La présente étude qui vise à comprendre la dynamique B. dorsalis a consisté à placer dans 4 vergers de ...

  14. Activity of Raphé Serotonergic Neurons Controls Emotional Behaviors

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    Anne Teissier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-established role of serotonin signaling in mood regulation, causal relationships between serotonergic neuronal activity and behavior remain poorly understood. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find that selectively increasing serotonergic neuronal activity in wild-type mice is anxiogenic and reduces floating in the forced-swim test, whereas inhibition has no effect on the same measures. In a developmental mouse model of altered emotional behavior, increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors correlate with reduced dorsal raphé and increased median raphé serotonergic activity. These mice display blunted responses to serotonergic stimulation and behavioral rescues through serotonergic inhibition. Furthermore, we identify opposing consequences of dorsal versus median raphé serotonergic neuron inhibition on floating behavior, together suggesting that median raphé hyperactivity increases anxiety, whereas a low dorsal/median raphé serotonergic activity ratio increases depression-like behavior. Thus, we find a critical role of serotonergic neuronal activity in emotional regulation and uncover opposing roles of median and dorsal raphé function.

  15. Mating compatibility between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, W; Ahmad, S; Dammalage, T; Tomas, U Sto; Wornoayporn, V; Ul Haq, I; Cáceres, C; Vreysen, M J B; Schutze, M K

    2014-04-01

    The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, is a highly polyphagous fruit pest that occurs predominantly in Africa yet has its origins in the Indian subcontinent. It is extremely morphologically and genetically similar to the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel); as such the specific relationship between these two species is unresolved. We assessed prezygotic compatibility between B. dorsalis and B. invadens using standardized field cage mating tests, which have proven effectiveness in tephritid cryptic species studies. These tests were followed by an assessment of postzygotic compatibility by examining egg viability, larval and pupal survival, and sex ratios of offspring produced from parental and subsequent F1 crosses to examine for hybrid breakdown as predicted under a two-species hypothesis. B. dorsalis was sourced from two countries (Pakistan and China), and each population was compared with B. invadens from its type locality of Kenya. B. invadens mated randomly with B. dorsalis from both localities, and there were generally high levels of hybrid viability and survival resulting from parental and F1 crosses. Furthermore, all but one hybrid cross resulted in equal sex ratios, with the single deviation in favor of males and contrary to expectations under Haldane's rule. These data support the hypothesis that B. dorsalis and B. invadens represent the same biological species, an outcome that poses significant implications for pest management and international trade for sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Dissociations between the effects of LSD on behavior and raphe unit activity in freely moving cats.

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    Trulson, M E; Jacobs, B L

    1979-08-03

    The hypothesis that the action of hallucinogenic drugs is mediated by a depression of the activity of brain serotonergic (raphe) neurons was tested by examining the behavioral effects of d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) while studying the activity of raphe neurons in freely moving cats. Although the results provide general support for the hypothesis, there were several important dissociations. (i) Low doses of LSD produced only small decreases in raphe unit activity but significant behavoiral changes; (ii) LSD-induced behavioral changes outlasted the depression of raphe unit activity; and (iii) raphe neurons were at least as responsive to LSD during tolerance as they were in the nontolerant condition.

  17. Preventive control of Scirtothrips dorsalis with biological insecticides, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study was 1) to evaluate the efficacy of the selected entomopathogens against a new invasive thrips pest, chilli thrips (CT) Scirtothrips dorsalis in pepper as a preventive control strategy, and 2) compare potential of entomopathogens with a chemical standard under greenhouse ...

  18. Analysis of clinical and imaging characteristics of tabes dorsalis

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    Xiao-feng WANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of clinical symptoms and imaging features of tabes dorsalis.  Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory examinations, imaging features, electrophysiological manifestations, treatment and prognosis of 3 patients with tabes dorsalis diagnosed in our hospital and 7 patients reported in literatures.  Results The initial symptoms of 10 patients with tabes dorsalis included unsteady gait, pricking or lightning pain in abdomen and numbness of limbs (especially in both legs and feet. In addition to the above symptoms, the most common clinical features also included urination disorders, weakened or disappeared reflexes at knee and ankle, disorders of deep and shallow sensation, Romberg sign positive and heel-knee-tibia test instability. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA in serum of all patients was positive, and the titer of rapid plasma reagin (RPR in serum was 1∶ 8-256. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF test showed increased white blood cell and protein. TPPA in CSF was also positive, and the titer of RPR in CSF was 1∶1-8. No obvious specificity of imaging changes was found except spinal disc degeneration. Some patients showed abnormal somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP with prolonged latency and decreased amplitude of bilateral P100 waves, and the nerve conduction velocity (NCV of most patients was normal. Six patients were improved after penicillin treatment.  Conclusions Due to its complicated clinical manifestations and non-specific imaging changes, tabes dorsalis is prone to be misdiagnosed. A clear diagnosis depends on clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory examinations, imaging and electrophysiological manifestations. Only a minority of patients show imaging changes which are proved significant for the diagnosis of tabes dorsalis. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.006

  19. Transmission Biology of Rice Stripe Mosaic Virus by an Efficient Insect Vector Recilia dorsalis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae

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    Xin Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe mosaic virus (RSMV is a newly discovered species of cytorhabdovirus infecting rice plants that is transmitted by the leafhopper Recilia dorsalis. In this study, the transmission characteristics of RSMV by R. dorsalis were investigated. Under suitable growth conditions for R. dorsalis, the RSMV acquisition rate reached 71.9% in the second-generation population raised on RSMV-infected rice plants. The minimum acquisition and inoculation access periods of R. dorsalis were 3 and 30 min, respectively. The minimum and maximum latent transmission periods of RSMV in R. dorsalis were 6 and 18 d, respectively, and some R. dorsalis intermittently transmitted RSMV at 2–6 d intervals. Our findings revealed that the virus can replicate in the leafhopper body, but is likely not transovarially transmitted to offspring. These transmission characteristics will help guide the formulation of RSMV prevention and control strategies.

  20. Activation of raphe nuclei triggers rapid and distinct effects on parallel olfactory bulb output channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vikrant; Provost, Allison C; Agarwal, Prateek; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-02-01

    The serotonergic raphe nuclei are involved in regulating brain states over timescales of minutes and hours. We examined more rapid effects of raphe activation on two classes of principal neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb, mitral and tufted cells, which send olfactory information to distinct targets. Brief stimulation of the raphe nuclei led to excitation of tufted cells at rest and potentiation of their odor responses. While mitral cells at rest were also excited by raphe activation, their odor responses were bidirectionally modulated, leading to improved pattern separation of odors. In vitro whole-cell recordings revealed that specific optogenetic activation of raphe axons affected bulbar neurons through dual release of serotonin and glutamate. Therefore, the raphe nuclei, in addition to their role in neuromodulation of brain states, are also involved in fast, sub-second top-down modulation similar to cortical feedback. This modulation can selectively and differentially sensitize or decorrelate distinct output channels.

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Guang-Mao Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, is one of the most economically important pests in the world, causing serious damage to fruit production. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its development and its ability to resist insecticides. Analysis of the B. dorsalis transcriptome and its expression profile data is essential to extending the genetic information resources on this species, providing a shortcut that will support studies on B. dorsalis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed de novo assembly of a transcriptome using short read sequencing technology (Illumina. The results generated 484,628 contigs, 70,640 scaffolds, and 49,804 unigenes. Of those unigenes, 27,455 (55.13% matched known proteins in the NCBI database, as determined by BLAST search. Clusters of orthologous groups (COG, gene orthology (GO, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG annotations were performed to better understand the functions of these unigenes. Genes related to insecticide resistance were analyzed in additional detail. Digital gene expression (DGE libraries showed differences in gene expression profiles at different developmental stages (eggs, third-instar larvae, pupae, and adults. To confirm the DGE results, the expression profiles of six randomly selected genes were analyzed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of B. dorsalis and makes a huge number of gene sequences available for further study, including both genes of known importance and genes of unknown function. The DGE data provide comprehensive insight into gene expression profiles at different developmental stages. This facilitates the study of the role of each gene in the developmental process and in insecticide resistance.

  2. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human

    OpenAIRE

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla, and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (a...

  3. Nab3 Facilitates the Function of the TRAMP Complex in RNA Processing via Recruitment of Rrp6 Independent of Nrd1

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    Fasken, Milo B.; Laribee, R. Nicholas; Corbett, Anita H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. In eukaryotic cells, ncRNAs are processed and/or degraded by the nuclear exosome, a ribonuclease complex containing catalytic subunits Dis3 and Rrp6. The TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air1/2-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex is a critical exosome cofactor in budding yeast that stimulates the exosome to process/degrade ncRNAs and human TRAMP components have recently been identified. Importantly, mutations in exosome and exosome cofactor genes cause neurodegenerative disease. How the TRAMP complex interacts with other exosome cofactors to orchestrate regulation of the exosome is an open question. To identify novel interactions of the TRAMP exosome cofactor, we performed a high copy suppressor screen of a thermosensitive air1/2 TRAMP mutant. Here, we report that the Nab3 RNA-binding protein of the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complex is a potent suppressor of TRAMP mutants. Unlike Nab3, Nrd1 and Sen1 do not suppress TRAMP mutants and Nrd1 binding is not required for Nab3-mediated suppression of TRAMP suggesting an independent role for Nab3. Critically, Nab3 decreases ncRNA levels in TRAMP mutants, Nab3-mediated suppression of air1/2 cells requires the nuclear exosome component, Rrp6, and Nab3 directly binds Rrp6. We extend this analysis to identify a human RNA binding protein, RALY, which shares identity with Nab3 and can suppress TRAMP mutants. These results suggest that Nab3 facilitates TRAMP function by recruiting Rrp6 to ncRNAs for processing/degradation independent of Nrd1. The data raise the intriguing possibility that Nab3 and Nrd1 can function independently to recruit Rrp6 to ncRNA targets, providing combinatorial flexibility in RNA processing. PMID:25775092

  4. Comparative sensitivity to methyl eugenol of four putative Bactrocera dorsalis complex sibling species ? further evidence that they belong to one and the same species B. dorsalis

    OpenAIRE

    Hee, Alvin K.W.; Ooi, Yue-Shin; Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan,Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Males of certain species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to, and readily feed on methyl eugenol (ME), a plant secondary compound that is found in over 480 plant species worldwide. Amongst those species is one of the world?s most severe fruit pests the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former taxonomic species Bactrocera invadens , Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis . The latter species have been recently synonymise...

  5. The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus studied with dual-probe microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus was investigated by means of dual-probe microdialysis in conscious rats. The release of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) after inhibition or stimulation of locus cocruleus and dorsal raphe activity was sampled in both

  6. Evaluation of Entomopathogenic Fungi Against Chilli Thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, Steven Paul; Aristizábal, Luis Fernando; Avery, Pasco Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Commercial strains of entomopathogenic fungi were evaluated for control of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), an invasive pest of ornamental and vegetable plants in the Caribbean and southeastern United States. In laboratory assays, LC50 values against adult S. dorsalis were 5.1 × 104 CFU/mL for Beauveria bassiana GHA, with higher values 3.1 × 105 for Metarhizium brunneum F52 and 3.8 × 105 for Isaria fumosorosea Apopka 97. Second instars were comparatively less susceptible to all isolates, ostensibly due to moulting, with LC50 values of 1.1 × 108, 7.0 × 105, and 9.9 × 105 CFU/spores per mL for GHA, F52, and Apopka 97 strains, respectively. In greenhouse cages, compared with controls, three applications of mycoinsecticides and other biorational insecticides at 7 to 14 day intervals reduced overall S. dorsalis populations on pepper plants Capsicum annuum cv. California Wonder: spinosad reduced populations by 94–99%, M. brunneum F52 by 84–93%, B. bassiana GHA by 81–94%, I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by 62–66%, and different horticultural oils by 58–85%. The proportion of marketable fruit was significantly increased by M. brunneum F52, B. bassiana GHA, and 2% SuffOil-X treatments. Slightly lower levels of control were observed in nursery tests with ornamental rose shrubs, Rosa sp. Red Double Knock Out®, during hot sunny conditions. Four applications reduced thrips populations over 10 weeks: spinosad by an average of 91%, M. brunneum F52 by an average of 81%, B. bassiana GHA by an average of 62%, SuffOil-X by an average of 50%, and I. fumosorosea PFR-97 by an average of 44%. The data show that mycoinsecticides can be used in management strategies for low to moderate populations of S. dorsalis and provide resistance management tools for the limited number of insecticides that are effective against this pest. PMID:23895429

  7. Comparative sensitivity to methyl eugenol of four putative Bactrocera dorsalis complex sibling species – further evidence that they belong to one and the same species B. dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K.W.; Ooi, Yue-Shin; Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Males of certain species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to, and readily feed on methyl eugenol (ME), a plant secondary compound that is found in over 480 plant species worldwide. Amongst those species is one of the world’s most severe fruit pests the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former taxonomic species Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis. The latter species have been recently synonymised with Bactrocera dorsalis based on their very similar morphology, mating compatibility, molecular genetics and identical sex pheromones following consumption of ME. Previous studies have shown that male fruit fly responsiveness to lures is a unique phenomenon that is dose species-specific, besides showing a close correlation to sexual maturity attainment. This led us to use ME sensitivity as a behavioural parameter to test if Bactrocera dorsalis and the three former taxonomic species had similar sensitivity towards odours of ME. Using Probit analysis, we estimated the median dose of ME required to elicit species’ positive response in 50% of each population tested (ED50). ED50 values were compared between Bactrocera dorsalis and the former species. Our results showed no significant differences between Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis in their response to ME. We consider that the Bactrocera males’ sensitivity to ME may be a useful behavioural parameter for species delimitation and, in addition to other integrative taxonomic tools used, provides further supportive evidence that the four taxa belong to one and the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis. PMID:26798265

  8. Comparative sensitivity to methyl eugenol of four putative Bactrocera dorsalis complex sibling species - further evidence that they belong to one and the same species B. dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K W; Ooi, Yue-Shin; Wee, Suk-Ling; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Males of certain species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to, and readily feed on methyl eugenol (ME), a plant secondary compound that is found in over 480 plant species worldwide. Amongst those species is one of the world's most severe fruit pests the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former taxonomic species Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis. The latter species have been recently synonymised with Bactrocera dorsalis based on their very similar morphology, mating compatibility, molecular genetics and identical sex pheromones following consumption of ME. Previous studies have shown that male fruit fly responsiveness to lures is a unique phenomenon that is dose species-specific, besides showing a close correlation to sexual maturity attainment. This led us to use ME sensitivity as a behavioural parameter to test if Bactrocera dorsalis and the three former taxonomic species had similar sensitivity towards odours of ME. Using Probit analysis, we estimated the median dose of ME required to elicit species' positive response in 50% of each population tested (ED50). ED50 values were compared between Bactrocera dorsalis and the former species. Our results showed no significant differences between Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., and the former Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera philippinensis in their response to ME. We consider that the Bactrocera males' sensitivity to ME may be a useful behavioural parameter for species delimitation and, in addition to other integrative taxonomic tools used, provides further supportive evidence that the four taxa belong to one and the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis.

  9. Chromatic cues to trap the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Yen; Chen, Yu-Po; Yang, En-Cheng

    2007-05-01

    Various colors have been used as visual cues to trap insect pests. For example, yellow traps for monitoring and control of the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) have been in use for a very long time. However, the chromatic cue of using color traps has never been meticulously investigated. In this study, the spectral sensitivities of the photoreceptors in the compound eyes of B. dorsalis were measured intracellularly, and the theory of receptor quantum catch was applied to study the chromatic cue of fly attracting. Responses to five wavelength categories with peak wavelengths of 370, 380, 490, and 510 nm, and one with dual peaks at 350 and 490 nm were recorded. Based on spectral sensitivities, six colored papers were chosen to test the color preference of the fly, and an additional UV preference test was done to confirm the effect of the UV stimuli. It was concluded that UV and green stimuli (spectra: 300-380 nm and 500-570 nm) would enhance the attractiveness of a colored paper to the oriental fruit fly, and blue stimuli (380-500 nm) would diminish the attractiveness.

  10. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  11. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A Rachid

    2011-04-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery.

  12. Effect of sweeteners on the survival and behaviour of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunyan; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Yijuan

    2016-05-01

    The oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) causes serious damage that affects fruit production. Chemical insecticides have been widely used for the prevention and control of this destructive pest. However, the resistance of B. dorsalis to these compounds has become a serious problem. This study tested six sweeteners for their toxicity to B. dorsalis. B. dorsalis fed on erythritol, aspartame and saccharin exhibited significantly higher mortality than those fed on sucrose. Flies fed on erythritol died faster than did the control flies (water). However, no dose-dependent effects were observed at the concentrations tested. These three sweeteners decreased the climbing ability of B. dorsalis. Notably, adults fed on saccharin exhibited significantly decreased climbing ability after 12 h compared with those fed on sucrose. Additionally, these three sweeteners had a negative effect on the frequency and duration of the flies' behaviour patterns (flying, walking, grooming and inactivity). Saccharin not only induced a marked reduction in the frequency of flights and walks but also induced decreases in the time spent flying and walking and increases in inactivity compared with sucrose. Erythritol induced a reduction in movement and increased the time spent inactive compared with the control and other treatments. Three sweeteners had significant negative effects on the survival of B. dorsalis. Erythritol was toxic to B. dorsalis. Aspartame and saccharin also decreased the survival and behaviour of adult flies and may be toxic to (or contribute to poor nutrition in) B. dorsalis. These sweeteners could therefore be developed as additive ingredients in baits. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Epicuticular chemistry reinforces the new taxonomic classification of the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae, Dacinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníčková, Lucie; Nagy, Radka; Pompeiano, Antonio; Kalinová, Blanka

    2017-01-01

    Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, have been recently synonymized under the name Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The closely related Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock remains as a discrete taxonomic entity. Although the synonymizations have been accepted by most researchers, debate about the species limits remains. Because of the economic importance of this group of taxa, any new information available to support or deny the synonymizations is valuable. We investigated the chemical epicuticle composition of males and females of B. dorsalis, B. invadens, B. papayae, B. philippinensis, and B. carambolae by means of one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by multiple factor analyses and principal component analysis. Clear segregation of complex cuticule profiles of both B. carambolae sexes from B. dorsalis (Hendel) was observed. In addition to cuticular hydrocarbons, abundant complex mixtures of sex-specific oxygenated lipids (three fatty acids and 22 fatty acid esters) with so far unknown function were identified in epicuticle extracts from females of all species. The data obtained supports both taxonomic synonymization of B. invadens, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis with B. dorsalis, as well as the exclusion of B. carambolae from B. dorsalis.

  14. Lethal and sublethal effects of cyantraniliprole on Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruimin; Jang, Eric B; He, Shiyu; Chen, Jiahua

    2015-02-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is one of the most globally important insect pests. Studies were conducted with the novel anthranilic diamide insecticide cyantraniliprole to determine its lethal and sublethal effects on B. dorsalis. An ingestion toxicity bioassay showed that cyantraniliprole was active against B. dorsalis, and the 72 h feeding LC50 was 3.22 µg g(-1) in adult diet for a susceptible strain. Sublethal doses of cyantraniliprole (1.30 µg g(-1) adult diet) induced a hormesis effect on B. dorsalis. The mating competitiveness of B. dorsalis treated with cyantraniliprole at 3.27 µg g(-1) adult diet was significantly lower when compared with the controls. The lower dose (1.30 µg g(-1) adult diet) of cyantraniliprole improved the total mating times of both mating pairs in treated groups and also the mating competitiveness of the treated males when compared with the higher dose and controls. Cyantraniliprole-treated females of the mated pairs with the lower dose laid more eggs. On the fifth day, female receptivity in the treated group was significantly reduced when compared with the controls. These results indicate that cyantraniliprole is effective against B. dorsalis. The inhibition and stimulation effect of cyantraniliprole on the adult's mating performance at different concentrations was proved. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Effects of Hydro Alcoholic Extraction of Valeriana on Astrocyte Raphe Magnus in Adult Rats

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    sajad Hatami joni

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Oral administration of hydro alcoholic extract of valerian increases astrocytes number and decreases their size in nucleus of raphe Magna, which indicated the effect of this extraction on proliferation of astrocytes increasing.

  16. Pontine-ventral respiratory column interactions through raphe circuits detected using multi-array spike train recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Solomon, Irene C; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2009-06-01

    Recently, Segers et al. identified functional connectivity between the ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC) and the pontine respiratory group (PRG). The apparent sparseness of detected paucisynaptic interactions motivated consideration of other potential functional pathways between these two regions. We report here evidence for "indirect" serial functional linkages between the PRG and VRC via intermediary brain stem midline raphé neurons. Arrays of microelectrodes were used to record sets of spike trains from a total of 145 PRG, 282 VRC, and 340 midline neurons in 11 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated cats. Spike trains of 13,843 pairs of neurons that included at least one raphé cell were screened for respiratory modulation and short-time scale correlations. Significant correlogram features were detected in 7.2% of raphé-raphé (291/4,021), 4.3% of VRC-raphé (292/6,755), and 4.0% of the PRG-raphé (124/3,067) neuron pairs. Central peaks indicative of shared influences were the most common feature in correlations between pairs of raphé neurons, whereas correlated raphé-PRG and raphé-VRC neuron pairs displayed predominantly offset peaks and troughs, features suggesting a paucisynaptic influence of one neuron on the other. Overall, offset correlogram features provided evidence for 33 VRC-to-raphé-to-PRG and 45 PRG-to-raphé-to-VRC correlational linkage chains with one or two intermediate raphé neurons. The results support a respiratory network architecture with parallel VRC-to-PRG and PRG-to-VRC links operating through intervening midline circuits, and suggest that raphé neurons contribute to the respiratory modulation of PRG neurons and shape the respiratory motor pattern through coordinated divergent actions on both the PRG and VRC.

  17. PROJECTIONS OF DORSAL AND MEDIAN RAPHE NUCLEI TO DORSAL AND VENTRAL STRIATUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Hassanzadeh G. Behzadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascending serotonergic projections are derived mainly from mesencephalic raphe nuclei. Topographical projections from mesencephalic raphe nuclei to the striatum were examined in the rat by the retrograde transport technique of HRP (horseradish peroxidase. In 29 rats stereotaxically injection of HRP enzyme were performed in dorsal and ventral parts of striatum separately. The extent of the injection sites and distribution of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies were drawed on representative sections using a projection microscope. Following ipsilateral injection of HRP into the dorsal striatum, numerous labeled neurons were seen in rostral portion of dorsal raphe (DR nucleus. In the same level the cluster of labeled neurons were hevier through caudal parts of DR. A few neurons were also located in lateral wing of DR. More caudally some labeled neurons were found in lateral, medial line of DR. In median raphe nucleus (MnR the labeled neurons were scattered only in median portion of this nucleus. The ipsilateral injection of HRP into the ventral region of striatum resulted on labeling of numerous neurons in rostral, caudal and lateral portions of DR. Through the caudal extension of DR on 4th ventricle level, a large number of labeled neurons were distributed along the ventrocaudal parts of DR. In MnR, labeled neurons were observed only in median part of this nucleus. These findings suggest the mesencephalic raphe nuclei projections to caudo-putamen are topographically organized. In addition dorsal and median raphe nuclei have a stronger projection to the ventral striatum.

  18. Central and peripheral chemoreceptors evoke distinct responses in simultaneously recorded neurons of the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network

    OpenAIRE

    Nuding, Sarah C.; Segers, Lauren S.; Shannon, Roger; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F.; Lindsey, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    The brainstem network for generating and modulating the respiratory motor pattern includes neurons of the medullary ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC), dorsolateral pons (PRG) and raphé nuclei. Midline raphé neurons are proposed to be elements of a distributed brainstem system of central chemoreceptors, as well as modulators of central chemoreceptors at other sites, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Stimulation of the raphé system or peripheral chemoreceptors can induce a long-term fa...

  19. Multiple serotonin receptors: regional distribution and effect of raphe lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackshear, M.A.; Sanders-Bush, E. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA). School of Medicine); Steranka, L.R. (Indiana University, Northwest Center for Medical Education, Gary, IN, USA)

    1981-12-17

    These studies confirm and extend the recent work suggesting that (/sup 3/H)lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) labels two distinct binding sites in rat brain resembling serotonin (5HT) receptors. Although Scatchard analyses of (/sup 3/H)LSD binding to membranes prepared from cortex/hippocampus were linear, the heterogeneity of the (/sup 3/H)LSD binding sites was clearly demonstrated in displacement studies. The displacement curves for both 5HT and spiperone were bisigmoidal with the concentration required to saturate the high affinity components nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations necessary to saturate the low affinity components. Additivity studies suggested that the sites with high affinity for 5HT and spiperone are different, independent sites. These sites are referred to as 5HT/sub 1/ and 5HT/sub 2/ respectively. Regional analyses showed, that in the frontal cortex, the density of the 5HT/sub 2/ site was slightly greater than the 5HT/sub 1/ site whereas the 5HT/sub 1/ site was predominant in all other brain areas, including the spinal cord. The pharmacological properties of the two sites have features in common with 5HT receptors; however, electrolytic lesions of the midbrain raphe nuclei did not change the densities or binding constants of the two apparent 5HT receptor subtypes, even though the number of high affinity 5HT uptake sites was markedly reduced.

  20. Nicotinic modulation of serotonergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Garduño, Julieta; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic receptors has been associated to a large number of physiological and behavioral processes such as learning, memory, attention, food-intake and mood disorders. Although it is well established that many nicotinic actions are mediated through an increase in serotonin (5-HT) release, the physiological mechanisms by which nicotine produces these effects are still unclear. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains the major amount of 5-HT neurons projecting to different parts of the brain. DRN also contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at somatic and presynaptic elements. Nicotine produces both inhibitory and excitatory effects on different subpopulations of 5-HT DRN neurons. In this review, we describe the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms by which nicotine increases the excitability of DRN neurons as well as the subtypes of nAChRs involved. We also describe the inhibitory effects of nicotine and the role of 5-HT1A receptors in this effect. These nicotinic actions modulate the activity of different neuronal subpopulations in the DRN, changing the 5-HT tone in the brain areas where these groups of neurons project. Some of the physiological implications of nicotine-induced 5-HT release are discussed.

  1. The role of Lithodoras dorsalis (Siluriformes: Doradidae as seed disperser in Eastern Amazon

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    Thiago A. P. Barbosa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ichthyochory is an important process responsible for the high diversity of plant species in tropical flooded forests. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the role of a catfish species, Lithodoras dorsalis, as seed disperser in the flooded forests at the Amazon River mouth, Brazil. Analyzing the stomach contents of 371 individuals of Lithodoras dorsalis, the Germination Potential (GP% and Germination Speed Index (GSI of seeds that were removed intact were investigated. This allowed us to evaluate the germination performance of two important species of plants in Amazonia, Euterpe oleracea (Açaí and Montrichardia linifera (Aninga, after passage through the digestive tract of this catfish species. Given that digestion by L. dorsalis reduced the germination viability of M. linifera and that seeds were often destroyed during consumption, we suggest that L. dorsalis may have a limited role as seed disperser of M. linifera and instead mostly act as seed predator. However, for the species E. oleracea, L. dorsalis was a potential disperser, since the performance of germination of these seeds was improved after digestion. In addition, the number of seeds consumed was directly proportional to the catfish’s body size, reinforcing the role of doradids as potential seed dispersers in tropical forests.

  2. Classical olfactory conditioning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li Liu

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a serious pest of fruits and vegetables. Methyl eugenol (ME, a male attractant, is used to against this fly by mass trapping. Control effect may be influenced by learning, which could modify the olfactory response of the fly to this attractant. To collect the behavioral evidence, studies on the capability of this fly for olfactory learning are necessary. We investigated olfactory learning in male flies with a classical olfactory conditioning procedure using restrained individuals under laboratory conditions. The acquisition of the proboscis extension reflex was used as the criterion for conditioning. A high conditioned response level was found in oriental fruit flies when an odor was presented in paired association with a sucrose reward but not when the odor and sucrose were presented unpaired. We also found that the conditioning performance was influenced by the odor concentration, intertrial interval, and starvation time. A slight sensitization elicited by imbibing sucrose was observed. These results indicate that oriental fruit flies have a high capacity to form an olfactory memory as a result of classical conditioning.

  3. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed.

  4. Control of breathing by raphe obscurus serotonergic neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy; Coates, Melissa B; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2011-02-09

    We used optogenetics to determine the global respiratory effects produced by selectively stimulating raphe obscurus (RO) serotonergic neurons in anesthetized mice and to test whether these neurons detect changes in the partial pressure of CO(2), and hence function as central respiratory chemoreceptors. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was selectively (∼97%) incorporated into ∼50% of RO serotonergic neurons by injecting AAV2 DIO ChR2-mCherry (adeno-associated viral vector double-floxed inverse open reading frame of ChR2-mCherry) into the RO of ePet-Cre mice. The transfected neurons heavily innervated lower brainstem and spinal cord regions involved in autonomic and somatic motor control plus breathing but eschewed sensory related regions. Pulsed laser photostimulation of ChR2-transfected serotonergic neurons increased respiratory frequency (fR) and diaphragmatic EMG (dEMG) amplitude in relation to the duration and frequency of the light pulses (half saturation, 1 ms; 5-10 Hz). dEMG amplitude and fR increased slowly (half saturation after 10-15 s) and relaxed monoexponentially (tau, 13-15 s). The breathing stimulation was reduced ∼55% by methysergide (broad spectrum serotonin antagonist) and potentiated (∼16%) at elevated levels of inspired CO(2) (8%). RO serotonergic neurons, identified by their entrainment to short light pulses (threshold, 0.1-1 ms) were silent (nine cells) or had a low and regular level of activity (2.1 ± 0.4 Hz; 11 cells) that was not synchronized with respiration. These and nine surrounding neurons with similar characteristics were unaffected by adding up to 10% CO(2) to the breathing mixture. In conclusion, RO serotonergic neurons activate breathing frequency and amplitude and potentiate the central respiratory chemoreflex but do not appear to have a central respiratory chemoreceptor function.

  5. Insecticide toxicity to oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is influenced by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuying; Jin, Tao; Zeng, Ling; Lu, Yongyue

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of environmental factors (temperature, dose, dietary source, and feeding density) on the insecticide tolerance of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). The results indicated that the toxicities of trichlorphon and abamectin to B. dorsalis increased with an increase in temperature. At 15-35 degrees C, the toxicity of beta-cypermethrin decreased with an increase in temperature at low doses (0.82 and 1.86 mg/L), but was similar at a high dose (4.18 mg/L). These results demonstrated that the temperature coefficient of beta-cypermethrin was related to both temperature and dosage. The insecticide sensitivity of B. dorsalis reared on different dietary sources was significantly different. Trichlorphon sensitivity of B. dorsalis fed on banana was the highest with an LC50 of 1.61 mg/L, followed by on apple, carambola, semiartificial diet, pear, mango, guava, orange, and papaya. With an increasing feeding density, the sensitivity of B. dorsalis adults to trichlorphon increased, while the sensitivities of B. dorsalis adults to abamectin and beta-cypermethrin decreased. The differences between LC50 values of insects reared at densities of 10 and 13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet to trichlorphon, abamectin and beta-cypermethrin were not significant. This result suggested that representative toxicity could be obtained by using adults developed at a feeding density between 10-13 eggs/g of semiartificial diet. Adult body weight was positively correlated with the LC50 value of trichlorphon, but was negatively correlated with the toxicities of abamectin and beta-cypermethrin. These results suggested that the effects of adult body weight on the toxicity of insecticides were different among different chemicals.

  6. Effects of damage to median raphe nucleus on ingestive behavior and wheel running activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid Salles, M S; Heym, J; Gladfelter, W E

    1979-01-01

    The effects of damage to the median raphe nucleus on the ingestive behavior and wheel running activity of rats were studied. This nucleus was damaged by the placement of either electrolytic or chemical (5,7-dihydroxytryptamine) lesions. After the placement of either type of lesion, wheel running activity was significantly decreased for the duration of the 8 week post-operative period. Although there were transient decreases in both food and water intakes after damage to the median raphe nucleus, these decreases did not appear to result from impairments in neuro-regulatory mechanisms. Rather, the decrease in food intake seemed to be related to the decrease in locomotor activity, and the decrease in water intake appeared to be linked to the decrease in food intake. In some rats with electrolytic lesions in the median raphe nucleus, the decrease in water intake was followed by a transient period of hyperdipsia.

  7. Transcriptome-wide binding sites for components of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae non-poly(A termination pathway: Nrd1, Nab3, and Sen1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J Creamer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II synthesizes a diverse set of transcripts including both protein-coding and non-coding RNAs. One major difference between these two classes of transcripts is the mechanism of termination. Messenger RNA transcripts terminate downstream of the coding region in a process that is coupled to cleavage and polyadenylation reactions. Non-coding transcripts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae snoRNAs terminate in a process that requires the RNA-binding proteins Nrd1, Nab3, and Sen1. We report here the transcriptome-wide distribution of these termination factors. These data sets derived from in vivo protein-RNA cross-linking provide high-resolution definition of non-poly(A terminators, identify novel genes regulated by attenuation of nascent transcripts close to the promoter, and demonstrate the widespread occurrence of Nrd1-bound 3' antisense transcripts on genes that are poorly expressed. In addition, we show that Sen1 does not cross-link efficiently to many expected non-coding RNAs but does cross-link to the 3' end of most pre-mRNA transcripts, suggesting an extensive role in mRNA 3' end formation and/or termination.

  8. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Baker, James F; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-10-24

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (antibody SMI-32). In transverse sections, PMD is oval with its long axis aligned with the dorsal border of the brainstem. We identified PMD in eight human brainstems, but found some variability both in its cross-sectional area and in its A-P extent among cases. It includes calretinin immunoreactive large cells with oval or polygonal cell bodies. Cells in PMD are not immunoreactive for either calbindin or parvalbumin, but a few fibers immunoreactive to each protein are found within its central region. Cells in PMD are also immunoreactive to nNOS, and immunoreactivity to a neurofilament protein shows many labeled cells and fibers. No similar region is identified in atlases of the cat, mouse, rat or monkey brain, nor does immunoreactivity to any of the markers that delineate it in the human reveal a comparable region in those species. The territory that PMD occupies is included in PH in other species. Since anatomical and physiological data in animals suggest that PH may have multiple subregions, we suggest that the PMD in human may be a further differentiation of PH and may have functions related to the vestibular control of eye movements.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of the chemosterilant lufenuron against Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, B. cucurbitae, and B. latifrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four species of tephritid fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, B. cucurbitae, and B. latifrons were evaluated for toxic, developmental, and physiological responses to the chemosterilant lufenuorn incorporated in an agar adult diet and a liquid larval diet. No significant mortality o...

  10. Mating compatibility among four pest members of the Bactrocera dorsalis fruit fly species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutze, M K; Jessup, A; Ul-Haq, I; Vreysen, M J B; Wornoayporn, V; Vera, M T; Clarke, A R

    2013-04-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock are pest members within the B. dorsalis species complex of tropical fruit flies. The species status of these taxa is unclear and this confounds quarantine, pest management, and general research. Mating studies carried out under uniform experimental conditions are required as part of resolving their species limits. These four taxa were collected from the wild and established as laboratory cultures for which we subsequently determined levels of prezygotic compatibility, assessed by field cage mating trials for all pair-wise combinations. We demonstrate random mating among all pair-wise combinations involving B. dorsalis, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis. B. carambolae was relatively incompatible with each of these species as evidenced by nonrandom mating for all crosses. Reasons for incompatibility involving B. carambolae remain unclear; however, we observed differences in the location of couples in the field cage for some comparisons. Alongside other factors such as pheromone composition or other courtship signals, this may lead to reduced interspecific mating compatibility with B. carambolae. These data add to evidence that B. dorsalis, B. papayae, and B. philippinensis represent the same biological species, while B. carambolae remains sufficiently different to maintain its current taxonomic identity. This poses significant implications for this group's systematics, impacting on pest management, and international trade.

  11. Bacterial communities associated with invasive populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L J; Martinez-Sañudo, I; Mazzon, L; Prabhakar, C S; Girolami, V; Deng, Y L; Dai, Y; Li, Z H

    2016-12-01

    The oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a destructive insect pest of a wide range of fruits and vegetables. This pest is an invasive species and is currently distributed in some provinces of China. To recover the symbiotic bacteria of B. dorsalis from different invasion regions in China, we researched the bacterial diversity of this fruit fly among one laboratory colony (Guangdong, China) and 15 wild populations (14 sites in China and one site in Thailand) using DNA-based approaches. The construction of 16S rRNA gene libraries allowed the identification of 24 operational taxonomic units of associated bacteria at the 3% distance level, and these were affiliated with 3 phyla, 5 families, and 13 genera. The higher bacterial diversity was recovered in wild populations compared with the laboratory colony and in samples from early term invasion regions compared with samples from late term invasion regions. Moreover, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Providencia sp. were two of the most frequently recovered bacteria, present in flies collected from three different regions in China where B. dorsalis is invasive. This study for the first time provides a systemic investigation of the symbiotic bacteria of B. dorsalis from different invasion regions in China.

  12. Characterization of Bactrocera dorsalis Serine Proteases and Evidence for Their Indirect Role in Insecticide Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Zhe Hou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel causes devastating losses to agricultural crops world-wide and is considered to be an economically important pest. Little is known about the digestive enzymes such as serine proteases (SPs in B. dorsalis, which are important both for energy supply and mitigation of fitness cost associated with insecticide tolerance. In this study, we identified five SP genes in the midgut of B. dorsalis, and the alignments of their deduced amino acid sequences revealed the presence of motifs conserved in the SP superfamily. Phylogenetic analyses with known SPs from other insect species suggested that three of them were trypsin-like proteases. Analyses of the expression profiles among the different developmental stages showed that all five genes were most abundant in larvae than in other stages. When larvae were continuously fed on diet containing 0.33 μg/g β-Cypermethrin, expression of all five genes were upregulated in the midgut but the larval development was delayed. Biochemical assays were consistent with the increased protease activity exhibited by SPs in the midgut after treatment with β-Cypermethrin. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the hypothesis that enhanced SP activity may play an indirect role in relieving the toxicity stress of insecticide in B. dorsalis.

  13. Nonhost status of mangosteen to Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unahawutti, Udorn; Intarakumheng, Rachada; Oonthonglang, Pitawat; Phankum, Salukjit; Follett, Peter A

    2014-08-01

    Postharvest quarantine treatments (irradiation or vapor heat) are used to control fruit flies and other pests in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) exported to the United States and Japan from Thailand. No-choice tests were conducted in the laboratory to determine whether Thai mangosteen is a host for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (oriental fruit fly) and Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (carambola fruit fly). Ripe commercial quality fruit (1 wk after harvest) that were either undamaged or damaged by puncturing or peeling the pericarp were exposed to a high density of gravid flies in screen cages and then held for 10 d and dissected to inspect for immature life stages. Undamaged mangosteen fruit were not infested by B. dorsalis and B. carambolae. Partially damaged fruit with shallow punctures in the pericarp that did not extend to the aril also were not infested. Both fruit flies could infest damaged fruit if the pericarp damage allowed oviposition in the aril. Results suggest that natural infestation of mangosteen by B. dorsalis and B. carambolae can only occur if fruit exhibit physical cracks or mechanical injury. Resistance appears to be due to the pericarp hardness and thickness as well as latex secretion. Nonhost status could be used without additional quarantine measures to achieve quarantine security against B. dorsalis and B. carambolae in mangosteen exported from Thailand.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Sex-Biased MicroRNAs in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Peng

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including sexual dimorphism. The oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis is one of the most destructive agricultural insect pests in many Asian countries. However, no miRNAs have been identified from the separate sex and gonads to elucidate sex gonad differentiation in B. dorsalis. In this study, we constructed four small RNA libraries from whole body of females, males (except ovaries and testes and ovaries, testes of B. dorsalis for deep sequencing. The data analysis revealed 183 known and 120 novel miRNAs from these libraries. 18 female-biased and 16 male-biased miRNAs that may be involved in sexual differentiation were found by comparing the miRNA expression profiles in the four libraries. Using a bioinformatic approach, we predicted doublesex (dsx as a target gene of the female-biased miR-989-3p which is considered as the key switch gene in the sex determination of tephritid insects. This study reveals the first miRNA profile related to the sex differentiation and gives a first insight into sex differences in miRNA expression of B. dorsalis which could facilitate studies of the reproductive organ specific roles of miRNAs.

  15. Biochemical and molecular characterisation of acetylcholinesterase in four field populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guang-Mao; Wang, Xiao-Na; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2012-12-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a major pest that infects fruits and agricultural products worldwide. The latest resistance monitoring of B. dorsalis from mainland China has identified high levels of resistance to insecticides. In this study, the biochemical and molecular characteristics of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in four field populations of B. dorsalis are investigated. Among the four populations, the DG population and its purified AChE were found to be the least susceptible to malathion and five inhibitors, whereas the KM population and its purified AChE were the most susceptible. The highest catalytic activity of purified AChE was found for the KM population, and the catalytic activity of the DG population was the lowest. Among developmental stages, the AChE purified from larvae was found to be the most insusceptible to inhibitors, but its catalytic activity was the highest. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding AChE showed that some residue differences existed. However, no significant differences in expression levels of the AChE gene among populations and developmental stages were detected. The results suggest that the decrease in susceptibility of B. dorsalis was mainly caused by decrease in AChE activity, and they provide a broad view on the relation between AChE and resistance. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTROCERA DORSALIS COMPLEX (DIPTERA : TEPHRITIDAE USING WING IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ADSAVAKULCHAI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bactrocera dorsalis complex (Diptera: Tephritidae used in this study included B. dorsalis, B. arecae, B. propinqua, B. pyrifoliae, B. verbascifoliae, and three new species complexes are species E, species K and species P. Bactrocera tau was used as an out-group. A total of 424 adults, which emerged from pupae collected from natural populations in Thai land, were prepared for wing measurements. Morphometric analysis was performed on measurements of wing vein characters. Wing images were captured in digital format and taken through digital image processing to calculate the Euclidean distance between wing vein junctions. Discriminant and cluster analyses were used for dichotomy of classification processes. All 424 wing specimens were classified to species in terms of the percentage of "grouped" cases which yielded about 89.6% accurate identificati on compared with the formal description of these species. After clustering, the percentage of "grouped"cases yielded 100.0%, 98.9%, 98.1%, 95.2% and 84.6% accurate identification between the B. dorsalis complex and B. tau; B. arecae and Species E; B. dorsalis and B. verbascifoliae; B. propinqua and B. pyrifoliae; and species K and species P, respectively. This method of numerical taxonomy may be useful for practical identification of other groups of agricultural pests.

  17. Identification of a carboxylesterase associated with resistance to naled in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compared to other organophosphate-resistant and -susceptible (S) lines of Bactrocera dorsalis, the carboxylesterase (CBE) BdE5 in the naled-resistant(nal-r) line has been found to possess remarkable quantitative elevation. Our study attempts to identify the role of BdE5 in naled resistance, and we d...

  18. Étude comparative du développement de Bactrocera dorsalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the development time depends on whether the fly is placed in choice or not choice condition. Compared to the pink banana, wild apple proves to be the most favorable substrate for B. dorsalis production in view of the duration of development of the various stages, the emergence rate, sex ratio and survival adults.

  19. Effects of Methyl Eugenol Feeding on Mating Compatibility of Asian Population of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) with African Population and with B. carambolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ihsan Ul; Vreysen, Marc J B; Schutze, Mark; Hendrichs, Jorge; Shelly, Todd

    2016-02-01

    Males of some species included in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex are strongly attracted to methyl eugenol (ME) (1,2-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenyl) benzene), a natural compound occurring in a variety of plant species. ME feeding of males of the B. dorsalis complex is known to enhance their mating competitiveness. Within B. dorsalis, recent studies show that Asian and African populations of B. dorsalis are sexually compatible, while populations of B. dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae are relatively incompatible. The objectives of this study were to examine whether ME feeding by males affects mating compatibility between Asian and African populations of B. dorsalis and ME feeding reduces male mating incompatibility between B. dorsalis (Asian population) and B. carambolae. The data confirmed that Asian and African populations of B. dorsalis are sexually compatible for mating and showed that ME feeding only increased the number of matings. Though ME feeding also increased the number of matings of B. dorsalis (Asian population) and B. carambolae males but the sexual incompatibility between both species was not reduced by treatment with ME. These results conform to the efforts resolving the biological species limits among B. dorsalis complex and have implications for fruit fly control programs in fields and horticultural trade. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  20. Ciliated Median Raphe Cyst of Perineum Presenting as Perianal Polyp: A Case Report with Immunohistochemical Study, Review of Literature, and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh Sagar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Median raphe cyst is a very rare, benign congenital lesion occurring mainly on the ventral aspect of the penis, but can develop anywhere in the midline between the external urethral meatus and anus. We report a case of median raphe cyst in the perineum presenting as a perianal polyp in a 65-year-old, English white male with exceptionally rare ciliated epithelium. According to our knowledge, this is the third such case of ciliated median raphe cyst in the English literature. This case, also the first case of ciliated median raphe cyst in the perineum location, focuses on pathogenesis of median raphe cyst.

  1. Functional analysis of a novel human serotonin transporter gene promoter in immortalized raphe cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Thomassen, M; Larsen, M B

    1999-01-01

    were found to possess the additional 379 bp fragment. The integrity of the promoter was furthermore confirmed by genomic Southern blotting. The promoter activity was analyzed by reporter gene assays in neuronal and non-neuronal serotonergic cell lines. In immortalized serotonergic raphe neurons, RN46A...

  2. Reward Processing by the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: 5-HT and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minmin; Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of…

  3. Median raphe cysts in men. Presentation of our experience and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalón-Monllor, V; Ordoño-Saiz, M V; Ordoño-Domínguez, F; Sabater-Marco, V; Pallás-Costa, Y; Navalón-Verdejo, P

    2017-04-01

    To present our experience with the diagnosis and treatment of median raphe cysts treated in our department in the last 25years. We conducted a retrospective study of 28men with median raphe cysts who underwent surgery in our department from June 1990 to March 2015. We analysed the age of presentation, reason for consultation, clinical manifestations, histological findings, treatment and outcome after exeresis. The majority of the patients (22; 79%) were asymptomatic and consulted for the aesthetic defect. Four cases (14%) presented urinary abnormalities, and 2 cases (7%) reported discomfort during sexual intercourse. In all cases, the treatment consisted of surgical extirpation of the cysts, with excellent aesthetic and functional results and no lesion recurrence in any of the patients during a mean follow-up of more than 10years. The most common histological type was the transitional cell type in 15 cases (54%), followed by the mixed type (transitional and squamous) in 11 cases (39%). One case (6%) was pure squamous type, and in another case (6%) the epithelium was glandular. Median raphe cysts are an uncommon type of disembryoplasia that can occur in any location of the median raphe, from the balanic meatus to the edges of the anus. These cysts are generally asymptomatic and their treatment of choice is surgical extirpation. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Inheritance, Realized Heritability, and Biochemical Mechanisms of Malathion Resistance in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luo-Luo; Feng, Zi-Jiao; Li, Ting; Lu, Xue-Ping; Zhao, Jia-Jia; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-02-01

    To better characterize the resistance development and therefore establish effective pest management strategies, this study was undertaken to investigate the inheritance mode and biochemical mechanisms of malathion resistance in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), which is one of the most notorious pests in the world. After 22 generations of selection with malathion, the malathion-resistant (MR) strain of B. dorsalis developed a 34-fold resistance compared with a laboratory susceptible strain [malathion-susceptible (MS)]. Bioassay results showed that there was no significant difference between the LD50 values of malathion against the progenies from both reciprocal crosses (F(1)-SR and F(1)-RS). The degree of dominance values (D) was calculated as 0.39 and 0.32 for F(1)-RS and F(1)-SR, respectively. The logarithm dosage-probit mortality lines of the F(2) generation and progeny from the backcross showed no clear plateaus of mortality across a range of doses. In addition, Chi-square analysis revealed significant differences between the mortality data and the theoretical expectations. The realized heritability (h(2)) value was 0.16 in the laboratory-selected resistant strain of B. dorsalis. Enzymatic activities identified significant changes of carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450 (general oxidases), and glutathione S-transferases in MR compared with the MS strain of B. dorsalis. Taken together, this study revealed for the first time that malathion resistance in B. dorsalis follows an autosomal, incompletely dominant, and polygenic mode of inheritance and is closely associated with significantly elevated activities of three major detoxification enzymes. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Identification and Expression Profile Analysis of Odorant Binding Proteins in the Oriental Fruit Fly Bactrocera dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is crucial in many insects for critical behaviors, including those regulating survival and reproduction. Insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs function in the first step of the olfactory system and play an essential role in the perception of odorants, such as pheromones and host chemicals. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive fruit-eating pest, due to its wide host range of up to 250 different types of fruits and vegetables, and this fly causes severe economic damage to the fruit and vegetable industry. However, OBP genes have not been largely identified in B. dorsalis. Based on our previously constructed B. dorsalis cDNA library, ten OBP genes were identified in B. dorsalis for the first time. A phylogenetic tree was generated to show the relationships among the 10 OBPs of B. dorsalis to OBP sequences of two other Dipteran species, including Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The expression profiles of the ten OBPs in different tissues (heads, thoraxes, abdomens, legs, wings, male antennae and female antenna of the mated adults were analyzed by real-time PCR. The results showed that nine of them are highly expressed in the antenna of both sexes, except BdorOBP7. Four OBPs (BdorOBP1, BdorOBP4, BdorOBP8, and BdorOBP10 are also enriched in the abdomen, and BdorOBP7 is specifically expressed in leg, indicating that it may function in other biological processes. This work will provide insight into the roles of OBPs in chemoreception and help develop new pest-control strategies.

  6. Involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei in the feeding behavior of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takase L.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei (raphe pallidus, RPa; raphe magnus, RMg, and raphe obscurus, ROb in feeding behavior of adult rats was studied by measuring c-Fos protein expression, in animals submitted to the "meal-feeding" model of food restriction in which the rats were fed ad libitum only from 7:00 to 9:00 h, for 15 days. The experimental groups submitted to chronic fasting, named 'search for food' (SF, 'ingestion of food' (IF and 'satiety of food' (SaF were scheduled after a previous study in which the body weight and the general and feeding behaviors were evaluated by daily monitoring. Acute, 48-h fasting (AF was used as control. In the chronic group, the animals presented a 16% reduction in body weight in the first week, followed by a continuous, slow rise in weight over the subsequent days. Entrainment of the sleep-wake cycle to the schedule of food presentation was also observed. The RPa was the most Fos immunopositive nucleus in the chronic fasting group, followed by the RMg. The ANOVA and Tukey test (P<0.05 confirmed these results. The IF group was significantly different from the other three groups, as also was the number of labeled cells in the RPa in SF and IF groups. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed between RMg and RPa, or RMg and ROb in the SaF and AF. However, it is interesting to observe that the groups in which the animals were more active, searching for or ingesting food, presented a larger number of labeled cells. These results suggest a different involvement of the caudal raphe nuclei in the somatic and autonomic events of feeding behavior, corroborating the functions reported for them earlier.

  7. The Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in China: Origin and Gradual Inland Range Expansion Associated with Population Growth: e25238

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xuanwu Wan; Francesco Nardi; Bin Zhang; Yinghong Liu

    2011-01-01

      The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, expanded throughout mainland China in the last century to become one of the most serious pests in the area, yet information on this process are fragmentary...

  8. The Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in China: Origin and Gradual Inland Range Expansion Associated with Population Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wan, Xuanwu; Nardi, Francesco; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yinghong

    2011-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, expanded throughout mainland China in the last century to become one of the most serious pests in the area, yet information on this process are fragmentary...

  9. Population dynamics of Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and other thrips species on two ornamental host plant species in Southern Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Catharine M; Derksen, Andrew I; Seal, Dakshina R; Osborne, Lance S; Martin, Cliff G

    2014-08-01

    Since its 2005 introduction into the United States, chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), has become a problematic pest of agronomic, vegetable, fruit, and ornamental plants. Knowledge of its population dynamics may help managers better monitor and control S. dorsalis. Population estimates were recorded for S. dorsalis and other thrips species on Knock-Out rose (Rosa 'Radrazz') and green buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus L.) from July 2007 to September 2008 in two field plots (one per plant species) in Homestead, FL. Yellow sticky card traps and samples of terminals, flowers, buds, and leaves were collected. S. dorsalis accounted for 95% of all thrips individuals collected from plants and 84% from traps with the remainder including at least 18 other thrips species. More thrips were caught on or flying near rose plants (47,438) than on or near buttonwoods (5,898), and on-plant densities of S. dorsalis appeared higher for rose than for buttonwood. Compared with rose leaves, rose buds, terminals, and flowers each had higher numbers of S. dorsalis, and buds and terminals had higher densities. On each host plant species, S. dorsalis density fluctuated over time with peaks in the late spring, summer, and fall, but populations were consistently low in the late winter and early spring. On roses, increased plant damage ratings correlated with reduced numbers of flowers and buds, reduced mean flower areas, and increased on-plant number and density of S. dorsalis. There were positive correlations over time between S. dorsalis density and plant damage rating for rose flowers (R = 0.78; P = 0.0003) and for buttonwood terminals (R = 0.90; P = 0.0001). Yellow sticky card traps were effective for monitoring S. dorsalis and may be especially useful and economically justified for the most susceptible hosts, but they also work well for less susceptible hosts. A good S. dorsalis scouting program should hence consider trap catches and symptoms such as leaf

  10. Oral immunization of swine with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium aroA SL3261 expressing a recombinant antigen of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (NrdF) primes the immune system for a NrdF specific secretory IgA response in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, P K; Walker, M J; Chin, J; Eamens, G J; Djordjevic, S P

    2001-02-01

    Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 (aroA mutant) expressing a recombinant Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen was used to orally immunize swine against porcine enzootic pneumonia. This construct, designated S. typhimurium aro A SL3261 (pKF1), expressed a recombinant protein containing the carboxy-terminal 11 kDa of a 42 kDa M. hyopneumoniae NrdF ribonucleotide reductase R2 subunit protein. Here we demonstrate that this antigen is present in all seven geographically diverse strains of M. hyopneumoniae tested, and is recognized by the swine immune system after experimental infection with the virulent M. hyopneumoniae Beaufort strain. The immune response of swine orally immunized twice with S. typhimurium SL3261 (pKF1) on day 0 and day 14 was evaluated. Oral immunization with S. typhimurium SL3261 (pKF1) primed the immune system to elicit a significant (P<0.05) secretory IgA response against the 15 kDa NrdF antigen in the respiratory tract of swine, post-challenge, compared to control groups. Blood lymphocytes from swine immunized with S. typhimurium SL3261 (pKF1) proliferated significantly (P<0.05) following stimulation with M. hyopneumoniae whole-cell extracts compared to control groups 14 days post-vaccination. Following challenge with virulent M. hyopneumoniae, swine immunized with S. typhimurium SL3261 (pKF1) showed higher average daily weight gains and reduced lung pathology compared to control groups. Copyright 2001 Crown Copyright.

  11. Monitoring of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) resistance to cyantraniliprole in the south of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruimin; He, Shiyu; Chen, Jiahua

    2014-06-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a globally important economic insect pest that has evolved resistance to various types of insecticides. Cyantraniliprole (DuPont Cyazypyr) is a new anthranilic diamide insecticide registered to control lepidopteran and sucking insects. The susceptibility of field-collected populations of B. dorsalis to cyantraniliprole was assessed via a diet incorporation bioassay in adults. Based on the obtained LC50 values (ranging from 3.29 to 15.83 microg/g), all the testing populations, including ZZ (Fujian province), HH (Yunnan province), JM (Guangdong province), SY (Hainan province), HZ (Zhejiang province), YL (Guangxi province), SH (Shanghai), WH (Hubei province), and CS (Hunan province), were susceptible to cyantraniliprole, with the samples of WH (Hubei province) being the most tolerant (by 4.80-fold). Two (SY, Hainan province; CS, Hunan province) of the nine field-collected populations of B. dorsalis showed a similar susceptibility to cyantraniliprole, while the remaining populations displayed narrow variations in tolerance compared with the laboratory strain. Synergist assays were performed to determine the potential detoxification mechanisms. Piperonyl butoxide showed significant synergism effects in lab, CS, and resistant strain. S,S,S-tributylphorotrithioate and diethyl maleate also showed obvious synergism effects in resistant strain. A 19.44-fold increase in resistance to cyantraniliprole was observed after 14 generations of selection in the laboratory. The present work clarifies the baseline susceptibility and primary mechanisms of B. dorsalis to cyantraniliprole in the south China and established a cyantraniliprole-resistant strain as well. A sound resistance management strategy is also discussed in relation to the risk of susceptibility.

  12. Inter-regional mating compatibility among Bactrocera dorsalis populations in Thailand (Diptera,Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinvinijkul, Suksom; Srikachar, Sunyanee; Kumjing, Phatchara; Weera Kimjong; Sukamnouyporn, Weerawan; Polchaimat, Nongon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mating compatibility among recently colonized (wildish) populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) from different geographic origins in Thailand was assessed through inter-regional mating tests. Outdoor octagonal nylon screen field cages containing single potted mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) were used. Sexual compatibility was determined using the index of sexual isolation (ISI), the male relative performance index (MRPI), and the female relative performance index (FRPI). The ISI values indicated that the northern population of Bactrocera dorsalis from Chiang Mai province was sexually compatible with the southern population of Bactrocera dorsalis (previously Bactrocera papayae) from Nakhon Si Thammarat province. The MRPI values showed that the northern males had a slightly higher tendency to mate than southern males, while the FRPI data reflected that females of both origins participated equally in matings. In all combinations there were no differences between homotypic and heterotypic couples in mating latency. Southern males tended to mate first with southern females, followed by northern males mating with northern females, while the latest matings involved heterotypic couples, in particular northern males mating with southern females. Overall, more couples were collected from higher parts of the field cage and the upper tree canopy, while there were no differences between the origins of flies in terms of elevation of couples within the cage. Laboratory assessments of fecundity showed no differences in the average number of eggs resulting from inter-regional crosses. Development of immature stages was also equal in the two hybrid crosses, with no differences found in the number of pupae produced, percentage pupal recovery, and percent adult emergence. The practical implication of this study is that colony of Bactrocera dorsalis derived from any northern or southern region of Thailand can potentially be used in sterile insect technique programs

  13. Role of the Oxytocin Receptor Expressed in the Rostral Medullary Raphe in Thermoregulation During Cold Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Tateishi, Yuko; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Otsuka, Ayano; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Sato, Keisuke; Hidema, Shizu; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent papers have reported that oxytocin (Oxt) and the oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) may be involved in the regulation of food intake in mammals. We therefore suspected the Oxt/Oxtr system to be involved in energy homeostasis. In previous studies, we found a tendency toward obesity in Oxtr-deficient (Oxtr ?/?) mice, as well as impaired thermoregulation when these mice were exposed to cold conditions. In the present study, we observed the expression of Oxtr in the rostral medullary raphe (RMR), th...

  14. The Scirtothrips dorsalis Species Complex: Endemism and Invasion in a Global Pest.

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    Aaron M Dickey

    Full Text Available Invasive arthropods pose unique management challenges in various environments, the first of which is correct identification. This apparently mundane task is particularly difficult if multiple species are morphologically indistinguishable but accurate identification can be determined with DNA barcoding provided an adequate reference set is available. Scirtothrips dorsalis is a highly polyphagous plant pest with a rapidly expanding global distribution and this species, as currently recognized, may be comprised of cryptic species. Here we report the development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for S. dorsalis and seven nuclear markers via next-generation sequencing for identification use within the complex. We also report the delimitation of nine cryptic species and two morphologically distinguishable species comprising the S. dorsalis species complex using histogram analysis of DNA barcodes, Bayesian phylogenetics, and the multi-species coalescent. One member of the complex, here designated the South Asia 1 cryptic species, is highly invasive, polyphagous, and likely the species implicated in tospovirus transmission. Two other species, South Asia 2, and East Asia 1 are also highly polyphagous and appear to be at an earlier stage of global invasion. The remaining members of the complex are regionally endemic, varying in their pest status and degree of polyphagy. In addition to patterns of invasion and endemism, our results provide a framework both for identifying members of the complex based on their DNA barcode, and for future species delimiting efforts.

  15. Olfactory Plasticity: Variation in the Expression of Chemosensory Receptors in Bactrocera dorsalis in Different Physiological States

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    Sha Jin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in physiological conditions could influence the perception of external odors, which is important for the reproduction and survival of insect. With the alteration of physiological conditions, such as, age, feeding state, circadian rhythm, and mating status, insect can modulate their olfactory systems accordingly. Ionotropic, gustatory, and odorant receptors (IR, GR, and ORs are important elements of the insect chemosensory system, which enable insects to detect various external stimuli. In this study, we investigated the changes in these receptors at the mRNA level in Bactrocera dorsalis in different physiological states. We performed transcriptome analysis to identify chemosensory receptors: 21 IRs, 12 GRs, and 43 ORs were identified from B. dorsalis antennae, including almost all previously known chemoreceptors in B. dorsalis and a few more. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the effects of feeding state, mating status and time of day on the expression of IR, GR, and OR genes. The results showed that expression of chemosensory receptors changed in response to different physiological states, and these changes were completely different for different types of receptors and between male and female flies. Our study suggests that the expressions of chemosensory receptors change to adapt to different physiological states, which may indicate the significant role of these receptors in such physiological processes.

  16. Suitability of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) Pupae for Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang-De; Lu, Yong-Yue; Zhao, Hai-Yan

    2015-06-01

    Spalangia endius (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is found to be one of the most important natural enemies of Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae) pupae in China. In this study, the influence of host pupal age on the preference for and suitability of the host by the parasitoid S. endius was determined using choice and nonchoice tests. S. endius females accepted the 1-7 d-old B. dorsalis pupae for oviposition, and their offspring developed successfully. However, the S. endius preferentially parasitized the 2-, 3-, and 4-d-old host pupae. The emergence rate of the adult progeny was not affected by the host pupal age, nor was the male body weight, male longevity, and sex ratio of the parasitoid offspring. However, the shortest development time of both male and female progeny and the greatest size and adult longevity of female progeny were observed in hosts that were ≤4 d old. Females emerged later and lived longer than males, and they weighed more than the males. Host mortality decreased as the age of the host increased for 1-7-d-old hosts. Our findings suggest that 2-, 3-, and 4-d-old B. dorsalis pupae would be the best host ages at which to rear S. endius for effective control in field releases. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dorsal Raphe Serotonin Neurons Mediate CO2-Induced Arousal from Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Haleigh R; Leibold, Nicole K; Rappoport, Daniel A; Ginapp, Callie M; Purnell, Benton S; Bode, Nicole M; Alberico, Stephanie L; Kim, Young-Cho; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius T; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2018-02-21

    Arousal from sleep in response to CO 2 is a critical protective phenomenon. Dysregulation of CO 2 -induced arousal contributes to morbidity and mortality from prevalent diseases, such as obstructive sleep apnea and sudden infant death syndrome. Despite the critical nature of this protective reflex, the precise mechanism for CO 2 -induced arousal is unknown. Because CO 2 is a major regulator of breathing, prevailing theories suggest that activation of respiratory chemo- and mechano-sensors is required for CO 2 -induced arousal. However, populations of neurons that are not involved in the regulation of breathing are also chemosensitive. Among these are serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) that comprise a component of the ascending arousal system. We hypothesized that direct stimulation of these neurons with CO 2 could cause arousal from sleep independently of enhancing breathing. Dialysis of CO 2 -rich acidified solution into DRN, but not medullary raphe responsible for modulating breathing, caused arousal from sleep. Arousal was lost in mice with a genetic absence of 5-HT neurons, and with acute pharmacological or optogenetic inactivation of DRN 5-HT neurons. Here we demonstrate that CO 2 can cause arousal from sleep directly, without requiring enhancement of breathing, and that chemosensitive 5-HT neurons in the DRN critically mediate this arousal. Better understanding mechanisms underlying this protective reflex may lead to interventions to reduce disease-associated morbidity and mortality. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although CO 2 -induced arousal is critical to a number of diseases, the specific mechanism is not well understood. We previously demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) neurons are important for CO 2 -induced arousal, as mice without 5-HT neurons do not arouse to CO 2 Many have interpreted this to mean that medullary 5-HT neurons that regulate breathing are important in this arousal mechanism. Here we found that direct application of CO 2

  18. Salicylic Acid Induces Changes in Mango Fruit that Affect Oviposition Behavior and Development of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available The Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel is an important quarantine pest around the globe. Although measures for its control are implemented worldwide through IPM and male annihilation, there is little effect on their population. Hence, there is a need for new strategies to control this minacious pest. A strategy that has received negligible attention is the induction of 'natural plant defenses' by phytohormones. In this study, we investigated the effect of salicylic acid (SA treatment of mango fruit (cv. Totapuri on oviposition and larval development of B. dorsalis. In oviposition choice assays, gravid females laid significantly less eggs in SA treated compared to untreated fruit. Headspace volatiles collected from SA treated fruit were less attractive to gravid females compared to volatiles from untreated fruit. GC-MS analysis of the headspace volatiles from SA treated and untreated fruit showed noticeable changes in their chemical compositions. Cis-ocimene and 3-carene (attractants to B. dorsalis were reduced in the headspace volatiles of treated fruit. Further, reduced pupae formation and adult emergence was observed in treated fruit compared to control. Increased phenol and flavonoid content was recorded in treated fruit. We also observed differential expression of anti-oxidative enzymes namely catalase (CAT, polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD. In summary, the results indicate that SA treatment reduced oviposition, larval development and adult emergence of B. dorsalis and suggest a role of SA in enhancing mango tolerance to B. dorsalis.

  19. Flight capacity of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) adult females based on flight mill studies and flight muscle ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chen, Peng; Ye, Hui; Yuan, Ruiling; Wang, Xiaowei; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is considered a major economic threat in many regions worldwide. To better comprehend flight capacity of B. dorsalis and its physiological basis, a computer-monitored flight mill was used to study flight capacity of B. dorsalis adult females of various ages, and the changes of its flight muscle ultrastructures were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The flight capacity (both speed and distance) changed significantly with age of B. dorsalis female adults, peaking at about 15 d; the myofibril diameter of the flight muscle of test insects at 15-d old was the longest, up to 1.56 µm, the sarcomere length at 15-d old was the shortest, averaging at 1.37 µm, volume content of mitochondria of flight muscle at 15-d old reached the peak, it was 32.64%. This study provides the important scientific data for better revealing long-distance movement mechanism of B. dorsalis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  20. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Liu Dongjuan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM. Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated

  1. Humoral immunocompetence shifts in response to developmental stage change and mating access in Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Lin, Y; Hou, Y; Zhang, H

    2015-04-01

    Because immune defenses are often costly employed, insect immunocompetence cannot be always maintained at its maximum level. Here, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), was used as a study object to investigate how its immune defenses varied with the developmental stage change and mating access. Our data indicated that both phenoloxidase (PO) activity and antibacterial activity significantly increased from new larvae to pupae but decreased in adults after emergence. Furthermore, both the PO activity and antibacterial activity in the hemolymph of copulated male and female adults were dramatically higher than that of virgin male and female ones, respectively. It provided the evidence that copulation could increase the magnitude of immune defense in hemolymph of B. dorsalis. Together, these results suggest that B. dorsalis possess a flexible investment strategy in immunity to meet its specific needs based on the endo- and exogenous factors, such as their distinct food source and living environments.

  2. Deviation of the penoscrotal median raphe: Is it a normal finding or within the spectrum of hypospadias?

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    Arvind Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Hypospadias is the most common congenital abnormality of the penis, and is most commonly diagnosed during the postnatal physical examination. However, milder forms of the condition can be difficult to detect, leading to delayed referral to specialist teams. We aim to determine whether there is an association between hypospadias and the position of the penoscrotal raphe. Materials and Methods: A case - control study was performed where clinical photographs from children undergoing hypospadias correction were compared with a control group of children without the condition. The position of the penoscrotal raphe was documented as midline, left or right. Pearson′s chi squared test was used to determine significance. Results: Images for 80 children undergoing hypospadias correction were compared with 80 normal children in the maternity ward. 88.8% of the children with hypospadias had a penoscrotal raphe deviated from the midline compared with only 13.8% in the control group (P < 0.0003. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a significant association between hypospadias and deviation of the penoscrotal raphe from the midline. Consideration should be given to whether to include this finding within the spectrum of abnormalities seen in hypospadias. Examination of the penoscrotal raphe is simple to perform and could aid in the early diagnosis in children with milder forms of the condition.

  3. Deficiency of Serotonin in Raphe Neurons and Altered Behavioral Responses in Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2-Knockout Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Shingo; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Washio, Youhei; Sato, Kenji; Kinoshita, Masato

    2017-12-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) is a bioactive monoamine that acts as a neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous system of animals. Teleost fish species have serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem; however, the role of 5-HT in the raphe neurons in teleost fish remains largely unknown. Here, we established a medaka (Oryzias latipes) strain with targeted disruption of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (tph2) gene that is involved in the 5-HT synthesis in the raphe nuclei. Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the homozygous mutants (tph2Δ13/Δ13) lacked the ability to synthesize 5-HT in the raphe neurons. To investigate the effects of 5-HT deficiency in adult behaviors, the mutant fish were subjected to five behavioral paradigms (diving, open-field, light-dark transition, mirror-biting, and two-fish social interaction). The homozygous mutation caused a longer duration of freezing response in all examined paradigms and reduced the number of entries to the top area in the diving test. In addition, the mutants exhibited a decreased number of mirror-biting in the males and an increased contact time in direct social interaction between the females. These results indicate that this tph2-knockout medaka serves as a good model to analyze the effects of 5-HT deficiency in the raphe neurons.

  4. Phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expression changes accompanying a sugar-only diet in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-08-17

    Diet composition (yeast:carbohydrate ratio) is an important determinant of growth, development, and reproduction. Recent studies have shown that decreased yeast intake elicits numerous transcriptomic changes and enhances somatic maintenance and lifespan, which in turn reduces reproduction in various insects. However, our understanding of the responses leading to a decrease in yeast ratio to 0% is limited. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a sugar-only diet (SD) on the gene expression patterns of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae. RNA sequencing analyses showed that flies reared on an SD induced significant changes in the expression levels of genes associated with specific metabolic as well as cell growth and death pathways. Moreover, the observed upregulated genes in energy production and downregulated genes associated with reproduction suggested that SD affects somatic maintenance and reproduction in B. dorsalis. As expected, we observed that SD altered B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress (starvation and desiccation) resistance, decreasing reproduction, but did not extend lifespan compared to those that received a normal diet (ND) regime. In addition, administration of an SD resulted in a reduction in antioxidant enzyme activities and an increase in MDA concentrations, thereby suggesting that antioxidants cannot keep up with the increase in oxidative damage induced by SD regime. The application of an SD diet induces changes in phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expressions in B. dorsalis. Previous studies have associated extended lifespan with reduced fecundity. The current study did not observe a prolongation of lifespan in B. dorsalis, which instead incurred oxidative damage. The findings of the present study improve our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and phenotypic response of B. dorsalis to an SD diet.

  5. Effect of Vapor Heat Treatment on the Mortality of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae and the Quality of Mango cv. Arumanis

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    Tri Wulan Widya Lestari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arumanis is a superior export variety mango from Indonesia. One inhibiting factor on the production of this fruit variety is the infestation of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae fruit fly. Vapor heat treatment was recommended by ISPM No. 28 of 2007 as an effective treatment in eradicating fruit flies. This research was aimed to find out the optimum temperature and the duration of vapor heat treatment on the mortality of egg and larvae of B. dorsalis. The experiment was conducted in the Laboratory of Vapor Heat Treatment, BBPOPT, Jatisari, from October 2016 to January 2017. The observed parameters were temperature, duration of treatment, mortality of egg and larvae of fruit fly, and fruit quality. The results showed that vapor heat treatment at 47°C for 40 minutes (min was effective to reduce the number of eggs and larvae of B. dorsalis and had no negative impact on the fruit quality.   Intisari Buah mangga varietas Arumanis merupakan varietas mangga ekspor unggulan Indonesia. Salah satu faktor pembatas produksi buah mangga varietas Arumanis adalah lalat buah B. dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae. Perlakuan uap panas direkomendasikan oleh ISPM Nomor 28 tahun 2007 sebagai tindakan perlakuan yang efektif dalam mengeradikasi lalat buah. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui suhu dan waktu optimum perlakuan uap panas terhadap mortalitas telur dan larva B. dorsalis pada buah mangga varietas Arumanis tanpa merusak kualitas buah. Penelitian dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Vapor Heat Treatment, BBPOPT, Jatisari, pada Oktober 2016 sampai dengan Januari 2017. Parameter yang diamati adalah suhu, lamanya waktu perlakuan, mortalitas telur dan larva lalat buah, dan kualitas buah. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan uap panas pada suhu 47°C selama 40 menit terbukti efektif membunuh telur dan larva B. dorsalis dan tidak berdampak negatif terhadap kualitas buah.

  6. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for delayed rewards.

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    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Doya, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    The forebrain serotonergic system is a crucial component in the control of impulsive behaviors. We previously reported that the activity of serotonin neurons in the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus increased when rats performed a task that required them to wait for delayed rewards. However, the causal relationship between serotonin neural activity and the tolerance for the delayed reward remained unclear. Here, we test whether the inhibition of serotonin neural activity by the local application of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin in the dorsal raphe nucleus impairs rats' tolerance for delayed rewards. Rats performed a sequential food-water navigation task that required them to visit food and water sites alternately via a tone site to get rewards at both sites after delays. During the short (2 s) delayed reward condition, the inhibition of serotonin neural activity did not significantly influence the numbers of reward choice errors (nosepoke at an incorrect reward site following a conditioned reinforcer tone), reward wait errors (failure to wait for the delayed rewards), or total trials (sum of reward choice errors, reward wait errors, and acquired rewards). By contrast, during the long (7-11 s) delayed reward condition, the number of wait errors significantly increased while the numbers of total trials and choice errors did not significantly change. These results indicate that the activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for long delayed rewards and suggest that elevated serotonin activity facilitates waiting behavior when there is the prospect of forthcoming rewards.

  7. Central motor and sensory conduction in adrenoleukomyeloneuropathy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy and tabes dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugawa, Y; Kohara, N; Shimpo, T; Mannen, T

    1988-08-01

    Central motor and sensory conduction was studied by percutaneous electrical stimulation of brain and spinal cord and by somatosensory evoked potential techniques respectively, in patients with adrenoleukomyeloneuropathy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1-associated myelopathy and tabes dorsalis. The results were all consistent with clinical and neuropathological findings in these disorders. Conductions in the corticospinal tract and posterior column could be evaluated separately with these two techniques. Percutaneous electrical stimulation technique would be useful for investigating conduction in the corticospinal tract in patients with spinal cord disorders.

  8. Hipotensão postural na tabes dorsalis: registro de um caso

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    Charles Peter Tilbery

    1977-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de paciente portador de tabes dorsalis, com hipotensão postural, confirmado por estudo poligráfico da pressão arterial por cateterismo intraórtico. Foram realizados exames laboratoriais e teste de Minor. O não-comprometimento significativo da função do sistema nervoso autônomo no presente caso, levaram os autores a concluir que a lesão responsável pela hipotensão postural está situada na via aferente dos barorreceptores.

  9. Nitric oxide in the nucleus raphe magnus modulates cutaneous blood flow in rats during hypothermia

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    Masoumeh Kourosh Arami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Nucleus Raphe Magnus (NRM that is involved in the regulation of body temperature contains nitric oxide (NO synthase. Considering the effect of NO on skin blood flow control, in this study, we assessed its thermoregulatory role within the raphe magnus. Materials and Methods: To this end, tail blood flow of male Wistar rats was measured by laser doppler following the induction of hypothermia. Results: Intra-NRM injection of SNP (exogenous NO donor, 0.1- 0.2 μl, 0.2 nM increased the blood flow. Similarly, unilateral microinjection of glutamate (0.1- 0.2 μl, 2.3 nM into the nucleus increased the blood flow. This effectof L-glutamate was reduced by prior intra NRM administrationof NO synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-L-arginine or NG-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME, 0.1 µl, 100 nM. Conclusion: It is concluded that NO modulates the thermoregulatory response of NRM to hypothermia and may interactwith excitatory amino acids in central skin blood flow regulation.

  10. Foot claudication with plantar flexion as a result of dorsalis pedis artery impingement in an Irish dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brigitte K; Engelbert, Travis; Turnipseed, William D

    2013-07-01

    Dorsalis pedis artery impingement is an extremely rare cause of foot claudication, with a single case reported in the literature. In this report, we describe the case of a 17-year-old female Irish dancer who presented with intermittent bilateral foot pain and discoloration during active plantar flexion. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An evaluation of the species status of Bactrocera invadens and the Systematics of the Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Bactrocera (Tephritidae) contains over 500 species, including many severe pests of fruits and vegetables. While native to tropical and sub-tropical areas of Africa, India, Southeast Asia and Australasia, a number of the pest species, largely members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, have...

  12. Field estimates of attraction of Ceratitis capitata to Trimedlure and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to methyl eugenol in varying environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measuring and modeling the attractiveness of semiochemical-baited traps is of significant importance to detection, delimitation and control of invasive pests. Here we describe the results of field mark-release-recapture experiments with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)...

  13. A qPCR-based method for detecting parasitism of Fopius arisanus (Sonan) in oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Parasitism rate detection and parasitoid species identification are necessary in fruit fly biological control. Currently release of mass-reared Fopius arisanus is occurring world-wide, as this species is effective in controlling Bactrocera dorsalis and Ceratitis capitata. While release i...

  14. A new hobo, Ac, Tam3 transposable element, hopper, from Bactrocera dorsalis is distantly related to hobo and Ac

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new transposable element from the hobo, Ac, TamJ transposon family was isolated as a genomic clone from the oriental fruit fly, BactrOCi!ro dorsalis. It is approximately 3.1 kb in length with 19-bp inverted terminal repeat sequences having a single mismatch.Though sharing several amino acid sequen...

  15. Ring-fluorinated analog of methyl eugenol: Attractiveness to and metabolism in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), males are highly attractive to the natural phenylpropanoid methyl eugenol (ME). They compulsively feed on ME and metabolize it to ring and side-chain hydroxylated compounds which have both pheromonal and allomonal functions. Side-chain metabolic act...

  16. Larval x-ray irradiation influences protein expression in pupae of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera Dorsalis

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    Third instar larvae were exposed to X-ray treatment of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. Irradiated pupae were collected daily. Biological performance parameters of pupae and adults of larvae treated with X-ray irradiation were evaluated. Standard proteomics procedures such as densitometr...

  17. MicroRNAs in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis: extending Drosophilid miRNA clusters to the Tephritidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest species in the family Tephritidae. It is a phytophagous species with broad host range, and while not established in the mainland United States, is a species of great concern for introduction. Despite of the vast amount of informatio...

  18. Functional analysis of five trypsin-like protease genes in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Li; Hou, Ming-Zhe; Shen, Guang-Mao; Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Zhe; Jia, Fu-Xian; Wang, Jin-Jun; Dou, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Insect midgut proteases catalyze the release of free amino acids from dietary proteins and are essential for insect normal development. To date, digestive proteases as potential candidates have made great progress in pest control. To clarify the function of trypsin-like protease genes in the digestive system of Bactrocera dorsalis, a serious pest of a wide range of tropical and subtropical fruit and vegetable crops, five trypsin genes (BdTry1, BdTry2, BdTry3, BdTry4 and BdTry5) were identified from transcriptome dataset, and the effects of feeding condition on their expression levels were examined subsequently. RNA interference (RNAi) was applied to further explore their function on the growth of B. dorsalis. The results showed that all the BdTrys in starving midgut expressed at a minimal level but up-regulated upon feeding (except BdTry3). Besides, RNAi by feeding dsRNAs to larvae proved to be an effective method to cause gene silencing and the mixed dsRNAs of the five BdTrys slowed larvae growth of B. dorsalis. The current data suggest that trypsin genes are actively involved in digestion process of B. dorsalis larvae and thereafter play crucial roles in their development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Survivorship of male and female Bactrocera dorsalis in the field and the effect of male annihilation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male Annihilation Technique (MAT) is a key component of the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae) management because of the “strong” attraction of males to the lure methyl eugenol. The optimal application density for MAT has not been investigated for this economically ...

  20. History of Neurology and Psychiatry: Sewing Machine, Tabes Dorsalis, and Ovarian Hysteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlef Claus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hysteria was the Sphinx of nervous disorders. In ancient times the cause of hysteria was supposed to be sited in the womb. However the French Neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot favoured the ovaries as the site of the origin of hysteria, and he recommended the therapeutic compression of the ovaries in order to terminate hysterical fits. To this end, the treatment of hysteria in women was carried out by the surgical removal of one ovary. This surgical intervention was not without risk in the 19th century, but more to the point it did not help the patients. Most German Neurologists doubted this “hysteric ovary” theory, but it was not until after 1901 that Steinhausen was able to prove by statistical analysis, that the “hysteric” ovary did not exist at all. Statistical data analysis also helped to support the connection between Syphilis and Tabes dorsalis, which usually became clinically manifest several years after infection. In those days neither cerebrospinal fluid analysis nor serology were available. Apart from several nonspecific suspected causes of Tabes - it was the use of the newly invented sewing machine that came under suspicion as the trigger of Tabes dorsalis.

  1. Transmission modes of a pesticide-degrading symbiont of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijun; Lu, Yongyue; Yang, Fan; Zeng, Ling; Liang, Guangwen; Xu, Yijuan

    2017-12-01

    Symbionts are associated with many insects and play several multifunctional roles in insect-microorganism mutualistic relationships. The trichlorphon-degrading symbiont Citrobacter freundii (CF-BD) of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis was recently discovered; however, its intraspecies transmission pathway among flies remains unknown. Here, we use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), PCR detection, and a series of ingenious experiments to reveal that CF-BD was aggregated in rectal pads associated with the female ovipositor, and the CF-BD symbiont was vertically transmitted via egg surface contamination. Although CF-BD was not detected in ovaries, it was found in deposited eggs. In addition, CF-BD was readily acquired horizontally between larvae or adults via oral uptake, although it was not transferred via mating behavior. Surface sterilization of eggs had a negative effect on the insects, which exhibited a lower body weight and a sharp decrease in fecundity, suggesting important biological roles of CF-BD in the fitness of the host insects. Our findings may also help to explain the high pesticide resistance levels of B. dorsalis. Furthermore, identifying a clear transmission pathway of this organophosphorus-degrading symbiont will be useful for pesticide resistance management and future pest control technologies.

  2. Transport of methyl eugenol-derived sex pheromonal components in the male fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah-Wei Hee, Alvin; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2006-08-01

    Males of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) are attracted strongly to and feed compulsively on methyl eugenol (1,2-dimethoxy- 4 -(2-propenyl)benzene), a highly potent male attractant. Pharmacophagy of methyl eugenol results in the production of phenylpropanoids 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol and (E)-coniferyl alcohol that are sequestered and stored in the rectal gland prior to release as sex pheromonal components during mating at dusk. While these pheromonal components have also been detected in the hemolymph and crop of methyl eugenol-fed males, there is currently little information on the transport of these compounds from the crop to rectal gland in male B. dorsalis. Therefore, using physiological techniques such as parabiosis, rectal gland transplantation and hemolymph transfusion coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses, we were able to ascertain and confirm the role of the hemolymph in the transport of these sex pheromonal components from the crop to the rectal gland. Further, the temporal profile of these methyl eugenol-derived bioactive compounds in the hemolymph also shows an increase with time post-methyl eugenol-feeding, i.e., 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol attaining maximum amounts 15 min after ME consumption and decreasing thereafter, while for (E)-coniferyl alcohol-the increase and decrease are more gradual. These results further demonstrate the ability of insect hemolymph to transport many diverse forms of bioactive molecules including attractant-derived sex pheromonal components.

  3. The Divergence in Bacterial Components Associated with Bactrocera dorsalis across Developmental Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Eco-evolutionary dynamics of microbiotas at the macroscale level are largely driven by ecological variables. The diet and living environment of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, diversify during development, providing a natural system to explore convergence, divergence, and repeatability in patterns of microbiota dynamics as a function of the host diet, phylogeny, and environment. Here, we characterized the microbiotas of 47 B. dorsalis individuals from three distinct populations by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. A significant deviation was found within the larvae, pupae, and adults of each population. Pupae were characterized by an increased bacterial taxonomic and functional diversity. Principal components analysis showed that the microbiotas of larvae, pupae, and adults clearly separated into three clusters. Acetobacteraceae, Lactobacillaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae were the predominant families in larval and adult samples, and PICRUSt analysis indicated that phosphoglycerate mutases and transketolases were significantly enriched in larvae, while phosphoglycerate mutases, transketolases, and proteases were significantly enriched in adults, which may support the digestive function of the microbiotas in larvae and adults. The abundances of Intrasporangiaceae, Dermabacteraceae (mainly Brachybacterium and Brevibacteriaceae (mainly Brevibacterium were significantly higher in pupae, and the antibiotic transport system ATP-binding protein and antibiotic transport system permease protein pathways were significantly enriched there as well, indicating the defensive function of microbiotas in pupae. Overall, differences in the microbiotas of the larvae, pupae, and adults are likely to contribute to differences in nutrient assimilation and living environments.

  4. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K., E-mail: avergis@iihr.ernet.i [Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2006-07-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  5. Phytosanitary Treatments Against Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae): Current Situation and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Hallman, Guy J; Grout, Timothy G; Clarke, Anthony R; Follett, Peter A; Cugala, Domingos R; Minh Tu, Duong; Murdita, Wayan; Hernandez, Emilio; Pereira, Rui; Myers, Scott W

    2017-02-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is arguably the most important tephritid attacking fruits after Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). In 2003 it was found in Africa and quickly spread to most of the sub-Saharan part of the continent, destroying fruits and creating regulatory barriers to their export. The insect is causing new nutritional and economic losses across Africa, as well as the losses it has caused for decades in infested areas of Asia, New Guinea, and Hawaii. This new panorama represents a challenge for fruit exportation from Africa. Phytosanitary treatments are required to export quarantined commodities out of infested areas to areas where the pest does not exist and could become established. This paper describes current phytosanitary treatments against B. dorsalis and their use throughout the world, the development of new treatments based on existing research, and recommendations for further research to provide phytosanitary solutions to the problem. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Isolation and identification of host cues from mango, Mangifera indica, that attract gravid female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Pagadala D Kamala; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A

    2012-04-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an economically damaging, polyphagous pest of fruit crops in South-East Asia and Hawaii, and a quarantine pest in other parts of the world. The objective of our study was to identify new attractants for B. dorsalis from overripe mango fruits. Headspace samples of volatiles were collected from two cultivars of mango, 'Alphonso' and 'Chausa', and a strong positive behavioral response was observed when female B. dorsalis were exposed to these volatiles in olfactometer bioassays. Coupled GC-EAG with female B. dorsalis revealed 7 compounds from 'Alphonso' headspace and 15 compounds from 'Chausa' headspace that elicited an EAG response. The EAG-active compounds, from 'Alphonso', were identified, using GC-MS, as heptane, myrcene, (Z)-ocimene, (E)-ocimene, allo-ocimene, (Z)-myroxide, and γ-octalactone, with the two ocimene isomers being the dominant compounds. The EAG-active compounds from 'Chausa' were 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl butanoate, ethyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate, ethyl tiglate, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-carene, p-cymene, ethyl sorbate, α-terpinolene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and benzothiazole. Individual compounds were significantly attractive when a standard dose (1 μg on filter paper) was tested in the olfactometer. Furthermore, synthetic blends with the same concentration and ratio of compounds as in the natural headspace samples were highly attractive (P < 0.001), and in a choice test, fruit flies did not show any preference for the natural samples over the synthetic blends. Results are discussed in relation to developing a lure for female B. dorsalis to bait traps with.

  7. Respiratory and Mayer wave-related discharge patterns of raphé and pontine neurons change with vagotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K F; Nuding, S C; Segers, L S; Baekey, D M; Shannon, R; Lindsey, B G; Dick, T E

    2010-07-01

    Previous models have attributed changes in respiratory modulation of pontine neurons after vagotomy to a loss of pulmonary stretch receptor "gating" of an efference copy of inspiratory drive. Recently, our group confirmed that pontine neurons change firing patterns and become more respiratory modulated after vagotomy, although average peak and mean firing rates of the sample did not increase (Dick et al., J Physiol 586: 4265-4282, 2008). Because raphé neurons are also elements of the brain stem respiratory network, we tested the hypotheses that after vagotomy raphé neurons have increased respiratory modulation and that alterations in their firing patterns are similar to those seen for pontine neurons during withheld lung inflation. Raphé and pontine neurons were recorded simultaneously before and after vagotomy in decerebrated cats. Before vagotomy, 14% of 95 raphé neurons had increased activity during single respiratory cycles prolonged by withholding lung inflation; 13% exhibited decreased activity. After vagotomy, the average index of respiratory modulation (eta(2)) increased (0.05 +/- 0.10 to 0.12 +/- 0.18 SD; Student's paired t-test, P waves. These "Mayer wave-related oscillations" (MWROs) were coupled with central respiratory drive and became synchronized with the central respiratory rhythm after vagotomy (7 of 10 animals). Cross-correlation analysis identified functional connectivity in 52 of 360 pairs of neurons with MWROs. Collectively, the results suggest that a distributed network participates in the generation of MWROs and in the coordination of respiratory and vasomotor rhythms.

  8. Prenatal stress alters diazepam withdrawal syndrome and 5HT1A receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehayli, S; Said, N; El Khachibi, M; El Ouahli, M; Nadifi, S; Hakkou, F; Tazi, A

    2016-08-25

    Early-life events have long-term effects on brain structures and cause behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. The present experiments were designed to investigate the effects of prenatal stress on diazepam-induced withdrawal syndrome and serotonin-1A (5HT1A) receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. The results of the present study reveal that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress increased the anxiety-like behavior in the prenatally stressed (PS) animals withdrawn from chronic diazepam (2.5mg/kg/day i.p for 1week). Moreover, prenatal stress induced a down-regulation of 5HT1A mRNA in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress enhances diazepam withdrawal symptoms and alters 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. Thus, more studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the decrease of 5HT1A receptors expression in the raphe nuclei of PS rats. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation of the release of serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus by alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the modulation of serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) by alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptors, dual-probe microdialysis was performed in conscious rats. The specific alpha(1) and alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists were locally infused into the DRN via

  10. Serotonergic projections from the raphe nuclei to the subthalamic nucleus; a retrograde- and anterograde neuronal tracing study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reznitsky, Martin; Plenge, Per; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A not were present. Retrograde tracer FluoroGold or Choleratoxin subunit B were iontophoretically delivered in the STN and combined with immunohistochemistry for 5-HT in order to map the topographic organization in the dorsal raphe system. The study showed that approximately 320...

  11. Cell-Type-Specific Modulation of Sensory Responses in Olfactory Bulb Circuits by Serotonergic Projections from the Raphe Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunert, Daniela; Tsuno, Yusuke; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T; Wachowiak, Matt

    2016-06-22

    Serotonergic neurons in the brainstem raphe nuclei densely innervate the olfactory bulb (OB), where they can modulate the initial representation and processing of olfactory information. Serotonergic modulation of sensory responses among defined OB cell types is poorly characterized in vivo Here, we used cell-type-specific expression of optical reporters to visualize how raphe stimulation alters sensory responses in two classes of GABAergic neurons of the mouse OB glomerular layer, periglomerular (PG) and short axon (SA) cells, as well as mitral/tufted (MT) cells carrying OB output to piriform cortex. In PG and SA cells, brief (1-4 s) raphe stimulation elicited a large increase in the magnitude of responses linked to inhalation of ambient air, as well as modest increases in the magnitude of odorant-evoked responses. Near-identical effects were observed when the optical reporter of glutamatergic transmission iGluSnFR was expressed in PG and SA cells, suggesting enhanced excitatory input to these neurons. In contrast, in MT cells imaged from the dorsal OB, raphe stimulation elicited a strong increase in resting GCaMP fluorescence with only a slight enhancement of inhalation-linked responses to odorant. Finally, optogenetically stimulating raphe serotonergic afferents in the OB had heterogeneous effects on presumptive MT cells recorded extracellularly, with an overall modest increase in resting and odorant-evoked responses during serotonergic afferent stimulation. These results suggest that serotonergic afferents from raphe dynamically modulate olfactory processing through distinct effects on multiple OB targets, and may alter the degree to which OB output is shaped by inhibition during behavior. Modulation of the circuits that process sensory information can profoundly impact how information about the external world is represented and perceived. This study investigates how the serotonergic system modulates the initial processing of olfactory information by the

  12. More tryptophan hydroxylase in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus in depressed suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Maura; Underwood, Mark D; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2005-04-11

    Deficient serotonin neurotransmission in suicide is indicated by reduced brainstem serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), fewer 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors and reduced cortical serotonin transporter binding in suicide victims. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of 5-HT, and alterations in TPH could explain some of these findings. We sought to determine the amount of TPH immunoreactivity (TPH-IR) in the dorsal (DRN) and median (MRN) raphe nuclei in suicides and controls. Brainstems of suicide victims and controls (n = 11 pairs) were collected at autopsy, matched for age, sex and postmortem interval, frozen and sectioned (20 microm). Immunoautoradiography, using an antibody to label TPH, was performed, slides exposed to film and autoradiograms quantified by a computer-based image analysis system. We examined sections every 1000 microm throughout the whole length of the nucleus, performing statistical analysis only on those subjects for whom the raphe was complete (n = 8 pairs). TPH-IR (microCi/g) was higher in suicides than controls (S: 300.8 +/- 70.8 vs. C: 259.6 +/- 40.7, t = 2.57, df = 7, P = 0.04) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and not different between suicides and controls (S: 251.3 +/- 44.2 vs. C: 235.9 +/- 27.4, t = 1.49, df = 7, P = 0.18) in the MRN. DRN TPH-IR was higher in male suicide victims (MS) compared to male controls (MC; MS: 318.4 +/- 54.4 vs. MC: 271.9 +/- 22.5, t = 2.66, df = 6, P = 0.03). The analysis of TPH-IR area and density at each DRN rostrocaudal levels showed higher area and density in suicides compared to controls in the rostral DRN and lower area and density in the caudal DRN. TPH-IR, an index of the amount of TPH enzyme, in the DRN is higher in depressed suicides. More TPH may be an upregulatory homeostatic response to impaired serotonin release or less autoreceptor activation. Alternatively, the serotonin impairment in suicide may be due to hypofunctional serotonin

  13. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Niche Overlap of Congeneric Invaders Supports a Single-Species Hypothesis and Provides Insight into Future Invasion Risk: Implications for Global Management of the Bactrocera dorsalis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew P.; Terblanche, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs), and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species’ realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. Principal Findings Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae). Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. Conclusions/Significance Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same–at least

  15. Characterizing the developmental transcriptome of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) through comparative genomic analysis with Drosophila melanogaster utilizing modENCODE datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Scott M; Calla, Bernarda; Hall, Brian; Hou, Shaobin; Manoukis, Nicholas C

    2014-10-28

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest of fruit and vegetable crops throughout Asia, and is considered a high risk pest for establishment in the mainland United States. It is a member of the family Tephritidae, which are the most agriculturally important family of flies, and can be considered an out-group to well-studied members of the family Drosophilidae. Despite their importance as pests and their relatedness to Drosophila, little information is present on B. dorsalis transcripts and proteins. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively characterize the transcripts present throughout the life history of B. dorsalis and functionally annotate and analyse these transcripts relative to the presence, expression, and function of orthologous sequences present in Drosophila melanogaster. We present a detailed transcriptome assembly of B. dorsalis from egg through adult stages containing 20,666 transcripts across 10,799 unigene components. Utilizing data available through Flybase and the modENCODE project, we compared expression patterns of these transcripts to putative orthologs in D. melanogaster in terms of timing, abundance, and function. In addition, temporal expression patterns in B. dorsalis were characterized between stages, to establish the constitutive or stage-specific expression patterns of particular transcripts. A fully annotated transcriptome assembly is made available through NCBI, in addition to corresponding expression data. Through characterizing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis through its life history and comparing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis to the model organism D. melanogaster, a database has been developed that can be used as the foundation to functional genomic research in Bactrocera flies and help identify orthologous genes between B. dorsalis and D. melanogaster. This data provides the foundation for future functional genomic research that will focus on improving our understanding of the physiology and

  16. Niche overlap of congeneric invaders supports a single-species hypothesis and provides insight into future invasion risk: implications for global management of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens, has expanded its range rapidly over the past 10 years. Here we aimed to determine if the recent range expansion of Bactrocera invadens into southern Africa can be better understood through niche exploration tools, ecological niche models (ENMs, and through incorporating information about Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., a putative conspecific species from Asia. We test for niche overlap of environmental variables between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. as well as two other putative conspecific species, Bactrocera philippinensis and B. papayae. We examine overlap and similarity in the geographical expression of each species' realised niche through reciprocal distribution models between Africa and Asia. We explore different geographical backgrounds, environmental variables and model complexity with multiple and single Bactrocera species hypotheses in an attempt to predict the recent range expansion of B. invadens into northern parts of South Africa. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bactrocera invadens has a high degree of niche overlap with B. dorsalis s.s. (and B. philippinensis and B. papayae. Ecological niche models built for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. have high transferability to describe the range of B. invadens, and B. invadens is able to project to the core range of B. dorsalis s.s. The ENMs of both Bactrocera dorsalis and B. dorsalis combined with B. philipenesis and B. papayae have significantly higher predictive ability to capture the distribution points in South Africa than for B. invadens alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Consistent with other studies proposing these Bactrocera species as conspecific, niche similarity and overlap between these species is high. Considering these other Bactrocera dorsalis complex species simultaneously better describes the range expansion and invasion potential of B. invadens in South Africa. We suggest that these species should be considered the same

  17. Intense Activity of the Raphe Spinal Pathway Depresses Motor Activity via a Serotonin Dependent Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Jørgensen, Lone K

    2018-01-01

    Motor fatigue occurring during prolonged physical activity has both peripheral and central origins. It was previously demonstrated that the excitability of motoneurons was decreased when a spillover of serotonin could activate extrasynaptic 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS......) of motoneurons. Here we investigated the impact of massive synaptic release of serotonin on motor behavior in an integrated preparation of the adult turtle performing fictive scratching behaviors. We found that a prolonged electrical stimulation of the raphe spinal pathway induced a reversible inhibition...... of the motor behavior that lasted several tens of seconds. The effect disappeared when the spinal cord was perfused with an antagonist for 5-HT1A receptors. By demonstrating a direct impact of serotonin on motor behavior, we suggest a central role of this monoamine behind central fatigue....

  18. Disconnectivity between Dorsal Raphe Nucleus and Posterior Cingulate Cortex in Later Life Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Ikuta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN has been repeatedly implicated as having a significant relationship with depression, along with its serotoninergic innervation. However, functional connectivity of the DRN in depression is not well understood. The current study aimed to isolate functional connectivity of the DRN distinct in later life depression (LLD compared to a healthy age-matched population. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data from 95 participants (33 LLD and 62 healthy were collected to examine functional connectivity from the DRN to the whole brain in voxel-wise fashion. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC bilaterally showed significantly smaller connectivity in the LLD group than the control group. The DRN to PCC connectivity did not show any association with the depressive status. The findings implicate that the LLD involves disruption of serotoninergic input to the PCC, which has been suggested to be a part of the reduced default mode network in depression.

  19. Genetic and cytogenetic characterization of genetic sexing strains of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharopoulou, A; Franz, G

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, we performed genetic and cytogenetic analyses of two genetic sexing strains (GSSs), one for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. and one for melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, the first such strains ever constructed in these species. In both strains, the genetic sexing mechanism is based on a pupal color dimorphism (white or brown) and is the result of a reciprocal translocation between the Y chromosome and the autosome bearing the white pupae (wp) locus. Based on genetic analysis and cytological data on mitotic metaphases and larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes, we succeeded in mapping the autosome breakpoints in the two Y-autosome translocations even though the Y chromosome is not visible in polytene nuclei. We show that polytene chromosomes can be used in cytogenetic analyses toward the development of genetic control methods in these pest species. The results of the genetic analysis are in full agreement with the cytological description of the strains.

  20. Physiological ecology of desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) eggs: temperature and water relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, A.

    1980-12-01

    The soil environment imposes constraints on the timing of oviposition and the location of suitable sites for egg burrows of the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis). The effects of temperature and water potential on the developmental period and hatching success of eggs were determined. Eggs hatch normally between 28/sup 0/ and 38/sup 0/C at environmental water potentials between -50 and -1500 kPa. Predictions were derived for the timing and placement of egg clutches based on soil water potential and temperature profiles measured in the field and on the results of laboratory incubation experiments. The results suggest that egg burrows should be located at depths >22 cm in washes or possibly in sparsely vegetated areas away from creosote bushes. The biogeography of desert iguanas within the United States is discussed in relation to soil environments and tolerances of eggs. The physical factors affecting incubation may limit the geographical range of desert iguanas.

  1. Modified dorsalis pedis flap for coverage of a pretibial pressure sore after hip rotationplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, B; Krapohl, B D; Plötz, W; Mailänder, P

    2001-04-01

    Rotationplasty is a well-established procedure after total femur resection, especially in children. Rehabilitation is superior to disarticulation of the hip or hemipelvectomy because patients regain hip and knee function.(1) A tight fit of the prosthetic shaft is essential. The pretibial area has a low physiological resistance to pressure and shear forces, and is thus at increased risk of developing pressure-related complications. Skin defects with exposure of skeletal elements require flap coverage. The dorsalis pedis flap is one of the surgical options available for skin coverage of the proximal anterior leg. It can be rotated to cover almost any site on the anterior aspect of the leg if the pedicle is mobilised up to the anterior tibial artery.(2)Since donor site complications are common, this flap has few indications.(3) Copyright 2001 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  2. PENGARUH KOMBINASI PETRAGENOL DAN EKSTRAK JERUK TERHADAP FEEDING STRATEGY LALAT BUAH Bactrocera dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhan Sumarmi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Petragenol is an attractant contained methyl-eugenol. It is an insect’s pheromone signaling for mating, made colony, and feeding. The oranges had too an attractants especially for fruit flies. The aim of this research was to know the influence of combination of oranges extract and petragenol to Feeding Strategy of Bactrocera dorsalis flies.      This research used the Y tube method. The 60 fruit flies were used as samples. The 10 flies were placed in start chamber Y tube and in two other tips were placed the bait as a single or combinations of non-matured oranges extract and petragenol (A, matured oranges extract and petragenol (B, decay-oranges extract and petragenol (C, and petragenol as control (D. Feeding Strategy defined by the need of time to reach the bait and the spend of time in the bait with categories as activity of Searching, Grounding, Gathering, and Learning. The data analyzed by Chi-square (X2. The results showed that the fastest searching activity in B, the longest time to gathering activity in A, the longest time to grounding activity in non-matured oranges extract, and the longest time to learning activity in matured oranges extract. It can conlude that the best attractant to teas Bactrocera dorsalis Feeding Strategy are matured oranges extract-petragenol combination for Searching and Learning activity, and combination of non-matured oranges extract  and petragenol to grounding and gathering activity. Key words: petragenol, oranges extract, feeding strategy

  3. Ankle position affects dorsalis pedis artery exposure in anterior ankle arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karia, Priyesh Ashok; Nathdwarawala, Yogesh; Szarko, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    In anterior ankle arthroscopy, the anterior working area (AWA) is restricted by the presence of the dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) and tendons. Pseudoaneurysms caused by iatrogenic damage to the DPA are difficult to identify intraoperatively. In knee arthroscopy, risk of popliteal artery damage is reduced in the flexed position [1]. This study investigates how DPA movement is affected by dorsiflexion and plantarflexion with the aim of identifying the positions providing the greatest AWA. Twelve cadaveric ankles were dissected to access the DPA. While distracted, ankles were progressively dorsiflexed at 5° intervals from maximum plantarflexion. DPA and tibialis anterior tendon (TA) movement at each 5° interval was measured by their respective distances from the inferior border of the medial malleolus. Mean ankle dorsiflexion was 24.58±1.30° with all specimens showing anterior DPA and TA movement as dorsiflexion increased. Mean DPA and TA movement at maximum dorsiflexion was 3.58±0.29mm and 2.92±0.34mm respectively. A ratio of 1:1.23 relates TA and DPA movement (inmm), and a ratio of 10:1.46 relates dorsiflexion angle to DPA movement (inmm). Anterior movement of the dorsalis pedis artery during dorsiflexion increases the AWA for anterior arthroscopy. Increasing the AWA with maximal dorsiflexion may prove to be a valuable method for lowering the risk of iatrogenic DPA damage. Additionally, increased AWA may allow the use of larger diameter surgical instruments allowing greater control and a reduction in operation time. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation of the Electrical Field in Equine Larynx to Optimize Functional Electrical Stimulation in Denervated Musculus Cricoarythenoideus Dorsalis

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Reichel; Johannes Martinek

    2014-01-01

    Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN) in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD) and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding o...

  5. Simulation of the electrical field in equine larynx to optimize functional electrical stimulation in denervated musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Reichel; Johannes Martinek

    2014-01-01

    Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN) in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD) and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding o...

  6. Impact of introduction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) and classical biological control releases of Fopius arisanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on economically important fruit flies in French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Leblanc, Luc; Putoa, Rudolph; Eitam, Avi

    2007-06-01

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), was discovered on Tahiti Island in July 1996. Eradication programs were conducted from 1997 to 2001, but failed. From 1998 to 2006, B. dorsalis was recovered from 29 different host fruit from the five Society Islands: Tahiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, and Huahine. Analysis of coinfestation patterns by B. dorsalis, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), and Bactrocera kirki (Froggatt) suggested B. dorsalis had displaced these two species and become the most abundant fruit fly in coastal areas. To suppress B. dorsalis populations, a classical biological control program was initiated to introduce the natural enemy Fopius arisanus (Sonan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) into French Polynesia from Hawaii. Wasps were released and established on Tahiti, Moorea, Raiatea, Tahaa, and Huahine Islands. In guava, Psidium guajava L., collections for Tahiti, F. arisanus parasitism of fruit flies was 2.1, 31.8, 37.5, and 51.9% for fruit collected for 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively. Based on guava collections in 2002 (before releases) and 2006 (after releases), there was a subsequent decrease in numbers of B. dorsalis, B. tryoni, and B. kirki fruit flies emerging (per kilogram of fruit) by 75.6, 79.3, and 97.9%, respectively. These increases in F. arisanus parasitism and decreases in infestation were similar for other host fruit. Establishment of F. arisanus is the most successful example of classical biological control of fruit flies in the Pacific area outside of Hawaii and serves as a model for introduction into South America, Africa, and China where species of the B. dorsalis complex are established.

  7. Ring-fluorinated analog of methyl eugenol: attractiveness to and metabolism in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrimian, Ashot; Siderhurst, Matthew S; Mcquate, Grant T; Liquido, Nicanor J; Nagata, Janice; Carvalho, Lori; Guzman, Filadelfo; Jang, Eric B

    2009-02-01

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), males are highly attracted to the natural phenylpropanoid methyl eugenol (ME). They compulsively feed on ME and metabolize it to ring and side-chain hydroxylated compounds that have both pheromonal and allomonal functions. Side-chain metabolic activation of ME leading to (E)-coniferyl alcohol has long been recognized as a primary reason for hepatocarcinogenicity of this compound in rodents. Earlier, we demonstrated that introduction of a fluorine atom at the terminal carbon of the ME side chain significantly depressed metabolism and specifically reduced formation of coniferyl alcohol but had little effect on field attractiveness to B. dorsalis. In the current paper, we demonstrate that fluorination of ME at the 4 position of the aromatic ring blocks metabolic ring-hydroxylation but overall enhances side-chain metabolism by increasing production of fluorinated (E)-coniferyl alcohol. In laboratory experiments, oriental fruit fly males were attracted to and readily consumed 1,2-dimethoxy-4-fluoro-5-(2-propenyl)benzene (I) at rates similar to ME but metabolized it faster. Flies that consumed the fluorine analog were as healthy post feeding as ones fed on methyl eugenol. In field trials, the fluorine analog I was approximately 50% less attractive to male B. dorsalis than ME.

  8. Oviposition site-selection by Bactrocera dorsalis is mediated through an innate recognition template tuned to γ-octalactone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available Innate recognition templates (IRTs in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest.

  9. Phenoloxidase and its zymogen are required for the larval-pupal transition in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ping-Ping; Xie, Yi-Fei; Shen, Guang-Mao; Wei, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Phenoloxidases (POs) play a key role in melanin production, are involved in invertebrate immune mechanisms, and are considered important enzymes in the insect development process. In the present study, we report the developmental stage and tissue-specific expression patterns of BdPPO1 and PO activity from Bactrocera dorsalis. The results showed that the activity of PO and its zymogen expression were closely related to the development of B. dorsalis during the larval-pupal transition, particularly in the integument. Additionally, biochemical characterization showed that PO from different developmental stages and tissues all had maximum activity at pH 7.5 and 37°C. After feeding a metal ion-containing artificial diet, the activity of PO and expression of BdPPO1 were significantly increased, indicating that PO was a metalloprotein and it could be activated by Zn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Cu2+. The functional analysis showed that the expression of BdPPO1 could be regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) after injection. Furthermore, injection of the double-stranded RNA of BdPPO1 into the 3rd instar larvae significantly reduced mRNA levels after 24 h and 48 h, and resulted in a lower pupation rate and abnormal phenotype. These results expand the understanding of the important role of PO and its zymogen in the growth of B. dorsalis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A phylogenetic assessment of the polyphyletic nature and intraspecific color polymorphism in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Luc; San Jose, Michael; Barr, Norman; Rubinoff, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Bactrocera dorsalis complex (Tephritidae) comprises 85 species of fruit flies, including five highly destructive polyphagous fruit pests. Despite significant work on a few key pest species within the complex, little has been published on the majority of non-economic species in the complex, other than basic descriptions and illustrations of single specimens regarded as typical representatives. To elucidate the species relationships within the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, we used 159 sequences from one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (elongation factor-1α and period) genes to construct a phylogeny containing 20 described species from within the complex, four additional species that may be new to science, and 26 other species from Bactrocera and its sister genus Dacus. The resulting concatenated phylogeny revealed that most of the species placed in the complex appear to be unrelated, emerging across numerous clades. This suggests that they were placed in the Bactrocera dorsalis complex based on the similarity of convergent characters, which does not appear to be diagnostic. Variations in scutum and abdomen color patterns within each of the non-economic species are presented and demonstrate that distantly-related, cryptic species overlap greatly in traditional morphological color patterns used to separate them in keys. Some of these species may not be distinguishable with confidence by means other than DNA data. PMID:26798267

  11. Historical perspective on the synonymization of the four major pest species belonging to the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Alvin K W; Wee, Suk-Ling; Nishida, Ritsuo; Ono, Hajime; Hendrichs, Jorge; Haymer, David S; Tan, Keng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    An FAO/IAEA-sponsored coordinated research project on integrative taxonomy, involving close to 50 researchers from at least 20 countries, culminated in a significant breakthrough in the recognition that four major pest species, Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera invadens, belong to the same biological species, Bactrocera dorsalis. The successful conclusion of this initiative is expected to significantly facilitate global agricultural trade, primarily through the lifting of quarantine restrictions that have long affected many countries, especially those in regions such as Asia and Africa that have large potential for fresh fruit and vegetable commodity exports. This work stems from two taxonomic studies: a revision in 1994 that significantly increased the number of described species in the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex; and the description in 2005 of Bactrocera invadens, then newly incursive in Africa. While taxonomically valid species, many biologists considered that these were different names for one biological species. Many disagreements confounded attempts to develop a solution for resolving this taxonomic issue, before the FAO/IAEA project commenced. Crucial to understanding the success of that initiative is an accounting of the historical events and perspectives leading up to the international, multidisciplinary collaborative efforts that successfully achieved the final synonymization. This review highlights the 21 year journey taken to achieve this outcome.

  12. Central and peripheral chemoreceptors evoke distinct responses in simultaneously recorded neurons of the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Shannon, Roger; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2009-09-12

    The brainstem network for generating and modulating the respiratory motor pattern includes neurons of the medullary ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC), dorsolateral pons (PRG) and raphé nuclei. Midline raphé neurons are proposed to be elements of a distributed brainstem system of central chemoreceptors, as well as modulators of central chemoreceptors at other sites, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus. Stimulation of the raphé system or peripheral chemoreceptors can induce a long-term facilitation of phrenic nerve activity; central chemoreceptor stimulation does not. The network mechanisms through which each class of chemoreceptor differentially influences breathing are poorly understood. Microelectrode arrays were used to monitor sets of spike trains from 114 PRG, 198 VRC and 166 midline neurons in six decerebrate vagotomized cats; 356 were recorded during sequential stimulation of both receptor classes via brief CO(2)-saturated saline injections in vertebral (central) and carotid arteries (peripheral). Seventy neurons responded to both stimuli. More neurons were responsive only to peripheral challenges than those responsive only to central chemoreceptor stimulation (PRG, 20 : 4; VRC, 41 : 10; midline, 25 : 13). Of 16 474 pairs of neurons evaluated for short-time scale correlations, similar percentages of reference neurons in each brain region had correlation features indicative of a specific interaction with at least one target neuron: PRG (59.6%), VRC (51.0%) and raphé nuclei (45.8%). The results suggest a brainstem network architecture with connectivity that shapes the respiratory motor pattern via overlapping circuits that modulate central and peripheral chemoreceptor-mediated influences on breathing.

  13. Effect of acupuncture on Lipopolysaccharide-induced anxiety-like behavioral changes: involvement of serotonin system in dorsal Raphe nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tae Young; Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Gyu Won; Lee, Eun Byeol; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Jong Han; Koo, Jin Suk; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Hee Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been used as a common therapeutic tool in many disorders including anxiety and depression. Serotonin transporter (SERT) plays an important role in the pathology of anxiety and other mood disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety-like behaviors and SERT in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Methods Rats were given acupuncture at ST41 (Jiexi), LI11 (Quchi) or SI3 (Houxi) acupoint in LPS-treated ...

  14. Increased mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase in dorsal raphe nucleus of depressive suicide victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sanchez-Bahillo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Sanchez-Bahillo1, V Bautista-Hernandez1, Carlos Barcia Gonzalez1, R Bañon2, A Luna2, EC Hirsch3, Maria-Trinidad Herrero11Clinical and Experimental Neuroscience, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED; 2Department of Legal Medicine, Department of Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, Murcia 30100, Spain; 3INSERM U679 Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Suicidal behavior is a problem with important social repercussions. Some groups of the population show a higher risk of suicide; for example, depression, alcoholism, psychosis or drug abuse frequently precedes suicidal behavior. However, the relationship between metabolic alterations in the brain and premorbid clinical symptoms of suicide remains uncertain. The serotonergic and noradrenergic systems have frequently been, implicated in suicidal behavior and the amount of serotonin in the brain and CSF of suicide victims has been found to be low compared with normal subjects. However, there are contradictory results regarding the role of noradrenergic neurons in the mediation of suicide attempts, possibly reflecting the heterogeneity of conditions that lead to a common outcome. In the present work we focus on the subgroup of suicide victims that share a common diagnosis of major depression. Based on post-mortem studies analyzing mRNA expression by in situ hybridization, serotonergic neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN from depressive suicide victims are seen to over-express cytochrome oxidase mRNA. However, no corresponding changes were found in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA in the noradrenergic neurons of the Locus Coeruleus (LC. These results suggest that, despite of the low levels of serotonin described in suicide victims, the activity of DRN neurons could increase in the suicidally depressed, probably due to the over activation of

  15. Distinct Contributions of Median Raphe Nucleus to Contextual Fear Conditioning and Fear-Potentiated Startle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R. C. B.; Cruz, A. P. M.; Avanzi, V.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Brandão, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Ascending 5-HT projections from the median raphe nucleus (MRN), probably to the hippocampus, are implicated in the acquisition of contextual fear (background stimuli), as assessed by freezing behavior. Foreground cues like light, used as a conditioned stimulus (CS) in classical fear conditioning, also cause freezing through thalamic transmission to the amygdala. As the MRN projects to the hippocampus and amygdala, the role of this raphe nucleus in fear conditioning to explicit cues remains to be explained. Here we analyzed the behavior of rats with MRN electrolytic lesions in a contextual conditioning situation and in a fear-potentiated startle procedure. The animals received MRN electrolytic lesions either before or on the day after two consecutive training sessions in which they were submitted to 10 conditioning trials, each in an experimental chamber (same context) where they. received foot-shocks (0.6 mA, 1 sec) paired to a 4-sec light CS. Seven to ten days later, the animals were submitted to testing sessions for assessing conditioned fear when they were placed for five shocks, and the duration of contextual freezing was recorded. The animals were then submitted to a fear-potentiated startle in response to a 4-sec light-CS, followed by white noise (100 dB, 50 ms). Control rats (sham) tested in the same context showed more freezing than did rats with pre- or post-training MRN lesions. Startle was clearly potentiated in the presence of light CS in the sham-lesioned animals. Whereas pretraining lesions reduced both freezing and fear-potentiated startle, the post-training lesions reduced only freezing to context, without changing the fear-potentiated startle. In a second experiment, neurotoxic lesions of the MRN with local injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate or the activation of 5-HT1A somatodendritic auto-receptors of the MRN by microinjections of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy- 2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) before the training sessions also

  16. Do thermal tolerances and rapid thermal responses contribute to the invasion potential of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Welma; Terblanche, John S; Addison, Pia

    2017-04-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) has shown remarkable range expansion over the past 10years and invaded several new continents including Africa. Here we report results of a detailed assessment of acute high and low temperature survival ability and the plasticity thereof, to test the hypothesis that traits of the thermal niche have contributed to the species' invasion ability. We also assess life-stage-related variation of thermal tolerances to determine potential stage-related environmental sensitivity. The temperatures at which c. 20% of the population survived of B. dorsalis were determined to be -6.5°C and 42.7°C, respectively, when using 2h exposures. Further, four life stages of B. dorsalis (egg, 3rd instar larvae, pupae and adults) were exposed to high and low discriminating temperatures to compare their thermal survival rates. The egg stage was found to be the most resistant life stage to both high and low temperatures, since 44±2.3% survived the low and 60±4.2% survived the high discriminating temperature treatments respectively. Finally, the potential for adult hardening responses to mediate tolerance of extremes was also considered using a diverse range of acute conditions (using 2h exposures to 15°C, 10°C and 5°C and 30°C, 35°C, 37°C and 39°C as hardening temperatures, and some treatments with and without recovery periods between hardening and discriminating temperature treatment). These showed that although some significant hardening responses could be detected in certain treatments (e.g. after exposure to 37°C and 39°C), the magnitude of this plasticity was generally low compared to two other wide-spread and more geographically-range-restricted con-familial species, Ceratitis capitata and C. rosa. In other words, Bactrocera dorsalis adults were unable to rapidly heat- or cold-harden to the same extent as the other Ceratitis species examined to date. These results suggest a narrower thermal niche in B. dorsalis compared

  17. Anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine mediates its effect in the median raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yan; Inoue, Takeshi; Kitaichi, Yuji; Izumi, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Song, Ning; Chen, Chong; Li, XiaoBai; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-11-15

    Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), blocks the α2-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which are responsible for controlling noradrenaline and 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) release. Though preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mirtazapine exerts an anxiolytic action, its precise brain target sites remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the brain area(s) in which mirtazapine exerts its anxiolytic-like effects on the expression of contextual conditioned freezing in rats. Mirtazapine (3 μg/site) was directly injected into three brain structures, the median raphe nucleus (MRN), hippocampus and amygdala. Freezing behavior tests were carried out 10 min after injections. Our results showed that the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine reduced freezing significantly, whereas injections into the hippocampus or the amygdala did not. In addition, the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine did not affect locomotor activity. These results suggest that the anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine might be mediated by its action on the MRN.

  18. A pilot study on predictors of brainstem raphe abnormality in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Milutin; Munjiza, Ana; Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Novakovic, Ivana; Dobricic, Valerija; Tosevski, Dusica Lecic; Mijajlovic, Milija

    2017-02-01

    Hypo/anechogenicity of the brainstem raphe (BR) structures has been suggested as a possible transcranial parenchymal sonography (TCS) marker associated with depression. The aim of this study was to analyze possible association of the abnormal BR echogenicity in patients with major depression when compared to healthy controls, and to evaluate its clinical and genetic correlates. TCS was performed in 53 patients diagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD) without psychotic symptoms and in 54 healthy matched controls. The TCS detected BR abnormalities were significantly more frequent in MDD patients (35 out of 53; 66%) in comparison to matched controls (5 out of 56; 9%). The prevalence of short allele (s) homozygocity in the length polymorphism of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was significantly higher in MDD patients relative to those with normal BR echogenicity. A stepwise statistical discriminant analysis revealed statistically significant separation between MDD patients with and without BR abnormalities groups based on the four predictors combined: the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale item 5 ("difficulty in concentration, poor memory"), presence of social phobia, s allele homozygocity of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and presence of generalized anxiety disorder. Cross-sectional design and heterogenous treatment of depressed patients. Reduced BR echogenicity in at least a subgroup of MDD patients may reflect a particular phenotype, characterized by more prevalent comorbid anxiety disorders, associated with particular genetic polymorphisms and neurotransmitter(s) deficits, most probably altered serotonergic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extrasynaptic glycine receptors of rodent dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons: a sensitive target for ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Edward P; Mitchell, Elizabeth A; Greig, Scott J; Corteen, Nicole; Balfour, David J K; Swinny, Jerome D; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant medical and social problem. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in ethanol's actions, with certain receptors and ion channels emerging as putative targets. The dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus is associated with the behavioral actions of alcohol, but ethanol actions on these neurons are not well understood. Here, using immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology we characterize DR inhibitory transmission and its sensitivity to ethanol. DR neurons exhibit inhibitory 'phasic' post-synaptic currents mediated primarily by synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) and, to a lesser extent, by synaptic glycine receptors (GlyR). In addition to such phasic transmission mediated by the vesicular release of neurotransmitter, the activity of certain neurons may be governed by a 'tonic' conductance resulting from ambient GABA activating extrasynaptic GABAARs. However, for DR neurons extrasynaptic GABAARs exert only a limited influence. By contrast, we report that unusually the GlyR antagonist strychnine reveals a large tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GlyRs, which dominates DR inhibition. In agreement, for DR neurons strychnine increases their input resistance, induces membrane depolarization, and consequently augments their excitability. Importantly, this glycinergic conductance is greatly enhanced in a strychnine-sensitive fashion, by behaviorally relevant ethanol concentrations, by drugs used for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and by taurine, an ingredient of certain 'energy drinks' often imbibed with ethanol. These findings identify extrasynaptic GlyRs as critical regulators of DR excitability and a novel molecular target for ethanol.

  20. Increased mRNA expression of cytochrome oxidase in dorsal raphe nucleus of depressive suicide victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bahillo, A; Bautista-Hernandez, V; Barcia Gonzalez, Carlos; Bañon, R; Luna, A; Hirsch, EC; Herrero, Maria-Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a problem with important social repercussions. Some groups of the population show a higher risk of suicide; for example, depression, alcoholism, psychosis or drug abuse frequently precedes suicidal behavior. However, the relationship between metabolic alterations in the brain and premorbid clinical symptoms of suicide remains uncertain. The serotonergic and noradrenergic systems have frequently been, implicated in suicidal behavior and the amount of serotonin in the brain and CSF of suicide victims has been found to be low compared with normal subjects. However, there are contradictory results regarding the role of noradrenergic neurons in the mediation of suicide attempts, possibly reflecting the heterogeneity of conditions that lead to a common outcome. In the present work we focus on the subgroup of suicide victims that share a common diagnosis of major depression. Based on post-mortem studies analyzing mRNA expression by in situ hybridization, serotonergic neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) from depressive suicide victims are seen to over-express cytochrome oxidase mRNA. However, no corresponding changes were found in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA in the noradrenergic neurons of the Locus Coeruleus (LC). These results suggest that, despite of the low levels of serotonin described in suicide victims, the activity of DRN neurons could increase in the suicidally depressed, probably due to the over activation of serotonin re-uptake. No alteration was found in noradrenergic neurons, suggesting that they play no crucial role in the suicidal behavior of depressive patients. PMID:18728743

  1. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  2. Corticotropin-releasing factor in the dorsal raphe nucleus: Linking stress coping and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2010-02-16

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal levels of tryptophan hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the dorsal raphe of depressed suicide victims.

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    Bonkale, Willy L; Murdock, Shayna; Janosky, Janine E; Austin, Mark C

    2004-02-01

    A variety of evidence suggests that serotonin neurotransmission is altered in the brain of suicide victims and depressed patients. While numerous post-mortem studies have investigated serotonin transporters and receptors, few studies have examined the biosynthetic integrity of the rate-limiting enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), in post-mortem specimens of depressed suicide subjects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the levels of TPH immunoreactivity (IR) are altered in specific subnuclei of the dorsal raphe (DR) in depressed suicide victims. Suicide victims with a confirmed diagnosis of major depression were matched with non-psychiatric controls based on age, gender and post-mortem interval. Frozen tissue sections containing the DR were selected from two anatomical levels and processed for TPH radioimmunocytochemistry. The optical density corresponding to the regional levels of TPH-IR was quantified in specific subnuclei of the DR from the film autoradiographic images. No significant differences in the levels of TPH-IR were found in any DR subnuclei between depressed suicide victims and control subjects. The lack of change in TPH-IR levels does not necessarily imply that serotonin synthesis or neurotransmission is not altered in the brain of depressed subjects. Many factors influence and regulate serotonin synthesis, and it is conceivable that alterations exist at other levels of regulation of serotonin biosynthesis in depression. Our findings indicate that TPH biosynthesis, at least at the protein level, is not significantly altered in the DR of depressed suicide victims.

  4. Serotonergic versus Nonserotonergic Dorsal Raphe Projection Neurons: Differential Participation in Reward Circuitry

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    Ross A. McDevitt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN contains the largest group of serotonin-producing neurons in the brain and projects to regions controlling reward. Although pharmacological studies suggest that serotonin inhibits reward seeking, electrical stimulation of the DRN strongly reinforces instrumental behavior. Here, we provide a targeted assessment of the behavioral, anatomical, and electrophysiological contributions of serotonergic and nonserotonergic DRN neurons to reward processes. To explore DRN heterogeneity, we used a simultaneous two-vector knockout/optogenetic stimulation strategy, as well as cre-induced and cre-silenced vectors in several cre-expressing transgenic mouse lines. We found that the DRN is capable of reinforcing behavior primarily via nonserotonergic neurons, for which the main projection target is the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Furthermore, these nonserotonergic projections provide glutamatergic excitation of VTA dopamine neurons and account for a large majority of the DRN-VTA pathway. These findings help to resolve apparent discrepancies between the roles of serotonin versus the DRN in behavioral reinforcement.

  5. Biophysical properties and computational modeling of calcium spikes in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Tuckwell, Henry C

    2013-06-01

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nuclei, with their extensive innervation of nearly the whole brain have important modulatory effects on many cognitive and physiological processes. They play important roles in clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders. In order to quantify the effects of serotonergic transmission on target cells it is desirable to construct computational models and to this end these it is necessary to have details of the biophysical and spike properties of the serotonergic neurons. Here several basic properties are reviewed with data from several studies since the 1960s to the present. The quantities included are input resistance, resting membrane potential, membrane time constant, firing rate, spike duration, spike and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude, spike threshold, cell capacitance, soma and somadendritic areas. The action potentials of these cells are normally triggered by a combination of sodium and calcium currents which may result in autonomous pacemaker activity. We here analyse the mechanisms of high-threshold calcium spikes which have been demonstrated in these cells the presence of TTX (tetrodotoxin). The parameters for calcium dynamics required to give calcium spikes are quite different from those for regular spiking which suggests the involvement of restricted parts of the soma-dendritic surface as has been found, for example, in hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of the oxytocin receptor expressed in the rostral medullary raphe in thermoregulation during cold conditions

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    Yoshiyuki eKasahara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent papers have reported that oxytocin (Oxt and the oxytocin receptor (Oxtr may be involved in the regulation of food intake in mammals. We therefore suspected the Oxt/Oxtr system to be involved in energy homeostasis. In previous studies, we found a tendency toward obesity in Oxtr-deficient mice, as well as impaired thermoregulation when these mice were exposed to cold conditions. In the present study, we observed the expression of Oxtr in the rostral medullary raphe (RMR, the brain region known to control thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. Through immunohistochemistry, we detected neurons expressing Oxtr and c-Fos in the RMR of mice exposed to cold conditions. Up to 40% of Oxtr-positive neurons in RMR were classified as glutamatergic neurons, as shown by immunostaining using anti-VGLUT3 antibody. In addition, mice with exclusive expression of Oxtr in the RMR were generated by injecting an AAV-Oxtr vector into the RMR region of Oxtr-deficient mice. We confirmed the recovery of thermoregulatory ability in the manipulated mice during exposure to cold conditions. Moreover, mice with RMR-specific expression of Oxtr lost the typical morphological change in brown adipose tissue observed in Oxtr-deficient mice. Additionally, increased expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene, Adrb3 was observed in brown adipose tissue. These results are the first to show the critical role of RMR Oxtr expression in thermoregulation during cold conditions.

  7. Different actions for acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmission associated with raphe nuclei and their innervation cortical regions.

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    Yamamura, Satoshi; Abe, Masao; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ochi, Shinichiro; Ueno, Shu-ichi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-03-01

    The atypical antidepressant, mirtazapine enhances noradrenergic transmission, but its effects on serotonergic transmission remain to be clarified. The present study determined the effects of acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmissions in raphe nuclei and their innervation regions, frontal and entorhinal cortex, using multiple-probes microdialysis with real-time PCR and western blotting. Acute administration of mirtazapine did not affect extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei or cortex; however, chronic administration increased extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei without affecting that in cortex. Blockade of 5-HT1A receptor, but not that of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor, enhanced the effects of acute administration of mirtazapine on extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei. Chronic mirtazapine administration reduced the inhibitory function associated with somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but enhanced postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor in serotonergic innervated cortical regions. Chronic administration reduced the expression of mRNA and protein of serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but not in the cortices. These results suggested that acute administration of mirtazapine probably activated serotonergic transmission, but its stimulatory action was abolished by activated inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor. Chronic administration of mirtazapine resulted in increased extracellular serotonin level via reduction of serotonin transporter with reduction of somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptor function in raphe nuclei. These pharmacological actions of mirtazapine include its serotonergic profiles as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Nearctic-Caribbean species Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius, 1801: Larval descriptions with a diagnosis of immature Ctenodactylini and natural history notes on the genus and tribe (Coleoptera, Carabidae

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    Terry Erwin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adults and larvae of Leptotrachelus dorsalis (Fabricius, the Sugarcane Savior Beetle, live in association with grasses, the larvae in the appressed leaf axils. Both adult and larval L. dorsalis eat larvae of the Sugarcane Borer, Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, and perhaps other insects living in the confines of the leaf sheaths of that and other grass-like species. The geographic range of L. dorsalis extends from Kansas in the west to the Atlantic seaboard, north as far as Ontario, Canada and south to Cuba; it is an eastern species of North America and the Caribbean. Larval character attributes that are shared with a related ctenodactyline, Askalaphium depressum (Bates, provide a preliminary basis for characterization of the immatures of tribe Ctenodactylini.

  9. Study on Disinfestation of Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis using Vapor Heat Treatment on Gedong Gincu Mango

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    Rokhani Hasbullah

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the prohibition of chemical method for insect disinfestations processes such as ethylene dibromide in 1984, heat treatment method was developed as quarantine technology. One of the heat treatment methods is vapor heat treatment (VHT. The objectives of this research were to study mortality of fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis and to study the responses of VHT on quality of gedong gincu mango. Fruit fly mortality due to heat has been investigated by immersing fruit fly eggs into heated water at temperatures of 40, 43, 46 and 49OC for 30 minutes immersed, also at temperature of 46OC for 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes. Gedong gincu mangoes were treated at temperature 46.5OC for 0, 10, 20, and 30 minutes. The results showed that mortality has been achieved 100% at temperature more than and equal to 43OC for 30 minutes and at temperature 46OC for more than and equal to 10 minutes. The VHT has significantly and fungi population although without adversely affecting to the fruit quality and there were no significant change in the fruit weight loss, hardness, color, soluble solid content, water content, vitamin C and organoleptic test. VHT at temperature 46.5OC for 20 up to 30 minutes were effective to kill fruit flies inside mangoes and were able to maintaining mango quality during storage.

  10. Impacts of brain serotonin deficiency following Tph2 inactivation on development and raphe neuron serotonergic specification.

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    Lise Gutknecht

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT is implicated in a wide range of functions from basic physiological mechanisms to complex behaviors, including neuropsychiatric conditions, as well as in developmental processes. Increasing evidence links 5-HT signaling alterations during development to emotional dysregulation and psychopathology in adult age. To further analyze the importance of brain 5-HT in somatic and brain development and function, and more specifically differentiation and specification of the serotonergic system itself, we generated a mouse model with brain-specific 5-HT deficiency resulting from a genetically driven constitutive inactivation of neuronal tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2. Tph2 inactivation (Tph2-/- resulted in brain 5-HT deficiency leading to growth retardation and persistent leanness, whereas a sex- and age-dependent increase in body weight was observed in Tph2+/- mice. The conserved expression pattern of the 5-HT neuron-specific markers (except Tph2 and 5-HT demonstrates that brain 5-HT synthesis is not a prerequisite for the proliferation, differentiation and survival of raphe neurons subjected to the developmental program of serotonergic specification. Furthermore, although these neurons are unable to synthesize 5-HT from the precursor tryptophan, they still display electrophysiological properties characteristic of 5-HT neurons. Moreover, 5-HT deficiency induces an up-regulation of 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(1B receptors across brain regions as well as a reduction of norepinephrine concentrations accompanied by a reduced number of noradrenergic neurons. Together, our results characterize developmental, neurochemical, neurobiological and electrophysiological consequences of brain-specific 5-HT deficiency, reveal a dual dose-dependent role of 5-HT in body weight regulation and show that differentiation of serotonergic neuron phenotype is independent from endogenous 5-HT synthesis.

  11. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

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    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The role of the dorsal raphé nucleus in reward-seeking behavior

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    Kae eNakamura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological experiments have shown that the modulation of brain serotonin levels has a strong impact on value-based decision making. Anatomical and physiological evidence also revealed that the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN, a major source of serotonin, and the dopamine system receive common inputs from brain regions associated with appetitive and aversive information processing. The serotonin and dopamine systems also have reciprocal functional influences on each other. However, the specific mechanism by which serotonin affects value-based decision making is not clear.To understand the information carried by the DRN for reward-seeking behavior, we measured single neuron activity in the primate DRN during the performance of saccade tasks to obtain different amounts of a reward. We found that DRN neuronal activity was characterized by tonic modulation that was altered by the expected and received reward value. Consistent reward-dependent modulation across different task periods suggested that DRN activity kept track of the reward value throughout a trial. The DRN was also characterized by modulation of its activity in the opposite direction by different neuronal subgroups, one firing strongly for the prediction and receipt of large rewards, with the other firing strongly for small rewards. Conversely, putative dopamine neurons showed positive phasic responses to reward-indicating cues and the receipt of an unexpected reward amount, which supports the reward prediction error signal hypothesis of dopamine.I suggest that the tonic reward monitoring signal of the DRN, possibly together with its interaction with the dopamine system, reports a continuous level of motivation throughout the performance of a task. Such a signal may provide reward context information to the targets of DRN projections, where it may be integrated further with incoming motivationally salient information.

  13. Chronic excitotoxic lesion of the dorsal raphe nucleus induces sodium appetite

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    Cavalcante-Lima H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined if the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN exerts tonic control of basal and stimulated sodium and water intake. Male Wistar rats weighing 300-350 g were microinjected with phosphate buffer (PB-DRN, N = 11 or 1 µg/0.2 µl, in a single dose, ibotenic acid (IBO-DRN, N = 9 to 10 through a guide cannula into the DRN and were observed for 21 days in order to measure basal sodium appetite and water intake and in the following situations: furosemide-induced sodium depletion (20 mg/kg, sc, 24 h before the experiment and a low dose of dietary captopril (1 mg/g chow. From the 6th day after ibotenic acid injection IBO-DRN rats showed an increase in sodium appetite (12.0 ± 2.3 to 22.3 ± 4.6 ml 0.3 M NaCl intake whereas PB-DRN did not exceed 2 ml (P < 0.001. Water intake was comparable in both groups. In addition to a higher dipsogenic response, sodium-depleted IBO-DRN animals displayed an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake compared to PB-DRN (37.4 ± 3.8 vs 21.6 ± 3.9 ml 300 min after fluid offer, P < 0.001. Captopril added to chow caused an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake during the first 2 days (IBO-DRN, 33.8 ± 4.3 and 32.5 ± 3.4 ml on day 1 and day 2, respectively, vs 20.2 ± 2.8 ml on day 0, P < 0.001. These data support the view that DRN, probably via ascending serotonergic system, tonically modulates sodium appetite under basal and sodium depletion conditions and/or after an increase in peripheral or brain angiotensin II.

  14. Discovery of genes related to insecticide resistance in Bactrocera dorsalis by functional genomic analysis of a de novo assembled transcriptome.

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    Ju-Chun Hsu

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance has recently become a critical concern for control of many insect pest species. Genome sequencing and global quantization of gene expression through analysis of the transcriptome can provide useful information relevant to this challenging problem. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is one of the world's most destructive agricultural pests, and recently it has been used as a target for studies of genetic mechanisms related to insecticide resistance. However, prior to this study, the molecular data available for this species was largely limited to genes identified through homology. To provide a broader pool of gene sequences of potential interest with regard to insecticide resistance, this study uses whole transcriptome analysis developed through de novo assembly of short reads generated by next-generation sequencing (NGS. The transcriptome of B. dorsalis was initially constructed using Illumina's Solexa sequencing technology. Qualified reads were assembled into contigs and potential splicing variants (isotigs. A total of 29,067 isotigs have putative homologues in the non-redundant (nr protein database from NCBI, and 11,073 of these correspond to distinct D. melanogaster proteins in the RefSeq database. Approximately 5,546 isotigs contain coding sequences that are at least 80% complete and appear to represent B. dorsalis genes. We observed a strong correlation between the completeness of the assembled sequences and the expression intensity of the transcripts. The assembled sequences were also used to identify large numbers of genes potentially belonging to families related to insecticide resistance. A total of 90 P450-, 42 GST-and 37 COE-related genes, representing three major enzyme families involved in insecticide metabolism and resistance, were identified. In addition, 36 isotigs were discovered to contain target site sequences related to four classes of resistance genes. Identified sequence motifs were also

  15. Identification of Male- and Female-Specific Olfaction Genes in Antennae of the Oriental Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis is a species of tephritid fruit fly, endemic to Southeast Asia but also introduced to many regions of the US, and it is one of the major pest species with a broad host range of cultivated and wild fruits. Although males of B. dorsalis respond strongly to methyl eugenol and this is used for monitoring and estimating populations, the molecular mechanism of the oriental fruit fly olfaction has not been elucidated yet. Therefore, in this project, using next generation sequencing technologies, we sequenced the transcriptome of the antennae of male and female adults of B. dorsalis. We identified a total of 20 candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs, 5 candidate chemosensory proteins (CSPs, 35 candidate odorant receptors (ORs, 12 candidate ionotropic receptors (IRs and 4 candidate sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs. The sex-specific expression of these genes was determined and a subset of 9 OR genes was further characterized by qPCR with male and female antenna, head, thorax, abdomen, leg and wing samples. In the male antennae, 595 genes showed a higher expression, while 128 genes demonstrated a higher expression in the female antennae. Interestingly, 2 ORs (BdorOR13 and BdorOR14 were highly and specifically expressed in the antennae of males, and 4 ORs (BdorOR13, BdorOR16, BdorOR18 and BdorOR35 clustered with DmOR677, suggesting pheromone reception. We believe this study with these antennae-enriched OBPs, CSPs, ORs, IRs and SNMPs can play an important role in the detection of pheromones and general odorants, and so in turn our data improve our current understanding of insect olfaction at the molecular level and provide important information for disrupting the behavior of the oriental fruit fly using chemical communication methods.

  16. The Alteration of Neonatal Raphe Neurons by Prenatal-Perinatal Nicotine. Meaning for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

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    Cerpa, Verónica J; Aylwin, María de la Luz O; Beltrán-Castillo, Sebastián; Bravo, Eduardo U; Llona, Isabel R; Richerson, George B; Eugenín, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine may link maternal cigarette smoking with respiratory dysfunctions in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure blunts ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and reduces central respiratory chemoreception in mouse neonates at Postnatal Days 0 (P0) to P3. This suggests that raphe neurons, which are altered in SIDS and contribute to central respiratory chemoreception, may be affected by nicotine. We therefore investigated whether prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure affects the activity, electrical properties, and chemosensitivity of raphe obscurus (ROb) neurons in mouse neonates. Osmotic minipumps, implanted subcutaneously in 5- to 7-day-pregnant CF1 mice, delivered nicotine bitartrate (60 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or saline (control) for up to 28 days. In neonates, ventilation was recorded by head-out plethysmography, c-Fos (neuronal activity marker), or serotonin autoreceptors (5HT1AR) were immunodetected using light microscopy, and patch-clamp recordings were made from raphe neurons in brainstem slices under normocarbia and hypercarbia. Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure decreased the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses at P1-P5, reduced both the number of c-Fos-positive ROb neurons during eucapnic normoxia at P1-P3 and their hypercapnia-induced recruitment at P3, increased 5HT1AR immunolabeling of ROb neurons at P3-P5, and reduced the spontaneous firing frequency of ROb neurons at P3 without affecting their CO2 sensitivity or their passive and active electrical properties. These findings reveal that prenatal-perinatal nicotine reduces the activity of neonatal ROb neurons, likely as a consequence of increased expression of 5HT1ARs. This hypoactivity may change the functional state of the respiratory neural network leading to breathing vulnerability and chemosensory failure as seen in SIDS.

  17. Snca and Bdnf gene expression in the VTA and raphe nuclei of midbrain in chronically victorious and defeated male mice.

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    Natalia N Kudryavtseva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn is a small neuronal protein that has been found to be expressed throughout the brain. It has been shown that α-Syn regulates the homeostasis of monoamine neurotransmitters and is involved in various degenerative and affective disorders. There is indication that α-Syn may regulate expression of the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF which plays an important role in the mood disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study aimed to analyze the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and raphe nuclei of the midbrain in male mice that had each won or defeated 20 encounters (20-time winners and 20-time losers, respectively in daily agonistic interactions. Groups of animals that had the same winning and losing track record followed by a no-fight period for 14 days (no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers were also studied. Snca mRNA levels were increased in the raphe nuclei in the 20-time losers and in the VTA of the 20-time winners. After no-fight period Snca mRNA levels decreased in both groups. Snca mRNA levels were similar to the control level in the VTA of the 20-time losers and in the raphe nuclei of the 20-time winners. However Snca gene expression increased in these areas in the no-fighting winners and no-fighting losers in comparison with respective mRNA levels in animals before no-fight period. Bdnf mRNA levels increased in VTA of 20-time winners. Significant positive correlations were found between the mRNA levels of Snca and Bdnf genes in the raphe nuclei. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Social experience affects Snca gene expression depending on brain areas and functional activity of monoaminergic systems in chronically victorious or defeated mice. These findings may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of forming different alpha-synucleinopathies.

  18. Colgajo tendinocutáneo vascularizado de dorsalis pedis: caso clínico

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    F. Martínez Martínez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Los grandes accidentes que afectan a la mano suelen cursar con daños en más de un tejido. Son frecuentes las exposiciones óseas, fracturas, lesiones tendinosas y pérdidas de cobertura cutánea, lo que supone un importante problema para la cirugía reconstructiva. Las técnicas quirúrgicas para afrontar estas lesiones múltiples pueden reunirse en tres grupos: A múltiples procedimientos escalonados, B procedimientos únicos parcialmente vascularizados, C procedimientos únicos totalmente vascularizados. Aquellas en las que en un primer tiempo se realiza cobertura cutánea y en un segundo tiempo se procede al injerto tendinoso, acarrean problemas relacionados con rigideces, dificultad en el cálculo de la longitud del injerto tendinoso debido a retracción muscular y adherencias tendinosas. Un colgajo muy utilizado para la reparación de este tipo de lesiones ha sido el del dorsalis pedis; muchos autores rechazan su uso como colgajo debido a varios inconvenientes: anatomía variable de la zona donante, disección tediosa y sobre todo, elevada morbilidad de la zona donante. Sin embargo, puede ser usado como colgajo tendinocutáneo ya que proporciona cuatro tendones vascularizados de adecuada longitud cubiertos por completo de epitenón y unidos de manera holgada a una piel que es muy similar a la del dorso de la mano. Además, el tendón vascularizado reduce el problema de adherencias que ocurre con los colgajos tendinosos simples. Presentamos un caso de traumatismo severo de la mano con afectación completa de los tendones extensores.

  19. From eradication to containment: invasion of French Polynesia by Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and releases of two natural enemies: a 17-year case study

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    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), was discovered on Tahiti Island, French Polynesia, in 1996. Two other economically important Bactrocera species were previously established: B. kirki (Froggatt) in 1928, and B. tryoni (Froggatt), Queensland fruit fly, in 1970. This situation provi...

  20. Di- and Tri-flourinated analogs of methyl eugenol: attractiveness to and metabolism in the oriental fruit fly, bactrocera dorsalis (hendel)

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    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), males are highly 1 attracted to the natural phenylpropanoid methyl eugenol (ME). They compulsively feed on ME and metabolize it to ring and side-chain hydroxylated compounds that have both pheromonal and allomonal properties. Previously, we demonstra...

  1. Characterizing the developmental transcriptome of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) through comparative genomic analysis with Drosophila melanogaster utilizing modENCODE datasets

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    Background The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest of fruit and vegetable crops throughout Asia, and is considered a high risk pest for establishment in the mainland United States. It is a member of the family Tephritidae, which are the most agriculturally important family ...

  2. De novo cloning and annotation of genes associated with immunity, detoxification and energy metabolism from the fat body of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Wen-Jia Yang

    Full Text Available The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive pest in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, we performed transcriptome-wide analysis of the fat body of B. dorsalis and obtained more than 59 million sequencing reads, which were assembled into 27,787 unigenes with an average length of 591 bp. Among them, 17,442 (62.8% unigenes matched known proteins in the NCBI database. The assembled sequences were further annotated with gene ontology, cluster of orthologous group terms, and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. In depth analysis was performed to identify genes putatively involved in immunity, detoxification, and energy metabolism. Many new genes were identified including serpins, peptidoglycan recognition proteins and defensins, which were potentially linked to immune defense. Many detoxification genes were identified, including cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. Many new transcripts possibly involved in energy metabolism, including fatty acid desaturases, lipases, alpha amylases, and trehalose-6-phosphate synthases, were identified. Moreover, we randomly selected some genes to examine their expression patterns in different tissues by quantitative real-time PCR, which indicated that some genes exhibited fat body-specific expression in B. dorsalis. The identification of a numerous transcripts in the fat body of B. dorsalis laid the foundation for future studies on the functions of these genes.

  3. The effect of dietary restriction on longevity, fecundity, and antioxidant responses in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

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    Chen, Er-Hu; Wei, Dong; Wei, Dan-Dan; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies in fruit flies have imposed dietary restriction (DR) by diluting yeast and have reported increased lifespan as the yeast-to-sugar ratio decreased. In this study, the effects of DR on the lifespan of Bactrocera dorsalis were investigated using constant-feeding diets with different yeast:sugar ratios and an intermittent-feeding diet in which flies ate every sixth day. Antioxidant enzyme activities and the malondialdehyde concentration were also measured in virgin females under constant-feeding DR protocols to investigate their relationships with lifespan. The results showed that B. dorsalis lifespan was significantly extended by DR, and carbohydrate-enriched diet may be important for lifespan-extension. Female flies lived significantly longer than males at all dietary levels under both feeding regimes, indicating no interaction between diet and sex in determining lifespan. Antioxidant enzyme activities increased with the amount of yeast increased in the diets (0-4.76%) between starvation and DR treatments, indicating that the antioxidants may have influences in determining lifespan in B. dorsalis under starvation and DR treatments. However, antioxidants cannot keep up with increased oxidative damage induced by the high yeast diet (25%). These results revealed that the extension of lifespan by DR is evolutionarily conserved in B. dorsalis and that yeast:sugar ratios significantly modulate lifespan in this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Function of the natalisin receptor in mating of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and identification of agonists/antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalisins (NTLs) are conservative neuropeptides, which are only found in arthropods and have been documented to regulate reproductive behaviors in insect species. In our previous study, we have confirmed NTL regulates the reproductive process in an important agricultural pest, Bactrocera dorsalis ...

  5. A review of recorded host plants of Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera (Bactrocera)dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera (Bactrocera) dorsalis (Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the Oriental fruit fly, is regulated through the Plant Protection Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7701-7772) and relevant Parts and Subparts of the Code of Federal Regulations (7 CFR – Agriculture). Presented herein is a compre...

  6. A revision of the Crane-fly genus Nephrotoma Meigen, 1803, in North America (Diptera, Tipulidae). Part II: the non-dorsalis species-groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbroek, Pjotr

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen nearctic species of Nephrotoma are revised. They are assigned to seven species-groups. Together with the 20 species of the dorsalis-group (Tangelder, 1983), this covers all the nearctic Nephrotoma species. Presented here for every species are: literature, type-material, synonyms,

  7. Short-term cold exposure activates TRH neurons exclusively in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and raphe pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Agustina; Valdivia, Spring; Reynaldo, Mirta; Cyr, Nicole E; Nillni, Eduardo A; Perello, Mario

    2012-06-19

    The neuropeptide thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is necessary for adequate cold-induced thermogenesis. TRH increases body temperature via both neuroendocrine and autonomic mechanisms. TRH neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulate thermogenesis through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during cold exposure. However, little is known about the role that TRH neurons play in mediating the sympathetic response to cold exposure. Here, we examined the response of TRH neurons of rats to cold exposure in hypothalamic regions including the PVN, the dorsomedial nucleus and the lateral hypothalamus along with areas of the ventral medulla including raphe obscurus, raphe pallidus (RPa) and parapyramidal regions. Our results using a double immunohistochemistry protocol to identify TRH and c-Fos (as a marker of cellular activity) followed by analysis of preproTRH gene expression demonstrate that only TRH neurons located in the PVN and the RPa are activated in animals exposed to short-term cold conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for involvement of the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus in urine storage and penile erection in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Ogawa, Y; Hatano, T; Koyama, Y; Miyazato, T; Oda, M

    1998-06-01

    Micturition and male sexual activity require the lower urinary tract to function. During the sexual act, micturition must be inhibited and urine stored in the bladder. We studied the role of the brainstem in relation to both micturition/urine storage and penile erection in rats. Wire electrodes were placed on the dorsal nerve of the penis and microelectrodes for stimulation were introduced into the brainstem in decerebrate male rats. Electrical stimulation was used to locate optimally responding sites by monitoring the isovolumetric intravesical pressure and intracavernous pressure. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis, the subcoeruleus nucleus in the rostral pons, and the nucleus raphe magnus in the caudal pons increased intracavernous pressure, but inhibited rhythmic bladder contractions. Electrical stimulation of Barrington's nucleus (the pontine micturition center in the rat) in the rostral pons induced bladder contraction. Stimulation of the pontine reticular formation did not increase intracavernous pressure. Acute transection of the thoracic spinal cord eliminated rhythmic bladder contractions, but gave rise to sporadic increments of intracavernous pressure. This electrophysiological study demonstrated that the subcoeruleus nucleus and nucleus raphe magnus are involved in both urine storage and penile erection, and that their physiological functions are reciprocally controlled; so that erection leads to inhibition of micturition.

  9. Motherhood and infant contact regulate neuroplasticity in the serotonergic midbrain dorsal raphe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschbach, M Allie; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2017-02-01

    The adult brain shows remarkable neuroplasticity in response to hormones and the socioemotional modifications that they influence. In females with reproductive and maternal experience, this neuroplasticity includes the birth and death of cells in several forebrain regions involved in maternal caregiving and postpartum affective state. Such plasticity in midbrain sites critical for these behavioral and emotional processes has never been examined, though. By visualizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotic cells, NeuroD for neuronal precursors, and TUNEL to identify dying cells, we found that the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DR, the source of most ascending serotoninergic projections) exhibited significant neuroplasticity in response to motherhood. Specifically, BrdU analyses revealed that DR newborn cell survival (but not proliferation) was regulated by reproductive state, such that cells born early postpartum were less likely to survive 12 days to reach the late postpartum period compared to cells born during late pregnancy that survived 12 days to reach the early postpartum period. Many of the surviving cells in the DR were NeuN immunoreactive, suggesting a neuronal phenotype. Consistent with these findings, late postpartum rats had fewer NeuroD-immunoreactive DR cells than early postpartum rats. Maternal experience contributed to the late postpartum reduction in DR newborn cell survival because removing the litter at parturition increased cell survival as well as reduced cell death. Unlike cytogenesis in the maternal hippocampus, which is reduced by circulating glucocorticoids, DR newborn cell survival was unaffected by postpartum adrenalectomy. These effects of reproductive state and motherhood on DR plasticity were associated with concurrent changes in DR levels of serotonin's precursor, 5-HTP, and its metabolite, 5-HIAA. Our results demonstrate for the first time that cytogenesis occurs in the midbrain DR of any adult mammal, that DR plasticity is

  10. The role of the transformer gene in sex determination and reproduction in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Zheng, Wenping; Handler, Alfred M; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-12-01

    Transformer (tra) is a switch gene in the somatic sex-determination hierarchy that regulates sexual dimorphism based on RNA splicing in many insects. In tephritids, a Y-linked male determining gene (M) controls sex in the sex-determination pathway. Here, homologues of Drosophila tra and transformer-2 (tra-2) genes were isolated and characterized in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most destructive agricultural insect pests in many Asian countries. Two male-specific and one female-specific isoforms of B. dorsalis transformer (Bdtra) were identified. The presence of multiple TRA/TRA-2 binding sites in Bdtra suggests that the TRA/TRA-2 proteins are splicing regulators promoting and maintaining, epigenetically, female sex determination by a tra positive feedback loop in XX individuals during development. The expression patterns of female-specific Bdtra transcripts during early embryogenesis shows that a peak appears at 15 h after egg laying. Using dsRNA to knock-down Bdtra expression in the embryo and adult stages, we showed that sexual formation is determined early in the embryo stage and that parental RNAi does not lead to the production of all male progeny as in Tribolium castaneum. RNAi results from adult abdominal dsRNA injections show that Bdtra has a positive influence on female yolk protein gene (Bdyp1) expression and fecundity.

  11. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of BdFoxO gene in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Bei; Yang, Wen-Jia; Xie, Yi-Fei; Xu, Kang-Kang; Tian, Yi; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-03-10

    The forkhead box O transcription factor (FoxO) is an important downstream transcription factor in the well-conserved insulin signaling pathway, which regulates the body size and development of insects. In this study, the FoxO gene (BdFoxO) was identified from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The open reading frame of BdFoxO (2732 bp) encoded a 910 amino acid protein, and the sequence was well conserved with other insect species. The BdFoxO was highly expressed in larvae and pupae among different development stages, and the highest tissue-specific expression level was found in the fat bodies compared to the testis, ovary, head, thorax, midgut, and Malpighian tubules of adults. Interestingly, we found BdFoxO expression was also up-regulated by starvation, but down-regulated when re-fed. Moreover, the injection of BdFoxO double-stranded RNAs into third-instar larvae significantly reduced BdFoxO transcript levels, which in turn down-regulated the expression of other four genes in the insulin signaling pathway. The silencing of BdFoxO resulted in delayed pupation, and the insect body weight increased significantly compared with that of the control. These results suggested that BdFoxO plays an important role in body size and development in B. dorsalis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Field Estimates of Attraction of Ceratitis capitata to Trimedlure and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Methyl Eugenol in Varying Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukis, Nicholas C; Siderhurst, Matthew; Jang, Eric B

    2015-06-01

    Measuring and modeling the attractiveness of semiochemical-baited traps is of significant importance to detection, delimitation, and control of invasive pests. Here, we describe the results of field mark-release-recapture experiments with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) to estimate the relationship between distance from a trap baited with trimedlure and methyl eugenol, respectively, and probability of capture for a receptive male insect. Experiments were conducted using a grid of traps with a central release point at two sites on Hawaii Island, a Macadamia orchard on the East side of the island and a lava field on the West side. We found that for B. dorsalis and methyl eugenol there is a 65% probability of capture at ∼36 m from a single trap, regardless of habitat. For C. capitata, we found a 65% probability of capture at a distance of ∼14 m from a single trap in the orchard and 7 m in the lava field. We also present results on the spatial and temporal pattern of recaptures. The attraction data are analyzed via a hyperbolic secant-based capture probability model. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Feeding ecology of immature Lithodoras dorsalis (Valenciennes, 1840 (Siluriformes: Doradidae in a tidal environment, estuary of the rio Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Augusto Pedroso Barbosa

    Full Text Available Studies of feeding ecology are important for the evaluation of interactive processes in fish communities. This study evaluated the feeding ecology of Lithodoras dorsalis (Doradidae from streams within the Amazon estuary delta (Brazil, a macro-tidal area, on different pluviometric periods. A total of 371 young specimens was collected during 12 months of sampling (July 2010 to June 2011. The species diet was composed of 28 food items analyzed by Repletion Index, Alimentary Index and Niche Breadth. Young L. dorsalis was classified as herbivore with a frugivory tendency due to the high importance of fruit and seeds in its diet. Food intake varied among sampled months, with the lowest intake being recorded during the rainy-dry season transition period, and the highest at the beginning of the dry season. The importance of food items and the composition of the diet were different throughout the year, probably due to the daily tides that allow fish to access new environments and the pluviometric periods. These results provide important data on the feeding ecology of Amazonian doradids. The study also emphasized the importance of allochthonous resources, derived from the riparian forest, which reinforces the importance of this habitat for the conservation of Neotropical freshwater fishes.

  14. Spatial Analysis of the Neuronal Density of Aminergic Brainstem Nuclei in Primary Neurodegenerative and Vascular Dementia: A Comparative Immunocytochemical and Quantitative Study Using a Graph Method

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    Yan Yang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph method was employed to analyse spatial neuronal patterns of pontine nuclei with ascending aminergic projections to the forebrain (nucleus centralis superior (NCS, raphes dorsalis (NRD and locus coeruleus (LC, in Alzheimer disease (AD, Huntington disease (HD, and vascular (VD as well as “mixed‐type” (VA dementia, compared with non‐demented controls (CO and a small sample of brains from schizophrenics (“dementia praecox” (DP. The quantitative evaluations by the “minimal spanning tree (MST” were complemented by rough neurofibrillary tangle (NFT counts and by semiquantitative immunohistochemical assessment of amyloid deposition, neuritic plaque formation, and cellular gliosis. The AD cases showed a significant decline of neuronal density in all nuclei examined, as compared with controls and DP. Neuronal loss was not significant in VD, while the mixed cases with both vascular and Alzheimer‐type pathology exhibited pronounced changes of neuronal density. Amyloid deposition occurred almost exclusively in AD and VA, as a rule, being of moderate degree, except for two presenile AD cases where it was marked. NFT were significantly increased in all nuclei in AD and in the VA cases, while they only occasionally appeared beyond age 55 in HD, DP and CO. The four HD cases showed in the NCS and NRD neuronal loss as severe as in AD. This neuronal loss implicates impairment of serotoninergic and noradrenergic neuromodulation as one basic mechanism promoting dementia in AD, VA and perhaps in HD.

  15. Cytogenetic and symbiont analysis of five members of the B. dorsalis complex (Diptera, Tephritidae): no evidence of chromosomal or symbiont-based speciation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Drosopoulou, Elena; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Asimakis, Elias D; Cáceres, Carlos; Tsiamis, George; Bourtzis, Kostas; Penelope Mavragani-Tsipidou; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2015-01-01

    The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, currently comprising about 90 entities has received much attention. During the last decades, considerable effort has been devoted to delimiting the species of the complex. This information is of great importance for agriculture and world trade, since the complex harbours several pest species of major economic importance and other species that could evolve into global threats. Speciation in Diptera is usually accompanied by chromosomal rearrangements, particularly inversions that are assumed to reduce/eliminate gene flow. Other candidates currently receiving much attention regarding their possible involvement in speciation are reproductive symbionts, such as Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, Arsenophonus, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Such symbionts tend to spread quickly through natural populations and can cause a variety of phenotypes that promote pre-mating and/or post-mating isolation and, in addition, can affect the biology, physiology, ecology and evolution of their insect hosts in various ways. Considering all these aspects, we present: (a) a summary of the recently gained knowledge on the cytogenetics of five members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, namely Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera carambolae, supplemented by additional data from a Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. colony from China, as well as by a cytogenetic comparison between the dorsalis complex and the genetically close species, Bactrocera tryoni, and, (b) a reproductive symbiont screening of 18 different colonized populations of these five taxa. Our analysis did not reveal any chromosomal rearrangements that could differentiate among them. Moreover, screening for reproductive symbionts was negative for all colonies derived from different geographic origins and/or hosts. There are many different factors that can lead to speciation, and our data do not support chromosomal and/or symbiotic

  16. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hsin Chiu

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+ were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB, and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  17. Upregulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus-prefrontal cortex serotonin system by chronic treatment with escitalopram in hyposerotonergic Wistar-Kyoto rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, Makiko; Kawahara, Yukie; Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sotogaku, Naoki; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Folgering, Joost H. A.; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats are sensitive to chronic stressors and exhibit depression-like behavior. Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons projecting to the prefrontal cortex (PFC) comprise the important neurocircuitry underlying the pathophysiology of depression. To evaluate the DRN-PFC

  18. Homologous expression of the nrdF gene of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes strain ATCC 6872 generates a manganese-metallocofactor (R2F) and a stable tyrosyl radical (Y˙) involved in ribonucleotide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Patrick; Barckhausen, Olaf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Knobbe, Nadine; Vogt, Carla; Pierik, Antonio J; Cox, Nicholas; Schmidt, Peter P; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Auling, Georg

    2010-12-01

    Ribonucleotide reduction, the unique step in the pathway to DNA synthesis, is catalyzed by enzymes via radical-dependent redox chemistry involving an array of diverse metallocofactors. The nucleotide reduction gene (nrdF) encoding the metallocofactor containing small subunit (R2F) of the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes ribonucleotide reductase was reintroduced into strain C. ammoniagenes ATCC 6872. Efficient homologous expression from plasmid pOCA2 using the tac-promotor enabled purification of R2F to homogeneity. The chromatographic protocol provided native R2F with a high ratio of manganese to iron (30:1), high activity (69 μmol 2'-deoxyribonucleotide·mg⁻¹ ·min⁻¹) and distinct absorption at 408 nm, characteristic of a tyrosyl radical (Y˙), which is sensitive to the radical scavenger hydroxyurea. A novel enzyme assay revealed the direct involvement of Y˙ in ribonucleotide reduction because 0.2 nmol 2'-deoxyribonucleotide was formed, driven by 0.4 nmol Y˙ located on R2F. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated a tyrosyl radical at an effective g-value of 2.004. Temperature dependent X/Q-band EPR studies revealed that this radical is coupled to a metallocofactor. Similarities of the native C. ammoniagenes ribonucleotide reductase to the in vitro activated Escherichia coli class Ib enzyme containing a dimanganese(III)-tyrosyl metallocofactor are discussed. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  19. RNA interference of four genes in adult Bactrocera dorsalis by feeding their dsRNAs.

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    Xiaoxue Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA interference (RNAi is a powerful method to inhibit gene expression in a sequence specific manner. Recently silencing the target gene through feeding has been successfully carried out in many insect species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Escherichia coli strain HT115 was genetically engineered to express dsRNA targeting genes that encode ribosomal protein Rpl19, V type ATPase D subunit, the fatty acid elongase Noa and a small GTPase Rab11. qRT-PCR showed that mRNA level of four target genes was reduced compared to ds-egfp control by feeding either engineered bacteria or dsRNAs. The maximum down-regulation of each gene varied from 35% to 100%. Tissue specific examination indicated that RNAi could be observed not only in midgut but also in other tissues like the ovary, nervous system and fat body. Silencing of rab11 through ingestion of dsRNA killed 20% of adult flies. Egg production was affected through feeding ds-noa and ds-rab11 compared to ds-egfp group. Adult flies were continuously fed with dsRNA and bacteria expressing dsRNA for 14 days and up-regulations of target genes were observed during this process. The transcripts of noa showed up-regulation compared to ds-egfp control group in four tissues on day 7 after continuous feeding either dsRNA or engineered bacteria. The maximum over-expression is 21 times compared to ds-egfp control group. Up-regulation of rab11 mRNA level could be observed in testes on day 7 after continuous bacteria treatment and in midgut on day 2 after ds-rab11 treatment. This phenomenon could also be observed in rpl19 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested that it is feasible to silence genes by feeding dsRNA and bacteria expressing dsRNA in Bactrocera dorsalis. Additionally the over-expression of the target gene after continuously feeding dsRNA or bacteria was observed.

  20. Computational modeling of spike generation in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, Henry C; Penington, Nicholas J

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus, with their extensive innervation of limbic and higher brain regions and interactions with the endocrine system have important modulatory or regulatory effects on many cognitive, emotional and physiological processes. They have been strongly implicated in responses to stress and in the occurrence of major depressive disorder and other psychiatric disorders. In order to quantify some of these effects, detailed mathematical models of the activity of such cells are required which describe their complex neurochemistry and neurophysiology. We consider here a single-compartment model of these neurons which is capable of describing many of the known features of spike generation, particularly the slow rhythmic pacemaking activity often observed in these cells in a variety of species. Included in the model are 11 kinds of ion channels: a fast sodium current INa, a delayed rectifier potassium current IKDR, a transient potassium current IA, a slow non-inactivating potassium current IM, a low-threshold calcium current IT, two high threshold calcium currents IL and IN, small and large conductance potassium currents ISK and IBK, a hyperpolarization-activated cation current IH and a leak current ILeak. In Sections 3-8, each current type is considered in detail and parameters estimated from voltage clamp data where possible. Three kinds of model are considered for the BK current and two for the leak current. Intracellular calcium ion concentration Cai is an additional component and calcium dynamics along with buffering and pumping is discussed in Section 9. The remainder of the article contains descriptions of computed solutions which reveal both spontaneous and driven spiking with several parameter sets. Attention is focused on the properties usually associated with these neurons, particularly long duration of action potential, steep upslope on the leading edge of spikes, pacemaker-like spiking, long-lasting afterhyperpolarization

  1. Evaluation of endogenous references for gene expression profiling in different tissues of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae

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    Wang Jin-Jun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR has been widely used for quantification of mRNA as a way to determine key genes involved in different biological processes. For accurate gene quantification analysis, normalization of RT-qPCR data is absolutely essential. To date, normalization is most frequently achieved by the use of internal controls, often referred to as reference genes. However, several studies have shown that the reference genes used for the quantification of mRNA expression can be affected by the experimental set-up or cell type resulting in variation of the expression level of these key genes. Therefore, the evaluation of reference genes is critical for gene expression profiling, which is often neglected in gene expression studies of insects. For this purpose, ten candidate reference genes were investigated in three different tissues (midgut, Malpighian tubules, and fat body of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel. Results Two different programs, geNorm and Normfinder, were used to analyze the data. According to geNorm, α-TUB + ACT5 are the most appropriate reference genes for gene expression profiling across the three different tissues in the female flies, while ACT3 + α-TUB are considered as the best for males. Furthermore, we evaluated the stability of the candidate reference genes to determine the sexual differences in the same tissue. In the midgut and Malpighian tubules, ACT2 + α-TUB are the best choice for both males and females. However, α-TUB + ACT1 are the best pair for fat body. Meanwhile, the results calculated by Normfinder are quite the same as the results with geNorm; α-TUB is always one of the most stable genes in each sample validated by the two programs. Conclusions In this study, we validated the suitable reference genes for gene expression profiling in different tissues of B. dorsalis. Moreover, appropriate reference genes were selected out for gene

  2. TrkB Signaling in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus is Essential for Antidepressant Efficacy and Normal Aggression Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Megumi; Autry, Anita E; Mahgoub, Melissa; Suzuki, Kanzo; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), have important roles in neural plasticity and are required for antidepressant efficacy. Studies examining the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in depression and antidepressant efficacy have largely focused on the limbic system, leaving it unclear whether this signaling is important in other brain regions. BDNF and TrkB are both highly expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a brain region that has been suggested to have a role in depression and antidepressant action, although it is unknown whether BDNF and TrkB in the dorsal raphe nucleus are involved in these processes. We combined the adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system to selectively knock down either Bdnf or TrkB in the DRN. These mice were then characterized in several behavioral paradigms including measures of depression-related behavior and antidepressant efficacy. We show that knockdown of TrkB, but not Bdnf, in the DRN results in loss of antidepressant efficacy and increased aggression-related behavior. We also show that knockdown of TrkB or Bdnf in this brain region does not have an impact on weight, activity levels, anxiety, or depression-related behaviors. These data reveal a critical role for TrkB signaling in the DRN in mediating antidepressant responses and normal aggression behavior. The results also suggest a non-cell autonomous role for BDNF in the DRN in mediating antidepressant efficacy.

  3. Characterization of a β-Adrenergic-Like Octopamine Receptor in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel

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    Hui-Min Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The biogenic amine octopamine plays a critical role in the regulation of many physiological processes in insects. Octopamine transmits its action through a set of specific G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely octopamine receptors. Here, we report on a β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor gene (BdOctβR1 from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, a destructive agricultural pest that occurs in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. As indicated by RT-qPCR, BdOctβR1 was highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and Malpighian tubules (MT in the adult flies, suggesting it may undertake important roles in neural signaling in the CNS as well as physiological functions in the MT of this fly. Furthermore, its ligand specificities were tested in a heterologous expression system where BdOctβR1 was expressed in HEK-293 cells. Based on cyclic AMP response assays, we found that BdOctβR1 could be activated by octopamine in a concentration-dependent manner, confirming that this receptor was functional, while tyramine and dopamine had much less potency than octopamine. Naphazoline possessed the highest agonistic activity among the tested agonists. In antagonistic assays, mianserin had the strongest activity and was followed by phentolamine and chlorpromazine. Furthermore, when the flies were kept under starvation, there was a corresponding increase in the transcript level of BdOctβR1, while high or low temperature stress could not induce significant expression changes. The above results suggest that BdOctβR1 may be involved in the regulation of feeding processes in Bactrocera dorsalis and may provide new potential insecticide leads targeting octopamine receptors.

  4. MicroRNAs in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis: extending Drosophilid miRNA conservation to the Tephritidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, Bernarda; Geib, Scott M

    2015-10-05

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important plant pest species in the family Tephritidae. It is a phytophagous species with broad host range, and while not established in the mainland United States, is a species of great concern for introduction. Despite the vast amount of information available from the closely related model organism Drosophila melanogaster, information at the genome and transcriptome level is still very limited for this species. Small RNAs act as regulatory molecules capable of determining transcript levels in the cells. The most studied small RNAs are micro RNAs, which may impact as much as 30 % of all protein coding genes in animals. We have sequenced small RNAs (sRNAs) from the Tephritid fruit fly, B. dorsalis (oriental fruit fly), specifically sRNAs corresponding to the 17 to 28 nucleotides long fraction of total RNA. Sequencing yielded more than 16 million reads in total. Seventy five miRNAs orthologous to known miRNAs were identified, as well as five additional novel miRNAs that might be specific to the genera, or to the Tephritid family. We constructed a gene expression profile for the identified miRNAs, and used comparative analysis with D. melanogaster to support our expression data. In addition, several miRNA clusters were identified in the genome that show conservancy with D. melanogaster. Potential targets for the identified miRNAs were also searched. The data presented here adds to our growing pool of information concerning the genome structure and characteristics of true fruit flies. It provides a basis for comparative studies with other Dipteran and within Tephritid species, and can be used for applied research such as in the development of new control strategies based on gene silencing and transgenesis.

  5. Wind-powered wheel locomotion, initiated by leaping somersaults, in larvae of the southeastern beach tiger beetle (Cicindela dorsalis media.

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    Alan Harvey

    Full Text Available Rapid movement is challenging for elongate, soft-bodied animals with short or no legs. Leaping is known for only a few animals with this "worm-like" morphology. Wheel locomotion, in which the animal's entire body rolls forward along a central axis, has been reported for only a handful of animals worldwide. Here we present the first documented case of wind-powered wheel locomotion, in larvae of the coastal tiger beetle Cicindela dorsalis media. When removed from their shallow burrows, larvae easily can be induced to enter a behavioral sequence that starts with leaping; while airborne, larvae loop their body into a rotating wheel and usually either "hit the ground rolling" or leap again. The direction larvae wheel is closely related to the direction in which winds are blowing; thus, all our larvae wheeled up-slope, as winds at our study site consistently blew from sea to land. Stronger winds increased both the proportion of larvae wheeling, and the distance traveled, exceeding 60 m in some cases. In addition, the proportion of larvae that wheel and the distance traveled by wheeling larvae are significantly greater on smooth sandy beaches than on beach surfaces made rough and irregular by pedestrian, equestrian, and vehicular traffic. Like other coastal species of tiger beetles, C. dorsalis media has suffered major declines in recent years that are clearly correlated with increased human impacts. The present study suggests that the negative effects of beach traffic may be indirect, preventing larvae from escaping from predators using wheel locomotion by disrupting the flat, hard surface necessary for efficient wheeling.

  6. Exposure to an open-field arena increases c-Fos expression in a subpopulation of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus, including neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hale, M.W.; Hay-Schmidt, A.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonergic systems in the dorsal raphe nucleus are thought to play an important role in the regulation of anxiety states. To investigate responses of neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus to a mild anxiety-related stimulus, we exposed rats to an open-field, under low-light or high-light conditions...... of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex that projects to forebrain circuits regulating anxiety states, we used cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) as a retrograde tracer to identify neurons projecting to the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) in combination with c-Fos immunostaining to identify cells...... that activated neurons were serotonergic, non-serotonergic, or both. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to anxiogenic stimuli activates a subset of neurons in the midbrain raphe complex projecting to amygdala anxiety circuits Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/10...

  7. Captures of Wild Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Traps with Improved Multilure TMR Dispensers Weathered in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Morse, Joseph G; Grafton-Cardwell, Elizabeth E; Haviland, David R; Kabashima, John N; Faber, Ben A; Mackey, Bruce; Cook, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During 2012–2013, solid Mallet TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) wafers impregnated with DDVP (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) insecticide were weathered during summer (8 wk) and winter (12 wk) in five California citrus-growing counties (Kern, Ventura, Orange, Tulare, and Riverside). In addition, TMR wafers without DDVP and with a Hercon Vaportape II insecticidal strip were compared with TMR dispensers with DDVP at Exeter and Riverside. Weathered treatments were shipped every week (overnight delivery) to Hawaii and frozen for a later bioassay in a 1,335-ha coffee plantation near Numila, Kauai Island, HI, where Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, and melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, were all present. We compared trap captures of the three species, C. capitata, B. dorsalis, and B. cucurbitae, for the five different weathering locations. Captures of C. capitata, B. dorsalis, and B. cucurbitae with Mallet TMR dispensers (with DDVP) were not significantly different for the five locations. Captures with the Mallet TMR dispenser without DDVP and Vaportape were similar to those for Mallet TMR with DDVP, although there were some slight location differences. In conclusion, based on these results, the Mallet TMR dispenser could potentially be used in California habitats where large numbers of detection traps are currently deployed. Use of Vaportape with dispensers would not require them to be registered with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dispensers for use as Male Annihilation Technique (MAT) devices will be tested further in Hawaii.

  8. BdorCSP2 is important for antifeed and oviposition-deterring activities induced by Rhodojaponin-III against Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Rhodojaponin-III is a nonvolatile botanical grayanoid diterpene compound, which has antifeedant and oviposition deterrence effects against many kinds of insects. However, the molecular mechanism of the chemoreception process remains unknown. In this study, the important role of BdorCSP2 in the recognition of Rhodojaponin-III was identified. The full length cDNA encoding BdorCSP2 was cloned from legs of Bactrocera dorsalis. The results of expression pattern revealed that BdorCSP2 was abundantly expressed in the legs of adult B. dorsalis. Moreover, the expression of BdorCSP2 could be up-regulated by Rhodojaponin-III. In order to gain comprehensive understanding of the recognition process, the binding affinity between BdorCSP2 and Rhodojaponin-III was measured by fluorescence binding assay. Silencing the expression of BdorCSP2 through the ingestion of dsRNA could weaken the effect of oviposition deterrence and antifeedant of Rhodojaponin-III. These results suggested that BdorCSP2 of B. dorsalis could be involved in chemoreception of Rhodojaponin-III and played a critical role in antifeedant and oviposition behaviors induced by Rhodojaponin-III.

  9. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lê, A.D.; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but ...

  10. Differential role of serotonin projections from the dorsal and median raphe nuclei in phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion and fos-like immunoreactivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusljic, Snezana; Van Den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-10-01

    Altered brain serotonin activity is implicated in schizophrenia. We have previously shown differential involvement of serotonergic projections from the dorsal or median raphe nucleus in phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats, a behavioral model of aspects of schizophrenia. Here we further investigated the effects of serotonergic lesions of the raphe nuclei on phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion by parallel assessment of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI), a marker of neuronal activation in the brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with pentobarbitone and stereotaxically microinjected with 5 μg of the serotonergic neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), into either the dorsal raphe (DRN) or median raphe nucleus (MRN). Two weeks after the surgery, rats with lesions of the MRN, but not those with lesions of the DRN, showed significant enhancement of the hyperlocomotion induced by injection of 2.5 mg/kg of phencyclidine. Rats with MRN lesions also showed significantly higher levels of FLI in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus in the dorsal hippocampus (PoDG) when compared with sham-operated controls. Rats with lesions of the DRN showed significantly higher levels of FLI in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These results indicate that FLI in the PoDG, but not the NAcc, correlates with enhanced phencyclidine-induced locomotor hyperactivity in MRN-lesioned rats. These results support our previous studies suggesting a role of serotonergic projections from the MRN to the dorsal hippocampus in some of the symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cadherin-13 Deficiency Increases Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neuron Density and Prefrontal Cortex Innervation in the Mouse Brain

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    Andrea Forero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During early prenatal stages of brain development, serotonin (5-HT-specific neurons migrate through somal translocation to form the raphe nuclei and subsequently begin to project to their target regions. The rostral cluster of cells, comprising the median and dorsal raphe (DR, innervates anterior regions of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex. Differential analysis of the mouse 5-HT system transcriptome identified enrichment of cell adhesion molecules in 5-HT neurons of the DR. One of these molecules, cadherin-13 (Cdh13 has been shown to play a role in cell migration, axon pathfinding, and synaptogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of Cdh13 to the development of the murine brain 5-HT system.Methods: For detection of Cdh13 and components of the 5-HT system at different embryonic developmental stages of the mouse brain, we employed immunofluorescence protocols and imaging techniques, including epifluorescence, confocal and structured illumination microscopy. The consequence of CDH13 loss-of-function mutations on brain 5-HT system development was explored in a mouse model of Cdh13 deficiency.Results: Our data show that in murine embryonic brain Cdh13 is strongly expressed on 5-HT specific neurons of the DR and in radial glial cells (RGCs, which are critically involved in regulation of neuronal migration. We observed that 5-HT neurons are intertwined with these RGCs, suggesting that these neurons undergo RGC-guided migration. Cdh13 is present at points of intersection between these two cell types. Compared to wildtype controls, Cdh13-deficient mice display increased cell densities in the DR at embryonic stages E13.5, E17.5, and adulthood, and higher serotonergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex at E17.5.Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence for a role of CDH13 in the development of the serotonergic system in early embryonic stages. Specifically, we indicate that Cdh13 deficiency affects the cell

  12. Estradiol Valerate and Remifemin ameliorate ovariectomy-induced decrease in a serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Guangxia; Jin, Biao; Wang, Ke; Chen, Xing; Sun, Yu; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2016-11-01

    Perimenopausal syndromes begin as ovarian function ceases and the most common symptoms are hot flushes. Data indicate that the projections of serotonin to hypothalamus may be involved in the mechanism of hot flushes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of the serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway for hot flushes in an animal model of menopause. We determined the changes in serotonin expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and preoptic anterior hypothalamus (POAH) in ovariectomized rats. We also explored the therapeutical effects of estradiol valerate and Remifemin in this model. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated (SHAM) group, ovariectomy (OVX) group with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate treatment (OVX+E) group and ovariectomy with Remifemin (OVX+ICR) group. Serotonin expression was evaluated in the DR and POAH using immunofluorescence and quantified in the DR using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Apoptosis was analyzed in the DR by TUNEL assay. The number of serotonin immunoreactive neurons and the level of serotonin expression in the DR decreased significantly following OVX compared to the SHAM group. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the DR in any group. In addition, following OVX, the number of serotonin-positive fibers decreased significantly in the ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), especially in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). Treatment with either estradiol or Remifemin for 4 weeks countered the OVX-induced decreases in serotonin levels in both the DR and the hypothalamus, with levels in the treated rats similar to those in the SHAM group. A fluorescently labeled retrograde tracer was injected into the VLPO at the 4-week time point. A significantly lower percentage of serotonin with CTB double-labeled neurons in CTB-labeled neurons was demonstrated after ovariectomy, and both estradiol and Remifemin countered this OVX

  13. Gene flow and genetic structure of Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera, Tephritidae) among geographical differences and sister species, B. dorsalis, inferred from microsatellite DNA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Isasawin, Siriwan; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae, is an invasive pest in Southeast Asia. It has been introduced into areas in South America such as Suriname and Brazil. Bactrocera carambolae belongs to the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, and seems to be separated from Bactrocera dorsalis based on morphological and multilocus phylogenetic studies. Even though the Carambola fruit fly is an important quarantine species and has an impact on international trade, knowledge of the molecular ecology of Bactrocera carambolae, concerning species status and pest management aspects, is lacking. Seven populations sampled from the known geographical areas of Bactrocera carambolae including Southeast Asia (i.e., Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand) and South America (i.e., Suriname), were genotyped using eight microsatellite DNA markers. Genetic variation, genetic structure, and genetic network among populations illustrated that the Suriname samples were genetically differentiated from Southeast Asian populations. The genetic network revealed that samples from West Sumatra (Pekanbaru, PK) and Java (Jakarta, JK) were presumably the source populations of Bactrocera carambolae in Suriname, which was congruent with human migration records between the two continents. Additionally, three populations of Bactrocera dorsalis were included to better understand the species boundary. The genetic structure between the two species was significantly separated and approximately 11% of total individuals were detected as admixed (0.100 ≤ Q ≤ 0.900). The genetic network showed connections between Bactrocera carambolae and Bactrocera dorsalis groups throughout Depok (DP), JK, and Nakhon Sri Thammarat (NT) populations. These data supported the hypothesis that the reproductive isolation between the two species may be leaky. Although the morphology and monophyly of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences in previous studies showed discrete entities, the hypothesis of semipermeable boundaries

  14. Assessment of Attractiveness of Plants as Roosting Sites for the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T.; Vargas, Roger I.

    2007-01-01

    The use of toxic protein bait sprays to suppress melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), populations typically involves application to vegetation bordering agricultural host areas where the adults seek shelter (“roost”). Although bait spray applications for suppression of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), populations have traditionally been applied to the host crop, rather than to crop borders, roosting by oriental fruit flies in borders of some crop species, such as papaya, Carica papaya L. (Brassicales: Caricaceae), suggests that bait spray applications to crop borders could also help in suppression of B. dorsalis populations. In order to develop improved recommendations for application of bait sprays to border plants for suppression of melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations, the relative attractiveness of a range of plant species, in a vegetative (non-flowering) stage, was tested to wild melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations established in a papaya orchard in Hawaii. A total of 20 plant species were evaluated, divided into four categories: 1) border plants, including corn, Zea mays L. (Poales: Poaceae), windbreaks and broad-leaved ornamentals, 7 species; 2) weed plants commonly found in agricultural fields in Hawaii, 6 species; 3) host crop plants, 1 species- zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. (Violales: Curcurbitaceae), and 4) locally grown fruit trees, 6 species. Plants were established in pots and placed in an open field, in clusters encircling protein bait traps, 20 m away from the papaya orchard. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), panax, Polyscias guilfoylei (Bull) Bailey (Apiales: Araliaceae), tiger's claw, Erythnna variegata L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), and guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) were identified as preferred roosting hosts for the melon fly, and tiger's claw, panax, castor bean, Canada cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (Asterales: Asteraceae

  15. The hippocampus and dorsal raphe nucleus are key brain areas associated with the antidepressant effects of lithium augmentation of desipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussotto, Sofia; Cryan, John F; O'Leary, Olivia F

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 50% of depressed individuals fail to achieve remission with first-line antidepressant drugs and a third remain treatment-resistant. When first-line antidepressant treatment is unsuccessful, second-line strategies include dose optimisation, switching to another antidepressant, combination with another antidepressant, or augmentation with a non-antidepressant medication. Much of the evidence for the efficacy of augmentation strategies comes from studies using lithium to augment the effects of tricyclic antidepressants. The neural circuitry underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium augmentation is not yet fully understood. Recently, we reported that chronic treatment with a combination of lithium and the antidepressant desipramine, exerted antidepressant-like behavioural effects in a mouse strain (BALB/cOLaHsd) that did not exhibit an antidepressant-like behavioural response to either drug alone. In the present study, we used this model in combination with ΔFosB/FosB immunohistochemistry to identify brain regions chronically affected by lithium augmentation of desipramine when compared to either treatment alone. The data suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and the CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus are key nodes in the neural circuitry underlying antidepressant action of lithium augmentation of desipramine. These data give new insight into the neurobiology underlying the mechanism of lithium augmentation in the context of treatment-resistant depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of acupuncture on Lipopolysaccharide-induced anxiety-like behavioral changes: involvement of serotonin system in dorsal Raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae Young; Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Gyu Won; Lee, Eun Byeol; Chang, Suchan; Lee, Jong Han; Koo, Jin Suk; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Hee Young

    2017-12-11

    Acupuncture has been used as a common therapeutic tool in many disorders including anxiety and depression. Serotonin transporter (SERT) plays an important role in the pathology of anxiety and other mood disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety-like behaviors and SERT in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN). Rats were given acupuncture at ST41 (Jiexi), LI11 (Quchi) or SI3 (Houxi) acupoint in LPS-treated rats. Anxiety-like behaviors of elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT) were measured and expressions of SERT and/or c-Fos were also examined in the DRN using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that 1) acupuncture at ST41 acupoint, but neither LI11 nor SI3, significantly attenuated LPS-induced anxiety-like behaviors in EPM and OFT, 2) acupuncture at ST41 decreased SERT expression increased by LPS in the DRN. Our results suggest that acupuncture can ameliorate anxiety-like behaviors, possibly through regulation of SERT in the DRN.

  17. Adaptive Control of Dorsal Raphe by 5-HT4 in the Prefrontal Cortex Prevents Persistent Hypophagia following Stress

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    Alexandra Jean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient reduced food intake (hypophagia following high stress could have beneficial effects on longevity, but paradoxically, hypophagia can persist and become anorexia-like behavior. The neural underpinnings of stress-induced hypophagia and the mechanisms by which the brain prevents the transition from transient to persistent hypophagia remain undetermined. In this study, we report the involvement of a network governing goal-directed behavior (decision. This network consists of the ascending serotonergic inputs from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Specifically, adult restoration of serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT4R expression in the mPFC rescues hypophagia and specific molecular changes related to depression resistance in the DR (5-HT release elevation, 5-HT1A receptor, and 5-HT transporter reductions of stressed 5-HT4R knockout mice. The adult mPFC-5-HT4R knockdown mimics the null phenotypes. When mPFC-5-HT4Rs are overexpressed and DR-5-HT1ARs are blocked in the DR, hypophagia following stress persists, suggesting an antidepressant action of early anorexia.

  18. Monorail/Foxa2 regulates floorplate differentiation and specification of oligodendrocytes, serotonergic raphé neurones and cranial motoneurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Will H.; Mangoli, Maryam; Lele, Zsolt; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Diamond, Brianne; Mercurio, Sara; Russell, Claire; Teraoka, Hiroki; Stickney, Heather L.; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Houart, Corinne; Schilling, Thomas F.; Frohnhoefer, Hans-Georg; Rastegar, Sepand; Neumann, Carl J.; Gardiner, R. Mark; Strähle, Uwe; Geisler, Robert; Rees, Michelle; Talbot, William S.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In this study, we elucidate the roles of the winged-helix transcription factor Foxa2 in ventral CNS development in zebrafish. Through cloning of monorail (mol), which we find encodes the transcription factor Foxa2, and phenotypic analysis of mol-/- embryos, we show that floorplate is induced in the absence of Foxa2 function but fails to further differentiate. In mol-/- mutants, expression of Foxa and Hh family genes is not maintained in floorplate cells and lateral expansion of the floorplate fails to occur. Our results suggest that this is due to defects both in the regulation of Hh activity in medial floorplate cells as well as cell-autonomous requirements for Foxa2 in the prospective laterally positioned floorplate cells themselves. Foxa2 is also required for induction and/or patterning of several distinct cell types in the ventral CNS. Serotonergic neurones of the raphé nucleus and the trochlear motor nucleus are absent in mol-/- embryos, and oculomotor and facial motoneurones ectopically occupy ventral CNS midline positions in the midbrain and hindbrain. There is also a severe reduction of prospective oligodendrocytes in the midbrain and hindbrain. Finally, in the absence of Foxa2, at least two likely Hh pathway target genes are ectopically expressed in more dorsal regions of the midbrain and hindbrain ventricular neuroepithelium, raising the possibility that Foxa2 activity may normally be required to limit the range of action of secreted Hh proteins. PMID:15677724

  19. The effect of continuous ELF-MFs on the level of 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Shiri, Leila; Alaei, Hojjatollah; Naghdi, Naser

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of continuous extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) with a frequency of 10 Hz and an intensity of 690-720 μT on the level of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in adult male Wistar rats. A total of 24 adult Wistar male rats were used, and after exposure with an ELF-MF for 15 successive days, all rats in each test were anesthetized with chloral hydrate. Then, they were placed in a stereotaxic frame for surgery and a microdialysis process. Dialysate samples were analyzed to measure the amount of 5-HIAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Results showed that ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 1 h daily, was not effective in altering the level of 5-HIAA. However, ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 3 h daily, decreased the level of the 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus. It can be concluded that ELF-MFs affect the serotonergic system and may be used to treat nervous system diseases. This study is an initial step towards helping cure depression using ELF-MFs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. The habenulo-raphe serotonergic circuit encodes an aversive expectation value essential for adaptive active avoidance of danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Ryunosuke; Fredes, Felipe; Kinoshita, Masae; Aoki, Ryo; Aizawa, Hidenori; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Aoki, Tazu; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Kakinuma, Hisaya; Matsuda, Masaru; Yamazaki, Masako; Takahoko, Mikako; Tsuboi, Takashi; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Koide, Tetsuya; Yabuki, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2014-12-03

    Anticipation of danger at first elicits panic in animals, but later it helps them to avoid the real threat adaptively. In zebrafish, as fish experience more and more danger, neurons in the ventral habenula (vHb) showed tonic increase in the activity to the presented cue and activated serotonergic neurons in the median raphe (MR). This neuronal activity could represent the expectation of a dangerous outcome and be used for comparison with a real outcome when the fish is learning how to escape from a dangerous to a safer environment. Indeed, inhibiting synaptic transmission from vHb to MR impaired adaptive avoidance learning, while panic behavior induced by classical fear conditioning remained intact. Furthermore, artificially triggering this negative outcome expectation signal by optogenetic stimulation of vHb neurons evoked place avoidance behavior. Thus, vHb-MR circuit is essential for representing the level of expected danger and behavioral programming to adaptively avoid potential hazard. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of lateral habenula-dorsal raphe nucleus circuits in higher brain functions and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Yang, Shao-Jun; Rusak, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) play an important role in regulation of many physiological functions. The lateral nucleus of the habenular complex (LHb) is closely connected to the DRN both morphologically and functionally. The LHb is a key regulator of the activity of DRN serotonergic neurons, and it also receives reciprocal input from the DRN. The LHb is also a major way-station that receives limbic system input via the stria medullaris and provides output to the DRN and thereby indirectly connects a number of other brain regions to the DRN. The complex interactions of the LHb and DRN contribute to the regulation of numerous important behavioral and physiological mechanisms, including those regulating cognition, reward, pain sensitivity and patterns of sleep and waking. Disruption of these functions is characteristic of major psychiatric illnesses, so there has been a great deal of interest in how disturbed LHb-DRN interactions may contribute to the symptoms of these illnesses. This review summarizes recent research related to the roles of the LHb-DRN system in regulation of higher brain functions and the possible role of disturbed LHb-DRN function in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contributions to elevated metabolism during recovery: dissecting the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Thomas V; Gleeson, Todd T

    2008-01-01

    The excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), a measure of recovery costs, is known to be large in ectothermic vertebrates such as the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), especially after vigorous activity. To analyze the cause of these large recovery costs in a terrestrial ectotherm, Dipsosaurus were run for 15 s at maximal-intensity (distance 35.0+/-1.9 m; 2.33+/-0.13 m s(-1)) while O(2) uptake was monitored via open-flow respirometry. Muscle metabolites (adenylates, phosphocreatine, and lactate) were measured at rest and after 0, 3, 10, and 60 min of recovery. Cardiac and ventilatory activity during rest and recovery were measured, as were whole-body lactate and blood lactate, which were used to estimate total muscle activity. This vigorous activity was supported primarily by glycolysis (65%) and phosphocreatine hydrolysis (29%), with only a small contribution from aerobic metabolism (2.5%). Aerobic recovery lasted 43.8+/-4.6 min, and EPOC measured 0.166+/-0.025 mL O(2) g(-1). This was a large proportion (98%) of the total suprabasal metabolic cost of the activity to the animal. The various contributions to EPOC after this short but vigorous activity were quantified, and a majority of EPOC was accounted for. The two primary causes of EPOC were phosphocreatine repletion (32%-50%) and lactate glycogenesis (30%-47%). Four other components played smaller roles: ATP repletion (8%-13%), elevated ventilatory activity (2%), elevated cardiac activity (2%), and oxygen store resaturation (1%).

  3. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in China: origin and gradual inland range expansion associated with population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuanwu; Nardi, Francesco; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yinghong

    2011-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, expanded throughout mainland China in the last century to become one of the most serious pests in the area, yet information on this process are fragmentary. Three mitochondrial genes (nad1, cytb and nad5) were used to infer the genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history of the oriental fruit fly from its entire distribution range in China. High levels of genetic diversity, as well as a significant correspondence between genetic and geographic distances, suggest that the invasion process might have been gradual, with no associated genetic bottlenecks. Three population groups could be identified, nevertheless the overall genetic structure was weak. The effective number of migrants between populations, estimated using the coalescent method, suggested asymmetric gene flow from the costal region of Guangdong to most inland regions. The demographic analysis indicates the oriental fruit fly underwent a recent population expansion in the Central China. We suggest the species originated in the costal region facing the South China Sea and gradually expanded to colonize mainland China, expanding here to high population numbers.

  4. Phylogeography and Ecological Niche Modeling of the Desert Iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Baird & Girard 1852) in the Baja California Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Carrillo, Tania; García-De León, Francisco J; Blázquez, Ma Carmen; Gutiérrez-Flores, Carina; González Zamorano, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the factors that explain the patterns of genetic structure or phylogeographic breaks at an intraspecific level is key to inferring the mechanisms of population differentiation in its early stages. These topics have been well studied in the Baja California region, with vicariance and the dispersal ability of individuals being the prevailing hypothesis for phylogeographic breaks. In this study, we evaluated the phylogeographic patterns in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), a species with a recent history in the region and spatial variation in life history traits. We analyzed a total of 307 individuals collected throughout 19 localities across the Baja California Peninsula with 15 microsatellite DNA markers. Our data reveal the existence of 3 geographically discrete genetic populations with moderate gene flow and an isolation-by-distance pattern presumably produced by the occurrence of a refugium in the Cape region during the Pleistocene Last Glacial Maximum. Bayesian methods and ecological niche modeling were used to assess the relationship between population genetic structure and present and past climatic preferences of the desert iguana. We found that the present climatic heterogeneity of the Baja California Peninsula has a marked influence on the population genetic structure of the species, suggesting that there are alternative explanations besides vicariance. The information obtained in this study provides data allowing a better understanding of how historical population processes in the Baja California Peninsula can be understood from an ecological perspective. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  6. Response of Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) to metabolic stress disinfection and disinfestation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Galarza, Lourdes; Follett, Peter A

    2011-02-01

    Metabolic stress disinfection and disinfestation (MSDD) is a postharvest treatment designed to control pathogens and arthropod pests on commodities that combines short cycles of low pressure/vacuum and high CO2 with ethanol vapor. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of MSDD treatment on various life stages of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), Mediterranean fruit fly; Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, oriental fruit fly; and Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, melon fly, in petri dishes and in papaya, Carica papaya L., fruit. In some experiments, the ethanol vapor phase was withheld to separate the effects of the physical (low pressure/ambient pressure cycles) and chemical (ethanol vapor plus low pressure) phases of treatment. In the experiments with tephritid fruit fly larvae and adults in petri dishes, mortality was generally high when insects were exposed to ethanol and low when ethanol was withheld during MSDD treatment, suggesting that ethanol vapor is highly lethal but that fruit flies are quite tolerant of short periods of low pressure treatment alone. When papaya fruit infested with fruit fly eggs or larvae were treated by MSDD, they produced fewer pupae than untreated control fruit, but a substantial number of individuals developed nonetheless. This suggests that internally feeding insects in fruit may be partially protected from the toxic effects of the ethanol because the vapor does not easily penetrate the fruit pericarp and pulp. MSDD treatment using the atmospheric conditions tested has limited potential as a disinfestation treatment for internal-feeding quarantine pests such as fruit flies infesting perishable commodities.

  7. Pengaruh Cara Aplikasi Minyak Suling Melaleuca bracteata dan Metil Eugenol terhadap Daya Pikat Lalat Buah Bactrocera dorsalis

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    Agus Kardinan

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted at farmer’s fruit garden in Cilebut area, Bogor during 1997–1998. The objective is to know the effect of some application techniques of oil distilled from Melaleuca bracteata leaves on trapping fruit fly. Research consisted of three activities, those were the effect of some techniques of application on trapping fruit flies (I weekly, (2 in two weeks and (3 the effects of some concentrations of methyl eugenol (ME on trapping fruit fly. All treatments were hung at the fruit trees as high as 1.5 m. Observations were done in the number and gender of fruit flies trapped weekly and two-weekly. Result revealed that melaleuca distilled oil can be applied either by dropping into water or into cotton ball. Melaleuca leaves distilled oil should be applied once in two weeks, since its effectiveness lasted for two weeks only. The minimum concentration of methyl eugenol which could fruit flies effectively was 57%. Key words: Melaleuca bracteata, Bactrocera dorsalis

  8. Transoesophageal ultrasound and computer tomographic assessment of the equine cricoarytenoid dorsalis muscle: Relationship between muscle geometry and exercising laryngeal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, M; Cercone, M; Rawlinson, J J; Ducharme, N G; Bookbinder, L; Thompson, M; Cheetham, J

    2017-05-01

    Early detection of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN) is of considerable interest to the equine industry. To describe two imaging modalities, transoesophageal ultrasound (TEU) and computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reconstruction to assess laryngeal muscle geometry, and determine the relationship between cricoarytenoid dorsalis (CAD) geometry and function. Two-phase study evaluating CAD geometry in experimental horses and horses with naturally occurring RLN. Equine CAD muscle volume was determined from CT scan sets using volumetric reconstruction with LiveWire. The midbody and caudal dorsal-ventral thickness of the CAD muscle was determined using a TEU in the same horses; and in horses with a range of severity of RLN (n = 112). Transoesophageal ultrasound was able to readily image the CAD muscles and lower left:right CAD thickness ratios were observed with increasing disease severity. Computed tomography based muscle volume correlated very closely with ex vivo muscle volume (R2 = 0.77). Computed tomography reconstruction can accurately determine intrinsic laryngeal muscle geometry. A relationship between TEU measurements of CAD geometry and laryngeal function was established. These imaging techniques could be used to track the response of the CAD muscle to restorative surgical treatments such as nerve muscle pedicle graft, nerve anastomosis and functional electrical stimulation. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Influence of various stressors on the expression of core genes of the small interfering RNA pathway in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

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    Xie, Yi-Fei; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yang, Wen-Jia; Shen, Guang-Mao; Wei, Dong; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based technology has emerged as a potential tool for controlling insect pests, however, previous studies found that the efficiency of RNAi in Bactrocera dorsalis was variable. In nature, insects often meet various challenges, such as pathogen infections, extreme temperatures, lack of nutrition and heavy metals. To better understand the association of the stressors with efficiency of RNAi, in the current study we tested the expression of three core genes, dicer2 (Bddcr2), r2d2 (Bdr2d2) and argonaute2 (Bdago2), of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway of B. dorsalis upon various stressors. Our results showed that all three genes were upregulated by the infection of invertebrate iridescent virus 6, which suggested a function of the siRNA pathway against viral infection. The loading of FeCl3 could also increase the expression of Bddcr2. The treatments of Escherichia coli, extremely high (40°C) and low (0°C) temperatures, as well as starvation, could negatively influence the expression of Bddcr2 and/or Bdago2. In total, our results showed that various stressors could influence the expression of core components of B. dorsalis siRNA pathway. This highlights further speculation on the RNAi efficiency upon these stressors. Considering the complexity and variation of RNAi efficiency in different conditions, these results provide initial aspects in possible environmental stressors to influence the activity of the siRNA pathway, but the real impact of RNAi efficiency posed by these stressors requires further studies. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Weathering and Chemical Degradation of Methyl Eugenol and Raspberry Ketone Solid Dispensers for Detection, Monitoring, and Male Annihilation of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Nkomo, Eddie; Cook, Peter J; Mackey, Bruce; Stark, John D

    2015-08-01

    Solid male lure dispensers containing methyl eugenol (ME) and raspberry ketone (RK), or mixtures of the lures (ME + RK), and dimethyl dichloro-vinyl phosphate (DDVP) were evaluated in area-wide pest management bucket or Jackson traps in commercial papaya (Carica papaya L.) orchards where both oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), and melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), are pests. Captures of B. dorsalis with fresh wafers in Jackson and bucket traps were significantly higher on the basis of ME concentration (Mallet ME [56%] > Mallet MR [31.2%] > Mallet MC [23.1%]). Captures of B. cucurbitae with fresh wafers in Jackson and bucket traps were not different regardless of concentration of RK (Mallet BR [20.1%] = Mallet MR [18.3%] = Mallet MC [15.9%]). Captures of B. dorsalis with fresh wafers, compared with weathered wafers, were significantly different after week 12; captures of B. cucurbitae were not significantly different after 16 wk. Chemical analyses revealed presence of RK in dispensers in constant amounts throughout the 16-wk trial. Degradation of both ME and DDVP over time was predicted with a high level of confidence by nonlinear asymptotic exponential decay curves. Results provide supportive data to deploy solid ME and RK wafers (with DDVP) in fruit fly traps for detection programs, as is the current practice with solid TML dispensers placed in Jackson traps. Wafers with ME and RK might be used in place of two separate traps for detection of both ME and RK responding fruit flies and could potentially reduce cost of materials and labor by 50%. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Dorsal-to-Ventral Shift in Midbrain Dopaminergic Projections and Increased Thalamic/Raphe Serotonergic Function in Early Parkinson Disease.

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    Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Seppänen, Marko; Noponen, Tommi; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2015-07-01

    Loss of nigrostriatal neurons leading to dopamine depletion in the dorsal striatum is the pathologic hallmark of Parkinson disease contributing to the primary motor symptoms of the disease. However, Parkinson pathology is more widespread in the brain, affecting also other dopaminergic pathways and neurotransmitter systems, but these changes are less well characterized. This study aimed to investigate the mesencephalic striatal and extrastriatal dopaminergic projections together with extrastriatal serotonin transporter binding in Parkinson disease. Two hundred sixteen patients with Parkinson disease and 204 control patients (patients without neurodegenerative parkinsonism syndromes and normal SPECT imaging) were investigated with SPECT using the dopamine/serotonin transporter ligand (123)I-N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ((123)I-FP-CIT) in the clinical setting. The group differences and midbrain correlations were analyzed voxel by voxel over the entire brain. We found that Parkinson patients had lower (123)I-FP-CIT uptake in the striatum and ventral midbrain but higher uptake in the thalamus and raphe nuclei than control patients. In patients with Parkinson disease, the correlation of the midbrain tracer uptake was shifted from the putamen to widespread corticolimbic areas. All findings were highly significant at the voxel level familywise error-corrected P value of less than 0.05. Our findings show that Parkinson disease is associated not only with the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine neurotransmission, but also with a parallel shift toward mesolimbic and mesocortical function. Furthermore, Parkinson disease patients seem to have upregulation of brain serotonin transporter function at the early phase of the disease. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores.

  13. GABAA receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice: escalation of aggression after alcohol consumption

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    Takahashi, Aki; Kwa, Carolyn; DeBold, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the origin for serotonin (5-HT) in forebrain areas, has been implicated in the neural control of escalated aggression. Gamma aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) and type-B (GABAB) receptors are expressed in the DRN and modulate 5-HT neuronal activity, and both play a role in the behavioral effect of alcohol. Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between drugs acting on GABA receptors in the DRN and alcohol in their effects on aggressive behaviors. Method Male CFW mice, housed with a female, were trained to self-administer ethanol (1.0 g/kg) or water via an operant conditioning panel in their home cage. Immediately after they drank either ethanol or water, the animals were microinfused with a GABAergic drug into the DRN, and their aggressive behaviors were assessed 10 min later. Muscimol (0.006 nmol), a GABAA receptor agonist, escalated alcohol-heightened aggression but had no effect in the absence of ethanol. This effect of muscimol was prominent in the animals that showed alcohol-heightened aggression, but not the animals that reduced or did not change aggressive behavior after ethanol infusion compared to water. On the other hand, the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.06 nmol) increased aggressive behavior similarly in both water and ethanol conditions. Antagonists of the GABAA and GABAB receptors, bicuculline (0.006 nmol) and phaclofen (0.3 nmol) respectively, did not suppress heightened-aggressive behavior induced by ethanol self-administration. Conclusion GABAA receptors in the DRN are one of the neurobiological targets of alcohol-heightened aggression. Activation of the GABAB receptors in the DRN also produced escalated aggression, but that is independent of the effect of alcohol. PMID:20589493

  14. GABA(A) receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice: escalation of aggression after alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Kwa, Carolyn; Debold, Joseph F; Miczek, Klaus A

    2010-09-01

    The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), the origin for serotonin (5-HT) in forebrain areas, has been implicated in the neural control of escalated aggression. Gamma aminobutyric acid type-A (GABA(A)) and type-B (GABA(B)) receptors are expressed in the DRN and modulate 5-HT neuronal activity, and both play a role in the behavioral effect of alcohol. The purpose of this study is to examine the interaction between drugs acting on GABA receptors in the DRN and alcohol in their effects on aggressive behaviors. Male CFW mice, housed with a female, were trained to self-administer ethanol (1.0 g/kg) or water via an operant conditioning panel in their home cage. Immediately after they drank either ethanol or water, the animals were microinfused with a GABAergic drug into the DRN, and their aggressive behaviors were assessed 10 min later. Muscimol (0.006 nmol), a GABA(A) receptor agonist, escalated alcohol-heightened aggression but had no effect in the absence of ethanol. This effect of muscimol was prominent in the animals that showed alcohol-heightened aggression, but not the animals that reduced or did not change aggressive behavior after ethanol infusion compared to water. On the other hand, the GABA(B) agonist baclofen (0.06 nmol) increased aggressive behavior similarly in both water and ethanol conditions. Antagonists of the GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors, bicuculline (0.006 nmol) and phaclofen (0.3 nmol) respectively, did not suppress heightened-aggressive behavior induced by ethanol self-administration. GABA(A) receptors in the DRN are one of the neurobiological targets of alcohol-heightened aggression. Activation of the GABA(B) receptors in the DRN also produced escalated aggression, but that is independent of the effect of alcohol.

  15. Effects of sleep deprivation on serotonergic neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the freely moving cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J P; Fornal, C A; Jacobs, B L

    1997-08-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) for one or more nights produces a rapid antidepressant response in humans. Since most pharmacological treatments for depression increase brain serotonin neurotransmission, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether TSD increases the activity of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in cats. Cats were prevented from sleeping by the experimenter, who monitored the behavioral state of each animal on a polygraph. Firing rates during quiet waking (QW) and active waking (AW) were obtained throughout a 24-h sleep deprivation period and subsequent 6-h recovery period. During the experiments, unit activity was also recorded during exposure to loud white noise, which elicited strong behavioral arousal. The inhibitory response of serotonergic DRN neurons to systemic administration of the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) was determined before and after TSD to assess possible changes in 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity. TSD increased mean firing rates by as much as 18% during both AW and white noise exposure. Maximal effects were observed after 15 h of TSD for AW, and after 18 h for white noise. QW firing rates also tended to be elevated throughout TSD. Firing rates for all conditions during the recovery period were not significantly different from baseline. The neuronal inhibition produced by 8-OH-DPAT was significantly diminished after TSD. Overall, these results indicate that TSD increases the firing rate of serotonergic DRN neurons during AW and arousal. This effect may be attributable to a decrease in the sensitivity of 5-HT1A autoreceptors. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that TSD exerts its antidepressant action, at least in part, through an activation of brain serotonergic neurons.

  16. Cellular adaptations of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons associated with the development of active coping in response to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Reyes, Beverly A S; Lee, Catherine S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Valentino, Rita J

    2013-06-01

    Social stress is a risk factor for affective disorders for certain vulnerable individuals. Stress and depression are linked in part through regulation of the dorsal raphe (DR)-serotonin (5-HT) system by the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). We used a rat social stress model that shows individual differences in coping strategies to determine whether differences in CRF-5-HT interactions underlie individual differences in the vulnerability to social stress. Rats were exposed to the resident-intruder model of social stress for 5 days. In vivo single-unit recordings assessed DR-5-HT neuronal responses to CRF and immunoelectron microscopy assessed CRF1 and CRF2 cellular localization 24 hours after the last stress. Rats responded to social stress passively, assuming defeat with short latencies (48%), or actively, with proactive behaviors and longer defeat latencies (LL, 52%). Whereas CRF (30 ng, intra-DR) inhibited 5-HT neuronal activity of control and SL rats, it activated 5-HT neurons of LL rats, an effect that was CRF2-mediated. Consistent with this, social stress promoted CRF1 internalization together with CRF2 recruitment to the plasma membrane of DR neurons selectively in LL rats. These data suggest that a proactive coping strategy toward social stress is associated with a redistribution of CRF1 and CRF2 in DR-5-HT neurons that primes the system to be activated by subsequent stress. The lack of this adaptation in passive coping rats may contribute to their depressive-like phenotype. These studies provide a cellular mechanism for individual differences in stress responses and consequences. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Median raphe stimulation-induced motor inhibition concurrent with suppression of type 1 and type 2 hippocampal theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Brian H; Bland, Cheryl E; MacIver, M Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological effects produced by electrical stimulation of posterior hypothalamic (PH) or median raphe (MR) nuclei, independently and during combined stimulation of both PH and MR. These three stimulation conditions were applied during spontaneous behavior in an open field and during PH stimulation-induced wheel running, while simultaneously recording hippocampal (HPC) field activity. An additional objective was to determine the effects of MR stimulation on Type 1 movement related theta and Type 2 sensory processing related theta. To achieve the latter, when behavioral studies were completed we studied the same rats under urethane anesthesia and then during urethane anesthesia with the addition of atropine sulfate (ATSO4). Here we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of a localized region of the MR nucleus resulted in a profound inhibition of both spontaneously occurring theta related motor behaviors and the theta related motor behaviors induced by electrical stimulation of the PH nucleus. Furthermore, this motor inhibition occurred concurrently with strong suppression of hippocampal theta field oscillations in the freely moving rat, a condition where the theta recorded is Type 2 sensory processing theta occurring coincidently with Type 1 movement related theta (Bland, 1986). Our results indicate that motor inhibition resulted from stimulation of neurons located in the mid central region of the MR, while stimulation in adjacent regions produced variable responses, including movements and theta activity. The present study provided evidence that the pharmacological basis of the suppression of Type 2 sensory processing HPC theta was cholinergic. However, MR inhibition of PH-induced wheel running was not affected by cholinergic blockade, which blocks Type 2 theta, indicating that MR stimulation-induced motor inhibition also requires the suppression of Type 1 theta. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cytomorphometric changes in the dorsal raphe neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation are mediated by noradrenalin in rats

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    Biswas Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the effect of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS deprivation (REMSD on the cytomorphology of the dorsal raphe (DR neurons and to evaluate the possible role of REMSD-induced increased noradrenalin (NA in mediating such effects. Methods Rats were REMS deprived by the flowerpot method; free moving normal home cage rats, large platform and post REMS-deprived recovered rats were used as controls. Further, to evaluate if the effects were induced by NA, separate sets of experimental rats were treated (i.p. with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (PRZ. Histomorphometric analysis of DR neurons in stained brain sections were performed in experimental and control rats; neurons in inferior colliculus (IC served as anatomical control. Results The mean size of DR neurons was larger in REMSD group compared to controls, whereas, neurons in the recovered group of rats did not significantly differ than those in the control animals. Further, mean cell size in the post-REMSD PRZ-treated animals was comparable to those in the control groups. IC neurons were not affected by REMSD. Conclusions REMS loss has been reported to impair several physiological, behavioral and cellular processes. The mean size of the DR neurons was larger in the REMS deprived group of rats than those in the control groups; however, in the REMS deprived and prazosin treated rats the size was comparable to the normal rats. These results showed that REMSD induced increase in DR neuronal size was mediated by NA acting on α1-adrenoceptor. The findings suggest that the sizes of DR neurons are sensitive to REMSD, which if not compensated could lead to neurodegeneration and associated disorders including memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsidoni, Vicky; Anagnostou, Ilektra; Panagis, George

    2013-03-01

    Cannabidiol is a non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa, which induces central effects in rodents. It has been shown that cannabidiol attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. However, to the best of our knowledge, its effects on brain stimulation reward and the reward-facilitating effects of drugs of abuse have not yet been examined. Therefore, we investigated the effects of cannabidiol on brain reward function and on the reward-facilitating effect of morphine and cocaine using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. Rats were prepared with a stimulating electrode into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and a guide cannula into the dorsal raphe (microinjection experiments), and were trained to respond for electrical brain stimulation. A low dose of cannabidiol did not affect the reinforcing efficacy of brain stimulation, whereas higher doses significantly elevated the threshold frequency required for MFB ICSS. Both cocaine and morphine lowered ICSS thresholds. Cannabidiol inhibited the reward-facilitating effect of morphine, but not cocaine. This effect was reversed by pre-treatment with an intra-dorsal raphe injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. The present findings indicate that cannabidiol does not exhibit reinforcing properties in the ICSS paradigm at any of the doses tested, while it decreases the reward-facilitating effects of morphine. These effects were mediated by activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe. Our results suggest that cannabidiol interferes with brain reward mechanisms responsible for the expression of the acute reinforcing properties of opioids, thus indicating that cannabidiol may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of opioids. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Simulation of the electrical field in equine larynx to optimize functional electrical stimulation in denervated musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding of maximum possible activation of CAD a simulation model of the actual entire setting is currently in development. Therefore the geometric model is built from CT-data of a dissected larynx containing the quadripolar electrodes as well as fiducials for later data registration. The geometric model is the basis for a finite difference method containing of voxels with corresponding electrical conductivity of the different types of tissue due to threshold segmentation of the CT-data. Model validation can be done by the measurement of the 3D electrical potential distribution of a larynx positioned in an electrolytic tray. Finally, measured and calculated results have to be compared as well as further investigated. Preliminary results show, that changes of electrode as well as conductivity configuration leads to significant different voltage distributions and can be well presented by equipotential lines superimposed CT-slices – a Matlab graphical user interface visualizes the results in freely selectable slices of the 3D geometry. Voltage distribution along theoretically estimated fiber paths could be calculated as well as visualized. For further calculation of nerve or denervated muscle fiber activation and its optimization, real fiber paths have to be defined and referenced to the potential- and the CT-data.

  1. Simulation of the electrical field in equine larynx to optimize functional electrical stimulation in denervated musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding of maximum possible activation of CAD a simulation model of the actual entire setting is currently in development. Therefore the geometric model is built from CT-data of a dissected larynx containing the quadripolar electrodes as well as fiducials for later data registration. The geometric model is the basis for a finite difference method containing of voxels with corresponding electrical conductivity of the different types of tissue due to threshold segmentation of the CT-data. Model validation can be done by the measurement of the 3D electrical potential distribution of a larynx positioned in an electrolytic tray. Finally, measured and calculated results have to be compared as well as further investigated. Preliminary results show, that changes of electrode as well as conductivity configuration leads to significant different voltage distributions and can be well presented by equipotential lines superimposed CT-slices – a Matlab graphical user interface visualizes the results in freely selectable slices of the 3D geometry. Voltage distribution along theoretically estimated fiber paths could be calculated as well as visualized. For further calculation of nerve or denervated muscle fiber activation and its optimization, real fiber paths have to be defined and referenced to the potential- and the CT-data.

  2. Simulation of the Electrical Field in Equine Larynx to Optimize Functional Electrical Stimulation in Denervated Musculus Cricoarythenoideus Dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Martin; Martinek, Johannes

    2014-09-23

    Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN) in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD) and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding of maximum possible activation of CAD a simulation model of the actual entire setting is currently in development. Therefore the geometric model is built from CT-data of a dissected larynx containing the quadripolar electrodes as well as fiducials for later data registration. The geometric model is the basis for a finite difference method containing of voxels with corresponding electrical conductivity of the different types of tissue due to threshold segmentation of the CT-data. Model validation can be done by the measurement of the 3D electrical potential distribution of a larynx positioned in an electrolytic tray. Finally, measured and calculated results have to be compared as well as further investigated. Preliminary results show, that changes of electrode as well as conductivity configuration leads to significant different voltage distributions and can be well presented by equipotential lines superimposed CT-slices - a Matlab graphical user interface visualizes the results in freely selectable slices of the 3D geometry. Voltage distribution along theoretically estimated fiber paths could be calculated as well as visualized. For further calculation of nerve or denervated muscle fiber activation and its optimization, real fiber paths have to be defined and referenced to the potential- and the CT-data.

  3. Among-Individual Variation in Desert Iguanas (Squamata: Dipsosaurus dorsalis): Endurance Capacity Is Positively Related to Home Range Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jennifer M; Garland, Theodore

    Among species of lizards, endurance capacity measured on a motorized treadmill is positively related to daily movement distance and time spent moving, but few studies have addressed such relationships at the level of individual variation within a sex and age category in a single population. Both endurance capacity and home range size show substantial individual variation in lizards, rendering them suitable for such studies. We predicted that these traits would be positively related because endurance capacity is one of the factors that has the potential to limit home range size. We measured the endurance capacity and home range size of adult male desert iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis). Lizards were field captured for measurements of endurance, and home range data were gathered using visual identification of previously marked individuals. Endurance was significantly repeatable between replicate trials, conducted 1-17 d apart ([Formula: see text] for log-transformed values, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). The log of the higher of two endurance trials was positively but not significantly related to log body mass. The log of home range area was positively but not significantly related to log body mass, the number of sightings, or the time span from first to last sighting. As predicted, log endurance was positively correlated with log home range area ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]; for body-mass residual endurance values: [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]). These results suggest that endurance capacity may have a permissive effect on home range size. Alternatively, individuals with larger home ranges may experience training effects (phenotypic plasticity) that increase their endurance.

  4. Dorsalis pedis arterial pressure is lower than noninvasive arm blood pressure in normotensive patients under sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Enqin; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Yongshuai; Lu, Kaizhi

    2016-02-01

    It is widely known that blood pressure (BP) in the lower extremity is higher than in the upper extremity. However, whether this phenomenon remains the same during general anesthesia is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the difference between invasive dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) pressure and the most commonly used noninvasive arm pressure during sevoflurane anesthesia. A total of 50 normotensive Chinese patients were enrolled in this observational study. Invasive DPA pressure, noninvasive arm pressure, and systemic vascular resistance index were assessed simultaneously. BP data during the entire surgery were analyzed through a Bland-Altman plot for repeated measures. The concordance of BP variation in the DPA and the arm was analyzed using four-quadrant plots and linear regression. The time-dependent changes in BP and the systemic vascular resistance index were also evaluated. Data from 46 effective cases were analyzed. Bias (95% limits of agreement) was -7.40 mmHg (-20.36 to +5.57 mmHg) for mean blood pressure, +3.54 mmHg (-20.32 to +27.41 mmHg) for systolic blood pressure, and -10.20 mmHg (-23.66 to +3.26 mmHg) for diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The concordance of BP variation at the two measurement sites was clinically acceptable. DPA pressure and vascular resistance in the lower limb decreased gradually during surgery. DPA pressure tends to be lower than arm pressure under sevoflurane anesthesia, especially the mean blood pressure and the diastolic blood pressure. Hence, noninvasive arm BP monitoring is recommend to be retained when invasive BP is measured at the DPA, so as to allow clinicians to comprehensively evaluate the BP condition of the patients and make appropriate therapeutic decisions.

  5. Low Diversity Bacterial Community and the Trapping Activity of Metabolites from Cultivable Bacteria Species in the Female Reproductive System of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhanghong; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to identify the bacteria inhabiting the reproductive system of the female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), and evaluate the chemotaxis of B. dorsalis to the metabolites produced by the bacteria. Based on 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), 18 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned to the five bacterial classes Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Nine OTUs were assigned to Gammaproteobacteria, which was the most highly represented class. Enterobacteriaceae constituted the dominant family, and within this family, three genera and five species were identified, including Enterobacter sakazakii, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter amnigenus. In this set, the first two species were the dominant components, and the latter three species were the minor ones. Finally, we found that the metabolites produced by R. terrigena, K. oxytoca and K. pneumoniae were attractive to the B. dorsalis adults, and in field studies, B. dorsalis adults were most attracted to K. oxytoca. Collectively, our results suggest that the female reproductive system plays an important role in the transfer of enterobacteria from the gut to fruit. Our data may prompt the development of a female-targeted population control strategy for this fly. PMID:22754363

  6. Molecular Cloning, Characterization and mRNA Expression of a Chitin Synthase 2 Gene from the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae

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    Kang-Kang Xu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chitin synthase (CHS, a potential target for eco-friendly insecticides, plays an essential role in chitin formation in insects. In this study, a full-length cDNA encoding chitin synthase 2 (BdCHS2 was cloned and characterized in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. The BdCHS2 cDNA had 4417 nucleotides, containing an open reading frame of 4122 nucleotides, which encoded 1373 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 158.5 kDa. Phylogenetic analysis with other insect CHSs suggested that BdCHS2 belongs to insect CHS2. The BdCHS2 transcript was predominately found in midgut but was detected at low levels in fat body, Malpighian tubules, integument, and trachea. Moreover, BdCHS2 was expressed in all developmental stages, and highly expressed in the feeding stages. There was a positive relationship between BdCHS2 expression and total chitin content during development. Furthermore, both the gene expression and chitin content in midgut decreased when the insect was fed for 24 h, then starved for 24 h, while they increased dramatically and rapidly under the condition of starvation for 24 h then feeding for 24 h. These results suggest that BdCHS2 may play an important role in regulating chitin content of the midgut, and subsequently affect the growth and development of B. dorsalis.

  7. Ecdysis Triggering Hormone Signaling (ETH/ETHR-A Is Required for the Larva-Larva Ecdysis in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae

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    Yan Shi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Insects must undergo ecdysis for successful development and growth, and the ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH, released by the Inka cells, is a master hormone in this process. In this study, we determined the sequence of the ETH precursor and receptors in an agriculturally important pest insect, the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel. We identified two functionally distinct splice receptor isoforms: BdETH-R-A and BdETH-R-B, and when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-WTA11 cells, they exhibited a high sensitivity to the two mature peptides BdETH1 and BdETH2. The BdETH transcript was detected in the tracheal tissue of the larvae. Inka cells were identified with immunohistochemical antibody staining against Drosophila melanogaster ETH1, and in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes. Selective RNA silencing of BdETH or BdETH-R-A, but not of BdETH-R-B, caused developmental failure at ecdysis. The dsRNA-treated larvae displayed tracheal defects and could not shed the old cuticle followed by death. Our results demonstrated that BdETH, via activation of BdETH-R-A but not ETH-R-B, plays an essential role in regulating the process of larva-larva ecdysis in B. dorsalis.

  8. Functional analysis of a NF-κB transcription factor in the immune defense of Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Liang, H; Hou, Y

    2017-04-01

    Although some novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP) have been successfully isolated from Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, the mechanisms underlying the induction of these peptides are still elusive. The homolog of NF-κB transcription factor Relish, designated as BdRelish, was cloned from B. dorsalis. The full length cDNA of BdRelish is 3954 bp with an open reading frame that encodes 1013 amino acids. Similar to Drosophila Relish and the mammalian p100, it is a compound protein containing a conserved Rel homology domain, an IPT (Ig-like, plexins, transcription factors) domain and an IκB-like domain (four ankyrin repeats), the nuclear localization signal RKRRR is also detected at the residues 449-453, suggesting that it has homology to Relish and it is a member of the Rel family of transcription activator proteins. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis reveals that BdRelish mRNAs are detected in different quantities from various tissues and the highest transcription level of BdRelish is determined in fat body. The injection challenge of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureas significantly upregulated the expression of BdRelish. The injection of BdRelish dsRNA markedly reduced the expression of BdRelish and decreased the transcription magnitude of antimicrobial peptides. Individuals injected BdRelish dsRNA died at a significantly faster rate compared with the control groups. Therefore, BdRelish is vital for the transcription of AMPs to attack the invading bacteria.

  9. Genetic analysis of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations based on mitochondrial cox1 and nad1 gene sequences from India and other Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Jaipal S; Naaz, Naiyar; Prabhakar, Chandra S; Lemtur, Moanaro

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the genetic diversity and demographic history of Bactrocera dorsalis, a destructive and polyphagous insect pest of fruit crops in diverse geographic regions of India. 19 widely dispersed populations of the fly from India and other Asian countries were analysed using partial sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) genes to investigate genetic diversity, genetic structure, and demographic history in the region. Genetic diversity indices [number of haplotypes (H), haloptype diversity (Hd), nucleotide diversity (π) and average number of nucleotide difference (k)] of populations revealed that B. dorsalis maintains fairly high level of genetic diversity without isolation by distance among the geographic regions. Demographic analysis showed significant (negative) Tajimas' D and Fu's F S with non significant sum of squared deviations (SSD) values, which indicate the possibility of recent sudden expansion of species and is further supported through distinctively star-like distribution structure of haplotypes among populations. Thus, the results indicate that both ongoing and historical factors have played important role in determining the genetic structure and diversity of the species in India. Consequently, sterile insect technique (SIT) could be a possible management strategy of species in the regions.

  10. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus is implicated in the anxiolytic-like effects of Cinnamomum cassia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yang-Hee; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hong, Sa-Ik; Lee, Sung-Ok; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2012-12-01

    Previously we reported that the 50% EtOH extract of Cinnamomum cassia (C. cassia) possesses anxiolytic-like activity in the mouse elevated plus maze (EPM) test. This activity was blocked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, WAY 100635. Therefore, in order to investigate the effect of C. cassia on 5-HT(1A) receptor binding, quantitative autoradiography of 5-HT(1A) receptors was carried out in brains of mice treated acutely and repeatedly with C. cassia. Binding of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to the 5-HT(1A) receptor was investigated in the mouse brain. After a single treatment of C. cassia (750 mg/kg, p.o.), [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding showed a significant increase in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). After repeated treatment with C. cassia (100mg/kg, once a day for 5 days, p.o.), [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding showed no significant change in any brain region. Taken together, the anxiolytic-like effect of the 50% EtOH extract of C. cassia might be mediated by region specific change of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Dania V.; Burke, Teresa F.; Hensler, Julie G.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTPγS binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10μM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G-proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram. PMID:18289523

  12. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  13. [DORSALIS PEDIS FLAP SERIES-PARALLEL BIG TOE NAIL COMPOSITE TISSUE FLAP TO REPAIR HAND SKIN OF DEGLOVING INJURY WITH THUMB DEFECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengju; Zhang, Wenlong; Zhao, Gang; Li, Zhigang; Zhao, Shaoping; Zhang, Tieshan

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of dorsalis pedis flap series-parallel big toe nail composite tissue flap in the repairment of hand skin of degloving injury with tumb defect. Between March 2009 and June 2013, 8 cases of hand degloving injury with thumb defect caused by machine twisting were treated. There were 7 males and 1 female with the mean age of 36 years (range, 26-48 years). Injury located at the left hand in 3 cases and at the right hand in 5 cases. The time from injury to hospitalization was 1.5-4.0 hours (mean, 2.5 hours). The defect area was 8 cm x 6 cm to 15 cm x 1 cm. The thumb defect was rated as degree I in 5 cases and as degree II in 3 cases. The contralateral dorsal skin flap (9 cm x 7 cm to 10 cm x 8 cm) combined with ipsilateral big toe nail composite tissue flap (2.5 cm x 1.8 cm to 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm) was used, including 3 parallel anastomosis flaps and 5 series anastomosis flaps. The donor site of the dorsal flap was repaired with thick skin grafts, the stumps wound was covered with tongue flap at the shank side of big toe. Vascular crisis occurred in 1 big toe nail composite tissue flap, margin necrosis occurred in 2 dorsalis pedis flap; the other flaps survived, and primary healing of wound was obtained. The grafted skin at dorsal donor site all survived, skin of hallux toe stump had no necrosis. Eight cases were followed up 4-20 months (mean, 15.5 months). All flaps had soft texture and satisfactory appearance; the cutaneous sensory recovery time was 4-7 months (mean, 5 months). At 4 months after operation, the two-point discrimination of the thumb pulp was 8-10 mm (mean, 9 mm), and the two-point discrimination of dorsal skin flap was 7-9 mm (mean, 8.5 mm). According to Society of Hand Surgery standard for the evaluation of upper part of the function, the results were excellent in 4 cases, good in 3 cases, and fair in 1 case. The donor foot had normal function. Dorsalis pedis flap series-parallel big toe nail composite tissue flap is an ideal

  14. Assessment of Attractiveness of Cassava as a Roosting Plant for the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and the Oriental Fruit Fly, B. dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T.

    2011-01-01

    Application of bait spray to crop borders is a standard approach for suppression of melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations and may also be of value for suppression of oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel) populations. Establishment of preferred roosting hosts as crop borders may help to improve suppression of both fruit fly species by providing sites for bait spray applications. In an area-wide B. cucurbitae suppression trial, the question was raised as to whether cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), could be used as a B. cucurbitae roosting host. M. esculenta was of interest as a roosting host because, in contrast to many other identified preferred roosting hosts, it would also be a crop potentially increasing the productivity of the crop production system overall. As a short-lived and shrubby perennial, M. esculenta potentially constitutes a crop with more persistent roosting foliage than an annual crop such as corn, Zea mays L. (Cyperales: Poaceae), that has often been planted as a roosting host for B. cucurbitae control. Using protein-baited traps set amidst potted plants placed adjacent to a papaya Carica papaya L. (Violales: Caricaceae) orchard known to have established populations of B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis, the effectiveness of M. esculenta as a roosting host was assessed by comparing its attractiveness to that of castor bean, Ricinus communis L (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), previously identified as one of the most attractive roosting hosts for B. cucurbitae, and to corn, a crop which has been planted as a roosting host for help in B. cucurbitae control. The results showed that use of M. esculenta as a roosting host is comparable to use of R. communis by both B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis. These results provide encouragement to incorporate M. esculenta on a farm as a trap crop (i.e. site for bait spray application). This has the advantage of having the trap crop be a crop on its

  15. Di- and tri-fluorinated analogs of methyl eugenol: attraction to and metabolism in the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eric B; Khrimian, Ashot; Siderhurst, Matthew S

    2011-06-01

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), males are attracted to the natural phenylpropanoid methyl eugenol (ME). They feed compulsively on ME and metabolize it to ring and side-chain hydroxylated compounds that have both pheromonal and allomonal properties. Previously, we demonstrated that mono-fluorination at the terminal carbon of the ME side-chain significantly reduced metabolic side-chain hydroxylation, while mono-fluorination of ME at position 4 of the aromatic ring blocked ring-hydroxylation but surprisingly enhanced side-chain hydroxylation. Here, we demonstrated that the introduction of fluorine atoms on both the ring and side-chain of ME blocks both positions that undergo enzymatic hydroxylation and, in particular, completely inhibits oxidative biotransformation of the allyl group. In laboratory experiments, B. dorsalis males initially were more attracted to both 1-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxy-2-(3,3-difluoro-2-propenyl)benzene (I) and 1-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxy-2-(3-fluoro-2-propenyl)benzene (II) than to ME. However, both I and II were taken up by flies at rates significantly less than that of ME. Flies fed with difluoroanalog II partially metabolized it to 5-fluoro-4-(3-fluoroprop-2-en-1-yl)-2-methoxyphenol (III), and flies fed with trifluoroanalog I produced 4-(3,3-difluoroprop-2-en-1-yl)-5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenol (V), but the rates of metabolism relative to rates of intakes were much lower compared to those of ME. Flies that consumed either the tri- or difluorinated analog showed higher post-feeding mortality than those that fed on methyl eugenol. In field trials, trifluoroanalog I was ∼90% less attractive to male B. dorsalis than ME, while difluoroanalog II was ∼50% less attractive. These results suggest that increasing fluorination can contribute to fly mortality, but the trade off with attractancy makes it unlikely that either a di or trifluorinated ME would be an improvement over ME for detection and/or eradication of this species.

  16. Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasawin, Siriwan; Aketarawong, Nidchaya; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Thanaphum, Sujinda

    2014-01-01

    The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization. Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions. Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae

  17. Disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A Heteroreceptor Complexes in the Raphe-Hippocampal 5-HT System Develop in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes are involved in neuroplasticity in the rat hippocampus and in the mesencephalic raphe 5-HT nerve cells. There exists a 5-HT1A protomer enhancement of FGFR1 protomer signaling. Acute and 10 day treatment with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT produced enhanced antidepressant effects in the forced swim test (FST. We studied in the current work the disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heterocomplexes in a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders sensitive line (FSL rats of Sprague-Dawley (SD origin, by means of neurochemical, neurophysiological and behavioral techniques. In control SD rats, the FGFR1 agonist SUN11602 and FGF2 produced a significant reduction of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK currents induced by 8-OH-DPAT in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In FSL rats, only i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT alone treatment produced a significant reduction in the immobility time. The combined i.c.v. treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT in FSL rats did not cause a significant decrease in immobility time in the FST. However, in the SD rats this combined treatment produced a significant reduction. Furthermore, in the FSL rat a significant increase in the density of FGFR1-5-HT1A proximity ligation assay (PLA positive clusters was only found after i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT treatment alone in the CA2 and CA3 areas. In the SD rat a significant increase in the density of specific PLA clusters was only observed in the CA2 area of the i.c.v. combined treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT group. No treatment led to significant changes in the PLA clusters of the dorsal raphe in the FSL rat. However, significant changes in the density of specific PLA clusters were only found in the dorsal raphe of SD rats after combined treatment and treatment with 8-OH-DPAT alone. The results indicate that in FSL rats compared with SD rats alterations may develop in the ability of 8-OH-DPAT and combined FGFR1 and 5-HT1A

  18. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  19. Disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A Heteroreceptor Complexes in the Raphe-Hippocampal 5-HT System Develop in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; DuPont, Caitlin M; Li, Xiang; Savelli, David; Lattanzi, Davide; Srivastava, Ipsit; Narváez, Manuel; Di Palma, Michael; Barbieri, Elisa; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Cuppini, Riccardo; Odagaki, Yuji; Palkovits, Miklos; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Lindskog, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    The FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes are involved in neuroplasticity in the rat hippocampus and in the mesencephalic raphe 5-HT nerve cells. There exists a 5-HT1A protomer enhancement of FGFR1 protomer signaling. Acute and 10 day treatment with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT produced enhanced antidepressant effects in the forced swim test (FST). We studied in the current work the disturbances in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heterocomplexes in a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats of Sprague-Dawley (SD) origin, by means of neurochemical, neurophysiological and behavioral techniques. In control SD rats, the FGFR1 agonist SUN11602 and FGF2 produced a significant reduction of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (GIRK) currents induced by 8-OH-DPAT in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In FSL rats, only i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT alone treatment produced a significant reduction in the immobility time. The combined i.c.v. treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT) in FSL rats did not cause a significant decrease in immobility time in the FST. However, in the SD rats this combined treatment produced a significant reduction. Furthermore, in the FSL rat a significant increase in the density of FGFR1-5-HT1A proximity ligation assay (PLA) positive clusters was only found after i.c.v. 8-OH-DPAT treatment alone in the CA2 and CA3 areas. In the SD rat a significant increase in the density of specific PLA clusters was only observed in the CA2 area of the i.c.v. combined treatment (FGF2 + 8-OH-DPAT) group. No treatment led to significant changes in the PLA clusters of the dorsal raphe in the FSL rat. However, significant changes in the density of specific PLA clusters were only found in the dorsal raphe of SD rats after combined treatment and treatment with 8-OH-DPAT alone. The results indicate that in FSL rats compared with SD rats alterations may develop in the ability of 8-OH-DPAT and combined FGFR1 and 5-HT1A agonist

  20. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, A D; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-05-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but had no effect on yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake during ongoing self-administration. Results indicate an important role of MRN CRF receptors in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but not yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Infralimbic and dorsal raphé microinjection of the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP-93,129: attenuation of aggressive behavior in CFW male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccidomo, S; Quadros, IMH; Takahashi, A; Fish, EW; Miczek, KA

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Aggressive behavior and impaired impulse control have been associated with dysregulations in the serotonergic system and with impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex. 5-HT1B receptors have been shown to specifically modulate several types of offensive aggression. Objective To characterize the relative importance of 2 populations of 5-HT1B receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and infralimbic cortex (ILC) in the modulation of aggressive behavior. Methods Male CFW mice were conditioned on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement to self-administer a 6% (w/v) alcohol solution. Mice repeatedly engaged in 5 min aggressive confrontations until aggressive behavior stabilized. Next, a cannula was implanted into either the DRN or the ILC. After recovery, mice were tested for aggression after self-administration of either 1.0 g/kg alcohol or water prior to a microinjection of the 5-HT1B agonist, CP-93,129 (0–1.0 µg/infusion). Results In both the DRN and ILC, CP-93,129 reduced aggressive behaviors after both water and alcohol self-administration. Intra-raphé CP-93,129 dose-dependently reduced both aggressive and locomotor behaviors. However, the anti-aggressive effects of intra-cortical CP-93,129 were behaviorally specific. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of the serotonergic system in the modulation of aggression and suggest that the behaviorally specific effects of 5-HT1B receptor agonists are regionally selective. 5-HT1B receptors in a medial subregion of the prefrontal cortex, the ILC, appear to be critically involved in the attenuation of species-typical levels of aggression. PMID:22222863

  2. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-05

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Infralimbic and dorsal raphé microinjection of the 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist CP-93,129: attenuation of aggressive behavior in CFW male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccidomo, S; Quadros, I M H; Takahashi, A; Fish, E W; Miczek, K A

    2012-07-01

    Aggressive behavior and impaired impulse control have been associated with dysregulations in the serotonergic system and with impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex. 5-HT(1B) receptors have been shown to specifically modulate several types of offensive aggression. This study aims to characterize the relative importance of two populations of 5-HT(1B) receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and infralimbic cortex (ILC) in the modulation of aggressive behavior. Male CFW mice were conditioned on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement to self-administer a 6% (w/v) alcohol solution. Mice repeatedly engaged in 5-min aggressive confrontations until aggressive behavior stabilized. Next, a cannula was implanted into either the DRN or the ILC. After recovery, mice were tested for aggression after self-administration of either 1.0 g/kg alcohol or water prior to a microinjection of the 5-HT(1B) agonist, CP-93,129 (0-1.0 μg/infusion). In both the DRN and ILC, CP-93,129 reduced aggressive behaviors after both water and alcohol self-administration. Intra-raphé CP-93,129 dose-dependently reduced both aggressive and locomotor behaviors. However, the anti-aggressive effects of intra-cortical CP-93,129 were behaviorally specific. These findings highlight the importance of the serotonergic system in the modulation of aggression and suggest that the behaviorally specific effects of 5-HT(1B) receptor agonists are regionally selective. 5-HT(1B) receptors in a medial subregion of the prefrontal cortex, the ILC, appear to be critically involved in the attenuation of species-typical levels of aggression.

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the dorsal raphe inhibits avoidance and escape reactions and activates forebrain regions related to the modulation of anxiety/panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wscieklica, Tatiana; Silva, Mariana S C F; Lemes, Jéssica A; Melo-Thomas, Liana; Céspedes, Isabel C; Viana, Milena B

    2017-03-15

    One of the main neurochemical systems associated with anxiety/panic is the serotonergic system originating from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Previous evidence suggests that the DR is composed of distinct subpopulations of neurons, both morphologically and functionally distinct. It seems that mainly the dorsal region of the DR (DRD) regulates anxiety-related reactions, while lateral wings DR (lwDR) serotonin (5-HT) neurons inhibit panic-related responses. In this study we used the technique of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to investigate the role played by the DRD and lwDR in defense. Male Wistar rats were submitted to high-frequency stimulation (100μA, 100Hz) in one of the two DR regions for 1h and immediately after tested in the avoidance or escape tasks of the elevated T-maze (ETM). In clinical terms, these responses have been related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. After being submitted to the ETM, animals were placed in an open field for locomotor activity assessment. An additional group of rats was submitted to DBS of the DRD or the lwDR and used for quantification of c-Fos immunoreactive (Fos-ir) neurons in brain regions related to the modulation of defense. Results showed that stimulation of the DRD decreased avoidance latencies, an anxiolytic-like effect. DRD stimulation also led to increases in Fos-ir in the medial amygdala, lateral septum and cingulate cortex. DBS applied to the lwDR increased escape latencies, a panicolytic-like effect. This data highlights the importance of raphe topography and the potential benefit of the DBS technique for the treatment of anxiety-related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Attraction and mortality of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) to STATIC Spinosad ME weathered under operational conditions in California and Florida: a reduced-risk male annihilation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Roger I; Souder, Steven K; Hoffman, Kevin; Mercogliano, Juan; Smith, Trevor R; Hammond, Jack; Davis, Bobbie J; Brodie, Matt; Dripps, James E

    2014-08-01

    Studies were conducted in 2013-2014 to quantify attraction, feeding, and mortality of male oriental fruit flies, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), to STATIC Spinosad ME a reduced-risk male annihilation treatment (MAT) formulation consisting of an amorphous polymer matrix in combination with methyl eugenol (ME) and spinosad compared with the standard treatment of Min-U-Gel mixed with ME and naled (Dibrom). Our approach used a behavioral methodology for evaluation of slow-acting reduced-risk insecticides. ME treatments were weathered for 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d under operational conditions in California and Florida and shipped to Hawaii for bioassays. In field tests using bucket traps to attract and capture wild males, and in toxicity studies conducted in 1-m(3) cages using released males of controlled ages, STATIC Spinosad ME performed equally as well to the standard formulation of Min-U-Gel ME with naled for material aged up to 28 d in both California and Florida. In laboratory feeding tests in which individual males were exposed for 5 min to the different ME treatments, mortality induced by STATIC Spinosad ME recorded at 24 h did not differ from mortality caused by Min-U-Gel ME with naled at 1, 7, 14, and 21 d in California and was equal to or higher for all weathered time periods in Florida during two trials. Spinosad has low contact toxicity, and when mixed with an attractant and slow release matrix, offers a reduced-risk alternative for eradication of B. dorsalis and related ME attracted species, without many of the potential negative effects to humans and nontargets associated with broad-spectrum contact insecticides such as naled.

  6. An assessment of cold hardiness and biochemical adaptations for cold tolerance among different geographic populations of the Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua; Zeng, Ling; Han, Zhaojun

    2014-01-01

    The cold hardiness of larvae, pupae, and adults of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera Dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) was characterized first, and then body water, total sugar and glycerol contents, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of different geographical populations subjected to suitable rearing conditions and under sublethal low-temperature stress were compared. The cold hardiness of different populations was well correlated with the latitudes of distributions. The northern marginal population (31.6° N) had higher cold tolerance than southern populations (23.1° N and 24.3° N). Among different life stages, larvae had the least cold tolerance, whereas pupae had the most tolerance. Under suitable rearing conditions, the marginal population had lower activities of all four tested enzymes than that of the southern populations and also had lower body water and higher total sugar and glycerol contents. The low-temperature stress induced higher SOD, CAT, POD, and ADH activities of all tested life stages and of all tested populations with higher increase intensity in adults and pupae than in larvae. The increase intensity was higher in the marginal population than in the southern populations. Pupae in the marginal population and adults in the southern populations showed the largest activity enhancement, which agreed with the insect's overwinter stages in their respective locations. Lower temperature stress lowered body water and total sugar contents and increased glycerol contents. The results revealed a strong correlation between the cold hardiness of a population and the concentration or activity of various biochemicals and enzymes known to be involved in cold tolerance. The marginal population of B. dorsalis might have evolved a new biotype with better adaption to low temperature. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of

  7. Two Chitin Biosynthesis Pathway Genes in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae): Molecular Characteristics, Expression Patterns, and Roles in Larval-Pupal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Wu, Yi-Bei; Chen, Li; Xu, Kang-Kang; Xie, Yi-Fei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI) and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP), two key components in the chitin biosynthesis pathway, are critical for insect growth and metamorphosis. In this study, we identified the genes BdG6PI and BdUAP from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The open reading frames (ORFs) of BdG6PI (1,491 bp) and BdUAP (1,677 bp) encoded 496 and 558 amino acid residues, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that BdG6PI and BdUAP had high amino acid sequence identity with other insect homologues. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated that BdG6PI was mainly expressed in the early stages of third-instar larvae and adults, while significantly higher expression of BdUAP was observed in adults. Both transcripts were expressed highly in the Malpighian tubules, but only slightly in the tracheae. The expression of both BdG6PI and BdUAP was significantly up-regulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone exposure and down-regulated by starvation. Moreover, injection of double-stranded RNAs of BdG6PI and BdUAP into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the corresponding gene expressions. Additionally, silencing of BdUAP resulted in 65% death and abnormal phenotypes of larvae, while silencing of BdG6PI had a slight effect on insect molting. These findings provide some data on the roles of BdG6PI and BdUAP in B. dorsalis and demonstrate the potential role for BdUAP in larval-pupal transition. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Differential stress induced c-Fos expression and identification of region-specific miRNA-mRNA networks in the dorsal raphe and amygdala of high-responder/low-responder rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua L; Ata, Anooshah E; Jackson, Nateka L; Rahn, Elizabeth J; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2017-02-15

    Chronic stress triggers a variety of physical and mental health problems, and how individuals cope with stress influences risk for emotional disorders. To investigate molecular mechanisms underlying distinct stress coping styles, we utilized rats that were selectively-bred for differences in emotionality and stress reactivity. We show that high novelty responding (HR) rats readily bury a shock probe in the defensive burying test, a measure of proactive stress coping behavior, while low novelty responding (LR) rats exhibit enhanced immobility, a measure of reactive coping. Shock exposure in the defensive burying test elicited greater activation of HR rats' caudal dorsal raphe serotonergic cells compared to LRs, but lead to more pronounced activation throughout LRs' amygdala (lateral, basolateral, central, and basomedial nuclei) compared to HRs. RNA-sequencing revealed 271 mRNA transcripts and 33 microRNA species that were differentially expressed in HR/LR raphe and amygdala. We mapped potential microRNA-mRNA networks by correlating and clustering mRNA and microRNA expression and identified networks that differed in either the HR/LR dorsal raphe or amygdala. A dorsal raphe network linked three microRNAs which were down-regulated in LRs (miR-206-3p, miR-3559-5p, and miR-378a-3p) to repression of genes related to microglia and immune response (Cd74, Cyth4, Nckap1l, and Rac2), the genes themselves were up-regulated in LR dorsal raphe. In the amygdala, another network linked miR-124-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-3068-3p, miR-380-5p, miR-539-3p, and miR-7a-1-3p with repression of chromatin remodeling-related genes (Cenpk, Cenpq, Itgb3bp, and Mis18a). Overall this work highlights potential drivers of gene-networks and downstream molecular pathways within the raphe and amygdala that contribute to individual differences in stress coping styles and stress vulnerabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Low Diversity Bacterial Community and the Trapping Activity of Metabolites from Cultivable Bacteria Species in the Female Reproductive System of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to identify the bacteria inhabiting the reproductive system of the female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, and evaluate the chemotaxis of B. dorsalis to the metabolites produced by the bacteria. Based on 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE, 18 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were assigned to the five bacterial classes Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Nine OTUs were assigned to Gammaproteobacteria, which was the most highly represented class. Enterobacteriaceae constituted the dominant family, and within this family, three genera and five species were identified, including Enterobacter sakazakii, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter amnigenus. In this set, the first two species were the dominant components, and the latter three species were the minor ones. Finally, we found that the metabolites produced by R. terrigena, K. oxytoca and K. pneumoniae were attractive to the B. dorsalis adults, and in field studies, B. dorsalis adults were most attracted to K. oxytoca. Collectively, our results suggest that the female reproductive system plays an important role in the transfer of enterobacteria from the gut to fruit. Our data may prompt the development of a female-targeted population control strategy for this fly.

  10. Peptidomic analysis of skin secretions of the Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis (Rhinophrynidae): Insight into the origin of host-defense peptides within the Pipidae and characterization of a proline-arginine-rich peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Guilhaudis, Laure; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Attoub, Samir; Jouenne, Thierry; King, Jay D

    2017-11-01

    The Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis is the sole extant representative of the Rhinophrynidae. United in the superfamily Pipoidea, the Rhinophrynidae is considered to be the sister-group to the extant Pipidae which comprises Hymenochirus, Pipa, Pseudhymenochirus and Xenopus. Cationic, α-helical host-defense peptides of the type found in Hymenochirus, Pseudhymenochirus, and Xenopus species (hymenochirins, pseudhymenochirins, magainins, and peptides related to PGLa, XPF, and CPF) were not detected in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of R. dorsalis. Skin secretions of representatives of the genus Pipa also do not contain cationic α-helical host-defense peptides which suggest, as the most parsimonious hypothesis, that the ability to produce such peptides by frogs within the Pipidae family arose in the common ancestor of (Hymenochirus+Pseudhymenochirus)+Xenopus after divergence from the line of evolution leading to extant Pipa species. Peptidomic analysis of the R. dorsalis secretions led to the isolation of rhinophrynin-27, a proline-arginine-rich peptide with the primary structure ELRLPEIARPVPEVLPARLPLPALPRN, together with rhinophrynin-33 containing the C-terminal extension KMAKNQ. Rhinophrynin-27 shows limited structural similarity to the porcine multifunctional peptide PR-39 but it lacks antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. Like PR-39, the peptide adopts a poly-l-proline helix but some changes in the circular dichroism spectrum were observed in the presence of anionic sodium dodecylsulfate micelles consistent with the stabilization of turn structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-Release Consumption of Methyl Eugenol Increases the Mating Competitiveness of Sterile Males of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in Large Field Enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Todd E.; Edu, James; McInnis, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The sterile insect technique may be implemented to control populations of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), when environmental concerns preclude widespread use of chemical attractants or toxicants. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the mating competitiveness of sterile B. dorsalis males could be increased via pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol. Males of the oriental fruit fly are strongly attracted to this plant-borne compound, which they ingest and use in the synthesis of the sex pheromone. Previous studies conducted in the laboratory and small field-cages have shown that males given methyl eugenol produce a more attractive pheromone for females and have a higher mating success rate than males denied methyl eugenol. Here, levels of egg sterility were compared following the release of wild-like flies and either methyl eugenol-fed (treated) or methyl eugenol-deprived (control) sterile males in large field enclosures at four over flooding ratios ranging from 5:1 to 60:1 (sterile: wild-like males). Treated sterile males were fed methyl eugenol for 1–4 h (depending on the over flooding ratio tested) 3 d prior to release. Eggs were dissected from introduced fruits (apples), incubated in the laboratory, and scored for hatch rate. The effect of methyl eugenol was most pronounced at lower over flooding ratios. At the 5:1 and 10:1 over flooding ratios, the level of egg sterility observed for treated, sterile males was significantly greater than that observed for control, sterile males. In addition, the incidence of egg sterility reported for treated sterile males at these lower over flooding ratios was similar to that noted for treated or control sterile males at the 30:1 or 60:1 over flooding ratios. This latter result, in particular, suggests that pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol allows for a reduction in the number of sterile flies that are produced and released, thus increasing the cost

  12. Molecular characteristics, mRNA expression, and alternative splicing of a ryanodine receptor gene in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Rui Yuan

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97% to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis.

  13. Pre-release consumption of methyl eugenol increases the mating competitiveness of sterile males of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, in large field enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Todd E; Edu, James; McInnis, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The sterile insect technique may be implemented to control populations of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), when environmental concerns preclude widespread use of chemical attractants or toxicants. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the mating competitiveness of sterile B. dorsalis males could be increased via pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol. Males of the oriental fruit fly are strongly attracted to this plant-borne compound, which they ingest and use in the synthesis of the sex pheromone. Previous studies conducted in the laboratory and small field-cages have shown that males given methyl eugenol produce a more attractive pheromone for females and have a higher mating success rate than males denied methyl eugenol. Here, levels of egg sterility were compared following the release of wild-like flies and either methyl eugenol-fed (treated) or methyl eugenol-deprived (control) sterile males in large field enclosures at four over flooding ratios ranging from 5:1 to 60:1 (sterile: wild-like males). Treated sterile males were fed methyl eugenol for 1-4 h (depending on the over flooding ratio tested) 3 d prior to release. Eggs were dissected from introduced fruits (apples), incubated in the laboratory, and scored for hatch rate. The effect of methyl eugenol was most pronounced at lower over flooding ratios. At the 5:1 and 10:1 over flooding ratios, the level of egg sterility observed for treated, sterile males was significantly greater than that observed for control, sterile males. In addition, the incidence of egg sterility reported for treated sterile males at these lower over flooding ratios was similar to that noted for treated or control sterile males at the 30:1 or 60:1 over flooding ratios. This latter result, in particular, suggests that pre-release feeding on methyl eugenol allows for a reduction in the number of sterile flies that are produced and released, thus increasing the cost

  14. Analysis of serotonin, dopamine and their metabolites in the caudate putamen, the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the median raphe nucleus of euthermic and torpid deermice, Peromyscus maniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L H; Pivorun, E B

    1989-06-01

    Deermice, subjected to food rationing and low ambient temperature, were sacrificed in normothermia or during daily torpor. Levels of monoamines and their metabolites in the caudate putamen (CPN), the suprachiasmatic nuclear area (SCN), and the median raphe nucleus (MRN) were quantified through the use of HPLC with electrochemical detection. Significant elevations in levels (pg/mg protein) of the serotonin (5-HT) metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were noted in torpid individuals in all nuclei examined. The dopamine (DA) metabolite, homovanillic acid (HVA) was significantly elevated in the CPN and MRN of torpid individuals. Moreover, a significant increase in the HVA to DA ratio was also noted in the CPN and the MRN. In the SCN, the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), 5-HT, DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were also increased significantly during torpor. These significant elevations suggest that an increase in the activity of the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems occurs in these nuclei during daily torpor in the deermouse.

  15. The vigilance promoting drug modafinil modulates serotonin transmission in the rat prefrontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus. Possible relevance for its postulated antidepressant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Luca; Antonelli, Tiziana; Beggiato, Sarah; Cristina Tomasini, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell; Tanganelli, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Modafinil, (RS)-2-(diphenylmethylsulfinyl)acetamide derivative (Modiodal, Provigil), is a vigilance-promoting agent which reduces sleep episodes by improving wakefulness. It is approved by the USA FDA for narcolepsy, shiftwork sleep disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea with residual excessive sleepiness despite optimal use of continuous positive airway pressure. Unlike classical psychostimulants such as amphetamine and amphetamine-like compounds, the awaking effect of modafinil is not associated with a disturbance of nighttime sleep, tolerance, and sensitization. Its precise mechanism of action is still unclear. In animal studies, modafinil and its analogues have been shown to modify dopaminergic, noradrenergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, orexinergic, and histaminergic pathways. Besides the approved use in sleep disorders, modafinil has been investigated for the treatment of fatigue, impaired cognition and some symptoms in a number of other disorders. In particular, clinical studies seem to indicate that the drug could be particularly successful in the treatment of depression and its use in major depressive and bipolar disorders, has been suggested. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this possible effect are still unknown. The present review firstly summarizes the structure-activity relationship studies and the mechanism of action of modafinil and its related compounds. Then, it focuses on data demonstrating that modafinil interacts with serotonin neuronal activity in rat frontal cortex and dorsal raphe nucleus, two brain areas linked together and involved in depression. Preclinical and clinical evidence of a positive interaction between modafinil and classical antidepressant drugs, is also summarized.

  16. How does early maternal separation and chronic stress in adult rats affect the immunoreactivity of serotonergic neurons within the dorsal raphe nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollano, Antonella; Trujillo, Verónica; Suárez, Marta M

    2018-01-01

    Vulnerability to emotional disorders like depression derives from interactions between early and late environments, including stressful conditions. The serotonin (5HT) system is strongly affected by stress and chronic unpredictable stress can alter the 5HT system. We evaluated the distribution of active serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) through immunohistochemistry in maternally separated and chronically stressed rats treated with an antidepressant, tianeptine, whose mechanism of action is still under review. Male Wistar rats were subjected to daily maternal separation (MS) for 4.5 h between postnatal days (PND) 1-21, or to animal facility rearing (AFR). Between (PND) days 50-74, rats were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress and were treated daily with tianeptine (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. We found an interaction between the effects of MS and chronic unpredictable stress on Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells at mid-caudal level of the DR. MS-chronically stressed rats showed an increase of Fos-5HT immunoreactive cells compared with AFR-chronically stressed rats. The ventrolateral (DRL/VLPAG) and dorsal (DRD) subdivisions of the DR were significantly more active than the ventral part (DRV). At the rostral level of the DR, tianeptine decreased the number of Fos-5HT cells in DR in the AFR groups, both unstressed and stressed. Overall, our results support the idea of a match in phenotype exhibited when the early and the adult environment correspond.

  17. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Knapp

    Full Text Available In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  18. The effects of speed on the in vivo activity and length of a limb muscle during the locomotion of the iguanian lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, F E; Jayne, B C

    2001-10-01

    The caudofemoralis muscle is the largest muscle that inserts onto the hindlimb of most ectothermic tetrapods, and previous studies hypothesize that it causes several movements that characterize the locomotion of vertebrates with a sprawling limb posture. Predicting caudofemoralis function is complicated because the muscle spans multiple joints with movements that vary with speed. Furthermore, depending on when any muscle is active relative to its change in length, its function can change from actively generating mechanical work to absorbing externally applied forces. We used synchronized electromyography, sonomicrometry and three-dimensional kinematics to determine in vivo caudofemoralis function in the desert iguana Dipsosaurus dorsalis for a wide range of speeds of locomotion from a walk to nearly maximal sprinting (50-350 cm s(-1)). Strain of the caudofemoralis increased with increasing tail elevation and long-axis rotation and protraction of the femur. However, knee extension only increased caudofemoralis strain when the femur was protracted. The maximum and minimum length of the caudofemoralis muscle and its average shortening velocity increased from the slowest speed up to the walk-run transition, but changed little with further increases in speed. The times of muscle shortening and lengthening were often not equal at higher locomotor speeds. Some (20-25 ms) activity occurred during lengthening of the caudofemoralis muscle before footfall. However, most caudofemoralis activity was consistent with performing positive mechanical work to flex the knee shortly after foot contact and to retract and rotate the femur throughout the propulsive phase.

  19. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of transformer and transformer 2 to Generate Male-Only Progeny in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guiqing; Wu, Qiang; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Guifen; Wan, Fanghao

    2015-01-01

    The transformer (tra) gene appears to act as the genetic switch that promotes female development by interaction with the transformer2 (tra-2) gene in several dipteran species including the Medfly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we describe the isolation, expression and function of tra and tra-2 in the economically important agricultural pest, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). Bdtra and Bdtra-2 are similar to their homologs from other tephritid species. Bdtra demonstrated sex-specific transcripts: one transcript in females and two transcripts in males. In contrast, Bdtra-2 only had one transcript that was common to males and females, which was transcribed continuously in different adult tissues and developmental stages. Bdtra-2 and the female form of Bdtra were maternally inherited in eggs, whereas the male form of Bdtra was not detectable until embryos of 1 and 2 h after egg laying. Function analyses of Bdtra and Bdtra-2 indicated that both were indispensable for female development, as nearly 100% males were obtained with embryonic RNAi against either Bdtra or Bdtra-2. The fertility of these RNAi-generated males was subsequently tested. More than 80% of RNAi-generated males could mate and the mated females could lay eggs, but only 40-48.6% males gave rise to progeny. In XX-reversed males and intersex individuals, no clear female gonadal morphology was observed after dissection. These results shed light on the development of a genetic sexing system with male-only release for this agricultural pest.

  20. cDNA CLONING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE CECROPIN AND ATTACIN FROM THE ORIENTAL FRUIT FLY, Bactrocera dorsalis (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yin-Yin; Zuo, Yu-Han; Tsai, Cheng-Lung; Hsu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Mei-Er

    2015-06-01

    We described the cDNA cloning of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), cecropin (BdCec), and attacin C (BdAttC), from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious insect pest of fruit trees. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends, fragments encompassing the entire open reading frames of BdCec and BdAttC were cloned and sequenced. The complete 425 bp cDNA of BdCec encodes a protein of 64 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 6.84 kDa. The 931 bp cDNA of BdAttC encodes a protein of 239 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 24.97 kDa. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the developmental transcription profiles of BdCec and BdAttC were similar in each larvae, pupae, and adults. The constitutive expression levels of both AMPs were high in the first-instar and late third-instar larvae, suggesting that their antimicrobial activity is active in the newly hatched larvae and just before pupation. The basal expression levels were not significant different in adult fat bodies. The expression of BdCec and BdAttC was upregulated after bacterial challenge in adult fat bodies. The ratio of inducible expression to constitutive expression was lower in males compared to females. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bdor\\Orco is important for oviposition-deterring behavior induced by both the volatile and non-volatile repellents in Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Zhao, Haiming; Wang, Peidan; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have shown that the selections of gravid females to potential oviposition sites from a distance were mediated by volatile signals, however, the means by which the sensory cues from non-volatile chemicals affected the insect behavior were still a controversial subject. Chemosensory in insect is a complex process, which is mediated by multigene families of chemoreceptors, including olfactory receptors, olfactory co-receptors, and odorant-binding proteins. To elucidate the chemoreception mechanism of volatile and non-volatile chemicals, the roles of Orco and OBP in oviposition-deterrent activities induced by citronellal and Rhodojaponin-III were investigated. Our results suggested that RNAi-mediated expression inhibition was successfully achieved by feeding dsRNA in Bactrocera dorsalis. High levels of Bdor\\Orco expression were essential for recognizing two chemicals of different physical properties, whereas the expression of Bdor\\OBP was only imperative in perception of volatile chemical. The results suggested that volatile and non-volatile chemicals may evoke distinct molecular basis for chemosensory in the flies, while Orco was essential in the perception of both chemicals. The study highlighted that the central role of Orco in chemical recognition, which enabled it to be the universally applied target of designing new botanical pesticide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Population structure of Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis (Diptera: Tephritidae in southeast Asia: evidence for a single species hypothesis using mitochondrial DNA and wing-shape data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schutze Mark K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. is a pestiferous tephritid fruit fly distributed from Pakistan to the Pacific, with the Thai/Malay peninsula its southern limit. Sister pest taxa, B. papayae and B. philippinensis, occur in the southeast Asian archipelago and the Philippines, respectively. The relationship among these species is unclear due to their high molecular and morphological similarity. This study analysed population structure of these three species within a southeast Asian biogeographical context to assess potential dispersal patterns and the validity of their current taxonomic status. Results Geometric morphometric results generated from 15 landmarks for wings of 169 flies revealed significant differences in wing shape between almost all sites following canonical variate analysis. For the combined data set there was a greater isolation-by-distance (IBD effect under a ‘non-Euclidean’ scenario which used geographical distances within a biogeographical ‘Sundaland context’ (r2 = 0.772, P r2 = 0.217, P beast analysis provided a root age and location of 540kya in northern Thailand, with migration of B. dorsalis s.l. into Malaysia 470kya and Sumatra 270kya. Two migration events into the Philippines are inferred. Sequence data revealed a weak but significant IBD effect under the ‘non-Euclidean’ scenario (r2 = 0.110, P  Conclusions Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis likely represent one species structured around the South China Sea, having migrated from northern Thailand into the southeast Asian archipelago and across into the Philippines. No migration is apparent between the Philippines and Taiwan. This information has implications for quarantine, trade and pest management.

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 and Its Analogs Act in the Dorsal Raphe and Modulate Central Serotonin to Reduce Appetite and Body Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Eerola, Kim; López-Ferreras, Lorena; Banke, Elin; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Berqquist, Filip; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Lamy, Christophe M; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2017-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and serotonin play critical roles in energy balance regulation. Both systems are exploited clinically as antiobesity strategies. Surprisingly, whether they interact in order to regulate energy balance is poorly understood. Here we investigated mechanisms by which GLP-1 and serotonin interact at the level of the central nervous system. Serotonin depletion impaired the ability of exendin-4, a clinically used GLP-1 analog, to reduce body weight in rats, suggesting that serotonin is a critical mediator of the energy balance impact of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. Serotonin turnover and expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C serotonin receptors in the hypothalamus were altered by GLP-1R activation. We demonstrate that the 5-HT2A, but surprisingly not the 5-HT2C, receptor is critical for weight loss, anorexia, and fat mass reduction induced by central GLP-1R activation. Importantly, central 5-HT2A receptors are also required for peripherally injected liraglutide to reduce feeding and weight. Dorsal raphe (DR) harbors cell bodies of serotonin-producing neurons that supply serotonin to the hypothalamic nuclei. We show that GLP-1R stimulation in DR is sufficient to induce hypophagia and increase the electrical activity of the DR serotonin neurons. Finally, our results disassociate brain metabolic and emotionality pathways impacted by GLP-1R activation. This study identifies serotonin as a new critical neural substrate for GLP-1 impact on energy homeostasis and expands the current map of brain areas impacted by GLP-1R activation. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Chronic social defeat up-regulates expression of the serotonin transporter in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and projection regions in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Fan, Yan; Li, Ying; Zhu, Hobart; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Chronic stress and dysfunction of the serotonergic system in the brain have been considered two of the major risks for development of depression. In this study, adult Fischer 344 rats were subjected to a regimen of chronic social defeat (CSD). To mimic stressful conditions, some rats were not exposed to CSD, but instead treated with corticosterone (CORT) in oral solution while maintained in their home cage. Protein levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), hippocampus, frontal cortex, and amygdala were examined by Western blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The results showed that CSD up-regulated SERT protein levels in the DRN, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and amygdala regions. This up-regulation was abolished or prevented by adrenalectomy, or treatment with antagonists of corticosteroid receptors mifepristone and spironolactone, alone or in combination. Similarly, up-regulated SERT protein levels in these brain regions were also observed in rats treated with oral CORT ingestion, which was analogously prevented by treatment with mifepristone and spironolactone. Furthermore, both CSD- and CORT-induced up-regulation of SERT protein levels in the DRN and three brain regions were attenuated by simultaneous treatment with fluoxetine, an antidepressant that specifically inhibits serotonin reuptake. The results indicate that up-regulation in SERT protein levels in the DRN and forebrain limbic structures caused by CSD regimen was mainly motivated by CORT through corticosteroid receptors. The present findings demonstrate that chronic stress is closely correlated with the serotonergic system by acting on the regulation of the SERT expression in the DRN and its projection regions, which may contribute to the development of depression. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Excitatory amino acid receptor blockade within the caudal pressor area and rostral ventrolateral medulla alters cardiovascular responses to nucleus raphe obscurus stimulation in rats

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    Silva N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressor responses elicited by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO depend on the integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. Therefore, to test the participation of excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors in the cardiovascular responses evoked by NRO stimulation (1 ms, 100 Hz, 40-70 µA, for 10 s, the EAA antagonist kynurenic acid (Kyn was microinjected at different sites in the ventrolateral medullar surface (2.7 nmol/200 nl of male Wistar rats (270-320 g, N = 39 and NRO stimulation was repeated. The effects of NRO stimulation were: hypertension (deltaMAP = +43 ± 1 mmHg, P<0.01, bradycardia (deltaHR = -30 ± 7 bpm, P<0.01 and apnea. Bilateral microinjection of Kyn into the RVLM, which did not change baseline parameters, almost abolished the bradycardia induced by NRO stimulation (deltaHR = -61 ± 3 before vs -2 ± 3 bpm after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. Unilateral microinjection of Kyn into the CVLM did not change baseline parameters or reduce the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 5 before vs +48 ± 5 mmHg after Kyn, N = 6. Kyn bilaterally microinjected into the caudal pressor area reduced blood pressure and heart rate and almost abolished the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 4 mmHg before vs +4 ± 2 mmHg after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. These results indicate that EAA receptors on the medullary ventrolateral surface play a role in the modulation of the cardiovascular responses induced by NRO stimulation, and also suggest that the RVLM participates in the modulation of heart rate responses and that the caudal pressor area modulates the pressor response following NRO stimulation.

  6. Agonistic-like responses from the torus semicircularis dorsalis elicited by GABA A blockade in the weakly electric fish Gymnotus carapo

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    T.T. Duarte

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Findings by our group have shown that the dorsolateral telencephalon of Gymnotus carapo sends efferents to the mesencephalic torus semicircularis dorsalis (TSd and that presumably this connection is involved in the changes in electric organ discharge (EOD and in skeletomotor responses observed following microinjections of GABA A antagonist bicuculline into this telencephalic region. Other studies have implicated the TSd or its mammalian homologue, the inferior colliculus, in defensive responses. In the present study, we explore the possible involvement of the TSd and of the GABA-ergic system in the modulation of the electric and skeletomotor displays. For this purpose, different doses of bicuculline (0.98, 0.49, 0.245, and 0.015 mM and muscimol (15.35 mM were microinjected (0.1 µL in the TSd of the awake G. carapo. Microinjection of bicuculline induced dose-dependent interruptions of EOD and increased skeletomotor activity resembling defense displays. The effects of the two highest doses showed maximum values at 5 min (4.3 ± 2.7 and 3.8 ± 2.0 Hz, P < 0.05 and persisted until 10 min (11 ± 5.7 and 8.7 ± 5.2 Hz, P < 0.05. Microinjections of muscimol were ineffective. During the interruptions of EOD, the novelty response (increased frequency in response to sensory novelties induced by an electric stimulus delivered by a pair of electrodes placed in the water of the experimental cuvette was reduced or abolished. These data suggest that the GABA-ergic mechanisms of the TSd inhibit the neural substrate of the defense reaction at this midbrain level.

  7. RNAi-Mediated Knock-Down of transformer and transformer 2 to Generate Male-Only Progeny in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel.

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    Guiqing Liu

    Full Text Available The transformer (tra gene appears to act as the genetic switch that promotes female development by interaction with the transformer2 (tra-2 gene in several dipteran species including the Medfly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we describe the isolation, expression and function of tra and tra-2 in the economically important agricultural pest, the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel. Bdtra and Bdtra-2 are similar to their homologs from other tephritid species. Bdtra demonstrated sex-specific transcripts: one transcript in females and two transcripts in males. In contrast, Bdtra-2 only had one transcript that was common to males and females, which was transcribed continuously in different adult tissues and developmental stages. Bdtra-2 and the female form of Bdtra were maternally inherited in eggs, whereas the male form of Bdtra was not detectable until embryos of 1 and 2 h after egg laying. Function analyses of Bdtra and Bdtra-2 indicated that both were indispensable for female development, as nearly 100% males were obtained with embryonic RNAi against either Bdtra or Bdtra-2. The fertility of these RNAi-generated males was subsequently tested. More than 80% of RNAi-generated males could mate and the mated females could lay eggs, but only 40-48.6% males gave rise to progeny. In XX-reversed males and intersex individuals, no clear female gonadal morphology was observed after dissection. These results shed light on the development of a genetic sexing system with male-only release for this agricultural pest.

  8. In silico cloning and annotation of genes involved in the digestion, detoxification and RNA interference mechanism in the midgut of Bactrocera dorsalis [Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G-M; Dou, W; Huang, Y; Jiang, X-Z; Smagghe, G; Wang, J-J

    2013-08-01

    As the second largest organ in insects, the insect midgut is the major tissue involved in the digestion of food and detoxification of xenobiotics, such as insecticides, and the first barrier and target for oral RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we performed a midgut-specific transcriptome analysis in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, an economically important worldwide pest, with many populations showing high levels of insecticide resistance. Using high-throughput sequencing, 52 838 060 short reads were generated and assembled to 25 236 unigenes with a mean length of 758 bp. Interestingly, 34 unique sequences encoding digestion enzymes were newly described and these included aminopeptidase and trypsin, genes associated with Bacillus thuringiensis resistance and fitness cost. Second, 41 transcripts were annotated to particular detoxification genes such as glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450s, and the subsequent phylogenetic analysis indicated homology with tissue-specific and insecticide resistance-related genes of Drosophila melanogaster. Third, we identified the genes involved in the mechanism of RNAi and the uptake of double-stranded RNA. The sequences encoding Dicer-2, R2D2, AGO2, and Eater were confirmed, but SID and SR-CI were absent in the midgut transcriptome. In conclusion, the results provide basic molecular information to better understand the mechanisms of food digestion, insecticide resistance and oral RNAi in this important pest insect in agriculture. Specific genes in these systems can be used in the future as potential targets for pest control, for instance, with RNAi technology. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  9. Consumption and metabolism of 1,2-dimethoxy-4-(3-fluoro-2-propenyl)benzene, a fluorine analog of methyl eugenol, in the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrimian, Ashot; Jang, Eric B; Nagata, Janice; Carvalho, Lori

    2006-07-01

    Methyl eugenol (ME) is a natural phenylpropanoid highly attractive to oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) males. The flies eagerly feed on ME and produce hydroxylated metabolites with both pheromonal and allomonal functions. Side-chain metabolic activation of ME has long been recognized as a primary reason for hepatocarcinogenicity of this compound on rodents. In an attempt to develop a safer alternative to ME for fruit fly management, we developed a fluorine analog 1,2-dimethoxy-4-(3-fluoro-2-propenyl)benzene (I), which, in earlier field tests, was as active to the oriental fruit fly as ME. Now we report that B. dorsalis males are not only attracted to, but also eagerly consume (up to approximately 1 mg/insect) compound I, thus recognizing this fluorinated benzene as a close kin of the natural ME. The flies metabolized the fluorine analog I in a similar fashion producing mostly two hydroxylated products, 2-(3-fluoro-2-propenyl)-4,5-dimethoxyphenol (II) and (E)-coniferyl alcohol (III), which they stored in rectal glands. However, the introduction of the fluorine atom at the terminal carbon atom of the double bond favors the ring hydroxylation over a side-chain metabolic oxidation pathway, by which coniferyl alcohol is produced. It also appears that fluorination overall impedes the metabolism: at high feed rate (10 mul per 10 males), the flies consumed in total more fluorine analog I than ME but were unable to metabolize it as efficiently as ME.

  10. Population structure of Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis (Diptera: Tephritidae) in southeast Asia: evidence for a single species hypothesis using mitochondrial DNA and wing-shape data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutze, Mark K; Krosch, Matthew N; Armstrong, Karen F; Chapman, Toni A; Englezou, Anna; Chomič, Anastasija; Cameron, Stephen L; Hailstones, Deborah; Clarke, Anthony R

    2012-07-30

    Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. is a pestiferous tephritid fruit fly distributed from Pakistan to the Pacific, with the Thai/Malay peninsula its southern limit. Sister pest taxa, B. papayae and B. philippinensis, occur in the southeast Asian archipelago and the Philippines, respectively. The relationship among these species is unclear due to their high molecular and morphological similarity. This study analysed population structure of these three species within a southeast Asian biogeographical context to assess potential dispersal patterns and the validity of their current taxonomic status. Geometric morphometric results generated from 15 landmarks for wings of 169 flies revealed significant differences in wing shape between almost all sites following canonical variate analysis. For the combined data set there was a greater isolation-by-distance (IBD) effect under a 'non-Euclidean' scenario which used geographical distances within a biogeographical 'Sundaland context' (r(2) = 0.772, P Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., B. papayae and B. philippinensis likely represent one species structured around the South China Sea, having migrated from northern Thailand into the southeast Asian archipelago and across into the Philippines. No migration is apparent between the Philippines and Taiwan. This information has implications for quarantine, trade and pest management.

  11. Regulation of Hippocampal 5-HT Release by P2X7 Receptors in Response to Optogenetic Stimulation of Median Raphe Terminals of Mice

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    Flóra Gölöncsér

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic and glutamatergic neurons of median raphe region (MRR play a pivotal role in the modulation of affective and cognitive functions. These neurons synapse both onto themselves and remote cortical areas. P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 are ligand gated ion channels expressed by central presynaptic excitatory nerve terminals and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. P2rx7s are implicated in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. Here we investigated whether 5-HT release released from the hippocampal terminals of MRR is subject to modulation by P2rx7s. To achieve this goal, an optogenetic approach was used to selectively activate subpopulation of serotonergic terminals derived from the MRR locally, and one of its target area, the hippocampus. Optogenetic activation of neurons in the MRR with 20 Hz was correlated with freezing and enhanced locomotor activity of freely moving mice and elevated extracellular levels of 5-HT, glutamate but not GABA in vivo. Similar optical stimulation (OS significantly increased [3H]5-HT and [3H]glutamate release in acute MRR and hippocampal slices. We examined spatial and temporal patterns of [3H]5-HT release and the interaction between the serotonin and glutamate systems. Whilst [3H]5-HT release from MRR neurons was [Ca2+]o-dependent and sensitive to TTX, CNQX and DL-AP-5, release from hippocampal terminals was not affected by the latter drugs. Hippocampal [3H]5-HT released by electrical but not OS was subject to modulation by 5- HT1B/D receptors agonist sumatriptan (1 μM, whereas the selective 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (0.1 μM was without effect. [3H]5-HT released by electrical and optical stimulation was decreased in mice genetically deficient in P2rx7s, and after perfusion with selective P2rx7 antagonists, JNJ-47965567 (0.1 μM, and AZ-10606120 (0.1 μM. Optical and electrical stimulation elevated the extracellular level of ATP. Our results demonstrate for the

  12. A description of the lumbar interfascial triangle and its relation with the lateral raphe: anatomical constituents of load transfer through the lateral margin of the thoracolumbar fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenke, M D; Vleeming, A; Van Hoof, T; Willard, F H

    2012-01-01

    rib to the iliac crest. This triangle results in the unification of different fascial sheaths along the lateral border of the TLF, creating a ridged-union of dense connective tissue that has been termed the lateral raphe (Spine, 9,1984, 163). This triangle may function in the distribution of laterally mediated tension to balance different viscoelastic moduli, along either the middle or posterior layers of the TLF. PMID:22582887

  13. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  14. Reproducción y alimentación del tiburón enano Mustelus dorsalis (Pisces: Triakidae en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica: Elementos para un manejo sostenible

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    José Rodrigo Rojas M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Se determinaron aspectos reproductivos y alimentarios del tiburón enano Mustelus dorsalis, a partir de 311 ejemplares capturados con línea y anzuelo en el Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica, durante marzo de 1999 y mayo de 2000. Se reconocieron 250 hembras y 61 machos. Las hembras son más grandes (550 a 660 mm vs. (500-585 mm y más pesadas (400-1 000 g vs. (200-300 g que los machos. Todos los ejemplares estaban maduros, la talla mínima de especimenes maduros fue de 500 y 541 mm para hembras y machos respectivamente. Entre septiembre y marzo todas las hembras y machos estaban maduras, e inmaduras entre abril y agosto. Se estudiaron 1 259 embriones, con una variación entre dos y seis embriones por litera. La longitud total de los embriones es entre 130 y 205 mm y el peso entre 6 y 35 g. Este tiburón es carnívoro polífago oportunista que consume crustáceos (Squilla hancocki, S. parva, Farfantepenaeus sp., peces (Anchoa sp. Caranx, sp, Lujanus sp., Engraulis y Ophistonema sp., y moluscos (Loligo sp. y Octopus sp.. Squilla hancocki es el ítem alimentario mas importante. La presencia de tiburones maduros de ambos sexos a lo largo del año en aguas poco profundas, y el consumo de presas bentónicas que viven en fondos rocosos costeros, sugiere la posibilidad de que este sector del Golfo de Nicoya esté funcionando como una zona de crianza y hábitat esencial. Con base en estos resultados se propone el establecimiento de un plan de manejo integral.Reproduction and feeding habits of Mustelus dorsalis (Pisces: Triakidae in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica: Elements for a sustainable management. A total of 311 sharptooth smooth-hound Mustelus dorsalis were collected in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica from March 1999 to May 2000 to determine reproduction and feeding habits. The fishes were collected using hook and line. 250 females and 61 males were identified. The females are bigger (550-660 mm and heavier (400-1 000 g than males (500-585 mm and 200-300 g

  15. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Injections of the of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin into the median raphe nucleus increase food intake and Fos expression in orexin neurons of free-feeding rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Eduardo Simão da; Flores, Rafael Appel; Ribas, Anderson Savaris; Taschetto, Ana Paula; Faria, Moacir Serralvo; Lima, Leandro Bueno; Metzger, Martin; Donato, José; Paschoalini, Marta Aparecida

    2017-05-01

    Previously, we showed that the blockade of α1-adrenoreceptors in the median raphe nucleus (MnR) increased food intake in free-feeding rats, indicating that adrenergic mechanisms in the MnR participate in the regulation of food intake. However, the impact of such a pharmacological manipulation on other neural circuits related to food intake remains unknown. In the current study, we sought to identify forebrain regions which are responsive to α1-adrenergic receptor blockade and presumably involved in the modulation of the feeding response. For this purpose, we examined the induction of c-Fos immunoreactivity in forebrain structures following injections of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin into the MnR of free-feeding rats. To determine the chemical identity of hypothalamic c-Fos-positive cells, we then conducted double-label immunohistochemistry for Fos/orexin (OX) or Fos/melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). Finally, we combined anterograde tracing from the MnR with immunohistochemical detection of orexin. Prazosin injections into the MnR significantly increased food intake. The ingestive response was accompanied by an increase in Fos expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). In the LHA, Fos expression occurred in neurons expressing OX, but not MCH. Combined anterograde tracing experiments revealed that LHA OX neurons are prominently targeted by MnR axons. These findings suggest that intra-MnR injection of prazosin, via activation of orexinergic neurons in the LHA and non-orexinergic neurons in the BLA, evoked a motivational response toward food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive Changes in the Sensitivity of the Dorsal Raphe and Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nuclei to Acute Exercise, and Hippocampal Neurogenesis May Contribute to the Antidepressant Effect of Regular Treadmill Running in Rats

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    Ayu Nishii

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing clinical evidence suggests that regular physical exercise can prevent or reduce the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders including depressive symptoms. Antidepressant effect of regular exercise may be implicated in monoaminergic transmission including serotonergic transmission, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and hippocampal neurogenesis, but few general concepts regarding the optimal exercise regimen for stimulating neural mechanisms involved in antidepressant properties have been developed. Here, we examined how 4 weeks of treadmill running at different intensities (0, 15, 25 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 times/week alters neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN, which is the major source of serotonin (5-HT neurons in the central nervous system, and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, in which corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF neurons initiate the activation of the HPA axis, during one session of acute treadmill running at different speeds (0, 15, 25 m/min, 30 min in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. We also examined neurogenesis in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry for doublecortin (DCX and assessed depressive-like behavior using the forced swim test after regular exercise for 4 weeks. In the pre-training period, acute treadmill running at low speed, but not at high speed, increased c-Fos positive nuclei in the DRN compared with the sedentary control. The number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN during acute treadmill running was increased in a running speed-dependent manner. Regular exercise for 4 weeks, regardless of the training intensity, induced an enhancement of c-Fos expression in the DRN during not only low-speed but also high-speed acute running, and generally reduced c-Fos expression in the PVN during acute running compared with pre-training. Furthermore, regular treadmill running for 4 weeks enhanced DCX immunoreactivity in the

  18. Reference levels at diagnosis (NRD) for explorations in TC of the university Hospital Donostia; Niveles de referencia en diagnostico (NRD) para exploraciones en TC del Hospital Universitario Donostia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Masso Odriozola, A.; Alonso Espinaco, M. t.; Pino Leon, C.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Larretxea Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is the establishment of diagnostic reference levels in TC, for the anatomical regions, in the University Hospital Donostia, in order to reduce the dose to patients and without prejudice to the required diagnosis. (Author)

  19. Factors Affecting Organizational Performance NRD San Diego FY 1997-2000: A Systems Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    moral, waiver, police/ juvenile involvement, alcohol/drug abuse and prior military service) • Explain enlistment obligations to applicants......specialists. For example, an applicant with bad acne would be sent to the NAVMEDCEN dermatologist to determine if he or she had a disqualifying

  20. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V; Mennenga, Sarah E; Talboom, Joshua S; Hewitt, Lauren T; Lavery, Courtney N; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  1. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Ryoko; Weyrich, Giulia; Koebele, Stephanie V.; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Talboom, Joshua S.; Hewitt, Lauren T.; Lavery, Courtney N.; Mendoza, Perla; Jordan, Ambra; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Decreased serotonin (5-HT) function is associated with numerous cognitive and affective disorders. Women are more vulnerable to these disorders and have a lower rate of 5-HT synthesis than men. Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are a major source of 5-HT in the forebrain and play a critical role in regulation of stress-related disorders. In particular, polymorphisms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TpH2, the brain-specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis) are implicated in cognitive and affective disorders. Administration of 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent naturally circulating estrogen in women and rats, can have beneficial effects on cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. Moreover, E2 increases TpH2 mRNA in specific subregions of the DRN. Although conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) are a commonly prescribed estrogen component of hormone therapy in menopausal women, there is a marked gap in knowledge regarding how CEE affects these behaviors and the brain 5-HT system. Therefore, we compared the effects of CEE and E2 treatments on behavior and TpH2 mRNA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized, administered either vehicle, CEE, or E2 and tested on a battery of cognitive, anxiety-like, and depressive-like behaviors. The brains of these animals were subsequently analyzed for TpH2 mRNA. Both CEE and E2 exerted beneficial behavioral effects, although efficacy depended on the distinct behavior and for cognition, on the task difficulty. Compared to CEE, E2 generally had more robust anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. E2 increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and mid DRN, corroborating previous findings. However, CEE increased TpH2 mRNA in the caudal and rostral, but not the mid, DRN, suggesting that distinct estrogens can have subregion-specific effects on TpH2 gene expression. We also found differential correlations between the level of TpH2 mRNA in specific DRN subregions and behavior, depending on the type of

  2. A unique nrdB gene can be used to improve the current HLB pathogen detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also referred to as yellow shoot disease and citrus greening disease, seriously threatens citrus production worldwide. Currently, the impact of HLB is grave, as there is no cure. A bacterium, “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), has been considered as the pathogen ...

  3. Digital map of the configuration of the base of the principal aquifer in the Elkhorn-Loup Model area, north-central Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District (NRD), Lower Elkhorn NRD, Lower Loup NRD, Lower Platte North...

  4. Digital map of the test-hole and well data used to estimate the configuration of the base of the principal aquifer and the geologic units underlying the principal aquifer in the Elkhorn-Loup model area, north-central Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District (NRD), Lower Elkhorn NRD, Lower Loup NRD, Lower Platte North...

  5. Digitial map of geologic units forming the base of the principal aquifer and areas where the base of aquifer is not well defined, Elkhorn-Loup Model area, north-central Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Lewis and Clark Natural Resources District (NRD), Lower Elkhorn NRD, Lower Loup NRD, Lower Platte North...

  6. Unusual five copies and dual forms of nrdB in “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus”: biological implications and PCR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), an alpha-proteobacterium, is associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), which is currently threatening citrus production worldwide. Research in CLas biology is challenging because the bacterium cannot be cultivated in vitro. In this ...

  7. Nab3 Facilitates the Function of the TRAMP Complex in RNA Processing via Recruitment of Rrp6 Independent of Nrd1

    OpenAIRE

    Fasken, Milo B.; Laribee, R. Nicholas; Corbett, Anita H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. In eukaryotic cells, ncRNAs are processed and/or degraded by the nuclear exosome, a ribonuclease complex containing catalytic subunits Dis3 and Rrp6. The TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air1/2-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex is a critical exosome cofactor in budding yeast that stimulates the exosome to process/degrade ncRNAs and human TRAMP components have recently been identified. Importantly, mutations in exosome and exosome cofactor genes cause ...

  8. Nab3 Facilitates the Function of the TRAMP Complex in RNA Processing via Recruitment of Rrp6 Independent of Nrd1: e1005044

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milo B Fasken; R Nicholas Laribee; Anita H Corbett

    2015-01-01

      Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. In eukaryotic cells, ncRNAs are processed and/or degraded by the nuclear exosome, a ribonuclease complex containing catalytic subunits Dis3 and Rrp6. The TRAMP...

  9. Nab3 facilitates the function of the TRAMP complex in RNA processing via recruitment of Rrp6 independent of Nrd1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fasken, Milo B; Laribee, R Nicholas; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play critical roles in gene regulation. In eukaryotic cells, ncRNAs are processed and/or degraded by the nuclear exosome, a ribonuclease complex containing catalytic subunits Dis3 and Rrp6. The TRAMP...

  10. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G

    2015-01-01

    implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined...

  11. Prolonged stimulation of a brainstem raphe region attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Pernille M.; Sloley, Stephanie S.; Vitores, Alberto A.

    2017-01-01

    of myelinated axons. It additionally lowered genetic expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursors, while raising expression of myelin basic protein. Studies of restorative...... expression (on day 37), with a focus on myelination and cytokine production. Controls, with inactive implants, showed a phase of disease exacerbation on days 19–25 that stimulation for >16 days eliminated. Prolonged stimulation also reduced numbers of infiltrating immune cells and increased numbers...

  12. Projections from the raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)......Hypothalamus, Circadian rhythm, Serotonin, Nucleus, Neuronal connections, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Cholera toxin (ChB)...

  13. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  14. Édouard Manet's Tabes Dorsalis: From Painful Ataxia to Phantom Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Tatu, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Édouard Manet (1832-1883) is considered the 'father' of Impressionism and even of XXth century modern art. Manet's genius involved getting away from the classical narrative or historical topics and replacing them by the banality of daily life. Technically, he erased volumes into flat two-dimensional coloured planes, and distorted conventional perspective with often gross brushstrokes intentionally giving an 'unfinished' aspect to the work. It is little known that Manet had a very painful second part of his life, due to excruciating limb and chest pains, which developed in parallel with proprioceptive ataxia and gait imbalance. Manet always remained discreet about his private life, and we mainly know that his future wife was his family piano teacher, with whom he had a liaison already at age 17. Later, the great but platonic passion of his life was the painter Berthe Morisot (1841-1895), who got married to Manet's brother Eugène. In fact, we do not know whether he had any mistress at all, although he had several elegant 'flirts' in the mundane and artistic milieu. Thus, while Manet's progressive painful ataxia from age 40 yields little doubt on its tabetic origin, how he contracted syphilis at least 15-20 years before will probably remain a mystery. It is fascinating that Manet's daily struggle against pain and poor coordination may have led his art to become one of the most significant of modern times, opening the way to XXth century avant-gardes, along with another victim of syphilis, Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). Manet never showed any sign of General Paresis, and like his contemporary the writer Alphonse Daudet, his clinical picture remained dominated by paroxysmal pain and walking impairment. Difficult hand coordination made him quit watercolor painting, and during the last 2 years of his life, he had to focus on small format oil works, whose subject was nearly limited to modest bunches of fresh flowers, now often considered to be his maturity masterpieces. Having become bedridden, he had to be amputated of one leg, which was developing gangrene probably associated with ergot overuse. While he died shortly thereafter, we have some witness anecdotes suggesting that he experienced a phantom limb: when Claude Monet (1840-1926) visited him and sat down on his bed, Manet violently shouted at him that he was just sitting on his (absent) leg, which provoked terrible pains. With its facts and mysteries, the subtle interaction between Manet's illness and his work output remains one of the most intriguing stories in neurology of art. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Colgajo tendinocutáneo vascularizado de dorsalis pedis: caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    F. Martínez Martínez; M.L. Guerrero Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Los grandes accidentes que afectan a la mano suelen cursar con daños en más de un tejido. Son frecuentes las exposiciones óseas, fracturas, lesiones tendinosas y pérdidas de cobertura cutánea, lo que supone un importante problema para la cirugía reconstructiva. Las técnicas quirúrgicas para afrontar estas lesiones múltiples pueden reunirse en tres grupos: A) múltiples procedimientos escalonados, B) procedimientos únicos parcialmente vascularizados, C) procedimientos únicos totalmente vascular...

  16. Nonhost status of mangosteen to Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera:Tephritidae) in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest quarantine treatments (irradiation or vapor heat) are used to control fruit flies and other pests in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) exported to the United States and Japan from Thailand. No-choice tests were conducted in the laboratory to determine whether Thai mangosteen is a host f...

  17. Considerations for pacing of the cricoarytenoid dorsalis muscle by neuroprosthesis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, N G; Cheetham, J; Sanders, I; Hermanson, J W; Hackett, R P; Soderholm, L V; Mitchell, L M

    2010-09-01

    The success rate of prosthetic laryngoplasty is limited and may be associated with significant sequelae. Nerve muscle pedicle transplantation has been attempted but requires a year before function is restored. To determine the optimal parameters for functional electrical stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in horses. An experimental in vivo study was performed on 7 mature horses (2-21 years). A nerve cuff was placed on the distal end of the common trunk of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). In 6 horses the ipsilateral adductor branch of RLN was also transected. The electrodes were connected to programmable internal stimulator. Stimulation was performed using cathodic phase and then biphasic pulses at 24 Hz with a 0.427 ms pulse duration. Stimulation-response experiments were performed at monthly intervals, from one week following implantation. The study continued until unit failure or the end of project (12 months). Two of the horses were stimulated continuously for 60 min to assess onset of fatigue. Excellent arytenoid cartilage abduction (mean arytenoid angle of 52.7 degrees, range 48.5-56.2 degrees) was obtained in 6 horses (laryngeal grades I or II (n = 3) and III (n = 2). Poor abduction was obtained in grade IV horses (n = 2). Arytenoid abduction was maintained for up to a year in one horse. Technical implant failure resulted in loss of abduction in 6 horses at one week to 11 months post operatively. Mean tissue impedance was 1.06 kOhm (range 0.64-1.67 kOhm) at one week, twice this value at 2 months (mean 2.32, range 1.11-3.75 kOhm) and was stable thereafter. Maximal abduction was achieved at a stimulation range of 0.65-7.2 mA. No electrical leakage was observed. Constant stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve for 60 min led to full abduction without evidence of muscle fatigue. Functional electrical stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve leading to full arytenoid abduction can be achieved. The minimal stimulation amplitude for maximal abduction angle is slightly higher than those for man and dogs. This treatment modality could eventually be applicable to horses with recurrent laryngeal neuropathy.

  18. Effect of Fopius arisanus Sonan oviposition experience on parasitization of Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fopius arisanus (Sonan) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an important fruit fly parasitoid, successfully introduced in programs of classical biological control around the world. One aspect of its reproductive biology that has received increasing attention is the role of learning on parasitization by ind...

  19. Origins of descending projections to the medulla oblongata and rostral medulla spinalis in the urodele Salamandra salamandra (amphibia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naujoks-Manteuffel, C; Manteuffel, G

    1988-07-08

    Descending projections to the medulla oblongata and rostral medulla spinalis have been examined in the urodele Salamandra salamandra with retrograde horseradish peroxidase tracing. Ipsilateral projections originate from the striatum and the nucleus ventrolateralis thalami and reach the medulla oblongata. The ipsilateral nucleus praeopticus magnocellularis reaches the medulla spinalis. The rostral part of the nucleus tuberculi posterioris projects to the ipsilateral medulla oblongata; its caudal part projects further caudally. Tectal efferents and the efferents of the nucleus praetectalis profundus project bilaterally, the nucleus praetectalis superficialis, nucleus mesencephalicus nervi trigemini, torus semicircularis, nucleus Darkschewitsch, and nucleus fasciculi longitudinalis medialis project ipsilaterally to the medulla oblongata. The nucleus mesencephalicus nervi trigemini, nucleus fasciculi longitudinalis medialis, and tectal efferents reach the rostral medulla spinalis. The nucleus ruber projects mainly via the contralateral dorsolateral funiculus to the medulla spinalis. A largely crossed medullary projection arises in the nucleus dorsalis tegmenti pars anterior, a bilateral projection arises in the nucleus dorsalis tegmenti pars posterior, and an ipsilateral projection arises in the nucleus ventralis tegmenti pars anterior. Cerebellar and statoacoustic efferents descend to the medulla spinalis. The nucleus reticularis isthmi, superior, medius and inferior as well as the nucleus raphes exhibit spinal trajectories. The nucleus vestibularis magnocellularis projects bilaterally, the nucleus vestibularis medialis projects ipsilaterally spinalward. The supposed nucleus descendens nervi trigemini descends mainly contralaterally. A small spinal projection arises in the nucleus tractus solitarii. The results indicate that salamander brains display elaborate descending connections which are similar to those in other vertebrates despite their scarcely differentiated

  20. Altered local cerebral glucose utilization induced by electrical stimulations of the thalamic sensory and parafascicular nuclei in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiko, Y; Shima, F; Hosokawa, S; Kato, M; Kitamura, K

    1987-04-07

    Alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) induced by electrical stimulation of the sensory relay nucleus (VPL) or parafascicular nucleus (Pf) of the thalamus in conscious rats were measured by the [14C]2-deoxyglucose method, the objective being to assess the mechanism of analgesia induced by electrical stimulations of these structures. Stimulation of the VPL induced an ipsilateral increase in LCGU in the sensory thalamic nucleus itself, the sensory cortex and substantia nigra. Stimulation of the Pf induced bilateral increases in LCGU in the Pf and central medial nucleus of the thalamus, sensory cortex, ventral areas of the striatum and substantia nigra, and ipsilateral increase in LCGU in the periaqueductal gray, parabrachial pontine nucleus and deep layers of the superior colliculus. No significant change in LCGU was detected in the raphe dorsalis, raphe magnus and spinal dorsal horn, in both groups. Our observations coincide with clinical findings that unilateral electrical stimulation of the Pf leads to amelioration of intractable pain bilaterally, while that of the VPL induces an analgesia restricted to the contralateral side.

  1. Natural Resource Damages: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    define concepts, terms and discuss topics related to NRD activities such as the authority under which NRD are assessed; definition; role of EPA; designation of Natural Resource Trustees; and conduct of natural resource assessments and restorations.

  2. Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHTSA; 2015 [cited 2016 Feb 5]. Available at URL: http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812231.pdf . ... NHTSA; 2015. [cited 2016 Feb 5]. Available at URL: http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/pubs/812013.pdf . ...

  3. Flattening plasma corticosterone levels increases the prevalence of serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons inhibitory responses to nicotine in adrenalectomised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-Domínguez, Carmen; Garduño, Julieta; Hernández, Salvador; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is characterized by a diminished activity of the brain serotonergic system as well as by the flattening of plasma cortisol levels. Nicotine improves mood in patients with major depression and in experimentally depressed animals by increasing brain serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline and dopamine levels. The present study was directed to determine if flattening plasma glucocorticoid levels changes nicotine's stimulatory effects upon 5-HT DRN neurons. The experiments were performed in brain slices obtained from rats previously (14 days) adrenalectomised and implanted subcutaneously with one pellet containing 75mg of corticosterone (Adx+CSR rats). Whole cell voltage and current clamp techniques were used to study the activity of immunocitochemically identified 5-HT DRN neurons. Administration of nicotine (1μM) in sham-operated animals produced stimulatory effects in all 5-HT DRN neurons studied. In Adx+CSR rats however, nicotine inhibited 75% of 5-HT DRN neurons and increased the potassium-dependent inward rectifying current. The inhibitory effect of nicotine upon 5-HT DRN neurons was dependent on serotonin release inside the DRN, since it was converted into a stimulatory response by the selective antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635, 25nM). Adx+CSR rats also presented an increased function of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, since, in these rats, serotonin (1-10μM) produced a higher increase in the potassium dependent inward rectifying current in comparison with sham-operated animals. Serotonin release inside DRN was mediated by α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors since the selective antagonist of these receptors dihydro-β-erytroidine hydrobromide (DHβE, 100nM) blocked the inhibitory effects of nicotine 5-HT DRN neurons. These data indicate that, in the experimental model of adrenalectomised rats implanted with corticosterone pellets, nicotine increases the function of 5-HT1A receptors of 5-HT DRN neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relevance of dorsal raphe nucleus firing in serotonin 5-HT2C receptor blockade-induced augmentation of SSRIs effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotty, Florence; Folgering, Joost H. A.; Brennum, Lise T.; Hogg, Sandra; Mork, Arne; Hertel, Peter; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressant drugs. However, they exhibit a slow onset of action, putatively due to the initial decrease in serotonin cell firing mediated via somato-dendritic autoreceptors. Interestingly, blockade of 5-HT2C receptors

  5. Homologous expression of the nrdF gene of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes strain ATCC 6872 generates a manganese‐metallocofactor (R2F) and a stable tyrosyl radical (Y•) involved in ribonucleotide reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stolle, Patrick; Barckhausen, Olaf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Knobbe, Nadine; Vogt, Carla; Pierik, Antonio J; Cox, Nicholas; Schmidt, Peter P; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Auling, Georg

    2010-01-01

    .... The chromatographic protocol provided native R2F with a high ratio of manganese to iron (30 : 1), high activity (69 μmol 2′‐deoxyribonucleotide·mg −1 ·min −1 ) and distinct absorption at 408...

  6. Response of Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera:Tephritidae) to metabolic stress disinfection and disinfestation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic stress disinfection and disinfestation (MSDD) is a postharvest treatment designed to control pathogens and arthropod pests on commodities that combines short cycles of low pressure/vacuum and high CO2 with ethanol vapor. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of MSDD treatment o...

  7. Pupal x-ray irradiation influences protein expression in adults of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We did protein analysis using 1-12-d-old adults from irradiated and non-irradiated oriental fruit fly pupae. We found that exposing pupae to x-ray irradiation impacted expression of 26 proteins in adult females and 30 proteins in adult males. There were 7 proteins (Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehyd...

  8. Natural field infestation of Mangifera casturi and M.lalijiwa by oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Mangifera indica, is a crop cultivated pantropically. There are, however, many other Mangifera spp. (“mango relatives”) which have much more restricted distributions and are poorly known, but have potential to produce mango-like fruits in areas where mangoes do not grow well or could be tapp...

  9. The Potential Geographical Distribution of bactrocera Dorsalis (Diptera: Tephrididae) in China Based on Emergence Rate Model and Arcgis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zhihong; Wu, Jiajiao; Rajotte, Edwin G.; Wan, Fanghao; Wang, Zhiling

    Precision agriculture is an important choice for the future agriculture. It is the base for precision agriculture development to change the state of small-scale farmland production and weak agricultural foundation in China gradually. Combined with the poorness of village in China, the variation of farmland and the dominance of small-scale peasant economy, this paper analyzed the adaptability of farmland landscape pattern to precision agriculture based on literatures and farmland landscape survey. With the requirements of precision agricultural production, this paper put forward the standards on cultivated field scale and shape, farmland corridor structure, cultivated field matrix and farmland landscape protection in order to make farmland landscape suitable for precision agriculture and to provide references for the sustainable development of precision agriculture in China.

  10. The role of the transformer gene in sex determination and reproduction in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transformer (tra) is a double-switch gene in the somatic sex-determination hierarchy that regulates sexual dimorphism based on RNA splicing in many insects. In tephritids, a Y-linked male determining gene (M) controls sex in the sex-determination pathway. Here, homologues of Drosophila tra and trans...

  11. Bacillus subtilis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase is a dimanganese(III)-tyrosyl radical enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Stubbe, Joanne

    2011-06-28

    Bacillus subtilis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the building blocks for DNA replication and repair. It is composed of two proteins: α (NrdE) and β (NrdF). β contains the metallo-cofactor, essential for the initiation of the reduction process. The RNR genes are organized within the nrdI-nrdE-nrdF-ymaB operon. Each protein has been cloned, expressed, and purified from Escherichia coli. As isolated, recombinant NrdF (rNrdF) contained a diferric-tyrosyl radical [Fe(III)(2)-Y(•)] cofactor. Alternatively, this cluster could be self-assembled from apo-rNrdF, Fe(II), and O(2). Apo-rNrdF loaded using 4 Mn(II)/β(2), O(2), and reduced NrdI (a flavodoxin) can form a dimanganese(III)-Y(•) [Mn(III)(2)-Y(•)] cofactor. In the presence of rNrdE, ATP, and CDP, Mn(III)(2)-Y(•) and Fe(III)(2)-Y(•) rNrdF generate dCDP at rates of 132 and 10 nmol min(-1) mg(-1), respectively (both normalized for 1 Y(•)/β(2)). To determine the endogenous cofactor of NrdF in B. subtilis, the entire operon was placed behind a Pspank(hy) promoter and integrated into the B. subtilis genome at the amyE site. All four genes were induced in cells grown in Luria-Bertani medium, with levels of NrdE and NrdF elevated 35-fold relative to that of the wild-type strain. NrdE and NrdF were copurified in a 1:1 ratio from this engineered B. subtilis. The visible, EPR, and atomic absorption spectra of the purified NrdENrdF complex (eNrdF) exhibited characteristics of a Mn(III)(2)-Y(•) center with 2 Mn/β(2) and 0.5 Y(•)/β(2) and an activity of 318-363 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) (normalized for 1 Y(•)/β(2)). These data strongly suggest that the B. subtilis class Ib RNR is a Mn(III)(2)-Y(•) enzyme.

  12. An active dimanganese(III)-tyrosyl radical cofactor in Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotruvo, Joseph A; Stubbe, Joanne

    2010-02-16

    Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) converts nucleoside 5'-diphosphates to deoxynucleoside 5'-diphosphates and is expressed under iron-limited and oxidative stress conditions. This RNR is composed of two homodimeric subunits: alpha2 (NrdE), where nucleotide reduction occurs, and beta2 (NrdF), which contains an unidentified metallocofactor that initiates nucleotide reduction. nrdE and nrdF are found in an operon with nrdI, which encodes an unusual flavodoxin proposed to be involved in metallocofactor biosynthesis and/or maintenance. Ni affinity chromatography of a mixture of E. coli (His)(6)-NrdI and NrdF demonstrated tight association between these proteins. To explore the function of NrdI and identify the metallocofactor, apoNrdF was loaded with Mn(II) and incubated with fully reduced NrdI (NrdI(hq)) and O(2). Active RNR was rapidly produced with 0.25 +/- 0.03 tyrosyl radical (Y*) per beta2 and a specific activity of 600 units/mg. EPR and biochemical studies of the reconstituted cofactor suggest it is Mn(III)(2)-Y*, which we propose is generated by Mn(II)(2)-NrdF reacting with two equivalents of HO(2)(-), produced by reduction of O(2) by NrdF-bound NrdI(hq). In the absence of NrdI(hq), with a variety of oxidants, no active RNR was generated. By contrast, a similar experiment with apoNrdF loaded with Fe(II) and incubated with O(2) in the presence or absence of NrdI(hq) gave 0.2 and 0.7 Y*/beta2 with specific activities of 80 and 300 units/mg, respectively. Thus NrdI(hq) hinders Fe(III)(2)-Y* cofactor assembly in vitro. We propose that NrdI is an essential player in E. coli class Ib RNR cluster assembly and that the Mn(III)(2)-Y* cofactor, not the diferric-Y* one, is the active metallocofactor in vivo.

  13. Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase Is a Dimanganese(III)-Tyrosyl Radical Enzyme†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the building blocks for DNA replication and repair. It is composed of two proteins: α (NrdE) and β (NrdF). β contains the metallo-cofactor, essential for the initiation of the reduction process. The RNR genes are organized within the nrdI-nrdE-nrdF-ymaB operon. Each protein has been cloned, expressed, and purified from E. coli. As isolated, recombinant (r) rNrdF contained a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y•) cofactor. Alternatively, this cluster could be self-assembled from apo-rNrdF, Fe(II), and O2. Apo-rNrdF loaded using 4 Mn(II)/β2, O2 and reduced NrdI (a flavodoxin), can form a dimanganese(III)-Y• (Mn(III)2-Y•) cofactor. In the presence of rNrdE/ATP/CDP, Mn(III)2-Y• and Fe(III)2-Y• rNrdF generate dCDP at 132 and 10 nmol min-1 mg-1 respectively (both normalized for 1 Y•/β2). To determine the endogenous cofactor of NrdF in B. subtilis, the entire operon was placed behind a Pspank(hy) promoter and integrated into the B. subtilis genome at the amyE site. All four genes were induced in cells grown in LB medium, with levels of NrdE and NrdF elevated 35 fold relative to the wild type (wt) strain. NrdE and NrdF co-purified in a 1:1 ratio from this engineered B. subtilis. The visible, EPR, and atomic absorption spectra of the purified NrdENrdF complex (eNrdF) exhibited characteristics of a Mn(III)2-Y• center with 2 Mn and 0.5 Y•/β2 and activity of 318-363 nmol min-1 mg-1 (normalized for 1 Y•/β2). These data strongly suggest that the B. subtilis class Ib RNR is a Mn(III)2-Y• enzyme. PMID:21561096

  14. Leptin receptor immunoreactivity is present in ascending serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Helboe, Lone; Larsen, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines......Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines...

  15. Semiquinone-induced Maturation of Bacillus anthracis Ribonucleotide Reductase by a Superoxide Intermediate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Gustav; Duraffourg, Nicolas; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and represent the only de novo pathway to provide DNA building blocks. Three different classes of RNR are known, denoted I-III. Class I RNRs are heteromeric proteins built up by α and β subunits and are further divided into different subclasses, partly based on the metal content of the β-subunit. In subclass Ib RNR the β-subunit is denoted NrdF, and harbors a manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor. The generation of this cofactor is dependent on a flavodoxin-like maturase denoted NrdI, responsible for the formation of an active oxygen species suggested to be either a superoxide or a hydroperoxide. Herein we report on the magnetic properties of the manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of Bacillus anthracis NrdF and the redox properties of B. anthracis NrdI. The tyrosyl radical in NrdF is stabilized through its interaction with a ferromagnetically coupled manganese dimer. Moreover, we show through a combination of redox titration and protein electrochemistry that in contrast to hitherto characterized NrdIs, the B. anthracis NrdI is stable in its semiquinone form (NrdIsq) with a difference in electrochemical potential of ∼110 mV between the hydroquinone and semiquinone state. The under anaerobic conditions stable NrdIsq is fully capable of generating the oxidized, tyrosyl radical-containing form of Mn-NrdF when exposed to oxygen. This latter observation strongly supports that a superoxide radical is involved in the maturation mechanism, and contradicts the participation of a peroxide species. Additionally, EPR spectra on whole cells revealed that a significant fraction of NrdI resides in its semiquinone form in vivo, underscoring that NrdIsq is catalytically relevant. PMID:25262022

  16. Semiquinone-induced maturation of Bacillus anthracis ribonucleotide reductase by a superoxide intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Gustav; Duraffourg, Nicolas; Sahlin, Margareta; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie

    2014-11-14

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and represent the only de novo pathway to provide DNA building blocks. Three different classes of RNR are known, denoted I-III. Class I RNRs are heteromeric proteins built up by α and β subunits and are further divided into different subclasses, partly based on the metal content of the β-subunit. In subclass Ib RNR the β-subunit is denoted NrdF, and harbors a manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor. The generation of this cofactor is dependent on a flavodoxin-like maturase denoted NrdI, responsible for the formation of an active oxygen species suggested to be either a superoxide or a hydroperoxide. Herein we report on the magnetic properties of the manganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of Bacillus anthracis NrdF and the redox properties of B. anthracis NrdI. The tyrosyl radical in NrdF is stabilized through its interaction with a ferromagnetically coupled manganese dimer. Moreover, we show through a combination of redox titration and protein electrochemistry that in contrast to hitherto characterized NrdIs, the B. anthracis NrdI is stable in its semiquinone form (NrdIsq) with a difference in electrochemical potential of ∼110 mV between the hydroquinone and semiquinone state. The under anaerobic conditions stable NrdIsq is fully capable of generating the oxidized, tyrosyl radical-containing form of Mn-NrdF when exposed to oxygen. This latter observation strongly supports that a superoxide radical is involved in the maturation mechanism, and contradicts the participation of a peroxide species. Additionally, EPR spectra on whole cells revealed that a significant fraction of NrdI resides in its semiquinone form in vivo, underscoring that NrdIsq is catalytically relevant. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Reduced Serotonin Transporter Levels and Inflammation in the Midbrain Raphe of 12 month old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Vaitheeswaran, Ramanan; Jensen, Katrine T

    2018-01-01

    Background Although mood and sleep disturbances are nearly universal among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), brain structures involved in non-cognitive processing remain under characterized in terms of AD pathology. Objectives This study was designed to evaluate hallmarks of AD pathology in...

  18. NMDA receptors trigger neurosecretion of 5-HT within dorsal raphé nucleus of the rat in the absence of action potential firing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kock, C.P.J.; Cornelisse, L.N.; Burnashev, N.; Lodder, J.C.; Timmerman, A.J.; Couey, J.J.; Mansvelder, H.D.; Brussaard, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Activity and calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitters from the somatodendritic compartment is an important signalling mechanism between neurones throughout the brain. NMDA receptors and vesicles filled with neurotransmitters occur in close proximity in many brain areas. It is unknown whether

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05425-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ostelium discoideum UDP glucose pyrophosphoryl... 44 1.5 1 ( FJ710598 ) Bactrocera dorsalis clone gt.bactr...ocera_dorsalis.... 44 1.5 1 ( EU443429 ) Ixodes pacificus isolate IpacCA2 16S ribos

  20. Morphological features of the ovaries during Oogenesis of the Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel) in relation to the physiological age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determination of physiological state (age?) in insects is useful in furthering our understanding of how insect behavior changes with age. Central to this determination is the identification of characters that allow assessment of physiological age. While non-destructive measures are the most desired ...

  1. Performance of Methyl Eugenol + Matrix + Toxicant combinations under field conditions in Hawaii and California for trapping B. dorsalis (Diptera:Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    New solid formulations containing methyl eugenol and either naled or DDVP toxicants were compared to the standard formulations on cotton wicks in large scale field evaluation in Hawaii. Two “reduced risk” toxicants (spinosad and Rynaxypyr®) were also evaluated. In one test the solid lure-toxicant-ma...

  2. Weathering and chemical degradation of methyl eugenol and raspberry ketone solid dispensers for detection, monitoring and male annihilation of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid male lure dispensers containing methyl eugenol (ME) and raspberry ketone (RK), or mixtures of the lures (ME + RK), and dimethyl dichloro-vinyl phosphate (DDVP) were evaluated in AWPM bucket or Jackson traps in commercial papaya (Carica papaya L.) orchards where both oriental fruit fly, Bactroc...

  3. Comparative rearing parameters for bisexual and genetic sexing strains of Zeugodacus cucurbitae and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) on an artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is an important component of area wide programs to control invading or established populations of pestiferous tephritids. The SIT involves the production, sterilization, and release of large numbers of the target species, with the goal of obtaining sterile male x w...

  4. Captures of wild Ceratitis capitata Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) in traps with improved multi-lure TMR-Dispensers weathered in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2012-2013 two “attract and kill” systems were weathered in California as potential detection and male annihilation treatments (MAT). Solid Mallet TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) wafers impregnated with DDVP (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) insecticide...

  5. Site-specific temporal and spatial validation of a generic plant pest forecast system with observations of Bactrocera dorsalis (oriental fruit fly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study introduces a simple generic model, the Generic Pest Forecast System (GPFS), for simulatingthe relative populations of non-indigenousarthropod pests in space and time. The model was designed to calculate the population index or relative population using hourly weather dataas influenced by...

  6. Mark-release-recapture experiments on the effectiveness of Methyl Eugenol-Spinosad male annihilation technique against an invading population of Bactrocera dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes the results of experiments compare two numbers of lure/insecticide spots per unit area upon detection of invading fruit flies. If the number of spots could be reduced with the same killing ability, then materials, labor, and time could be spared without compromising safety. Surp...

  7. Attraction of Bactrocera cucurbitae and B.dorsalis(Diptera: Tephritidae) to beer waste and other protein sources laced with ammonium acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is known that adult tephritid fruit fly females require protein sources for adequate egg production and that ammonia and its derivatives serve as volatile cues to locate protein-rich food. The attractiveness of beer waste and the commercially available baits Nulure, Buminal, and Bugs 4 Bugs Fruit...

  8. 76 FR 78168 - Importation of Chinese Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ..., sand pears from areas in China in which the Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) is not known to...), an aphid. Bactrocera dorsalis, Oriental fruit fly. Caleptrimerus neimongolensis Kuang and Geng, a... (Zacher), Hawthorn spider mite; Aphanostigma iaksuiense (Kishida), an ] aphid; Bactrocera dorsalis...

  9. 77 FR 75007 - Importation of Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) is not known to exist will have to be produced in accordance with a systems... viennensis (Zacher), Hawthorn spider mite. Aphanostigma iaksuiense (Kishida), an aphid. Bactrocera dorsalis... (Zacher), Hawthorn spider mite; Aphanostigma iaksuiense (Kishida), an aphid; Bactrocera dorsalis, Oriental...

  10. Exosome Cofactors Connect Transcription Termination to RNA Processing by Guiding Terminated Transcripts to the Appropriate Exonuclease within the Nuclear Exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyumin; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Iktae; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Minkyu

    2016-06-17

    The yeast Nrd1 interacts with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNApII) through its CTD-interacting domain (CID) and also associates with the nuclear exosome, thereby acting as both a transcription termination and RNA processing factor. Previously, we found that the Nrd1 CID is required to recruit the nuclear exosome to the Nrd1 complex, but it was not clear which exosome subunits were contacted. Here, we show that two nuclear exosome cofactors, Mpp6 and Trf4, directly and competitively interact with the Nrd1 CID and differentially regulate the association of Nrd1 with two catalytic subunits of the exosome. Importantly, Mpp6 promotes the processing of Nrd1-terminated transcripts preferentially by Dis3, whereas Trf4 leads to Rrp6-dependent processing. This suggests that Mpp6 and Trf4 may play a role in choosing a particular RNA processing route for Nrd1-terminated transcripts within the exosome by guiding the transcripts to the appropriate exonuclease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Biochemical Characterization of the Split Class II Ribonucleotide Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Crona

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its flexibility with respect to oxygen load is reflected by the fact that its genome encodes all three existing classes of ribonucleotides reductase (RNR: the oxygen-dependent class I RNR, the oxygen-indifferent class II RNR, and the oxygen-sensitive class III RNR. The P. aeruginosa class II RNR is expressed as two separate polypeptides (NrdJa and NrdJb, a unique example of a split RNR enzyme in a free-living organism. A split class II RNR is also found in a few closely related γ-Proteobacteria. We have characterized the P. aeruginosa class II RNR and show that both subunits are required for formation of a biologically functional enzyme that can sustain vitamin B12-dependent growth. Binding of the B12 coenzyme as well as substrate and allosteric effectors resides in the NrdJa subunit, whereas the NrdJb subunit mediates efficient reductive dithiol exchange during catalysis. A combination of activity assays and activity-independent methods like surface plasmon resonance and gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analysis suggests that the enzymatically active form of the enzyme is a (NrdJa-NrdJb2 homodimer of heterodimers, and a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments and molecular modeling suggests a plausible region in NrdJa that interacts with NrdJb. Our detailed characterization of the split NrdJ from P. aeruginosa provides insight into the biochemical function of a unique enzyme known to have central roles in biofilm formation and anaerobic growth.

  12. Biochemical Characterization of the Split Class II Ribonucleotide Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crona, Mikael; Hofer, Anders; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Tholander, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Its flexibility with respect to oxygen load is reflected by the fact that its genome encodes all three existing classes of ribonucleotides reductase (RNR): the oxygen-dependent class I RNR, the oxygen-indifferent class II RNR, and the oxygen-sensitive class III RNR. The P. aeruginosa class II RNR is expressed as two separate polypeptides (NrdJa and NrdJb), a unique example of a split RNR enzyme in a free-living organism. A split class II RNR is also found in a few closely related γ-Proteobacteria. We have characterized the P. aeruginosa class II RNR and show that both subunits are required for formation of a biologically functional enzyme that can sustain vitamin B12-dependent growth. Binding of the B12 coenzyme as well as substrate and allosteric effectors resides in the NrdJa subunit, whereas the NrdJb subunit mediates efficient reductive dithiol exchange during catalysis. A combination of activity assays and activity-independent methods like surface plasmon resonance and gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analysis suggests that the enzymatically active form of the enzyme is a (NrdJa-NrdJb)2 homodimer of heterodimers, and a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments and molecular modeling suggests a plausible region in NrdJa that interacts with NrdJb. Our detailed characterization of the split NrdJ from P. aeruginosa provides insight into the biochemical function of a unique enzyme known to have central roles in biofilm formation and anaerobic growth.

  13. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  14. Familial Clustering of Unexplained Transient Respiratory Distress in 12 Newborns from Three Unrelated Families Suggests an Autosomal-Recessive Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guala

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 12 near-term babies from three families in which an unexplained transient respiratory distress was observed. No known risk factor was present in any family and no sequelae were recorded at follow-up. The most common causes of respiratory distress at birth are Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRD and Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn (TTN, and their cumulative incidence is estimated to be about 2%. Genetic factors have been identified in NRD (surfactant genes or suggested for TTN (genes affecting lung liquid clearance. Survivors from NRD may develop clinically relevant sequelae, while TTN does not cause any problem later in life. Our cases do not immediately fit NRD or TTN, while familial recurrence suggests the existence of a previously unreported subgroup on patients with respiratory distress for which autosomal-recessive inheritance is likely.

  15. Ego depletion interferes with rule-defined category learning but not non-rule-defined category learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minda, John P; Rabi, Rahel

    2015-01-01

    ...) categories as opposed to the learning of non-rule-defined (NRD) categories. Prior research has also suggested that ego depletion can temporarily reduce the capacity for executive functioning and cognitive flexibility...

  16. Mechanism of assembly of the dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase: enzymatic generation of superoxide is required for tyrosine oxidation via a Mn(III)Mn(IV) intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotruvo, Joseph A; Stich, Troy A; Britt, R David; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2013-03-13

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) utilize radical chemistry to reduce nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. In the class Ia and Ib RNRs, this reaction requires a stable tyrosyl radical (Y(•)) generated by oxidation of a reduced dinuclear metal cluster. The Fe(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in the NrdB subunit of the class Ia RNRs can be generated by self-assembly from Fe(II)2-NrdB, O2, and a reducing equivalent. By contrast, the structurally homologous class Ib enzymes require a Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in their NrdF subunit. Mn(II)2-NrdF does not react with O2, but it binds the reduced form of a conserved flavodoxin-like protein, NrdIhq, which, in the presence of O2, reacts to form the Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor. Here we investigate the mechanism of assembly of the Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in Bacillus subtilis NrdF. Cluster assembly from Mn(II)2-NrdF, NrdI(hq), and O2 has been studied by stopped flow absorption and rapid freeze quench EPR spectroscopies. The results support a mechanism in which NrdI(hq) reduces O2 to O2(•-) (40-48 s(-1), 0.6 mM O2), the O2(•-) channels to and reacts with Mn(II)2-NrdF to form a Mn(III)Mn(IV) intermediate (2.2 ± 0.4 s(-1)), and the Mn(III)Mn(IV) species oxidizes tyrosine to Y(•) (0.08-0.15 s(-1)). Controlled production of O2(•-) by NrdIhq during class Ib RNR cofactor assembly both circumvents the unreactivity of the Mn(II)2 cluster with O2 and satisfies the requirement for an "extra" reducing equivalent in Y(•) generation.

  17. Particle size inhomogeneity effect on neutron resonance densitometry

    OpenAIRE

    BECKER BJÖRN; Harada, Hiroshi; KAUWENBERGHS KIM JOSEPHA; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Kopecky, Stefan; MOENS Andre; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Sibbens, Goedele; Tsuchiya, H.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD) represents a possible option to determine the heavy metal content in melted nuclear fuel. This method is based on the well-established methodology of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) transmission and capture measurements. In particular, NRD can measure both the isotopic and the elemental composition. It is a non-destructive method and is applicable for highly radioactive material. The details of this method are explained in another contribution to this bulleti...

  18. Demonstration of decreased gray matter concentration in the midbrain encompassing the dorsal raphe nucleus and the limbic subcortical regions in major depressive disorder: an optimized voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Tae, Woo Suk; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Byeong-Taek; Paik, Jong-Woo; Son, Kyu-Ri; Oh, Yu-Whan; Lee, Min-Soo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2011-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have reported changes in several brain areas, such as the medial and dorsolateral orbital cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent, and relatively few studies have been conducted using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to detect gray matter concentration (GMC) abnormalities in patients with MDD. We examined 47 MDD patients and 51 healthy controls to investigate structural abnormalities using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system, which was normalized to a customized T1 template and segmented with optimized VBM. Analysis of covariance with age and gender as covariates was adopted for the VBM statistics; the level of statistical significance was set at Pemotion regulation was lower in MDD patients. In particular, we found decreased GMC in the DRN. These findings may provide a better understanding of the anatomical properties of the neural mechanisms underlying the etiology of MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Field trials of solid triple lure (trimedlure, methyl eugenol, raspberry ketone, and DDVP) dispensers for detection and male annihilation of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and Bactrocera cucurbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid Mallet TMR (trimedlure [TML], methyl eugenol [ME], raspberry ketone [RK]) wafers and Mallet CMR (ceralure, ME, RK, benzyl acetate) wafers impregnated with DDVP insecticide were evaluated in traps as potential detection and male annihilation devices. Comparisons were made with 1) liquid lure a...

  20. A review of the hispaniolan colubrid snake Genus Ialtris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Albert; Rossman, Douglas A.

    1976-01-01

    Of the four endemic Hispaniolan genera of colubrid snakes, the least known is Ialtris Cope. Two species of Ialtris are recognized, each monotypic – dorsalis Günther and parishi Cochran. Neither has been commonly collected. COCHRAN (1941 : 375) listed 12 specimens of I. dorsalis in American

  1. 2553 IJBCS-Article-Seyni Sané

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    In Senegal, the mango industry contributes to the fight against poverty and food insecurity in rural areas. However, it faces phytosanitary constraints including those related to Bactrocera dorsalis. This study, aimed at understanding the dynamics of B. dorsalis, was conducted in four mango orchards, using Sentrap type ...

  2. 7 CFR 318.13-22 - Bananas from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... chapter for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), the melon fruit fly (Bactrocera curcurbitae), the Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis), and the green scale (Coccus viridis) and are inspected... fly (Bactrocera curcurbitae), and the Oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) and are inspected...

  3. First records of two species of mammals in the Huachuca Mountains: results of ecological stewardship at Fort Huachuca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnie Sidner; H. Sheridan Stone

    2005-01-01

    We report the first voucher of the cliff chipmunk (Neotamias dorsalis) and observations of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) from the Huachuca Mountains, Arizona, where these species had not been documented. While presence of T. brasiliensis was expected on Fort Huachuca, N. dorsalis was a surprise after a century...

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cornish, D.A.. Vol 21, No 1 (1986) - Articles Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus dorsalis (Perciformes: Clinidae) Abstract PDF · Vol 21, No 4 (1986) - Articles Ovarian adaptations in the viviparous teleosts Clinus superciliosus and Clinus dorsalis (Perciformes: Clinidae) Abstract PDF.

  5. Cryptotetany--place of EMG-recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, G; Dijs, H; Guastavino, V; Deckers, K; Naessens, G; Driessens, M

    1996-01-01

    Ninety-two cryptotetany tests were performed with simultaneous EMG-recording in the M. Interosseus dorsalis I and the M. Opponens pollicis. It was found that, in 21 cases out of 92 (22.8%), exclusively in the M. Interosseus dorsalis I, and in 11 cases out of 92 (11.9%), exclusively in the M. Opponens pollicis, multiplet activity was detected for at least 2 minutes. From this study it appears that, in performing the cryptotetany test, the M. Opponens pollicis is certainly not be preferred to the M. Interosseus dorsalis as the only place of recording. It appears, on the contrary, that simultaneous recording in the M. Interosseus dorsalis I and the M. Opponens pollicis is to be preferred to a recording exclusively in the M. Interosseus dorsalis I. In this way, a not unsignificant number of false negative cryptotetany tests can be avoided.

  6. Molecular and cellular characteristics of ABCA3 mutations associated with diffuse parenchymal lung diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamein, Florence; Riffault, Laure; Muselet-Charlier, Céline; Pernelle, Julie; Feldmann, Delphine; Jonard, Laurence; Durand-Schneider, Anne-Marie; Coulomb, Aurore; Maurice, Michèle; Nogee, Lawrence M; Inagaki, Nobuya; Amselem, Serge; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Rigourd, Virginie; Brémont, François; Marguet, Christophe; Brouard, Jacques; de Blic, Jacques; Clement, Annick; Epaud, Ralph; Guillot, Loïc

    2012-02-15

    ABCA3 (ATP-binding cassette subfamily A, member 3) is expressed in the lamellar bodies of alveolar type II cells and is crucial to pulmonary surfactant storage and homeostasis. ABCA3 gene mutations have been associated with neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) and pediatric interstitial lung disease (ILD). The objective of this study was to look for ABCA3 gene mutations in patients with severe NRD and/or ILD. The 30 ABCA3 coding exons were screened in 47 patients with severe NRD and/or ILD. ABCA3 mutations were identified in 10 out of 47 patients, including 2 homozygous, 5 compound heterozygous and 3 heterozygous patients. SP-B and SP-C expression patterns varied across patients. Among patients with ABCA3 mutations, five died shortly after birth and five developed ILD (including one without NRD). Functional studies of p.D253H and p.T1173R mutations revealed that p.D253H and p.T1173R induced abnormal lamellar bodies. Additionally, p.T1173R increased IL-8 secretion in vitro. In conclusion, we identified new ABCA3 mutations in patients with life-threatening NRD and/or ILD. Two mutations associated with ILD acted via different pathophysiological mechanisms despite similar clinical phenotypes.

  7. A SUMO-regulated activation function controls synergy of c-Myb through a repressor–activator switch leading to differential p300 recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molværsmyr, Ann-Kristin; Sæther, Thomas; Gilfillan, Siv; Lorenzo, Petra Isabel; Kvaløy, Heidi; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke

    2010-01-01

    Synergy between transcription factors operating together on complex promoters is a key aspect of gene activation. The ability of specific factors to synergize is restricted by sumoylation (synergy control, SC). Focusing on the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb, we found evidence for a strong SC linked to SUMO-conjugation in its negative regulatory domain (NRD), while AMV v-Myb has escaped this control. Mechanistic studies revealed a SUMO-dependent switch in the function of NRD. When NRD is sumoylated, the activity of c-Myb is reduced. When sumoylation is abolished, NRD switches into being activating, providing the factor with a second activation function (AF). Thus, c-Myb harbours two AFs, one that is constitutively active and one in the NRD being SUMO-regulated (SRAF). This double AF augments c-Myb synergy at compound natural promoters. A similar SUMO-dependent switch was observed in the regulatory domains of Sp3 and p53. We show that the change in synergy behaviour correlates with a SUMO-dependent differential recruitment of p300 and a corresponding local change in histone H3 and H4 acetylation. We therefore propose a general model for SUMO-mediated SC, where SUMO controls synergy by determining the number and strength of AFs associated with a promoter leading to differential chromatin signatures. PMID:20385574

  8. The Role of Metacognitive Reading Strategies, Metacognitive Study and Learning Strategies, and Behavioral Study and Learning Strategies in Predicting Academic Success in Students With and Without a History of Reading Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Thérèse M; Parrila, Rauno; Ritchie, Krista C; Deacon, S Hélène

    2017-01-01

    We examined the self-reported use of reading, study, and learning strategies in university students with a history of reading difficulties (HRD; n = 77) and with no history of reading difficulties (NRD; n = 295). We examined both between-groups differences in strategy use and strategy use as a predictive measure of academic success. Participants completed online questionnaires regarding reading history and strategy use. GPA and frequency of use of academic support services were also obtained for all students. University students with HRD reported a different profile of strategy use than their NRD peers, and self-reported strategy use was differentially predictive of GPA for students with HRD and NRD. For students with HRD, the use of metacognitive reading strategies and the use of study aids predicted academic success. Implications for university student services providers are discussed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2015.

  9. Clinical outcomes of no residual disease in the specimen after endoscopic resection for gastric neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Min; Kim, Sang Gyun; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Lim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Jeongmin; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Kim, Woo Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-02-01

    No residual disease (NRD) can be found in the specimen after endoscopic resection (ER) of biopsy-proven gastric neoplasm. This study aimed to evaluate the endoscopic and pathologic characteristics of patients with NRD and identify the cause and long-term prognosis. Medical records of patients who underwent ER for biopsy-proven gastric neoplasms at a single tertiary hospital between January 2005 and November 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients whose post-ER histology was revealed as NRD were included. Overall incidence, clinicopathologic characteristics, cause, and long-term prognosis were analyzed. NRD was detected in 143 (3.2%) of 4401 cases of gastric neoplasms treated with ER. Mean endoscopic size of the initial lesion was 8.15 ± 6.64 mm; in 93 cases (65.0%), the lesion was located in the lower third of the stomach. Initial pathologic diagnosis was as follows: adenoma (n = 110), carcinoma (n = 29), and atypical gland (n = 4). The causes of NRD were minute lesions removed by biopsy in 140 patients, pathologic misdiagnoses in two, and localization error in one. Local recurrence was detected in five patients (3.6%) with minute lesions during follow-up and treated with argon plasma coagulation (n = 4) or re-ER (n = 1). Synchronous (n = 5, 3.6%) and metachronous gastric lesions (n = 6, 4.3%) were also detected during follow-up. The main cause of NRD was minute lesions which might be completely removed by initial diagnostic biopsy. These cases showed a minimal rate of local recurrence and synchronous or metachronous gastric neoplasms. Careful follow-up is also mandatory for detection of residual disease.

  10. Role of Ribonucleotide Reductase in Bacillus subtilis Stress-Associated Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cerritos, Karla Viridiana; Yasbin, Ronald E; Robleto, Eduardo A; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2017-02-15

    The Gram-positive microorganism Bacillus subtilis relies on a single class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to generate 2'-deoxyribonucleotides (dNDPs) for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we investigated the influence of RNR levels on B. subtilis stationary-phase-associated mutagenesis (SPM). Since RNR is essential in this bacterium, we engineered a conditional mutant of strain B. subtilis YB955 (hisC952 metB5 leu427) in which expression of the nrdEF operon was modulated by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Moreover, genetic inactivation of ytcG, predicted to encode a repressor (NrdR) of nrdEF in this strain, dramatically increased the expression levels of a transcriptional nrdE-lacZ fusion. The frequencies of mutations conferring amino acid prototrophy in three genes were measured in cultures under conditions that repressed or induced RNR-encoding genes. The results revealed that RNR was necessary for SPM and overexpression of nrdEF promoted growth-dependent mutagenesis and SPM. We also found that nrdEF expression was induced by H2O2 and such induction was dependent on the master regulator PerR. These observations strongly suggest that the metabolic conditions operating in starved B. subtilis cells increase the levels of RNR, which have a direct impact on SPM. Results presented in this study support the concept that the adverse metabolic conditions prevailing in nutritionally stressed bacteria activate an oxidative stress response that disturbs ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) levels. Such an alteration of RNR levels promotes mutagenic events that allow Bacillus subtilis to escape from growth-limited conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. An unusual swelling in the male perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Arie Stewart; Freeman, Alex; Kirkham, Alex; Muneer, Asif

    2015-01-22

    Median raphe cysts are a rare, congenital entity. We present a case and review the literature in respect to a 35-year-old man with a non-visible, painless midline swelling in the anterior perineum initially thought to be a liposarcoma. Subsequent histopathological examination confirmed a median raphe cyst. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Contributions to Papuasian Botany II. A new species of Acianthus (Orchidaceae) from Bougainville Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schodde, Richard

    1967-01-01

    Herba terrestris infirma ca. 7—13 cm alta, iolio profunde cordato margine subtilissime crenulato, bracteis late ovatis acutis ovario sub-aequilongis, sepalo dorsali attenuatim lineari, sepalis lateralibus petalisque filiformibus, labello latissime rhombico glabro, in fauce callo

  13. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perciformes: Clinidae) ... extensive embryonic adaptations for the uptake of nutrients secreted by the follicular epithelium. Specialized ..... Cellular surface projections in C. dorsalis are virtually confined to the pericardial region of the embryo and ...

  14. Molecular Characterization of Tospovirus Transmitting Thrips Populations from India

    OpenAIRE

    Rang L.  Meena; T. Ramasubramanian; Venkatesan, S; Mohankumar, S.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of Tospovirus in thrips vector, Scirtothrips dorsalis has been detected for the first time in India using RT- PCR analysis. Similarly RT-PCR analysis with GBNV infected tomato leaves also resulted in the amplification of cDNA corresponding to the N gene (approximately 830 bp) of Coimbatore isolate. Dendrogram constructed on the basis of RAPD similarity matrix revealed that S. dorsalis population from tomato, groundnut and chillies had atleast 75% similarity while; only 50 % simil...

  15. A simplified sequence-based identification scheme for Bordetella reveals several putative novel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Theodore; Leber, Amy L; Marcon, Mario J; Newton, Duane W; Darrah, Rebecca; Vandamme, Peter; Lipuma, John J

    2014-02-01

    The differentiation of Bordetella species, particularly those causing human infection, is problematic. We found that sequence analysis of an internal fragment of nrdA allowed differentiation of the currently named Bordetella species. Analysis of 107 "Bordetella" isolates recovered almost exclusively from human respiratory tract specimens identified several putative novel species.

  16. RnlB Antitoxin of the Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB Toxin-Antitoxin Module Requires RNase HI for Inhibition of RnlA Toxin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Kenta; Qi, Dan; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2017-01-11

    The Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB toxin-antitoxin system is related to the anti-phage mechanism. Under normal growth conditions, an RnlA toxin with endoribonuclease activity is inhibited by binding of its cognate RnlB antitoxin. After bacteriophage T4 infection, RnlA is activated by the disappearance of RnlB, resulting in the rapid degradation of T4 mRNAs and consequently no T4 propagation when T4 dmd encoding a phage antitoxin against RnlA is defective. Intriguingly, E. coli RNase HI, which plays a key role in DNA replication, is required for the activation of RnlA and stimulates the RNA cleavage activity of RnlA. Here, we report an additional role of RNase HI in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system. Both RNase HI and RnlB are associated with NRD (one of three domains of RnlA). The interaction between RnlB and NRD depends on RNase HI. Exogenous expression of RnlA in wild-type cells has no effect on cell growth because of endogenous RnlB and this inhibition of RnlA toxicity requires RNase HI and NRD. These results suggest that RNase HI recruits RnlB to RnlA through NRD for inhibiting RnlA toxicity and thus plays two contrary roles in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-06-21

    Jun 21, 2016 ... prolonged rupture of membranes (regardless of chorioamnionitis) which accelerates pulmonary maturation [22, 23]. The fact that. 40.9% of women with prolonged rupture of membranes > 12 hours and maternal fever > 38 °C were on antibiotherapy might also explain the reason why the odds of NRD were ...

  18. The Utility of Chinese Tone Processing Skill in Detecting Children with English Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alida; Wang, Min

    2012-01-01

    The utility of Chinese tone processing skill in detecting children with English reading difficulties was examined through differences in a Chinese tone experimental task between a group of native English-speaking children with reading disabilities (RD) and a comparison group of children with normal reading development (NRD). General auditory…

  19. Dissection of Dom34-Hbs1 reveals independent functions in two RNA quality control pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Elzen, Antonia M G; Henri, Julien; Lazar, Noureddine; Gas, María Eugenia; Durand, Dominique; Lacroute, François; Nicaise, Magali; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Séraphin, Bertrand; Graille, Marc

    2010-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells have several quality control pathways that rely on translation to detect and degrade defective RNAs. Dom34 and Hbs1 are two proteins that are related to translation termination factors and are involved in no-go decay (NGD) and nonfunctional 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) decay (18S NRD) pathways that eliminate RNAs that cause strong ribosomal stalls. Here we present the structure of Hbs1 with and without GDP and a low-resolution model of the Dom34-Hbs1 complex. This complex mimics complexes of the elongation factor and transfer RNA or of the translation termination factors eRF1 and eRF3, supporting the idea that it binds to the ribosomal A-site. We show that nucleotide binding by Hbs1 is essential for NGD and 18S NRD. Mutations in Hbs1 that disrupted the interaction between Dom34 and Hbs1 strongly impaired NGD but had almost no effect on 18S NRD. Hence, NGD and 18S NRD could be genetically uncoupled, suggesting that mRNA and rRNA in a stalled translation complex may not always be degraded simultaneously.

  20. The Effect of Moral Waivers on the Success of Navy Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    psychedelic drugs (other than experimental/casual use of marijuana). CO, NRD; mandatory minimum waiting period of one year since last use or conviction...3 Table 3. Eligibility Determination Policy for Alcohol/ Drug Abusers [After, CNRC, 2002...System NCSA National Call to Service NF Nuclear Field NIDT Non-Instrumented Drug Test xiv NPS Naval Postgraduate School NPSB Non-Prior

  1. Genetic location of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 deficient in the ability to induce endonuclease II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P; Sinha, N K; Warner, H R; Snustad, D P

    1972-01-01

    Reciprocal three-factor crosses and the use of a partial revertant of a putative ribonucleotide reductase mutant of Escherichia coli B/5 as indicator have made it possible to map denA (deficient in endonuclease II) between nrd-11 (ribonucleotide reductase gene B) and amM69 (gene 63) on the bacteriophage T4 chromosome.

  2. The Role of Metacognitive Reading Strategies, Metacognitive Study and Learning Strategies, and Behavioral Study and Learning Strategies in Predicting Academic Success in Students with and without a History of Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Thérèse M.; Parrila, Rauno; Ritchie, Krista C.; Deacon, S. Hélène

    2017-01-01

    We examined the self-reported use of reading, study, and learning strategies in university students with a history of reading difficulties (HRD; n = 77) and with no history of reading difficulties (NRD; n = 295). We examined both between-groups differences in strategy use and strategy use as a predictive measure of academic success. Participants…

  3. Ego depletion interferes with rule-defined category learning but not non-rule-defined category learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minda, John P.; Rabi, Rahel

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research on category learning has suggested that many cognitive and environmental factors can have a differential effect on the learning of rule-defined (RD) categories as opposed to the learning of non-rule-defined (NRD) categories. Prior research has also suggested that ego depletion can temporarily reduce the capacity for executive functioning and cognitive flexibility. The present study examined whether temporarily reducing participants’ executive functioning via a resource depletion manipulation would differentially impact RD and NRD category learning. Participants were either asked to write a story with no restrictions (the control condition), or without using two common letters (the ego depletion condition). Participants were then asked to learn either a set of RD categories or a set of NRD categories. Resource depleted participants performed more poorly than controls on the RD task, but did not differ from controls on the NRD task, suggesting that self regulatory resources are required for successful RD category learning. These results lend support to multiple systems theories and clarify the role of self-regulatory resources within this theory. PMID:25688220

  4. Restos esqueléticos de osos (Ursus arctos y Ursus spelaeus en el oriente de la Región Cantábrica. Distribución geográfica y análisis biométrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villaluenga, Aritza

    2015-01-01

    (NRD, entre los que han sido identificados múltiples individuos de Ursus arctos Linnaeo y Ursus spelaeus Rosenmüller-Heinroth del Pleistoceno Superior y Holoceno inicial. Finalmente, se detallan las principales características paleontológicas y taxonómicas de las cavidades y se realiza un estudio comparativo regional.

  5. 76 FR 20372 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree and Settlement Agreement Regarding Natural Resource Damage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree and Settlement Agreement Regarding Natural Resource Damage Claims... St. Regis Mohawk Tribe. The NRD Settlement Agreement resolves claims for natural resource damages and... be addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, Environment and Natural Resources Division, and...

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress in a reference neonatal unit in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute fetal distress, elective caesarean delivery, APGAR score < 7 at the 1st minute, prematurity, male gender and macrosomia were independent predictors of NRD. The main etiologies were neonatal infections (31%) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (25%). Its neonatal mortality rate was 24.5%, mainly associated ...

  7. Neuroretinal Degeneration in HIV Patients Without Opportunistic Ocular Infections in the cART Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirkaya, Nazli; Wit, Ferdinand; Schlingemann, Reinier; Verbraak, Franciscus

    2015-01-01

    Subtle structural and functional retinal abnormalities, termed 'HIV-associated Neuroretinal Disorder (HIV-NRD)', have been reported in HIV patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), without infectious retinitis or any apparent fundus abnormalities otherwise. In this review, we

  8. Nonwoven textile for use in a nanoparticle respiratory deposition sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Donna J H; Park, Jae Hong; Mines, Levi W D; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Peters, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    The nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler is a personal sampler that combines a cyclone, impactor, and a nylon mesh diffusion stage to measure a worker's exposure to nanoparticles. The concentration of titanium in the nylon mesh of the diffusion stage complicates the application of the NRD sampler for assessing exposures to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. This study evaluated commercially available nonwoven textiles for use as an alternative media in the diffusion stage of the NRD sampler. Three textiles were selected as containing little titanium from an initial screening of 11 textiles by field portable x-ray fluorescence (FPXRF). Further evaluation on these three textiles was conducted to determine the concentration of titanium and other metals by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), the number of layers required to achieve desired collection characteristics for use as the diffusion stage in the NRD sampler (i.e., the nanoparticulate matter, NPM, criterion), and the pressure drop associated with that number of layers.  Only three (two composed of cotton fibers, C1 and C2; and one of viscose bamboo and cotton fibers, BC) of 11 textiles screened had titanium concentrations below the limit of detection the XRF device (0.15 µg/cm 2 ). Multiple metals, including small amounts of titanium, were found in each of the three nonwoven textiles using ICP-OES. The number of 25-mm-diameter layers required to achieve the collection efficiency by size required for the NRD sampler was three for C1 (R 2 = 0.95 with reference to the NPM criterion), two for C2 (R 2 = 0.79), and three for BC (R 2 = 0.87). All measured pressure drops were less than theoretical and even the greatest pressure drop of 65.4 Pa indicated that a typical personal sampling pump could accommodate any of the three nonwoven textiles in the NRD sampler. The titanium concentration, collection efficiency, and measured pressure drops show there is a potential for

  9. Relationship between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Neuroretinal Disorder and Vision-Specific Quality of Life among People with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Davin C; May, K Patrick; Holland, Gary N; Van Natta, Mark L; Wu, Albert W; Thorne, Jennifer E; Jabs, Douglas A

    2015-12-01

    Some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have evidence of optic nerve or retinal dysfunction that manifests as decreased contrast sensitivity, even with good best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). This condition, termed HIV-related neuroretinal disorder (HIV-NRD), is a risk factor for vision impairment (BCVA AIDS cohort who completed the National Eye Institute 25-item Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25), had BCVA of 20/40 or better, and had no evidence of ocular opportunistic infection or cataract. We compared QOL by HIV-NRD status, adjusting for potential confounding variables, using multiple linear regression. Among those with HIV-NRD, we assessed the relationship between VFQ-25 and the logarithm of contrast sensitivity (logCS), using Spearman correlation. We defined a minimum clinically important difference (MCID) as 1 standard error of measurement from a well-characterized, historical population of individuals with a variety of ophthalmic disorders. Subscales and composite VFQ-25 scores (0 = worst, 100 = best). A total of 813 individuals met study criteria. Those with HIV-NRD (n = 39 [4.8%]) had a lower mean composite score than those without HIV-NRD (81 vs. 89; P = 0.0002) and lower mean scores in the following subscales: near activities (77 vs. 86; P = 0.004), distance activities (85 vs. 91; P = 0.01), social functioning (89 vs. 96; P = 0.0005), mental health (75 vs. 87; P = 0.0001), dependency (81 vs. 94; P AIDS and good BCVA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Influence of the neutron transport tube on neutron resonance densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatani, Fumito; Tsuchiya, Harufumi; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Takamine, Jun; Hori, Junichi; Sano, Tadafumi

    2017-09-01

    Neutron Resonance Densitometry (NRD) is a non-destructive assay technique of nuclear materials in particle-like debris that contains various materials. An aim of NRD is to quantify nuclear materials in a melting fuel of Fukusima Daiichi plant, spent nuclear fuel and annihilation disposal fuel etc. NRD consists of two techniques of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) and Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) or Prompt Gamma-ray Analysis (PGA). A density of nuclear material isotopes is decided with NRTA. The materials absorbing a neutron in a wide energy range such as boron in a sample are identified by NRCA/PGA. The information of NRCA/PGA is used in NRTA analysis to quantify nuclear material isotopes. A neutron time of flight (TOF) method is used in NRD measurements. A facility, consisting of a neutron source, a neutron flight path, and a detector is required. A short flight path and a strong neutron source are needed to downsize such a facility and put NRD into practical use. A neutron transport tube covers a flight path to prevent noises. In order to investigate the effect of neutron transport tube and pulse width of a neutron source, we carried out NRTA experiments with a 2-m short neutron transport tube constructed at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute - Linear Accelerator (KURRI-LINAC), and impacts of shield of neutron transport tube and influence of pulse width of a neutron source were examined. A shield of the neutron transport tube reduced a background and had a good influence on the measurement. The resonance dips of 183W at 27 eV was successfully observed with a pulse width of a neutron source less than 2 μs.

  11. Supraspinal morphine and descending inhibitions acting on the dorsal horn of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, A H; Le Bars, D

    1987-03-01

    following the microinjection (a mean 77% reduction) and then returned towards control values. All but three of the corresponding microinjection sites were such as to include the medio-ventral p.a.g. including the nucleus raphé dorsalis. In contrast none of the cases where d.n.i.c. was unaltered included microinjection sites in this region. 5. No relationship was found between the changes in d.n.i.c. and the number of spikes evoked in the control sequences, or the changes in the C-fibre responses. 6. Autoradiographic controls using [3H]morphine showed a large diffusion of the drug within an area of about 0.75 mm around the tip of the cannula.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  12. Low-Dose Irradiation With Modified Atmosphere Packaging for Mango Against the Oriental Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimartpirom, Monnipa; Burikam, Intawat; Limohpasmanee, Wanich; Kongratarporn, Titima; Thannarin, Thodsapon; Bunsiri, Apita; Follett, Peter A

    2017-12-27

    Irradiation is used to disinfest the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and other pests on mango fruits before export from Thailand to foreign markets. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) used during export of mangoes creates a low-oxygen environment that may reduce the efficacy of quarantine irradiation treatment against B. dorsalis. 'Nam Dok Mai' mangoes infested with third-instar larvae of B. dorsalis, wrapped with three different kinds of MAP bags (CF1, FF5, and H34M) or no MAP, were treated with gamma radiation at 0 (control), 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 Gy. The average O2 and CO2 concentrations in MAP bags with mangos were 7.2 and 8.7% in the H34M bag, 8.6 and 21.2% in the CF1 bag, and 9.6 and 26.7% in the FF5 bag, respectively. The use of MAP on infested mangoes significantly increased mortality of B. dorsalis under irradiation treatment. The estimated lethal doses to cause 99% mortality (LD99) for no MAP and MAP (CF1, FF5, and H34M bags) treatments were 58.1, 41.6, 43.8, and 47.4 Gy, respectively. Therefore, MAP acted as an additional stressor rather than providing radioprotection in irradiated B. dorsalis. Large-scale confirmatory testing of 35,000 B. dorsalis larvae treated at a radiation dose of 150 Gy in mangoes with H34M MAP bags produced no survivors to the adult stage. Commercial use of MAP producing the O2 levels that we observed for mangos in this study will not reduce the efficacy of the approved 150 Gy quarantine irradiation treatment for B. dorsalis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Does serotonin play a role in entrance into hibernation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canguilhem, B; Miro, J L; Kempf, E; Schmitt, P

    1986-10-01

    To study the role of brain serotonin in entrance into hibernation, intraventricular injections of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, electrolytic lesions of small parts of the median raphe nucleus, and chemical lesions of the same nucleus were undertaken on the European hamster in winter. All the lesions led to a variable decrease of serotonin levels in all parts of the brain areas examined. However, hibernation was suppressed only in those animals whose serotonergic neurons were destroyed in a small anterior part of the median raphe nucleus. Electrolytic lesions as well as chemical lesions in the other parts of the median raphe nucleus or the 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine injections into lateral ventricles do not prevent hibernation. These data suggest that in the European hamster only a specific group of serotonergic neurons of the median raphe nucleus are involved in the process of entrance into hibernation.

  14. A Comparison of Dental and Skeletal Changes Between Rapid Palatal Expansion and Nickel Titanium Palatal Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-03

    of Science In Orthodontics Department of Orthodontics Morgantown, West Virginia 1999 (Pll Redacted] REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved...viii CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION 1 A. BACKGROUND 1 B. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 2 C. SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY 3 D. HYPOTHESIS 3 E. OPERATIONAL...palatal raphe 48 Identification of dental cast landmarks 48 Tracing of transverse palatal contour with identification of median palatal raphe 49

  15. Lactococcus lactis TrxD represents a subgroup of thioredoxins prevalent in Gram-positive bacteria containing WCXDC active site motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Efler, Petr; Epie, Denis Ebong

    2014-01-01

    on protein-protein equilibria LlTrxA (E01 = -259 mV) and LlNrdH (E01 = -238 my) show approximately 10 mV higher standard state redox potentials than the corresponding E. coil homologues, while E 01 of LlTrxD is -243 mV, more similar to glutaredoxin than "classical" thioredoxin. EcTrx1 and LlTrxA have high......Three protein disulfide reductases of the thioredoxin superfamily from the industrially important Gram-positive Lactococcus lactis (LlTrxA, LlTrxD and LlNrdH) are compared to the "classical" thioredoxin from Escherichia coil (EcTrx1). LlTrxA resembles EcTrx1 with a WCGPC active site motif and other...

  16. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Shih Keng; Mahfodz, Nur Hidayana; Wali, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; Talib, Siti Aisyah A; Nasrah, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; Wong, Pooi Fong; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2016-05-03

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species.

  17. Quantifying spatial patterns in the Yakama Nation Tribal Forest and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest to assess forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, T. F.

    2013-05-01

    Over the past century western United States have experienced drastic anthropogenic land use change from practices such as agriculture, fire exclusion, and timber harvesting. These changes have complex social, cultural, economic, and ecological interactions and consequences. This research studied landscapes patterns of watersheds with similar LANDFIRE potential vegetation in the Southern Washington Cascades physiographic province, within the Yakama Nation Tribal Forest (YTF) and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Naches Ranger District (NRD). In the selected watersheds, vegetation-mapping units were delineated and populated based on physiognomy of homogeneous areas of vegetative composition and structure using high-resolution aerial photos. Cover types and structural classes were derived from the raw, photo-interpreted vegetation attributes for individual vegetation mapping units and served as individual and composite response variables to quantify and assess spatial patterns and forest health conditions between the two ownerships. Structural classes in both the NRD and YTF were spatially clustered (Z-score 3.1, p-value 0.01; Z-score 2.3, p-value 0.02, respectively), however, ownership and logging type both explained a significant amount of variance in structural class composition. Based on FRAGSTATS landscape metrics, structural classes in the NRD displayed greater clustering and fragmentation with lower interspersion relative to the YTF. The NRD landscape was comprised of 47.4% understory reinitiation structural class type and associated high FRAGASTAT class metrics demonstrated high aggregation with moderate interspersion. Stem exclusion open canopy displayed the greatest dispersal of structural class types throughout the NRD, but adjacencies were correlated to other class types. In the YTF, stem exclusion open canopy comprised 37.7% of the landscape and displayed a high degree of aggregation and interspersion about clusters throughout the YTF. Composite cover

  18. Health benefits and consequences of the Eastern Orthodox fasting in monks of Mount Athos: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, S N; Persynaki, A; Petróczi, A; Barkans, E; Mulrooney, H; Kypraiou, M; Tzotzas, T; Tziomalos, K; Kotsa, K; Tsioudas, A A; Pichard, C; Naughton, D P

    2017-06-01

    Greek Orthodox fasting (OF), which involves 180-200 days of fasting per year, is dictated by the Christian Orthodox religion. For the first time, this cross-sectional study examines the characteristics and the effects of OF on anthropometry, cardiometabolic markers and calcium homeostasis in Athonian monks (AMs). Daily intakes of energy, macro- and micronutrients of a day during a weekend of Nativity Fast, defined as non-restrictive day (NRD), and a weekday during Great Lent, labeled as restrictive day (RD) were recorded. The daily energy intake of 70 AM (age=38.8±9.7 years) was low during both RD and NRD (1265.9±84.5 vs 1660±81 kcal, respectively, Pbenefits of the strict Athonian OF through optimal lipid and glucose homeostasis.

  19. Three promising fungal strains pathogenic to fruit flies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, T.; Praveena, R.; Babu, Kavitha; Naseema, A.; Anitha, N. [College of Agriculture, Kerala (India)

    2006-07-01

    Pathogenicity of the fungi Paecilomyces lilacinus, isolated from Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Aspergillus candidus, isolated from B. dorsalis, was tested. Cross infectivity of P. lilacinus on B. dorsalis and A. candidus on B. cucurbitae and cross infectivity of a local isolate of B. bassiana from bhindi leaf roller (Sylepta derogata) on fruit flies (B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis ) were also studied. These fungi were new records in these hosts. P. lilacinus at 109 spores / ml caused 96.67% and 100 % cumulative mortality in fruit flies on the second and on the third days. LC50 values of P. lilacinus on B. cucurbitae were 5.0 x 106, 8.0 x 105, 7.0 x 105 spores/ ml on second, third and fourth day, respectively. The fungus was found to cross infect B. dorsalis. LC50 values of A. candidus on B. cucurbitae were 1.29 x 108, 1.22 x 107, 2.27 x 106 spores / ml on third, fourth and fifth day, respectively. The fungus was found to be cross infective to B. cucurbitae. B. bassiana at 109 spores/ ml on B. dorsalis was found to cause 70%, 80% and 90% mortality on fourth, fifth and sixth day. LC50 values of B. bassiana on B. dorsalis were 7.0 x 108, 2.0 x 107, 5.0 x 106 spores/ ml on third, fourth and fifth day ,respectively . Formulation of P. lilacinus as wettable powder and granules and B. bassiana as wettable powder, were also prepared and their efficacy was tested on hosts. (author)

  20. Final Report: Education, Public Access, and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    supervision was provided by Mr. Roger Hamilton, Chief, RAB; Mr. Chegter 0. Martin , Acting Chief, SB; Mr. J. L. Decell, Acting Chief, NRD; and Dr. John...Alicia Ridell, Outdoor Recreation Planner National Park Service George H. Siehl , Specialist in Natural Resources Policy Congressional Research Service...Spectrum for Outdoor Recreation Planning on Army Installations," Technical Report N-124, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA. Siehl

  1. Two self-splicing group I introns in the ribonucleotide reductase large subunit gene of Staphylococcus aureus phage Twort

    OpenAIRE

    Landthaler, Markus; Begley, Ulrike; Lau, Nelson C.; Shub, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently described three group I introns inserted into a single gene, orf142, of the staphylococcal bacteriophage Twort and suggested the presence of at least two additional self-splicing introns in this phage genome. Here we report that two previously uncharacterized introns, 429 and 1087 nt in length, interrupt the Twort gene coding for the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (nrdE). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of RNA isolated from Staphylococcus a...

  2. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  3. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Jolley

    Full Text Available Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone (IOT, and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%, end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2% and neural respiratory drive (NRD (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography. Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  4. Porous Polyurethane Foam for Use as a Particle Collection Substrate in a Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Levi W D; Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Grassian, Vicki H; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Porous polyurethane foam was evaluated to replace the eight nylon meshes used as a substrate to collect nanoparticles in the Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition (NRD) sampler. Cylindrical (25-mm diameter by 40-mm deep) foam with 110 pores per inch was housed in a 25-mm-diameter conductive polypropylene cassette cowl compatible with the NRD sampler. Pristine foam and nylon meshes were evaluated for metals content via elemental analysis. The size-selective collection efficiency of the foam was evaluated using salt (NaCl) and metal fume aerosols in independent tests. Collection efficiencies were compared to the nanoparticulate matter (NPM) criterion and a semi-empirical model for foam. Changes in collection efficiency and pressure drop of the foam and nylon meshes were measured after loading with metal fume particles as measures of substrate performance. Substantially less titanium was found in the foam (0.173 μg sampler -1 ) compared to the nylon mesh (125 μg sampler -1 ), improving the detection capabilities of the NRD sampler for titanium dioxide particles. The foam collection efficiency was similar to that of the nylon meshes and the NPM criterion (R 2 = 0.98, for NaCl), although the semi-empirical model underestimated the experimental efficiency (R 2 = 0.38). The pressure drop across the foam was 8% that of the nylon meshes when pristine and changed minimally with metal fume loading (~ 19 mg). In contrast, the pores of the nylon meshes clogged after loading with ~ 1 mg metal fume. These results indicate that foam is a suitable substrate to collect metal (except for cadmium) nanoparticles in the NRD sampler.

  5. Retrograde pedal access with a 20-gauge intravenous cannula after failed antegrade recanalization of a tibialis anterior artery in a diabetic patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Colkesen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde tibiopedal approach is being used frequently in below-the-knee vascular interventions. In patients with diabetic foot pathology, complex anatomy often requires a retrograde technique when the distal vascular anatomy and puncture site is suitable. The dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries can be punctured because of their relatively superficial position. We report a retrograde puncturing technique in patients with chronic total occlusions. After failed antegrade recanalization, puncturing and cannulation of a tiny dorsalis pedis artery with a narrow bore [20-gauge (0.8 mm] intravenous cannula is described.

  6. Magnetic resonance sounding survey data collected in the North Platte, Twin Platte, and South Platte Natural Resource Districts, Western Nebraska, Fall 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Mason A.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Irons, Trevor P.; Cannia, James C.; Abraham, Jared D.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a release of digital data and associated survey descriptions from a series of magnetic resonance soundings (MRS, also known as surface nuclear magnetic resonance) that was conducted during October and November of 2012 in areas of western Nebraska as part of a cooperative hydrologic study by the North Platte Natural Resource District (NRD), South Platte NRD, Twin Platte NRD, the Nebraska Environmental Trust, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of the study was to delineate the base-of-aquifer and refine the understanding of the hydrologic properties in the aquifer system. The MRS technique non-invasively measures water content in the subsurface, which makes it a useful tool for hydrologic investigations in the near surface (up to depths of approximately 150 meters). In total, 14 MRS production-level soundings were acquired by the USGS over an area of approximately 10,600 square kilometers. The data are presented here in digital format, along with acquisition information, survey and site descriptions, and metadata.

  7. Eye movements of university students with and without reading difficulties during naming speed tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dahhan, Noor; Georgiou, George K; Hung, Rickie; Munoz, Douglas; Parrila, Rauno; Kirby, John R

    2014-07-01

    Although naming speed (NS) has been shown to predict reading into adulthood and differentiate between adult dyslexics and controls, the question remains why NS is related to reading. To address this question, eye movement methodology was combined with three letter NS tasks (the original letter NS task by Denckla & Rudel, Cortex 10:186-202, 1974, and two more developed by Compton, The Journal of Special Education 37:81-94, 2003, with increased phonological or visual similarity of the letters). Twenty undergraduate students with reading difficulties (RD) and 27 without (NRD) were tested on letter NS tasks (eye movements were recorded during the NS tasks), phonological processing, and reading fluency. The results indicated first that the RD group was slower than the NRD group on all NS tasks with no differences between the NS tasks. In addition, the NRD group had shorter fixation durations, longer saccades, and fewer saccades and fixations than the RD group. Fixation duration and fixation count were significant predictors of reading fluency even after controlling for phonological processing measures. Taken together, these findings suggest that the NS-reading relationship is due to two factors: less able readers require more time to acquire stimulus information during fixation and they make more saccades.

  8. Efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign stricture after upper gastrointestinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Jeong Eun; KIm, Hyo Cheol; Lee, Myung Su; Hur, Sae Beom; KIm, Minuk; Lee, Sang Hwan; Cho, Soo Buem; KIm, Chan Sun; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To determine the efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign anastomotic stricture after upper gastrointestinal (UGI) surgery. From June 2009 to May 2015, a total of 56 retrievable metallic stents with fixation string were placed under fluoroscopy guidance in 42 patients who were diagnosed with benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. Clinical success was defined as achieving normal regular diet (NRD). The clinical success rate after the first stent placement was 57.1% (24/42). After repeated stent placement and/or balloon dilation, the clinical success rate was increased to 83.3% (35/42). Six (14.3%) patients required surgical revision to achieve NRD. One (2.4%) patient failed to achieve NRD. Stent migration occurred in 60.7% (34/56) of patients. Successful rate of removing the stent using fixation string and angiocatheter was 94.6% (53/56). Distal migration occurred in 12 stents. Of the 12 stents, 10 (83.3%) were successfully removed whereas 2 could not be removed. No complication occurred regarding distal migration. Using retrievable metallic stent with a fixation string is a feasible option for managing early benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. It can reduce complications caused by distal migration of the stent.

  9. Development and validation of a structured query language implementation of the Elixhauser comorbidity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; Dexter, Franklin

    2017-07-01

    Comorbidity adjustment is often performed during outcomes and health care resource utilization research. Our goal was to develop an efficient algorithm in structured query language (SQL) to determine the Elixhauser comorbidity index. We wrote an SQL algorithm to calculate the Elixhauser comorbidities from Diagnosis Related Group and International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes. Validation was by comparison to expected comorbidities from combinations of these codes and to the 2013 Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD). The SQL algorithm matched perfectly with expected comorbidities for all combinations of ICD-9 or ICD-10, and Diagnosis Related Groups. Of 13 585 859 evaluable NRD records, the algorithm matched 100% of the listed comorbidities. Processing time was ∼0.05 ms/record. The SQL Elixhauser code was efficient and computationally identical to the SAS algorithm used for the NRD. This algorithm may be useful where preprocessing of large datasets in a relational database environment and comorbidity determination is desired before statistical analysis. A validated SQL procedure to calculate Elixhauser comorbidities and the van Walraven index from ICD-9 or ICD-10 discharge diagnosis codes has been published.

  10. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Reilly

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD, the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 53.5% predicted and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02 and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04 were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic

  11. The serotonergic anatomy of the developing human medulla oblongata: implications for pediatric disorders of homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Hannah C; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Haynes, Robin L; Rognum, Ingvar J; Paterson, David S

    2011-07-01

    The caudal serotonergic (5-HT) system is a critical component of a medullary "homeostatic network" that regulates protective responses to metabolic stressors such as hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hyperthermia. We define anatomically the caudal 5-HT system in the human medulla as 5-HT neuronal cell bodies located in the raphé (raphé obscurus, raphé magnus, and raphé pallidus), extra-raphé (gigantocellularis, paragigantocellularis lateralis, intermediate reticular zone, lateral reticular nucleus, and nucleus subtrigeminalis), and ventral surface (arcuate nucleus). These 5-HT neurons are adjacent to all of the respiratory- and autonomic-related nuclei in the medulla where they are positioned to modulate directly the responses of these effector nuclei. In the following review, we highlight the topography and development of the caudal 5-HT system in the human fetus and infant, and its inter-relationships with nicotinic, GABAergic, and cytokine receptors. We also summarize pediatric disorders in early life which we term "developmental serotonopathies" of the caudal (as well as rostral) 5-HT domain and which are associated with homeostatic imbalances. The delineation of the development and organization of the human caudal 5-HT system provides the critical foundation for the neuropathologic elucidation of its disorders directly in the human brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thrips management program for horticultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article presents a systems approach for managing key thrips pests including western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and chilli thrips (Scirtothrips dorsalis) known to cause millions of dollars loss annually. Thrips small size (1-2 mm), thigmotactic behavior, high reproductive rate an...

  13. Unexpected high intragenomic variation in two of three major pest thrips species does not affect ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)utility for thrips identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mitochondrial gene mtCO1 and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA are among the most widely used molecular markers for insect taxonomic characterization. Three economically important species of thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis, Thrips palmi, and Frankliniella occidental...

  14. Volume 9 No. 9 December 2009 POTENTIAL IMPACT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... Western Tree- hyrax. Long-tailed/Tree. Pangolin. Dendrohyrax Dorsalis. Manis tricuspis. T. E. C. S. 11. 2. REPTILIA. Reptila. Nile croccodilus. Monitor lizard. Water moccasin. Rock python. Green mamba. Black cobra. Hingeback. Croccodilus niloticus. Veranus niloticus. Python sebae. Dendrospis viridis.

  15. Preliminary Monitoring of Anura Species in Selected Vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2–4. A total of 12 anuran species were recorded on the transects at the Ijede study site (Fig. 5). There were seven species observed in the family Ranidae while two species. (Afrixalus dorsalis and Hyperolius f. burtoni) were seen in the family. Hyperoliidae. Arthroleptis variabilis was the only leaf litter species recorded while.

  16. 7 CFR 301.32-1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), in any stage of development. Melon fruit fly. The insect known as the melon... insect known as Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), in any stage of development. Move (moved... insect known as Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), in any stage of development. Peach...

  17. Species Diversity and Relative Abundance of Fisheries Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative abundance of key organisms in the beach seine landings include Chloroscombrus chrysurus (26.0%) in 2007, Brachydeuterus auritus (22.8%) in 2008, Ilisha africana (14.7%) in 2008, Sardinella aurita (13.1%) in 2009 and Selene dorsalis (11.2%) in 2007. The organisms that were in low relative abundance ...

  18. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    black, cold, swollen and tender. The dorsalis ... feet were normal. Oliguric ARF was also observed on day 5, and plasma and urinary investigations confirmed renal insufficiency (Ta- ble 2). Fluid intake per day was subsequently restricted to in- sensible ... The high body temperature gradually returned to normal. (36.5°C) by ...

  19. Oral and Topical Toxicity of Fipronil to Melon Fly and Oriental Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to develop basic oral and topical toxicity data for Fipronil in Solulys protein bait to wild melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) and the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). RESULTS: For the oral study, both females and males were ...

  20. Helminth Community of Tree frogs at the Okomu National Park, Edo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (7.4%); Monogenea: Polystoma chiromantis (4.7%), Polystoma dorsalis (3.7%), Polystoma gracei (6.7%) and Polystoma okomuensis (15.6%); The trematodes encountered included Mesocoelium monodi, Mesocoelium monas and Ostioloides rappiae which were observed to be multi-host parasites. Among the nematodes ...

  1. Coercive copopulation in two sexually cannibalistic camel-spider species (Arachnida: Solifugae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrusková-Martisová, M.; Pekár, S.; Bilde, T.

    2010-01-01

    Males can overcome female resistance to mating either by using luring behaviour or through sexual coercion. We studied mating behaviour in two sexually cannibalistic camel-spider species Galeodes caspius subfuscus (Galeodidae) and Gluvia dorsalis (Desiidae), to determine the presence of luring an...

  2. Subtropical Fruit Fly Invasions into Temperate Fruit Fly Territory in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtropical fruit fly species including peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders); melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett); oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel); and Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata Weidemann, have been detected in the past decade in the San Joaquin Valley of Califo...

  3. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onadeko, AB. Vol 8, No 1 (2016) - Articles Habitat selection of four african treefrogs (Leptopelis boulengeri, Hyperolius fusciventris bourtoni, H. Guttulatus and Afrixalus dorsalis) in degraded environments of the Niger Delta, Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2141-1778. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  4. Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment - Vol 8 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Habitat selection of four african treefrogs (Leptopelis boulengeri, Hyperolius fusciventris bourtoni, H. Guttulatus and Afrixalus dorsalis) in degraded environments of the Niger Delta, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AB Onadeko, OS Ogoanah ...

  5. Transcriptome of the egg parasitoid Fopius arisanus, an important biocontrol tool for Tephritid fruit fly suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background The Braconoid wasp Fopius arisanus (Sonan) has been utilized for biological control of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), and the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis), both phytophagous fruit flies pest of economic importance in Hawaii. We have sequenced and assembled t...

  6. A new genus of Odontopygid Millipeds from Tanzania (Diplopoda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new genus of Odontopygid Millipeds from Tanzania (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida: Odontopygidae). Richard L Hoffman, Kim M Howell. Abstract. The new generic taxon Calyptomastix is proposed to accommodate the type species Odontopyge kakandae Kraus, 1958, and, tentatively, Odontopyge dorsalis Carl, 1909, ...

  7. Resveratrol modifies tephritid fruit fly response to nutritional and radiation stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol is a recently discovered compound. Three concentrations (50, 100, 200 µM) of resveratrol were evaluated against Bactrocera dorsalis and B. cucurbitae by incorporating resveratrol into fruit fly liquid larval diet under the following conditions: 1) with or without wheat germ oil (WGO) in ...

  8. Whole genome sequencing of the Braconid parasitoid wasp Fopius arisanus, an important biocontrol agent of pest Tepritid fruit flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The braconid wasp Fopius arisanus (Sonan) is an important biological control agent of tropical and subtropical pest fruit flies including two important global pests, the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), and the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis}). The goal of this study was to dev...

  9. Attraction and Mortality of Oriental Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to SPLAT-MAT- Methyl Eugenol with Spinosad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted in Hawaii to quantify attraction and feeding responses resulting in mortality of male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), to SPLAT-MAT-methyl eugenol (ME) with spinosad in comparison with Min-U-Gel-ME with naled (Dibrom). Our approach invol...

  10. Evaluation of Cuelure and Methyl Eugenol solid lure and insecticide dispensers for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) monitoring and control in Tahiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Performance of solid male lure (cuelure (C-L)/raspberry ketone (RK) - against Bactrocera tyroni (Froggatt), and methyl eugenol (ME) - against oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis (Hendel) and insecticide formulations, were evaluated in Tahiti Island (French Polynesia), as alternatives to current monitori...

  11. Evaluation of Methyl Eugenol and Cue-Lure Traps with Solid Lure and Insecticide Dispensers for Fruit Fly Monitoring and Male Annihilation in the Hawaii Area-Wide Pest Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl eugenol (ME) and cue-lure (C-L) traps with solid lure dispensers were deployed in areas with low and high populations of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and melon fly, B. cucurbitae (Coquillett), respectively. In low density areas, standard Jackson traps or Hawaii fruit fly A...

  12. Host status of Vaccinium reticulatum (Ericaceae) to invasive tephritid fruit flies in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A; Zee, Francis T

    2011-04-01

    Ohelo (Vaccicinium reticulatum Small) (Ericaceae) is a native Hawaiian plant that has commercial potential in Hawaii as a nursery crop to be transplanted for berry production or for sale as a potted ornamental. No-choice infestation studies were conducted to determine whether ohelo fruit are hosts for four invasive tephritid fruit fly species. Ohelo berries were exposed to gravid female flies ofBactrocera dorsalis Hendel (oriental fruit fly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Mediterranean fruit fly), Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillet (melon fly),or Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) in screen cages outdoors for 24 h and then held on sand in the laboratory for 2 wk for pupal development and adult emergence. Only B. dorsalis successfully attacked and developed in ohelo berries. In total, 1570 berries produced 10 puparia, all of which emerged as adults, for a fruit infestation rate of 0.0064% and an average of 0.0053 puparia per gram of fruit. By comparison, papaya fruit used as controls produced an average of 1.44 B. dorsalis puparia per g of fruit. Ohelo berry is a marginal host for B. dorsalis and apparently a nonhost for C. capitata, B. cucurbitae, and B. latifrons. Commercial plantings of ohelo will rarely be attacked by fruit flies in Hawaii.

  13. Identification of Aedes campestris from New Mexico: with notes on the isolation of western equine encephalitis and other arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G G; Crabbs, C L; Bailey, C L; Calisher, C H; Craig, G B

    1986-12-01

    An arbovirus survey was conducted during August 1985 at White Sands Missile Range in southcentral New Mexico following a suspected arboviral disease epizootic among feral horses. A total of 20,566 mosquitoes (18,505 females and 2,061 males) and 8,900 biting gnats were collected and assayed for virus. Female mosquitoes were principally Aedes campestris (54.8%), Aedes dorsalis (30.4%) and Culex tarsalis (13.2%). Arboviruses were not isolated from biting gnats, but mosquitoes yielded a total of 37 viral isolates, including western equine encephalitis (WEE) (18), California serogroup (15), Cache Valey (1), and Hart Park (1) viruses in addition to 2, as yet unidentified, rhabdoviruses. Isolates of WEE virus were from 9 pools of Ae. campestris, 6 of Cx. tarsalis and 3 of Ae. dorsalis. California serogroup viruses, including 2 subtypes, were obtained from 7 pools of females and 1 pool of males of Ae. campestris and from 4 pools of Ae. dorsalis. Cache Valley and Hart Park viruses were isolated from single pools of Ae. dorsalis and Cx. tarsalis, respectively, and the rhabdoviruses were obtained from Ae. campestris and Psorophora signipennis.

  14. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences - Vol 9 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude de la dynamique de Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) dans les vergers de mangues en Basse Casamance : influence des facteurs climatiques · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Ibrahima Solo Konta, Saliou Djiba, Seyni Sane, ...

  15. Identification of Bactrocera invadens (Diptera: Tephritidae) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bactrocera (Bactrocera) invadens Drew (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a new species of fruit fly in 2005. It belongs to the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, but is difficult to diagnose based on solely morphological identification. It occurs in India, Bhutan and some countries of Africa. In this study, 14 adult samples of fruit flies were ...

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude de la dynamique de Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) dans les vergers de mangues en Basse Casamance : influence des facteurs climatiques. Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 1 (2016) - Articles Révision du genre Digitaria Haller (Poaceae) au Sénégal : proposition d'une clé de détermination pour une ...

  17. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences - Vol 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Étude comparative du développement de Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera : Tephritidae) sur Irvingia gabonensis et Musa sp. EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Micheline V. Hintenou, Espérantos O. de Souza, Aimé H. Bokonon-Ganta, Inès G.

  18. RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... Searching the PROSITE database revealed no common motifs for both subunits sequences. The phylogenetic tree analysis shows that the V-ATPase subunit a of both. P. gossypiella and Tribolium castaneum are located on the same branch as Bactrocera dorsalis with 94% bootstrap support (Figure 1a).

  19. Using two-sex life tables to determine fitness parameters of four Bactrocera species (Diptera: Tephritidae) reared on a semi-artificial diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, W; Yin, J; Wang, D; He, Y; Lu, L; Shi, H

    2017-09-25

    Fruit flies in the genus Bactrocera are global, economically important pests of agricultural food crops. However, basic life history information about these pests, which is vital for designing more effective control methods, is currently lacking. Artificial diets can be used as a suitable replacement for natural host plants for rearing fruit flies under laboratory conditions, and this study reports on the two-sex life-table parameters of four Bactrocera species (Bactrocera correcta, Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Bactrocera tau) reared on a semi-artificial diet comprising corn flour, banana, sodium benzoate, yeast, sucrose, winding paper, hydrochloric acid and water. The results indicated that the larval development period of B. correcta (6.81 ± 0.65 days) was significantly longer than those of the other species. The fecundity of B. dorsalis (593.60 eggs female-1) was highest among the four species. There were no differences in intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ) among the four species. The gross reproductive rate (GRR) and net reproductive rate (R 0) of B. dorsalis were higher than those of the other species, and the mean generation time (T) of B. cucurbitae (42.08 ± 1.21 h) was longer than that of the other species. We conclude that the semi-artificial diet was most suitable for rearing B. dorsalis, due to its shorter development time and higher fecundity. These results will be useful for future studies of fruit fly management.

  20. Erectie bij een kleuter door "high-flow" -priapisme: spoedgeval.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    A healthy 5-year-old child was brought to the general practitioner with priapism that had been observed for a few days, without any other symptoms. Angiography revealed an arteriovenous fistula originating from the left A. dorsalis penis, which was successfully embolised. The diagnosis was ‘high

  1. Suckling behaviour in captive Dendrohyrax arboreus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1980-11-06

    Nov 6, 1980 ... drohyrax dorsalis) Biologia Gabonica I. RUDNAI, J. 1984. Activity cycle and space utilization in a captive. Dendrohyrax arboreus group. S. Afr. J. Zool. 19: 124-128. SALE, J.B. 1 965a. Some aspects of the behaviour and ecology of the rock hyraces (Genera Procavia and Heterohyrax) Ph.D. thesis, Ju·.

  2. Embryonic adaptations and nutrition in the viviparous teleost Clinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryos of Clinus dorsalis absorb nutrients from the embiyotrophe, secreted by the follicular epithelium. Autoradiographic studies revealed that the principal areas of nutrient absorption are the embryonic gut and epidermis. A histological and electron microscopic study of embryonic structure revealed an extensively ...

  3. Revision of the genus Tropobracon Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    1993-01-01

    The genus Tropobracon Cameron, 1905 (Braconidae: Braconinae) is revised and its species are keyed. The type species is re-described and fully illustrated. Two new species are described: T. comorensis spec. nov. from the Comores and T. infuscatus spec. nov. from Hong-Kong. Bracon dorsalis Matsumura,

  4. Sowing on the emergence and early development of seedlings o baru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Mario Zuffo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work to evaluate the influence of the position of baru seeds, the emergence and early seedling development. The test was conducted in a greenhouse experiment in randomized blocks, with five treatments (seeding position, with four replications, positions were: A - Hilo up, B - hilo down C - hilum and raphe aside, D - horizontal raphe up, E - horizontal raphe down. It was observed that the seeds deposited at the position B (heel down provided better emergence and seedling development. We evaluated the emergence, speed of emergence index, plant height, stem diameter, root length, dry mass of air, root dry weight, relative AP/DC, FSPA/FSR and Dickson quality index. The emergence and early seedling development baru were influenced by sowing position. The seeds deposited with the hilum down provided better results.

  5. Pharmacologically Induced Sex Hormone Fluctuation Effects on Resting-State Functional Connectivity in a Risk Model for Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Larsen, Camilla Borgsted; Beliveau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    RHa-provoked depressive symptoms associations with change in resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) in 58 healthy women for six seeds (amygdala, hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal raphe, median raphe, and posterior cingulate cortex). GnRHa intervention did not significantly affect rs-FC in any seeds....... Considering the GnRHa group only, the emergence of depressive symptoms following intervention was positively associated with amygdala-right temporal cortex and negatively associated with hippocampus-cingulate rs-FC. A test for mediation suggested that rs-FC changes in these networks marginally mediated...

  6. Enhancement of thioredoxin/glutaredoxin-mediated L-cysteine synthesis from S-sulfocysteine increases L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatani Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli has two L-cysteine biosynthetic pathways; one is synthesized from O-acetyl L-serine (OAS and sulfate by L-cysteine synthase (CysK, and another is produced via S-sulfocysteine (SSC from OAS and thiosulfate by SSC synthase (CysM. SSC is converted into L-cysteine and sulfite by an uncharacterized reaction. As thioredoxins (Trx1 and Trx2 and glutaredoxins (Grx1, Grx2, Grx3, Grx4, and NrdH are known as reductases of peptidyl disulfides, overexpression of such reductases might be a good way for improving L-cysteine production to accelerate the reduction of SSC in E. coli. Results Because the redox enzymes can reduce the disulfide that forms on proteins, we first tested whether these enzymes catalyze the reduction of SSC to L-cysteine. All His-tagged recombinant enzymes, except for Grx4, efficiently convert SSC into L-cysteine in vitro. Overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH enhanced a 15-40% increase in the E. coliL-cysteine production. On the other hand, disruption of the cysM gene cancelled the effect caused by the overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH, suggesting that its improvement was due to the efficient reduction of SSC under the fermentative conditions. Moreover, L-cysteine production in knockout mutants of the sulfite reductase genes (ΔcysI and ΔcysJ and the L-cysteine synthase gene (ΔcysK each decreased to about 50% of that in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in L-cysteine production between wild-type strain and gene deletion mutant of the upstream pathway of sulfite (ΔcysC or ΔcysH. These results indicate that sulfite generated from the SSC reduction is available as the sulfur source to produce additional L-cysteine molecule. It was finally found that in the E. coliL-cysteine producer that co-overexpress glutaredoxin (NrdH, sulfite reductase (CysI, and L-cysteine synthase (CysK, there was the highest amount of L-cysteine produced per cell. Conclusions In this work, we

  7. Unusual attempt to direct the growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets by electroless exchange of Cu by Pt for an efficient alcohol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeena, S. E.; Gnanaprakasam, P.; Selvaraju, T.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and an efficient tool for the direct growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods (NRDs) on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) nanosheets was developed at glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Initially, Cu shell was grown on Ag core as Ag@Cu NRD by the seed-mediated growth method. Accordingly, Cu shell has been successfully replaced by Pt using the electroless galvanic replacement method with ease by effective functionalization of L-tryptophan on ERGO surface (L-ERGO), which eventually plays an important role in the direct growth of one-dimensional bimetallic NRDs. As a result, the synthesized Ag@Pt NRD-supported L-ERGO nanosheets (Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Raman spectroscopy. Anodic stripping voltammetry was used to explore its electrochemical properties. Finally, the developed bimetallic Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCEs were studied as a better electrocatalyst compared to the commercial catalysts such as Pt40/C or Pt20/C-loaded electrode for the oxidation of ethanol or methanol with a high tolerance level and an enhanced current density. In addition, the long-term stability was studied using chronoamperometry for 1000 s at the bimetallic NRD electrode for alcohol oxidation which impedes the fouling properties. The unfavourable and favourable electrooxidation of ethanol at Ag@Cu NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (a) and Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (b) is discussed. The synergistic effect of Ag core and catalytic properties of Pt shell at Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE tend to strongly minimize the CO poisoning effect and enhanced ethanol electrooxidation.

  8. Unusual attempt to direct the growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets by electroless exchange of Cu by Pt for an efficient alcohol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeena, S. E.; Gnanaprakasam, P. [Karunya University, Department of Chemistry (India); Selvaraju, T., E-mail: veluselvaraju@gmail.com [Bharathiar University, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2017-01-15

    A simple and an efficient tool for the direct growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods (NRDs) on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) nanosheets was developed at glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Initially, Cu shell was grown on Ag core as Ag@Cu NRD by the seed-mediated growth method. Accordingly, Cu shell has been successfully replaced by Pt using the electroless galvanic replacement method with ease by effective functionalization of L-tryptophan on ERGO surface (L-ERGO), which eventually plays an important role in the direct growth of one-dimensional bimetallic NRDs. As a result, the synthesized Ag@Pt NRD-supported L-ERGO nanosheets (Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Raman spectroscopy. Anodic stripping voltammetry was used to explore its electrochemical properties. Finally, the developed bimetallic Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCEs were studied as a better electrocatalyst compared to the commercial catalysts such as Pt{sub 40}/C or Pt{sub 20}/C-loaded electrode for the oxidation of ethanol or methanol with a high tolerance level and an enhanced current density. In addition, the long-term stability was studied using chronoamperometry for 1000 s at the bimetallic NRD electrode for alcohol oxidation which impedes the fouling properties. The unfavourable and favourable electrooxidation of ethanol at Ag@Cu NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (a) and Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE (b) is discussed. The synergistic effect of Ag core and catalytic properties of Pt shell at Ag@Pt NRDs/L-ERGO/GCE tend to strongly minimize the CO poisoning effect and enhanced ethanol electrooxidation.

  9. BPM-CUL3 E3 ligase modulates thermotolerance by facilitating negative regulatory domain-mediated degradation of DREB2A in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kyoko; Ohama, Naohiko; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Mizoi, Junya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Todaka, Daisuke; Mogami, Junro; Sato, Hikaru; Qin, Feng; Kim, June-Sik; Fukao, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2017-10-03

    DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN 2A (DREB2A) acts as a key transcription factor in both drought and heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis and induces the expression of many drought- and heat stress-inducible genes. Although DREB2A expression itself is induced by stress, the posttranslational regulation of DREB2A, including protein stabilization, is required for its transcriptional activity. The deletion of a 30-aa central region of DREB2A known as the negative regulatory domain (NRD) transforms DREB2A into a stable and constitutively active form referred to as DREB2A CA. However, the molecular basis of this stabilization and activation has remained unknown for a decade. Here we identified BTB/POZ AND MATH DOMAIN proteins (BPMs), substrate adaptors of the Cullin3 (CUL3)-based E3 ligase, as DREB2A-interacting proteins. We observed that DREB2A and BPMs interact in the nuclei, and that the NRD of DREB2A is sufficient for its interaction with BPMs. BPM-knockdown plants exhibited increased DREB2A accumulation and induction of DREB2A target genes under heat and drought stress conditions. Genetic analysis indicated that the depletion of BPM expression conferred enhanced thermotolerance via DREB2A stabilization. Thus, the BPM-CUL3 E3 ligase is likely the long-sought factor responsible for NRD-dependent DREB2A degradation. Through the negative regulation of DREB2A stability, BPMs modulate the heat stress response and prevent an adverse effect of excess DREB2A on plant growth. Furthermore, we found the BPM recognition motif in various transcription factors, implying a general contribution of BPM-mediated proteolysis to divergent cellular responses via an accelerated turnover of transcription factors.

  10. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression.

  11. REP sequences: Mediators of the environmental stress response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenxing; Deutscher, Murray P

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic (REP) sequences are highly conserved, structured, 35- to 40-nt elements located at ∼500 positions around the Escherichia coli chromosome. They are found in intergenic regions and are transcribed together with their upstream genes. Although their stable stem-loop structures protect messages against exoribonuclease digestion, their primary function has remained unknown. Recently, we found that about half of all REP sequences have the potential to stall ribosomes immediately upstream of the termination codon, leading to endonucleolytic cleavage of the mRNA, and induction of the trans-translation process. As a consequence, the mRNA and almost completed protein are degraded, and protein production from the affected gene is down-regulated. The process is critically dependent on the location of the REP element, with an effect only if it is within 15 nt of the termination codon. Using nrdAB as a model, we found that its down-regulation is affected by RNA helicases. Elimination of 6 helicases lowered NrdA production further, whereas overexpression of any RNA helicase partially reversed the downregulation. UV stress completely reversed down-regulation of NrdA production. Analysis of genes containing a REP sequence within 15 nt of the termination codon revealed that most, if not all, are up-regulated by environmental stress, as are RNA helicases. Based on these findings, we propose that REP-dependent downregulation serves as a mechanism to allow a rapid response to environmental stresses whereby RNA helicases partially open the REP elements enabling ribosomes to complete translation immediately increasing protein production from the affected genes.

  12. The Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efler, Petr

    -dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) in order to complete its catalytic cycle. Glutathione-dependent glutaredoxin complements Trx in many organisms. This thesis focuses on disulfide reduction pathways in Lactococcus lactis, an important industrial microorganism used traditionally for cheese and buttermilk production....... L. lactis lacks glutathione and glutaredoxin, but it a contains Trx system consisting of an NTR (LlTrxB), a classical Trx (LlTrxA) containing the conserved WCGPC active site motif, a Trx-like protein (LlTrxD) containing a WCGDC active site motif and a redoxin (LlNrdH) providing electrons to class Ib...

  13. Administering ketoconazole (25mg/Kg) For 14 Days in male wistar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structures ( amygdala, median emmence, paraventricular and raphe nuclei) and plasma. ACTH increase significantly. These results were also obtained in humans where it was found that chronic administration of KTCN generated a very significant elevation of plasma. ACTH [34]. The inhibition of plasma corticosterone by ...

  14. Does serotonin influence aggression? Comparing regional activity before and during social interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Summers, C.H.; Korzan, W.J.; Lukkes, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    baseline serotonergic activity is lower in the septum, nucleus accumbens, striatum, medial amygdala, anterior hypothalamus, raphe, and locus ceruleus but not in the hippocampus, lateral amygdala, preoptic area, substantia nigra, or ventral tegmental area. However, in regions such as the nucleus accumbens...

  15. Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine - Vol 17, No 1 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Andrew Revell, Paul Khabo, Lotty Ledwaba, Sean Emery, Dechao Wang, Robin Wood, Carl Morrow, Hugo Tempelman, Raph L Hamers, Peter Reiss, Ard van Sighem, Anton Pozniak, Julio Montaner, H Clifford Lane, ...

  16. Computational models as predictors of HIV treatment outcomes for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational models as predictors of HIV treatment outcomes for the Phidisa cohort in South Africa. Andrew Revell, Paul Khabo, Lotty Ledwaba, Sean Emery, Dechao Wang, Robin Wood, Carl Morrow, Hugo Tempelman, Raph L Hamers, Peter Reiss, Ard van Sighem, Anton Pozniak, Julio Montaner, H Clifford Lane, ...

  17. Serotonin-induced down-regulation of cell surface serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Christensen, Peter Møller; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    SERT inhibitor S-citalopram. 5-HT-induced reduction in SERT expression was further supported by surface biotinylation experiments showing 5-HT-induced reduction in wild type SERT plasma membrane levels. Moreover, preincubation with 5-HT lowered the Vmax for 5-HT uptake in cultured raphe serotonergic...

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANALGESIA AND EXTRACELLULAR MORPHINE IN BRAIN AND SPINAL-CORD IN AWAKE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MATES, FF; ROLLEMA, H; TAIWO, YO; LEVINE, JD; BASBAUM, AI

    1995-01-01

    Extracellular concentrations of morphine from the dorsal spinal cord, the periaqueductal gray (FAG) including the dorsal raphe, and the lateral hypothalamus were measured by microdialysis in awake rats after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 2.5, 5.0 and 10 mg/kg morphine. Morphine

  19. An unusual swelling in the male perineum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parnham, Arie Stewart; Freeman, Alex; Kirkham, Alex; Muneer, Asif

    2015-01-01

    Median raphe cysts are a rare, congenital entity. We present a case and review the literature in respect to a 35-year-old man with a non-visible, painless midline swelling in the anterior perineum initially thought to be a...

  20. Constitutive and Acquired Serotonin Deficiency Alters Memory and Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Sebastian P; Muzerelle, Aude; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Barik, Jacques; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M; Gaspar, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) deficiency occurs in a number of brain disorders that affect cognitive function. However, a direct causal relationship between 5-HT hypo-transmission and memory and underlying mechanisms has not been established. We used mice with a constitutive depletion of 5-HT brain levels (Pet1KO mice) to analyze the contribution of 5-HT to different forms of learning and memory. Pet1KO mice exhibited a striking deficit in novel object recognition memory, a hippocampal-dependent task. No alterations were found in tasks for social recognition, procedural learning, or fear memory. Viral delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs was used to selectively silence the activity of 5-HT neurons in the raphe. Inhibition of 5-HT neurons in the median raphe, but not the dorsal raphe, was sufficient to impair object recognition in adult mice. In vivo electrophysiology in behaving mice showed that long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of 5-HT-deficient mice was altered, and administration of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OHDPAT rescued the memory deficits. Our data suggest that hyposerotonergia selectively affects declarative hippocampal-dependent memory. Serotonergic projections from the median raphe are necessary to regulate object memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity processes, through an inhibitory control mediated by 5-HT1A receptors.

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF HOOF ARTERIAL BLOOD VESSELS IN BOSNIAN MOUNTAIN HORSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velida Ćutahija

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Casting method was conducted by injecting the Vinilyth mass into the digital blood vessels of 36 fore and hind limbs of the Bosnian Mountain Horse of both genders, aged from 5 to 7 years. Corrosive casts provided a precise estimation of position and branching characteristics of the arterial blood vessels in the hoof of the Bosnian Mountain Horse. By comparison of our results with the previous literature findings we found certain differences in branching of the digital arteries. So, we found differences in branching of the rami dorsales phalangis I, a. tori digitalis and a. dorsalis phalangis II. Last observed difference, according to our research, was that we did not demonstrate the existence of the a. dorsalis phalangis III. These findings may provide better understanding of the diseases, prognoses and treatment of the horse hoof disorders. Undoubtedly, these findings may have a practical importance in equine orthopedics.Key words: artery, hoof, horse

  2. Projections to the midbrain tectum in Salamandra salamandra L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstädt, T; Ebbesson, S O; Ewert, J P

    1983-01-01

    Following unilateral iontophoretic application of HRP into the optic tectum of Salamandra salamandra, retrogradely HRP-filled cells were found bilaterally in the pretectum, tegmentum isthmi, the reticular formation, pars medialis, and in the nucleus vestibularis magnocellularis. The area octavo-lateralis projects only to the caudal part of the tectum. Ipsilateral projections were noted from the dorsal gray columns of the cervical spinal cord, the dorsal tegmentum, the thalamus dorsalis pars medialis, thalamus dorsalis, pars anterior (to the rostral one-third of the tectum), the thalamus ventralis (in its entire rostro-caudal extent), and the preoptico-hypothalamic complex. Retrogradely filled cells were identified in deeper layers of the contralateral tectum. There are two telencephalic nuclei projecting ipsilaterally to the tectum via the lateral forebrain: the ventral part of the lateral pallium, and the posterior strioamygdalar complex.

  3. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P ...In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... of another limb. Static exercise increased heart rate and mean arterial pressure, which were largest during one-leg knee extension. After exercise heart rate and mean arterial pressure returned to the resting level. No changes were recorded in arterial carbon dioxide tension, and the rate of perceived...

  4. The millipede genus Solaenodolichopus Verhoeff, 1924 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae. 1. New genus diagnosis and redescriptions of named species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mesibov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solaenodolichopus Verhoeff, 1924 is redefined to include S. pruvoti (Brolemann, 1931, S. rubriventris Verhoeff, 1928, S. sulcatus (Verhoeff, 1928, S. teres (Verhoeff, 1924, S. vittatus (Verhoeff, 1924 and S. walesius Verhoeff, 1928, each of which is redescribed. Lectotypes are designated for S. sulcatus, S. teres, S. vittatus and S. walesius. Parwalesoma Verhoeff, 1937 is synonymised with Solaenodolichopus and S. vittatus dorsalis (Verhoeff, 1924 with S. vittatus vittatus (Verhoeff, 1924.

  5. Taxonomic identity of the invasive fruit fly pest, Bactrocera invadens: concordance in morphometry and DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Fathiya M; Masiga, Daniel K; Mohamed, Samira A; Salifu, Daisy; de Meyer, Marc; Ekesi, Sunday

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, a new fruit fly pest species was recorded for the first time in Kenya and has subsequently been found in 28 countries across tropical Africa. The insect was described as Bactrocera invadens, due to its rapid invasion of the African continent. In this study, the morphometry and DNA Barcoding of different populations of B. invadens distributed across the species range of tropical Africa and a sample from the pest's putative aboriginal home of Sri Lanka was investigated. Morphometry using wing veins and tibia length was used to separate B. invadens populations from other closely related Bactrocera species. The Principal component analysis yielded 15 components which correspond to the 15 morphometric measurements. The first two principal axes contributed to 90.7% of the total variance and showed partial separation of these populations. Canonical discriminant analysis indicated that only the first five canonical variates were statistically significant. The first two canonical variates contributed a total of 80.9% of the total variance clustering B. invadens with other members of the B. dorsalis complex while distinctly separating B. correcta, B. cucurbitae, B. oleae and B. zonata. The largest Mahalanobis squared distance (D(2) = 122.9) was found to be between B. cucurbitae and B. zonata, while the lowest was observed between B. invadens populations against B. kandiensis (8.1) and against B. dorsalis s.s (11.4). Evolutionary history inferred by the Neighbor-Joining method clustered the Bactrocera species populations into four clusters. First cluster consisted of the B. dorsalis complex (B. invadens, B. kandiensis and B. dorsalis s. s.), branching from the same node while the second group was paraphyletic clades of B. correcta and B. zonata. The last two are monophyletic clades, consisting of B. cucurbitae and B. oleae, respectively. Principal component analysis using the genetic distances confirmed the clustering inferred by the NJ tree.

  6. Taxonomic identity of the invasive fruit fly pest, Bactrocera invadens: concordance in morphometry and DNA barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathiya M Khamis

    Full Text Available In 2003, a new fruit fly pest species was recorded for the first time in Kenya and has subsequently been found in 28 countries across tropical Africa. The insect was described as Bactrocera invadens, due to its rapid invasion of the African continent. In this study, the morphometry and DNA Barcoding of different populations of B. invadens distributed across the species range of tropical Africa and a sample from the pest's putative aboriginal home of Sri Lanka was investigated. Morphometry using wing veins and tibia length was used to separate B. invadens populations from other closely related Bactrocera species. The Principal component analysis yielded 15 components which correspond to the 15 morphometric measurements. The first two principal axes contributed to 90.7% of the total variance and showed partial separation of these populations. Canonical discriminant analysis indicated that only the first five canonical variates were statistically significant. The first two canonical variates contributed a total of 80.9% of the total variance clustering B. invadens with other members of the B. dorsalis complex while distinctly separating B. correcta, B. cucurbitae, B. oleae and B. zonata. The largest Mahalanobis squared distance (D(2 = 122.9 was found to be between B. cucurbitae and B. zonata, while the lowest was observed between B. invadens populations against B. kandiensis (8.1 and against B. dorsalis s.s (11.4. Evolutionary history inferred by the Neighbor-Joining method clustered the Bactrocera species populations into four clusters. First cluster consisted of the B. dorsalis complex (B. invadens, B. kandiensis and B. dorsalis s. s., branching from the same node while the second group was paraphyletic clades of B. correcta and B. zonata. The last two are monophyletic clades, consisting of B. cucurbitae and B. oleae, respectively. Principal component analysis using the genetic distances confirmed the clustering inferred by the NJ tree.

  7. Unexpected High Intragenomic Variation in Two of Three Major Pest Thrips Species Does Not Affect Ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2 Utility for Thrips Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (mtCO1 and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2 are among the most widely used molecular markers for insect taxonomic characterization. Three economically important species of thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis, Thrips palmi, and Frankliniella occidentalis were selected to examine the extent of intragenomic variation within these two marker regions in the family Thripidae, and determine if this variation would affect the utility of markers in thrips molecular diagnostics. For each species, intragenomic (within individual variation and intergenomic (among individuals variation was assessed by cloning and sequencing PCR-amplified copies. Intergenomic variation was generally higher than intragenomic variation except in cases where intergenomic variation was very low, as in mtCO1 from S. dorsalis and F. occidentalis. Intragenomic variation was detected in both markers in all three of the thrips species, however, 2–3 times more intragenomic variation was observed for ITS2 than mtCO1 in both S. dorsalis and T. palmi. Furthermore, levels of intragenomic variation were low for both of the genes in F. occidentalis. In all of the three thrips species, no sex-based clustering of haplotypes was observed in either marker. Unexpected high intragenomic variation in ITS2 for two of three thrips species did not interfere with thrips diagnostics. However, caution should be taken in applying ITS2 to certain studies of S. dorsalis and T. palmi when high levels of intragenomic variation could be problematic or confounding. In such studies, mtCO1 may be a preferable marker. Possible reasons for discrepancies in intragenomic variation among genomic regions are discussed.

  8. A new orthoclad species of Rheocricotopus Thienemann & Harnisch (Diptera, Chironomidae from the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalayas in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazra, N.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The adults and pupa of a new species, Rheocricotopus rarispina are described from the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalayas in India. The species is distinguished by the few spines on the thoracic horn, anal lobe without fringe and bristle-like L setae and presence of ovoid humeral pit, nine squamal setae, structure of anal point and triangular and subterminal crista dorsalis in the adult male. With this new species, the number of Indian species of the genus rises to six.

  9. Acute Aortic Dissection Presenting Exclusively as Lower Extremity Paresthesias

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Gibney; Jonathan Patane; Steven Bunch

    2017-01-01

    History of Present Illness: A 45-year-old male presented with left-lower extremity numbness for 3 hours. He denied chest pain, shortness of breath, back pain, or pain to his leg. On physical examination, he was noted to have a normal cardiac exam without murmurs and normal breath sounds, but had no palpable femoral or dorsalis pedis pulse on the left lower extremity. His extremity examination showed normal range of motion, full strength to both lower extremities, but subjective decreased...

  10. Peche a la senne de plage au Benin et durabilite des ressources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aussi, la senne de plage détruit-elle les habitats des poissons côtiers, les nurseries et les aires de recrutement (Kebe M. et al., 1997, Beurier J. P. et Keïta R., 1982). Les juvéniles dominantes des captures sont, entre autres, le Musso africain (Selene dorsalis), l'Alose (Ilisha africana), le Sapater (Chloroscombrus chrysurus), ...

  11. Pictorial keys for predominant Bactrocera and Dacus fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) of north western Himalaya

    OpenAIRE

    C. S. Prabhakar; Pankaj Sood; P. K. Mehta

    2012-01-01

    A pictorial key for 13 species of fruit flies under 2 genera namely Bactrocera and Dacus of subfamily Dacinae (Diptera: Tephritidae) is presented in this paper based on actual photographs of fruit flies collected from north western Himalaya of India during 2009-2010. Among these, Bactrocera diversa (Coquillett), Bactrocera scutellaris (Bezzi), Bactrocera tau (Walker), Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), Bactrocera zonata (Saunders), Bactrocera correcta (Bezzi), Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), B...

  12. Description of a new species and new country distribution records of Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae: Dacinae) from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Luc; San Jose, Michael; Rubinoff, Daniel

    2015-09-04

    Bactrocera (Bactrocera) kohkongiae Leblanc (Diptera: Tephritidae: Dacinae), from the Koh Kong Province of Cambodia, is described as new. This species belongs to the Oriental fruit fly (B. dorsalis) complex. Genetic sequences (mitochondrial COI and nuclear EF1α and Period) are deposited in GenBank. A haplotype network, based on the COI sequences for 21 specimens, shows high genetic diversity. New country records from Cambodia are included for 22 species.

  13. Excretory system of the liver in deers (Manzana americana, Blastocerus bezoarticus e Manzana simplicicornis II. Ramus principalis sinister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica Miglino

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The excretory system of the liver in 8 specimens of Manzana americana (6, 1 of Manzana simplicicornis (1 and 1 of Blastocerus bezoarticus (I was injected with colored latex Neoprene, fixed in 10% formaldehyde solution and dissected. The ramus principalis sinister is made up of the ramus dorsalis lobi sinistri, the truncus intermediomedialis, the truncus intermediolateralis, the ramus lateralis lobi sinistri and the ramus lobi quadrati.

  14. Expression of cathepsin K in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, C; Krueger, S; Kuester, D; Ostertag, H; Samii, M; Buehling, F; Broemme, D; Czerniak, B; Roessner, A

    2000-07-01

    Invasive growth of chordoma is accompanied by severe destruction of adjacent bone tissue, a fact that requires high proteolytic activity at the tumor invasion fronts. In this context, cathepsin K is a candidate molecule. It is a protease with high collagenolytic and elastinolytic activity and previously thought to be restricted to osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, 44 cases of chordoma of sphenooccipital localization, and 10 embryo-fetal specimens including chorda dorsalis were studied immunohistochemically for their expression of cathepsin K. In 4 additional snap-frozen chordoma cases, the enzyme expression was investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme histochemistry. Ten chondrosarcomas of the skull base served as controls. Various concentrations of cathepsin K mRNA could be seen in all snap-frozen chordoma specimens. The protease was immunohistochemically expressed by the tumor cells. The immunoreactions were accentuated at the tumor invasion fronts. Enzyme histochemistry indicated a strong tumor cell-associated cathepsin K activity in invasive tumor components. In contrast to chordoma, cathepsin K was not significantly expressed in chorda dorsalis and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. In chondrosarcoma, protease expression was limited to osteoclastic cells localized between infiltrative tumor components and regular bone trabeculae. This study shows the significant expression and activity of cathepsin K in chordoma and implicates an important and direct role of this protease in the infiltrative growth of this tumor. This protease expression occurred during neoplastic transformation and did not appear in chorda dorsalis.

  15. Development of cranial muscles in the actinopterygian fish Senegal bichir, Polypterus senegalus Cuvier, 1829.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Masatsugu; Miyake, Tsutomu; Okabe, Masataka

    2017-04-01

    Polypterus senegalus Cuvier, 1829 is one of the most basal living actinopterygian fish and a member of the Actinopterygii. We analyzed the spatial and temporal pattern of cranial muscle development of P. senegalus using whole-mount immunostaining and serial sectioning. We described the detailed structure of the external gill muscles which divided into dorsal and ventral parts after yolk exhaustion. The pattern of the division is similar to that of urodeles. We suggest that, the external gill muscles of P. senegalus are involved in spreading and folding of the external gill stem and the branches. The fibers of the external gill muscles appear postero-lateral to the auditory capsule. In addition, the facial nerve passes through the external gills. Therefore, the external gill muscles are probably derived from the m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis. In contrast to previous studies, we described the mm. interhyoideus and hyohyoideus fibers as independent components in the yolk-sac larvae. The m. hyohyoideus fibers appear lateral to the edge of the ventral portion of the external gill muscles, which are probably derived from the m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis. These findings suggest that the m. hyohyoidues is derived from the m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis in P. senegalus. In other actinopterygians, the m. hyohyoideus is derived from the m. constrictor hyoideus ventralis; therefore, the homology of the m. hyohyoidues of P. senegalus and other actinopterygians remains unclear. J. Morphol. 278:450-463, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acidic Microenvironments in Waste Rock Characterized by Neutral Drainage: Bacteria–Mineral Interactions at Sulfide Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Dockrey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial populations and microbe-mineral interactions were examined in waste rock characterized by neutral rock drainage (NRD. Samples of three primary sulfide-bearing waste rock types (i.e., marble-hornfels, intrusive, exoskarn were collected from field-scale experiments at the Antamina Cu–Zn–Mo mine, Peru. Microbial communities within all samples were dominated by neutrophilic thiosulfate oxidizing bacteria. However, acidophilic iron and sulfur oxidizers were present within intrusive waste rock characterized by bulk circumneutral pH drainage. The extensive development of microbially colonized porous Fe(III (oxyhydroxide and Fe(III (oxyhydroxysulfate precipitates was observed at sulfide-mineral surfaces during examination by field emission-scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-SEM-EDS. Linear combination fitting of bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectra for these precipitates indicated they were composed of schwertmannite [Fe8O8(OH6–4.5(SO41–1.75], lepidocrocite [γ-FeO(OH] and K-jarosite [KFe3(OH6(SO42]. The presence of schwertmannite and K-jarosite is indicative of the development of localized acidic microenvironments at sulfide-mineral surfaces. Extensive bacterial colonization of this porous layer and pitting of underlying sulfide-mineral surfaces suggests that acidic microenvironments can play an important role in sulfide-mineral oxidation under bulk circumneutral pH conditions. These findings have important implications for water quality management in NRD settings.

  17. Construction and pilot screening of a signature-tagged mutant library of Sinorhizobium fredii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yuan Chun; Wu, Li Juan; Liu, Jian Xin; Zhang, Pan; Jiao, Jian; Yan, Hui; Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2016-03-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii is well known for its ability to establish symbiosis with diverse legumes such as Glycine max (soybean, determinate nodules) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea, indeterminate nodules). In order to make screening of S. fredii genes related to symbiosis cost-effective, we constructed a large Tn5 insertion mutant library of S. fredii CCBAU45436 using the signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) technique. This STM library contains a total of 25,500 independent mutants distributed in 17 sublibraries tagged by corresponding distinct DNA bar-code sequences. After the pilot screening of 255 mutants in 15 batches, Tag85-4, Tag4-17, Tag4-11 and Tag10-13 were found to have attenuated competitiveness (0-30 % in nodule occupation) compared to the wild-type strain when inoculated on soybean. Further characterization of these mutants suggests that Tag4-11 (a pyrC mutant) and Tag10-13 (a nrdJ mutant) are defective in establishing symbiosis with soybean. The pyrC mutant induced uninfected pseudonodules while the nrdJ mutant formed significantly more nodules containing bacteroids with poor persistence ability. When these two mutants were tested on pigeon pea, host-specific symbiotic defects were found. These results demonstrated the STM library as a valuable resource for identifying S. fredii genes relevant to symbiosis.

  18. Assessing wildlife benefits and carbon storage from restored and natural coastal marshes in the Nisqually River Delta: Determining marsh net ecosystem carbon balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Frank; Bergamaschi, Brian; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Woo, Isa; De La Cruz, Susan; Drexler, Judith; Byrd, Kristin; Thorne, Karen M.

    2016-06-24

    Working in partnership since 1996, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Nisqually Indian Tribe have restored 902 acres of tidally influenced coastal marsh in the Nisqually River Delta (NRD), making it the largest estuary-restoration project in the Pacific Northwest to date. Marsh restoration increases the capacity of the estuary to support a diversity of wildlife species. Restoration also increases carbon (C) production of marsh plant communities that support food webs for wildlife and can help mitigate climate change through long-term C storage in marsh soils.In 2015, an interdisciplinary team of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers began to study the benefits of carbon for wetland wildlife and storage in the NRD. Our primary goals are (1) to identify the relative importance of the different carbon sources that support juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) food webs and contribute to current and historic peat formation, (2) to determine the net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) in a reference marsh and a restoration marsh site, and (3) to model the sustainability of the reference and restoration marshes under projected sea-level rise conditions along with historical vegetation change. In this fact sheet, we focus on the main C sources and exchanges to determine NECB, including carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake through plant photosynthesis, the loss of CO2 through plant and soil respiration, emissions of methane (CH4), and the lateral movement or leaching loss of C in tidal waters.

  19. Structural insights into the inhibition mechanism of bacterial toxin LsoA by bacteriophage antitoxin Dmd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hua; Otsuka, Yuichi; Gao, Zeng-Qiang; Wei, Yong; Chen, Zhen; Masuda, Michiaki; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Yu-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria have obtained a variety of resistance mechanisms including toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems against bacteriophages (phages), whereas phages have also evolved to overcome bacterial anti-phage mechanisms. Dmd from T4 phage can suppress the toxicities of homologous toxins LsoA and RnlA from Escherichia coli, representing the first example of a phage antitoxin against multiple bacterial toxins in known TA systems. Here, the crystal structure of LsoA-Dmd complex showed Dmd is inserted into the deep groove between the N-terminal repeated domain (NRD) and the Dmd-binding domain (DBD) of LsoA. The NRD shifts significantly from a 'closed' to an 'open' conformation upon Dmd binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of Dmd revealed the conserved residues (W31 and N40) are necessary for LsoA binding and the toxicity suppression as determined by pull-down and cell toxicity assays. Further mutagenesis identified the conserved Dmd-binding residues (R243, E246 and R305) of LsoA are vital for its toxicity, and suggested Dmd and LsoB may possess different inhibitory mechanisms against LsoA toxicity. Our structure-function studies demonstrate Dmd can recognize LsoA and inhibit its toxicity by occupying the active site possibly via substrate mimicry. These findings have provided unique insights into the defense and counter-defense mechanisms between bacteria and phages in their co-evolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cryptic Transcription and Early Termination in the Control of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on yeast transcriptome have revealed the presence of a large set of RNA polymerase II transcripts mapping to intergenic and antisense regions or overlapping canonical genes. Most of these ncRNAs (ncRNAs are subject to termination by the Nrd1-dependent pathway and rapid degradation by the nuclear exosome and have been dubbed cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. CUTs are often considered as by-products of transcriptional noise, but in an increasing number of cases they play a central role in the control of gene expression. Regulatory mechanisms involving expression of a CUT are diverse and include attenuation, transcriptional interference, and alternative transcription start site choice. This review focuses on the impact of cryptic transcription on gene expression, describes the role of the Nrd1-complex as the main actor in preventing nonfunctional and potentially harmful transcription, and details a few systems where expression of a CUT has an essential regulatory function. We also summarize the most recent studies concerning other types of ncRNAs and their possible role in regulation.

  1. Life in the Clouds of Venus? An Experimental Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Amatya, D.; Bajar, B.; Geilich, B.; Hu, J.; Jackson, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of Venus constitutes the most hellish and biologically inhospitable planetary surface in our solar system, boasting a pH of 0, blistering winds that can melt lead, and pressures of 60 atm. However, during the earlier years of the solar system, without the runaway greenhouse effect that has plagued the planet, Venus potentially housed oceans and perhaps even life. There is a possibility that microbes could have retreated into hospitable niches in the atmosphere, as suggested by Carl Sagan as early as 1967 [1]. For example, 50 km above the raging hell of the Venusian surface, exists a relatively temperate environment that might serve as reservoir for life. This astrobiology project seeks to explore life at the extremes and to theorize whether microbial communities could not only survive but also reproduce in the Venusian atmosphere. Specifically, we ask: are aerosols viable microbial environments? But before we can test for life in the clouds, we have to develop a proper reporter to visualize cell growth in situ. For this purpose, we aimed to develop cell-growth dependent reporters to serve as remote biosensors for cell growth. We developed two using the polA promoter, a DNA-replication dependent promoter, and nrd operon promoter, a cell-cycle dependent promoter. Using these cell-growth reporters, the next step is to aerosolize microbes expressing these reporters in a suspension chamber adapted from a Millikan Drop Apparatus to assay reproduction in an aerosolized environment. Better yet is to test the reproduction of microbes in a microgravity regime such as on ISS.Approach: We engineered two cell-cycle dependent genetic reporters. One was the polA promoter which codes for DNA Polymerase I, a gene active in DNA replication [2]. The other was the nrdP. The activation of ribonucleotide reductase reduces ribonucleotides into deoxyribonucleotides and is involved in the bacterial cell cycle [3]. This promoter began activation during the initiation of DNA

  2. Accumulation of phenylpropanoid and sesquiterpenoid volatiles in male rectal pheromonal glands of the guava fruit fly, Bactrocera correcta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokushima, Isao; Orankanok, Watchreeporn; Tan, Keng Hong; Ono, Hajime; Nishida, Ritsuo

    2010-12-01

    The guava fruit fly, Bactrocera correcta, is widely distributed in Thailand and other surrounding Southeast Asian countries, and, like the closely related sympatric species, the oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis, infests various fruits, including guava, peach, and mango. Males of both B. correcta and B. dorsalis are strongly attracted to, and compulsively feed on, methyl eugenol (ME). Bactrocera dorsalis males fed on ME sequester its metabolite phenylpropanoids, (E)-coniferyl alcohol and 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol, in the rectal pheromone gland. In contrast, B. correcta males fed on ME sequester two different metabolites, (Z)-coniferyl alcohol (ZCF) and (Z)-3,4-dimethoxycinnamyl alcohol (DMC), in the rectal gland. Examination of the temporal changes of ME metabolites in B. correcta male rectal glands revealed that the total of ZCF and DMC was as high as 100 μg/male at 24 hr after ME feeding. ZCF and DMC were detected in a large proportion of wild B. correcta males captured at various sites in Thailand. Since B. correcta and B. dorsalis are sympatric species in Thailand, these two different subsets of rectal phenylpropanoids could play a role to avoid interbreeding between the species. Further survey of wild flies in Thailand revealed that a large proportion of males of B. correcta store large quantities (over 250 μg/gland) of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, including β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, and alloaromadendrene in the rectal gland in addition to, or instead of, ZCF and DMC. Laboratory-reared males also sequestered β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, along with ZCF and DMC, when the sesquiterpenes were artificially supplied together with ME. A field test demonstrated that a mixture (1:1) of β-caryophyllene and α-humulene attracted male B. correcta, albeit in smaller numbers than in traps baited with ME. The sequestration of sesquiterpenes, in addition to the different ME metabolites in the pheromone gland in B. correcta males, contrasts with the situation in

  3. A probabilistic approach to delineating functional brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable observer-independent approach to delineating volumes of interest (VOIs) for functional brain regions that are not identifiable on structural MR images. The case is made for the raphe nuclei, a collection of nuclei situated in the brain stem known...... healthy subjects. The templates were subsequently included in the region sets used in a previously published automatic MRI-based approach to create an observer- and activity-independent probabilistic VOI map. The probabilistic map approach was tested in a different group of 10 subjects and compared......-independent, reliable approach to delineating regions that can be identified only by functional imaging, here exemplified by the raphe nuclei. This approach can be used in future studies to create functional VOI maps based on neuroreceptor fingerprints retrieved through in vivo brain imaging Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6...

  4. Influence of early stress on social abilities and serotonergic functions across generations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara B Franklin

    Full Text Available Exposure to adverse environments during early development is a known risk factor for several psychiatric conditions including antisocial behavior and personality disorders. Here, we induced social anxiety and altered social recognition memory in adult mice using unpredictable maternal separation and maternal stress during early postnatal life. We show that these social defects are not only pronounced in the animals directly subjected to stress, but are also transmitted to their offspring across two generations. The defects are associated with impaired serotonergic signaling, in particular, reduced 5HT1A receptor expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, and increased serotonin level in a dorsal raphe projection area. These findings underscore the susceptibility of social behaviors and serotonergic pathways to early stress, and the persistence of their perturbation across generations.

  5. Valve morphology and systematic position of Navicula walkeri (Bacillariophyceae), a diatom endemic to Oregon and California (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociolek, J.P.; Spaulding, S.A.; Kingston, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in valve size and ultrastructure is documented for Navicula walkeri, a freshwater diatom species endemic to Oregon and central California (USA). In LM, this large diatom has longitudinal lines on either side of the axial area, as well as lineolate striae. External proximal raphe ends recurve toward the same side as the deflected distal ends. A large central nodule and bulbous areas at the terminus of each raphe branch are visible internally. The edges of an axial plate form the image of longitudinal lines. The suite of features present in N. walkeri suggests it is part of Navicula sensu stricto but occupies an isolated position within the group. Navicula sensu stricto is not an entirely homogeneous assemblage, and further refinements of the systematic affinities of its members may be warranted.

  6. Observational Study of Neural Respiratory Drive During Sleep at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, Joerg; Cade, Nic; Walker, Ben; Moxham, John; Jolley, Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Steier, Joerg, Nic Cade, Ben Walker, John Moxham, and Caroline Jolley. Observational study of neural respiratory drive during sleep at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 18:242-248, 2017. Ventilation at altitude changes due to altered levels of pO 2 , pCO 2 and the effect on blood pH. Nocturnal ventilation is particularly exposed to these changes. We hypothesized that an increasing neural respiratory drive (NRD) is associated with the severity of sleep-disordered breathing at altitude. Mountaineers were studied at sea level (London, United Kingdom), and at altitude at the Aconcagua (Andes, Argentina). NRD was measured as electromyogram of the diaphragm (EMGdi) overnight by a transesophageal multi-electrode catheter; results were reported for sea level, 3,380 m, 4,370 m, and 5,570 m. Four healthy subjects (3 men, age 31(3)years, body mass index 23.6(0.9)kg/m 2 , neck circumference 37.0(2.7)cm, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 111.8(5.1)%predicted, and forced vital capacity 115.5(6.3)%predicted) were studied. No subject had significant sleep abnormalities at sea level. Time to ascent to 3,380 m was 1 day, to 4,370 m was 5 days, and the total nights at altitude were 21 days. The oxygen desaturation index (4% oxygen desaturation index [ODI] 0.8(0.4), 22.0 (7.2), 61.4 (26.9), 144.9/hour, respectively) and the EMGdi (5.2 (1.9), 12.8 (5.1), 14.1 (3.4), 18.5%, respectively) increased with the development of periodic breathing at altitude, whereas the average SpO 2 declined (97.5 (1.3), 84.8 (0.5), 81.0 (4.1), 68.5%, respectively). The average EMGdi correlated well with the 4%ODI (r = 0.968, p = 0.032). NRD sleep increases at altitude in relation to the severity of periodic breathing.

  7. Study on dependence of dose enhancement on cluster morphology of gold nanoparticles in radiation therapy using a body-centred cubic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Chung, Kwangzoo; Shin, Jung Wook; Cheon, Wonjoong; Han, Youngyih; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho

    2017-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected in a body for dose enhancement in radiation therapy are known to form clusters. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the GNP morphology using Monte-Carlo simulations and compared the model predictions with experimental data. The cluster morphology was approximated as a body-centred cubic (BCC) structure by placing GNPs at the 8 corners and the centre of a cube with an edge length of 0.22-1.03 µm in a 4  ×  4  ×  4 µm3 water-filled phantom. We computed the dose enhancement ratio (DER) for 50 and 260 kVp photons as a function of the distance from the cube centre for 12 different cube sizes. A 10 nm-wide concentric shell shaped detector was placed up to 100 nm away from a GNP at the cube centre. For model validation, simulations based on BCC and nanoparticle random distribution (NRD) models were performed using parameters that corresponded to the experimental conditions, which measured increases in the relative biological effect due to GNPs. We employed the linear quadratic model to compute cell surviving fraction (SF) and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER). The DER is inversely proportional to the distance to the GNPs. The largest DERs were 1.97 and 1.80 for 50 kVp and 260 kVp photons, respectively. The SF predicted by the BCC model agreed with the experimental value within 10%, up to a 5 Gy dose, while the NRD model showed a deviation larger than 10%. The SERs were 1.21  ±  0.13, 1.16  ±  0.11, and 1.08  ±  0.11 according to the experiment, BCC, and NRD models, respectively. We most accurately predicted the GNP radiosensitization effect using the BCC approximation and suggest that the BCC model is effective for use in nanoparticle dosimetry.

  8. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    light limited in early occurs at a time when the ambient nutri- July. Eddies play an important role in determining the mean. Oceanio 5 raph’y I Vol. 19...hierarchal istics (initially, growth responses to light (Doney et al., 2004; DeLong and Karl, approach to modeling. The broad inter- and ambient ... gestions from anonymous reviewers. J. time and space scales depends, of course, data fusion systems (e.g., the direct Cullen was also supported by ONR, the

  9. Prevention of Alcohol-Heightened Aggression by CRF-R1 Antagonists in Mice: Critical Role for DRN-PFC Serotonin Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Quadros, Isabel M.; Hwa, Lara S.; Shimamoto, Akiko; Carlson, Julia; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol can escalate aggressive behavior in a significant subgroup of rodents, humans, and nonhuman primates. The present study investigated whether blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) could prevent the emergence of alcohol-heightened aggression in mice. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) by CRF-R1 was investigated as a possible target for the prevention of alcohol-heightened aggressive behavi...

  10. MicroPET imaging of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in rat brain: a test-retest [{sup 18}F]MPPF study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznavour, Nicolas [McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Laboratory of Neuroenergetics and Cellular Dynamics, EPFL, SV, BMI, Lausanne (Switzerland); Benkelfat, Chawki; Gravel, Paul [McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aliaga, Antonio [McGill University, Department of Small Animal Imaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Rosa-Neto, Pedro [Douglas Hospital, Molecular NeuroImaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bedell, Barry [McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[McGill University, Department of Small Animal Imaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Zimmer, Luc [CERMEP, ANIMAGE Department, Lyon (France)]|[Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS, Lyon (France); Descarries, Laurent [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Universite de Montreal, Department of Physiology, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Universite de Montreal, GRSNC, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Earlier studies have shown that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the radioligand [{sup 18}F]MPPF allows for measuring the binding potential of serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine{sub 1A} (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors in different regions of animal and human brain, including that of 5-HT{sub 1A} autoreceptors in the raphe nuclei. In the present study, we sought to determine if such data could be obtained in rat, with a microPET (R4, Concorde Microsystems). Scans from isoflurane-anaesthetised rats (n = 18, including six test-retest) were co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging data, and binding potential, blood to plasma ratio and radiotracer efflux were estimated according to a simplified reference tissue model. Values of binding potential for hippocampus (1.2), entorhinal cortex (1.1), septum (1.1), medial prefrontal cortex (1.0), amygdala (0.8), raphe nuclei (0.6), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (0.5) and raphe obscurus (0.5) were comparable to those previously measured with PET in cats, non-human primates or humans. Test-retest variability was in the order of 10% in the larger brain regions (hippocampus, medial prefrontal and entorhinal cortex) and less than 20% in small nuclei such as the septum and the paraventricular hypothalamic, basolateral amygdaloid and raphe nuclei. MicroPET brain imaging of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors with [{sup 18}F]MPPF thus represents a promising avenue for investigating 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor function in rat. (orig.)

  11. Increased metabolic activity in the septum and habenula during stress is linked to subsequent expression of learned helplessness behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine M Mirrione

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrollable stress can have a profound effect on an organism’s ability to respond effectively to future stressful situations. Behavior subsequent to uncontrollable stress can vary greatly between individuals, falling on a spectrum between healthy resilience and maladaptive learned helplessness. It is unclear whether dysfunctional brain activity during uncontrollable stress is associated with vulnerability to learned helplessness; therefore, we measured metabolic activity during uncontrollable stress that correlated with ensuing inability to escape future stressors. We took advantage of small animal positron emission tomography (PET and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG to probe in vivo metabolic activity in wild type Sprague Dawley rats during uncontrollable, inescapable, unpredictable foot-shock stress, and subsequently tested the animals response to controllable, escapable, predictable foot-shock stress. When we correlated metabolic activity during the uncontrollable stress with consequent behavioral outcomes, we found that the degree to which animals failed to escape the foot-shock correlated with increased metabolic activity in the lateral septum and habenula. When used a seed region, metabolic activity in the habenula correlated with activity in the lateral septum, hypothalamus, medial thalamus, mammillary nuclei, ventral tegmental area, central gray, interpeduncular nuclei, periaqueductal gray, dorsal raphe, and rostromedial tegmental nucleus, caudal linear raphe, and subiculum transition area. Furthermore, the lateral septum correlated with metabolic activity in the preoptic area, medial thalamus, habenula, interpeduncular nuclei, periaqueductal gray, dorsal raphe, and caudal linear raphe. Together, our data suggest a group of brain regions involved in sensitivity to uncontrollable stress involving the lateral septum and habenula.

  12. Characterization of Biopolymer Surfaces Using Scanning Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-15

    7raphLto and gold (orbor et al., 128S), o-trLcosenoLc and 12,8-diynoic acids (Cd salt:) on silicon wafer and graphite The substrate was highly oriented...which gave about 801 coveracgc monolayc: adsorption was asumeOd. The 31:crepany may be duo to: ill the Presence e1 multilayar adsorbtes wh~u..h r.ad boon

  13. Cerebello-cortical heterotopia in dentate nucleus, and other microdysgeneses in trisomy D1 (Patau) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, A; Peiffer, J; Pfeiffer, R A; Iizuka, R

    1980-01-01

    Several new histological findings in six cases of the trisomy D1 syndrome are described: hyperplasia of fetal structures (indusium griseum, median raphe of the medulla oblongata) and completely developed cerebellar cortical heterotopia in the dentate nucleus. In one case, a heterotopic pontine nucleus was found within the cerebellar white matter. The coexistence of overdeveloped and remaining fetal structures is emphasized. Several hypotheses regarding cerebellar dysgenesis are discussed.

  14. Serotonergic systems associated with arousal and vigilance behaviors following administration of anxiogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, J K; Johnson, P L; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2005-01-01

    drugs on topographically organized subpopulations of serotonergic neurons using double immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos and tryptophan hydroxylase combined with topographical analysis of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Anxiogenic drugs with diverse pharmacological properties including...... nucleus, a forebrain structure important for emotional appraisal and modulation of anxiety-related physiological and behavioral responses. Together these findings support the hypothesis that there is a functional topographical organization in the DR and are consistent with the hypothesis that anxiogenic...

  15. Cellular Architecture and Functional Aspects of the Olfactory Rosette of Wallago attu (Bleeker)

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saroj Kumar; Chakrabarti, Padmanabha

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium of Wallago attu has been studied with conventional histological techniques. The elongated olfactory rosette consists of 62 to 64 primary lamellae in each left and right rosette. The olfactory lamellae are arranged in two rows on either side of the long raphe. Each olfactory lamella consists of two layers of epithelium separated by central core. The olfactory epithelium in one side consists of mixed sensory and non-sensory epithelium while the other side is consists of...

  16. Influência da posição e da profundidade de semeadura na emergência de plântulas de açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart. - Arecaceae Influence of the position and the depth of sowing in the emergency of açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart. - Arecaceae seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Marques da Silva e Silva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a posição e a profundidade de semeadura mais adequadas para a emergência de plântulas de açaizeiro. As sementes foram colocadas para germinar nas profundidades de 0; 3 e 6 cm e nas seguintes posições: sementes com a rafe perpendicular à superfície do substrato e poro germinativo para cima, rafe perpendicular e poro germinativo para baixo, rafe paralela à superfície e poro germinativo para baixo e rafe paralela à superfície e poro germinativo para cima. A emergência de plântulas de açaizeiro com a rafe perpendicular à superfície do substrato e poro germinativo para cima é a mais adequada, pois proporciona igual porcentagem e menor tempo médio de emergência. Profundidades iguais ou superiores a 3 cm são inadequadas para semeadura de Euterpe oleracea Mart.The present work had the objective to determine the most suitable depth and position of sowing for the emergency of açaizeiro seedlings. The seeds were placed to germinate at the depths of 0; 3 and 6 cm and in the following positions: with the raphe perpendicular to the surface of the substratum and germinative aperture up, the raphe perpendicular and germinative aperture down, the raphe parallel to the low surface and germinative aperture down, and raphe parallel to the surface and germinative aperture up. The emergency of açaizeiro seedlings with rafe perpendicular to the surface of the substratum and germinative aperture up is the most suitable, as it provides an equal percentage and minor average time of emergency. Depths equal or superior to 3 cm are inadequate for sowing of Euterpe oleracea Mart.

  17. National Dam Safety Program. Court Street Dam (Inventory Number NY 6843), Monroe County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    i. Foundation . - V- .d* 6 I I ~j. Abutments ,, ,.-. ,X. 1. Approach & Outlet Channels .... _ __’_ _ _ _ M. Energy Dissipators (Plunge...4o16.03)( 6Oba.24)( 7500.34)( 942b.26)( HiDRO $RAPH At 1, 200.00 1 lY925o 34668. 49812. 64756. 79699. 99b24.( o73.40) ( 5b64.21)( 987.3b)( 1410.52

  18. Differential effects of LSD serotonin and l-tryptophan on visually evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahlendorf, J C; Goldstein, F J; Rossi, G V; Malseed, R T

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in photically-evoked cortical responses were assessed in immobilized artificially respired cats following intraraphe microinjections of LSD and serotonin (5-HT) and IV administration of LSD and l-tryptophan. Both systemic (10-100 micrograms/kg; N = 5) and intraraphe (0.25 microgram; N = 10) LSD significantly increased the amplitudes of the three primary components of the visual evoked response (VER). In contrast, the same VER components were significantly depressed following intraraphe 5-HT (30 micrograms; N = 4) and IV l-tryptophan (100 mg/kg; N = 6), a serotonin precursor that elevates raphe 5-HT levels. Intraraphe cinanserin (180 micrograms; 30 minute pretreatment) completely reversed LSD-induced enhancements in all three components (p less than 0.01). Depressions of VER following intraraphe 5-HT (30 micrograms) were also antagonized by cinanserin, although to lesser degree (p less than 0.05 for first 2 components only) than with LSD. The depressive effects of l-tryptophan (100 mg/kg) were unaffected by cinanserin. Modification of raphe neuronal activity can significantly alter photically evoked responses, and may explain the perceptual disturbances associated with LSD, i.e., depression of an area (raphe) normally inhibiting forebrain areas of the visual system.

  19. Morphology, ecology and biogeography of Stauroneis pachycephala P.T. Cleve (Bacillariophyta) and its transfer to the genus Envekadea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atazadeh, Islam; Edlund, Mark B.; van de Vijver, Bart; Mills, Keely; Spaulding, Sarah A.; Gell, Peter A.; Crawford, Simon; Barton, Andrew F.; Lee, Sylvia S.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Newall, Peter; Potapova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Stauroneis pachycephala was described in 1881 from the Baakens River, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Recently, it was found during surveys of the MacKenzie River (Victoria, Australia), the Florida Everglades (USA) and coastal marshes of Louisiana (USA). The morphology, ecology and geographic distribution of this species are described in this article. This naviculoid species is characterised by lanceolate valves with a gibbous centre, a sigmoid raphe, an axial area narrowing toward the valve ends, and capitate valve apices. The central area is a distinct stauros that is slightly widened near the valve margin. The raphe is straight and filiform, and the terminal raphe fissures are strongly deflected in opposite directions. Striae are fine and radiate in the middle of the valve, becoming parallel and eventually convergent toward the valve ends. The external surface of the valves and copulae is smooth and lacks ornamentation. We also examined the type material of S. pachycephala. Our observations show this species has morphological characteristics that fit within the genus Envekadea. Therefore, the transfer of S. pachycephala to Envekadea is proposed and a lectotype is designated.

  20. Treadmill exercise alleviates depressive symptoms in rotenone-induced Parkinson disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by selective loss of the dopaminergic neurons. The symptoms of depression following PD are closely associated with reduced activity of the serotonergic system in the dorsal raphe. We explored the antidepressive effect of exercise and its possible mechanism using the rotenone-induced PD rats. PD rats were induced by subcutaneously injection with rotenone for 14 days. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Forced swimming test, immunohistochemistry for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), and western blot for serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor were conducted. Injection of rotenone induced PD rats. PD rats showed depressive state and treadmill exercise ameliorated this depressive state. 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor expressions in the dorsal raphe were suppressed by rotenone injection and treadmill exercise increased the expressions of 5-HT, TPH, and 5-HT1A receptor in the rotenone-injected rats. The present results show that treadmill exercise ameliorated depressive symptoms in the rotenone-induced PD rats. The antidepressive effect of treadmill exercise might be ascribed to the enhancement of serotonergic function through upregulation of 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe.

  1. Neonatal citalopram exposure decreases serotonergic fiber density in the olfactory bulb of male but not female adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlin eZhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of serotonin (5HT during early development has been shown to induce long-lasting morphological changes within the raphe nuclear complex and serotonergic circuitry throughout the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated altered raphe-derived 5HT transporter (SERT immunoreactive axonal expression in several cortical target sites after brief perinatal exposure to selective 5HT reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram (CTM. Since the serotonergic raphe nuclear complex projects to the olfactory bulb (OB and perinatal 5HT disruption has been shown to disrupt olfactory behaviors, the goal of this study was to further investigate such developmental effects in the OB of CTM exposed animals. Male and female rat pups were exposed to CTM from postnatal day 8-21. After animals reach adulthood (>90 days, OB tissue sections were processed immunohistochemically for SERT antiserum. Our data revealed that the density of the SERT immunoreactive fibers decreased ~40% in the OB of CTM exposed male rats, but not female rats. Our findings support a broad and long-lasting change throughout most of the 5HT system, including the OB, after early manipulation of 5HT. Because dysfunction of the early 5HT system has been implicated in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, these new findings may offer insight into the abnormal olfactory perception often noted in patients with ASD.

  2. Increased corticotropin-releasing hormone immunoreactivity in monoamine-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M C; Janosky, J E; Murphy, H A

    2003-03-01

    A number of clinical investigations and postmortem brain studies have provided evidence that excessive corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) secretion and neurotransmission is involved in the pathophysiology of depressive illness, and several studies have suggested that the hyperactivity in CRH neurotransmission extends beyond the hypothalamus involving several extra-hypothalamic brain regions. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that CRH levels are increased in specific brainstem regions of suicide victims with a diagnosis of major depression. Frozen tissue sections of the pons containing the locus coeruleus and caudal raphe nuclei from 11 matched pairs of depressed suicide and control male subjects were processed for radioimmunocytochemistry using a primary antiserum to CRH and a ([125])I-IgG secondary antibody. The optical density corresponding to the level of CRH-immunoreactivity (IR) was quantified in specific pontine regions from the film autoradiographic images. The level of CRH-IR was increased by 30% in the locus coeruleus, 39% in the median raphe and 45% in the caudal dorsal raphe in the depressed suicide subjects compared to controls. No difference in CRH-IR was found in the dorsal tegmentum or medial parabrachial nucleus between the subject groups. These findings reveal that CRH-IR levels are specifically increased in norepinephrine- and serotonin-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men, and thus they are consistent with the hypothesis that CRH neurotransmission is elevated in extra-hypothalamic brain regions of depressed subjects.

  3. The Significance of Brain Transcranial Sonography in Burning Mouth Syndrome: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Zavoreo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic disorder which is affecting mostly postmenopausal women and is characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity on the clinically healthy oral mucosa. The results of previous studies suggested a possible role of peripheral and/or central neurological disturbances in these patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with burning mouth syndrome using transcranial sonography. Methods: By use of transcranial sonography of the brain parenchyma, substantia nigra, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus were evaluated in 20 patients with BMS (64.7±12.3 years and 20 controls with chronic pain in the lumbosacral region (61.5±15. Statistical analysis was performed by use of Student t test with significance set at p<0.05. Results: The results of this study have shown hypoechogenicity of the substantia nigra and midbrain raphe as well as hyperechogenicity of the brain nucleus in BMS patients (p<0,05 as compared to controls. Conclusions: Altered transcranial sonography findings of the brain parenchyma, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus in patients with burning mouth syndrome might reflect central disturbances within this syndrome.

  4. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  5. Pet-1 deficiency alters the circadian clock and its temporal organization of behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Ciarleglio

    Full Text Available The serotonin and circadian systems are two important interactive regulatory networks in the mammalian brain that regulate behavior and physiology in ways that are known to impact human mental health. Previous work on the interaction between these two systems suggests that serotonin modulates photic input to the central circadian clock (the suprachiasmatic nuclei; SCN from the retina and serves as a signal for locomotor activity, novelty, and arousal to shift the SCN clock, but effects of disruption of serotonergic signaling from the raphe nuclei on circadian behavior and on SCN function are not fully characterized. In this study, we examined the effects on diurnal and circadian behavior, and on ex vivo molecular rhythms of the SCN, of genetic deficiency in Pet-1, an ETS transcription factor that is necessary to establish and maintain the serotonergic phenotype of raphe neurons. Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit loss of rhythmic behavioral coherence and an extended daily activity duration, as well as changes in the molecular rhythms expressed by the clock, such that ex vivo SCN from Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit period lengthening and sex-dependent changes in rhythmic amplitude. Together, our results indicate that Pet-1 regulation of raphe neuron serotonin phenotype contributes to the period, precision and light/dark partitioning of locomotor behavioral rhythms by the circadian clock through direct actions on the SCN clock itself, as well as through non-clock effects.

  6. Pet-1 deficiency alters the circadian clock and its temporal organization of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarleglio, Christopher M; Resuehr, Holly E S; Axley, John C; Deneris, Evan S; McMahon, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin and circadian systems are two important interactive regulatory networks in the mammalian brain that regulate behavior and physiology in ways that are known to impact human mental health. Previous work on the interaction between these two systems suggests that serotonin modulates photic input to the central circadian clock (the suprachiasmatic nuclei; SCN) from the retina and serves as a signal for locomotor activity, novelty, and arousal to shift the SCN clock, but effects of disruption of serotonergic signaling from the raphe nuclei on circadian behavior and on SCN function are not fully characterized. In this study, we examined the effects on diurnal and circadian behavior, and on ex vivo molecular rhythms of the SCN, of genetic deficiency in Pet-1, an ETS transcription factor that is necessary to establish and maintain the serotonergic phenotype of raphe neurons. Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit loss of rhythmic behavioral coherence and an extended daily activity duration, as well as changes in the molecular rhythms expressed by the clock, such that ex vivo SCN from Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit period lengthening and sex-dependent changes in rhythmic amplitude. Together, our results indicate that Pet-1 regulation of raphe neuron serotonin phenotype contributes to the period, precision and light/dark partitioning of locomotor behavioral rhythms by the circadian clock through direct actions on the SCN clock itself, as well as through non-clock effects.

  7. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jaime Herrera-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT expression associated with low testosterone (T levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1 if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2 if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population.

  8. Learned helplessness at fifty: Insights from neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Steven F; Seligman, Martin E P

    2016-07-01

    Learned helplessness, the failure to escape shock induced by uncontrollable aversive events, was discovered half a century ago. Seligman and Maier (1967) theorized that animals learned that outcomes were independent of their responses-that nothing they did mattered-and that this learning undermined trying to escape. The mechanism of learned helplessness is now very well-charted biologically, and the original theory got it backward. Passivity in response to shock is not learned. It is the default, unlearned response to prolonged aversive events and it is mediated by the serotonergic activity of the dorsal raphe nucleus, which in turn inhibits escape. This passivity can be overcome by learning control, with the activity of the medial prefrontal cortex, which subserves the detection of control leading to the automatic inhibition of the dorsal raphe nucleus. So animals learn that they can control aversive events, but the passive failure to learn to escape is an unlearned reaction to prolonged aversive stimulation. In addition, alterations of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex-dorsal raphe pathway can come to subserve the expectation of control. We speculate that default passivity and the compensating detection and expectation of control may have substantial implications for how to treat depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Termination of Transcription of Short Noncoding RNAs by RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Karen M; Reines, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription cycle is often divided into three major stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Research over the last decade has blurred these divisions and emphasized the tightly regulated transitions that occur as RNA polymerase II synthesizes a transcript from start to finish. Transcription termination, the process that marks the end of transcription elongation, is regulated by proteins that interact with the polymerase, nascent transcript, and/or chromatin template. The failure to terminate transcription can cause accumulation of aberrant transcripts and interfere with transcription at downstream genes. Here, we review the mechanism, regulation, and physiological impact of a termination pathway that targets small noncoding transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II. We emphasize the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 pathway in yeast, in which the process has been extensively studied. The importance of understanding small RNA termination pathways is underscored by the need to control noncoding transcription in eukaryotic genomes.

  10. Isoleucine and valine supplementation of crude protein-reduced diets for pigs aged 5-8 weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Fernández, José Adalberto

    2009-01-01

    The present experiment had two purposes: (i) to study crystalline amino acid supplementation to crude protein-reduced diets, and (ii) to study the effect of different isoleucine (Ile) to lysine (Lys) and valine (Val) to Lys ratios in diets for young pigs. A total of 145 pigs were weaned at 28 days...... the PRD diet. These results indicate that Val is limiting before Ile, when reduced relative to Lys. By supplying crystalline amino acids, dietary crude protein can be reduced without negative effects on animal performance....... and fed one of 5 diets for a total of 4 weeks. Two basal diets were formulated to provide crude protein in levels either as recommended (positive reference diet, PRD), or below recommendations (negative reference diet, NRD). The basal diets contained 95% of recommended Lys, and all other essential amino...

  11. Detection and classification of Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy using a Back-Propagation neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Salvador Velázquez-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Una de las complicaciones más graves de la Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 es la Retinopatía Diabética (RD. La RD es una enfermedad silenciosa y solo es reconocida por el portador cuándo los cambios en la retina han progresado a un nivel en el cual el tratamiento se complica, por lo que el diagnóstico oportuno y la remisión al oftalmólogo u optometrista para el manejo de esta enfermedad pueden prevenir el 98% de la pérdida visual grave. El objetivo de este trabajo es identificar de manera automática la No Retinopatía Diabética (NRD y la Retinopatía de Fondo, utilizando imágenes del fondo de ojo. Nuestros resultados muestran una efectividad del 92%, con una sensitividad y especificidad del 95%.

  12. Stress-induced activation of nitric oxide-producing neurons in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukoff, T L; Khalili, P

    1997-01-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous neurotransmitter that may mediate a decrease in sympathetic output to the periphery. This implication predicts that NO-producing neurons in the brain are activated in animals experiencing increased levels of sympathetic activity. To test this prediction, we subjected three groups of experimental rats to differing levels of environmental stimulation for 1 hour: minimal stimulation, moderate stimulation, and restraint stress. NO-producing neurons were histochemically visualized in sections of the brain, and activation of these neurons was assessed according to the neuronal expression of the immediate early gene c-fos. Constitutive activation of NO-producing neurons was found in the hypothalamus (paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei), dorsal raphe nuclei, and spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve of minimally stimulated rats. When animals were subjected to a novel environment (moderate stimulation), additional NO-producing neurons were activated in the medial septum, medial amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei (lateral, periventricular, and posterior), colliculi, nucleus raphe obscurus, medial vestibular nucleus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and several components of the ventrolateral medulla. Restraint stress caused the activation of NO-producing neurons in all of these areas, often in increasing numbers, and the activation of additional NO-producing neurons in the diagonal band of Broca, lateral and medial preoptic areas, basomedial and basolateral amygdalar nuclei, hypothalamic nuclei (dorsomedial, retrochiasmatic supraoptic, and circularis), nucleus raphe pontus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, and pontine nuclei. Expressed as a proportion of NO-producing neurons per section, the largest percentages (>20%) of double-stained neurons were found in the basolateral amygdala (46%), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (35%), corpora quadrigemina (estimated at 40%), dorsal raphe (45%), nuclei raphe pontus (33%) and obscurus (63%), lateral

  13. Routine Use of Surgical Retrograde Transtibial Endovascular Approach for Failed Attempts at Antegrade Recanalization of Chronic Peripheral Artery Total Occlusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, GangZhu; Zhang, FuXian, E-mail: gangzhuliang@126.com; Luo, XiaoYun; Zhang, ChangMing; Feng, YaPing; Niu, LuYuan; Zhang, Huan; Hu, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Cheng, Long; Zhang, MingYi [Capital Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital (China)

    2016-12-15

    PurposeOur aim was to describe the technical aspects and clinical outcomes of an open surgical approach to retrograde transtibial endovascular therapy for recanalization of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) of peripheral arteries because of inability to acquire antegrade intravascular access across the occlusion.Materials and MethodsBetween January 2011 and May 2014, conventional antegrade revascularization failed in 15 limbs of 15 patients (11 males, 4 females) with complex CTOs. The mean age of the patients was 74 years (range 48–83 years). Five patients had severe claudication (Rutherford Category 3), and 10 patients had critical limb-threatening ischemia (Rutherford Categories 4–5). For each of these cases of antegrade failure, an open surgical exposure of the tibial or dorsalis pedis artery was used to allow a safe retrograde transtibial endovascular approach to recanalize the CTO.ResultsSurgical retrograde access from the tibial artery was achieved successfully in 14 of the 15 patients. In the 14 successful retrograde endovascular approaches, surgical retrograde transtibial access was achieved from the dorsalis pedis artery in 8 patients and from the posterior tibial artery in 6. The average time to obtain retrograde access was 5 min (range 2–11 min). No stenosis or occlusion occurred in the tibial or dorsalis pedis arteries used for the retrograde access sites during follow-up.ConclusionsRoutine surgical exposure can be a safe and an effective method for retrograde transtibial access to the more proximal occluded arterial segments in selected patients with CTO.

  14. Homologies of the transversospinalis muscles in the anterior presacral region of Sauria (crown Diapsida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuihiji, Takanobu

    2005-02-01

    Homologies of muscles of the m. transversospinalis group in the dorsal and cervical regions in Sauria are established based on detailed dissections and published accounts of lepidosaurs, crocodylians, and birds. Attachments and directions of tendons comprising this muscle group are fairly conserved among the saurian clades, enabling rather robust inferences on muscle homologies. The innervation pattern indicates that mm. ascendentes are the most lateral muscles of the m. transversospinalis group in Aves, and are inferred to be homologous with the crocodylian m. tendinoarticularis based on their topological similarities. It is suggested here that the lepidosaurian articulo-parietalis part of m. longissimus cervico-capitis actually belongs to the m. transversospinalis group because its tendons of origin are shared with those of m. semispinalis. The avian m. complexus and the lateral part of the crocodylian m. transversospinalis capitis have origins and insertions similar to this lepidosaurian muscle, and are proposed to be homologous with the latter. In some birds, m. longus colli dorsalis, pars profunda continues directly into the anterior cervical region as m. splenius accessorius, suggesting a serially homologous relationship. Similarly, m. splenius anticus continues anteriorly from m. longus colli dorsalis, pars cranialis, and both of these muscles lie dorsal to m. splenius accessorius. Therefore, the currently used nomenclature that regards m. splenius accessorius as a part of m. longus colli dorsalis, pars cranialis and that regards m. splenius anticus as a part of the former muscle does not accurately reflect the serial homologies among these muscles and may not be justified. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Transcriptomics and identification of the chemoreceptor superfamily of the pupal parasitoid of the oriental fruit fly, Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae.

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    Yuping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, causes serious losses to fruit production and is one of the most economically important pests in many countries, including China, Spalangia endius Walker is a pupal parasitoid of various dipteran hosts, and may be considered a potentially important ectoparasitic pupal parasitoid of B. dorsalis. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its interaction with this host. Analysis of the S. endius transcriptome is essential to extend the resources of genetic information on this species and, to support studies on S. endius on the host B. dorsalis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed de novo assembly RNA-seq of S. endius. We obtained nearly 10 Gbp of data using a HiSeq platform, and 36319 high-quality transcripts using Trinity software. A total of 22443 (61.79% unigenes were aligned to homologous sequences in the jewel wasp and honeybee (Apis florae protein set from public databases. A total of 10037 protein domains were identified in 7892 S. endius transcripts using HMMER3 software. We identified expression of six gustatory receptor and 21 odorant receptor genes in the sample, with only one gene having a high expression level in each family. The other genes had a low expression level, including two genes regulated by splicing. This result may be due to the wasps being kept under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a total of 3727 SSR markers were predicted, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms and functional genes within wasp populations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of S. endius and provides a large number of gene sequences for further study.

  16. Insulin signaling pathway in the oriental fruit fly: The role of insulin receptor substrate in ovarian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kang-Kang; Yang, Wen-Jia; Tian, Yi; Wu, Yi-Bei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-05-15

    Insulin signaling pathways have integral roles in regulating organ growth and body size of insects. Here, we identified and characterized six insulin signaling pathway components-InR, IRS, PI3K92E, PI3K21B, Akt, and PDK-from Bactrocera dorsalis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to establish gene expression profiles for the insulin signaling pathway components for different developmental stages and tissues, and in response to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and starvation. IRS, PI3K92E, and PI3K21B were highly expressed in the head, while InR, Akt, and PDK were most abundant in Malpighian tubules. Both IRS and PI3K92E were highly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transition, while the remaining four genes were highly expressed only during the pupal-adult transition. Following initial exposure to 20E, the expression levels of most genes were significantly decreased. However, the expression levels of IRS, PI3K92E, and PI3K21B were significantly increased at 8 and 12h post-treatment compared with the control. Moreover, we found that most insulin signaling pathway genes in B. dorsalis were up-regulated in response to starvation, but decreased when re-fed. On the contrary, transcript levels of PI3K21B decreased significantly during starvation. Furthermore, injection of IRS dsRNA into adult females significantly reduced IRS transcript levels. Suppression of IRS expression inhibited ovarian development, and the average ovary size was reduced by 33% compared with the control. This study provides new insight into the roles of insulin signaling pathway components in B. dorsalis, and demonstrates an important role for IRS in ovarian development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Laura M.N.; Dörr, Natália C.; Ribeiro, Ana Paula A.; de Salles, Silvia M.; de Oliveira, Jaime V.; Menezes, Valmir G.; Fiuza, Lidia M.

    2012-01-01

    The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively) as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil), which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64%) and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62%) strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82%) to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations. PMID:24031872

  18. The construction and evaluation of reference spectra for the identification of human pathogenic microorganisms by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Xiao

    Full Text Available Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS is an emerging technique for the rapid and high-throughput identification of microorganisms. There remains a dearth of studies in which a large number of pathogenic microorganisms from a particular country or region are utilized for systematic analyses. In this study, peptide mass reference spectra (PMRS were constructed and evaluated from numerous human pathogens (a total of 1019 strains from 94 species, including enteric (46 species, respiratory (21 species, zoonotic (17 species, and nosocomial pathogens (10 species, using a MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper system (MBS. The PMRS for 380 strains of 52 species were new contributions to the original reference database (ORD. Compared with the ORD, the new reference database (NRD allowed for 28.2% (from 71.5% to 99.7% and 42.3% (from 51.3% to 93.6% improvements in identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. Misidentification rates were 91.7% and 57.1% lower with the NRD than with the ORD for genus and species identification, respectively. Eight genera and 25 species were misidentified. For genera and species that are challenging to accurately identify, identification results must be manually determined and adjusted in accordance with the database parameters. Through augmentation, the MBS demonstrated a high identification accuracy and specificity for human pathogenic microorganisms. This study sought to provide theoretical guidance for using PMRS databases in various fields, such as clinical diagnosis and treatment, disease control, quality assurance, and food safety inspection.

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M.N. Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil, which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64% and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62% strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82% to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations.

  20. Predictors of 30- and 90-day readmission following craniotomy for malignant brain tumors: analysis of nationwide data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Daniel A; Wen, Timothy; Babadjouni, Robin M; Schwartzman, William; Buchanan, Ian A; Cen, Steven Y; Zada, Gabriel; Mack, William J; Attenello, Frank J

    2018-01-01

    Hospital readmissions are a major contributor to increased health care costs and are associated with worse patient outcomes after neurosurgery. We used the newly released Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) to describe the association between patient, hospital and payer factors with 30- and 90-day readmission following craniotomy for malignant brain tumor. All adult inpatients undergoing craniotomy for primary and secondary malignant brain tumors in the NRD from 2013 to 2014 were included. We identified all cause readmissions within 30- and 90-days following craniotomy for tumor, excluding scheduled chemotherapeutic procedures. We used univariate and multivariate models to identify patient, hospital and administrative factors associated with readmission. We identified 27,717 admissions for brain tumor craniotomy in 2013-2014, with 3343 (13.2%) 30-day and 5271 (25.7%) 90-day readmissions. In multivariate analysis, patients with Medicaid and Medicare were more likely to be readmitted at 30- and 90-days compared to privately insured patients. Patients with two or more comorbidities were more likely to be readmitted at 30- and 90-days, and patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities or home health care were associated with increased 90-day readmission rates. Finally, hospital procedural volume above the 75th percentile was associated with decreased 90-day readmission rates. Patients treated at high volume hospitals are less likely to be readmitted at 90-days. Insurance type, non-routine discharge and patient comorbidities are predictors of postoperative non-scheduled readmission. Further studies may elucidate potentially modifiable risk factors when attempting to improve outcomes and reduce cost associated with brain tumor surgery.