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Sample records for rapamycin heterodimerizer system

  1. SUMO modification through rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization reveals a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to nuclear pore complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shanshan; Zhang Hong; Matunis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    SUMOs (small ubiquitin-related modifiers) are eukaryotic proteins that are covalently conjugated to other proteins and thereby regulate a wide range of important cellular processes. The molecular mechanisms by which SUMO modification influences the functions of most target proteins and cellular processes, however, remain poorly defined. A major obstacle to investigating the effects of SUMO modification is the availability of a system for selectively inducing the modification or demodification of an individual protein. To address this problem, we have developed a procedure using the rapamycin heterodimerizer system. This procedure involves co-expression of rapamycin-binding domain fusion proteins of SUMO and candidate SUMO substrates in living cells. Treating cells with rapamycin induces a tight association between SUMO and a single SUMO substrate, thereby allowing specific downstream effects to be analyzed. Using RanGAP1 as a model SUMO substrate, the heterodimerizer system was used to investigate the molecular mechanism by which SUMO modification targets RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our results revealed a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to NPCs: In addition to conjugating SUMO-1 to RanGAP1, Ubc9 is also required to form a stable ternary complex with SUMO-1 modified RanGAP1 and Nup358. As illustrated by our studies, the rapamycin heterodimerizer system represents a novel tool for studying the molecular effects of SUMO modification

  2. Rapamycin-based inducible translocation systems for studying phagocytosis.

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    Bohdanowicz, Michal; Fairn, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an immune receptor-mediated process whereby cells engulf large particles. The process is dynamic and requires several localized factors acting in concert with and sequentially after the engagement of immune receptors to envelope the particle. Once the particle is internalized, the nascent -phagosome undergoes a series of events leading to its maturation to the microbicidal phagolysosome. Investigating these dynamic and temporally controlled series of events in live cells requires noninvasive methods. The ability to rapidly recruit the proteins of interest to the sites of phagocytosis or to nascent phagosomes would help dissect the regulatory mechanisms involved during phagocytosis. Here, we describe a general approach to express in RAW264.7 murine macrophages, a genetically encoded rapamycin--induced heterodimerization system. In the presence of rapamycin, tight association between FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and FKBP rapamycin-binding protein (FRB) is observed. Based on this principle, a synthetic system consisting of a targeting domain attached to FKBP can recruit a protein of interest fused to FRB upon the addition of rapamycin. Previously, this technique has been used to target lipid-modifying enzymes and small GTPases to the phagosome or plasma membrane. The recruitment of the FRB module can be monitored by fluorescent microscopy if a fluorescent protein is fused to the FRB sequence. While the focus of this chapter is on phagocytic events, this method can be employed to study any organelle of interest when the appropriate targeting sequence is used.

  3. Modulation of translation-initiation in CHO-K1 cells by rapamycin-induced heterodimerization of engineered eIF4G fusion proteins.

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    Schlatter, Stefan; Senn, Claudia; Fussenegger, Martin

    2003-07-20

    Translation-initiation is a predominant checkpoint in mammalian cells which controls protein synthesis and fine-tunes the flow of information from gene to protein. In eukaryotes, translation-initiation is typically initiated at a 7-methyl-guanylic acid cap posttranscriptionally linked to the 5' end of mRNAs. Alternative cap-independent translation-initiation involves 5' untranslated regions (UTR) known as internal ribosome entry sites, which adopt a particular secondary structure. Translation-initiating ribosome assembly at cap or IRES elements is mediated by a multiprotein complex of which the initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) consisting of eIF4A (helicase), eIF4E (cap-binding protein), and eIF4G is a major constituent. eIF4G is a key target of picornaviral protease 2A, which cleaves this initiation factor into eIF4G(Delta) and (Delta)eIF4G to redirect the cellular translation machinery exclusively to its own IRES-containing transcripts. We have designed a novel translation control system (TCS) for conditional as well as adjustable translation of cap- and IRES-dependent transgene mRNAs in mammalian cells. eIF4G(Delta) and (Delta)eIF4G were fused C- and N-terminally to the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin-binding domain (FRB) of the human FKBP-rapamycin-associated protein (FRAP), respectively. Rapamycin-induced heterodimerization of eIF4G(Delta)-FKBP and FRB-(Delta)eIF4G fusion proteins reconstituted a functional chimeric elongation factor 4G in a dose-dependent manner. Rigorous quantitative expression analysis of cap- and IRES-dependent SEAP- (human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase) and luc- (Photinus pyralis luciferase) encoding reporter constructs confirmed adjustable translation control and revealed increased production of desired proteins in response to dimerization-induced heterologous eIF4G in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 83: 210-225, 2003.

  4. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Neuman, Joshua C; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A; Cummings, Nicole E; Brar, Harpreet K; Pumper, Cassidy P; Kimple, Michelle E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Rapamycin-induced oligomer formation system of FRB-FKBP fusion proteins.

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    Inobe, Tomonao; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    Most proteins form larger protein complexes and perform multiple functions in the cell. Thus, artificial regulation of protein complex formation controls the cellular functions that involve protein complexes. Although several artificial dimerization systems have already been used for numerous applications in biomedical research, cellular protein complexes form not only simple dimers but also larger oligomers. In this study, we showed that fusion proteins comprising the induced heterodimer formation proteins FRB and FKBP formed various oligomers upon addition of rapamycin. By adjusting the configuration of fusion proteins, we succeeded in generating an inducible tetramer formation system. Proteins of interest also formed tetramers by fusing to the inducible tetramer formation system, which exhibits its utility in a broad range of biological applications. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin disrupts consolidation and reconsolidation of auditory fear memory.

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    Mac Callum, Phillip E; Hebert, Mark; Adamec, Robert E; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a critical regulator of mRNA translation and is known to be involved in various long lasting forms of synaptic and behavioural plasticity. However, information concerning the temporal pattern of mTOR activation and susceptibility to pharmacological intervention during both consolidation and reconsolidation of long-term memory (LTM) remains scant. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following conditioning or retrieval in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, and compared to vehicle (and/or anisomycin) controls for subsequent memory recall. Systemic blockade of mTOR with rapamycin immediately or 12h after training or reactivation impairs both consolidation and reconsolidation of an auditory fear memory. Further behavioural analysis revealed that the enduring effects of rapamycin on reconsolidation are dependent upon reactivation of the memory trace. Rapamycin, however, has no effect on short-term memory or the ability to retrieve an established fear memory. Collectively, our data suggest that biphasic mTOR signalling is essential for both consolidation and reconsolidation-like activities that contribute to the formation, re-stabilization, and persistence of long term auditory-fear memories, while not influencing other aspects of the memory trace. These findings also provide evidence for a cogent treatment model for reducing the emotional strength of established, traumatic memories analogous to those observed in acquired anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobias, through pharmacologic blockade of mTOR using systemic rapamycin following reactivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeting Rapamycin to Podocytes Using a Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1-Harnessed SAINT-Based Lipid Carrier System.

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    Ganesh Ram R Visweswaran

    Full Text Available Together with mesangial cells, glomerular endothelial cells and the basement membrane, podocytes constitute the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB of the kidney. Podocytes play a pivotal role in the progression of various kidney-related diseases such as glomerular sclerosis and glomerulonephritis that finally lead to chronic end-stage renal disease. During podocytopathies, the slit-diaphragm connecting the adjacent podocytes are detached leading to severe loss of proteins in the urine. The pathophysiology of podocytopathies makes podocytes a potential and challenging target for nanomedicine development, though there is a lack of known molecular targets for cell selective drug delivery. To identify VCAM-1 as a cell-surface receptor that is suitable for binding and internalization of nanomedicine carrier systems by podocytes, we investigated its expression in the immortalized podocyte cell lines AB8/13 and MPC-5, and in primary podocytes. Gene and protein expression analyses revealed that VCAM-1 expression is increased by podocytes upon TNFα-activation for up to 24 h. This was paralleled by anti-VCAM-1 antibody binding to the TNFα-activated cells, which can be employed as a ligand to facilitate the uptake of nanocarriers under inflammatory conditions. Hence, we next explored the possibilities of using VCAM-1 as a cell-surface receptor to deliver the potent immunosuppressant rapamycin to TNFα-activated podocytes using the lipid-based nanocarrier system Saint-O-Somes. Anti-VCAM-1-rapamycin-SAINT-O-Somes more effectively inhibited the cell migration of AB8/13 cells than free rapamycin and non-targeted rapamycin-SAINT-O-Somes indicating the potential of VCAM-1 targeted drug delivery to podocytes.

  8. The rapamycin-binding domain of the protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin is a destabilizing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah R; Wandless, Thomas J

    2007-05-04

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug that binds simultaneously to the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein (FKBP12, or FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. The resulting ternary complex has been used to conditionally perturb protein function, and one such method involves perturbation of a protein of interest through its mislocalization. We synthesized two rapamycin derivatives that possess large substituents at the C-16 position within the FRB-binding interface, and these derivatives were screened against a library of FRB mutants using a three-hybrid assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several FRB mutants responded to one of the rapamycin derivatives, and twenty of these mutants were further characterized in mammalian cells. The mutants most responsive to the ligand were fused to yellow fluorescent protein, and fluorescence levels in the presence and absence of the ligand were measured to determine stability of the fusion proteins. Wild-type and mutant FRB domains were expressed at low levels in the absence of the rapamycin derivative, and expression levels rose up to 10-fold upon treatment with ligand. The synthetic rapamycin derivatives were further analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, and one of the compounds was found to contain contaminating rapamycin. Furthermore, uncontaminated analogs retained the ability to inhibit mTOR, although with diminished potency relative to rapamycin. The ligand-dependent stability displayed by wild-type FRB and FRB mutants as well as the inhibitory potential and purity of the rapamycin derivatives should be considered as potentially confounding experimental variables when using these systems.

  9. A traffic signal for heterodimeric amino acid transporters to transfer from the ER to the Golgi.

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    Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2009-01-15

    Heterodimeric amino acid transporters represent a unique class of transport systems that consist of a light chain that serves as the 'transporter proper' and a heavy chain that is necessary for targeting the complex to the plasma membrane. The currently prevailing paradigm assigns no role for the light chains in the cellular processing of these transporters. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Sakamoto et al. provide evidence contrary to this paradigm. Their studies with the rBAT -b(0,+)AT (related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter-b(0,+)-type amino acid transporter) heterodimeric amino acid transporter show that the C-terminus of the light chain b(0,+)AT contains a sequence motif that serves as the traffic signal for the transfer of the heterodimeric complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. This is a novel function for the light chain in addition to its already established role as the subunit responsible for the transport activity. These new findings also seem to be applicable to other heterodimeric amino acid transporters as well.

  10. Microsphere-Based Rapamycin Delivery, Systemic Versus Local Administration in a Rat Model of Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, Jurjen; van Beuge, Marike M.; Zuidema, Johan; Petersen, Arjen H.; Staal, Mark; Duque, Luisa F.; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lathuile, Audrey A. R.; Veldhuis, Gert J.; Steendam, Rob; Bank, Ruud A.; Popa, Eliane R.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and treatment costs of kidney diseases call for innovative therapeutic strategies that prevent disease progression at an early stage. We studied a novel method of subcapsular injection of monodisperse microspheres, to use as a local delivery system of drugs to the kidney.

  11. Rapamycin exerts antifungal activity in vitro and in vivo against Mucor circinelloides via FKBP12-dependent inhibition of Tor.

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    Bastidas, Robert J; Shertz, Cecelia A; Lee, Soo Chan; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2012-03-01

    The zygomycete Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly infects patients with malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and solid organ transplants. Despite the widespread use of antifungal therapy in the management of zygomycosis, the incidence of infections continues to rise among immunocompromised individuals. In this study, we established that the target and mechanism of antifungal action of the immunosuppressant rapamycin in M. circinelloides are mediated via conserved complexes with FKBP12 and a Tor homolog. We found that spontaneous mutations that disrupted conserved residues in FKBP12 conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Disruption of the FKBP12-encoding gene, fkbA, also conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Expression of M. circinelloides FKBP12 (McFKBP12) complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain lacking FKBP12 to restore rapamycin sensitivity. Expression of the McTor FKBP12-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain conferred rapamycin resistance in S. cerevisiae, and McFKBP12 interacted in a rapamycin-dependent fashion with the McTor FRB domain in a yeast two-hybrid assay, validating McFKBP12 and McTor as conserved targets of rapamycin. We showed that in vitro, rapamycin exhibited potent growth inhibitory activity against M. circinelloides. In a Galleria mellonella model of systemic mucormycosis, rapamycin improved survival by 50%, suggesting that rapamycin and nonimmunosuppressive analogs have the potential to be developed as novel antifungal therapies for treatment of patients with mucormycosis.

  12. Rapamycin Exerts Antifungal Activity In Vitro and In Vivo against Mucor circinelloides via FKBP12-Dependent Inhibition of Tor

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    Bastidas, Robert J.; Shertz, Cecelia A.; Lee, Soo Chan; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The zygomycete Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly infects patients with malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and solid organ transplants. Despite the widespread use of antifungal therapy in the management of zygomycosis, the incidence of infections continues to rise among immunocompromised individuals. In this study, we established that the target and mechanism of antifungal action of the immunosuppressant rapamycin in M. circinelloides are mediated via conserved complexes with FKBP12 and a Tor homolog. We found that spontaneous mutations that disrupted conserved residues in FKBP12 conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Disruption of the FKBP12-encoding gene, fkbA, also conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Expression of M. circinelloides FKBP12 (McFKBP12) complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain lacking FKBP12 to restore rapamycin sensitivity. Expression of the McTor FKBP12-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain conferred rapamycin resistance in S. cerevisiae, and McFKBP12 interacted in a rapamycin-dependent fashion with the McTor FRB domain in a yeast two-hybrid assay, validating McFKBP12 and McTor as conserved targets of rapamycin. We showed that in vitro, rapamycin exhibited potent growth inhibitory activity against M. circinelloides. In a Galleria mellonella model of systemic mucormycosis, rapamycin improved survival by 50%, suggesting that rapamycin and nonimmunosuppressive analogs have the potential to be developed as novel antifungal therapies for treatment of patients with mucormycosis. PMID:22210828

  13. The Rapamycin-Binding Domain of the Protein Kinase mTOR is a Destabilizing Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah R.; Wandless, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug that binds simultaneously to the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein (FKBP12, or FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB) of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. The resulting ternary complex has been used to conditionally perturb protein function, and one such method involves perturbation of a protein of interest through its mislocalization. We synthesized two rapamycin derivatives that possess large substituents at the C16 position within the FRB-binding interface, and these derivatives were screened against a library of FRB mutants using a three-hybrid assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several FRB mutants responded to one of the rapamycin derivatives, and twenty of these mutants were further characterized in mammalian cells. The mutants most responsive to the ligand were fused to yellow fluorescent protein, and fluorescence levels in the presence and absence of the ligand were measured to determine stability of the fusion proteins. Wild-type and mutant FRB domains were expressed at low levels in the absence of the rapamycin derivative, and expression levels rose up to ten-fold upon treatment with ligand. The synthetic rapamycin derivatives were further analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, and one of the compounds was found to contain contaminating rapamycin. Furthermore, uncontaminated analogs retain the ability to inhibit mTOR, albeit with diminished potency relative to rapamycin. The ligand-dependent stability displayed by wildtype FRB and FRB mutants as well as the inhibitory potential and purity of the rapamycin derivatives should be considered as potentially confounding experimental variables when using these systems. PMID:17350953

  14. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

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    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  15. Investigation into the Mechanism of Homo- and Heterodimerization of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

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    Abrie, J Albert; Moolman, Wessel J A; Cozier, Gyles E; Schwager, Sylva L; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D

    2018-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which is primarily responsible for blood pressure homeostasis. Studies have shown that ACE inhibitors yield cardiovascular benefits that cannot be entirely attributed to the inhibition of ACE catalytic activity. It is possible that these benefits are due to interactions between ACE and RAS receptors that mediate the protective arm of the RAS, such as angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AT 2 R) and the receptor MAS. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the molecular interactions of ACE, including ACE homodimerization and heterodimerization with AT 2 R and MAS, respectively. Molecular interactions were assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells transfected with vectors encoding fluorophore-tagged proteins. The specificity of dimerization was verified by competition experiments using untagged proteins. These techniques were used to study several potential requirements for the germinal isoform of angiotensin-converting enzyme expressed in the testes (tACE) dimerization as well as the effect of ACE inhibitors on both somatic isoforms of angiotensin-converting enzyme expressed in the testes (sACE) and tACE dimerization. We demonstrated constitutive homodimerization of sACE and of both of its domains separately, as well as heterodimerization of both sACE and tACE with AT 2 R, but not MAS. In addition, we investigated both soluble sACE and the sACE N domain using size-exclusion chromatography-coupled small-angle X-ray scattering and we observed dimers in solution for both forms of the enzyme. Our results suggest that ACE homo- and heterodimerization does occur under physiologic conditions. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Rapamycin prevents drug seeking via disrupting reconsolidation of reward memory in rats.

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    Lin, Jue; Liu, Lingqi; Wen, Quan; Zheng, Chunming; Gao, Yang; Peng, Shuxian; Tan, Yalun; Li, Yanqin

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive drug memory developed between the drug-rewarding effect and environmental cues contributes to difficulty in preventing drug relapse. Established reward memories can be disrupted by pharmacologic interventions following their reactivation. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, has been proved to be involved in various memory consolidation. However, it is less well characterized in drug memory reconsolidation. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we examined the effects of systemically administered rapamycin on reconsolidation of drug memory in rats. We found that systemically administered rapamycin (0.1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) after re-exposure to drug-paired environment, dose dependently decreased the expression of CPP 1 d later, and the effect lasted for up to 14 d and could not be reversed by a priming injection of morphine. The effect of rapamycin on morphine-associated memory was specific to drug-paired context, and rapamycin had no effect on subsequent CPP expression when rats were exposed to saline-paired context or homecage. These results indicated that systemic administration of rapamycin after memory reactivation can persistently inhibit the drug seeking behaviour via disruption of morphine memory reconsolidation in rats. Additionally, the effect of rapamycin on memory reconsolidation was reproduced in cocaine CPP and alcohol CPP. Furthermore, rapamycin did not induce conditioned place aversion and had no effect on locomotor activity and anxiety behaviour. These findings suggest that rapamycin could erase the acquired drug CPP in rats, and that mTOR activity plays an important role in drug reconsolidation and is required for drug relapse.

  17. Rapamycin up-regulates triglycerides in hepatocytes by down-regulating Prox1.

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    Kwon, Sora; Jeon, Ji-Sook; Kim, Su Bin; Hong, Young-Kwon; Ahn, Curie; Sung, Jung-Suk; Choi, Inho

    2016-02-27

    Although the prolonged use of rapamycin may cause unwanted side effects such as hyperlipidemia, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Prox1 is a transcription factor responsible for the development of several tissues including lymphatics and liver. There is growing evidences that Prox1 participates in metabolism in addition to embryogenesis. However, whether Prox1 is directly related to lipid metabolism is currently unknown. HepG2 human hepatoma cells were treated with rapamycin and total lipids were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The effect of rapamycin on the expression of Prox1 was determined by western blotting. To investigate the role of Prox1 in triglycerides regulation, siRNA and overexpression system were employed. Rapamycin was injected into mice for 2 weeks and total lipids and proteins in liver were measured by thin layer chromatography and western blot analysis, respectively. Rapamycin up-regulated the amount of triglyceride and down-regulated the expression of Prox1 in HepG2 cells by reducing protein half-life but did not affect its transcript. The loss-of-function of Prox1 was coincident with the increase of triglycerides in HepG2 cells treated with rapamycin. The up-regulation of triglycerides by rapamycin in HepG2 cells reverted to normal levels by the compensation of Prox1 using the overexpression system. Rapamycin also down-regulated Prox1 expression but increased triglycerides in mouse liver. This study suggests that rapamycin can increase the amount of triglycerides by down-regulating Prox1 expression in hepatocytes, which means that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is important for the regulation of triglycerides by maintaining Prox1 expression.

  18. Inhibition of HIF-2.alpha. heterodimerization with HIF1.beta. (ARNT)

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    Bruick, Richard K.; Caldwell, Charles G.; Frantz, Doug E.; Gardner, Kevin H.; MacMillan, John B.; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Tambar, Uttam K.

    2017-09-12

    Provided is a method of inhibiting heterodimerization of HIF-2.alpha. to HIF1.beta. (ARNT) comprising binding certain small molecules to the HIF-2.alpha. PAS-B domain cavity but not to HIF1.alpha. and inhibiting HIF-2.alpha. heterodimerization to HIF1.beta. (ARNT) but not inhibiting HIF1.alpha. heterodimerization to HIF1.beta. (ARNT). Those certain small molecules are also referenced synonymously as HIF2-HDI and HIF2.alpha. heterodimerization inhibitors and also simply as certain small molecules.

  19. Inhibition of repopulation is not a determining factor for the radiosensitizing effects of rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkaria, J.N.; Carlson, B.L.; Mladek, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key downstream effector of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and we have previously shown that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin significantly enhances the efficacy of prolonged fractionated radiation in U87 glioma cells grown as xenografts or spheroids. To test whether inhibition of repopulation between radiation fractions contributes to the sensitizing effects of rapamycin, the efficacy of our previous protracted radiation schedule was compared with an accelerated regimen in U87 spheroids. Regrowth of individual spheroids was tracked over time following treatment with either accelerated or protracted radiation in the presence or absence of rapamycin. As in our previous studies, treatment with 10 nM rapamycin significantly increased the time required for U87 spheroids to regrow to 10 times their original volume (22 ± 2 days [mean ± 95% CI]) compared to control (7 ± 1 days). Regrowth after protracted radiation (2 Gy every 3 days x 4; 9 ± 2 days)did not significantly differ from control treatment, while accelerated radiation (2 Gy every 4 hours x 4) modestly delayed spheroid regrowth (12 ± 2 days). Specific to our model, the relatively small difference in regrowth time between the two radiation fractionation schedules suggests that repopulation is not a major detrimental factor in the protracted radiation schedule. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin with either protracted or accelerated RT significantly enhanced the efficacy of the radiation with regrowth times of 31 ± 4 days and 29 ± 4 days, respectively. Consistent with this in vitro data, preliminary results from an animal study suggest that treatment with a rapamycin analog and daily radiation is as effective as protracted radiation/ rapamycin schedules. Thus, any effects of rapamycin on repopulation in our model systems do not contribute significantly to the sensitizing effects of rapamycin

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of the heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seldeen, Kenneth L.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Deegan, Brian J.; Farooq, Amjad

    2008-01-01

    Jun and Fos are components of the AP1 family of transcription factors and bind to the promoters of a diverse multitude of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and cancer. Here, using the powerful technique of isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterize the thermodynamics of heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos. Our data suggest that the heterodimerization of leucine zippers is driven by enthalpic forces with unfavorable entropy change at physiological temperatures. Furthermore, the basic regions appear to modulate the heterodimerization of leucine zippers and may undergo at least partial folding upon heterodimerization. Large negative heat capacity changes accompanying the heterodimerization of leucine zippers are consistent with the view that leucine zippers do not retain α-helical conformations in isolation and that the formation of the native coiled-coil α-helical dimer is attained through a coupled folding-dimerization mechanism

  1. Inhibition of Akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

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    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  2. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  3. A photocleavable rapamycin conjugate for spatiotemporal control of small GTPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takanari

    2011-01-12

    We developed a novel method to spatiotemporally control the activity of signaling molecules. A newly synthesized photocaged rapamycin derivative induced rapid dimerization of FKBP (FK-506 binding protein) and FRB (FKBP-rapamycin binding protein) upon UV irradiation. With this system and the spatially confined UV irradiation, we achieved subcellularly localized activation of Rac, a member of small GTPases. Our technique offers a powerful approach to studies of dynamic intracellular signaling events.

  4. Evidence for Heterodimerization and Functional Interaction of the Angiotensin Type 2 Receptor and the Receptor MAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Julia; Villela, Daniel C; Teichmann, Anke; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Mayer, Magnus C; Mardahl, Maibritt; Kirsch, Sebastian; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Benz, Verena; Alenina, Natalia; Daniell, Nicholas; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Multhaup, Gerhard; Schülein, Ralf; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2017-06-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor MAS are receptors of the protective arm of the renin-angiotensin system. They mediate strikingly similar actions. Moreover, in various studies, AT2R antagonists blocked the effects of MAS agonists and vice versa. Such cross-inhibition may indicate heterodimerization of these receptors. Therefore, this study investigated the molecular and functional interplay between MAS and the AT2R. Molecular interactions were assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and by cross correlation spectroscopy in human embryonic kidney-293 cells transfected with vectors encoding fluorophore-tagged MAS or AT2R. Functional interaction of AT2R and MAS was studied in astrocytes with CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression as readout. Coexpression of fluorophore-tagged AT2R and MAS resulted in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of 10.8 ± 0.8%, indicating that AT2R and MAS are capable to form heterodimers. Heterodimerization was verified by competition experiments using untagged AT2R and MAS. Specificity of dimerization of AT2R and MAS was supported by lack of dimerization with the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C-member 6. Dimerization of the AT2R was abolished when it was mutated at cysteine residue 35. AT2R and MAS stimulation with the respective agonists, Compound 21 or angiotensin-(1-7), significantly induced CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression. Effects of each agonist were blocked by an AT2R antagonist (PD123319) and also by a MAS antagonist (A-779). Knockout of a single of these receptors made astrocytes unresponsive for both agonists. Our results suggest that MAS and the AT2R form heterodimers and that-at least in astrocytes-both receptors functionally depend on each other. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Rapamycin delays growth of Wnt-1 tumors in spite of suppression of host immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirshchevskaya, Elena V; Mariotti, Jacopo; Wright, Mollie H; Viskova, Natalia Y; Telford, William; Fowler, Daniel H; Varticovski, Lyuba

    2008-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), is an immunosuppressive agent that has anti-proliferative effects on some tumors. However, the role of Rapamycin-induced immune suppression on tumor progression has not been examined. We developed a transplantation model for generation of mammary tumors in syngeneic recipients that can be used to address the role of the immune system on tumor progression. We examined the effect of Rapamycin on the immune system and growth of MMTV-driven Wnt-1 mammary tumors which were transplanted into irradiated and bone marrow-reconstituted, or naïve mice. Rapamycin induced severe immunosuppression and significantly delayed the growth of Wnt-1 tumors. T cell depletion in spleen and thymus and reduction in T cell cytokine secretion were evident within 7 days of therapy. By day 20, splenic but not thymic T cell counts, and cytokine secretion recovered. We determined whether adoptive T cell therapy enhances the anti-cancer effect using ex vivo generated Rapamycin-resistant T cells. However, T cell transfer during Rapamycin therapy did not improve the outcome relative to drug therapy alone. Thus, we could not confirm that suppression of T cell immunity contributes to tumor growth in this model. Consistent with suppression of the mTOR pathway, decreased 4E-BP1, p70 S6-kinase, and S6 protein phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in Wnt-1 tumor cell proliferation. Rapamycin has a direct anti-tumor effect on Wnt-1 breast cancer in vivo that involves inhibition of the mTOR pathway at doses that also suppress host immune responses

  6. Rapamycin and Glucose-Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Protein Signaling in Plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates energy, nutrients, growth factors, and stress signals to promote survival and growth in all eukaryotes. The reported land plant resistance to rapamycin and the embryo lethality of the Arabidopsis tor mutants have hindered functional dissection of TOR signaling in plants. We developed sensitive cellular and seedling assays to monitor endogenous Arabidopsis TOR activity based on its conserved S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Surprisingly, rapamycin effectively inhibits Arabidopsis TOR-S6K1 signaling and retards glucose-mediated root and leaf growth, mimicking estradiol-inducible tor mutants. Rapamycin inhibition is relieved in transgenic plants deficient in Arabidopsis FK506-binding protein 12 (FKP12), whereas FKP12 overexpression dramatically enhances rapamycin sensitivity. The role of Arabidopsis FKP12 is highly specific as overexpression of seven closely related FKP proteins fails to increase rapamycin sensitivity. Rapamycin exerts TOR inhibition by inducing direct interaction between the TOR-FRB (FKP-rapamycin binding) domain and FKP12 in plant cells. We suggest that variable endogenous FKP12 protein levels may underlie the molecular explanation for longstanding enigmatic observations on inconsistent rapamycin resistance in plants and in various mammalian cell lines or diverse animal cell types. Integrative analyses with rapamycin and conditional tor and fkp12 mutants also reveal a central role of glucose-TOR signaling in root hair formation. Our studies demonstrate the power of chemical genetic approaches in the discovery of previously unknown and pivotal functions of glucose-TOR signaling in governing the growth of cotyledons, true leaves, petioles, and primary and secondary roots and root hairs. PMID:22134914

  7. Brain Injury-Induced Synaptic Reorganization in Hilar Inhibitory Neurons Is Differentially Suppressed by Rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2017-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), treatment with rapamycin suppresses mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity and specific components of hippocampal synaptic reorganization associated with altered cortical excitability and seizure susceptibility. Reemergence of seizures after cessation of rapamycin treatment suggests, however, an incomplete suppression of epileptogenesis. Hilar inhibitory interneurons regulate dentate granule cell (DGC) activity, and de novo synaptic input from both DGCs and CA3 pyramidal cells after TBI increases their excitability but effects of rapamycin treatment on the injury-induced plasticity of interneurons is only partially described. Using transgenic mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is expressed in the somatostatinergic subset of hilar inhibitory interneurons, we tested the effect of daily systemic rapamycin treatment (3 mg/kg) on the excitability of hilar inhibitory interneurons after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-induced focal brain injury. Rapamycin treatment reduced, but did not normalize, the injury-induced increase in excitability of surviving eGFP+ hilar interneurons. The injury-induced increase in response to selective glutamate photostimulation of DGCs was reduced to normal levels after mTOR inhibition, but the postinjury increase in synaptic excitation arising from CA3 pyramidal cell activity was unaffected by rapamycin treatment. The incomplete suppression of synaptic reorganization in inhibitory circuits after brain injury could contribute to hippocampal hyperexcitability and the eventual reemergence of the epileptogenic process upon cessation of mTOR inhibition. Further, the cell-selective effect of mTOR inhibition on synaptic reorganization after CCI suggests possible mechanisms by which rapamycin treatment modifies epileptogenesis in some models but not others.

  8. Rapamycin Influences the Efficiency of Fertilization and Development in the Mouse: A Role for Autophagic Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun-Kyung Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR regulates cellular processes such as cell growth, metabolism, transcription, translation, and autophagy. Rapamycin is a selective inhibitor of mTOR, and induces autophagy in various systems. Autophagy contributes to clearance and recycling of macromolecules and organelles in response to stress. We previously reported that vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes show acute increases in autophagy during warming, and suggested that it is a natural response to cold stress. In this follow-up study, we examined whether the modulation of autophagy influences survival, fertilization, and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes. We used rapamycin to enhance autophagy in metaphase II (MII oocytes before and after vitrification. The oocytes were then subjected to in vitro fertilization (IVF. The fertilization and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed oocytes after rapamycin treatment were significantly lower than those for control groups. Modulation of autophagy with rapamycin treatment shows that rapamycin-induced autophagy exerts a negative influence on fertilization and development of vitrified-warmed oocytes.

  9. Heterodimerization of Msx and Dlx homeoproteins results in functional antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Hu, G; Wang, H; Sciavolino, P; Iler, N; Shen, M M; Abate-Shen, C

    1997-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions are known to be essential for specifying the transcriptional activities of homeoproteins. Here we show that representative members of the Msx and Dlx homeoprotein families form homo- and heterodimeric complexes. We demonstrate that dimerization by Msx and Dlx proteins is mediated through their homeodomains and that the residues required for this interaction correspond to those necessary for DNA binding. Unlike most other known examples of homeoprotein interactions, association of Msx and Dlx proteins does not promote cooperative DNA binding; instead, dimerization and DNA binding are mutually exclusive activities. In particular, we show that Msx and Dlx proteins interact independently and noncooperatively with homeodomain DNA binding sites and that dimerization is specifically blocked by the presence of such DNA sites. We further demonstrate that the transcriptional properties of Msx and Dlx proteins display reciprocal inhibition. Specifically, Msx proteins act as transcriptional repressors and Dlx proteins act as activators, while in combination, Msx and Dlx proteins counteract each other's transcriptional activities. Finally, we show that the expression patterns of representative Msx and Dlx genes (Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, and Dlx5) overlap in mouse embryogenesis during limb bud and craniofacial development, consistent with the potential for their protein products to interact in vivo. Based on these observations, we propose that functional antagonism through heterodimer formation provides a mechanism for regulating the transcriptional actions of Msx and Dlx homeoproteins in vivo.

  10. Biological constraints limit the use of rapamycin-inducible FKBP12-Inp54p for depleting PIP2 in dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda C; Snider, Samuel B; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J; Rittiner, Joseph E; Zylka, Mark J

    2013-09-08

    Rapamycin-induced translocation systems can be used to manipulate biological processes with precise temporal control. These systems are based on rapamycin-induced dimerization of FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) with the FKBP Rapamycin Binding (FRB) domain of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we sought to adapt a rapamycin-inducible phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-specific phosphatase (Inp54p) system to deplete PIP2 in nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We genetically targeted membrane-tethered CFP-FRBPLF (a destabilized FRB mutant) to the ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 locus, generating a Rosa26-FRBPLF knockin mouse. In a second knockin mouse line, we targeted Venus-FKBP12-Inp54p to the Calcitonin gene-related peptide-alpha (CGRPα) locus. We hypothesized that after intercrossing these mice, rapamycin treatment would induce translocation of Venus-FKBP12-Inp54p to the plasma membrane in CGRP+ DRG neurons. In control experiments with cell lines, rapamycin induced translocation of Venus-FKBP12-Inp54p to the plasma membrane, and subsequent depletion of PIP2, as measured with a PIP2 biosensor. However, rapamycin did not induce translocation of Venus-FKBP12-Inp54p to the plasma membrane in FRBPLF-expressing DRG neurons (in vitro or in vivo). Moreover, rapamycin treatment did not alter PIP2-dependent thermosensation in vivo. Instead, rapamycin treatment stabilized FRBPLF in cultured DRG neurons, suggesting that rapamycin promoted dimerization of FRBPLF with endogenous FKBP12. Taken together, our data indicate that these knockin mice cannot be used to inducibly deplete PIP2 in DRG neurons. Moreover, our data suggest that high levels of endogenous FKBP12 could compete for binding to FRBPLF, hence limiting the use of rapamycin-inducible systems to cells with low levels of endogenous FKBP12.

  11. A Signal-On Fluorosensor Based on Quench-Release Principle for Sensitive Detection of Antibiotic Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jin Jeong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin detection methods, many of them have limited sensitivity, and/or need complicated procedures and long assay time. As a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin, here we propose “Q’-body”, which works on the fluorescence quench-release principle inspired by the antibody-based quenchbody (Q-body technology. We constructed rapamycin Q’-bodies by linking the two interacting domains FKBP12 and FRB, whose association is triggered by rapamycin. The fusion proteins were each incorporated position-specifically with one of fluorescence dyes ATTO520, tetramethylrhodamine, or ATTO590 using a cell-free translation system. As a result, rapid rapamycin dose-dependent fluorescence increase derived of Q’-bodies was observed, especially for those with ATTO520 with a lowest detection limit of 0.65 nM, which indicates its utility as a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin.

  12. A signal-on fluorosensor based on quench-release principle for sensitive detection of antibiotic rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Jin; Itayama, Shuya; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-03-26

    An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin detection methods, many of them have limited sensitivity, and/or need complicated procedures and long assay time. As a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin, here we propose "Q'-body", which works on the fluorescence quench-release principle inspired by the antibody-based quenchbody (Q-body) technology. We constructed rapamycin Q'-bodies by linking the two interacting domains FKBP12 and FRB, whose association is triggered by rapamycin. The fusion proteins were each incorporated position-specifically with one of fluorescence dyes ATTO520, tetramethylrhodamine, or ATTO590 using a cell-free translation system. As a result, rapid rapamycin dose-dependent fluorescence increase derived of Q'-bodies was observed, especially for those with ATTO520 with a lowest detection limit of 0.65 nM, which indicates its utility as a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin.

  13. Are invertebrates relevant models in ageing research? Focus on the effects of rapamycin on TOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is the organisms increased susceptibility to death, which is linked to accumulated damage in the cells and tissues. Ageing is a complex process regulated by crosstalk of various pathways in the cells. Ageing is highly regulated by the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway activity. TOR is an evolutionary conserved key protein kinase in the TOR pathway that regulates growth, proliferation and cell metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and stress. Comparing the ageing process in invertebrate model organisms with relatively short lifespan with mammals provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process faster than mammal systems. Inhibition of the TOR pathway activity via either genetic manipulation or rapamycin increases lifespan profoundly in most invertebrate model organisms. This contribution will review the recent findings in invertebrates concerning the TOR pathway and effects of TOR inhibition by rapamycin on lifespan. Besides some contradictory results, the majority points out that rapamycin induces longevity. This suggests that administration of rapamycin in invertebrates is a promising tool for pursuing the scientific puzzle of lifespan prolongation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKBP12 binds Arabidopsis thaliana TOR and its expression in plants leads to rapamycin susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormani, Rodnay; Yao, Lei; Menand, Benoît; Ennar, Najla; Lecampion, Cécile; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe

    2007-06-01

    The eukaryotic TOR pathway controls translation, growth and the cell cycle in response to environmental signals such as nutrients or growth-stimulating factors. The TOR protein kinase can be inactivated by the antibiotic rapamycin following the formation of a ternary complex between TOR, rapamycin and FKBP12 proteins. The TOR protein is also found in higher plants despite the fact that they are rapamycin insensitive. Previous findings using the yeast two hybrid system suggest that the FKBP12 plant homolog is unable to form a complex with rapamycin and TOR, while the FRB domain of plant TOR is still able to bind to heterologous FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. The resistance to rapamycin is therefore limiting the molecular dissection of the TOR pathway in higher plants. Here we show that none of the FKBPs from the model plant Arabidopsis (AtFKBPs) is able to form a ternary complex with the FRB domain of AtTOR in the presence of rapamycin in a two hybrid system. An antibody has been raised against the AtTOR protein and binding of recombinant yeast ScFKBP12 to native Arabidopsis TOR in the presence of rapamycin was demonstrated in pull-down experiments. Transgenic lines expressing ScFKBP12 were produced and were found to display a rapamycin-dependent reduction of the primary root growth and a lowered accumulation of high molecular weight polysomes. These results further strengthen the idea that plant resistance to rapamycin evolved as a consequence of mutations in plant FKBP proteins. The production of rapamycin-sensitive plants through the expression of the ScFKBP12 protein illustrates the conservation of the TOR pathway in eukaryotes. Since AtTOR null mutants were found to be embryo lethal 1, transgenic ScFKBP12 plants will provide an useful tool for the post-embryonic study of plant TOR functions. This work also establish for the first time a link between TOR activity and translation in plant cells.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKBP12 binds Arabidopsis thaliana TOR and its expression in plants leads to rapamycin susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Christian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic TOR pathway controls translation, growth and the cell cycle in response to environmental signals such as nutrients or growth-stimulating factors. The TOR protein kinase can be inactivated by the antibiotic rapamycin following the formation of a ternary complex between TOR, rapamycin and FKBP12 proteins. The TOR protein is also found in higher plants despite the fact that they are rapamycin insensitive. Previous findings using the yeast two hybrid system suggest that the FKBP12 plant homolog is unable to form a complex with rapamycin and TOR, while the FRB domain of plant TOR is still able to bind to heterologous FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. The resistance to rapamycin is therefore limiting the molecular dissection of the TOR pathway in higher plants. Results Here we show that none of the FKBPs from the model plant Arabidopsis (AtFKBPs is able to form a ternary complex with the FRB domain of AtTOR in the presence of rapamycin in a two hybrid system. An antibody has been raised against the AtTOR protein and binding of recombinant yeast ScFKBP12 to native Arabidopsis TOR in the presence of rapamycin was demonstrated in pull-down experiments. Transgenic lines expressing ScFKBP12 were produced and were found to display a rapamycin-dependent reduction of the primary root growth and a lowered accumulation of high molecular weight polysomes. Conclusion These results further strengthen the idea that plant resistance to rapamycin evolved as a consequence of mutations in plant FKBP proteins. The production of rapamycin-sensitive plants through the expression of the ScFKBP12 protein illustrates the conservation of the TOR pathway in eukaryotes. Since AtTOR null mutants were found to be embryo lethal 1, transgenic ScFKBP12 plants will provide an useful tool for the post-embryonic study of plant TOR functions. This work also establish for the first time a link between TOR activity and translation in plant cells

  16. Enhanced antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate in combination with rapamycin in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; Lubet, Ronald A; Komas, Steven M; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2015-04-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is an alkylating agent and a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism. Rapamycin is an inhibitor of the serine/threonine protein kinase mTOR. Both 3-BrPA and rapamycin show chemopreventive efficacy in mouse models of lung cancer. Aerosol delivery of therapeutic drugs for lung cancer has been reported to be an effective route of delivery with little systemic distribution in humans. In this study, 3-BrPA and rapamycin were evaluated in combination for their preventive effects against lung cancer in mice by aerosol treatment, revealing a synergistic ability as measured by tumor multiplicity and tumor load compared treatment with either single-agent alone. No evidence of liver toxicity was detected by monitoring serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzymes. To understand the mechanism in vitro experiments were performed using human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. 3-BrPA and rapamycin also synergistically inhibited cell proliferation. Rapamycin alone blocked the mTOR signaling pathway, whereas 3-BrPA did not potentiate this effect. Given the known role of 3-BrPA as an inhibitor of glycolysis, we investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics changes in vitro in 3-BrPA-treated NSCLC cells. 3-BrPA significantly decreased glycolytic activity, which may be due to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and decreased expression of GAPDH. Our results demonstrate that rapamycin enhanced the antitumor efficacy of 3-BrPA, and that dual inhibition of mTOR signaling and glycolysis may be an effective therapeutic strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Synthesis of I-125 labeled photoaffinity rapamycin analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, A.Y.L.; Yamashita, D.S.; Holt, D.A.; Heys, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Two no-carrier-added 125 I-labelled photoaffinity rapamycin analogs were prepared: 7-demethoxy-7-(4-azido-3- 125 I-benzyloxy) rapamycin and its C 28 -C 29 seco analog. The key reactions of the synthesis were substitution of the C 7 methoxyl of rapamycin with 4-azido-3-tributylstannylbenzyloxy group, exchange of tributyltin with 125 I using Na 125 I and Chloramine-T, and a ZnCl 2 mediated retro-Aldol cleavage of the C 28 -C 29 bond of rapamycin. (author)

  18. The E. coli monothiol glutaredoxin GrxD forms homodimeric and heterodimeric FeS cluster containing complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, N; Gold, B; Liu, N L; Prathapam, R; Sterling, H J; Willams, E R; Butland, G

    2011-10-18

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (mono-Grx) represent a highly evolutionarily conserved class of proteins present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. Mono-Grxs have been implicated in iron sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis as potential scaffold proteins and in iron homeostasis via an FeS-containing complex with Fra2p (homologue of E. coli BolA) in yeast and are linked to signal transduction in mammalian systems. However, the function of the mono-Grx in prokaryotes and the nature of an interaction with BolA-like proteins have not been established. Recent genome-wide screens for E. coli genetic interactions reported the synthetic lethality (combination of mutations leading to cell death; mutation of only one of these genes does not) of a grxD mutation when combined with strains defective in FeS cluster biosynthesis (isc operon) functions [Butland, G., et al. (2008) Nature Methods 5, 789-795]. These data connected the only E. coli mono-Grx, GrxD to a potential role in FeS cluster biosynthesis. We investigated GrxD to uncover the molecular basis of this synthetic lethality and observed that GrxD can form FeS-bound homodimeric and BolA containing heterodimeric complexes. These complexes display substantially different spectroscopic and functional properties, including the ability to act as scaffold proteins for intact FeS cluster transfer to the model [2Fe-2S] acceptor protein E. coli apo-ferredoxin (Fdx), with the homodimer being significantly more efficient. In this work, we functionally dissect the potential cellular roles of GrxD as a component of both homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes to ultimately uncover if either of these complexes performs functions linked to FeS cluster biosynthesis. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition With Rapamycin Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su I. [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF) is a late toxicity of therapeutic radiation. Signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin drives several processes implicated in RIPF, including inflammatory cytokine production, fibroblast proliferation, and epithelial senescence. We sought to determine if mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with rapamycin would mitigate RIPF. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6NCr mice received a diet formulated with rapamycin (14 mg/kg food) or a control diet 2 days before and continuing for 16 weeks after exposure to 5 daily fractions of 6 Gy of thoracic irradiation. Fibrosis was assessed with Masson trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. Cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Senescence was assessed by staining for β-galactosidase activity. Results: Administration of rapamycin extended the median survival of irradiated mice compared with the control diet from 116 days to 156 days (P=.006, log-rank test). Treatment with rapamycin reduced hydroxyproline content compared with the control diet (irradiation plus vehicle, 45.9 ± 11.8 μg per lung; irradiation plus rapamycin, 21.4 ± 6.0 μg per lung; P=.001) and reduced visible fibrotic foci. Rapamycin treatment attenuated interleukin 1β and transforming growth factor β induction in irradiated lungs compared with the control diet. Type II pneumocyte senescence after irradiation was reduced with rapamycin treatment at 16 weeks (3-fold reduction at 16 weeks, P<.001). Conclusions: Rapamycin protected against RIPF in a murine model. Rapamycin treatment reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, extracellular matrix production, and senescence in type II pneumocytes.

  20. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  1. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrer, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.fahrer@uni-ulm.de [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Wagner, Silvia [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Buerkle, Alexander [Molecular Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz (Germany); Koenigsrainer, Alfred [Clinic of General, Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, ZMF, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  2. Synergistic Effect of Rapamycin and Metformin Against Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress in Rat Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Garg, Geetika; Singh, Sandeep; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Erythrocytes are particularly vulnerable toward age-dependent oxidative stress-mediated damage. Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) may provide a novel strategy for the maintenance of redox balance as well as effective treatment of age-associated diseases. Herein, we have investigated the beneficial effect of cotreatment with CRM-candidate drugs, rapamycin (an immunosuppressant drug and inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin) and metformin (an antidiabetic biguanide and activator of adenosine monophosphate kinase), against aging-induced oxidative stress in erythrocytes and plasma of aging rats. Male Wistar rats of age 4 (young) and 24 months (old) were coexposed to rapamycin (0.5 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) and metformin (300 mg/kg b.w.), and data were compared with the response of rats receiving an independent exposure to these chemicals at similar doses. The exposure of individual candidate drugs significantly reversed the age-dependent alterations in the endpoints associated with oxidative stress such as reactive oxygen species, ferric reducing ability of plasma, malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, plasma membrane redox system, plasma protein carbonyl, and acetyl cholinesterase in erythrocytes and plasma of aging rats. However, the cotreatment with rapamycin and metformin showed a significant augmented effect compared with individual drug interventions on reversal of these age-dependent biomarkers of oxidative stress, suggesting a synergistic response. Thus, the findings open up further possibilities for the design of new combinatorial therapies to prevent oxidative stress- and age-associated health problems.

  3. Surface Engineering of Porous Silicon Microparticles for Intravitreal Sustained Delivery of Rapamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J.; Freeman, William R.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Methods. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. Results. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Conclusions. Porous silicon–based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. PMID:25613937

  4. Surface engineering of porous silicon microparticles for intravitreal sustained delivery of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J; Freeman, William R; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-22

    To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Porous silicon-based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. Echinococcus granulosus: Evidence of a heterodimeric glutathione transferase built up by phylogenetically distant subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbildi, Paula; La-Rocca, Silvana; Lopez, Veronica; Da-Costa, Natalia; Fernandez, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    In the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus, three phylogenetically distant cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) (EgGST1, 2 and 3) were identified. Interestingly, the C-terminal domains of EgGST3 and EgGST2 but not EgGST1, exhibit all amino acids involved in Sigma-class GST dimerization. Here, we provide evidence indicating that EgGST2 and EgGST3 naturally form a heterodimeric structure (EgGST2-3), and also we report the enzymatic activity of the recombinant heterodimer. EgGST2-3 might display novel properties able to influence the infection establishment. This is the first report of a stable heterodimeric GST built up by phylogenetically distant subunits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heterodimerization with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is necessary for VEGFR-3 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Antoine; Herault, Jean-Pascal; Barron, Pauline; Favier, Benoit; Fons, Pierre; Delesque-Touchard, Nathalie; Senegas, Isabelle; Laboudie, Patricia; Bonnin, Jacques; Cassan, Cecile; Savi, Pierre; Ruggeri, Bruce; Carmeliet, Peter; Bono, Francoise; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    VEGFR-3 is essential for vascular development and maintenance of lymphatic vessel's integrity. Little is known about its cooperative effect with other receptors of the same family. Contrary to VEGFR-2, stimulation of VEGFR-3 by VEGF-C and -D failed to enhance its phosphorylation either in HEK293T or in PAE cells. These ligands were unable to induce angiogenesis of PAEC expressing VEGFR-3 alone. In the presence of VEGFR-2, VEGF-C and -D induced heterodimerization of VEGFR-3 with VEGFR-2. This heterodimerization was associated with enhanced VEGFR-3 phosphorylation and subsequent cellular responses as evidenced by the formation of capillary-like structures in PAE cells and proliferation of primary human endothelial cells expressing both receptors. Taken together, these results show for the first time that VEGFR-3 needs to be associated to VEGFR-2 to induce ligand-dependent cellular responses

  7. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  8. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies......, the evidence presented in this review suggests that RAPA may be a useful drug that should be evaluated for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection....... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...

  9. Rapamycin Synergizes with Cisplatin in Antiendometrial Cancer Activation by Improving IL-27–Stimulated Cytotoxicity of NK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell function is critical for controlling initial tumor growth and determining chemosensitivity of the tumor. A synergistic relationship between rapamycin and cisplatin in uterine endometrial cancer (UEC in vitro has been reported, but the mechanism and the combined therapeutic strategy for endometrial cancer (EC are still unknown. We found a positive correlation between the level of IL-27 and the differentiated stage of UEC. The increase of IL-27 in uterine endometrial cancer cell (UECC lines (Ishikawa, RL95-2 and KLE led to a high cytotoxic activity of NK cells to UECC in the co-culture system. Exposure with rapamycin enhanced the cytotoxicity of NK cells by upregulating the expression of IL-27 in UECC and IL-27 receptors (IL-27Rs: WSX-1 and gp130 on NK cells and further restricted the growth of UEC in Ishikawa-xenografted nude mice. In addition, treatment with rapamycin resulted in an increased autophagy level of UECC, and IL-27 enhanced this ability of rapamycin. Cisplatin-mediated NK cells' cytotoxic activity and anti-UEC activation were independent of IL-27; however, the combination of rapamycin and cisplatin led to a higher cytotoxic activity of NK cells, smaller UEC volume and longer survival rate in vivo. These results suggest that rapamycin and cisplatin synergistically activate the cytotoxicity of NK cells and inhibit the progression of UEC in both an IL-27–dependent and –independent manner. This provides a scientific basis for potential rapamycin-cisplatin combined therapeutic strategies targeted to UEC, especially for the patients with low differentiated stage or abnormally low level of IL-27.

  10. Increased BRAF Heterodimerization Is the Common Pathogenic Mechanism for Noonan Syndrome-Associated RAF1 Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue; Yin, Jiani; Simpson, Jeremy; Kim, Kyoung-Han; Gu, Shengqing; Hong, Jenny H.; Bayliss, Peter; Backx, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a relatively common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital heart defects, short stature, and facial dysmorphia. NS is caused by germ line mutations in several components of the RAS–RAF–MEK–extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, including both kinase-activating and kinase-impaired alleles of RAF1 (∼3 to 5%), which encodes a serine-threonine kinase for MEK1/2. To investigate how kinase-impaired RAF1 mutants cause NS, we generated knock-in mice expressing Raf1D486N. Raf1D486N/+ (here D486N/+) female mice exhibited a mild growth defect. Male and female D486N/D486N mice developed concentric cardiac hypertrophy and incompletely penetrant, but severe, growth defects. Remarkably, Mek/Erk activation was enhanced in Raf1D486N-expressing cells compared with controls. RAF1D486N, as well as other kinase-impaired RAF1 mutants, showed increased heterodimerization with BRAF, which was necessary and sufficient to promote increased MEK/ERK activation. Furthermore, kinase-activating RAF1 mutants also required heterodimerization to enhance MEK/ERK activation. Our results suggest that an increased heterodimerization ability is the common pathogenic mechanism for NS-associated RAF1 mutations. PMID:22826437

  11. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  12. Biphasic Rapamycin Effects in Lymphoma and Carcinoma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Dao, Vinh; Padrón, Álvaro; Drerup, Justin M; Lao, Shunhua; Liu, Aijie; Hurez, Vincent; Curiel, Tyler J

    2017-01-15

    mTOR drives tumor growth but also supports T-cell function, rendering the applications of mTOR inhibitors complex especially in T-cell malignancies. Here, we studied the effects of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in mouse EL4 T-cell lymphoma. Typical pharmacologic rapamycin (1-8 mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor burden via direct suppression of tumor cell proliferation and improved survival in EL4 challenge independent of antitumor immunity. Denileukin diftitox (DD)-mediated depletion of regulatory T cells significantly slowed EL4 growth in vivo in a T-cell-dependent fashion. However, typical rapamycin inhibited T-cell activation and tumor infiltration in vivo and failed to boost DD treatment effects. Low-dose (LD) rapamycin (75 μg/kg) increased potentially beneficial CD44hiCD62L + CD8 + central memory T cells in EL4 challenge, but without clinical benefit. LD rapamycin significantly enhanced DD treatment efficacy, but DD plus LD rapamycin treatment effects were independent of antitumor immunity. Instead, rapamycin upregulated EL4 IL2 receptor in vitro and in vivo, facilitating direct DD tumor cell killing. LD rapamycin augmented DD efficacy against B16 melanoma and a human B-cell lymphoma, but not against human Jurkat T-cell lymphoma or ID8agg ovarian cancer cells. Treatment effects correlated with IL2R expression, but mechanisms in some tumors were not fully defined. Overall, our data define a distinct, biphasic mechanisms of action of mTOR inhibition at doses that are clinically exploitable, including in T-cell lymphomas. Cancer Res; 77(2); 520-31. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Christopher J; Scarlett, Kisha A; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Jones, Kia J; Sandifer, Brittney J; Davis, Ahriea S; Marcus, Adam I; Hinton, Cimona V

    2016-05-06

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Christopher J.; Scarlett, Kisha A.; Chetram, Mahandranauth A.; Jones, Kia J.; Sandifer, Brittney J.; Davis, Ahriea S.; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression. PMID:26841863

  15. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12 mediates the interaction between rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjie Xiong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12 in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis such as KU63794, AZD8055 and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profiling analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles

  16. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12) Mediates the Interaction between Rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangjie; Dong, Pan; Liu, Mei; Xie, Gengxin; Wang, Kai; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants, and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12 KD (FKBP12) in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) such as KU63794, AZD8055, and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profile analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles.

  17. Heterodimerization and endocytosis of Arabidopsis brassinosteroid receptors BRI1 and AtSERK3 (BAK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russinova, Eugenia; Borst, Jan-Willem; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    us to localize each receptor independently in vivo. We show that BRI1, but not AtSERK3, homodimerizes in the plasma membrane, whereas BRI1 and AtSERK3 preferentially heterodimerize in the endosomes. Coexpression of BRI1 and AtSERK3 results in a change of the steady state distribution of both...... receptors because of accelerated endocytosis. Endocytic vesicles contain either BRI1 or AtSERK3 alone or both. We propose that the AtSERK3 protein is involved in changing the equilibrium between plasma membrane-located BRI1 homodimers and endocytosed BRI1-AtSERK3 heterodimers....

  18. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68 or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40 significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68 (p<0.05. Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1 compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05, and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05 and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1, anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05, and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05 genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3 compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes.

  19. Beneficial role of rapamycin in experimental autoimmune myositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Prevel

    Full Text Available We developed an experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM mouse model of polymyositis where we outlined the role of regulatory T (Treg cells. Rapamycin, this immunosuppressant drug used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, is known to spare Treg. Our aim was to test the efficacy of rapamycin in vivo in this EAM model and to investigate the effects of the drug on different immune cell sub-populations.EAM is induced by 3 injections of myosin emulsified in CFA. Mice received rapamycin during 25 days starting one day before myosin immunization (preventive treatment, or during 10 days following the last myosin immunization (curative treatment.Under preventive or curative treatment, an increase of muscle strength was observed with a parallel decrease of muscle inflammation, both being well correlated (R(2 = -0.645, p<0.0001. Rapamycin induced a general decrease in muscle of CD4 and CD8 T cells in lymphoid tissues, but spared B cells. Among T cells, the frequency of Treg was increased in rapamycin treated mice in draining lymph nodes (16.9 ± 2.2% vs. 9.3 ± 1.4%, p<0.001, which were mostly activated regulatory T cells (CD62L(lowCD44(high: 58.1 ± 5.78% vs. 33.1 ± 7%, treated vs. untreated, p<0.001. In rapamycin treated mice, inhibition of proliferation (Ki-67(+ is more important in effector T cells compared to Tregs cells (p<0.05. Furthermore, during preventive treatment, rapamycin increased the levels of KLF2 transcript in CD44(low CD62L(high naive T cell and in CD62L(low CD44(high activated T cell.Rapamycin showed efficacy both as curative and preventive treatment in our murine model of experimental myositis, in which it induced an increase of muscle strength with a parallel decrease in muscle inflammation. Rapamycin administration was also associated with a decrease in the frequency of effector T cells, an increase in Tregs, and, when administered as preventive treatment, an upregulation of KFL2 in naive and activated T cells.

  20. A novel antibody engineering strategy for making monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibodies by electrostatic steering mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Leng, Esther C; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Pentony, Martin; Shen, Min; Howard, Monique; Stoops, Janelle; Manchulenko, Kathy; Razinkov, Vladimir; Liu, Hua; Fanslow, William; Hu, Zhonghua; Sun, Nancy; Hasegawa, Haruki; Clark, Rutilio; Foltz, Ian N; Yan, Wei

    2015-03-20

    Producing pure and well behaved bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) on a large scale for preclinical and clinical testing is a challenging task. Here, we describe a new strategy for making monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibodies in mammalian cells. We applied an electrostatic steering mechanism to engineer antibody light chain-heavy chain (LC-HC) interface residues in such a way that each LC strongly favors its cognate HC when two different HCs and two different LCs are co-expressed in the same cell to assemble a functional bispecific antibody. We produced heterodimeric IgGs from transiently and stably transfected mammalian cells. The engineered heterodimeric IgG molecules maintain the overall IgG structure with correct LC-HC pairings, bind to two different antigens with comparable affinity when compared with their parental antibodies, and retain the functionality of parental antibodies in biological assays. In addition, the bispecific heterodimeric IgG derived from anti-HER2 and anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) antibody was shown to induce a higher level of receptor internalization than the combination of two parental antibodies. Mouse xenograft BxPC-3, Panc-1, and Calu-3 human tumor models showed that the heterodimeric IgGs strongly inhibited tumor growth. The described approach can be used to generate tools from two pre-existent antibodies and explore the potential of bispecific antibodies. The asymmetrically engineered Fc variants for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity enhancement could be embedded in monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG to make best-in-class therapeutic antibodies. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Hartman

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway integrates signals from different nutrient sources, including amino acids and glucose. Compounds that inhibit mTOR kinase activity such as rapamycin and everolimus can suppress seizures in some chronic animal models and in patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, it is not known whether mTOR inhibitors exert acute anticonvulsant effects in addition to their longer term antiepileptogenic effects. To gain insights into how rapamycin suppresses seizures, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of rapamycin using acute seizure tests in mice.Following intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin, normal four-week-old male NIH Swiss mice were evaluated for susceptibility to a battery of acute seizure tests similar to those currently used to screen potential therapeutics by the US NIH Anticonvulsant Screening Program. To assess the short term effects of rapamycin, mice were seizure tested in ≤ 6 hours of a single dose of rapamycin, and for longer term effects of rapamycin, mice were tested after 3 or more daily doses of rapamycin.The only seizure test where short-term rapamycin treatment protected mice was against tonic hindlimb extension in the MES threshold test, though this protection waned with longer rapamycin treatment. Longer term rapamycin treatment protected against kainic acid-induced seizure activity, but only at late times after seizure onset. Rapamycin was not protective in the 6 Hz or PTZ seizure tests after short or longer rapamycin treatment times. In contrast to other metabolism-based therapies that protect in acute seizure tests, rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in normal mice.The efficacy of rapamycin as an acute anticonvulsant agent may be limited. Furthermore, the combined pattern of acute seizure test results places rapamycin in a third category distinct from both fasting and the ketogenic diet, and which is more similar to drugs acting on sodium channels.

  2. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration-like retinopathy by rapamycin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Muraleva, Natalia A; Zhdankina, Anna A; Stefanova, Natalia A; Fursova, Anzhela Z; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration, a neurodegenerative and vascular retinal disease, is the most common cause of blindness in the Western countries. Evidence accumulates that target of rapamycin is involved in aging and age-related diseases, including neurodegeneration. The target of rapamycin inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses the senescent cell phenotype and extends life span in diverse species, including mice. Rapamycin decreases senescence-associated phenotypes in retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on spontaneous retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, an animal model of age-related macular degeneration. Rats were treated with either 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg rapamycin, which was given orally as a food mixture. In a dose-dependent manner, rapamycin decreased the incidence and severity of retinopathy. Rapamycin improved some (but not all) histological abnormalities associated with retinopathy. Thus, in retinal pigment epithelial cell layers, rapamycin decreased nuclei heterogeneity and normalized intervals between nuclei. In photoreceptor cells, associated neurons, and radial glial cells, rapamycin prevented nuclear and cellular pyknosis. More important, rapamycin prevented destruction of ganglionar neurons in the retina. Rapamycin did not exert any adverse effects on the retina in control disease-free Wistar rats. Taken together, our data suggest the therapeutic potential of rapamycin for treatment and prevention of retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bone growth during rapamycin therapy in young rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapamycin is an effective immunosuppressant widely used to maintain the renal allograft in pediatric patients. Linear growth may be adversely affected in young children since rapamycin has potent anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic properties. Methods Weanling three week old rats were given rapamycin at 2.5 mg/kg daily by gavage for 2 or 4 weeks and compared to a Control group given equivalent amount of saline. Morphometric measurements and biochemical determinations for serum calcium, phosphate, iPTH, urea nitrogen, creatinine and insulin-growth factor I (IGF-I were obtained. Histomorphometric analysis of the growth plate cartilage, in-situ hybridization experiments and immunohistochemical studies for various proteins were performed to evaluate for chondrocyte proliferation, chondrocyte differentiation and chondro/osteoclastic resorption. Results At the end of the 2 weeks, body and tibia length measurements were shorter after rapamycin therapy associated with an enlargement of the hypertrophic zone in the growth plate cartilage. There was a decrease in chondrocyte proliferation assessed by histone-4 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR expression. A reduction in parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP and an increase in Indian hedgehog (Ihh expression may explain in part, the increase number of hypertrophic chondrocytes. The number of TRAP positive multinucleated chondro/osteoclasts declined in the chondro-osseous junction with a decrease in the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa β ligand (RANKL and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression. Although body and tibial length remained short after 4 weeks of rapamycin, changes in the expression of chondrocyte proliferation, chondrocyte differentiation and chondro/osteoclastic resorption which were significant after 2 weeks of rapamycin improved at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion When given to young rats, 2 weeks of rapamycin

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic

  5. Disruption of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in macrophages decreases chemokine gene expression and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I.; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma low-density lipoprotein levels. This suggests an antiatherogenic effect possibly mediated by the modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. GSK-3/Rb12 Pathway as a Novel Target of Rapamycin in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Litovchick, Larissa

    2005-01-01

    .... Rapamycin exerts its effects through inhibition of mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase resulting in a decreased expression of a subset of proteins essential for cell cycle progression...

  7. Rapamycin: An InhibiTOR of Aging Emerges From the Soil of Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a macrolide immunosuppressant that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase and extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. Although rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug for select indications, a diverse set of negative side effects may preclude its wide-scale deployment as an antiaging therapy. mTOR forms two different protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2; the former is acutely sensitive to rapamycin whereas the latter is only chronically sensitive to rapamycin in vivo. Over the past decade, it has become clear that although genetic and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 extends lifespan and delays aging, inhibition of mTORC2 has negative effects on mammalian health and longevity and is responsible for many of the negative side effects of rapamycin. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular and physiological effects of rapamycin treatment, and we discuss how the use of alternative rapamycin treatment regimens or rapamycin analogs has the potential to mitigate the deleterious side effects of rapamycin treatment by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Although the side effects of rapamycin are still of significant concern, rapid progress is being made in realizing the revolutionary potential of rapamycin-based therapies for the treatment of diseases of aging. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [GPCRs heterodimerization: a new way towards the discovery of function for the orphan receptors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levoye, Angélique; Jockers, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also called seven transmembrane domain (7TM) proteins, represent the largest family of cell surface receptors. GPCRs control a variety of physiological processes, are involved in multiple diseases and are major drug targets. Despite a vast effort of academic and industrial research, more than one hundred receptors remain orphans. These orphan GPCRs offer a great potential for drug discovery, as almost 60% of currently prescribed drugs target GPCRs. Deorphenization strategies have concentrated mainly on the identification of the natural ligands of these proteins. Recent advances have shown that orphan GPCRs, similar to orphan nuclear receptors, can regulate the function of non-orphan receptors by heterodimerization. These findings not only help to better understand the extraordinary diversity of GPCRs, but also open new perspectives for the identification of the function of these orphan receptors that hold great therapeutic potential.

  9. Protein engineering and the use of molecular modeling and simulation: the case of heterodimeric Fc engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreter Von Kreudenstein, Thomas; Lario, Paula I; Dixit, Surjit B

    2014-01-01

    Computational and structure guided methods can make significant contributions to the development of solutions for difficult protein engineering problems, including the optimization of next generation of engineered antibodies. In this paper, we describe a contemporary industrial antibody engineering program, based on hypothesis-driven in silico protein optimization method. The foundational concepts and methods of computational protein engineering are discussed, and an example of a computational modeling and structure-guided protein engineering workflow is provided for the design of best-in-class heterodimeric Fc with high purity and favorable biophysical properties. We present the engineering rationale as well as structural and functional characterization data on these engineered designs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Three tapasin docking sites in TAP cooperate to facilitate transporter stabilization and heterodimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Abrahimi, Parwiz; Mitchell, Susan M.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptide antigens into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for loading onto major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. MHC class I acquires its peptide cargo in the peptide loading complex (PLC), an oligomeric complex that the chaperone tapasin organizes by bridging TAP to MHC class I and recruiting accessory molecules such as ERp57 and calreticulin. Three tapasin binding sites on TAP have been described, two of which are located in the N-terminal domains (N domains) of TAP1 and TAP2. The third binding site is present in the core transmembrane domain (coreTMD) of TAP1 and is only used by the unassembled subunits. Tapasin is required to promote TAP stability, but through which binding site(s) it is acting is unknown. In particular the role of tapasin binding to the coreTMD of TAP1 single chains is mysterious as this interaction is lost upon TAP2 association. In this study, we map the respective binding site in TAP1 to the polar face of the amphipathic transmembrane helix TM9 and identify key residues that are essential to establish the interaction. We find that this interaction is dispensable for the peptide transport function but essential to achieve full stability of human TAP1. The interaction is also required for proper heterodimerization of the transporter. Based on similar results obtained using TAP mutants lacking tapasin binding to either N domain, we conclude that all three tapasin-binding sites in TAP cooperate to achieve high transporter stability and efficient heterodimerization. PMID:24501197

  11. Suppression of Th17-polarized airway inflammation by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joean, Oana; Hueber, Anja; Feller, Felix; Jirmo, Adan Chari; Lochner, Matthias; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Albrecht, Melanie

    2017-11-10

    Because Th17-polarized airway inflammation correlates with poor control in bronchial asthma and is a feature of numerous other difficult-to-treat inflammatory lung diseases, new therapeutic approaches for this type of airway inflammation are necessary. We assessed different licensed anti-inflammatory agents with known or expected efficacy against Th17-polarization in mouse models of Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Upon intravenous transfer of in vitro derived Th17 cells and intranasal challenge with the corresponding antigen, we established acute and chronic murine models of Th17-polarised airway inflammation. Consecutively, we assessed the efficacy of methylprednisolone, roflumilast, azithromycin, AM80 and rapamycin against acute or chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Quantifiers for Th17-associated inflammation comprised: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) differential cell counts, allergen-specific cytokine and immunoglobulin secretion, as well as flow cytometric phenotyping of pulmonary inflammatory cells. Only rapamycin proved effective against acute Th17-dependent airway inflammation, accompanied by increased plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and reduced neutrophils as well as reduced CXCL-1 levels in BAL. Chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation was unaltered by rapamycin treatment. None of the other agents showed efficacy in our models. Our results demonstrate that Th17-dependent airway inflammation is difficult to treat with known agents. However, we identify rapamycin as an agent with inhibitory potential against acute Th17-polarized airway inflammation.

  12. Paradoxical effects of rapamycin on experimental house dust mite-induced asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Fredriksson

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR modulates immune responses and cellular proliferation. The objective of this study was to assess whether inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin modifies disease severity in two experimental murine models of house dust mite (HDM-induced asthma. In an induction model, rapamycin was administered to BALB/c mice coincident with nasal HDM challenges for 3 weeks. In a treatment model, nasal HDM challenges were performed for 6 weeks and rapamycin treatment was administered during weeks 4 through 6. In the induction model, rapamycin significantly attenuated airway inflammation, airway hyperreactivity (AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia. In contrast, treatment of established HDM-induced asthma with rapamycin exacerbated AHR and airway inflammation, whereas goblet cell hyperplasia was not modified. Phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein, which is downstream of mTORC1, was increased after 3 weeks, but not 6 weeks of HDM-challenge. Rapamycin reduced S6 phosphorylation in HDM-challenged mice in both the induction and treatment models. Thus, the paradoxical effects of rapamycin on asthma severity paralleled the activation of mTOR signaling. Lastly, mediastinal lymph node re-stimulation experiments showed that treatment of rapamycin-naive T cells with ex vivo rapamycin decreased antigen-specific Th2 cytokine production, whereas prior exposure to in vivo rapamycin rendered T cells refractory to the suppressive effects of ex vivo rapamycin. We conclude that rapamycin had paradoxical effects on the pathogenesis of experimental HDM-induced asthma. Thus, consistent with the context-dependent effects of rapamycin on inflammation, the timing of mTOR inhibition may be an important determinant of efficacy and toxicity in HDM-induced asthma.

  13. Rapamycin causes growth arrest and inhibition of invasion in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhu, Jiaxue; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a highly malignant tumor that is characterized by a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis and notable for its lack of response to conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Rapamycin, the inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a valuable drug with diverse clinical applications and regulates many cellular processes. However, the effects of rapamycin on cell growth and invasion of human chondrosarcoma cells are not well known. We determined the effect of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and invasion by using MTS, flow cytometry and invasion assays in two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, SW1353 and JJ012. Cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression analysis was performed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). We also evaluated the effect of rapamycin on tumor growth by using mice xenograph models. Rapamycin significantly inhibited the cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and decreased the invasion ability of human chondrosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, rapamycin modulated the cell cycle regulatory and invasion-related genes' expression. Furthermore, the tumor growth of mice xenograph models with human chondrosarcoma cells was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. These results provided further insight into the role of rapamycin in chondrosarcoma. Therefore, rapamycin targeted therapy may be a potential treatment strategy for chondrosarcoma.

  14. Agonist-induced CXCR4 and CB2 Heterodimerization Inhibits Gα13/RhoA-mediated Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Kisha A; White, El-Shaddai Z; Coke, Christopher J; Carter, Jada R; Bryant, Latoya K; Hinton, Cimona V

    2018-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heterodimerization has emerged as a means by which alternative signaling entities can be created; yet, how receptor heterodimers affect receptor pharmacology remains unknown. Previous observations suggested a biochemical antagonism between GPCRs, CXCR4 and CB2 (CNR2), where agonist-bound CXCR4 and agonist-bound CB2 formed a physiologically nonfunctional heterodimer on the membrane of cancer cells, inhibiting their metastatic potential in vitro However, the reduced signaling entities responsible for the observed functional outputs remain elusive. This study now delineates the signaling mechanism whereby heterodimeric association between CXCR4 and CB2, induced by simultaneous agonist treatment, results in decreased CXCR4-mediated cell migration, invasion, and adhesion through inhibition of the Gα13/RhoA signaling axis. Activation of CXCR4 by its cognate ligand, CXCL12, stimulates Gα13 (GNA13), and subsequently, the small GTPase RhoA, which is required for directional cell migration and the metastatic potential of cancer cells. These studies in prostate cancer cells demonstrate decreased protein expression levels of Gα13 and RhoA upon simultaneous CXCR4/CB2 agonist stimulation. Furthermore, the agonist-induced heterodimer abrogated RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in the attenuation of cell migration and invasion of an endothelial cell barrier. Finally, a reduction was observed in the expression of integrin α5 (ITGA5) upon heterodimerization, supported by decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrices in vitro Taken together, the data identify a novel pharmacologic mechanism for the modulation of tumor cell migration and invasion in the context of metastatic disease. Implications: This study investigates a signaling mechanism by which GPCR heterodimerization inhibits cancer cell migration. Mol Cancer Res; 16(4); 728-39. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. IGF-1-dependent subunit communication of the IGF-1 holoreceptor: Interactions between αβ heterodimeric receptor halves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilden, P.A.; Treadway, J.L.; Morrison, B.D.; Pessin, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of 125 I-IGF-1 affinity cross-linking and β-subunit autophosphorylation has indicated that IGF-1 induces a covalent association of isolated αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors into an α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state, in a similar manner to that observed for the insulin receptor. The formation of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric IGF-1 receptor complex from the partially purified αβ heterodimers was time dependent with half-maximal formation in approximately 30 min at saturating IGF-1 concentrations. The IGF-1-dependent association of the partially purified αβ heterodimers into an α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state was specific for the IGF-1 receptors since IGF-1 was unable to stimulate the protein kinase activity of the purified αβ heterodimeric insulin receptor complex. Incubation of the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric IGF-1 holoreceptor with the specific sulfhydryl agent iodoacetamide (IAN) did not alter 125 I-IGF-1 binding or IGF-1 stimulation of protein kinase activity. However, IAN treatment of the αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptors inhibited the IGF-1 dependent covalent formation of the disulfide-linked α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric complex. These data indicate that IGF-1 induces the covalent association of isolated αβ heterodimeric IGF-1 receptor complexes into a disulfide-linked α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric state whereas Mn/MgATP induces a noncovalent association. Therefore, unlike the insulin receptor in which noncovalent association is sufficient for kinase activation, only the covalent assembly of the IGF-1 receptor αβ heterodimers into the α 2 β 2 heterotetrameric holoreceptor complex is associated with ligand-stimulated protein kinase activation

  16. Detection of constitutive heterodimerization of the integrin Mac-1 subunits by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Guo; Yang Huayan; Wang Chen; Zhang Feng; You Zhendong; Wang Guiying; He Cheng; Chen Yizhang; Xu Zhihan

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) belongs to β 2 subfamily of integrins that mediate important cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Biochemical studies have indicated that Mac-1 is a constitutive heterodimer in vitro. Here, we detected the heterodimerization of Mac-1 subunits in living cells by means of two fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques (fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy) and our results demonstrated that there is constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits and this constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits is cell-type independent. Through FRET imaging, we found that heterodimers of Mac-1 mainly localized in plasma membrane, perinuclear, and Golgi area in living cells. Furthermore, through analysis of the estimated physical distances between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to Mac-1 subunits, we suggested that the conformation of Mac-1 subunits is not affected by the fusion of CFP or YFP and inferred that Mac-1 subunits take different conformation when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, respectively

  17. Cloning, Purification, and Characterization of a Heterodimeric β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi; Han, Ning; Wang, Yan-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3 was obtained from kefir grains, which have high lactose hydrolytic activity. In this study, a heterodimeric LacLM-type β-galactosidase gene (lacLM) from ZW3 was isolated, which was composed of two overlapping genes, lacL (1,884 bp) and lacM (960 bp) encoding large and small subunits with calculated molecular masses of 73,620 and 35,682 Da, respectively. LacLM, LacL, and LacM were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and these recombinant proteins were purified and characterized. The results showed that, compared with the recombinant holoenzyme, the recombinant large subunit exhibits obviously lower thermostability and hydrolytic activity. Moreover, the optimal temperature and pH of the holoenzyme and large subunit are 60°C and 7.0, and 50°C and 8.0, respectively. However, the recombinant small subunit alone has no activity. Interestingly, the activity and thermostability of the large subunit were greatly improved after mixing it with the recombinant small subunit. Therefore, the results suggest that the small subunit might play an important role in maintaining the stability of the structure of the catalytic center located in the large subunit.

  18. Treatment with native heterodimeric IL-15 increases cytotoxic lymphocytes and reduces SHIV RNA in lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysios C Watson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available B cell follicles in secondary lymphoid tissues represent an immune privileged sanctuary for AIDS viruses, in part because cytotoxic CD8+ T cells are mostly excluded from entering the follicles that harbor infected T follicular helper (TFH cells. We studied the effects of native heterodimeric IL-15 (hetIL-15 treatment on uninfected rhesus macaques and on macaques that had spontaneously controlled SHIV infection to low levels of chronic viremia. hetIL-15 increased effector CD8+ T lymphocytes with high granzyme B content in blood, mucosal sites and lymph nodes, including virus-specific MHC-peptide tetramer+ CD8+ cells in LN. Following hetIL-15 treatment, multiplexed quantitative image analysis (histo-cytometry of LN revealed increased numbers of granzyme B+ T cells in B cell follicles and SHIV RNA was decreased in plasma and in LN. Based on these properties, hetIL-15 shows promise as a potential component in combination immunotherapy regimens to target AIDS virus sanctuaries and reduce long-term viral reservoirs in HIV-1 infected individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02452268.

  19. Novel synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin with bortezomib on hepatocellular carcinoma cells and orthotopic tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the chemotherapy efficacy against HCC is still unsatisfactory. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been emerged as an important cancer therapeutic target. However, HCC cells often resistant to rapamycin because of the paradoxical activation of Akt by rapamycin. In this study, we investigated whether bortezomib could enhance the antitumor effects of rapamycin. Methods The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness in vitro were assessed by CCK-8 analysis, flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342 staining and transwell assays, respectively. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Akt were detected by Western blotting. The effects of rapamycin and/or bortezomib on the mRNA expression levels of p53, p27, p21 and Bcl-2 family in HCCLM3 cells were evaluated by RT-PCR. The roles of rapamycin and bortezomib on HCC growth and metastasis in xenograft models were evaluated by tumor volumes and fluorescent signals. The effects of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vivo were test by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Results Bortezomib synergized with rapamycin to reduce cell growth, induce apoptosis, and inhibit cell mobility in vitro. Further mechanistic studies showed that bortezomib inhibited rapamycin-induced phosphorylated Akt, which in turn enhanced apoptosis of HCC cell lines. The alteration of the mRNA expression of cell cycle inhibitors p53, p27, p21 and apoptosis associated genes Bcl-2, Bax were also involved in the synergistic antitumor effects of rapamycin and bortezomib. P53 inhibitor PFT-α significantly attenuate the effect of rapamycin and bortezomib on cell apoptosis, which indicated that the pro-apoptotic effect of rapamycin and bortezomib may be p53-dependent. Treatment of HCCLM3-R bearing nude mice with rapamycin and bortezomib significantly enhanced tumor growth

  20. Longitudinal imaging studies of tumor microenvironment in mice treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Saito

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an allosteric inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, and inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Recent studies suggested a possibility that rapamycin renormalizes aberrant tumor vasculature and improves tumor oxygenation. The longitudinal effects of rapamycin on angiogenesis and tumor oxygenation were evaluated in murine squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to identify an optimal time after rapamycin treatment for enhanced tumor radioresponse. Rapamycin treatment was initiated on SCCVII solid tumors 8 days after implantation (500-750 mm(3 and measurements of tumor pO(2 and blood volume were conducted from day 8 to 14 by EPRI/MRI. Microvessel density was evaluated over the same time period by immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor blood volume as measured by MRI significantly decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment. Tumor pO(2 levels modestly but significantly increased 2 days after rapamycin treatment; whereas, it decreased in non-treated control tumors. Furthermore, the fraction of hypoxic area (pixels with pO(2<10 mm Hg in the tumor region decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor microvessel density and pericyte coverage revealed that microvessel density decreased 2 days after rapamycin treatment, but pericyte coverage did not change, similar to what was seen with anti-angiogenic agents such as sunitinib which cause vascular renormalization. Collectively, EPRI/MRI co-imaging can provide non-invasive evidence of rapamycin-induced vascular renormalization and resultant transient increase in tumor oxygenation. Improved oxygenation by rapamycin treatment provides a temporal window for anti-cancer therapies to realize enhanced response to radiotherapy.

  1. Rapamycin attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats and the expression of metalloproteinase-9 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 in lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoguang; Dai, Huaping; Ding, Ke; Xu, Xuefeng; Pang, Baosen; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common and devastating form of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in the clinic. There is no effective therapy except for lung transplantation. Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug with potent antifibrotic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats and the relation to the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intratracheal injection of 0.3 ml of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in sterile 0.9% saline to make the pulmonary fibrosis model. Rapamycin was given at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg per gavage, beginning one day before bleomycin instillation and once daily until animal sacrifice. Ten rats in each group were sacrificed at 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days after bleomycin administration. Alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis were semi-quantitatively assessed after HE staining and Masson staining under an Olympus BX40 microscope with an IDA-2000 Image Analysis System. Type I and III collagen fibers were identified by Picro-sirius-polarization. Hydroxyproline content in lung tissue was quantified by a colorimetric-based spectrophotometric assay, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and by realtime quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bleomycin induced alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis of rats was inhibited by rapamycin. Significant inhibition of alveolitis and hydroxyproline product were demonstrated when daily administration of rapamycin lasted for at least 14 days. The inhibitory efficacy on pulmonary fibrosis was unremarkable until rapamycin treatment lasted for at least 28 days (P pulmonary fibrosis, which is associated with decreased expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1.

  2. Improving prediction of heterodimeric protein complexes using combination with pairwise kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Peiying; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2018-02-19

    Since many proteins become functional only after they interact with their partner proteins and form protein complexes, it is essential to identify the sets of proteins that form complexes. Therefore, several computational methods have been proposed to predict complexes from the topology and structure of experimental protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. These methods work well to predict complexes involving at least three proteins, but generally fail at identifying complexes involving only two different proteins, called heterodimeric complexes or heterodimers. There is however an urgent need for efficient methods to predict heterodimers, since the majority of known protein complexes are precisely heterodimers. In this paper, we use three promising kernel functions, Min kernel and two pairwise kernels, which are Metric Learning Pairwise Kernel (MLPK) and Tensor Product Pairwise Kernel (TPPK). We also consider the normalization forms of Min kernel. Then, we combine Min kernel or its normalization form and one of the pairwise kernels by plugging. We applied kernels based on PPI, domain, phylogenetic profile, and subcellular localization properties to predicting heterodimers. Then, we evaluate our method by employing C-Support Vector Classification (C-SVC), carrying out 10-fold cross-validation, and calculating the average F-measures. The results suggest that the combination of normalized-Min-kernel and MLPK leads to the best F-measure and improved the performance of our previous work, which had been the best existing method so far. We propose new methods to predict heterodimers, using a machine learning-based approach. We train a support vector machine (SVM) to discriminate interacting vs non-interacting protein pairs, based on informations extracted from PPI, domain, phylogenetic profiles and subcellular localization. We evaluate in detail new kernel functions to encode these data, and report prediction performance that outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  3. Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a downstream effector of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway to regulate photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangjie; Zhang, Rui; Meng, Zhigang; Deng, Kexuan; Que, Yumei; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Guo, Sundui; Datla, Raju; Ren, Maozhi

    2017-01-01

    The components of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway have been well characterized in heterotrophic organisms from yeast to humans. However, because of rapamycin insensitivity, embryonic lethality in tor null mutants and a lack of reliable ways of detecting TOR protein kinase in higher plants, the key players upstream and downstream of TOR remain largely unknown in plants. Using engineered rapamycin-sensitive Binding Protein 12-2 (BP12-2) plants, the present study showed that combined treatment with rapamycin and active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) results in synergistic inhibition of TOR activity and plant growth in Arabidopsis. Based on this system, we revealed that TOR signaling plays a crucial role in modulating the transition from heterotrophic to photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (S6K2) was identified as a direct downstream target of TOR, and the growth of TOR-suppressed plants could be rescued by up-regulating S6K2. Systems, genetic, and biochemical analyses revealed that Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a novel downstream effector of S6K2, and the phosphorylation of BIN2 depends on TOR-S6K2 signaling in Arabidopsis. By combining pharmacological with genetic and biochemical approaches, we determined that the TOR-S6K2-BIN2 signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating the photoautotrophic growth of Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Rapamycin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 in Liver but Inhibits Bile Flow Recovery after Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist, Alwine; Wakkie, Joris; Madu, Max; Versteeg, Ruth; ten Berge, Judith; Nikolic, Andrej; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Porte, Robert J.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Barritt, Greg J.

    Background/Aims. Rapamycin, which is employed in the management of patients undergoing liver surgery, induces the synthesis of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in some non-liver cell types. The aim was to investigate whether rapamycin can induce HO-1 expression in the liver, and to test the effects of

  5. Rapamycin preconditioning attenuates transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lele; Ye, Shasha; Chen, Zhen; Zeng, Yaoying

    2012-12-01

    Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and immunosuppressive agent in clinic, has protective effects on traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. But, its effects on transient focal ischemia/reperfusion disease are not very clear. In this study, we examined the effects of rapamycin preconditioning on mice treated with middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion operation (MCAO/R). We found that the rapamycin preconditioning by intrahippocampal injection 20 hr before MCAO/R significantly improved the survival rate and longevity of mice. It also decreased the neurological deficit score, infracted areas and brain edema. In addition, rapamycin preconditioning decreased the production of NF-κB, TNF-α, and Bax, but not Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein in the ischemic area. From these results, we may conclude that rapamycin preconditioning attenuate transient focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and inhibits apoptosis induced by MCAO/R in mice.

  6. The antiaging activity and cerebral protection of rapamycin at micro-doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiyan; Su, Feng-Yun; Wan, Shan; Chen, Yongjie; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Liu, Ai-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin was reported to have an antiaging activity, which was attributed to the TORC1 inhibition that inhibits cell proliferation and increases autophagy. However, rapamycin also exhibits a number of harmful adverse effects. Whether rapamycin can be developed into an antiaging agent remains unclear. We demonstrated that rapamycin at micro-doses (below the TORC1 inhibiting concentration) exhibits a cell-protective activity: (1) It protects cultured neurons against neurotoxin MPP(+) and H2O2. (2) It increases survival time of neuron in culture. (3) It maintains the nonproliferative state of cultured senescent human fibroblasts and prevents cell death induced by telomere dysfunction. (4) In animal models, it decreased the cerebral infarct sizes induced by acute ischemia and dramatically extended the life span of stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SPs). We propose that rapamycin at micro-dose can be developed into an antiaging agent with a novel mechanism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Prediction of heterodimeric protein complexes from weighted protein-protein interaction networks using novel features and kernel functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiying Ruan

    Full Text Available Since many proteins express their functional activity by interacting with other proteins and forming protein complexes, it is very useful to identify sets of proteins that form complexes. For that purpose, many prediction methods for protein complexes from protein-protein interactions have been developed such as MCL, MCODE, RNSC, PCP, RRW, and NWE. These methods have dealt with only complexes with size of more than three because the methods often are based on some density of subgraphs. However, heterodimeric protein complexes that consist of two distinct proteins occupy a large part according to several comprehensive databases of known complexes. In this paper, we propose several feature space mappings from protein-protein interaction data, in which each interaction is weighted based on reliability. Furthermore, we make use of prior knowledge on protein domains to develop feature space mappings, domain composition kernel and its combination kernel with our proposed features. We perform ten-fold cross-validation computational experiments. These results suggest that our proposed kernel considerably outperforms the naive Bayes-based method, which is the best existing method for predicting heterodimeric protein complexes.

  8. Bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human taste receptor for the discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance.

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    Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Ahn, Sae Ryun; Kim, Daesan; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Un-Kyung; Simons, Christopher T; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2014-10-28

    The sense of taste helps humans to obtain information and form a picture of the world by recognizing chemicals in their environments. Over the past decade, large advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms of taste detection and mimicking its capability using artificial sensor devices. However, the detection capability of previous artificial taste sensors has been far inferior to that of animal tongues, in terms of its sensitivity and selectivity. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human sweet taste receptors for the detection and discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance, where single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors were functionalized with nanovesicles containing human sweet taste receptors and used to detect the binding of sweeteners to the taste receptors. The receptors are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of human taste receptor type 1 member 2 (hTAS1R2) and human taste receptor type 1 member 3 (hTAS1R3), which have multiple binding sites and allow a human tongue-like broad selectivity for the detection of sweeteners. This nanovesicle-based bioelectronic tongue can be a powerful tool for the detection of sweeteners as an alternative to labor-intensive and time-consuming cell-based assays and the sensory evaluation panels used in the food and beverage industry. Furthermore, this study also allows the artificial sensor to exam the functional activity of dimeric GPCRs.

  9. Structure-based discovery of an immunomodulatory inhibitor of TLR1-TLR2 heterodimerization from a natural product-like database.

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    Zhong, Zhangfeng; Liu, Li-Juan; Dong, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Lihua; Wang, Modi; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Wang, Yitao

    2015-06-30

    We report herein the identification of an immunomodulatory natural product-like compound as a direct inhibitor of TLR1-TLR2 heterodimerization. Compound suppressed TNF-α and IL-6 secretion in Pam3CSK4-induced macrophages. Moreover, compound inhibited the phagocytic activity of macrophages, presumably through modulation of TLR1-TLR2 signaling and inactivation of NF-κB. Molecular docking revealed that compound bound to the interface region of TLR1-TLR2 by forming two hydrogen bonds with residues lining the binding site. To our knowledge, compound has been only the second inhibitor overall of TLR1-TLR2 heterodimerization reported to date.

  10. An approach to analyse the specific impact of rapamycin on mRNA-ribosome association

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    Jaquier-Gubler Pascale

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work, using both cell culture model systems and tumour derived cell lines, suggests that the differential recruitment into polysomes of mRNA populations may be sufficient to initiate and maintain tumour formation. Consequently, a major effort is underway to use high density microarray profiles to establish molecular fingerprints for cells exposed to defined drug regimes. The aim of these pharmacogenomic approaches is to provide new information on how drugs can impact on the translational read-out within a defined cellular background. Methods We describe an approach that permits the analysis of de-novo mRNA-ribosome association in-vivo during short drug exposures. It combines hypertonic shock, polysome fractionation and high-throughput analysis to provide a molecular phenotype of translationally responsive transcripts. Compared to previous translational profiling studies, the procedure offers increased specificity due to the elimination of the drugs secondary effects (e.g. on the transcriptional read-out. For this pilot "proof-of-principle" assay we selected the drug rapamycin because of its extensively studied impact on translation initiation. Results High throughput analysis on both the light and heavy polysomal fractions has identified mRNAs whose re-recruitment onto free ribosomes responded to short exposure to the drug rapamycin. The results of the microarray have been confirmed using real-time RT-PCR. The selective down-regulation of TOP transcripts is also consistent with previous translational profiling studies using this drug. Conclusion The technical advance outlined in this manuscript offers the possibility of new insights into mRNA features that impact on translation initiation and provides a molecular fingerprint for transcript-ribosome association in any cell type and in the presence of a range of drugs of interest. Such molecular phenotypes defined pre-clinically may ultimately impact on the evaluation of

  11. Rapamycin protects kidney against ischemia reperfusion injury through recruitment of NKT cells.

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    Zhang, Chao; Zheng, Long; Li, Long; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Liping; Huang, Shang; Gu, Chenli; Zhang, Lexi; Yang, Cheng; Zhu, Tongyu; Rong, Ruiming

    2014-08-19

    NKT cells play a protective role in ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury, of which the trafficking in the body and recruitment in injured organs can be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of rapamycin on kidneys exposed to IR injury in early stage and on trafficking of NKT cells in a murine model. Balb/c mice were subjected to kidney 30 min ischemia followed by 24 h reperfusion. Rapamycin (2.5 ml/kg) was administered by gavage daily, starting 1 day before the operation. Renal function and histological changes were assessed. The proportion of NKT cells in peripheral blood, spleen and kidney was detected by flow cytometry. The chemokines and corresponding receptor involved in NKT cell trafficking were determined by RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Rapamycin significantly improved renal function and ameliorated histological injury. In rapamycin-treated group, the proportion of NKT cells in spleen was significantly decreased but increased in peripheral blood and kidney. In addition, the CXCR3+ NKT cell in the kidney increased remarkably in the rapamycin-treated group. The chemokines, CXCL9 and CXCL10, as the ligands of CXCR3, were also increased in the rapamycin-treated kidney. Rapamycin may recruit NKT cells from spleen to the IR-induced kidney to ameliorate renal IR injury in the early stage.

  12. Rapamycin treatment is associated with an increased apoptosis rate in experimental vein grafts.

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    Schachner, Thomas; Oberhuber, Alexander; Zou, Yping; Tzankov, Alexandar; Ott, Harald; Laufer, Günther; Bonatti, Johannes

    2005-02-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive agent with marked antiproliferative properties and is effective in reducing in stent restenosis and vein graft neointimal hyperplasia. Apoptosis is one mechanism counterbalancing cellular proliferation. We therefore investigated the role of apoptosis in rapamycin treated vein grafts in a mouse model. C57BL6J mice underwent interposition of the inferior vena cava from isogenic donor mice into the common carotid artery using a cuff technique. In the treatment group 200 microg of rapamycin were applied locally in pluronic gel. The control group did not receive local treatment. Vein grafts were harvested at 4 weeks postoperatively and underwent morphometric analysis as well as immunohistochemical analysis for apoptosis (TUNEL). In grafted veins without treatment (controls) neointimal thickness was 50 (12-58) microm at 4 weeks postoperatively. In 200 microg rapamycin treated grafts the neointimal thickness was 17 (5-55) microm. Rapamycin treated vein grafts showed a significantly increased rate of apoptosis in the adventitia as compared with controls (P=0.032). In the neointima the apoptosis rate was lower in both groups with no significant difference between rapamycin treated grafts and controls. We conclude that treatment of experimental vein grafts with rapamycin is associated with an increased apoptosis rate in the vascular wall and a trend towards reduction of neointimal hyperplasia. These results suggest that apoptosis may be a beneficial antiproliferative component for the treatment of vein graft disease.

  13. An emerging role for the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR in 'pathological' protein translation: relevance to cocaine addiction

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    Christopher V Dayas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex neuroadaptations within key nodes of the brain’s ‘reward circuitry’ are thought to underpin long-term vulnerability to relapse. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular signalling events that subserve relapse vulnerability may lead to pharmacological treatments that could improve treatment outcomes for psychostimulant-addicted individuals. Recent advances in this regard include findings that drug-induced perturbations to neurotrophin, metabotropic glutamate receptor and dopamine receptor signalling pathways perpetuate plasticity impairments at excitatory glutamatergic synapses on ventral tegmental area (VTA and nucleus accumbens (NAC neurons. In the context of addiction, much previous work, in terms of downstream effectors to these receptor systems, has centered on the extracellular-regulated MAP kinase (ERK signalling pathway. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the evidence of an emerging role for another downstream effector of these addiction-relevant receptor systems - the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 functions to regulate synaptic protein translation and is a potential critical link in our understanding of the neurobiological processes that drive addiction and relapse behavior. The precise cellular and molecular changes that are regulated by mTORC1 and contribute to relapse vulnerability are only just coming to light. Therefore, we aim to highlight evidence that mTORC1 signalling may be dysregulated by drug-exposure and that these changes may contribute to aberrant translation of synaptic proteins that appear critical to increased relapse vulnerability, including AMPARs. The importance of understanding the role of this signalling pathway in the development of addiction vulnerability is underscored by the fact that the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduces drug-seeking in preclinical models and preliminary evidence indicating that rapamycin suppresses drug craving in

  14. Rapamycin sensitizes T-ALL cells to dexamethasone-induced apoptosis

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    Mu Dezhi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoid (GC resistance is frequently seen in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T-cell lineage (T-ALL. In this study we investigate the potential and mechanism of using rapamycin to restore the sensitivity of GC-resistant T-ALL cells to dexamethasone (Dex treatment. Methods Cell proliferation was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl- 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis was used to analyze apoptosis and cell cycles. Western blot analysis was performed to test the expression of the downstream effector proteins of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the cell cycle regulatory proteins, and apoptosis associated proteins. Results 10 nM rapamycin markedly increased GC sensitivity in GC-resistant T-ALL cells and this effect was mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway. Cell cycle arrest was associated with modulation of G1-S phase regulators. Both rapamycin and Dex can induce up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitors of p21 and p27 and co-treatment of rapamycin with Dex resulted in a synergistic induction of their expressions. Rapamycin did not obviously affect the expression of cyclin A, whereas Dex induced cyclin A expression. Rapamycin prevented Dex-induced expression of cyclin A. Rapamycin had a stronger inhibition of cyclin D1 expression than Dex. Rapamycin enhanced GC-induced apoptosis and this was not achieved by modulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR expression, but synergistically up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins like caspase-3, Bax, and Bim, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein of Mcl-1. Conclusion Our data suggests that rapamycin can effectively reverse GC resistance in T-ALL and this effect is achieved by inducing cell cycles arrested at G0/G1 phase and activating the intrinsic apoptotic program. Therefore, combination of mTOR inhibitor rapamycin with GC containing protocol might be an attracting

  15. Differential effects of rapamycin and dexamethasone in mouse models of established allergic asthma.

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    Elizabeth M Mushaben

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays an important role in cell growth/differentiation, integrating environmental cues, and regulating immune responses. Our lab previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin prevented house dust mite (HDM-induced allergic asthma in mice. Here, we utilized two treatment protocols to investigate whether rapamycin, compared to the steroid, dexamethasone, could inhibit allergic responses during the later stages of the disease process, namely allergen re-exposure and/or during progression of chronic allergic disease. In protocol 1, BALB/c mice were sensitized to HDM (three i.p. injections and administered two intranasal HDM exposures. After 6 weeks of rest/recovery, mice were re-exposed to HDM while being treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone. In protocol 2, mice were exposed to HDM for 3 or 6 weeks and treated with rapamycin or dexamethasone during weeks 4-6. Characteristic features of allergic asthma, including IgE, goblet cells, airway hyperreactivity (AHR, inflammatory cells, cytokines/chemokines, and T cell responses were assessed. In protocol 1, both rapamycin and dexamethasone suppressed goblet cells and total CD4(+ T cells including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells in the lung tissue, with no effect on AHR or total inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Rapamycin also suppressed IgE, although IL-4 and eotaxin 1 levels were augmented. In protocol 2, both drugs suppressed total CD4(+ T cells, including activated, effector, and regulatory T cells and IgE levels. IL-4, eotaxin, and inflammatory cell numbers were increased after rapamycin and no effect on AHR was observed. Dexamethasone suppressed inflammatory cell numbers, especially eosinophils, but had limited effects on AHR. We conclude that while mTOR signaling is critical during the early phases of allergic asthma, its role is much more limited once disease is established.

  16. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

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    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2

  17. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

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    Valladares, Ricardo B; Graves, Christina; Wright, Kaitlyn; Gardner, Christopher L; Lorca, Graciela L; Gonzalez, Claudio F

    2015-01-01

    Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B) whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS) sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold). Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB, and FMN) were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  18. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B Valladares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold. Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB and FMN were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  19. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR/p70S6K activation in CA3 region of the hippocampus of the rat and impairs long term memory.

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    Lana, D; Di Russo, J; Mello, T; Wenk, G L; Giovannini, M G

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at establishing whether the mTOR pathway and its downstream effector p70S6K in CA3 pyramidal neurons are under the modulation of the cholinergic input to trigger the formation of long term memories, similar to what we demonstrated in CA1 hippocampus. We performed in vivo behavioral experiments using the step down inhibitory avoidance test in adult Wistar rats to evaluate memory formation under different conditions. We examined the effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 formation, scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist or mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist, on short and long term memory formation and on the functionality of the mTOR pathway. Acquisition was conducted 30min after i.c.v. injection of rapamycin. Recall testing was performed 1h, 4h or 24h after acquisition. We found that (1) mTOR and p70S6K activation in CA3 pyramidal neurons were involved in long term memory formation; (2) rapamycin significantly inhibited mTOR and of p70S6K activation at 4h, and long term memory impairment 24h after acquisition; (3) scopolamine impaired short but not long term memory, with an early increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h followed by stabilization at longer times; (4) mecamylamine and scopolamine co-administration impaired short term memory at 1h and 4h and reduced the scopolamine-induced increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h and 4h; (5) mecamylamine and scopolamine treatment did not impair long term memory formation; (6) unexpectedly, rapamycin increased mTORC2 activation in microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that in CA3 pyramidal neurons the mTOR/p70S6K pathway is under the modulation of the cholinergic system and is involved in long-term memory encoding, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the CA3 region of the hippocampus is involved in memory mechanisms based on rapid, one-trial object-place learning and recall. Furthermore, our results are in accordance with previous reports that selective

  20. Advances in the therapeutic use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in dermatology.

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    Fogel, Alexander L; Hill, Sharleen; Teng, Joyce M C

    2015-05-01

    Significant developments in the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (mTORIs) as immunosuppressant and antiproliferative agents have been made. Recent advances in the understanding of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream effects on tumorigenesis and vascular proliferation have broadened the clinical applications of mTORIs in many challenging disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex, pachyonychia congenita, complex vascular anomalies, and inflammatory dermatoses. Systemic mTORI therapy has shown benefits in these areas, but is associated with significant side effects that sometimes necessitate drug holidays. To mitigate the side effects of systemic mTORIs for dermatologic applications, preliminary work to assess the potential of percutaneous therapy has been performed, and the evidence suggests that percutaneous delivery of mTORIs may allow for effective long-term therapy while avoiding systemic toxicities. Additional large placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized studies are needed to assess the efficacy, safety, duration, and tolerability of topical treatments. The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the novel use of mTORIs in the management of many cutaneous disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanne C; Allstadt, Sara D; Fan, Timothy M; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J; Hansen, Ryan J; Gustafson, Daniel L; Legendre, Alfred M; Galyon, Gina D; LeBlanc, Amy K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and noncompartmental analyses. Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in nanograms per milliliter. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, need to be determined.

  2. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

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    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  3. Suppression of AKT phosphorylation restores rapamycin-based synthetic lethality in SMAD4-defective pancreatic cancer cells.

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    Le Gendre, Onica; Sookdeo, Ayisha; Duliepre, Stephie-Anne; Utter, Matthew; Frias, Maria; Foster, David A

    2013-05-01

    mTOR has been implicated in survival signals for many human cancers. Rapamycin and TGF-β synergistically induce G1 cell-cycle arrest in several cell lines with intact TGF-β signaling pathway, which protects cells from the apoptotic effects of rapamycin during S-phase of the cell cycle. Thus, rapamycin is cytostatic in the presence of serum/TGF-β and cytotoxic in the absence of serum. However, if TGF-β signaling is defective, rapamycin induced apoptosis in both the presence and absence of serum/TGF-β in colon and breast cancer cell lines. Because genetic dysregulation of TGF-β signaling is commonly observed in pancreatic cancers-with defects in the Smad4 gene being most prevalent, we hypothesized that pancreatic cancers would display a synthetic lethality to rapamycin in the presence of serum/TGF-β. We report here that Smad4-deficient pancreatic cancer cells are killed by rapamycin in the absence of serum; however, in the presence of serum, we did not observe the predicted synthetic lethality with rapamycin. Rapamycin also induced elevated phosphorylation of the survival kinase Akt at Ser473. Suppression of rapamycin-induced Akt phosphorylation restored rapamycin sensitivity in Smad4-null, but not Smad4 wild-type pancreatic cancer cells. This study shows that the synthetic lethality to rapamycin in pancreatic cancers with defective TGF-β signaling is masked by rapamycin-induced increases in Akt phosphorylation. The implication is that a combination of approaches that suppress both Akt phosphorylation and mTOR could be effective in targeting pancreatic cancers with defective TGF-β signaling. ©2013 AACR.

  4. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia treated with rapamycin in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

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    Pollack, Sarah F; Geffrey, Alexandra L; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Shah, Uzma

    2015-09-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy characterized by a congenital malformation of the lymphatic vessels of the small intestine causing insufficient drainage and leakage of lymph fluid. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by benign hamartomas in multiple organ systems. While the lymphatic system has been implicated in TSC through lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and lymphedema, this paper reports the first case of PIL in TSC, a female patient with a TSC2 mutation. She developed persistent and significant abdominal distension with chronic diarrhea during her first year of life. Due to lack of treatment options and the involvement of the mTOR pathway in TSC, a trial of an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, was initiated. This treatment was highly effective, with improvement in clinical symptoms of PIL as well as abnormal laboratory values including VEGF-C, which was elevated to over seven times the normal upper limit before treatment. This case suggests that PIL is a rare manifestation of TSC, warranting the use of mTOR inhibitors in future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR): a central regulator of male fertility?

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    Jesus, Tito T; Oliveira, Pedro F; Sousa, Mário; Cheng, C Yan; Alves, Marco G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cellular metabolic phenotype and is involved in virtually all aspects of cellular function. It integrates not only nutrient and energy-sensing pathways but also actin cytoskeleton organization, in response to environmental cues including growth factors and cellular energy levels. These events are pivotal for spermatogenesis and determine the reproductive potential of males. Yet, the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR signaling acts in male reproductive system remain a matter of debate. Here, we review the current knowledge on physiological and molecular events mediated by mTOR in testis and testicular cells. In recent years, mTOR inhibition has been explored as a prime strategy to develop novel therapeutic approaches to treat cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmunity, and metabolic disorders. However, the physiological consequences of mTOR dysregulation and inhibition to male reproductive potential are still not fully understood. Compelling evidence suggests that mTOR is an arising regulator of male fertility and better understanding of this atypical protein kinase coordinated action in testis will provide insightful information concerning its biological significance in other tissues/organs. We also discuss why a new generation of mTOR inhibitors aiming to be used in clinical practice may also need to include an integrative view on the effects in male reproductive system.

  6. Restoration of Corticosteroid Sensitivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Akihisa; Ito, Kazuhiro; Vuppusetty, Chaitanya; Barnes, Peter J; Mercado, Nicolas

    2016-01-15

    Corticosteroid resistance is a major barrier to the effective treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed, such as activations of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. However, the mechanism for corticosteroid resistance is still not fully elucidated. To investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in corticosteroid sensitivity in COPD. The corticosteroid sensitivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from patients with COPD, smokers, and nonsmoking control subjects, or of human monocytic U937 cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE), was quantified as the dexamethasone concentration required to achieve 30% inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced CXCL8 production in the presence or absence of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. mTOR activity was determined as the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase, using Western blotting. mTOR activity was increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with COPD, and treatment with rapamycin inhibited this as well as restoring corticosteroid sensitivity. In U937 cells, CSE stimulated mTOR activity and c-Jun expression, but pretreatment with rapamycin inhibited both and also reversed CSE-induced corticosteroid insensitivity. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin restores corticosteroid sensitivity via inhibition of c-Jun expression, and thus mTOR is a potential novel therapeutic target for COPD.

  7. Negative Effects of Chronic Rapamycin Treatment on Behavior in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

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    Rachel M. Saré

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, is also highly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. It is caused by expansion of a CGG repeat sequence on the X chromosome resulting in silencing of the FMR1 gene. This is modeled in the mouse by deletion of Fmr1 (Fmr1 KO. Fmr1 KO mice recapitulate many of the behavioral features of the disorder including seizure susceptibility, hyperactivity, impaired social behavior, sleep problems, and learning and memory deficits. The mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (mTORC1 is upregulated in Fmr1 KO mice and is thought to be important for the pathogenesis of this disorder. We treated Fmr1 KO mice chronically with an mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, to determine if rapamycin treatment could reverse behavioral phenotypes. We performed open field, zero maze, social behavior, sleep, passive avoidance, and audiogenic seizure testing. We found that pS6 was upregulated in Fmr1 KO mice and normalized by rapamycin treatment, but, except for an anxiogenic effect, it did not reverse any of the behavioral phenotypes examined. In fact, rapamycin treatment had an adverse effect on sleep and social behavior in both control and Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggest that targeting the mTOR pathway in FXS is not a good treatment strategy and that other pathways should be considered.

  8. TORC1 Inhibition by Rapamycin Promotes Antioxidant Defences in a Drosophila Model of Friedreich's Ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Calap-Quintana

    Full Text Available Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, the most common inherited ataxia in the Caucasian population, is a multisystemic disease caused by a significant decrease in the frataxin level. To identify genes capable of modifying the severity of the symptoms of frataxin depletion, we performed a candidate genetic screen in a Drosophila RNAi-based model of FRDA. We found that genetic reduction in TOR Complex 1 (TORC1 signalling improves the impaired motor performance phenotype of FRDA model flies. Pharmacologic inhibition of TORC1 signalling by rapamycin also restored this phenotype and increased the lifespan and ATP levels. Furthermore, rapamycin reduced the altered levels of malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals and total glutathione of the model flies. The rapamycin-mediated protection against oxidative stress is due in part to an increase in the transcription of antioxidant genes mediated by cap-n-collar (Drosophila ortholog of Nrf2. Our results suggest that autophagy is indeed necessary for the protective effect of rapamycin in hyperoxia. Rapamycin increased the survival and aconitase activity of model flies subjected to high oxidative insult, and this improvement was abolished by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. These results point to the TORC1 pathway as a new potential therapeutic target for FRDA and as a guide to finding new promising molecules for disease treatment.

  9. Target of rapamycin (TOR) plays a critical role in triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Sone, Toshiyuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-10-01

    Most microalgae produce triacylglycerol (TAG) under stress conditions such as nitrogen depletion, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we focused on the role of target of rapamycin (TOR) in TAG accumulation. TOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is highly conserved and plays pivotal roles in nitrogen and other signaling pathways in eukaryotes. We previously constructed a rapamycin-susceptible Cyanidioschyzon merolae, a unicellular red alga, by expressing yeast FKBP12 protein to evaluate the results of TOR inhibition (Imamura et al. in Biochem Biophys Res Commun 439:264-269, 2013). By using this strain, we here report that rapamycin-induced TOR inhibition results in accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets containing TAG. Transcripts for TAG synthesis-related genes, such as glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were increased by rapamycin treatment. We also found that fatty acid synthase-dependent de novo fatty acid synthesis was required for the accumulation of lipid droplets. Induction of TAG and up-regulation of DGAT gene expression by rapamycin were similarly observed in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These results suggest the general involvement of TOR signaling in TAG accumulation in divergent microalgae.

  10. Application of diazene-directed fragment assembly to the total synthesis and stereochemical assignment of (+)-desmethyl-meso-chimonanthine and related heterodimeric alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Lathrop, Stephen; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first application of our methodology for heterodimerization via diazene fragmentation towards the total synthesis of (−)-calycanthidine, meso-chimonanthine, and (+)-desmethyl-meso-chimonanthine. Our syntheses of these alkaloids feature an improved route to C3a-aminocyclotryptamines, an enhanced method for sulfamide synthesis and oxidation, in addition to a late-stage diversification leading to the first enantioselective total synthesis of (+)-desmethyl-meso-chimonanthine and i...

  11. Surgical trauma induces overgrowth in lower limb gigantism: regulation with use of rapamycin is promising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rohan Sebastian; Harrison, William David; Graham, Kenneth; Nayagam, Durai

    2018-01-04

    We describe an unclassified overgrowth syndrome characterised by unregulated growth of dermal fibroblasts in the lower limbs of a 35-year-old woman. A PIK3CA gene mutation resulted in lower limb gigantism. Below the waist, she weighed 117 kg with each leg measuring over 100 cm in circumference. Her total adiposity was 50% accounted for by her legs mainly. Liposuction and surgical debulking were performed to reduce the size of the limbs but had exacerbated the overgrowth in her lower limbs. Systemic sepsis from an infected foot ulcer necessitated treatment by an above-knee amputation. Postoperatively, the stump increased in size by 19 kg. A trial of rapamycin to reverse the growth of the stump has shown promise. We discuss the clinical and genetic features of this previously unclassified disorder and the orthopaedic considerations involved. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Structural differences between glycosylated, disulfide-linked heterodimeric Knob-into-Hole Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglstatter, A; Stihle, M; Neumann, C; Müller, C; Schaefer, W; Klein, C; Benz, J

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of bispecific therapeutic antibodies are progressing through clinical development. The Knob-into-Hole (KiH) technology uses complementary mutations in the CH3 region of the antibody Fc fragment to achieve heavy chain heterodimerization. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structures of glycosylated and disulfide-engineered heterodimeric KiH Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products. The heterodimer structure confirms the KiH design principle and supports the hypothesis that glycosylation stabilizes a closed Fc conformation. Both homodimer structures show parallel Fc fragment architectures, in contrast to recently reported crystal structures of the corresponding aglycosylated Fc fragments which in the absence of disulfide mutations show an unexpected antiparallel arrangement. The glycosylated Knob-Knob Fc fragment is destabilized as indicated by variability in the relative orientation of its CH3 domains. The glycosylated Hole-Hole Fc fragment shows an unexpected intermolecular disulfide bond via the introduced Y349C Hole mutation which results in a large CH3 domain shift and a new CH3-CH3 interface. The crystal structures of glycosylated, disulfide-linked KiH Fc fragment and its Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products reported here will facilitate further design of highly efficient antibody heterodimerization strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats I: Magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Willem M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has received increasing attention as a potential antiepileptogenic target. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin after status epilepticus reduces the development of epilepsy in a rat model. To study whether rapamycin mediates this effect via restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) was used to determine BBB permeability throughout epileptogenesis. Imaging was repeatedly performed until 6 weeks after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rapamycin (6 mg/kg for 6 weeks starting 4 h after SE) and vehicle-treated rats, using gadobutrol as contrast agent. Seizures were detected using video monitoring in the week following the last imaging session. Gadobutrol leakage was widespread and extensive in both rapamycin and vehicle-treated epileptic rats during the acute phase, with the piriform cortex and amygdala as the most affected regions. Gadobutrol leakage was higher in rapamycin-treated rats 4 and 8 days after status epilepticus compared to vehicle-treated rats. However, during the chronic epileptic phase, gadobutrol leakage was lower in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats along with a decreased seizure frequency. This was confirmed by local fluorescein staining in the brains of the same rats. Total brain volume was reduced by this rapamycin treatment regimen. The initial slow recovery of BBB function in rapamycin-treated epileptic rats indicates that rapamycin does not reduce seizure activity by a gradual recovery of BBB integrity. The reduced BBB leakage during the chronic phase, however, could contribute to the decreased seizure frequency in post-status epilepticus rats treated with rapamycin. Furthermore, the data show that CE-MRI (using step-down infusion with gadobutrol) can be used as biomarker for monitoring the effect of drug therapy in rats. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a Nup107–Nup133 heterodimeric nucleoporin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2007-01-01

    A heterodimeric complex consisting of the C-terminal domains of human nucleoporins Nup107 and Nup133 was purified and crystallized and complete diffraction data sets were collected. The nuclear pore complex (NPC), the sole gateway of traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, is built up from multiple copies of about 30 proteins collectively termed nucleoporins (nups). Nups are organized into distinct subcomplexes. Nup107 and Nup133 are members of the essential Nup107–160 subcomplex, a component of the central NPC architecture. A dimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of human Nup107 and Nup133 was expressed from a bicistronic vector in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Crystals grown in the presence of 18–22% PEG 3350 belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffracted to 2.9 Å. Native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals grown in the presence of 1.1 M sodium malonate belong to space group C2 and diffracted to 2.55 and 2.9 Å, respectively. Structure determination of this complex will give the first insights into the protein–protein interactions within a core module of the NPC

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a Nup107–Nup133 heterodimeric nucleoporin complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas U., E-mail: tus@mit.edu [Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    A heterodimeric complex consisting of the C-terminal domains of human nucleoporins Nup107 and Nup133 was purified and crystallized and complete diffraction data sets were collected. The nuclear pore complex (NPC), the sole gateway of traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, is built up from multiple copies of about 30 proteins collectively termed nucleoporins (nups). Nups are organized into distinct subcomplexes. Nup107 and Nup133 are members of the essential Nup107–160 subcomplex, a component of the central NPC architecture. A dimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of human Nup107 and Nup133 was expressed from a bicistronic vector in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Crystals grown in the presence of 18–22% PEG 3350 belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.9 Å. Native and seleno-l-methionine-derivative crystals grown in the presence of 1.1 M sodium malonate belong to space group C2 and diffracted to 2.55 and 2.9 Å, respectively. Structure determination of this complex will give the first insights into the protein–protein interactions within a core module of the NPC.

  16. Evaluation of the antitumor effects of c-Myc-Max heterodimerization inhibitor 100258-F4 in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiandong; Ma, Xiaoli; Jones, Hannah M; Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Song, Fang; Zhang, Weiyuan; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2014-08-21

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological cancer due to its silent onset and recurrence with resistance to chemotherapy. Overexpression of oncogene c-Myc is one of the most frequently encountered events present in ovarian carcinoma. Disrupting the function of c-Myc and its downstream target genes is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the potential effects of small-molecule c-Myc inhibitor, 10058-F4, on ovarian carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms by which 10058-F4 exerts its actions. Using MTT assay, colony formation, flow cytometry and Annexin V FITC assays, we found that 10058-F4 significantly inhibited cell proliferation of both SKOV3 and Hey ovarian cancer cells in a dose dependent manner through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle G1 arrest. Treatment with 10058-F4 reduced cellular ATP production and ROS levels in SKOV3 and Hey cells. Consistently, primary cultures of ovarian cancer treated with 10058-F4 showed induction of caspase-3 activity and inhibition of cell proliferation in 15 of 18 cases. The response to 10058-F4 was independent the level of c-Myc protein over-expression in primary cultures of ovarian carcinoma. These novel findings suggest that the growth of ovarian cancer cells is dependent upon c-MYC activity and that targeting c-Myc-Max heterodimerization could be a potential therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer.

  17. TOR (target of rapamycin) is a key regulator of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Most microalgae abundantly accumulate lipid droplets (LDs) containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) under several stress conditions, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In a recent study, we found that inhibition of TOR (target of rapamycin), a highly conserved protein kinase of eukaryotes, by rapamycin resulted in TAG accumulation in microalgae, indicating that TOR negatively regulates TAG accumulation. Here, we show that formation of intracellular LDs and TAG accumulation were also induced in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after exposure to Torin1 or AZD8055, which are novel TOR inhibitors that inhibit TOR activity in a manner different from rapamycin. These results supported quite well our previous conclusion that TOR is a central regulator of TAG accumulation in microalgae.

  18. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  19. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanne C.; Allstadt, Sara D.; Fan, Timothy M.; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina D.; LeBlanc, Amy K.; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. Animals 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. Procedures The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and non-compartmental analyses. Results Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in ng/mL. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, needs to be determined. PMID:26709938

  20. The rapamycin-regulated gene expression signature determines prognosis for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsavachidis Spiridon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in multiple intracellular signaling pathways promoting tumor growth. mTOR is aberrantly activated in a significant portion of breast cancers and is a promising target for treatment. Rapamycin and its analogues are in clinical trials for breast cancer treatment. Patterns of gene expression (metagenes may also be used to simulate a biologic process or effects of a drug treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the gene-expression signature regulated by rapamycin could predict disease outcome for patients with breast cancer. Results Colony formation and sulforhodamine B (IC50 in vitro and in vivo gene expression data identified a signature, termed rapamycin metagene index (RMI, of 31 genes upregulated by rapamycin treatment in vitro as well as in vivo (false discovery rate of 10%. In the Miller dataset, RMI did not correlate with tumor size or lymph node status. High (>75th percentile RMI was significantly associated with longer survival (P = 0.015. On multivariate analysis, RMI (P = 0.029, tumor size (P = 0.015 and lymph node status (P = 0.001 were prognostic. In van 't Veer study, RMI was not associated with the time to develop distant metastasis (P = 0.41. In the Wang dataset, RMI predicted time to disease relapse (P = 0.009. Conclusion Rapamycin-regulated gene expression signature predicts clinical outcome in breast cancer. This supports the central role of mTOR signaling in breast cancer biology and provides further impetus to pursue mTOR-targeted therapies for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Nuclear PIM1 confers resistance to rapamycin-impaired endothelial proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walpen, Thomas; Kalus, Ina [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schwaller, Juerg [Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Peier, Martin A. [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Battegay, Edouard J. [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Humar, Rok, E-mail: Rok.Humar@usz.ch [Research Unit, Division Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zuerich, 8091 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pim1{sup -/-} endothelial cell proliferation displays increased sensitivity to rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mTOR inhibition by rapamycin enhances PIM1 cytosolic and nuclear protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Truncation of Pim1 beyond serine 276 results in nuclear localization of the kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear PIM1 increases endothelial proliferation independent of rapamycin. -- Abstract: The PIM serine/threonine kinases and the mTOR/AKT pathway integrate growth factor signaling and promote cell proliferation and survival. They both share phosphorylation targets and have overlapping functions, which can partially substitute for each other. In cancer cells PIM kinases have been reported to produce resistance to mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Tumor growth depends highly on blood vessel infiltration into the malignant tissue and therefore on endothelial cell proliferation. We therefore investigated how the PIM1 kinase modulates growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC). We found that proliferation of MAEC lacking Pim1 was significantly more sensitive to rapamycin inhibition, compared to wildtype cells. Inhibition of mTOR and AKT in normal MAEC resulted in significantly elevated PIM1 protein levels in the cytosol and in the nucleus. We observed that truncation of the C-terminal part of Pim1 beyond Ser 276 resulted in almost exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. Re-expression of this Pim1 deletion mutant significantly increased the proliferation of Pim1{sup -/-} cells when compared to expression of the wildtype Pim1 cDNA. Finally, overexpression of the nuclear localization mutant and the wildtype Pim1 resulted in complete resistance to growth inhibition by rapamycin. Thus, mTOR inhibition-induced nuclear accumulation of PIM1 or expression of a nuclear C-terminal PIM1 truncation mutant is sufficient to increase endothelial cell proliferation

  2. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quitterer, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.quitterer@pharma.ethz.ch [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. {yields} First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. {yields} Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. {yields} A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. {yields} AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R

  3. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quitterer, Ursula; Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. → First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. → Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. → A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. → AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R heterodimerization, confocal FRET imaging of

  4. Rapamycin causes activation of protein phosphatase-2A1 and nuclear translocation of PCNA in CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, Peter W.; Tung, H.Y. Lim; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2004-01-01

    Rapamycin is a powerful immunosuppressant that causes cell cycle arrest in T cells and several other cell types. Despite its important clinical role, the mechanism of action of rapamycin is not fully understood. Here, we show that rapamycin causes the activation of protein phosphatase-2A 1 which forms a complex with proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a CD 4+ T cell line. Rapamycin also induces PCNA translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, an effect which is antagonized by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of type 2A protein phosphatases. These findings provide evidence for the existence of a signal transduction pathway that links a rapamycin-activated type 2A protein phosphatase to the control of DNA synthesis, DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell death via PCNA

  5. Evidence for Heterodimerization and Functional Interaction of the Angiotensin Type 2 Receptor and the Receptor MAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, Julia; Villela, Daniel C.; Teichmann, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor MAS are receptors of the protective arm of the renin-angiotensin system. They mediate strikingly similar actions. Moreover, in various studies, AT2R antagonists blocked the effects of MAS agonists and vice versa. Such cross-inhibition may in...

  6. Rapamycin doses sufficient to extend lifespan do not compromise muscle mitochondrial content or endurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Vang, Ole; Ye, Lan

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial transcripts were decreased, particularly in the highly oxidative soleus muscle, we found no consistent change in mitochondrial DNA or protein levels. In agreement with the lack of change in mitochondrial components, rapamycin-treated mice had endurance equivalent to that of untreated controls...

  7. Rapamycin blocks the antidepressant effect of ketamine in task-dependent manner

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Kristína; Kletečková, Lenka; Škurlová, Martina; Říčný, J.; Stuchlík, Aleš; Valeš, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 233, č. 11 (2016), s. 2077-2097 ISSN 0033-3158 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13403 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ketamine * rapamycin * antidepressants * anxiety * cognitive deficit * bulbectomy * mTOR * BDNF Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.308, year: 2016

  8. The Immunosuppressive drug – Rapamycin – Electroanalytical Sensing Using Boron- Doped Diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanković, Dalibor M.; Kalcher, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: This paper presents for the first time the study of electrochemical behavior of well known immunosuppressant drug – rapamycin (sirolimus) using boron-doped diamond electrode. Rapamycin provided single and oval-shaped oxidation peak at +1.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl electrode in Britton–Robinson buffer solution at pH 3 confirming highly irreversible behavior of analyte at boron-doped diamond electrode. A differential pulse voltammetry was used for quantification of tested drug under the optimum experimental conditions. The calibration curve was linear over the range from 0.5 to 19.5 μM (R 2 = 0.9976) with detection limit of 0.22 μM. Repeatability of ten successfully measurements of three different concentrations (5, 10 and 15 μM) was 2.5, 1.9 and 1,7 %, respectively. Influence of most common biomolecules presented in urine samples was evaluated. The suggested analytical methodology was successfully applied for determination of rapamycin in four urine samples with excellent recoveries. The developed approach could be beneficial in analysis of rapamycin in biological samples using boron-doped diamond electrode as up-to-date electrochemical sensor and could represent inexpensive analytical alternative to separation methods

  9. Rapamycin potentiates cytotoxicity by docetaxel possibly through downregulation of Survivin in lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hui

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, can potentiate the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in lung cancer cells and to probe the mechanism underlying such enhancement. Methods Lung cancer cells were treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effect on the proliferation of lung cancer cells was evaluated using the MTT method, and cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Protein expression and level of phosphorylation were assayed using Western Blot method. Results Co-treatment of rapamycin and docetaxel was found to favorably enhance the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in four lung cancer cell lines. This tumoricidal boost is associated with a reduction in the expression and phosphorylation levels of Survivin and ERK1/2, respectively. Conclusion The combined application of mTOR inhibitor and docetaxel led to a greater degree of cancer cell killing than that by either compound used alone. Therefore, this combination warrants further investigation in its suitability of serving as a novel therapeutic scheme for treating advanced and recurrent lung cancer patients.

  10. Taking two to tango: a role for ghrelin receptor heterodimerization in stress and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Harriët; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2013-08-30

    The gut hormone, ghrelin, is the only known peripherally derived orexigenic signal. It activates its centrally expressed receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a), to stimulate food intake. The ghrelin signaling system has recently been suggested to play a key role at the interface of homeostatic control of appetite and the hedonic aspects of food intake, as a critical role for ghrelin in dopaminergic mesolimbic circuits involved in reward signaling has emerged. Moreover, enhanced plasma ghrelin levels are associated with conditions of physiological stress, which may underline the drive to eat calorie-dense "comfort-foods" and signifies a role for ghrelin in stress-induced food reward behaviors. These complex and diverse functionalities of the ghrelinergic system are not yet fully elucidated and likely involve crosstalk with additional signaling systems. Interestingly, accumulating data over the last few years has shown the GHS-R1a receptor to dimerize with several additional G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in appetite signaling and reward, including the GHS-R1b receptor, the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3), dopamine receptors (D1 and D2), and more recently, the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2C). GHS-R1a dimerization was shown to affect downstream signaling and receptor trafficking suggesting a potential novel mechanism for fine-tuning GHS-R1a receptor mediated activity. This review summarizes ghrelin's role in food reward and stress and outlines the GHS-R1a dimer pairs identified to date. In addition, the downstream signaling and potential functional consequences of dimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor in appetite and stress-induced food reward behavior are discussed. The existence of multiple GHS-R1a heterodimers has important consequences for future pharmacotherapies as it significantly increases the pharmacological diversity of the GHS-R1a receptor and has the potential to enhance specificity of novel ghrelin-targeted drugs.

  11. Taking Two to Tango: A Role for Ghrelin Receptor Heterodimerization in Stress and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet eSchellekens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The gut hormone, ghrelin, is the only known peripherally derived orexigenic signal. It activates its centrally expressed receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a, to stimulate food intake. The ghrelin signalling system has recently been suggested to play a key role at the interface of homeostatic control of appetite and the hedonic aspects of food intake, as a critical role for ghrelin in dopaminergic mesolimbic circuits involved in reward signalling has emerged. Moreover, enhanced plasma ghrelin levels are associated with conditions of physiological stress, which may underline the drive to eat calorie-dense ‘comfort-foods’ and signifies a role for ghrelin in stress-induced food reward behaviours. These complex and diverse functionalities of the ghrelinergic system are not yet fully elucidated and likely involve crosstalk with additional signalling systems. Interestingly, accumulating data over the last few years has shown the GHS-R1a receptor to dimerize with several additional G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs involved in appetite signalling and reward, including the GHS-R1b receptor, the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3, dopamine receptors (D1 and D2, and more recently, the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2C. GHS-R1a dimerization was shown to affect downstream signalling and receptor trafficking suggesting a potential novel mechanism for fine-tuning GHS-R1a receptor mediated activity. This review summarizes ghrelin’s role in food reward and stress and outlines the GHS-R1a dimer pairs identified to date. In addition, the downstream signalling and potential functional consequences of dimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor in appetite and stress-induced food reward behaviour are discussed. The existence of multiple GHS-R1a heterodimers has important consequences for future pharmacotherapies as it significantly increases the pharmacological diversity of the GHS-R1a receptor and has the potential to enhance specificity of novel

  12. The effect of the immunophilin ligands rapamycin and FK506 on proliferation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultsch, T; Martin, R; Hohman, R J

    1992-01-01

    The immunosuppressive drugs FK506 and cyclosporin A have an identical spectrum of activities with respect to IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-mediated exocytosis from mast cells and T cell receptor-mediated transcription of IL-2. These findings suggest a common step in receptor-mediated signal transduction leading to exocytosis and transcription and imply that immunosuppressive drugs target specific signal transduction pathways, rather than specific cell types. This hypothesis is supported by studies on the effect of rapamycin on IL-3 dependent proliferation of the rodent mast cell line PT18. Rapamycin inhibits proliferation of PT18 cells, achieving a plateau of 80% inhibition at 1 nM. This inhibition is prevented in a competitive manner by FK506, a structural analogue of rapamycin. Proliferation of rat basophilic leukemia cells and WEHI-3 cells was also inhibited, at doses comparable to those shown previously to inhibit IL-2-dependent proliferation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte line (CTLL) cells. In contrast, proliferation of A-431 cells, a epidermoid cell line, was not affected by rapamycin. DNA histograms indicate that complexes formed between the rapamycin-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and rapamycin arrest-proliferating PT18 cells in the G0/G1-phase. It is concluded that FKBP-rapamycin complexes may inhibit proliferative signals emanating from IL-3 receptors, resulting in growth arrest of cytokine-dependent, hematopoietic cells. PMID:1384815

  13. Rapamycin enhances the anti-angiogenesis and anti-proliferation ability of YM155 in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kong-Liang; Wang, Yu-Fan; Qin, Jia-Ruo; Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong-Tao; Zheng, Li-Wu; Li, Ming-Hua; Kong, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hong-Yu

    2017-06-01

    YM155, a small molecule inhibitor of survivin, has been studied in many tumors. It has been shown that YM155 inhibited oral squamous cell carcinoma through promoting apoptosis and autophagy and inhibiting proliferation. It was found that YM155 also inhibited the oral squamous cell carcinoma-mediated angiogenesis through the inactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, played an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. In our study, cell proliferation assay, transwell assay, tube formation assay, and western blot assay were used to investigate the synergistic effect of rapamycin on YM155 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Either in vitro or in vivo, rapamycin and YM155 exerted a synergistic effect on the inhibition of survivin and vascular endothelial growth factor through mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Overall, our results revealed that low-dose rapamycin strongly promoted the sensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to YM155.

  14. Basic Concepts in G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Homo- and Heterodimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Franco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs were considered to be expressed as monomers on the cell surface of neuronal and non-neuronal cells. It is now becoming evident that this view must be overtly changed since these receptors can form homodimers, heterodimers, and higher-order oligomers on the plasma membrane. Here we discuss some of the basics and some new concepts of receptor homo- and heteromerization. Dimers-oligomers modify pharmacology, trafficking, and signaling of receptors. First of all, GPCR dimers must be considered as the main molecules that are targeted by neurotransmitters or by drugs. Thus, binding data must be fitted to dimer-based models. In these models, it is considered that the conformational changes transmitted within the dimer molecule lead to cooperativity. Cooperativity must be taken into account in the binding of agonists-antagonists-drugs and also in the binding of the so-called allosteric modulators. Cooperativity results from the intramolecular cross-talk in the homodimer. As an intramolecular cross-talk in the heterodimer, the binding of one neurotransmitter to one receptor often affects the binding of the second neurotransmitter to the partner receptor. Coactivation of the two receptors in a heterodimer can change completely the signaling pathway triggered by the neurotransmitter as well as the trafficking of the receptors. Heterodimer-specific drugs or dual drugs able to activate the two receptors in the heterodimer simultaneously emerge as novel and promising drugs for a variety of central nervous system (CNS therapeutic applications.

  15. HER2 monoclonal antibodies that do not interfere with receptor heterodimerization-mediated signaling induce effective internalization and represent valuable components for rational antibody-drug conjugate design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Bart E C G; Peipp, Matthias; de Haij, Simone; van den Brink, Edward N; Kellner, Christian; Riedl, Thilo; de Jong, Rob; Vink, Tom; Strumane, Kristin; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 provides an excellent target for selective delivery of cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells by antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) as has been clinically validated by ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla(TM)). While selecting a suitable antibody for an ADC approach often takes specificity and efficient antibody-target complex internalization into account, the characteristics of the optimal antibody candidate remain poorly understood. We studied a large panel of human HER2 antibodies to identify the characteristics that make them most suitable for an ADC approach. As a model toxin, amenable to in vitro high-throughput screening, we employed Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') fused to an anti-kappa light chain domain antibody. Cytotoxicity induced by HER2 antibodies, which were thus non-covalently linked to ETA', was assessed for high and low HER2 expressing tumor cell lines and correlated with internalization and downmodulation of HER2 antibody-target complexes. Our results demonstrate that HER2 antibodies that do not inhibit heterodimerization of HER2 with related ErbB receptors internalize more efficiently and show greater ETA'-mediated cytotoxicity than antibodies that do inhibit such heterodimerization. Moreover, stimulation with ErbB ligand significantly enhanced ADC-mediated tumor kill by antibodies that do not inhibit HER2 heterodimerization. This suggests that the formation of HER2/ErbB-heterodimers enhances ADC internalization and subsequent killing of tumor cells. Our study indicates that selecting HER2 ADCs that allow piggybacking of HER2 onto other ErbB receptors provides an attractive strategy for increasing ADC delivery and tumor cell killing capacity to both high and low HER2 expressing tumor cells.

  16. The heterodimeric structure of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 dictates 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-directed transcriptional events in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Bajaj, S Paul; Chun, Rene F; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C plays a key role in RNA processing. More recently hnRNP C has also been shown to function as a DNA binding protein exerting a dominant-negative effect on transcriptional responses to the vitamin D hormone,1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D), via interaction in cis with vitamin D response elements (VDREs). The physiologically active form of human hnRNPC is a tetramer of hnRNPC1 (huC1) and C2 (huC2) subunits known to be critical for specific RNA binding activity in vivo , yet the requirement for heterodimerization of huC1 and C2 in DNA binding and downstream action is not well understood. While over-expression of either huC1 or huC2 alone in mouse osteoblastic cells did not suppress 1,25(OH) 2 D-induced transcription, over-expression of huC1 and huC2 in combination using a bone-specific polycistronic vector successfully suppressed 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of osteoblast target gene expression. Over-expression of either huC1 or huC2 in human osteoblasts was sufficient to confer suppression of 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated transcription, indicating the ability of transfected huC1 and huC2 to successfully engage as heterodimerization partners with endogenously expressed huC1 and huC2. The failure of the chimeric combination of mouse and human hnRNPCs to impair 1,25(OH) 2 D-driven gene expression in mouse cells was structurally predicted, owing to the absence of the last helix in the leucine zipper (LZ) heterodimerization domain of hnRNPC gene product in lower species, including the mouse. These results confirm that species-specific heterodimerization of hnRNPC1 and hnRNPC2 is a necessary prerequisite for DNA binding and down-regulation of 1,25(OH) 2 D-VDR-VDRE-directed gene transactivation in osteoblasts.

  17. Involvement of the VDE homing endonuclease and rapamycin in regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GSH11 gene encoding the high affinity glutathione transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Tsuyoshi; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Sammoto, Hiroyuki; Ono, Bun-Ichiro

    2003-10-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene HGT1/GSH11 encodes the high affinity glutathione transporter and is repressed by cysteine added to the culture medium. It has been found previously that a 5'-upstream cis-element, CCGCCACAC, is responsible for regulating GSH11 expression and that several proteins bind to this element (Miyake, T., Kanayama, M., Sammoto, H., and Ono, B. (2002) Mol. Genet. Genomics 266, 1004-1011). In this report we present evidence that the most prominent of these proteins is VDE, known previously as the homing endonuclease encoded by VMA1. We show also that GSH11 is not expressed in a VDE-deleted strain and that inability to express the GSH11 of this strain is overcome by introduction of the coding region of VDE or the entire VMA1 gene. It is also found that VDE does not cut DNA in the vicinity of the GSH11 cis-element. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signal-transduction system, is found to enhance expression of GSH11 in a VDE-dependent manner under conditions of sulfur starvation. These results indicate that GSH11 is regulated by a system sensitive to sulfur starvation (presumably via cysteine depletion) and a more general system involving the nutritional starvation signal mediated by the TOR system. Both systems need to be operational (inhibition of TOR and sulfur starvation) for full expression of GSH11.

  18. Prenatal Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (m TORC1) Inhibition by Rapamycin Treatment of Pregnant Mice Causes Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Alters Postnatal Cardiac Growth, Morphology, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Maria; Fiedler, Saskia; Jux, Christian; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef

    2017-08-04

    Fetal growth impacts cardiovascular health throughout postnatal life in humans. Various animal models of intrauterine growth restriction exhibit reduced heart size at birth, which negatively influences cardiac function in adulthood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates nutrient and growth factor availability with cell growth, thereby regulating organ size. This study aimed at elucidating a possible involvement of mTORC1 in intrauterine growth restriction and prenatal heart growth. We inhibited mTORC1 in fetal mice by rapamycin treatment of pregnant dams in late gestation. Prenatal rapamycin treatment reduces mTORC1 activity in various organs at birth, which is fully restored by postnatal day 3. Rapamycin-treated neonates exhibit a 16% reduction in body weight compared with vehicle-treated controls. Heart weight decreases by 35%, resulting in a significantly reduced heart weight/body weight ratio, smaller left ventricular dimensions, and reduced cardiac output in rapamycin- versus vehicle-treated mice at birth. Although proliferation rates in neonatal rapamycin-treated hearts are unaffected, cardiomyocyte size is reduced, and apoptosis increased compared with vehicle-treated neonates. Rapamycin-treated mice exhibit postnatal catch-up growth, but body weight and left ventricular mass remain reduced in adulthood. Prenatal mTORC1 inhibition causes a reduction in cardiomyocyte number in adult hearts compared with controls, which is partially compensated for by an increased cardiomyocyte volume, resulting in normal cardiac function without maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Prenatal rapamycin treatment of pregnant dams represents a new mouse model of intrauterine growth restriction and identifies an important role of mTORC1 in perinatal cardiac growth. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. Rapamycin-ameliorated diabetic symptoms involved in increasing adiponectin expression in diabetic mice on a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fang-Hua; Ye, Yan-Na; Li, Jin-Meng; Zhao, Hai-Yang; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies showed that rapamycin improved diabetic complications. Here, we investigated the metabolic effects of rapamycin in type 2 diabetes model (T2DM) mice. Mice were treated with a daily intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin at 2 mg/kg or vehicle only for 3 weeks and were maintained on a high-fat diet. The treated diabetic mice exhibited decreased body weight, blood glucose levels, and fat mass. FGF21 expression was suppressed in C57B/L6 mice, but adiponectin expression increased both in FGF21 KO and C57B/L6 mice. These results suggest that rapamycin may alleviate FGF21 resistance in mice on a high-fat diet. The reduction of adipose tissue mass of the diabetic mice may be due to the increased adiponectin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b from Pleurotus ostreatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Scozzafava, Andrea; Ullah, Sana; Tron, Thierry; Piscitelli, Alessandra; Sannia, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Laccases are multicopper oxidases of great biotechnological potential. While laccases are generally monomeric glycoproteins, the white-rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus produces two closely related heterodimeric isoenzymes composed of a large subunit, homologous to the other fungal laccases, and a small subunit. The sequence of the small subunit does not show significant homology to any other protein or domain of known function and consequently its function is unknown. The highest similarity to proteins of known structure is to a putative enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase from Acinetobacter baumannii, which shows an identity of 27.8%. Diffraction-quality crystals of the small subunit of the heterodimeric laccase POXA3b (sPOXA3b) from P. ostreatus were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K from a solution consisting of 1.8 M sodium formate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212 or P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.6, c = 53.9 Å. The asymmetric unit contains two molecules related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis. A complete data set extending to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å was collected at 100 K using a wavelength of 1.140 Å. PMID:24419623

  1. Effects of rapamycin treatment after controlled cortical impact injury on neurogenesis and synaptic reorganization in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corwin R Butler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8-13 weeks, evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis.

  2. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and express...

  3. Activation of the unfolded protein response in sarcoma cells treated with rapamycin or temsirolimus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Briggs

    Full Text Available Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR in eukaryotic cells represents an evolutionarily conserved response to physiological stress. Here, we report that the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin (sirolimus and structurally related temsirolimus are capable of inducing UPR in sarcoma cells. However, this effect appears to be distinct from the classical role for these drugs as mTOR inhibitors. Instead, we detected these compounds to be associated with ribosomes isolated from treated cells. Specifically, temsirolimus treatment resulted in protection from chemical modification of several rRNA residues previously shown to bind rapamycin in prokaryotic cells. As an application for these findings, we demonstrate maximum tumor cell growth inhibition occurring only at doses which induce UPR and which have been shown to be safely achieved in human patients. These results are significant because they challenge the paradigm for the use of these drugs as anticancer agents and reveal a connection to UPR, a conserved biological response that has been implicated in tumor growth and response to therapy. As a result, eIF2 alpha phosphorylation and Xbp-1 splicing may serve as useful biomarkers of treatment response in future clinical trials using rapamycin and rapalogs.

  4. Descending serotonergic facilitation mediated by spinal 5-HT3 receptors engages spinal rapamycin-sensitive pathways in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Curtis O.; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported the importance of spinal rapamycin-sensitive pathways in maintaining persistent pain-like states. A descending facilitatory drive mediated through spinal 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) originating from superficial dorsal horn NK1-expressing neurons and that relays through the parabrachial nucleus and the rostroventral medial medulla to act on deep dorsal horn neurons is known be important in maintaining these pain-like states. To determine if spinal rapamycin-sensitive pathways are activated by a descending serotonergic drive, we investigated the effects of spinally administered rapamycin on responses of deep dorsal horn neurons that had been pre-treated with the selective 5-HT3R antagonist ondansetron. We also investigated the effects of spinally administered cell cycle inhibitor (CCI)-779 (a rapamycin ester analogue) on deep dorsal horn neurons from rats with carrageenan-induced inflammation of the hind paw. Unlike some other models of persistent pain, this model does not involve an altered 5-HT3R-mediated descending serotonergic drive. We found that the inhibitory effects of rapamycin were significantly reduced for neuronal responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli when the spinal cord was pre-treated with ondansetron. Furthermore, CCI-779 was found to be ineffective in attenuating spinal neuronal responses to peripheral stimuli in carrageenan-treated rats. Therefore, we conclude that 5-HT3R-mediated descending facilitation is one requirement for activation of rapamycin-sensitive pathways that contribute to persistent pain-like states. PMID:20709148

  5. Rapamycin Eye Drops Suppress Lacrimal Gland Inflammation In a Murine Model of Sjögren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir; Edman, Maria C.; Reddy Janga, Srikanth; Yarber, Frances; Meng, Zhen; Klinngam, Wannita; Bushman, Jonathan; Ma, Tao; Liu, Siyu; Louie, Stan; Mehta, Arjun; Ding, Chuanqing; MacKay, J. Andrew; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of topical rapamycin in treating autoimmune dacryoadenitis in a mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome. Methods We developed rapamycin in a poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE) micelle formulation to maintain solubility. Rapamycin or PEG-DSPE eye drops (vehicle) were administered in a well-established Sjögren's syndrome disease model, the male nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, twice daily for 12 weeks starting at 8 weeks of age. Mouse tear fluid was collected and tear Cathepsin S, a putative tear biomarker for Sjögren's syndrome, was measured. Lacrimal glands were retrieved for histological evaluation, and quantitative real-time PCR of genes associated with Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis. Tear secretion was measured using phenol red threads, and corneal fluorescein staining was used to assess corneal integrity. Results Lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal glands from rapamycin-treated mice was significantly (P = 0.0001) reduced by 3.8-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice after 12 weeks of treatment. Rapamycin, but not vehicle, treatment increased tear secretion and decreased corneal fluorescein staining after 12 weeks. In rapamycin-treated mice, Cathepsin S activity was significantly reduced by 3.75-fold in tears (P eye. PMID:28122086

  6. An integrin alpha4beta7•IgG heterodimeric chimera binds to MAdCAM-1 on high endothelial venules in gut-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Mitoma, Junya; Sato, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Minoru; Nakayama, Jun

    2011-06-01

    Lymphocyte homing is regulated by a multistep process mediated by sequential adhesive interactions between circulating lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs). In gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the initial interactive step, "tethering and rolling," is partly mediated by integrin α4β7 expressed on GALT-homing lymphocytes and its ligand MAdCAM-1, which is exclusively expressed on HEVs in GALT. To probe functional MAdCAM-1 in tissue sections, we developed a soluble integrin α4β7 heterodimeric IgG chimera by joining the extracellular region of mouse integrin α4 and β7 subunits to a human IgG Fc domain. Western blot analysis revealed that co-transfection of HEK 293T cells with expression vectors encoding integrin α4•IgG and β7•IgG results in the formation of α4β7•IgG heterodimeric chimeras. This complex preferentially binds to CHO cells expressing MAdCAM-1 and, to a lesser extent, to cells expressing VCAM-1, but not to cells expressing ICAM-1. Moreover, α4β7•IgG specifically binds to HEVs in GALT in situ in a divalent cation-dependent fashion and inhibits lymphocyte binding to HEVs in GALT. These findings indicate that α4β7•IgG can be used as a probe for functional MAdCAM-1 expressed on HEVs in GALT and could potentially serve as an anti-inflammatory drug inhibiting GALT-specific lymphocyte migration.

  7. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  8. A randomized controlled trial to establish effects of short-term rapamycin treatment in 24 middle-aged companion dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Silvan R; Kaeberlein, Tammi L; Mailheau, Susan; Bergman, Philip J; Creevy, Kate E; Promislow, Daniel E L; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2017-04-01

    Age is the single greatest risk factor for most causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and their companion animals. As opposed to other model organisms used to study aging, dogs share the human environment, are subject to similar risk factors, receive comparable medical care, and develop many of the same age-related diseases humans do. In this study, 24 middle-aged healthy dogs received either placebo or a non-immunosuppressive dose of rapamycin for 10 weeks. All dogs received clinical and hematological exams before, during, and after the trial and echocardiography before and after the trial. Our results showed no clinical side effects in the rapamycin-treated group compared to dogs receiving the placebo. Echocardiography suggested improvement in both diastolic and systolic age-related measures of heart function (E/A ratio, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction) in the rapamycin-treated dogs. Hematological values remained within the normal range for all parameters studied; however, the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was decreased in rapamycin-treated dogs. Based on these results, we will test rapamycin on a larger dog cohort for a longer period of time in order to validate its effects on cardiac function and to determine whether it can significantly improve healthspan and reduce mortality in companion dogs.

  9. Survival benefit with proapoptotic molecular and pathologic responses from dual targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin and epidermal growth factor receptor in a preclinical model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christopher W; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-10-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), although rare, often metastasize, such that surgery, the only potentially curative therapy, is not possible. There is no effective systemic therapy for patients with advanced PNETs. Therefore, new strategies are needed. Toward that end, we investigated the potential benefit of dual therapeutic targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases, using a preclinical mouse model of PNET. Rapamycin and erlotinib, inhibitors of mTOR and EGFR, respectively, were used to treat RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice bearing advanced multifocal PNET. Tumor growth and survival were monitored, and tumors were surveyed for potential biomarkers of response to the therapeutics. Rapamycin monotherapy was notably efficacious, prolonging survival concomitant with tumor stasis (stable disease). However, the tumors developed resistance, as evidenced by eventual relapse to progressive tumor growth. Erlotinib monotherapy slowed tumor growth and elicited a marginal survival benefit. In combination, there was an unprecedented survival benefit in the face of this aggressive multifocal cancer and, in contrast to either monotherapy, the development of adaptive resistance was not apparent. Additionally, the antiapoptotic protein survivin was implicated as a biomarker of sensitivity and beneficial responses to the dual targeted therapy. Preclinical trials in a mouse model of endogenous PNET suggest that combined targeting of the mTOR and EGFR signaling pathways could have potential clinical benefit in treating PNET. These results have encouraged development of an ongoing phase II clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment regimen in human neuroendocrine tumors.

  10. Kinetic modelling of in vitro data of PI3K, mTOR1, PTEN enzymes and on-target inhibitors Rapamycin, BEZ235, and LY294002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsov, Alexey; Tashkandi, Ghassan; Langdon, Simon P; Harrison, David J; Bown, James L

    2017-01-15

    The phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR1) are two key targets for anti-cancer therapy. Predicting the response of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 signalling pathway to targeted therapy is made difficult because of network complexities. Systems biology models can help explore those complexities but the value of such models is dependent on accurate parameterisation. Motivated by a need to increase accuracy in kinetic parameter estimation, and therefore the predictive power of the model, we present a framework to integrate kinetic data from enzyme assays into a unified enzyme kinetic model. We present exemplar kinetic models of PI3K and mTOR1, calibrated on in vitro enzyme data and founded on Michaelis-Menten (MM) approximation. We describe the effects of an allosteric mTOR1 inhibitor (Rapamycin) and ATP-competitive inhibitors (BEZ235 and LY294002) that show dual inhibition of mTOR1 and PI3K. We also model the kinetics of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which modulates sensitivity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 pathway to these drugs. Model validation with independent data sets allows investigation of enzyme function and drug dose dependencies in a wide range of experimental conditions. Modelling of the mTOR1 kinetics showed that Rapamycin has an IC 50 independent of ATP concentration and that it is a selective inhibitor of mTOR1 substrates S6K1 and 4EBP1: it retains 40% of mTOR1 activity relative to 4EBP1 phosphorylation and inhibits completely S6K1 activity. For the dual ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR1 and PI3K, LY294002 and BEZ235, we derived the dependence of the IC 50 on ATP concentration that allows prediction of the IC 50 at different ATP concentrations in enzyme and cellular assays. Comparison of drug effectiveness in enzyme and cellular assays showed that some features of these drugs arise from signalling modulation beyond the on-target action and MM approximation and require a systems-level consideration of the whole PI3K

  11. Phosphoproteomic profiling of in vivo signaling in liver by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1.

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    Gokhan Demirkan

    Full Text Available Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood.We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO(2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates.In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo.

  12. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-01-01

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  13. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-α (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity

  14. A central role for the mammalian target of rapamycin in LPS-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunshuang; Wang, Yi; Li, Dan; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), also known as endotoxin, induces profound anorexia. However, the LPS-provoked pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and the neural mechanisms underlying the development of anorexia are not clear. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of metabolism, cell growth, and protein synthesis. This study aimed to determine whether the mTOR pathway is involved in LPS-induced anorexia. Effects of LPS on hypothalamic gene/protein expression in mice were measured by RT-PCR or western blotting analysis. To determine whether inhibition of mTOR signaling could attenuate LPS-induced anorexia, we administered an i.c.v. injection of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on LPS-treated male mice. In this study, we showed that LPS stimulates the mTOR signaling pathway through the enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) and p70S6K(Thr389). We also showed that LPS administration increased the phosphorylation of FOXO1(Ser256), the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (Panorexia by decreasing the phosphorylation of p70S6K(Thr389), FOXO1(Ser256), and FOXO1/3a(Thr) (24) (/) (32). These results suggest promising approaches for the prevention and treatment of LPS-induced anorexia. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Regulates Growth in Response to Nutritional Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Ronit

    2016-10-01

    All organisms can respond to the availability of nutrients by regulating their metabolism, growth, and cell division. Central to the regulation of growth in response to nutrient availability is the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling that is composed of two structurally distinct complexes: TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). The TOR genes were first identified in yeast as target of rapamycin, a natural product of a soil bacterium, which proved beneficial as an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug and is currently being tested for a handful of other pathological conditions including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and age-related diseases. Studies of the TOR pathway unraveled a complex growth-regulating network. TOR regulates nutrient uptake, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation, as well as metabolic pathways, in a coordinated manner that ensures that cells grow or cease growth in response to nutrient availability. The identification of specific signals and mechanisms that stimulate TOR signaling is an active and exciting field of research that has already identified nitrogen and amino acids as key regulators of TORC1 activity. The signals, as well as the cellular functions of TORC2, are far less well understood. Additional open questions in the field concern the relationships between TORC1 and TORC2, as well as the links with other nutrient-responsive pathways. Here I review the main features of TORC1 and TORC2, with a particular focus on yeasts as model organisms.

  16. Construction of a mutant of Actinoplanes sp. N902-109 that produces a new rapamycin analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Gao, Ping; Zhao, Qi; Hu, Hai-Feng

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, we introduced point mutations into Ac_rapA which encodes a polyketide synthase responsible for rapamycin biosynthesis in Actinoplanes sp. N902-109, in order to construct a mutant with an inactivated enoylreductase (ER) domain, which was able to synthesize a new rapamycin analog. Based on the homologous recombination induced by double-strand breaks in chromosome mediated by endonuclease I-SceI, the site-directed mutation in the first ER domain of Ac_rapA was introduced using non-replicating plasmid pLYERIA combined with an I-SceI expression plasmid. Three amino acid residues of the active center, Ala-Gly-Gly, were converted to Ala-Ser-Pro. The broth of the mutant strain SIPI-027 was analyzed by HPLC and a new peak with the similar UV spectrum to that of rapamycin was found. The sample of the new peak was prepared by solvent extraction, column chromatography, and crystallization methods. The structure of new compound, named as SIPI-rapxin, was elucidated by determining and analyzing its MS and NMR spectra and its biological activity was assessed using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). An ER domain-deficient mutant of Actinoplanes sp. N902-109, named as SIPI-027, was constructed, which produced a novel rapamycin analog SIPI-rapxin and its structure was elucidated to be 35, 36-didehydro-27-O-demethylrapamycin. The biological activity of SIPI-rapxin was better than that of rapamycin. In conclusion, inactivation of the first ER domain of rapA, one of the modular polyketide synthase responsible for macro-lactone synthesis of rapamycin, gave rise to a mutant capable of producing a novel rapamycin analog, 35, 36-didehydro-27-O-demethylrapamycin, demonstrating that the enoylreductase domain was responsible for the reduction of the double bond between C-35 and C-36 during rapamycin synthesis. Copyright © 2018 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression and mechanism of mammalian target of rapamycin in age-related renal cell senescence and organ aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Li; Cai, Guangyan; Liu, Fuyou; Fu, Bo; Liu, Weiping; Hong, Quan; Ma, Qiang; Peng, Youming; Wang, Jianzhong; Chen, Xiangmei

    2009-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is relevant to cell senescence and organismal aging. This study firstly showed that the level of mTOR expression increased with aging in rat kidneys, rat mesangial cells and WI-38 cells (P aging-related phenotypes were all reduced in cells treated with rapamycin (an inhibitor of mTOR) than in control cells (P aging, and that mTOR may promote cellular senescence by regulating the cell cycle through p21(WAF1/CIP1/SDI1), which might provide a new target for preventing renal aging.

  18. Contribution of EGFR and ErbB-3 Heterodimerization to the EGFR Mutation-Induced Gefitinib- and Erlotinib-Resistance in Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treatments.

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    Debby D Wang

    Full Text Available EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has become a major threat to the treatment of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Essentially, the resistance mechanism involves modifications of the intracellular signaling pathways. In our work, we separately investigated the EGFR and ErbB-3 heterodimerization, regarded as the origin of intracellular signaling pathways. On one hand, we combined the molecular interaction in EGFR heterodimerization with that between the EGFR tyrosine kinase and its inhibitor. For 168 clinical subjects, we characterized their corresponding EGFR mutations using molecular interactions, with three potential dimerization partners (ErbB-2, IGF-1R and c-Met of EGFR and two of its small molecule inhibitors (gefitinib and erlotinib. Based on molecular dynamics simulations and structural analysis, we modeled these mutant-partner or mutant-inhibitor interactions using binding free energy and its components. As a consequence, the mutant-partner interactions are amplified for mutants L858R and L858R_T790M, compared to the wild type EGFR. Mutant delL747_P753insS represents the largest difference between the mutant-IGF-1R interaction and the mutant-inhibitor interaction, which explains the shorter progression-free survival of an inhibitor to this mutant type. Besides, feature sets including different energy components were constructed, and efficient regression trees were applied to map these features to the progression-free survival of an inhibitor. On the other hand, we comparably examined the interactions between ErbB-3 and its partners (EGFR mutants, IGF-1R, ErbB-2 and c-Met. Compared to others, c-Met shows a remarkably-strong binding with ErbB-3, implying its significant role in regulating ErbB-3 signaling. Moreover, EGFR mutants corresponding to poor clinical outcomes, such as L858R_T790M, possess lower binding affinities with ErbB-3 than c-Met does. This may promote the communication between ErbB-3 and c-Met in these cancer cells. The

  19. Efficacy of Polyphenon E, Red Ginseng, and Rapamycin on Benzo(apyrene-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice

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    Ying Yan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of several novel agents in preventing lung tumorigenesis in mice. We evaluated polyphenon E, red ginseng, and rapamycin in A/J mice treated with the tobacco-specific carcinogen benzo(apyrene for their ability to inhibit pulmonary adenoma formation and growth. We found that treatment with polyphenon E exhibited a significant reduction on both tumor multiplicity and tumor load (tumor multiplicity × tumor volume in a dose-dependent fashion. Polyphenon E (2% wt/wt in the diet reduced tumor multiplicity by 46% and tumor load by 94%. This result provided key evidence in support of a phase II clinical chemoprevention trial of lung cancer. Administration of red ginseng in drinking water decreased tumor multiplicity by 36% and tumor load by 70%. The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin showed significant efficacy against lung tumor growth in the tumor progression protocol and reduced tumor load by 84%. The results of these investigations demonstrate that polyphenon E, red ginseng, and rapamycin significantly inhibit pulmonary adenoma formation and growth in A/J mice.

  20. Neuroprotective effect of rapamycin on spinal cord injury via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

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    Kai Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a crucial role in neural development, axonal guidance, neuropathic pain remission and neuronal survival. In this study, we initially examined the effect of rapamycin on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway after spinal cord injury, by intraperitoneally injecting spinal cord injured rats with rapamycin over 2 days. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression levels of β-catenin protein, ca-spase-3 protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein, components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Rapamycin increased the levels of β-catenin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the injured spinal cord, improved the pathological morphology at the injury site, reduced the loss of motor neurons, and promoted motor functional recovery in rats after spinal cord injury. Our experimental findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of rapamycin intervention is mediated through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway after spinal cord injury.

  1. Target of rapamycin signalling mediates the lifespan-extending effects of dietary restriction by essential amino acid alteration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emran, S.; Yang, M.Y.; He, X.L.; Zandveld, J.; Piper, M.D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), defined as a moderate reduction in food intake short of malnutrition, has been shown to extend healthy lifespan in a diverse range of organisms, from yeast to primates. Reduced signalling through the insulin/IGF-like (IIS) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathways

  2. Effects of rapamycin and curcumin treatment on the development of epilepsy after electrically induced status epilepticus in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, Cato M.; Borm, Lars E.; Kooijman, Lieneke; Aronica, Eleonora; Wadman, Wytse J.; Hartog, Aloysius F.; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been suggested as a possible antiepileptogenic strategy in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here we aim to elucidate whether mTOR inhibition has antiepileptogenic and/or antiseizure effects using different treatment strategies in the

  3. Effects of rapamycin and curcumin treatment on the development of epilepsy after electrically induced status epilepticus in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, C.M.; Borm, L.E.; Kooijman, L.; Aronica, E.; Wadman, W.J.; Hartog, A.F.; van Vliet, E.A.; Gorter, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been suggested as a possible antiepileptogenic strategy in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here we aim to elucidate whether mTOR inhibition has antiepileptogenic and/or antiseizure effects using different treatment

  4. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) protein expression in the tumor and its microenvironment correlates with more aggressive pathology at cystectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, B.R. (Brian R.); Vakar-Lopez, F. (Funda); Brown, L. (Lisha); Montgomery, B. (Bruce); Seiler, R. (Roland); P.C. Black (Peter C.); J.L. Boormans (Joost); Dall′Era, M. (Marc); Davincioni, E. (Elai); Douglas, J. (James); Gibb, E.A. (Ewan A.); B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); M.S. van der Heijden (Michiel); Hsieh, A.C. (Andrew C.); Wright, J.L. (Jonathan L.); Lam, H.-M. (Hung-Ming)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been implicated in driving tumor biology in multiple malignancies, including urothelial carcinoma (UC). We investigate how mTOR and phosphorylated mTOR (pmTOR) protein expression correlate with chemoresponsiveness in the tumor

  5. Synergism between the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and FAK down-regulation in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Pei-Jie Shi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is an aggressive malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells in both children and adults. Although improvements in contemporary therapy and development of new treatment strategies have led to dramatic increases in the cure rate in children with ALL, the relapse rate remains high and the prognosis of relapsed childhood ALL is poor. Molecularly targeted therapies have emerged as the leading treatments in cancer therapy. Multi-cytotoxic drug regimens have achieved success, yet many studies addressing targeted therapies have focused on only one single agent. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is synergistic with the effect of focal adhesion kinase (FAK down-regulation in the treatment of ALL. Methods The effect of rapamycin combined with FAK down-regulation on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, and apoptosis was investigated in the human precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells REH and on survival time and leukemia progression in a non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse model. Results When combined with FAK down-regulation, rapamycin-induced suppression of cell proliferation, G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis were significantly enhanced. In addition, REH cell-injected NOD/SCID mice treated with rapamycin and a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA to down-regulate FAK had significantly longer survival times and slower leukemia progression compared with mice injected with REH-empty vector cells and treated with rapamycin. Moreover, the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (BCL-2 gene family was shown to be involved in the enhancement, by combined treatment, of REH cell apoptosis. Conclusions FAK down-regulation enhanced the in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effects of rapamycin on REH cell growth, indicating that the simultaneous targeting of mTOR- and FAK-related pathways might offer a novel

  6. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galat, Andrzej; Thai, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome

  7. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  8. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galat, Andrzej, E-mail: galat@dsvidf.cea.fr; Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  9. Spatio-temporal manipulation of small GTPase activity at subcellular level and on timescale of seconds in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRose, Robert; Pohlmeyer, Christopher; Umeda, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Nagano, Tetsuo; Kuo, Scot; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-03-09

    Dynamic regulation of the Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with great spatiotemporal precision is essential for various cellular functions and events(1, 2). Their spatiotemporally dynamic nature has been revealed by visualization of their activity and localization in real time(3). In order to gain deeper understanding of their roles in diverse cellular functions at the molecular level, the next step should be perturbation of protein activities at a precise subcellular location and timing. To achieve this goal, we have developed a method for light-induced, spatio-temporally controlled activation of small GTPases by combining two techniques: (1) rapamycin-induced FKBP-FRB heterodimerization and (2) a photo-caging method of rapamycin. With the use of rapamycin-mediated FKBP-FRB heterodimerization, we have developed a method for rapidly inducible activation or inactivation of small GTPases including Rac(4), Cdc42(4), RhoA(4) and Ras(5), in which rapamycin induces translocation of FKBP-fused GTPases, or their activators, to the plasma membrane where FRB is anchored. For coupling with this heterodimerization system, we have also developed a photo-caging system of rapamycin analogs. A photo-caged compound is a small molecule whose activity is suppressed with a photocleavable protecting group known as a caging group. To suppress heterodimerization activity completely, we designed a caged rapamycin that is tethered to a macromolecule such that the resulting large complex cannot cross the plasma membrane, leading to virtually no background activity as a chemical dimerizer inside cells(6). Figure 1 illustrates a scheme of our system. With the combination of these two systems, we locally recruited a Rac activator to the plasma membrane on a timescale of seconds and achieved light-induced Rac activation at the subcellular level(6).

  10. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  11. Giant Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipomas and Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Presenting after Two Successive Pregnancies Successfully Treated with Surgery and Rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Peces

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with abdominal and flank pain with two successive pregnancies and was diagnosed of giant bilateral renal AMLs and pulmonary LAM associated with TSC in the post-partum of her second pregnancy. This case illustrates that in women with TSC rapid growth from renal AMLs and development of LAM may occur with successive pregnancies. It also stresses the potential for preservation of renal function despite successive bilateral renal surgery of giant AMLs. Moreover, the treatment with a low-dose rapamycin may be an option for LAM treatment. Finally, a low-dose rapamycin may be considered as an adjuvant treatment together to kidney-sparing conservative surgery for renal AMLs.

  12. Topical rapamycin as a treatment for fibrofolliculomas in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized split-face trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke M C Gijezen

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the occurrence of benign, mostly facial, skin tumours called fibrofolliculomas, multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and an increased renal cancer risk. Current treatments for fibrofolliculomas have high rates of recurrence and carry a risk of complications. It would be desirable to have a treatment that could prevent fibrofolliculomas from growing. Animal models of BHD have previously shown deregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Topical use of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is an effective treatment for the skin tumours (angiofibromas in tuberous sclerosis complex, which is also characterised by mTOR deregulation. In this study we aimed to determine if topical rapamycin is also an effective treatment for fibrofolliculomas in BHD.We performed a double blinded, randomised, facial left-right controlled trial of topical rapamycin 0.1% versus placebo in 19 BHD patients. Trial duration was 6 months. The primary outcome was cosmetic improvement as measured by doctors and patients. Changes in fibrofolliculoma number and size were also measured, as was occurrence of side effects.No change in cosmetic status of fibrofolliculomas was reported in the majority of cases for the rapamycin treated (79% by doctors, 53% by patients as well as the placebo treated facial sides (both 74%. No significant differences between rapamycin and placebo treated facial halves were observed (p = 1.000 for doctors opinion, p = 0.344 for patients opinion. No significant difference in fibrofolliculoma number or change in size of the fibrofolliculomas was seen after 6 months. Side effects occurred more often after rapamycin treatment (68% of patients than after placebo (58% of patients; p = 0.625. A burning sensation, erythema, itching and dryness were most frequently reported.This study provides no evidence that treatment of fibrofolliculomas with topical

  13. Meta-Analysis of 29 Experiments Evaluating the Effects of Rapamycin on Life Span in the Laboratory Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, William R

    2017-08-01

    Rapamycin has favorable effects on aging in mice and may eventually be applied to encourage "healthy aging" in humans. This study analyzed raw data from 29 survival studies of rapamycin- and control-treated mice, with the goals of estimating summary statistics and identifying factors associated with effect size heterogeneity. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant heterogeneity across studies, with hazard ratio (HR) estimates ranging from 0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.82) to 0.92 (95% CI: 0.65-1.28). Sex was the major factor accounting for effect size variation, and mortality was decreased more in females (HR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.35-0.48) as compared with males (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.55-0.71). Rapamycin effects were also genotype dependent, however, with stronger survivorship increases in hybrid mice (14.4%; 95% CI: 12.5-16.3%) relative to pure inbred strains (8.8%; 95% CI: 6.2-11.6%). Number needed to treat was applied as an effect size metric, which consistently identified early senescence as the age of peak treatment benefit. These results provide synthesis of existing data to support the potential translation of findings from mouse to primate species. Because rapamycin's effect on survival depends on sex and genotype, further work is justified to understand how these factors shape treatment response. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The Drosophila FoxA ortholog Fork head regulates growth and gene expression downstream of Target of rapamycin.

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    Margret H Bülow

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Forkhead transcription factors of the FoxO subfamily regulate gene expression programs downstream of the insulin signaling network. It is less clear which proteins mediate transcriptional control exerted by Target of rapamycin (TOR signaling, but recent studies in nematodes suggest a role for FoxA transcription factors downstream of TOR. In this study we present evidence that outlines a similar connection in Drosophila, in which the FoxA protein Fork head (FKH regulates cellular and organismal size downstream of TOR. We find that ectopic expression and targeted knockdown of FKH in larval tissues elicits different size phenotypes depending on nutrient state and TOR signaling levels. FKH overexpression has a negative effect on growth under fed conditions, and this phenotype is not further exacerbated by inhibition of TOR via rapamycin feeding. Under conditions of starvation or low TOR signaling levels, knockdown of FKH attenuates the size reduction associated with these conditions. Subcellular localization of endogenous FKH protein is shifted from predominantly cytoplasmic on a high-protein diet to a pronounced nuclear accumulation in animals with reduced levels of TOR or fed with rapamycin. Two putative FKH target genes, CG6770 and cabut, are transcriptionally induced by rapamycin or FKH expression, and silenced by FKH knockdown. Induction of both target genes in heterozygous TOR mutant animals is suppressed by mutations in fkh. Furthermore, TOR signaling levels and FKH impact on transcription of the dFOXO target gene d4E-BP, implying a point of crosstalk with the insulin pathway. In summary, our observations show that an alteration of FKH levels has an effect on cellular and organismal size, and that FKH function is required for the growth inhibition and target gene induction caused by low TOR signaling levels.

  15. Anti‐aging pharmacology in cutaneous wound healing: effects of metformin, resveratrol, and rapamycin by local application

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Pan; Sui, Bing‐Dong; Liu, Nu; Lv, Ya‐Jie; Zheng, Chen‐Xi; Lu, Yong‐Bo; Huang, Wen‐Tao; Zhou, Cui‐Hong; Chen, Ji; Pang, Dan‐Lin; Fei, Dong‐Dong; Xuan, Kun; Hu, Cheng‐Hu; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous wounds are among the most common soft tissue injuries and are particularly hard to heal in aging. Caloric restriction (CR) is well documented to extend longevity; pharmacologically, profound rejuvenative effects of CR mimetics have been uncovered, especially metformin (MET), resveratrol (RSV), and rapamycin (RAPA). However, locally applied impacts and functional differences of these agents on wound healing remain to be established. Here, we discovered that chronic topical ad...

  16. The Role of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathway is one of the most integral pathways linked to cell metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. This pathway is dysregulated in a variety of diseases, including neoplasia, immune-mediated diseases, and fibroproliferative diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. The mTOR kinase is frequently referred to as the master regulator of this pathway. Alterations in mTOR signaling are closely associated with dysregulation of autophagy, inflammation, and cell growth and survival, leading to the development of lung fibrosis. Inhibitors of mTOR have been widely studied in cancer therapy, as they may sensitize cancer cells to radiation therapy. Studies also suggest that mTOR inhibitors are promising modulators of fibroproliferative diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF). Therefore, mTOR represents an attractive and unique therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the pathological role of mTOR kinase in pulmonary fibrosis and examine how mTOR inhibitors may mitigate fibrotic progression. PMID:29518028

  17. The antidepressant sertraline inhibits translation initiation by curtailing mammalian target of rapamycin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Ju; Robert, Francis; Sukarieh, Rami; Michnick, Stephen; Pelletier, Jerry

    2010-04-15

    Sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is a widely used antidepressant agent. Here, we show that sertraline also exhibits antiproliferative activity. Exposure to sertraline leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in protein synthesis. Moreover, polysome profile analysis of sertraline-treated cells shows a reduction in polysome content and a concomitant increase in 80S ribosomes. The inhibition in translation caused by sertraline is associated with decreased levels of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex, altered localization of eIF4E, and increased eIF2alpha phosphorylation. The latter event leads to increased REDD1 expression, which in turn impinges on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by affecting TSC1/2 signaling. Sertraline also independently targets the mTOR signaling pathway downstream of Rheb. In the Emu-myc murine lymphoma model where carcinogenesis is driven by phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) inactivation, sertraline is able to enhance chemosensitivity to doxorubicin. Our results indicate that sertraline exerts antiproliferative activity by targeting the mTOR signaling pathway in a REDD1-dependent manner. (c) 2010 AACR.

  18. Epigenetic aging signatures in mice livers are slowed by dwarfism, calorie restriction and rapamycin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tina; Tsui, Brian; Kreisberg, Jason F; Robertson, Neil A; Gross, Andrew M; Yu, Michael Ku; Carter, Hannah; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Adams, Peter D; Ideker, Trey

    2017-03-28

    Global but predictable changes impact the DNA methylome as we age, acting as a type of molecular clock. This clock can be hastened by conditions that decrease lifespan, raising the question of whether it can also be slowed, for example, by conditions that increase lifespan. Mice are particularly appealing organisms for studies of mammalian aging; however, epigenetic clocks have thus far been formulated only in humans. We first examined whether mice and humans experience similar patterns of change in the methylome with age. We found moderate conservation of CpG sites for which methylation is altered with age, with both species showing an increase in methylome disorder during aging. Based on this analysis, we formulated an epigenetic-aging model in mice using the liver methylomes of 107 mice from 0.2 to 26.0 months old. To examine whether epigenetic aging signatures are slowed by longevity-promoting interventions, we analyzed 28 additional methylomes from mice subjected to lifespan-extending conditions, including Prop1 df/df dwarfism, calorie restriction or dietary rapamycin. We found that mice treated with these lifespan-extending interventions were significantly younger in epigenetic age than their untreated, wild-type age-matched controls. This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers.

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in polycystic kidney disease: From bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common life-threatening hereditary disease in the USA resulting in chronic kidney disease and the need for dialysis and transplantation. Approximately 85% of cases of ADPKD are caused by a mutation in the Pkd1 gene that encodes polycystin-1, a large membrane receptor. The Pkd1 gene mutation results in abnormal proliferation in tubular epithelial cells, which plays a crucial role in cyst development and/or growth in PKD. Activation of the proliferative mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been demonstrated in polycystic kidneys from rodents and humans. mTOR inhibition with sirolimus or everolimus decreases cysts in most animal models of PKD including Pkd1 and Pkd2 gene deficient orthologous models of human disease. On the basis of animal studies, human studies were undertaken. Two large randomized clinical trials published in the New England Journal of Medicine of everolimus or sirolimus in ADPKD patients were very unimpressive and associated with a high side-effect profile. Possible reasons for the unimpressive nature of the human studies include their short duration, the high drop-out rate, suboptimal dosing, lack of randomization of “fast” and “slow progressors” and the lack of correlation between kidney size and kidney function in ADPKD. The future of mTOR inhibition in ADPKD is discussed.

  20. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm. © FASEB.

  1. A comprehensive review of everolimus clinical reports: a new mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurk-Turner, Cheryle; Manitpisitkul, Wana; Cooper, Matthew

    2012-10-15

    As new immunosuppressive agents are introduced to the market, clinicians are faced with the daunting task of sifting through the published literature to decide the value that the agent will add to their own practice. We often must extrapolate information provided through study in other solid-organ transplantation populations than our specific area of interest as we interpret the results and outcomes. With these challenges in mind, this compilation of published work for the newest mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (Certican; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Hanover, NJ) (Zortress; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland) is intended to provide a concise but thorough presentation of available literature so that the reader who may be unfamiliar with the agent can make their own judgment. Both Ovid and PubMed search engines were queried with a particular focus on high-impact articles noted in the Web of Science or Citation Index. Work described solely in abstract or case report form was excluded, as well as meta-analyses or those that were editorial or commentary in nature. Included were publications presented using the English language that described adult human subjects who received a heart, lung, kidney, or liver allograft. The goal of this strategy was to allow for the inclusion of pertinent literature in an unbiased fashion. Tables are provided that outline trial specific information, leaving a discussion of major outcomes to the text of the review.

  2. GTPase ROP2 binds and promotes activation of target of rapamycin, TOR, in response to auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Makarian, Joelle; Srour, Ola; Geldreich, Angèle; Yang, Zhenbiao; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; Ryabova, Lyubov A

    2017-04-03

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) promotes reinitiation at upstream ORFs (uORFs) in genes that play important roles in stem cell regulation and organogenesis in plants. Here, we report that the small GTPase ROP2, if activated by the phytohormone auxin, promotes activation of TOR, and thus translation reinitiation of uORF-containing mRNAs. Plants with high levels of active ROP2, including those expressing constitutively active ROP2 (CA-ROP2), contain high levels of active TOR ROP2 physically interacts with and, when GTP-bound, activates TOR in vitro TOR activation in response to auxin is abolished in ROP-deficient rop2 rop6 ROP4 RNAi plants. GFP-TOR can associate with endosome-like structures in ROP2-overexpressing plants, indicating that endosomes mediate ROP2 effects on TOR activation. CA-ROP2 is efficient in loading uORF-containing mRNAs onto polysomes and stimulates translation in protoplasts, and both processes are sensitive to TOR inhibitor AZD-8055. TOR inactivation abolishes ROP2 regulation of translation reinitiation, but not its effects on cytoskeleton or intracellular trafficking. These findings imply a mode of translation control whereby, as an upstream effector of TOR, ROP2 coordinates TOR function in translation reinitiation pathways in response to auxin. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Overexpression of TOR (target of rapamycin) inhibits cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Mishra, Himanshu; Lohia, Rakhee; Saran, Shweta

    2016-05-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) protein kinase acts as a central controller of cell growth and development of an organism. Present study was undertaken to find the expression pattern and role of TOR during growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum. Failures to generate either knockout and/or knockdown mutants indicate that interference with its levels led to cellular defects. Thus, the effects of TOR (DDB_G0281569) overexpression specifically, cells expressing Dd(Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp mutant was analyzed. Elevated expression of (Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp reduced both cell size and cell proliferation. DdTOR was found to be closer to fungus. mRNA level of TOR was found maximally in the freshly starved/aggregate cells that gradually declined. This was also strengthened by the expression patterns observed by in situ and the analysis of β-galactosidase reporter driven by the putative TOR promoter. The TOR protein was found to be highest at the aggregate stage. The fusion protein, (Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp was localized to the cell membrane, cytosol, and the nucleus. We suggest, DdTOR to be an essential protein and high TOR expression inhibits cell proliferation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 promotes macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Feng, Ye; Shu, Bingyan; Gui, Yuan; Wei, Wei; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling controls many essential cellular functions. However, the role of Rictor/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) in regulating macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. We report here that Rictor/mTORC2 was activated in macrophages from the fibrotic kidneys of mice. Ablation of Rictor in macrophages reduced kidney fibrosis, inflammatory cell accumulation, macrophage proliferation and polarization after unilateral ureter obstruction or ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), deletion of Rictor or blockade of protein kinase Cα inhibited cell migration. Additionally, deletion of Rictor or blockade of Akt abolished interleukin-4-stimulated or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated macrophage M2 polarization. Furthermore, deletion of Rictor downregulated TGF-β1-stimulated upregulation of multiple profibrotic cytokines, including platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor, in BMMs. Conditioned medium from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor -/- macrophages stimulated fibroblast activation less efficiently than that from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor +/+ macrophages. These results demonstrate that Rictor/mTORC2 signalling can promote macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis. Targeting this signalling pathway in macrophages may shine light on ways to protect against kidney fibrosis in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Synergistic nuclear import of NeuroD1 and its partner transcription factor, E47, via heterodimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, Rashid; Yasuhara, Noriko; Oe, Souichi; Nagai, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The transition from undifferentiated pluripotent cells to terminally differentiated neurons is coordinated by a repertoire of transcription factors. NeuroD1 is a type II basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor that plays critical roles in neuronal differentiation and maintenance in the central nervous system. Its dimerization with E47, a type I bHLH transcription factor, leads to the transcriptional regulation of target genes. Mounting evidence suggests that regulating the localization of transcription factors contributes to the regulation of their activity during development as defects in their localization underlie a variety of developmental disorders. In this study, we attempted to understand the nuclear import mannerisms of NeuroD1 and E47. We found that the nuclear import of NeuroD1 and E47 is energy-dependent and involves the Ran-mediated pathway. Herein, we demonstrate that NeuroD1 and E47 can dimerize inside the cytoplasm before their nuclear import. Moreover, this dimerization promotes nuclear import as the nuclear accumulation of NeuroD1 was enhanced in the presence of E47 in an in vitro nuclear import assay, and NLS-deficient NeuroD1 was successfully imported into the nucleus upon E47 overexpression. NeuroD1 also had a similar effect on the nuclear accumulation of NLS-deficient E47. These findings suggest a novel role for dimerization that may promote, at least partially, the nuclear import of transcription factors allowing them to function efficiently in the nucleus.

  6. Heterodimerization with the β1 subunit directs the α2 subunit of nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase to calcium-insensitive cell-cell contacts in HEK293 cells: Interaction with Lin7a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Julia; Haase, Tobias; Busker, Mareike; Sömmer, Anne; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen; Behrends, Sönke

    2016-12-15

    Nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase is a heterodimeric enzyme consisting of an α and a β subunit. Two different α subunits (α 1 and α 2 ) give rise to two heterodimeric enzymes α 1 /β 1 and α 2 /β 1 . Both coexist in a wide range of tissues including blood vessels and the lung, but expression of the α 2 /β 1 form is generally much lower and approaches levels similar to the α 1 /β 1 form in the brain only. In the present paper, we show that the α 2 /β 1 form interacts with Lin7a in mouse brain synaptosomes based on co-precipitation analysis. In HEK293 cells, we found that the overexpressed α 2 /β 1 form, but not the α 1 /β 1 form is directed to calcium-insensitive cell-cell contacts. The isolated PDZ binding motif of an amino-terminally truncated α 2 subunit was sufficient for cell-cell contact localization. For the full length α 2 subunit with the PDZ binding motif this was only the case in the heterodimer configuration with the β 1 subunit, but not as isolated α 2 subunit. We conclude that the PDZ binding motif of the α 2 subunit is only accessible in the heterodimer conformation of the mature nitric oxide-sensitive enzyme. Interaction with Lin7a, a small scaffold protein important for synaptic function and cell polarity, can direct this complex to nectin based cell-cell contacts via MPP3 in HEK293 cells. We conclude that heterodimerization is a prerequisite for further protein-protein interactions that direct the α 2 /β 1 form to strategic sites of the cell membrane with adjacent neighbouring cells. Drugs increasing the nitric oxide-sensitivity of this specific form may be particularly effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of the metabolic phenotype of rapamycin-treated CD8+ T cells with augmented ability to generate long-lasting memory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular metabolism plays a critical role in regulating T cell responses and the development of memory T cells with long-term protections. However, the metabolic phenotype of antigen-activated T cells that are responsible for the generation of long-lived memory cells has not been characterized. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV peptide gp33-specific CD8(+ T cells derived from T cell receptor transgenic mice, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of proliferating T cells that were activated and expanded in vitro in the presence or absence of rapamycin, and determined the capability of these rapamycin-treated T cells to generate long-lived memory cells in vivo. RESULTS: Antigen-activated CD8(+ T cells treated with rapamycin gave rise to 5-fold more long-lived memory T cells in vivo than untreated control T cells. In contrast to that control T cells only increased glycolysis, rapamycin-treated T cells upregulated both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. These rapamycin-treated T cells had greater ability than control T cells to survive withdrawal of either glucose or growth factors. Inhibition of OXPHOS by oligomycin significantly reduced the ability of rapamycin-treated T cells to survive growth factor withdrawal. This effect of OXPHOS inhibition was accompanied with mitochondrial hyperpolarization and elevation of reactive oxygen species that are known to be toxic to cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that these rapamycin-treated T cells may represent a unique cell model for identifying nutrients and signals critical to regulating metabolism in both effector and memory T cells, and for the development of new methods to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell cancer therapy.

  8. Co-delivery of rapamycin- and piperine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Sameer S; Muntimadugu, Eameema; Rafeeqi, Towseef Amin; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux is the major cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors when using anticancer drugs, moreover, poor bioavailability of few drugs is also due to P-gp efflux in the gut. Rapamycin (RPM) is in the clinical trials for breast cancer treatment, but its P-gp substrate property leads to poor oral bioavailability and efficacy. The objective of this study is to formulate and evaluate nanoparticles of RPM, along with a chemosensitizer (piperine, PIP) for improved oral bioavailability and efficacy. Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was selected as polymer as it has moderate MDR reversal activity, which may provide additional benefits. The nanoprecipitation method was used to prepare PLGA nanoparticles with particle size below 150 nm, loaded with both drugs (RPM and PIP). Prepared nanoparticles showed sustained in vitro drug release for weeks, with initial release kinetics of zero order with non-Fickian transport, subsequently followed by Higuchi kinetics with Fickian diffusion. An everted gut sac method was used to study the effect of P-gp efflux on drug transport. This reveals that the uptake of the RPM (P-gp substrate) has been increased in the presence of chemosensitizer. Pharmacokinetic studies showed better absorption profile of RPM from polymeric nanoparticles compared to its suspension counterpart and improved bioavailability of 4.8-folds in combination with a chemosensitizer. An in vitro cell line study indicates higher efficacy of nanoparticles compared to free drug solution. Results suggest that the use of a combination of PIP with RPM nanoparticles would be a promising approach in the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies: a focus on the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven

    2013-03-01

    To review the history of risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mToR) inhibitors, evaluate their required REMS elements, and delineate the reasons for them being released from their REMS requirements. Articles were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (January 2007-July 2012) using the search terms: risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, REMS, everolimus, sirolimus and organ transplant (individual organs also were searched). Information from the Federal Register, the Food and Drug Administration, and the manufacturers of the mToR inhibitors was also evaluated. REMS are strategies implemented to manage known or potential risks associated with medications and to ensure ongoing pharmacovigilance throughout the life of a pharmaceutical product. The mToR inhibitors have been associated with several potential risks, including proteinuria, graft thrombosis, and wound-healing complications. The Food and Drug Administration approved REMS programs for both sirolimus and everolimus. The manufacturers of both medications complied with the components of their approved REMS, but after less than 2 years, both medications have been relieved of their REMS obligations. The only element of the sirolimus REMS was a medication guide, whereas the everolimus REMS consisted of a medication guide and a communication plan. The sirolimus REMS was implemented more than 10 years after its initial approval by the Food and Drug Administration, but was released from its REMS requirement within 7 months of its implementation. The everolimus REMS was instituted upon initial approval and was removed approximately 2 years later. Both medications' REMS were always intended to educate health care providers and patients about the potential risks associated with this transplant immunosuppressant. Transplant practitioners should be familiar with the mToR inhibitors' associated risks and properly educate patients regarding the

  10. Activated mammalian target of rapamycin is a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Da-zhi; Sun, Xiao-wei; Guan, Yuan-xiang; Li, Yuan-fang; Lin, Tong-yu; Geng, Qi-rong; Tian, Ying; Cai, Mu-yan; Fang, Xin-juan; Zhan, You-qing; Zhou, Zhi-wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-bo

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in cellular growth and homeostasis. The purpose of our present study is to investigate the expression of activated mTOR (p-mTOR) in gastric cancer patients, their prognostic significance and the inhibition effect of RAD001 on tumor growth and to determine whether targeted inhibition of mTOR could be a potential therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. The expression of p-mTOR was detected in specimens of 181 gastric cancers who underwent radical resection (R0) by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of p-mTOR expression to clinicopathologic features and survival of gastric cancer was studied. We also determined the inhibition effect of RAD001 on tumor growth using BGC823 and AGS human gastric cancer cell lines. Immunostaining for p-mTOR was positive in 93 of 181 (51.4%) gastric cancers, closely correlated with lymph node status and pTNM stage. Patients with p-mTOR positive showed significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates than those with p-mTOR-negative tumors in univariable analyses, and there was a trend toward a correlation between p-mTOR expression and survival in multivariable analyses. RAD001 markedly inhibited dose-dependently proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells by down-regulating expression of p70s6k, p-p70s6k, C-myc, CyclinD1 and Bcl-2, up-regulating expression of P53. In gastric cancer, p-mTOR is a potential therapeutic target and RAD001 was a promising treatment agent with inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by down-regulating expression of C-myc, CyclinD1 and Bcl-2, up-regulating expression of P53

  11. Rapamycin inhibits BMP-7-induced osteogenic and lipogenic marker expressions in fetal rat calvarial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Lee-Chuan C; Ma, Xiuye; Ford, Jeffery J; Adamo, Martin L; Lee, John C

    2013-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in vitro and in vivo. BMPs canonically signal through Smad transcription factors, but BMPs may activate signaling pathways traditionally stimulated by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Of these, the mTOR pathway has received considerable attention because BMPs activate P70S6K, a downstream effector of mTOR, suggesting that BMP-induced osteogenesis is mediated by mTOR activation. However, contradictory effects of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (RAPA) on bone formation have been reported. Since bone formation is thought to be inversely related to lipid accumulation and mTOR is also important for lipid synthesis, we postulated that BMP-7 may stimulate lipogenic enzyme expression in a RAPA-sensitive mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of RAPA on BMP-7-stimulated expression of osteogenic and lipogenic markers in cultured fetal rat calvarial cells. Our study showed that BMP-7 promoted the expression of osteogenic and lipogenic markers. The effect of BMP-7 on osteogenic markers was greater in magnitude than on lipogenic markers and was temporally more sustained. RAPA inhibited basal and BMP-7-stimulated osteogenic and lipogenic marker expression and bone nodule mineralization. The acetyl CoA carboxylase inhibitor TOFA stimulated the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers, whereas palmitate suppressed their expression. We speculate that the BMP-7-stimulated adipogenesis is part of the normal anabolic response to BMPs, but that inappropriate activation of the lipid biosynthetic pathway by mTOR could have deleterious effects on bone formation and could explain paradoxical effects of RAPA to promote bone formation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Deng, Changyan; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor flox/flox mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor flox/flox mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of the IL-6 Trans-Signaling/Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Axis in Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwanpura, Saleela M; McLeod, Louise; Dousha, Lovisa F; Seow, Huei J; Alhayyani, Sultan; Tate, Michelle D; Deswaerte, Virginie; Brooks, Gavin D; Bozinovski, Steven; MacDonald, Martin; Garbers, Christoph; King, Paul T; Bardin, Philip G; Vlahos, Ross; Rose-John, Stefan; Anderson, Gary P; Jenkins, Brendan J

    2016-12-15

    The potent immunomodulatory cytokine IL-6 is consistently up-regulated in human lungs with emphysema and in mouse emphysema models; however, the mechanisms by which IL-6 promotes emphysema remain obscure. IL-6 signals using two distinct modes: classical signaling via its membrane-bound IL-6 receptor (IL-6R), and trans-signaling via a naturally occurring soluble IL-6R. To identify whether IL-6 trans-signaling and/or classical signaling contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema. We used the gp130 F/F genetic mouse model for spontaneous emphysema and cigarette smoke-induced emphysema models. Emphysema in mice was quantified by various methods including in vivo lung function and stereology, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay was used to assess alveolar cell apoptosis. In mouse and human lung tissues, the expression level and location of IL-6 signaling-related genes and proteins were measured, and the levels of IL-6 and related proteins in sera from emphysematous mice and patients were also assessed. Lung tissues from patients with emphysema, and from spontaneous and cigarette smoke-induced emphysema mouse models, were characterized by excessive production of soluble IL-6R. Genetic blockade of IL-6 trans-signaling in emphysema mouse models and therapy with the IL-6 trans-signaling antagonist sgp130Fc ameliorated emphysema by suppressing augmented alveolar type II cell apoptosis. Furthermore, IL-6 trans-signaling-driven emphysematous changes in the lung correlated with mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 hyperactivation, and treatment of emphysema mouse models with the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor rapamycin attenuated emphysematous changes. Collectively, our data reveal that specific targeting of IL-6 trans-signaling may represent a novel treatment strategy for emphysema.

  14. Rapamycin and CHIR99021 Coordinate Robust Cardiomyocyte Differentiation From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Reducing p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-Xu; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Guan, Ya-Na; Jia, Qian-Qian; Wang, Chen; Liang, He; Li, Yong-Qin; Yang, Huang-Tian; Qin, Yong-Wen; Huang, Shuang; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Jing, Qing

    2017-10-02

    Cardiomyocytes differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an unexhausted source for a cellular cardiac disease model. Although small molecule-mediated cardiomyocyte differentiation methods have been established, the differentiation efficiency is relatively unsatisfactory in multiple lines due to line-to-line variation. Additionally, hurdles including line-specific low expression of endogenous growth factors and the high apoptotic tendency of human pluripotent stem cells also need to be overcome to establish robust and efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation. We used the H9-human cardiac troponin T-eGFP reporter cell line to screen for small molecules that promote cardiac differentiation in a monolayer-based and growth factor-free differentiation model. We found that collaterally treating human pluripotent stem cells with rapamycin and CHIR99021 during the initial stage was essential for efficient and reliable cardiomyocyte differentiation. Moreover, this method maintained consistency in efficiency across different human embryonic stem cell and human induced pluripotent stem cell lines without specifically optimizing multiple parameters (the efficiency in H7, H9, and UQ1 human induced pluripotent stem cells is 98.3%, 93.3%, and 90.6%, respectively). This combination also increased the yield of cardiomyocytes (1:24) and at the same time reduced medium consumption by about 50% when compared with the previous protocols. Further analysis indicated that inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin allows efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation through overcoming p53-dependent apoptosis of human pluripotent stem cells during high-density monolayer culture via blunting p53 translation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. We have demonstrated that mammalian target of rapamycin exerts a stage-specific and multifaceted regulation over cardiac differentiation and provides an optimized approach for generating large numbers of functional

  15. Serotonin induces memory-like, rapamycin-sensitive hyperexcitability in sensory axons of aplysia that contributes to injury responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weragoda, Ramal M S; Walters, Edgar T

    2007-09-01

    The induction of long-term facilitation (LTF) of synapses of Aplysia sensory neurons (SNs) by serotonin (5-HT) has provided an important mechanistic model of memory, but little is known about other long-term effects of 5-HT on sensory properties. Here we show that crushing peripheral nerves results in long-term hyperexcitability (LTH) of the axons of these nociceptive SNs that requires 5-HT activity in the injured nerve. Serotonin application to a nerve segment induces local axonal (but not somal) LTH that is inhibited by 5-HT-receptor antagonists. Blockade of crush-induced axonal LTH by an antagonist, methiothepin, provides evidence for mediation of this injury response by 5-HT. This is the first demonstration in any axon of neuromodulator-induced LTH, a phenomenon potentially important for long-lasting pain. Methiothepin does not reduce axonal LTH induced by local depolarization, so 5-HT is not required for all forms of axonal LTH. Serotonin-induced axonal LTH is expressed as reduced spike threshold and increased repetitive firing, whereas depolarization-induced LTH involves only reduced threshold. Like crush- and depolarization-induced LTH, 5-HT-induced LTH is blocked by inhibiting protein synthesis. Blockade by rapamycin, which also blocks synaptic LTF, is interesting because the eukaryotic protein kinase that is the target of rapamycin (TOR) has a conserved role in promoting growth by stimulating translation of proteins required for translation. Rapamycin sensitivity suggests that localized increases in translation of proteins that promote axonal conduction and excitability at sites of nerve injury may be regulated by the same signals that increase translation of proteins that promote neuronal growth.

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Heon [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa Kyoung [Department of Anatomy, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  18. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin-Independent Antidepressant Effects of (R)-Ketamine in a Social Defeat Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Qu, Youge; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ma, Min; Dong, Chao; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    The role of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the antidepressant effects of ketamine is controversial. In addition to mTOR, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a key signaling molecule in prominent pathways that regulate protein synthesis. (R)-Ketamine has a greater potency and longer-lasting antidepressant effects than (S)-ketamine. Here we investigated whether mTOR signaling and ERK signaling play a role in the antidepressant effects of two enantiomers. The effects of mTOR inhibitors (rapamycin and AZD8055) and an ERK inhibitor (SL327) on the antidepressant effects of ketamine enantiomers in the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model (n = 7 or 8) and on those of ketamine enantiomers in these signaling pathways in mouse brain regions were examined. The intracerebroventricular infusion of rapamycin or AZD8055 blocked the antidepressant effects of (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, in the CSDS model. Furthermore, (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, significantly attenuated the decreased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream effector, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, in the prefrontal cortex of susceptible mice after CSDS. Pretreatment with SL327 blocked the antidepressant effects of (R)-ketamine but not (S)-ketamine. Moreover, (R)-ketamine, but not (S)-ketamine, significantly attenuated the decreased phosphorylation of ERK and its upstream effector, mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase, in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus of susceptible mice after CSDS. This study suggests that mTOR plays a role in the antidepressant effects of (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, and that ERK plays a role in (R)-ketamine's antidepressant effects. Thus, it is unlikely that the activation of mTOR signaling is necessary for antidepressant actions of (R)-ketamine. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin is required for phrenic long-term facilitation following severe but not moderate acute intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Brendan J; Fields, Daryl P; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-09-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a persistent increase in phrenic nerve activity after acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). Distinct cell-signaling cascades give rise to pLTF depending on the severity of hypoxemia within hypoxic episodes. Moderate AIH (mAIH; three 5-min episodes, PaO2 ∼35-55 mmHG) elicits pLTF by a serotonin (5-HT)-dependent mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high-affinity receptor (TrkB), and ERK MAPK signaling. In contrast, severe AIH (sAIH; three 5-min episodes, PaO2 ∼25-30 mmHG) elicits pLTF by an adenosine-dependent mechanism that requires new TrkB synthesis and Akt signaling. Although both mechanisms require spinal protein synthesis, the newly synthesized proteins are distinct, as are the neurochemicals inducing plasticity (serotonin vs. adenosine). In many forms of neuroplasticity, new protein synthesis requires translational regulation via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Since Akt regulates mTOR activity, we hypothesized that mTOR activity is necessary for sAIH- but not mAIH-induced pLTF. Phrenic nerve activity in anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats was recorded before, during, and 60 min after mAIH or sAIH. Rats were pretreated with intrathecal injections of 20% DMSO (vehicle controls) or rapamycin (0.1 mM, 12 μl), a selective mTOR complex 1 inhibitor. Consistent with our hypothesis, rapamycin blocked sAIH- but not mAIH-induced pLTF. Thus spinal mTOR activity is required for adenosine-dependent (sAIH) but not serotonin-dependent (mAIH) pLTF, suggesting that distinct mechanisms regulate new protein synthesis in these forms of spinal neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Analysis of various types of single-polypeptide-chain (sc) heterodimeric A{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R complexes and their allosteric receptor–receptor interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Toshio, E-mail: kamiya@z2.keio.jp [Department of Molecular Cell Signaling, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan); Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan); Cell Biology Laboratory, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Nakata, Hiroyasu [Department of Molecular Cell Signaling, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, 2-6 Musashidai, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Various scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R constructs, with spacers between the two receptors, were created. • Using whole cell binding assay, constructs were examined for their binding activity. • Although the apparent ratio of A{sub 2A}R to D{sub 2}R binding sites should be 1, neither was 1. • Counter agonist-independent binding cooperativity occurred in context of scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R. - Abstract: Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor (A{sub 2A}R) heteromerizes with dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R). However, these class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) dimers are not fully formed, but depend on the equilibrium between monomer and dimer. In order to stimulate the heteromerization, we have previously shown a successful design for a fusion receptor, single-polypeptide-chain (sc) heterodimeric A{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R complex. Here, using whole cell binding assay, six more different scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R constructs were examined. Not only in scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2}R ‘liberated’ with longer spacers between the two receptors, which confer the same configuration as the prototype, the A{sub 2A}R-odr4TM-D{sub 2L}R, but differ in size (Forms 1–3), but also in scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R (Form 6) fused with a transmembrane (TM) of another type II TM protein, instead of odr4TM, neither of their fixed stoichiometry (the apparent ratios of A{sub 2A}R to D{sub 2}R binding sites) was 1, suggesting their compact folding. This suggests that type II TM, either odr4 or another, facilitates the equilibrial process of the dimer formation between A{sub 2A}R and D{sub 2L}R, resulting in the higher-order oligomer formation from monomer of scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R itself. Also, in the reverse type scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R, i.e., the D{sub 2L}R-odr4TM-A{sub 2A}R, counter agonist-independent binding cooperativity (cooperative folding) was found to occur (Forms 4 and 5). In this way, the scA{sub 2A}R/D{sub 2L}R system has unveiled the cellular phenomenon as a snapshot of the

  1. PEGylated lipid bilayer-wrapped nano-graphene oxides for synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and rapamycin to prevent drug resistance in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2017-07-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (nGO) is a carbon allotrope studied for its potential as carrier for chemotherapeutic delivery and its photoablation effects. However, interaction of nGO with blood components and the subsequent toxicities warrant a hybrid system for effective cancer drug delivery. Combination chemotherapy aids in effective cancer treatment and prevention of drug resistance. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to prepare polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) lipid bilayer-wrapped nGO co-loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and rapamycin (RAPA), GOLDR, for the prevention and treatment of resistant cancers. Our results revealed a stable GOLDR formulation with appropriate particle size (∼170 nm), polydispersity (∼0.19) and drug loading. Free drug combination (DOX and RAPA) presented synergistic anticancer effects in MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and BT474 cells. Treatment with GOLDR formulation maintained this synergism in treated cancer cells, which was further enhanced by the near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation-induced photothermal effects of nGO. Higher chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, and enhanced protein expression of apoptosis-related markers (Bax, p53, p21, and c-caspase 3) following GOLDR treatment in the presence of NIR laser treatment clearly suggests its superiority in effective chemo-photothermal therapy of resistant cancers. The hybrid nanosystem that we developed provides a basis for the effective use of GOLDR treatment in the prevention and treatment of resistant cancer types.

  2. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Is a Novel Molecular Mechanism Linking Folate Availability and Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elena; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Folate deficiency has been linked to a wide range of disorders, including cancer, neural tube defects, and fetal growth restriction. Folate regulates cellular function mediated by its involvement in the synthesis of nucleotides, which are needed for DNA synthesis, and its function as a methyl donor, which is critical for DNA methylation. Here we review current data showing that folate sensing by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) constitutes a novel and distinct pathway by which folate modulates cell functions such as nutrient transport, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial respiration. The mTOR signaling pathway responds to growth factors and changes in nutrient availability to control cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism. mTOR exists in 2 complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2, which have distinct upstream regulators and downstream targets. Folate deficiency in pregnant mice caused a marked inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in multiple maternal and fetal tissues, downregulation of placental amino acid transporters, and fetal growth restriction. In addition, folate deficiency in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells resulted in inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling and decreased the activity of key amino acid transporters. Folate sensing by mTOR in PHT cells is independent of the accumulation of homocysteine and requires the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT; solute carrier 46A1). Furthermore, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate trophoblast folate uptake by modulating the cell surface expression of folate receptor α and the reduced folate carrier. These findings, which provide a novel link between folate availability and cell function, growth, and proliferation, may have broad biological significance given the critical role of folate in normal cell function and the multiple diseases that have been associated with decreased or excessive folate availability. Low maternal folate concentrations are linked to restricted fetal growth, and we

  3. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  4. Differential responses of human regulatory T cells (Treg and effector T cells to rapamycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Strauss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RAPA promotes the expansion of CD4(+ CD25(highFoxp3(+ regulatory T cells via mechanisms that remain unknown. Here, we studied expansion, IL-2R-gamma chain signaling, survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis in human Treg responding to RAPA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD4(+CD25(+ and CD4(+CD25(neg T cells were isolated from PBMC of normal controls (n = 21 using AutoMACS. These T cell subsets were cultured in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies and 1000 IU/mL IL-2 for 3 to 6 weeks. RAPA (1-100 nM was added to half of the cultures. After harvest, the cell phenotype, signaling via the PI3K/mTOR and STAT pathways, expression of survival proteins and Annexin V binding were determined and compared to values obtained with freshly-separated CD4(+CD25(high and CD4(+CD25(neg T cells. Suppressor function was tested in co-cultures with autologous CFSE-labeled CD4(+CD25(neg or CD8(+CD25(neg T-cell responders. The frequency and suppressor activity of Treg were increased after culture of CD4(+CD25(+ T cells in the presence of 1-100 nM RAPA (p<0.001. RAPA-expanded Treg were largely CD4(+CD25(highFoxp3(+ cells and were resistant to apoptosis, while CD4(+CD25(neg T cells were sensitive. Only Treg upregulated anti-apoptotic and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins. Treg expressed higher levels of the PTEN protein than CD4(+CD25(neg cells. Activated Treg+/-RAPA preferentially phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 and did not utilize the PI3K/mTOR pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RAPA favors Treg expansion and survival by differentially regulating signaling, proliferation and sensitivity to apoptosis of human effector T cells and Treg after TCR/IL-2 activation.

  5. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intrathecal administration of rapamycin inhibits the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8 and attenuates STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wan-You; Zhang, Bin; Xiong, Qing-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Xiang; Zhao, Wei-Cheng; He, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Han-Bing

    2016-04-21

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of mRNA translation and protein synthesis, and it is specifically inhibited by rapamycin. In chronic pain conditions, mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis is crucial for neuronal hyperexcitability and synaptic plasticity. The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel Nav1.8 plays a major role in action potential initiation and propagation and cellular excitability in DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons. In this study, we investigated if mTOR modulates the phosphorylation of Nav1.8 that is associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and behavioral hypersensitivity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin (STZ) at 60mg/kg. After the onset of PDN, the rats received daily intrathecal administrations of rapamycin (1μg, 3μg, or 10μg/day) for 7 days; other diabetic rats received the same volumes of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Herein, we demonstrate a marked increase in protein expression of total mTOR and phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR) together with the up-regulation of phosphor-Nav1.8 (p-Nav1.8) prior to the mechanical withdrawal threshold reaching a significant reduction in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Furthermore, the intrathecal administration of rapamycin, inhibiting the activity of mTOR, suppressed the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8, reduced the TTX-R current density, heightened the voltage threshold for activation and lowered the voltage threshold for inactivation and relieved mechanical hypersensitivity in diabetic rats. An intrathecal injection (i.t.) of rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation and enhanced the functional availability of DRG Nav1.8 attenuated STZ-induced hyperalgesia. These results suggest that rapamycin is a potential therapeutic intervention for clinical PDN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  8. The crosstalk between Target of Rapamycin (TOR) and Jasmonic Acid (JA) signaling existing in Arabidopsis and cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun; Zhao, Ge; Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Linxuan; Xiong, Fangjie; Zhuo, Fengping; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Zuoren; Datla, Raju; Ren, Maozhi; Li, Fuguang

    2017-04-04

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) acts as an important regulator of cell growth, development and stress responses in most examined diploid eukaryotes. However, little is known about TOR in tetraploid species such as cotton. Here, we show that TORC1-S6K-RPS6, the major signaling components, are conserved and further expanded in cotton genome. Though the cotton seedlings are insensitive to rapamycin, AZD8055, the second-generation inhibitor of TOR, can significantly suppress the growth in cotton. Global transcriptome analysis revealed that genes associated with jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis and transduction were significantly altered in AZD8055 treated cotton seedlings, suggesting the potential crosstalk between TOR and JA signaling. Pharmacological and genetic approaches have been employed to get further insights into the molecular mechanism of the crosstalk between TOR and JA. Combination of AZD8055 with methyl jasmonate can synergistically inhibit cotton growth, and additionally JA levels were significantly increased when cotton seedlings were subjected to AZD8055. JA biosynthetic and signaling mutants including jar1, coi1-2 and myc2-2 displayed TOR inhibitor-resistant phenotypes, whereas COI1 overexpression transgenic lines and jaz10 exhibited sensitivity to AZD8055. Consistently, cotton JAZ can partially rescue TOR-suppressed phenotypes in Arabidopsis. These evidences revealed that the crosstalk between TOR and JA pathway operates in cotton and Arabidopsis.

  9. Paradigmenwechsel in der Anti-Aging-Medizin: Hormesis, Target-of-Rapamycin-Komplex und erste Anti-Aging-Pillen // Paradigm Shift in Anti-Aging Medicine: Hormesis, Target of Rapamycin Complex and First Human Anti-Aging-Pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Römmler A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies in model organisms have shown that some drugs and lifestyle practices (calorie-restricted diets, regular exercise, e.g. can extend life and health span and protect against the onset of age-related chronic diseases by targeting physiological pathways.brA common mode of action was found via mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin pathway signalling. This intracellular protein kinase complex plays a key role in stimulating anabolic and cell growth promoting processes, while inhibiting autophagy. On the other hand, downregulation results in antiproliferative, anticancer and intensive cell-repairing effects leading to life and health span extension and stress resistance. The mTOR complex regulates such basic cell activities and integrates signals from nutrition sensing, energy metabolism, insulin and growth factors, stress and hypoxia.brImportantly, mTOR can be inhibited by some molecules and their analogs (rapamycin, resveratrol, metformin, e.g., which are released naturally from plants, yeast or bacteria to protect against natural enemies. Its dosage resembles an adaptive hormetic response relationship, as high concentrations are toxic and mild doses are associated with anticancer and antiaging effects. This opens up new avenues for their use as „anti-aging pills“ in humans.brRecent human data suggest that metformin, rapamycin and other mTOR-inhibitors could delay heart disease, cancer, cognitive decline and improve survival time in people with diabetes mellitus. In addition, response to influenca vaccine was enhanced by rapamycin in adults with immunosenescence, indicating beneficial anti-aging effects in the elderly.br“Treat aging” is an actual call to recognize aging as an indication appropriate for clinical trials and treatments, as it was recently approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA USA. p bKurzfassung/b: Die ansteigende Morbidität und Invalidität in alternden Industrienationen stößt an die Grenzen der Ressourcen

  10. Etude par génétique inverse du gène codant la protéine TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN d'Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTOR), l'homologue d'une kinase contrôlant la croissance cellulaire chez les eucaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Menand, Benoit

    2002-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) protein kinases were identified in yeast, mammals and Drosophila as central controllers of cell growth. Thu, G1 to S phases progression through the cell cycle is blocked by rapamycin, a drug which specifically inhibits TOR activity by forming a ternary complex with the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase FKBP12 (FK506 and rapamycin binding protein), and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB) of TOR proteins. This work presents the study, the Arabidopsis homologue of yeast and...

  11. The post-therapeutic effect of rapamycin in mild traumatic brain-injured rats ensuing in the upregulation of autophagy and mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changxing; Hu, Zhiying; Zou, Yang; Xiang, Mingjun; Jiang, Yuting; Botchway, Benson O A; Huo, Xue; Du, Xiaoxue; Fang, Marong

    2017-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), common in juveniles, has been reported to be caused by sports-related concussion. Many young children may suffer from post-concussion syndrome. mTBI, in early stages of life, could play a part in neuron apoptosis and degeneration, cognitive and motor coordination impairment, as well as dementia. Our study was aimed at further investigating the post-therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin in the recuperation of mTBI while at the same time investigating the metamorphosis in both autophagy and mitophagy in mTBI. We created a weight-drop rat mTBI model with the administration of rapamycin at 4 h after every mTBI. Behavioral tests of beam walking and open field task indicated the expected improvement of cognitive and motor coordination functions. Both Western blot and immunofluorescence examinations revealed increased Beclin-1 and PINK1 in the treated rats as well as reduction of caspase-3 and cytochrome C (Cyt C). More so, the TUNEL staining evidenced curtailment of apoptotic cells following treatment with rapamycin. The upregulation of Beclin-1 and PINK1 and the downregulation of caspase-3 and Cyt C extrapolate that rapamycin plays neuroprotective as well as anti-apoptotic role via interposition of both autophagy and mitophagy. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  12. Sustained activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin nutrient sensing pathway is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, but not with steatosis, in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsheninnikova, E.; van der Zon, G. C. M.; Voshol, P. J.; Janssen, G. M.; Havekes, L. M.; Grefhorst, A.; Kuipers, F.; Reijngoud, D. -J.; Romijn, J. A.; Ouwens, D. M.; Maassen, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Activation of nutrient sensing through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We examined activation of mTOR-signalling in relation to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. Materials and methods Chronic hepatic

  13. Sustained activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin nutrient sensing pathway is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, but not with steatosis, in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsheninnikova, E.; van der Zon, G. C. M.; Voshol, P. J.; Janssen, G. M.; Havekes, L. M.; Grefhorst, A.; Kuipers, F.; Reijngoud, D.-J.; Romijn, J. A.; Ouwens, D. M.; Maassen, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of nutrient sensing through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We examined activation of mTOR-signalling in relation to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in mice. Chronic hepatic steatosis and hepatic insulin resistance

  14. Dysplasia and overgrowth. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric brain abnormalities secondary to alterations in the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrot, Shai [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Hwang, Misun; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Soares, Bruno P. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stafstrom, Carl E. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2018-02-15

    The current classification of malformations of cortical development is based on the type of disrupted embryological process (cell proliferation, migration, or cortical organization/post-migrational development) and the resulting morphological anomalous pattern of findings. An ideal classification would include knowledge of biological pathways. It has recently been demonstrated that alterations affecting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway result in diverse abnormalities such as dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, ganglioglioma, dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma, focal cortical dysplasia type IIb, and brain lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis. We review the neuroimaging findings in brain abnormalities related to alterations in the mTOR pathway, following the emerging trend from morphology towards genetics in the classification of malformations of cortical development. This approach improves the understanding of anomalous brain development and allows precise diagnosis and potentially targeted therapies that may regulate mTOR pathway function. (orig.)

  15. Dysplasia and overgrowth. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric brain abnormalities secondary to alterations in the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrot, Shai; Hwang, Misun; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Soares, Bruno P.; Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2018-01-01

    The current classification of malformations of cortical development is based on the type of disrupted embryological process (cell proliferation, migration, or cortical organization/post-migrational development) and the resulting morphological anomalous pattern of findings. An ideal classification would include knowledge of biological pathways. It has recently been demonstrated that alterations affecting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway result in diverse abnormalities such as dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, ganglioglioma, dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma, focal cortical dysplasia type IIb, and brain lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis. We review the neuroimaging findings in brain abnormalities related to alterations in the mTOR pathway, following the emerging trend from morphology towards genetics in the classification of malformations of cortical development. This approach improves the understanding of anomalous brain development and allows precise diagnosis and potentially targeted therapies that may regulate mTOR pathway function. (orig.)

  16. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunits in skeletal muscle mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy-sensing protein in skeletal muscle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates translation initiation and protein synthesis through ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). AMPK...... activation reduces muscle protein synthesis by down-regulating mTOR signaling, whereas insulin mediates mTOR signaling via Akt activation. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated inhibitory effects on mTOR signaling depend on catalytic alpha2 and regulatory gamma3 subunits. Extensor digitorum longus muscle from...... (Thr37/46) (P mTOR targets, suggesting mTOR signaling is blocked by prior AMPK activation. The AICAR-induced inhibition was partly rescued...

  17. Induction of biogenic magnetization and redox control by a component of the target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Nishida

    Full Text Available Most organisms are simply diamagnetic, while magnetotactic bacteria and migratory animals are among organisms that exploit magnetism. Biogenic magnetization not only is of fundamental interest, but also has industrial potential. However, the key factor(s that enable biogenic magnetization in coordination with other cellular functions and metabolism remain unknown. To address the requirements for induction and the application of synthetic bio-magnetism, we explored the creation of magnetism in a simple model organism. Cell magnetization was first observed by attraction towards a magnet when normally diamagnetic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown with ferric citrate. The magnetization was further enhanced by genetic modification of iron homeostasis and introduction of ferritin. The acquired magnetizable properties enabled the cells to be attracted to a magnet, and be trapped by a magnetic column. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry confirmed and quantitatively characterized the acquired paramagnetism. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed electron-dense iron-containing aggregates within the magnetized cells. Magnetization-based screening of gene knockouts identified Tco89p, a component of TORC1 (Target of rapamycin complex 1, as important for magnetization; loss of TCO89 and treatment with rapamycin reduced magnetization in a TCO89-dependent manner. The TCO89 expression level positively correlated with magnetization, enabling inducible magnetization. Several carbon metabolism genes were also shown to affect magnetization. Redox mediators indicated that TCO89 alters the intracellular redox to an oxidized state in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, we demonstrated that synthetic induction of magnetization is possible and that the key factors are local redox control through carbon metabolism and iron supply.

  18. Combination of rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanxiong Ding

    Full Text Available Though prostate cancer (PCa has slow progression, the hormone refractory (HRCP and metastatic entities are substantially lethal and lack effective treatments. Transcription factor Slug is critical in regulating metastases of various tumors including PCa. Here we studied targeted therapy against Slug using combination of 3 drugs targeting 3 pathways respectively converging via Slug and further regulating PCa metastasis. Using in vitro assays we confirmed that Slug up-regulation incurred inhibition of E-cadherin that was anti-metastatic, and inhibited Bim-regulated cell apoptosis in PCa. Upstream PTEN/Akt, mTOR, Erk, and AR/Hsp90 pathways were responsible for Slug up-regulation and each of these could be targeted by rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG respectively. In 4 PCa cell lines with different traits in terms of PTEN loss and androgen sensitivity we tested the efficacy of mono- and combined therapy with the drugs. We found that metastatic capacity of the cells was maximally inhibited only when all 3 drugs were combined, due to the crosstalk between the pathways. 17-AAG decreases Slug expression via blockade of HSP90-dependent AR stability. Combination of rapamycin and CI-1040 diminishes invasiveness more potently in PCa cells that are androgen insensitive and with PTEN loss. Slug inhibited Bim-mediated apoptosis that could be rescued by mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors. Using mouse models for circulating PCa DNA quantification, we found that combination of mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors reduced circulating PCa cells in vivo significantly more potently than combination of 2 or monotherapy. Conclusively, combination of mTOR/Erk/Hsp90 inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

  19. Four-week rapamycin treatment improves muscular dystrophy in a fukutin-deficient mouse model of dystroglycanopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Steven J; Luan, Junna; Call, Jarrod A; Patel, Ankit; Peissig, Kristen B; Fortunato, Marisa J; Beedle, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Secondary dystroglycanopathies are a subset of muscular dystrophy caused by abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (αDG). Loss of αDG functional glycosylation prevents it from binding to laminin and other extracellular matrix receptors, causing muscular dystrophy. Mutations in a number of genes, including FKTN (fukutin), disrupt αDG glycosylation. We analyzed conditional Fktn knockout (Fktn KO) muscle for levels of mTOR signaling pathway proteins by Western blot. Two cohorts of Myf5-cre/Fktn KO mice were treated with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin (RAPA) for 4 weeks and evaluated for changes in functional and histopathological features. Muscle from 17- to 25-week-old fukutin-deficient mice has activated mTOR signaling. However, in tamoxifen-inducible Fktn KO mice, factors related to Akt/mTOR signaling were unchanged before the onset of dystrophic pathology, suggesting that Akt/mTOR signaling pathway abnormalities occur after the onset of disease pathology and are not causative in early dystroglycanopathy development. To determine any pharmacological benefit of targeting mTOR signaling, we administered RAPA daily for 4 weeks to Myf5/Fktn KO mice to inhibit mTORC1. RAPA treatment reduced fibrosis, inflammation, activity-induced damage, and central nucleation, and increased muscle fiber size in Myf5/Fktn KO mice compared to controls. RAPA-treated KO mice also produced significantly higher torque at the conclusion of dosing. These findings validate a misregulation of mTOR signaling in dystrophic dystroglycanopathy skeletal muscle and suggest that such signaling molecules may be relevant targets to delay and/or reduce disease burden in dystrophic patients.

  20. Rapamycin and chloroquine: the in vitro and in vivo effects of autophagy-modifying drugs show promising results in valosin containing protein multisystem proteinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Nalbandian

    Full Text Available Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP gene cause hereditary Inclusion body myopathy (hIBM associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB, frontotemporal dementia (FTD, more recently termed multisystem proteinopathy (MSP. Affected individuals exhibit scapular winging and die from progressive muscle weakness, and cardiac and respiratory failure, typically in their 40s to 50s. Histologically, patients show the presence of rimmed vacuoles and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43-positive large ubiquitinated inclusion bodies in the muscles. We have generated a VCPR155H/+ mouse model which recapitulates the disease phenotype and impaired autophagy typically observed in patients with VCP disease. Autophagy-modifying agents, such as rapamycin and chloroquine, at pharmacological doses have previously shown to alter the autophagic flux. Herein, we report results of administration of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway, and chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor which reverses autophagy by accumulating in lysosomes, responsible for blocking autophagy in 20-month old VCPR155H/+ mice. Rapamycin-treated mice demonstrated significant improvement in muscle performance, quadriceps histological analysis, and rescue of ubiquitin, and TDP-43 pathology and defective autophagy as indicated by decreased protein expression levels of LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, optineurin and inhibiting the mTORC1 substrates. Conversely, chloroquine-treated VCPR155H/+ mice revealed progressive muscle weakness, cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies and increased LC3-I/II, p62/SQSTM1, and optineurin expression levels. Our in vitro patient myoblasts studies treated with rapamycin demonstrated an overall improvement in the autophagy markers. Targeting the mTOR pathway ameliorates an increasing list of disorders, and these findings suggest that VCP disease and related neurodegenerative multisystem

  1. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Attenuates Salt-Induced Hypertension and Kidney Injury in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Wollner, Clayton; Kurth, Theresa; Bukowy, John D; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore the protective effects of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) inhibition by rapamycin on salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We have previously demonstrated that H 2 O 2 is elevated in the kidneys of SS rats. The present study showed a significant upregulation of renal mTORC1 activity in the SS rats fed a 4.0% NaCl for 3 days. In addition, renal interstitial infusion of H 2 O 2 into salt-resistant Sprague Dawley rats for 3 days was also found to stimulate mTORC1 activity independent of a rise of arterial blood pressure. Together, these data indicate that the salt-induced increases of renal H 2 O 2 in SS rats activated the mTORC1 pathway. Daily administration of rapamycin (IP, 1.5 mg/kg per day) for 21 days reduced salt-induced hypertension from 176.0±9.0 to 153.0±12.0 mm Hg in SS rats but had no effect on blood pressure salt sensitivity in Sprague Dawley treated rats. Compared with vehicle, rapamycin reduced albumin excretion rate in SS rats from 190.0±35.0 to 37.0±5.0 mg/d and reduced the renal infiltration of T lymphocytes (CD3 + ) and macrophages (ED1 + ) in the cortex and medulla. Renal hypertrophy and cell proliferation were also reduced in rapamycin-treated SS rats. We conclude that enhancement of intrarenal H 2 O 2 with a 4.0% NaCl diet stimulates the mTORC1 pathway that is necessary for the full development of the salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in the SS rat. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. FK506 Binding Protein Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Sensitivity to Rapamycin Treatment by Regulating NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 belongs to a family of immunophilins named for their ability to bind immunosuppressive drugs, also known as peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases, and also with chaperones to help protein folding. Using glioma cDNA microarray analysis, we found that FKBP5 was overexpressed in glioma tumors. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The roles of FKBP5 in glioma cells were then examined. We found that cell growth was suppressed after FKBP5 expression was inhibited by short interfering RNA transfection and enhanced by FKBP5 overexpression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and DNA binding was enhanced by FKBP5 overexpression. The expression level of I-kappa B alpha and phosphorylated NF-κB was regulated by the expression of FKBP5. These data suggest that FKBP5 is involved in NF-κB pathway activation in glioma cells. In addition, FKBP5 overexpression in rapamycin-sensitive U87 cells blocked the cells' response to rapamycin treatment, whereas rapamycin-resistant glioma cells, both PTEN-positive and -negative, were synergistically sensitive to rapamycin after FKBP5 was knocked down, suggesting that the FKBP5 regulates glioma cell response to rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that FKBP5 plays an important role in glioma growth and chemoresistance through regulating signal transduction of the NF-κB pathway.

  3. Drosophila larvae lacking the bcl-2 gene, buffy, are sensitive to nutrient stress, maintain increased basal target of rapamycin (Tor signaling and exhibit characteristics of altered basal energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrate Jessica P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 proteins are the central regulators of apoptosis. The two bcl-2 genes in Drosophila modulate the response to stress-induced cell death, but not developmental cell death. Because null mutants are viable, Drosophila provides an optimum model system to investigate alternate functions of Bcl-2 proteins. In this report, we explore the role of one bcl-2 gene in nutrient stress responses. Results We report that starvation of Drosophila larvae lacking the bcl-2 gene, buffy, decreases survival rate by more than twofold relative to wild-type larvae. The buffy null mutant reacted to starvation with the expected responses such as inhibition of target of rapamycin (Tor signaling, autophagy initiation and mobilization of stored lipids. However, the autophagic response to starvation initiated faster in larvae lacking buffy and was inhibited by ectopic buffy. We demonstrate that unusually high basal Tor signaling, indicated by more phosphorylated S6K, was detected in the buffy mutant and that removal of a genomic copy of S6K, but not inactivation of Tor by rapamycin, reverted the precocious autophagy phenotype. Instead, Tor inactivation also required loss of a positive nutrient signal to trigger autophagy and loss of both was sufficient to activate autophagy in the buffy mutant even in the presence of enforced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling. Prior to starvation, the fed buffy mutant stored less lipid and glycogen, had high lactate levels and maintained a reduced pool of cellular ATP. These observations, together with the inability of buffy mutant larvae to adapt to nutrient restriction, indicate altered energy metabolism in the absence of buffy. Conclusions All animals in their natural habitats are faced with periods of reduced nutrient availability. This study demonstrates that buffy is required for adaptation to both starvation and nutrient restriction. Thus, Buffy is a Bcl-2 protein that plays an

  4. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2010-11-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implanted devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering RNA (siRNA) conjugated with branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) in fibroblastic lineage cells in serum-based cell culture as shown by both gene and protein analysis. This mTOR knock-down led to an inhibition in fibroblast proliferation by 70% and simultaneous down-regulation in the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts in vitro. These siRNA/bPEI complexes were released from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings surrounding model polymer implants in a subcutaneous rodent model in vivo. No significant reduction in fibrous capsule thickness and mTOR expression in the foreign body capsules were observed. The siRNA inefficacy in this in vivo implant model was attributed to siRNA dosing limitations in the gel delivery system, and lack of targeting ability of the siRNA complex specifically to fibroblasts. While in vitro data supported mTOR knock-down in fibroblast cultures, in vivo siRNA delivery must be further improved to produce clinically relevant effects on fibrotic encapsulation around implants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the immersion properties of the peripheral membrane anchor of the FATC domain of the kinase "target of rapamycin" by NMR, oriented CD spectroscopy, and MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Lisa A M; Janke, J Joel; Bennett, W F Drew; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S; Tieleman, D Peter; Dames, Sonja A

    2014-05-08

    The multidomain ser/thr kinase "target of rapamycin" (TOR) centrally controls eukaryotic growth and metabolism. The C-terminal FATC domain is important for TOR regulation and was suggested to directly mediate TOR-membrane interactions. Here, we present a detailed characterization of the membrane immersion properties of the oxidized and reduced yeast TOR1 FATC domain (2438-2470 = y1fatc). The immersion depth was characterized by NMR-monitored interaction studies with DPC micelles containing paramagnetically tagged 5- or 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-/16-SASL) and by analyzing the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) from Mn(2+) in the solvent. Complementary MD-simulations of micellar systems in the absence and presence of protein showed that 5-/16-SASL can move in the micelle and that 16-SASL can bend such that the doxyl group is close to the headgroup region and not deep in the interior as commonly assumed. Based on oriented CD (OCD) data, the single α-helix of oxidized/reduced y1fatc has an angle to the membrane normal of ∼30-60°/∼35-65° in neutral and ∼5-35°/∼0-30° in negatively charged bilayers. The presented experimentally well-founded models help to better understand how this redox-sensitive peripheral membrane anchor may be part of a network of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions regulating TOR localization at different cellular membranes. Moreover, the presented work provides a good methodological reference for the structural characterization of other peripherally membrane associating proteins.

  6. Testing intravitreal toxicity of rapamycin in rabbit eyes Toxicidade intravítrea da rapamicina em olhos de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pereira de Almeida Manzano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate retinal toxicity of varying doses of rapamycin when injected intravitreally in rabbits. Rapamycin is a potent immunosuppressive agent with significant antitumor and antiangiogenic properties, clinically approved for prevention of organ transplant rejection. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand albino rabbits were divided into four groups. Four different doses of rapamycin were prepared in 0.1 ml: 20 µg, 50 µg, 200 µg, and 1000 µg. Each concentration was injected in one eye of three rabbits, and 0.1 ml volume of sterile BSS was injected into the contralateral eye of the three rabbits. Slit-lamp and fundoscopic examinations were performed and the animals were observed for 2 weeks for signs of infection, inflammation, and toxicity. A baseline ERG was performed before drug treatment and at day 14, after which the rabbits were euthanized. Histology of the enucleated eyes was studied to look for retinal toxicity. RESULTS: ERG results showed some decrease in scotopic response; however this was not dose related. ERG results were normal at 20 µg. Histological results showed no retinal toxicity in all groups. CONCLUSION: Although ERG changes were identified at dosages between 50-1000 µg, the histology of all groups up to 1000 µg did not show any discernable abnormalities.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a toxicidade da injeção intravítrea de diferentes doses de rapamicina para a retina de coelhos. Rapamicina é uma potente droga imunossupressora aprovada clinicamente para a prevenção da rejeição de transplantes de orgãos. MÉTODOS: Doze coelhos albinos da Nova Zelândia foram usados neste estudo. Foram divididos em quatro grupos. Quatro diferentes doses de rapamicina foram preparadas nas seguintes concentrações: 20 µg, 50 µg, 200 µg, 1000 µg. Foram realizadas injeções intravítreas de 0,1 ml de cada concentração em um olho de três coelhos e 0,1 ml de solução salina foi injetada no olho contralateral de cada coelho. Foram

  7. Ketamine Exhibits Different Neuroanatomical Profile After Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex: the Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Danielski, Lucineia G; Petronilho, Fabricia; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-09-01

    Studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been identified as a novel MDD therapy; however, the antidepressant mechanism is not fully understood. In addition, the effects of ketamine after mTOR inhibition have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we examined the behavioral and biochemical effects of ketamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens after inhibition of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol) or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Immobility was assessed in forced swimming tests, and then oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory markers were evaluated in the brain and periphery. mTOR activation in the PFC was essential to ketamine's antidepressant-like effects. Ketamine increased lipid damage in the PFC, hippocampus, and amygdala. Protein carbonyl was elevated in the PFC, amygdala, and NAc after ketamine administration. Ketamine also increased nitrite/nitrate in the PFC, hippocampus, amygdala, and NAc. Myeloperoxidase activity increased in the hippocampus and NAc after ketamine administration. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced after ketamine administration in all brain areas studied. Inhibition of mTOR signaling pathways by rapamycin in the PFC was required to protect against oxidative stress by reducing damage and increasing antioxidant enzymes. Finally, the TNF-α level was increased in serum by ketamine; however, the rapamycin plus treatment group was not able to block this increase. Activation of mTOR in the PFC is involved in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine; however, the inhibition of this pathway was able to protect certain brain areas against

  8. Icotinib combined with rapamycin in a renal transplant recipient with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated non-small cell lung cancer: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, QIONG; WANG, YINA; TANG, YEMIN; PENG, LING

    2013-01-01

    As kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing cancer, regular monitoring should be undertaken to monitor the balance between immunosuppression and graft function and to identify malignancy. The present study reports the outcome of the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the lung (T1aN0M1a, stage IV) using the molecular-targeted therapy, icotinib, in a 66-year-old male renal transplant patient receiving rapamycin and prednisolone as ongoing renal immunosuppressive therapy. An ...

  9. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering...

  10. Icotinib combined with rapamycin in a renal transplant recipient with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated non-small cell lung cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiong; Wang, Yina; Tang, Yemin; Peng, Ling

    2014-01-01

    As kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing cancer, regular monitoring should be undertaken to monitor the balance between immunosuppression and graft function and to identify malignancy. The present study reports the outcome of the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the lung (T1aN0M1a, stage IV) using the molecular-targeted therapy, icotinib, in a 66-year-old male renal transplant patient receiving rapamycin and prednisolone as ongoing renal immunosuppressive therapy. An initial partial response to icotinib was achieved, and graft function remained good. However, the patient subsequently developed interstitial pneumonitis. The plasma concentrations of rapamycin and icotinib were within the normal ranges, which excluded the possibility of a pharmacokinetic drug interaction and indicated that the interstitial pneumonitis was likely to be associated with the side-effects of icotinib. Drug therapy was discontinued and the patient underwent a segmentectomy. Tacrolimus was administered for ongoing renal graft immunosuppression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the concomitant administration of icotinib and rapamycin in post-transplant de novo lung cancer. It is also the first report of interstitial pneumonitis associated with icotinib in a post-transplant patient.

  11. HPV-16 E7 expression up-regulates phospholipase D activity and promotes rapamycin resistance in a pRB-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabachini, Tatiana; Boccardo, Enrique; Andrade, Rubiana; Perez, Katia Regina; Nonogaki, Suely; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Villa, Luisa Lina

    2018-04-27

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main risk factor for the development and progression of cervical cancer. HPV-16 E6 and E7 expression is essential for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. These oncoproteins interfere with the function of several intracellular proteins, including those controlling the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in which Phospolipase D (PLD) and Phosphatidic acid (PA) play a critical role. PLD activity was measured in primary human keratinocytes transduced with retroviruses expressing HPV-16 E6, E7 or E7 mutants. The cytostatic effect of rapamycin, a well-known mTOR inhibitor with potential clinical applications, was evaluated in monolayer and organotypic cultures. HPV-16 E7 expression in primary human keratinocytes leads to an increase in PLD expression and activity. Moreover, this activation is dependent on the ability of HPV-16 E7 to induce retinoblastoma protein (pRb) degradation. We also show that cells expressing HPV-16 E7 or silenced for pRb acquire resistance to the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin. This is the first indication that HPV oncoproteins can affect PLD activity. Since PA can interfere with the ability of rapamycin to bind mTOR, the use of combined strategies to target mTOR and PLD activity might be considered to treat HPV-related malignancies.

  12. Sqstm1 knock-down causes a locomotor phenotype ameliorated by rapamycin in a zebrafish model of ALS/FTLD.

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    Lattante, Serena; de Calbiac, Hortense; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Ciura, Sorana; Kabashi, Edor

    2015-03-15

    Mutations in SQSTM1, encoding for the protein SQSTM1/p62, have been recently reported in 1-3.5% of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (ALS/FTLD). Inclusions positive for SQSTM1/p62 have been detected in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, including ALS/FTLD. In order to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms induced by SQSTM1 mutations in ALS/FTLD, we developed a zebrafish model. Knock-down of the sqstm1 zebrafish ortholog, as well as impairment of its splicing, led to a specific phenotype, consisting of behavioral and axonal anomalies. Here, we report swimming deficits associated with shorter motor neuronal axons that could be rescued by the overexpression of wild-type human SQSTM1. Interestingly, no rescue of the loss-of-function phenotype was observed when overexpressing human SQSTM1 constructs carrying ALS/FTLD-related mutations. Consistent with its role in autophagy regulation, we found increased mTOR levels upon knock-down of sqstm1. Furthermore, treatment of zebrafish embryos with rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTOR pathway, yielded an amelioration of the locomotor phenotype in the sqstm1 knock-down model. Our results suggest that loss-of-function of SQSTM1 causes phenotypic features characterized by locomotor deficits and motor neuron axonal defects that are associated with a misregulation of autophagic processes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Triolimus: A Multi-Drug Loaded Polymeric Micelle Containing Paclitaxel, 17-AAG, and Rapamycin as a Novel Radiosensitizer.

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    Tomoda, Keishiro; Tam, Yu Tong; Cho, Hyunah; Buehler, Darya; Kozak, Kevin R; Kwon, Glen S

    2017-01-01

    Triolimus is a multi-drug loaded polymeric micelle containing paclitaxel (PTX), 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), and rapamycin (RAP). This study examines the radiosensitizing effect of Triolimus in vitro and in vivo. Radiosensitizing effects of Triolimus on A549 cells are dose dependent and at 2 × 10 -9 m, Triolimus shows significant radiosensitization even at low radiation doses (2 Gy). By sensitivity enhancement ratio, PTX alone, dual drug combinations, and Triolimus treatment at 2 × 10 -9 m have radiosensitizing effects with potency as follows: PTX alone (PTX) > PTX and RAP (P/R) > Triolimus (TRIO) > PTX and 17-AAG (P/17) >17-AAG and RAP (17/R). In vivo, fractionated radiation of 15 Gy preceded by infusion of PTX alone, dual drug combinations, or an intermediate dose of Triolimus (Int. TRIO: PTX/17-AAG/RAP at 15/15/7.5 mg kg -1 ) strongly inhibits A549 tumor growth. Notably, pretreatment with high dose of Triolimus (High TRIO: PTX/17-AAG/RAP at 60/60/30 mg kg -1 ) before the fractionated radiation leads to tumor control for up to 24 weeks. An enhanced radiosensitizing effect is observed without an increase in acute toxicity compared to PTX alone or radiation alone. These results suggest that further investigations of Triolimus in combination with radiation therapy are merited. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fluoride-Induced Autophagy via the Regulation of Phosphorylation of Mammalian Targets of Rapamycin in Mice Leydig Cells.

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    Zhang, Jianhai; Zhu, Yuchen; Shi, Yan; Han, Yongli; Liang, Chen; Feng, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Heping; Eng, Michelle; Wang, Jundong

    2017-10-11

    Fluoride is known to impair testicular function and decrease testosterone levels, yet the underlying mechanisms remain inconclusive. The objective of this study is to investigate the roles of autophagy in fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity using both in vivo and in vitro Leydig cell models. Using transmission electron microscopy and monodansylcadaverine staining, we observed increasing numbers of autophagosomes in testicular tissue, especially in Leydig cells of fluoride-exposed mice. Further study revealed that fluoride increased the levels of mRNA and protein expression of autophagy markers LC3, Beclin1, and Atg 5 in primary Leydig cells. Furthermore, fluoride inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian targets of rapamycin and 4EBP1, which in turn resulted in a decrease in the levels of AKT and PI3K mRNA expression, as well as an elevation of the level of AMPK expression in both testes and primary Leydig cells. Additionally, fluoride exposure significantly changed the mRNA expression of the PDK1, TSC, and Atg13 regulator genes in primary Leydig cells but not in testicular cells. Taken together, our findings highlight the roles of autophagy in fluoride-induced testicular and Leydig cell damage and contribute to the elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity.

  15. Tramadol Pretreatment Enhances Ketamine-Induced Antidepressant Effects and Increases Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

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    Chun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that acute administration of ketamine elicits fast-acting antidepressant effects. Moreover, tramadol also has potential antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with tramadol on ketamine-induced antidepressant activity and was to determine the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Rats were intraperitoneally administrated with ketamine at the dose of 10 mg/kg or saline 1 h before the second episode of the forced swimming test (FST. Tramadol or saline was intraperitoneally pretreated 30 min before the former administration of ketamine or saline. The locomotor activity and the immobility time of FST were both measured. After that, rats were sacrificed to determine the expression of mTOR in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Tramadol at the dose of 5 mg/kg administrated alone did not elicit the antidepressant effects. More importantly, pretreatment with tramadol enhanced the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects and upregulated the expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tramadol enhances the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects, which is associated with the increased expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  16. Up-Regulation of the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 by Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

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    Abeer Abousaab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The excitatory amino-acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 clear glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus terminate neuronal excitation. The carriers are subject to regulation by various kinases. The EAAT3 isoform is regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. The present study thus explored whether mTOR influences transport by EAAT1 and/or EAAT2. Methods: cRNA encoding wild type EAAT1 (SLC1A3 or EAAT2 (SLC1A2 was injected into Xenopus oocytes without or with additional injection of cRNA encoding mTOR. Dual electrode voltage clamp was performed in order to determine electrogenic glutamate transport (IEAAT. EAAT2 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. Results: Appreciable IEAAT was observed in EAAT1 or EAAT2 expressing but not in water injected oocytes. IEAAT was significantly increased by coexpression of mTOR. Coexpression of mTOR increased significantly the maximal IEAAT in EAAT1 or EAAT2 expressing oocytes, without significantly modifying affinity of the carriers. Moreover, coexpression of mTOR increased significantly EAAT2 protein abundance in the cell membrane. Conclusions: The kinase mTOR up-regulates the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2.

  17. Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Mediates Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1-Induced Parathyroid Cell Proliferation in Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovelsky, Oded; Cohen, Gili; Kenig, Ariel; Wasserman, Gilad; Dreazen, Avigail; Meyuhas, Oded; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2016-04-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by increased serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level and parathyroid cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways mediating the increased parathyroid cell proliferation remain undefined. Here, we found that the mTOR pathway was activated in the parathyroid of rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by either chronic hypocalcemia or uremia, which was measured by increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream target of the mTOR pathway. This activation correlated with increased parathyroid cell proliferation. Inhibition of mTOR complex 1 by rapamycin decreased or prevented parathyroid cell proliferation in secondary hyperparathyroidism rats and in vitro in uremic rat parathyroid glands in organ culture. Knockin rpS6(p-/-) mice, in which rpS6 cannot be phosphorylated because of substitution of all five phosphorylatable serines with alanines, had impaired PTH secretion after experimental uremia- or folic acid-induced AKI. Uremic rpS6(p-/-) mice had no increase in parathyroid cell proliferation compared with a marked increase in uremic wild-type mice. These results underscore the importance of mTOR activation and rpS6 phosphorylation for the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism and indicate that mTORC1 is a significant regulator of parathyroid cell proliferation through rpS6. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. The Inhibitory Effect of Rapamycin on Toll Like Receptor 4 and Interleukin 17 in the Early Stage of Rat Diabetic Nephropathy

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    Ruichao Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: There is increasing evidence showing that innate immune responses and inflammatory processes play an important role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN. The potential effect of innate immunity in the early stage of DN is still unclear. Toll-Like-Receptor 4 (TLR4 is vigorously involved in the progress of kidney diseases in a sterile environment. The activation of the interleukin 17 (IL-17 pathway produces inflammatory cytokines, appearing in various kidney diseases. Unfortunately the relationship between TLR4 and IL-17 has not been investigated in diabetic nephropathy to date. The aim of this study is to investigate whether mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibition may be dependent on TLR4 signaling and the pro-inflammatory factor IL-17 to delay the progression of DN. Methods: Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats were randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups: a diabetic nephropathy group (DN, n = 6; and a diabetic nephropathy treated with rapamycin group (Rapa, n = 6 and a control group (Control, n =6. Body weight, fasting blood sugar, and 24h urine albumin were assessed at week 2, week 4 and week 8. Renal tissues were harvested for H&E, PAS staining, as well as an immunohistochemistry assay for TLR4 and IL-17. TLR4 quantitative expression was measured by Western-Blot analysis and RT-PCR. Results: Our results demonstrated that the expression of both TLR4 and IL-17 were upregulated in early stage DN and reduced by rapamycin. TLR4 and IL-17 both increased and positively related to 24h urinary albumin and kidney/weight ratio. However, neither TLR4 nor IL-17 made a significant difference on fasting blood sugar. Conclusions: Taken together, our results confirm and extend previous studies identifying the significance of the TLR4 and Th17 pathways in development of early stage DN. Furthermore, we suggest this overexpression of TLR4 might be involved in the immunopathogenesis of DN through

  19. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α--a downstream effector of mammalian target of rapamycin--modulates DNA repair and cancer response to treatment.

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    Liron Tuval-Kochen

    Full Text Available In an effort to circumvent resistance to rapamycin--an mTOR inhibitor--we searched for novel rapamycin-downstream-targets that may be key players in the response of cancer cells to therapy. We found that rapamycin, at nM concentrations, increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2α in rapamycin-sensitive and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells, but had only a minimal effect on eIF2α phosphorylation in the rapamycin-insensitive triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Addition of salubrinal--an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation--decreased expression of a surface marker associated with capacity for self renewal, increased senescence and induced clonogenic cell death, suggesting that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α is detrimental to the cells' survival. Treating cells with salubrinal enhanced radiation-induced increase in eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death and showed that irradiated cells are more sensitive to increased eIF2α phosphorylation than non-irradiated ones. Similar to salubrinal--the phosphomimetic eIF2α variant--S51D--increased sensitivity to radiation, and both abrogated radiation-induced increase in breast cancer type 1 susceptibility gene, thus implicating enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α in modulation of DNA repair. Indeed, salubrinal inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination repair of double strand breaks that were induced by I-SceI in green fluorescent protein reporter plasmids. In addition to its effect on radiation, salubrinal enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor--vorinostat. Finally, the catalytic competitive inhibitor of mTOR--Ku-0063794--increased phosphorylation of eIF2α demonstrating further the involvement of mTOR activity in modulating eIF2α phosphorylation. These experiments suggest that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α decreases survival of cancer cells; making eIF2α a worthy target for

  20. MicroRNA-99a inhibits insulin-induced proliferation, migration, dedifferentiation, and rapamycin resistance of vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and mammalian target of rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-wei; Guo, Rui-wei; Lv, Jin-lin; Wang, Xian-mei; Ye, Jin-shan; Lu, Ni-hong; Liang, Xing; Yang, Li-xia

    2017-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are characterized by insulin resistance and are subsequently at high risk for atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia has been associated with proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been demonstrated to be the underlying signaling pathways. Recently, microRNA-99a (miR-99a) has been suggested to regulate the phenotypic changes of VSMCs in cancer cells. However, whether it is involved in insulin-induced changes of VSCMs has not been determined. In this study, we found that insulin induced proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of mouse VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the stimulating effects of high-dose insulin on proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of mouse VSMCs were found to be associated with the attenuation of the inhibitory effects of miR-99a on IGF-1R and mTOR signaling activities. Finally, we found that the inducing effect of high-dose insulin on proliferation, migration, and dedifferentiation of VSMCs was partially inhibited by an active mimic of miR-99a. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-99a plays a key regulatory role in the pathogenesis of insulin-induced proliferation, migration, and phenotype conversion of VSMCs at least partly via inhibition of IGF-1R and mTOR signaling. Our results provide evidence that miR-99a may be a novel target for the treatment of hyperinsulinemia-induced atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Suggesting a new mechanism of insulin-triggered VSMC functions. • Providing a new therapeutic strategies that target atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. • Providing a new strategies that target in-stent restenosis in T2DM patients.

  1. Target of rapamycin complex 2 signals to downstream effector yeast protein kinase 2 (Ypk2) through adheres-voraciously-to-target-of-rapamycin-2 protein 1 (Avo1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2012-02-24

    The conserved Ser/Thr kinase target of rapamycin (TOR) serves as a central regulator in controlling cell growth-related functions. There exist two distinct TOR complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, each coupling to specific downstream effectors and signaling pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC2 is involved in regulating actin organization and maintaining cell wall integrity. Ypk2 (yeast protein kinase 2), a member of the cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, and PKC (AGC) kinase family, is a TORC2 substrate known to participate in actin and cell wall regulation. Employing avo3(ts) mutants with defects in TORC2 functions that are suppressible by active Ypk2, we investigated the molecular interactions involved in mediating TORC2 signaling to Ypk2. GST pulldown assays in yeast lysates demonstrated physical interactions between Ypk2 and components of TORC2. In vitro binding assays revealed that Avo1 directly binds to Ypk2. In avo3(ts) mutants, the TORC2-Ypk2 interaction was reduced and could be restored by AVO1 overexpression, highlighting the important role of Avo1 in coupling TORC2 to Ypk2. The interaction was mapped to an internal region (amino acids 600-840) of Avo1 and a C-terminal region of Ypk2. Ypk2(334-677), a truncated form of Ypk2 containing the Avo1-interacting region, was able to interfere with Avo1-Ypk2 interaction in vitro. Overexpressing Ypk2(334-677) in yeast cells resulted in a perturbation of TORC2 functions, causing defective cell wall integrity, aberrant actin organization, and diminished TORC2-dependent Ypk2 phosphorylation evidenced by the loss of an electrophoretic mobility shift. Together, our data support the conclusion that the direct Avo1-Ypk2 interaction is crucial for TORC2 signaling to the downstream Ypk2 pathway.

  2. Critical analysis of the potential for therapeutic targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mikito Inokuchi,1 Keiji Kato,1 Kazuyuki Kojima,2 Kenichi Sugihara1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Multidisciplinary treatment including chemotherapy has become the global standard of care for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC; nonetheless, survival remains poor. Although many molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for various cancers, only anti-HER2 treatment has produced promising results in patients with mGC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a key role in cell proliferation, antiapoptosis, and metastasis in signaling pathways from the tyrosine kinase receptor, and its activation has been demonstrated in gastric cancer (GC cells. This review discusses the clinical relevance of mTOR in GC and examines its potential as a therapeutic target in patients with mGC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that suppression of the mTOR pathway inhibits the proliferation of GC cells and delays tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been evaluated as second- or third-line treatment in clinical trials. Adverse events were well tolerated although the effectiveness of everolimus alone was limited. Everolimus is now being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy in Phase III clinical studies in this subgroup of patients. Two Phase III studies include exploratory biomarker research designed to evaluate the predictive value of the expression or mutation of molecules related to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These biomarker studies may lead to the realization of targeted therapy for selected patients with mGC in the future. Keywords: gastric cancer, mTOR, everolimus

  3. Branched Chain Amino Acid Suppresses Hepatocellular Cancer Stem Cells through the Activation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Shinobu; Horie, Mayumi; Ishizaki, Sonoko; Yano, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) into cancer cells causes increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. Although inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to CSC survival, the effect of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activator remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BCAA on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells expressing a hepatic CSC marker, EpCAM. We examined the effects of BCAA and/or 5-fluorouracil (FU) on expression of EpCAM and other CSC-related markers, as well as cell proliferation in HCC cells and in a xenograft mouse model. We also characterized CSC-related and mTOR signal-related molecule expression and tumorigenicity in HCC cells with knockdown of Rictor or Raptor, or overexpression of constitutively active rheb (caRheb). mTOR signal-related molecule expression was also examined in BCAA-treated HCC cells. In-vitro BCAA reduced the frequency of EpCAM-positive cells and improved sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of 5-FU. Combined 5-FU and BCAA provided better antitumor efficacy than 5-FU alone in the xenograft model. Stimulation with high doses of BCAA activated mTORC1. Knockdown and overexpression experiments revealed that inhibition of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) or activation of mTORC1 led to decreased EpCAM expression and little or no tumorigenicity. BCAA may enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy by reducing the population of cscs via the mTOR pathway. This result suggests the utility of BCAA in liver cancer therapy. PMID:24312415

  4. Combined treatment of rapamycin and dietary restriction has a larger effect on the transcriptome and metabolome of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Wilson C; Bokov, Alex; Gelfond, Jonathan; Yu, Zhen; Zhang, Yiqiang; Doderer, Mark; Chen, Yidong; Javors, Martin; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I

    2014-04-01

    Rapamycin (Rapa) and dietary restriction (DR) have consistently been shown to increase lifespan. To investigate whether Rapa and DR affect similar pathways in mice, we compared the effects of feeding mice ad libitum (AL), Rapa, DR, or a combination of Rapa and DR (Rapa + DR) on the transcriptome and metabolome of the liver. The principal component analysis shows that Rapa and DR are distinct groups. Over 2500 genes are significantly changed with either Rapa or DR when compared with mice fed AL; more than 80% are unique to DR or Rapa. A similar observation was made when genes were grouped into pathways; two-thirds of the pathways were uniquely changed by DR or Rapa. The metabolome shows an even greater difference between Rapa and DR; no metabolites in Rapa-treated mice were changed significantly from AL mice, whereas 173 metabolites were changed in the DR mice. Interestingly, the number of genes significantly changed by Rapa + DR when compared with AL is twice as large as the number of genes significantly altered by either DR or Rapa alone. In summary, the global effects of DR or Rapa on the liver are quite different and a combination of Rapa and DR results in alterations in a large number of genes and metabolites that are not significantly changed by either manipulation alone, suggesting that a combination of DR and Rapa would be more effective in extending longevity than either treatment alone. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Branched chain amino acid suppresses hepatocellular cancer stem cells through the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin.

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    Shinobu Nishitani

    Full Text Available Differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs into cancer cells causes increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. Although inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR leads to CSC survival, the effect of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs, an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 activator remains unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BCAA on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells expressing a hepatic CSC marker, EpCAM. We examined the effects of BCAA and/or 5-fluorouracil (FU on expression of EpCAM and other CSC-related markers, as well as cell proliferation in HCC cells and in a xenograft mouse model. We also characterized CSC-related and mTOR signal-related molecule expression and tumorigenicity in HCC cells with knockdown of Rictor or Raptor, or overexpression of constitutively active rheb (caRheb. mTOR signal-related molecule expression was also examined in BCAA-treated HCC cells. In-vitro BCAA reduced the frequency of EpCAM-positive cells and improved sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of 5-FU. Combined 5-FU and BCAA provided better antitumor efficacy than 5-FU alone in the xenograft model. Stimulation with high doses of BCAA activated mTORC1. Knockdown and overexpression experiments revealed that inhibition of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2 or activation of mTORC1 led to decreased EpCAM expression and little or no tumorigenicity. BCAA may enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy by reducing the population of cscs via the mTOR pathway. This result suggests the utility of BCAA in liver cancer therapy.

  6. Anti-aging pharmacology in cutaneous wound healing: effects of metformin, resveratrol, and rapamycin by local application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Sui, Bing-Dong; Liu, Nu; Lv, Ya-Jie; Zheng, Chen-Xi; Lu, Yong-Bo; Huang, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Chen, Ji; Pang, Dan-Lin; Fei, Dong-Dong; Xuan, Kun; Hu, Cheng-Hu; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Cutaneous wounds are among the most common soft tissue injuries and are particularly hard to heal in aging. Caloric restriction (CR) is well documented to extend longevity; pharmacologically, profound rejuvenative effects of CR mimetics have been uncovered, especially metformin (MET), resveratrol (RSV), and rapamycin (RAPA). However, locally applied impacts and functional differences of these agents on wound healing remain to be established. Here, we discovered that chronic topical administration of MET and RSV, but not RAPA, accelerated wound healing with improved epidermis, hair follicles, and collagen deposition in young rodents, and MET exerted more profound effects. Furthermore, locally applied MET and RSV improved vascularization of the wound beds, which were attributed to stimulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, the key mediator of wound healing. Notably, in aged skin, AMPK pathway was inhibited, correlated with impaired vasculature and reduced healing ability. As therapeutic approaches, local treatments of MET and RSV prevented age-related AMPK suppression and angiogenic inhibition in wound beds. Moreover, in aged rats, rejuvenative effects of topically applied MET and RSV on cell viability of wound beds were confirmed, of which MET showed more prominent anti-aging effects. We further verified that only MET promoted wound healing and cutaneous integrity in aged skin. These findings clarified differential effects of CR-based anti-aging pharmacology in wound healing, identified critical angiogenic and rejuvenative mechanisms through AMPK pathway in both young and aged skin, and unraveled chronic local application of MET as the optimal and promising regenerative agent in treating cutaneous wound defects. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dynamin-dependent amino acid endocytosis activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1).

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    Shibutani, Shusaku; Okazaki, Hana; Iwata, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-03

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein synthesis and potential target for modifying cellular metabolism in various conditions, including cancer and aging. mTORC1 activity is tightly regulated by the availability of extracellular amino acids, and previous studies have revealed that amino acids in the extracellular fluid are transported to the lysosomal lumen. There, amino acids induce recruitment of cytoplasmic mTORC1 to the lysosome by the Rag GTPases, followed by mTORC1 activation by the small GTPase Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb). However, how the extracellular amino acids reach the lysosomal lumen and activate mTORC1 remains unclear. Here, we show that amino acid uptake by dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a critical role in mTORC1 activation. We found that mTORC1 is inactivated when endocytosis is inhibited by overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin 2 or by pharmacological inhibition of dynamin or clathrin. Consistently, the recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosome was suppressed by the dynamin inhibition. The activity and lysosomal recruitment of mTORC1 were rescued by increasing intracellular amino acids via cycloheximide exposure or by Rag overexpression, indicating that amino acid deprivation is the main cause of mTORC1 inactivation via the dynamin inhibition. We further show that endocytosis inhibition does not induce autophagy even though mTORC1 inactivation is known to strongly induce autophagy. These findings open new perspectives for the use of endocytosis inhibitors as potential agents that can effectively inhibit nutrient utilization and shut down the upstream signals that activate mTORC1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling promotes cell cycle progression and protects cells from apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma.

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    Peponi, Evangelia; Drakos, Elias; Reyes, Guadalupe; Leventaki, Vasiliki; Rassidakis, George Z; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2006-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) and cyclin D1 overexpression. However, additional molecular events are most likely required for oncogenesis, possibly through cell cycle and apoptosis deregulation. We hypothesized that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is activated in MCL and contributes to tumor proliferation and survival. In MCL cell lines, pharmacological inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway was associated with decreased phosphorylation (activation) of mTOR and its downstream targets phosphorylated (p)-4E-BP1, p-p70S6 kinase, and p-ribosomal protein S6, resulting in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These changes were associated with down-regulation of cyclin D1 and the anti-apoptotic proteins cFLIP, BCL-XL, and MCL-1. Furthermore, silencing of mTOR expression using mTOR-specific short interfering RNA decreased phosphorylation of mTOR signaling proteins and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Silencing of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4E), a downstream effector of mTOR, recapitulated these results. We also assessed mTOR signaling in MCL tumors using immunohistochemical methods and a tissue microarray: 10 of 30 (33%) expressed Ser473p-AKT, 13 of 21 (62%) Ser2448p-mTOR, 22 of 22 (100%) p-p70S6K, and 5 of 20 (25%) p-ribosomal protein S6. Total eIF4E binding protein 1 and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E were expressed in 13 of 14 (93%) and 16 of 29 (55%) MCL tumors, respectively. These findings suggest that the mTOR signaling pathway is activated and may contribute to cell cycle progression and tumor cell survival in MCL.

  9. Renal function in heart transplant patients after switch to combined mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor and calcineurin inhibitor therapy

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    Helmschrott M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Helmschrott,1 Rasmus Rivinius,1 Thomas Bruckner,2 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology, Pneumology, 2Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: A calcineurin inhibitor (CNI-based immunosuppression combined with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORs seems to be attractive in patients after heart transplantation (HTX in special clinical situations, for example, in patients with adverse drug effects of prior immunosuppression. Previous studies in patients after HTX detected advantageous effects regarding renal function of a tacrolimus (TAC-based vs cyclosporine-A (CSA-based immunosuppression (in combination with mycophenolate mofetil. However, data regarding renal function after HTX in mTOR/CNI patients remain limited. Aim: Primary end point of the present study was to analyze renal function in HTX patients 1 year after switch to an mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression. Methods: Data of 80 HTX patients after change to mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression were retrospectively analyzed. Renal function was assessed by measured serum creatinine and by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR calculated from Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Results: Twenty-nine patients received mTOR/CSA-based treatment and 51 patients received mTOR/TAC-based therapy. At time of switch and at 1-year follow-up, serum creatinine and eGFR did not differ significantly between both study groups (all P=not statistically significant. Analysis of variances with repeated measurements detected a similar change of renal function in both study groups. Conclusion: The present study detected no significant differences between both mTOR/CNI study groups, indicating a steady state of renal function in HTX patients after switch of immunosuppressive regimen. Keywords: heart transplantation, cyclosporine A, tacrolimus, risk factors

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of the mechanistic target of rapamycin and hypoxia signalling pathways in basal cell carcinoma and trichoepithelioma.

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    Tjinta Brinkhuizen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Trichoepithelioma (TE is a benign neoplasm that strongly resembles BCC. Both are hair follicle (HF tumours. HFs are hypoxic microenvironments, therefore we hypothesized that hypoxia-induced signalling pathways could be involved in BCC and TE as they are in other human malignancies. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1 and mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR are key players in these pathways. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether HIF1/mTOR signalling is involved in BCC and TE. METHODS: We used immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded BCC (n = 45 and TE (n = 35 samples to assess activity of HIF1, mTORC1 and their most important target genes. The percentage positive tumour cells was assessed manually in a semi-quantitative manner and categorized (0%, 80%. RESULTS: Among 45 BCC and 35 TE examined, expression levels were respectively 81% and 57% (BNIP3, 73% and 75% (CAIX, 79% and 86% (GLUT1, 50% and 19% (HIF1α, 89% and 88% (pAKT, 55% and 61% (pS6, 15% and 25% (pMTOR, 44% and 63% (PHD2 and 44% and 49% (VEGF-A. CAIX, Glut1 and PHD2 expression levels were significantly higher in TE when only samples with at least 80% expression were included. CONCLUSIONS: HIF and mTORC1 signalling seems active in both BCC and TE. There are no appreciable differences between the two with respect to pathway activity. At this moment immunohistochemical analyses of HIF, mTORC1 and their target genes does not provide a reliable diagnostic tool for the discrimination of BCC and TE.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

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    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  12. Preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a potent and selective inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2: distinct from rapamycin.

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    Bhagwat, Shripad V; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Crew, Andrew P; Cooke, Andy; Yao, Yan; Mantis, Christine; Kahler, Jennifer; Workman, Jennifer; Bittner, Mark; Dudkin, Lorina; Epstein, David M; Gibson, Neil W; Wild, Robert; Arnold, Lee D; Houghton, Peter J; Pachter, Jonathan A

    2011-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, and mTOR is a clinically validated target. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which regulate cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. Rapamycin and its analogues partially inhibit mTOR through allosteric binding to mTORC1, but not mTORC2, and have shown clinical utility in certain cancers. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a selective and potent dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with biochemical IC(50) values of 22 nmol/L and 65 nmol/L, respectively. OSI-027 shows more than 100-fold selectivity for mTOR relative to PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ, and DNA-PK. OSI-027 inhibits phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates 4E-BP1 and S6K1 as well as the mTORC2 substrate AKT in diverse cancer models in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 and OXA-01 (close analogue of OSI-027) potently inhibit proliferation of several rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive nonengineered and engineered cancer cell lines and also, induce cell death in tumor cell lines with activated PI3K-AKT signaling. OSI-027 shows concentration-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT in tumor tissue with resulting tumor growth inhibition. OSI-027 shows robust antitumor activity in several different human xenograft models representing various histologies. Furthermore, in COLO 205 and GEO colon cancer xenograft models, OSI-027 shows superior efficacy compared with rapamycin. Our results further support the important role of mTOR as a driver of tumor growth and establish OSI-027 as a potent anticancer agent. OSI-027 is currently in phase I clinical trials in cancer patients. ©2011 AACR

  13. Antitumor efficacy profile of PKI-402, a dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor.

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    Mallon, Robert; Hollander, Irwin; Feldberg, Larry; Lucas, Judy; Soloveva, Veronica; Venkatesan, Aranapakam; Dehnhardt, Christoph; Delos Santos, Efren; Chen, Zecheng; Dos Santos, Osvaldo; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Gibbons, Jay

    2010-04-01

    PKI-402 is a selective, reversible, ATP-competitive, equipotent inhibitor of class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), including PI3K-alpha mutants, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR; IC(50) versus PI3K-alpha = 2 nmol/L). PKI-402 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines derived from breast, brain (glioma), pancreas, and non-small cell lung cancer tissue and suppressed phosphorylation of PI3K and mTOR effector proteins (e.g., Akt at T308) at concentrations that matched those that inhibited cell growth. In MDA-MB-361 [breast: Her2(+) and PIK3CA mutant (E545K)], 30 nmol/L PKI-402 induced cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a marker for apoptosis. In vivo, PKI-402 inhibited tumor growth in MDA-MB-361, glioma (U87MG), and lung (A549) xenograft models. In MDA-MB-361, PKI-402 at 100 mg/kg (daily for 5 days, one round) reduced initial tumor volume of 260 mm(3) to 129 mm(3) and prevented tumor regrowth for 70 days. In MDA-MB-361 tumors, PKI-402 (100 mg/kg, single dose) suppressed Akt phosphorylation (at T308) and induced cleaved PARP. Suppression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) was complete at 8 hours and still evident at 24 hours. Cleaved PARP was evident at 8 and 24 hours. In normal tissue (heart and lung), PKI-402 (100 mg/kg) had minimal effect on p-Akt, with no detectable cleaved PARP. Preferential accumulation of PKI-402 in tumor tissue was observed. Complete, sustained suppression of Akt phosphorylation may cause tumor regression in MDA-MB-361 and other xenograft models. We are testing whether dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors can durably suppress p-Akt, induce cleaved PARP, and cause tumor regression in a diverse set of human tumor xenograft models. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 976-84. (c)2010 AACR.

  14. Expression status and prognostic significance of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway members in urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder after cystectomy.

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    Schultz, Luciana; Albadine, Roula; Hicks, Jessica; Jadallah, Sana; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Chen, Ying-Bei; Nielsen, Matthew E; Neilsen, Matthew E; Gonzalgo, Mark L; Sidransky, David; Schoenberg, Mark; Netto, George J

    2010-12-01

    Bladder urothelial carcinoma has high rates of mortality and morbidity. Identifying novel molecular prognostic factors and targets of therapy is crucial. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a pivotal role in establishing cell shape, migration, and proliferation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 132 cystectomies (1994-2002). Immunohistochemistry was performed for Pten, c-myc, p27, phosphorylated (phos)Akt, phosS6, and 4E-BP1. Markers were evaluated for pattern, percentage, and intensity of staining. Mean length of follow-up was 62.6 months (range, 1-182 months). Disease progression, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 42%, 60%, and 68%, respectively. Pten showed loss of expression in 35% of bladder urothelial carcinoma. All markers showed lower expression in invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma compared with benign urothelium with the exception of 4E-BP1. Pten, p27, phosAkt, phosS6, and 4E-BP1 expression correlated with pathologic stage (pathological stage; P<.03). Pten, 4E-BP1, and phosAkt expression correlated with divergent aggressive histology and invasion. phosS6 expression inversely predicted OS (P=.01), DSS (P=.001), and progression (P=.05). c-myc expression inversely predicted progression (P=.01). In a multivariate analysis model that included TNM stage grouping, divergent aggressive histology, concomitant carcinoma in situ, phosS6, and c-myc expression, phosS6 was an independent predictor of DSS (P=.03; hazard ratio [HR], -0.19), whereas c-myc was an independent predictor of progression (P=.02; HR, -0.38). In a second model substituting organ-confined disease and lymph node status for TNM stage grouping, phosS6 and c-myc remained independent predictors of DSS (P=.03; HR, -0.21) and progression (P=.03; HR, -0.34), respectively. We found an overall down-regulation of mTOR pathway in bladder urothelial carcinoma. phosS6 independently predicted DSS, and c-myc independently predicted progression

  15. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

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    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  16. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K m ) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors

  17. Comparison of three rapamycin dosing schedules in A/J Tsc2+/- mice and improved survival with angiogenesis inhibitor or asparaginase treatment in mice with subcutaneous tuberous sclerosis related tumors

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    Dabora Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant tumor disorder characterized by the growth of hamartomas in various organs including the kidney, brain, skin, lungs, and heart. Rapamycin has been shown to reduce the size of kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC; however, tumor regression is incomplete and kidney angiomyolipomas regrow after cessation of treatment. Mouse models of TSC2 related tumors are useful for evaluating new approaches to drug therapy for TSC. Methods In cohorts of Tsc2+/- mice, we compared kidney cystadenoma severity in A/J and C57BL/6 mouse strains at both 9 and 12 months of age. We also investigated age related kidney tumor progression and compared three different rapamycin treatment schedules in cohorts of A/J Tsc2+/- mice. In addition, we used nude mice bearing Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumors to evaluate the therapeutic utility of sunitinib, bevacizumab, vincristine, and asparaginase. Results TSC related kidney disease severity is 5-10 fold higher in A/J Tsc2+/- mice compared with C57BL/6 Tsc2+/- mice. Similar to kidney angiomyolipomas associated with TSC, the severity of kidney cystadenomas increases with age in A/J Tsc2+/- mice. When rapamycin dosing schedules were compared in A/J Tsc2+/- cohorts, we observed a 66% reduction in kidney tumor burden in mice treated daily for 4 weeks, an 82% reduction in mice treated daily for 4 weeks followed by weekly for 8 weeks, and an 81% reduction in mice treated weekly for 12 weeks. In the Tsc2-/- subcutaneous tumor mouse model, vincristine is not effective, but angiogenesis inhibitors (sunitinib and bevacizumab and asparaginase are effective as single agents. However, these drugs are not as effective as rapamycin in that they increased median survival only by 24-27%, while rapamycin increased median survival by 173%. Conclusions Our results indicate that the A/J Tsc2+/- mouse model is an improved, higher through-put mouse model for future TSC

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent up-regulation of the heterodimeric amino acid transporter LAT1 (SLC7A5)/CD98hc (SLC3A2) by diesel exhaust particle extract in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Lecureur, Valérie [Institut de Recherches en Santé, Environnement et Travail (IRSET), UMR INSERM U1085, Faculté de Pharmacie, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.fardel@univ-rennes1.fr [Institut de Recherches en Santé, Environnement et Travail (IRSET), UMR INSERM U1085, Faculté de Pharmacie, 2 Avenue du Pr Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-01

    The heterodimeric L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) 1/CD98hc is overexpressed in lung cancers with a poor prognosis factor. Factors that contribute to LAT1/CD98hc overexpression in lung cells remain however to be determined, but the implication of atmospheric pollution can be suspected. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the effects of diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (DEPe) on LAT1/CD98hc expression in bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Exposure to DEPe up-regulated LAT1 and CD98hc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent manner, with DEPe EC{sub 50} values (around 0.2 μg/mL) relevant to environmental situations. DEPe concomitantly induced LAT1/CD98hc protein expression and LAT1-mediated leucine accumulation in BEAS-2B cells. Inhibition of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway through the use of a chemical AhR antagonist or the siRNA-mediated silencing of AhR expression was next found to prevent DEPe-mediated induction of LAT1/CD98hc, indicating that this regulation depends on AhR, known to be activated by major chemical DEP components like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. DEPe exposure was finally shown to induce mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in BEAS-2B cells, in a CD98hc/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) manner, thus suggesting that DEPe-mediated induction of CD98hc triggers activation of the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway known to be involved in MMP-2 regulation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that exposure to DEPe induces functional overexpression of the amino acid transporter LAT1/CD98hc in lung cells. Such a regulation may participate to pulmonary carcinogenic effects of DEPs, owing to the well-documented contribution of LAT1 and CD98hc to cancer development. - Highlights: • The amino acid transporter LAT1/CD98hc is up-regulated in DEPe-treated lung cells. • The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is involved in DEPe-triggered induction of LAT1/CD98hc.

  19. The interaction between early life epilepsy and autistic-like behavioral consequences: a role for the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway.

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    Delia M Talos

    Full Text Available Early life seizures can result in chronic epilepsy, cognitive deficits and behavioral changes such as autism, and conversely epilepsy is common in autistic children. We hypothesized that during early brain development, seizures could alter regulators of synaptic development and underlie the interaction between epilepsy and autism. The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR modulates protein translation and is dysregulated in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, a disorder characterized by epilepsy and autism. We used a rodent model of acute hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures that results in long term increases in neuronal excitability, seizure susceptibility, and spontaneous seizures, to determine how seizures alter mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling. We hypothesized that seizures occurring at a developmental stage coinciding with a critical period of synaptogenesis will activate mTORC1, contributing to epileptic networks and autistic-like behavior in later life. Here we show that in the rat, baseline mTORC1 activation peaks during the first three postnatal weeks, and induction of seizures at postnatal day 10 results in further transient activation of its downstream targets phospho-4E-BP1 (Thr37/46, phospho-p70S6K (Thr389 and phospho-S6 (Ser235/236, as well as rapid induction of activity-dependent upstream signaling molecules, including BDNF, phospho-Akt (Thr308 and phospho-ERK (Thr202/Tyr204. Furthermore, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin immediately before and after seizures reversed early increases in glutamatergic neurotransmission and seizure susceptibility and attenuated later life epilepsy and autistic-like behavior. Together, these findings suggest that in the developing brain the mTORC1 signaling pathway is involved in epileptogenesis and altered social behavior, and that it may be a target for development of novel therapies that eliminate the progressive effects of neonatal seizures.

  20. Branched-chain amino acids enhance premature senescence through mammalian target of rapamycin complex I-mediated upregulation of p21 protein.

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    Masayuki Nakano

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs have been applied as an oral supplementation to patients with liver cirrhosis. BCAAs not only improve nutritional status of patients but also decrease the incidence of liver cancer. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR links cellular metabolism with growth and proliferation in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. BCAAs, especially leucine, have been shown to regulate protein synthesis through mTOR activities. On the other hand, cellular senescence is suggested to function as tumor suppressor mechanisms, and induced by a variety of stimuli including DNA damage-inducing drugs. However, it is not clear how BCAA supplementation prevents the incidence of liver cancer in patients with cirrhosis. Here we showed that human cancer cells, HepG2 and U2OS, cultured in medium containing BCAAs with Fischer's ratio about 3, which was shown to have highest activities to synthesize and secrete of albumin, had higher activities to induce premature senescence and elevate mTORC1 activities. Furthermore, BCAAs themselves enhanced the execution of premature senescence induced by DNA damage-inducing drugs, which was effectively prevented by rapamycin. These results strongly suggested the contribution of the mTORC1 pathway to the regulation of premature senescence. Interestingly, the protein levels of p21, a p53 target and well-known gene essential for the execution of cellular senescence, were upregulated in the presence of BCAAs. These results suggested that BCAAs possibly contribute to tumor suppression by enhancing cellular senescence mediated through the mTOR signalling pathway.

  1. Convergence of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1- and glycogen synthase kinase 3-β-signaling pathways regulates the innate inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huizhi; Brown, Jonathan; Gu, Zhen; Garcia, Carlos A; Liang, Ruqiang; Alard, Pascale; Beurel, Eléonore; Jope, Richard S; Greenway, Terrance; Martin, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The PI3K pathway and its regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) play pivotal roles in controlling inflammation. In this article, we show that mTORC1 and GSK3-β converge and that the capacity of mTORC1 to affect the inflammatory response is due to the inactivation of GSK3-β. Inhibition of mTORC1 attenuated GSK3 phosphorylation and increased its kinase activity. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays demonstrated that GSK3-β associated with a downstream target of mTORC1, p85S6K, and phosphorylated GSK3-β. Inhibition of S6K1 abrogated the phosphorylation of GSK3-β while increasing and decreasing the levels of IL-12 and IL-10, respectively, in LPS-stimulated monocytes. In contrast, the direct inhibition of GSK3 attenuated the capacity of S6K1 inhibition to influence the levels of IL-10 and IL-12 produced by LPS-stimulated cells. At the transcriptional level, mTORC1 inhibition reduced the DNA binding of CREB and this effect was reversed by GSK3 inhibition. As a result, mTORC1 inhibition increased the levels of NF-κB p65 associated with CREB-binding protein. Inhibition of NF-κB p65 attenuated rapamycin's ability to influence the levels of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine production in monocytes stimulated with LPS. These studies identify the molecular mechanism by which mTORC1 affects GSK3 and show that mTORC1 inhibition regulates pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production via its capacity to inactivate GSK3.

  2. MID1 and MID2 homo- and heterodimerise to tether the rapamycin-sensitive PP2A regulatory subunit, Alpha 4, to microtubules: implications for the clinical variability of X-linked Opitz GBBB syndrome and other developmental disorders

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    Cox Timothy C

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Opitz GBBB syndrome present with a variable array of developmental defects including craniofacial, cardiac, and genital anomalies. Mutations in the X-linked MID1 gene, which encodes a microtubule-binding protein, have been found in ~50% of Opitz GBBB syndrome patients consistent with the genetically heterogeneous nature of the disorder. A protein highly related to MID1, called MID2, has also been described that similarly associates with microtubules. Results To identify protein partners of MID1 and MID2 we undertook two separate yeast two-hybrid screens. Using this system we identified Alpha 4, a regulatory subunit of PP2-type phosphatases and a key component of the rapamycin-sensitive signaling pathway, as a strong interactor of both proteins. Analysis of domain-specific deletions has shown that the B-boxes of both MID1 and MID2 mediate the interaction with Alpha 4, the first demonstration in an RBCC protein of a specific role for the B-box region. In addition, we show that the MID1/2 coiled-coil motifs mediate both homo- and hetero-dimerisation, and that dimerisation is a prerequisite for association of the MID-Alpha 4 complex with microtubules. Conclusions Our findings not only implicate Alpha 4 in the pathogenesis of Opitz GBBB syndrome but also support our earlier hypothesis that MID2 is a modifier of the X-linked phenotype. Of further note is the observation that Alpha 4 maps to Xq13 within the region showing linkage to FG (Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome. Overlap in the clinical features of FG and Opitz GBBB syndromes warrants investigation of Alpha 4 as a candidate for causing FG syndrome.

  3. Transforming Growth Factor β1-induced Apoptosis in Podocytes via the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1-NADPH Oxidase 4 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranjan; Xu, Shanhua; Nguyen, Tuyet Thi; Quan, Xianglan; Choi, Seong-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Eun Young; Cha, Seung-Kuy; Park, Kyu-Sang

    2015-12-25

    TGF-β is a pleiotropic cytokine that accumulates during kidney injuries, resulting in various renal diseases. We have reported previously that TGF-β1 induces the selective up-regulation of mitochondrial Nox4, playing critical roles in podocyte apoptosis. Here we investigated the regulatory mechanism of Nox4 up-regulation by mTORC1 activation on TGF-β1-induced apoptosis in immortalized podocytes. TGF-β1 treatment markedly increased the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream targets p70S6K and 4EBP1. Blocking TGF-β receptor I with SB431542 completely blunted the phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, and 4EBP1. Transient adenoviral overexpression of mTOR-WT and constitutively active mTORΔ augmented TGF-β1-treated Nox4 expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptosis, whereas mTOR kinase-dead suppressed the above changes. In addition, knockdown of mTOR mimicked the effect of mTOR-KD. Inhibition of mTORC1 by low-dose rapamycin or knockdown of p70S6K protected podocytes through attenuation of Nox4 expression and subsequent oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by TGF-β1. Pharmacological inhibition of the MEK-ERK cascade, but not the PI3K-Akt-TSC2 pathway, abolished TGF-β1-induced mTOR activation. Inhibition of either ERK1/2 or mTORC1 did not reduce the TGF-β1-stimulated increase in Nox4 mRNA level but significantly inhibited total Nox4 expression, ROS generation, and apoptosis induced by TGF-β1. Moreover, double knockdown of Smad2 and 3 or only Smad4 completely suppressed TGF-β1-induced ERK1/2-mTORactivation. Our data suggest that TGF-β1 increases translation of Nox4 through the Smad-ERK1/2-mTORC1 axis, which is independent of transcriptional regulation. Activation of this pathway plays a crucial role in ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to podocyte apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of the ERK1/2-mTORC1 pathway could be a potential therapeutic and preventive target in proteinuric and chronic

  4. Drosophila insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR pathways regulate GSK3 beta activity to control Myc stability and determine Myc expression in vivo

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    Parisi Federica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster reveal an important role for Myc in controlling growth. Similar studies have also shown how components of the insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR pathways are key regulators of growth. Despite a few suggestions that Myc transcriptional activity lies downstream of these pathways, a molecular mechanism linking these signaling pathways to Myc has not been clearly described. Using biochemical and genetic approaches we tried to identify novel mechanisms that control Myc activity upon activation of insulin and TOR signaling pathways. Results Our biochemical studies show that insulin induces Myc protein accumulation in Drosophila S2 cells, which correlates with a decrease in the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3β a kinase that is responsible for Myc protein degradation. Induction of Myc by insulin is inhibited by the presence of the TOR inhibitor rapamycin, suggesting that insulin-induced Myc protein accumulation depends on the activation of TOR complex 1. Treatment with amino acids that directly activate the TOR pathway results in Myc protein accumulation, which also depends on the ability of S6K kinase to inhibit GSK3β activity. Myc upregulation by insulin and TOR pathways is a mechanism conserved in cells from the wing imaginal disc, where expression of Dp110 and Rheb also induces Myc protein accumulation, while inhibition of insulin and TOR pathways result in the opposite effect. Our functional analysis, aimed at quantifying the relative contribution of Myc to ommatidial growth downstream of insulin and TOR pathways, revealed that Myc activity is necessary to sustain the proliferation of cells from the ommatidia upon Dp110 expression, while its contribution downstream of TOR is significant to control the size of the ommatidia. Conclusions Our study presents novel evidence that Myc activity acts downstream of insulin and TOR pathways to control growth in Drosophila. At

  5. Drosophila insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR) pathways regulate GSK3 beta activity to control Myc stability and determine Myc expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Federica; Riccardo, Sara; Daniel, Margaret; Saqcena, Mahesh; Kundu, Nandini; Pession, Annalisa; Grifoni, Daniela; Stocker, Hugo; Tabak, Esteban; Bellosta, Paola

    2011-09-27

    Genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster reveal an important role for Myc in controlling growth. Similar studies have also shown how components of the insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR) pathways are key regulators of growth. Despite a few suggestions that Myc transcriptional activity lies downstream of these pathways, a molecular mechanism linking these signaling pathways to Myc has not been clearly described. Using biochemical and genetic approaches we tried to identify novel mechanisms that control Myc activity upon activation of insulin and TOR signaling pathways. Our biochemical studies show that insulin induces Myc protein accumulation in Drosophila S2 cells, which correlates with a decrease in the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3β ) a kinase that is responsible for Myc protein degradation. Induction of Myc by insulin is inhibited by the presence of the TOR inhibitor rapamycin, suggesting that insulin-induced Myc protein accumulation depends on the activation of TOR complex 1. Treatment with amino acids that directly activate the TOR pathway results in Myc protein accumulation, which also depends on the ability of S6K kinase to inhibit GSK3β activity. Myc upregulation by insulin and TOR pathways is a mechanism conserved in cells from the wing imaginal disc, where expression of Dp110 and Rheb also induces Myc protein accumulation, while inhibition of insulin and TOR pathways result in the opposite effect. Our functional analysis, aimed at quantifying the relative contribution of Myc to ommatidial growth downstream of insulin and TOR pathways, revealed that Myc activity is necessary to sustain the proliferation of cells from the ommatidia upon Dp110 expression, while its contribution downstream of TOR is significant to control the size of the ommatidia. Our study presents novel evidence that Myc activity acts downstream of insulin and TOR pathways to control growth in Drosophila. At the biochemical level we found that both these pathways

  6. The dynamics of histone H2A ubiquitination in HeLa cells exposed to rapamycin, ethanol, hydroxyurea, ER stress, heat shock and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Shiori; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Ito, Akihiro; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2016-03-25

    Polyubiquitination plays key roles in proteasome-dependent and independent cellular events, whereas monoubiquitination is involved in gene expression, DNA repair, protein-protein interaction, and protein trafficking. We previously developed an FK2 antibody, which specifically recognizes poly-Ub moieties but not free Ub. To elucidate the role of Ub conjugation in response to cellular stress, we used FK2 to investigate whether chemical stress (rapamycin, ethanol, or hydroxyurea), ER stress (thapsigargin or tunicamycin), heat shock or DNA damage (H2O2 or methyl methanesulfonate) affect the formation of Ub conjugates including histone H2A (hH2A) ubiquitination. First, we found that all forms of stress tested increased poly-ubiquitinated proteins in HeLa cells. Furthermore, rapamycin and hydroxyurea treatment, and ER stress increased ubiquitination of hH2A, while methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment induced deubiquitination of hH2A. The ethanol and H2O2 treatments, and heat shock transiently induced hH2A de-ubiquitination, although deubiquitinated hH2A were ubiquitinated again by subsequent cultivation. We also revealed that FK2 reacts with not only polyubiquitinated proteins but also mono-ubiquitinated hH2A. With the exception of MMS, all forms of stress tested increased the acetylation of K5-hH2A, K9-hH3 and K8-hH4 in addition to ubiquitination. K118 and K119 of hH2A were ubiquitinated in cells under normal conditions, and K119 was the major ubiquitination site. The MMS-treatment and heat shock induced the deubiquitination of both K118 and K119-histone H2A. Interestingly, MMS treatment did not affect cell HeLa cell viability expressing double-mutant hH2A (KK118,119AA-hH2A), while heat shock slightly but significantly decreased viability of double-mutant hH2A expressing cells, indicating that ubiquitination of both sites associates with recovery from heat shock but not MMS treatment. Thus, we characterized FK2 reactivity and demonstrated that various stresses alter

  7. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Alters Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), Reduces Ribosomal p70S6 Kinase and p4E-BP1 Levels in Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qun; Ren, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Reduced insulin sensitivity following chronic alcohol consumption may contribute to alcohol-induced brain damage although the underlying mechanism(s) has not been elucidated. This study was designed to examine the effect of chronic alcohol intake on insulin signaling in mouse cerebral cortex. FVB mice were fed with a 4% alcohol diet for 16 weeks. Insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1, IRS-2) and post-receptor signaling molecules Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal p70s6 kinase (...

  8. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic Acid, the Major Lipid Component of Royal Jelly, Extends the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans through Dietary Restriction and Target of Rapamycin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Honda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly (RJ produced by honeybees has been reported to possess diverse health-beneficial properties and has been implicated to have a function in longevity across diverse species as well as honeybees. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA, the major lipid component of RJ produced by honeybees, was previously shown to increase the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. The objective of this study is to elucidate signaling pathways that are involved in the lifespan extension by 10-HDA. 10-HDA further extended the lifespan of the daf-2 mutants, which exhibit long lifespan through reducing insulin-like signaling (ILS, indicating that 10-HDA extended lifespan independently of ILS. On the other hand, 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the eat-2 mutants, which show long lifespan through dietary restriction caused by a food-intake defect. This finding indicates that 10-HDA extends lifespan through dietary restriction signaling. We further found that 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the long-lived mutants in daf-15, which encodes Raptor, a target of rapamycin (TOR components, indicating that 10-HDA shared some longevity control mechanisms with TOR signaling. Additionally, 10-HDA was found to confer tolerance against thermal and oxidative stress. 10-HDA increases longevity not through ILS but through dietary restriction and TOR signaling in C. elegans.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote head and neck cancer progression through Periostin-mediated phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanxia; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Baixiang; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Chaowei; Yu, Mengfei; Cao, Guifen; Wang, Huiming

    2018-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) have been shown to be recruited to the tumor microenvironment and exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of BMMSC on head and neck cancer (HNC) are not clear. In this study, we investigated Periostin (POSTN) and its roles in the tumor-promoting effect of BMMSC on HNC. In vitro analysis of HNC cells cultured in BMMSC-conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted cancer progression by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), and altering expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Moreover, MSC-CM promoted the expression of POSTN and POSTN promoted HNC progression through the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. In a murine model of HNC, we found that BMMSC promoted tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and enhanced the expression of POSTN and EMT in tumor tissues. Clinical sample analysis further confirmed that the expression of POSTN and N-cadherin were correlated with pathological grade and lymph node metastasis of HNC. In conclusion, this study indicated that BMMSC promoted proliferation, invasion, survival, tumorigenicity and migration of head and neck cancer through POSTN-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu; Liu, Cheng; Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu; Xu, Kewei; Lin, Tianxin; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway

  11. A pilot trial of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor RAD001 in patients with advanced B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Thomas; Sandherr, Michael; Goetze, Katharina; Oelsner, Madlen; Ringshausen, Ingo; Peschel, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is treatable, it remains an incurable disease and most patients inevitably suffer relapse. Many therapeutic options exist for those requiring therapy, including monoclonal antibodies and stem cell transplantation, but remissions tend to last shorter in the course of the disease. Targeting the cell cycle has recently been realized to be an attractive therapeutic approach in solid and hematological malignancies, and the proliferative nature of B-CLL is increasingly accepted. Here, we report data on a phase II pilot trial with the oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor RAD001 5 mg/daily in patients with advanced B-CLL who had progressive disease after at least two lines of treatment. After treatment of seven patients, this trial was stopped because of toxicity concerns, although some degree of activity was observed (one partial remission, three patients with stable disease). Interestingly, cyclin E expression decreased in responding patients. Further strategies of mTOR inhibition by RAD001 in B-CLL should focus on different treatment schedules, adequate anti-infectious prophylaxis, or combinations with cytotoxic drugs.

  12. Target of rapamycin complex 1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases are required for sensing changes in nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinmei; Yan, Gonghong; Liu, Sichi; Jiang, Tong; Zhong, Mingming; Yuan, Wenjie; Chen, Shaoxian; Zheng, Yin; Jiang, Yong; Jiang, Yu

    2017-12-01

    In yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) and Tap42-associated phosphatases regulate expression of genes involved in nitrogen limitation response and the nitrogen discrimination pathway. However, it remains unclear whether TORC1 and the phosphatases are required for sensing nitrogen conditions. Utilizing temperature sensitive mutants of tor2 and tap42, we examined the role of TORC1 and Tap42 in nuclear entry of Gln3, a key transcription factor in yeast nitrogen metabolism, in response to changes in nitrogen conditions. Our data show that TORC1 is essential for Gln3 nuclear entry upon nitrogen limitation and downshift in nitrogen quality. However, Tap42-associated phosphatases are required only under nitrogen limitation condition. In cells grown in poor nitrogen medium, the nitrogen permease reactivator kinase (Npr1) inhibits TORC1 activity and alters its association with Tap42, rendering Tap42-associated phosphatases unresponsive to nitrogen limitation. These findings demonstrate a direct role for TORC1 and Tap42-associated phosphatases in sensing nitrogen conditions and unveil an Npr1-dependent mechanism that controls TORC1 and the phosphatases in response to changes in nitrogen quality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The pan phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor SAR245409 (voxtalisib/XL765) blocks survival, adhesion and proliferation of primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, R; Ter Burg, J; van Bochove, G G W; de Rooij, M F M; Kuil, A; Jansen, M H; Kuijpers, T W; Baars, J W; Virone-Oddos, A; Spaargaren, M; Egile, C; van Oers, M H J; Eldering, E; Kersten, M J; Kater, A P

    2016-02-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are critical components of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway and have an important role in the pathobiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Inhibitors of PI3Kδ block BCR-mediated cross-talk between CLL cells and the lymph node microenvironment and provide significant clinical benefit to CLL patients. However, the PI3Kδ inhibitors applied thus far have limited direct impact on leukemia cell survival and thus are unlikely to eradicate the disease. The use of inhibitors of multiple isoforms of PI3K might lead to deeper remissions. Here we demonstrate that the pan-PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor SAR245409 (voxtalisib/XL765) was more pro-apoptotic to CLL cells--irrespective of their ATM/p53 status--than PI3Kα or PI3Kδ isoform selective inhibitors. Furthermore, SAR245409 blocked CLL survival, adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, SAR245409 was a more potent inhibitor of T-cell-mediated production of cytokines, which support CLL survival. Taken together, our in vitro data provide a rationale for the evaluation of a pan-PI3K inhibitor in CLL patients.

  14. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic Acid, the Major Lipid Component of Royal Jelly, Extends the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans through Dietary Restriction and Target of Rapamycin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoko; Araki, Yoko; Hata, Taketoshi; Ichihara, Kenji; Ito, Masafumi; Tanaka, Masashi; Honda, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) produced by honeybees has been reported to possess diverse health-beneficial properties and has been implicated to have a function in longevity across diverse species as well as honeybees. 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), the major lipid component of RJ produced by honeybees, was previously shown to increase the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. The objective of this study is to elucidate signaling pathways that are involved in the lifespan extension by 10-HDA. 10-HDA further extended the lifespan of the daf-2 mutants, which exhibit long lifespan through reducing insulin-like signaling (ILS), indicating that 10-HDA extended lifespan independently of ILS. On the other hand, 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the eat-2 mutants, which show long lifespan through dietary restriction caused by a food-intake defect. This finding indicates that 10-HDA extends lifespan through dietary restriction signaling. We further found that 10-HDA did not extend the lifespan of the long-lived mutants in daf-15, which encodes Raptor, a target of rapamycin (TOR) components, indicating that 10-HDA shared some longevity control mechanisms with TOR signaling. Additionally, 10-HDA was found to confer tolerance against thermal and oxidative stress. 10-HDA increases longevity not through ILS but through dietary restriction and TOR signaling in C. elegans.

  15. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Liu, Cheng [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Xu, Kewei [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Lin, Tianxin, E-mail: tianxinl@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Huang, Jian, E-mail: urolhj@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway.

  16. Rapamycin combined with anti-CD45RB mAb and IL-10 or with G-CSF induces tolerance in a stringent mouse model of islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gagliani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large pool of preexisting alloreactive effector T cells can cause allogeneic graft rejection following transplantation. However, it is possible to induce transplant tolerance by altering the balance between effector and regulatory T (Treg cells. Among the various Treg-cell types, Foxp3(+Treg and IL-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells have frequently been associated with tolerance following transplantation in both mice and humans. Previously, we demonstrated that rapamycin+IL-10 promotes Tr1-cell-associated tolerance in Balb/c mice transplanted with C57BL/6 pancreatic islets. However, this same treatment was unsuccessful in C57BL/6 mice transplanted with Balb/c islets (classified as a stringent transplant model. We accordingly designed a protocol that would be effective in the latter transplant model by simultaneously depleting effector T cells and fostering production of Treg cells. We additionally developed and tested a clinically translatable protocol that used no depleting agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetic C57BL/6 mice were transplanted with Balb/c pancreatic islets. Recipient mice transiently treated with anti-CD45RB mAb+rapamycin+IL-10 developed antigen-specific tolerance. During treatment, Foxp3(+Treg cells were momentarily enriched in the blood, followed by accumulation in the graft and draining lymph node, whereas CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T (i.e., Tr1 cells localized in the spleen. In long-term tolerant mice, only CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T cells remained enriched in the spleen and IL-10 was key in the maintenance of tolerance. Alternatively, recipient mice were treated with two compounds routinely used in the clinic (namely, rapamycin and G-CSF; this drug combination promoted tolerance associated with CD4(+IL-10(+IL-4(- T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The anti-CD45RB mAb+rapamycin+IL-10 combined protocol promotes a state of tolerance that is IL-10 dependent. Moreover, the combination of rapamycin+G-CSF induces

  17. A randomized control trial to establish the feasibility and safety of rapamycin treatment in an older human cohort: Immunological, physical performance, and cognitive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraig, Ellen; Linehan, Leslie A; Liang, Hanyu; Romo, Terry Q; Liu, Qianqian; Wu, Yubo; Benavides, Adriana D; Curiel, Tyler J; Javors, Martin A; Musi, Nicolas; Chiodo, Laura; Koek, Wouter; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Kellogg, Dean L

    2018-05-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by rapamycin (RAPA), an FDA-approved immunosuppressive drug used as a clinical therapy to prevent solid organ allograft rejection, enhances longevity in mice. Importantly, RAPA was efficacious even when initiated in relatively old animals, suggesting that mTOR inhibition could potentially slow the progression of aging-associated pathologies in older humans (Harrison et al., 2009; Miller et al., 2011). However, the safety and tolerability of RAPA in older human subjects have not yet been demonstrated. Towards this end, we undertook a placebo-controlled pilot study in 25 generally healthy older adults (aged 70-95 years); subjects were randomized to receive either 1 mg RAPA or placebo daily. Although three subjects withdrew, 11 RAPA and 14 controls completed at least 8 weeks of treatment and were included in the analysis. We monitored for changes that would indicate detrimental effects of RAPA treatment on metabolism, including both standard clinical laboratory assays (CBC, CMP, HbA1c) and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs). We also monitored parameters typically associated with aging that could potentially be modified by RAPA; these included cognitive function which was assessed by three different tools: Executive Interview-25 (EXIT25); Saint Louis University Mental Status Exam (SLUMS); and Texas Assessment of Processing Speed (TAPS). In addition, physical performance was measured by handgrip strength and 40-foot timed walks. Lastly, changes in general parameters of healthy immune aging, including serum pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and blood cell subsets, were assessed. Five subjects reported potential adverse side effects; in the RAPA group, these were limited to facial rash (1 subject), stomatitis (1 subject) and gastrointestinal issues (2 subjects) whereas placebo treated subjects only reported stomatitis (1 subject). Although no other adverse events were reported, statistically

  18. Novel fusion protein approach for efficient high-throughput screening of small molecule-mediating protein-protein interactions in cells and living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2005-08-15

    Networks of protein interactions execute many different intracellular pathways. Small molecules either synthesized within the cell or obtained from the external environment mediate many of these protein-protein interactions. The study of these small molecule-mediated protein-protein interactions is important in understanding abnormal signal transduction pathways in a variety of disorders, as well as in optimizing the process of drug development and validation. In this study, we evaluated the rapamycin-mediated interaction of the human proteins FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) rapamycin-binding domain (FRB) and FKBP12 by constructing a fusion of these proteins with a split-Renilla luciferase or a split enhanced green fluorescent protein (split-EGFP) such that complementation of the reporter fragments occurs in the presence of rapamycin. Different linker peptides in the fusion protein were evaluated for the efficient maintenance of complemented reporter activity. This system was studied in both cell culture and xenografts in living animals. We found that peptide linkers with two or four EAAAR repeat showed higher protein-protein interaction-mediated signal with lower background signal compared with having no linker or linkers with amino acid sequences GGGGSGGGGS, ACGSLSCGSF, and ACGSLSCGSFACGSLSCGSF. A 9 +/- 2-fold increase in signal intensity both in cell culture and in living mice was seen compared with a system that expresses both reporter fragments and the interacting proteins separately. In this fusion system, rapamycin induced heterodimerization of the FRB and FKBP12 moieties occurred rapidly even at very lower concentrations (0.00001 nmol/L) of rapamycin. For a similar fusion system employing split-EGFP, flow cytometry analysis showed significant level of rapamycin-induced complementation.

  19. Disease Evolution and Response to Rapamycin in Activated Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ Syndrome: The European Society for Immunodeficiencies-Activated Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ Syndrome Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Maccari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K δ Syndrome (APDS, caused by autosomal dominant mutations in PIK3CD (APDS1 or PIK3R1 (APDS2, is a heterogeneous primary immunodeficiency. While initial cohort-descriptions summarized the spectrum of clinical and immunological manifestations, questions about long-term disease evolution and response to therapy remain. The prospective European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID-APDS registry aims to characterize the disease course, identify outcome predictors, and evaluate treatment responses. So far, 77 patients have been recruited (51 APDS1, 26 APDS2. Analysis of disease evolution in the first 68 patients pinpoints the early occurrence of recurrent respiratory infections followed by chronic lymphoproliferation, gastrointestinal manifestations, and cytopenias. Although most manifestations occur by age 15, adult-onset and asymptomatic courses were documented. Bronchiectasis was observed in 24/40 APDS1 patients who received a CT-scan compared with 4/15 APDS2 patients. By age 20, half of the patients had received at least one immunosuppressant, but 2–3 lines of immunosuppressive therapy were not unusual before age 10. Response to rapamycin was rated by physician visual analog scale as good in 10, moderate in 9, and poor in 7. Lymphoproliferation showed the best response (8 complete, 11 partial, 6 no remission, while bowel inflammation (3 complete, 3 partial, 9 no remission and cytopenia (3 complete, 2 partial, 9 no remission responded less well. Hence, non-lymphoproliferative manifestations should be a key target for novel therapies. This report from the ESID-APDS registry provides comprehensive baseline documentation for a growing cohort that will be followed prospectively to establish prognostic factors and identify patients for treatment studies.

  20. Enteral delivery of proteins stimulates protein synthesis in human duodenal mucosa in the fed state through a mammalian target of rapamycin-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coëffier, Moïse; Claeyssens, Sophie; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Guérin, Charlène; Maurer, Brigitte; Lecleire, Stéphane; Lavoinne, Alain; Donnadieu, Nathalie; Cailleux, Anne-Françoise; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Glutamine modulates duodenal protein metabolism in fasted healthy humans, but its effects in a fed state remain unknown. We aimed to assess the effects of either glutamine or an isonitrogenous protein mixture on duodenal protein metabolism in humans in the fed state. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were randomly included in 2 groups. Each volunteer was studied on 2 occasions in a random order and received, during 5 h, either an enteral infusion of maltodextrins alone (0.25 g · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹; both groups) that mimicked a carbohydrate fed state or maltodextrins with glutamine (group 1) or an isonitrogenous (22.4 mg N · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) protein powder (group 2). Simultaneously, a continuous intravenous infusion of ¹³C-leucine and ²H₅-phenylalanine (both 9 μmol · kg⁻¹ · h⁻¹) was performed. Endoscopic duodenal biopsies were taken. Leucine and phenylalanine enrichments were assessed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in duodenal proteins and the intracellular free amino acids pool to calculate the mucosal fractional synthesis rate (FSR). Proteasome proteolytic activities and phosphokinase expression were assessed by using specific fluorogenic substrates and macroarrays, respectively. The FSR and proteasome activity were not different after the glutamine supply compared with after maltodextrins alone. In contrast, the FSR increased (1.7-fold increase; P protein-powder delivery without modification of total proteasome activity. The protein powder increased insulinemia, PI3 kinase, and erk phosphorylation but did not affect the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal-integrating kinase 1 phosphorylation. A trend for an increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation was observed (P = 0.07). In the carbohydrate fed state, enteral proteins but not glutamine increased duodenal protein synthesis through an mTOR independent pathway in humans.

  1. mTORC1 activity as a determinant of cancer risk--rationalizing the cancer-preventive effects of adiponectin, metformin, rapamycin, and low-protein vegan diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    Increased plasma levels of adiponectin, metformin therapy of diabetes, rapamycin administration in transplant patients, and lifelong consumption of low-protein plant-based diets have all been linked to decreased risk for various cancers. These benefits may be mediated, at least in part, by down-regulated activity of the mTORC1 complex, a key regulator of protein translation. By boosting the effective availability of the translation initiator eIF4E, mTORC1 activity promotes the translation of a number of "weak" mRNAs that code for proteins, often up-regulated in cancer, that promote cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and angiogenesis, and that abet cancer promotion and chemoresistance by opposing apoptosis. Measures which inhibit eIF4E activity, either directly or indirectly, may have utility not only for cancer prevention, but also for the treatment of many cancers in which eIF4E drives malignancy. Since eIF4E is overexpressed in many cancers, strategies which target eIF4E directly--some of which are now being assessed clinically--may have the broadest efficacy in this regard. Many of the "weak" mRNAs coding for proteins that promote malignant behavior or chemoresistance are regulated transcriptionally by NF-kappaB and/or Stat3, which are active in a high proportion of cancers; thus, regimens concurrently targeting eIF4E, NF-kappaB, and Stat3 may suppress these proteins at both the transcriptional and translational levels, potentially achieving a very marked reduction in their expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. mTOR (Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) Inhibition Decreases Mechanosignaling, Collagen Accumulation, and Stiffening of the Thoracic Aorta in Elastin-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Guangxin; Li, Qingle; Ali, Rahmat; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Wei; Qyang, Yibing; Greif, Daniel M; Geirsson, Arnar; Humphrey, Jay D; Tellides, George

    2017-09-01

    Elastin deficiency because of heterozygous loss of an ELN allele in Williams syndrome causes obstructive aortopathy characterized by medial thickening and fibrosis and consequent aortic stiffening. Previous work in Eln -null mice with a severe arterial phenotype showed that inhibition of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), a key regulator of cell growth, lessened the aortic obstruction but did not prevent early postnatal death. We investigated the effects of mTOR inhibition in Eln -null mice partially rescued by human ELN that manifest a less severe arterial phenotype and survive long term. Thoracic aortas of neonatal and juvenile mice with graded elastin deficiency exhibited increased signaling through both mTOR complex 1 and 2. Despite lower predicted wall stress, there was increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, suggestive of greater integrin activation, and increased transforming growth factor-β-signaling mediators, associated with increased collagen expression. Pharmacological blockade of mTOR by rapalogs did not improve luminal stenosis but reduced mechanosignaling (in delayed fashion after mTOR complex 1 inhibition), medial collagen accumulation, and stiffening of the aorta. Rapalog administration also retarded somatic growth, however, and precipitated neonatal deaths. Complementary, less-toxic strategies to inhibit mTOR via altered growth factor and nutrient responses were not effective. In addition to previously demonstrated therapeutic benefits of rapalogs decreasing smooth muscle cell proliferation in the absence of elastin, we find that rapalogs also prevent aortic fibrosis and stiffening attributable to partial elastin deficiency. Our findings suggest that mTOR-sensitive perturbation of smooth muscle cell mechanosensing contributes to elastin aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Transforming Growth Factor-β Is an Upstream Regulator of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Dependent Bladder Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sounak; Hau, Andrew M; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Harwalkar, Jyoti; Shoskes, Aaron C; Elson, Paul; Beach, Jordan R; Hussey, George S; Schiemann, William P; Egelhoff, Thomas T; Howe, Philip H; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-05-01

    Our prior work identified the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) as a key regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion, although upstream growth factor mediators of this pathway in bladder cancer have not been well delineated. We tested whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, which can function as a promotility factor in bladder cancer cells, could regulate mTORC2-dependent bladder cancer cell motility and invasion. In human bladder cancers, the highest levels of phosphorylated SMAD2, a TGF-β signaling intermediate, were present in high-grade invasive bladder cancers and associated with more frequent recurrence and decreased disease-specific survival. Increased expression of TGF-β isoforms, receptors, and signaling components was detected in invasive high-grade bladder cancer cells that expressed Vimentin and lacked E-cadherin. Application of TGF-β induced phosphorylation of the Ser473 residue of AKT, a selective target of mTORC2, in a SMAD2- and SMAD4-independent manner and increased bladder cancer cell migration in a modified scratch wound assay and invasion through Matrigel. Inhibition of TGF-β receptor I using SB431542 ablated TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. A similar effect was seen when Rictor, a key mTORC2 component, was selectively silenced. Our results suggest that TGF-β can induce bladder cancer cell invasion via mTORC2 signaling, which may be applicable in most bladder cancers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Hormone Modulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Activity and the Regulation of Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Protein mRNA Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Watterson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1 by nutrients, insulin and leptin leads to appetite suppression (anorexia. Contrastingly, increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity by ghrelin promotes appetite (orexia. However, the interplay between these mechanisms remains poorly defined. The relationship between the anorexigenic hormones, insulin and leptin, and the orexigenic hormone, ghrelin, on mTORC1 signalling was examined using S6 kinase phosphorylation as a marker for changes in mTORC1 activity in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. Additionally, the contribution of AMPK and mTORC1 signalling in relation to insulin-, leptin- and ghrelin-driven alterations to mouse hypothalamic agouti-related protein (AgRP mRNA levels was examined. Insulin and leptin increase mTORC1 activity in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K- and protein kinase B (PKB-dependent manner, compared to vehicle controls, whereas increasing AMPK activity inhibits mTORC1 activity and blocks the actions of the anorexigenic hormones. Ghrelin mediates an AMPK-dependent decrease in mTORC1 activity and increases hypothalamic AgRP mRNA levels, the latter effect being prevented by insulin in an mTORC1-dependent manner. In conclusion, mTORC1 acts as an integration node in hypothalamic neurons for hormone-derived PI3K and AMPK signalling and mediates at least part of the assimilated output of anorexigenic and orexigenic hormone actions in the hypothalamus.

  5. A novel strategy inducing autophagic cell death in Burkitt's lymphoma cells with anti-CD19-targeted liposomal rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K; Sato, T; Iyama, S; Tatekoshi, A; Hashimoto, A; Kamihara, Y; Horiguchi, H; Kikuchi, S; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kobune, M; Kato, J

    2014-01-01

    Relapsed or refractory Burkitt's lymphoma often has a poor prognosis in spite of intensive chemotherapy that induces apoptotic and/or necrotic death of lymphoma cells. Rapamycin (Rap) brings about autophagy, and could be another treatment. Further, anti-CD19-targeted liposomal delivery may enable Rap to kill lymphoma cells specifically. Rap was encapsulated by anionic liposome and conjugated with anti-CD19 antibody (CD19-GL-Rap) or anti-CD2 antibody (CD2-GL-Rap) as a control. A fluorescent probe Cy5.5 was also liposomized in the same way (CD19 or CD2-GL-Cy5.5) to examine the efficacy of anti-CD19-targeted liposomal delivery into CD19-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, SKW6.4. CD19-GL-Cy5.5 was more effectively uptaken into SKW6.4 cells than CD2-GL-Cy5.5 in vitro. When the cells were inoculated subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice, intravenously administered CD19-GL-Cy5.5 made the subcutaneous tumor fluorescent, while CD2-GL-Cy5.5 did not. Further, CD19-GL-Rap had a greater cytocidal effect on not only SKW6.4 cells but also Burkitt's lymphoma cells derived from patients than CD2-GL-Rap in vitro. The specific toxicity of CD19-GL-Rap was cancelled by neutralizing anti-CD19 antibody. The survival period of mice treated with intravenous CD19-GL-Rap was significantly longer than that of mice treated with CD2-GL-Rap after intraperitoneal inoculation of SKW6.4 cells. Anti-CD19-targeted liposomal Rap could be a promising lymphoma cell-specific treatment inducing autophagic cell death

  6. Differential Role of Rapamycin in Epidermis-Induced IL-15-IGF-1 Secretion via Activation of Akt/mTORC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Yashu; Li, Haisheng; Liu, Meixi; Huang, Zhenggen; Yan, Rongshuai; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Backgroud/Aims: The effects of rapamycin (RPM) on wound healing have been previously studied. However, reciprocal contradictory data have been reported, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to uncover differential role of RPM in regulation of wound healing and explore the possible mechanism. C57BL/6J mice and epidermal cells were treated with different doses of RPM. The wound re-epithelialization was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Epidermal cell survival was determined by CCK-8 assays. Moreover, the mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway were examined by western blot analysis. This study showed that differential doses of RPM could lead to separate consequences in epidermis. Histological analyses showed that low-dose RPM promoted wound healing, and enhanced the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1. Furthermore, western blot analysis showed that the effect of low-dose RPM in epidermis were not through mTORC1 pathway. Instead, activation of the Akt/mTORC2 pathway was involved in low-dose RPM-induced IL-15 and IGF-1 production in epidermis, while high-dose RPM inhibited the expression of IL-15 and IGF-1 and the activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathway. This study for the first time demonstrated that RPM-mediated wound healing was dose-dependent. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Stomatitis associated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition: A review of pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, and clinical implications for oral practice in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Mark S; Rugo, Hope S; Litton, Jennifer K; Meiller, Timothy F

    2018-04-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer may develop oral morbidities that result from therapeutic interventions. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS) is a common adverse event (AE), secondary to mTOR inhibitor therapy, that can have a negative impact on treatment adherence, quality of life, and health care costs. A multidisciplinary team approach is important to minimize mIAS and to maximize treatment benefits to patients with breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and natural history of mIAS. Current and new management strategies for the prevention and treatment of mIAS are described in the context of fostering a coordinated team care approach to optimizing patient care. The authors conducted a PubMed search from 2007 through 2017 using the terms "stomatitis," "mIAS," "everolimus," "mTOR," "metastatic breast cancer," and "oral care." They selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals that reported controlled trials and evidence-based guidelines. mIAS can be distinguished from mucositis caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy on the basis of cause, clinical presentation, and treatment paradigms. Specific preventive and therapeutic management strategies can be implemented across the continuum of patient oral health care. Oral health care providers are on the frontline of oral health care for patients with metastatic breast cancer and are uniquely positioned to provide patient education, advocate accurate reporting of mIAS, and support early identification, monitoring, and prompt intervention to mitigate the severity and duration of this manageable, potentially dose-limiting AE. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathway in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Carolina; Martelli, Alberto M; Zauli, Giorgio; Vitale, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M

    2018-04-18

    Despite considerable progress in treatment protocols, B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) displays a poor prognosis in about 15-20% of pediatric cases and about 60% of adult patients. In addition, life-long irreversible late effects from chemo- and radiation therapy, including secondary malignancies, are a growing problem for leukemia survivors. Targeted therapy holds promising perspectives for cancer treatment as it may be more effective and have fewer side effects than conventional therapies. The phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key regulatory cascade which controls proliferation, survival and drug-resistance of cancer cells, and it is frequently upregulated in the different subtypes of B-ALL, where it plays important roles in the pathophysiology, maintenance and progression of the disease. Moreover, activation of this signaling cascade portends a poorer prognosis in both pediatric and adult B-ALL patients. Promising preclinical data on PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors have documented their anticancer activity in B-ALL and some of these novel drugs have entered clinical trials as they could lead to a longer event-free survival and reduce therapy-associated toxicity for patients with B-ALL. This review highlights the current status of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors in B-ALL, with an emphasis on emerging evidence of the superior efficacy of synergistic combinations involving the use of traditional chemotherapeutics or other novel, targeted agents. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Convergence of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1- and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3-β–Signaling Pathways Regulates the Innate Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huizhi; Brown, Jonathan; Gu, Zhen; Garcia, Carlos A.; Liang, Ruqiang; Alard, Pascale; Beurel, Eléonore; Jope, Richard S.; Greenway, Terrance; Martin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K pathway and its regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) play pivotal roles in controlling inflammation. In this article, we show that mTORC1 and GSK3-β converge and that the capacity of mTORC1 to affect the inflammatory response is due to the inactivation of GSK3-β. Inhibition of mTORC1 attenuated GSK3 phosphorylation and increased its kinase activity. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assays demonstrated that GSK3-β associated with a downstream target of mTORC1, p85S6K, and phosphorylated GSK3-β. Inhibition of S6K1 abrogated the phosphorylation of GSK3-β while increasing and decreasing the levels of IL-12 and IL-10, respectively, in LPS-stimulated monocytes. In contrast, the direct inhibition of GSK3 attenuated the capacity of S6K1 inhibition to influence the levels of IL-10 and IL-12 produced by LPS-stimulated cells. At the transcriptional level, mTORC1 inhibition reduced the DNA binding of CREB and this effect was reversed by GSK3 inhibition. As a result, mTORC1 inhibition increased the levels of NF-κB p65 associated with CREB-binding protein. Inhibition of NF-κB p65 attenuated rapamycin’s ability to influence the levels of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine production in monocytes stimulated with LPS. These studies identify the molecular mechanism by which mTORC1 affects GSK3 and show that mTORC1 inhibition regulates pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production via its capacity to inactivate GSK3. PMID:21422248

  10. The novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin, NVP-BEZ235, inhibits growth and proliferation in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Philipp; Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Oduncu, Fuat; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    NVP-BEZ235 is a new inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) whose efficacy in advanced solid tumours is currently being evaluated in a phase I/II clinical trial. Here we show that NVP-BEZ235 inhibits growth in common myeloma cell lines as well as primary myeloma cells at nanomolar concentrations in a time and dose dependent fashion. Further experiments revealed induction of apoptosis in three of four cell lines. Inhibition of cell growth was mainly due to inhibition of myeloma cell proliferation, as shown by the BrdU assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, which was due to downregulation of cyclin D1, pRb and cdc25a. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt), P70S6k and 4E-BP-1. Furthermore we show that the stimulatory effect of CD40-ligand (CD40L), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and conditioned medium of HS-5 stromal cells on myeloma cell growth is completely abrogated by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, synergism studies revealed synergistic and additive activity of NVP-BEZ235 together with melphalan, doxorubicin and bortezomib. Taken together, inhibition of PI3 kinase/mTOR by NVP-BEZ235 is highly effective and NVP-BEZ235 represents a potential new candidate for targeted therapy in multiple myeloma

  11. Moderate mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition induces autophagy in HTR8/SVneo cells via O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuxia; Na, Quan; Song, Weiwei

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy, a highly regulated process with a dual role (pro-survival or pro-death), has been implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism whereby mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling regulates autophagy by modulating protein O-GlcNAcylation in human trophoblasts. HTR8/SVneo cells were incubated in serum-free medium for different time intervals or treated with varying doses of Torin1. Protein expression and cell apoptosis were detected by immunoblotting and flow cytometry, respectively. Short-term serum starvation or slight suppression of mTOR signaling promoted autophagy and decreased apoptosis in HTR8/SVneo cells. Conversely, prolonged serum starvation or excessive inhibition of mTOR reduced autophagy and enhanced cell apoptosis. Both serum starvation and mTOR signaling suppression reduced protein O-GlcNAcylation. Upregulation and downregulation of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) levels attenuated and augmented autophagy, respectively. Moderate mTOR inhibition-induced autophagy was blocked by upregulation of protein O-GlcNAcylation. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation studies revealed that Beclin1 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29) could be O-GlcNAcylated, and that slight mTOR inhibition resulted in decreased O-GlcNAc modification of Beclin1 and SNAP29. Notably, we observed an inverse correlation between phosphorylation (Ser15) and O-GlcNAcylation of Beclin1. mTOR signaling inhibition played dual roles in regulating autophagy and apoptosis in HTR8/SVneo cells. Moderate mTOR suppression might induce autophagy via modulating O-GlcNAcylation of Beclin1 and SNAP29. Moreover, the negative interplay between Beclin1 O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation (Ser15) may be involved in autophagy regulation by mTOR signaling. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Molecular imaging of drug-modulated protein-protein interactions in living subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F; Huang, Jing; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2004-03-15

    Networks of protein interactions mediate cellular responses to environmental stimuli and direct the execution of many different cellular functional pathways. Small molecules synthesized within cells or recruited from the external environment mediate many protein interactions. The study of small molecule-mediated interactions of proteins is important to understand abnormal signal transduction pathways in cancer and in drug development and validation. In this study, we used split synthetic renilla luciferase (hRLUC) protein fragment-assisted complementation to evaluate heterodimerization of the human proteins FRB and FKBP12 mediated by the small molecule rapamycin. The concentration of rapamycin required for efficient dimerization and that of its competitive binder ascomycin required for dimerization inhibition were studied in cell lines. The system was dually modulated in cell culture at the transcription level, by controlling nuclear factor kappaB promoter/enhancer elements using tumor necrosis factor alpha, and at the interaction level, by controlling the concentration of the dimerizer rapamycin. The rapamycin-mediated dimerization of FRB and FKBP12 also was studied in living mice by locating, quantifying, and timing the hRLUC complementation-based bioluminescence imaging signal using a cooled charged coupled device camera. This split reporter system can be used to efficiently screen small molecule drugs that modulate protein-protein interactions and also to assess drugs in living animals. Both are essential steps in the preclinical evaluation of candidate pharmaceutical agents targeting protein-protein interactions, including signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  13. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2010-11-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. One chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) fused to a cellular 'address' (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). The second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain from FKBP-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1, also known as mTor). Rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBP12- and FRB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment.

  14. CD4~+Foxp3~+ regulatory T cells converted by rapamycin from peripheral CD4~+ CD25~-naive T cells display more potent regulatory ability in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-fei; GAO Jie; ZHANG Dong; WANG Zi-han; ZHU Ji-ye

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapamycin (RAPA) is a relatively new immunosuppressant drug that functions as a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. RAPA blocks activation of T-effector (Teff) cells by inhibiting the response to interleukin-2. Recently, RAPA was also shown to selectively expand the T-regulator (Treg) cell population. To date, no studies have examined the mechanism by which RAPA converts Teff cells to Treg cells. Methods Peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T cells were cultivated with RAPA and B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vitro. CD4~+CD25~- T cells were harvested after 6 days and analyzed for expression of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) using flow cytometry. CD4~+CD25~+CD127~- subsets as the converted Tregs were isolated from the mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with CD127 negative selection, followed by CD4 and CD25 positive selection using microbeads and magnetic separation column (MSC). Moreover, mRNA was extracted from converted Tregs and C57BL/6 naive CD4~+CD25~+ T cells and Foxp3 levels were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). A total of 1×10~5 carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells/well from C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with DBA/2 or C3H maturation of dendritic cells (mDCs) (0.25×10~5/well) in 96-well round-bottom plates for 6 days. Then 1×10~5 or 0.25×10~5 converted Treg cells were added to every well as regulatory cells. Cells were harvested after 6 days of culture and analyzed for proliferation of CFSE-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells using flow cytometry. Data were analyzed using CellQuest software.Results We found that RAPA can convert peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T Cells to CD4~+Foxp3~+ Treg cells using B cells as APCs, and this subtype of Treg can potently suppress Teff proliferation and maintain antigenic specificity. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence that RAPA induces Treg cell conversion from Teff cells and

  15. Her4 and Her2/neu tyrosine kinase domains dimerize and activate in a reconstituted in vitro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Schlesinger, Paul; Bose, Ron

    2010-03-05

    Her4 (ErbB-4) and Her2/neu (ErbB-2) are receptor-tyrosine kinases belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. Crystal structures of EGFR and Her4 kinase domains demonstrate kinase dimerization and activation through an allosteric mechanism. The kinase domains form an asymmetric dimer, where the C-lobe surface of one monomer contacts the N-lobe of the other monomer. EGFR kinase dimerization and activation in vitro was previously reported using a nickel-chelating lipid-liposome system, and we now apply this system to all other members of the EGFR family. Polyhistidine-tagged Her4, Her2/neu, and Her3 kinase domains are bound to these nickel-liposomes and are brought to high local concentration, mimicking what happens to full-length receptors in vivo following ligand binding. Addition of nickel-liposomes to Her4 kinase domain results in 40-fold activation in kinase activity and marked enhancement of C-terminal tail autophosphorylation. Activation of Her4 shows a sigmoidal dependence on kinase concentration, consistent with a cooperative process requiring kinase dimerization. Her2/neu kinase activity is also activated by nickel-liposomes, and is increased further by heterodimerization with Her3 or Her4. The ability of Her3 and Her4 to heterodimerize and activate other family members is studied in vitro. Her3 kinase domain readily activates Her2/neu but is a poor activator of Her4, which differs from the prediction made by the asymmetric dimer model. Mutation of Her3 residues (952)ENI(954) to the corresponding sequence in Her4 enhanced the ability of Her3 to activate Her4, demonstrating that sequence differences on the C-lobe surface influence the heterodimerization and activation of ErbB kinase domains.

  16. Lack of evidence for AT1R/B2R heterodimerization in COS-7, HEK293, and NIH3T3 cells: how common is the AT1R/B2R heterodimer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob L; Hansen, Jonas T; Speerschneider, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    dimerization using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and regulated secretion/aggregation technology. However, although both the AT1Rs and B2Rs were functional in our systems and the systems were fine tuned to detect small changes in receptor function, we failed to detect any functional modulation...

  17. Mammalian-target of rapamycin inhibition with temsirolimus in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients is associated with considerable toxicity: results of the temsirolimus pilot trial by the German MDS Study Group (D-MDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermke, Martin; Schuster, Claudia; Nolte, Florian; Al-Ali, Haifa-Kathrin; Kiewe, Philipp; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Jakob, Christiane; von Bonin, Malte; Hentschel, Leopold; Klut, Ina-Maria; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Baretton, Gustavo; Germing, Ulrich; Herbst, Regina; Haase, Detelef; Hofmann, Wolf K; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    The mammalian-target of rapamycin (also termed mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR) pathway integrates various pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic stimuli and is involved in regulatory T-cell (TREG) development. As these processes contribute to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we hypothesized that mTOR modulation with temsirolimus (TEM) might show activity in MDS. This prospective multicentre trial enrolled lower and higher risk MDS patients, provided that they were transfusion-dependent/neutropenic or relapsed/refractory to 5-azacitidine, respectively. All patients received TEM at a weekly dose of 25 mg. Of the 9 lower- and 11 higher-risk patients included, only 4 (20%) reached the response assessment after 4 months of treatment and showed stable disease without haematological improvement. The remaining patients discontinued TEM prematurely due to adverse events. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in the lower-risk group and 296 days in the higher-risk group. We observed a significant decline of bone marrow (BM) vascularisation (P = 0·006) but were unable to demonstrate a significant impact of TEM on the balance between TREG and pro-inflammatory T-helper-cell subsets within the peripheral blood or BM. We conclude that mTOR-modulation with TEM at a dose of 25 mg per week is accompanied by considerable toxicity and has no beneficial effects in elderly MDS patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prognostic significance and therapeutic potential of the activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ju; Yin, Minzhi; Zhu, Yiping; Gu, Ling; Zhang, Yanle; Li, Qiang; Jia, Cangsong; Ma, Zhigui

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (AKT/mTOR) pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-mediated tumorigenesis in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and correlated with unfavorable outcome in certain types of other cancers. However, the prognostic value of AKT/mTOR activation in ALCL remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we aim to address this question from a clinical perspective by comparing the expressions of the AKT/mTOR signaling molecules in ALCL patients and exploring the therapeutic significance of targeting the AKT/mTOR pathway in ALCL. A cohort of 103 patients with ALCL was enrolled in the study. Expression of ALK fusion proteins and the AKT/mTOR signaling phosphoproteins was studied by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The pathogenic role of ALK fusion proteins and the therapeutic significance of targeting the ATK/mTOR signaling pathway were further investigated in vitro study with an ALK + ALCL cell line and the NPM-ALK transformed BaF3 cells. ALK expression was detected in 60% of ALCLs, of which 79% exhibited the presence of NPM-ALK, whereas the remaining 21% expressed variant-ALK fusions. Phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1), and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase polypeptide 1 (p70S6K1) was detected in 76%, 80%, 91%, and 93% of ALCL patients, respectively. Both phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and p-mTOR were correlated to ALK expression, and p-mTOR was closely correlated to p-AKT. Both p-4E-BP1 and p-p70S6K1 were correlated to p-mTOR, but were not correlated to the expression of ALK and p-AKT. Clinically, ALK + ALCL occurred more commonly in younger patients, and ALK + ALCL patients had a much better prognosis than ALK-ALCL cases. However, expression of p-AKT, p-mTOR, p-4E-BP1, or p-p70S6K1 did not have an impact on the clinical outcome. Overexpression of NPM-ALK in a nonmalignant murine pro-B lymphoid cell line, BaF3, induced the

  19. Nitrogen-responsive Regulation of GATA Protein Family Activators Gln3 and Gat1 Occurs by Two Distinct Pathways, One Inhibited by Rapamycin and the Other by Methionine Sulfoximine*

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    Georis, Isabelle; Tate, Jennifer J.; Cooper, Terrance G.; Dubois, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen availability regulates the transcription of genes required to degrade non-preferentially utilized nitrogen sources by governing the localization and function of transcription activators, Gln3 and Gat1. TorC1 inhibitor, rapamycin (Rap), and glutamine synthetase inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine (Msx), elicit responses grossly similar to those of limiting nitrogen, implicating both glutamine synthesis and TorC1 in the regulation of Gln3 and Gat1. To better understand this regulation, we compared Msx- versus Rap-elicited Gln3 and Gat1 localization, their DNA binding, nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive gene expression, and the TorC1 pathway phosphatase requirements for these responses. Using this information we queried whether Rap and Msx inhibit sequential steps in a single, linear cascade connecting glutamine availability to Gln3 and Gat1 control as currently accepted or alternatively inhibit steps in two distinct parallel pathways. We find that Rap most strongly elicits nuclear Gat1 localization and expression of genes whose transcription is most Gat1-dependent. Msx, on the other hand, elicits nuclear Gln3 but not Gat1 localization and expression of genes that are most Gln3-dependent. Importantly, Rap-elicited nuclear Gln3 localization is absolutely Sit4-dependent, but that elicited by Msx is not. PP2A, although not always required for nuclear GATA factor localization, is highly required for GATA factor binding to nitrogen-responsive promoters and subsequent transcription irrespective of the gene GATA factor specificities. Collectively, our data support the existence of two different nitrogen-responsive regulatory pathways, one inhibited by Msx and the other by rapamycin. PMID:22039046

  20. Nitrogen-responsive regulation of GATA protein family activators Gln3 and Gat1 occurs by two distinct pathways, one inhibited by rapamycin and the other by methionine sulfoximine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georis, Isabelle; Tate, Jennifer J; Cooper, Terrance G; Dubois, Evelyne

    2011-12-30

    Nitrogen availability regulates the transcription of genes required to degrade non-preferentially utilized nitrogen sources by governing the localization and function of transcription activators, Gln3 and Gat1. TorC1 inhibitor, rapamycin (Rap), and glutamine synthetase inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine (Msx), elicit responses grossly similar to those of limiting nitrogen, implicating both glutamine synthesis and TorC1 in the regulation of Gln3 and Gat1. To better understand this regulation, we compared Msx- versus Rap-elicited Gln3 and Gat1 localization, their DNA binding, nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive gene expression, and the TorC1 pathway phosphatase requirements for these responses. Using this information we queried whether Rap and Msx inhibit sequential steps in a single, linear cascade connecting glutamine availability to Gln3 and Gat1 control as currently accepted or alternatively inhibit steps in two distinct parallel pathways. We find that Rap most strongly elicits nuclear Gat1 localization and expression of genes whose transcription is most Gat1-dependent. Msx, on the other hand, elicits nuclear Gln3 but not Gat1 localization and expression of genes that are most Gln3-dependent. Importantly, Rap-elicited nuclear Gln3 localization is absolutely Sit4-dependent, but that elicited by Msx is not. PP2A, although not always required for nuclear GATA factor localization, is highly required for GATA factor binding to nitrogen-responsive promoters and subsequent transcription irrespective of the gene GATA factor specificities. Collectively, our data support the existence of two different nitrogen-responsive regulatory pathways, one inhibited by Msx and the other by rapamycin.

  1. Protein kinase FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the target of rapamycin and high osmolarity glycerol pathways and regulates multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in Fusarium graminearum.

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    Gu, Qin; Zhang, Chengqi; Yu, Fangwei; Yin, Yanni; Shim, Won-Bo; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase Sch9 is one of the downstream effectors of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 1 and plays multiple roles in stress resistance, longevity and nutrient sensing. However, the functions of Sch9 orthologs in filamentous fungi, particularly in pathogenic species, have not been characterized to date. Here, we investigated biological and genetic functions of FgSch9 in Fusarium graminearum. The FgSCH9 deletion mutant (ΔFgSch9) was defective in aerial hyphal growth, hyphal branching and conidial germination. The mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, cell wall-damaging agents, and to rapamycin, while showing increased thermal tolerance. We identified FgMaf1 as one of the FgSch9-interacting proteins that plays an important role in regulating mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence of F. graminearum. Co-immunoprecipitation and affinity capture-mass spectrometry assays showed that FgSch9 also interacts with FgTor and FgHog1. More importantly, both ΔFgSch9 and FgHog1 null mutant (ΔFgHog1) exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses. This defect was more severe in the FgSch9/FgHog1 double mutant. Taken together, we propose that FgSch9 serves as a mediator of the TOR and high osmolarity glycerol pathways, and regulates vegetative differentiation, multiple stress responses and secondary metabolism in F. graminearum. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

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    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  3. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  4. Regulation of Cre recombinase by ligand-induced complementation of inactive fragments.

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    Jullien, Nicolas; Sampieri, François; Enjalbert, Alain; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2003-11-01

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. To overcome this, we have developed DiCre, a regulatable fragment complementation system for Cre. The enzyme was split into two moieties that were fused to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12-rapamycin-associated protein), respectively. These can be efficiently heterodimerized by rapamycin. Several variants, based on splitting Cre at different sites and using different linker peptides, were tested in an indicator cell line. The fusion proteins, taken separately, had no recombinase activity. Stable transformants, co-expressing complementing fragments based on splitting Cre between Asn59 and Asn60, displayed low background activity affecting 0.05-0.4% of the cells. Rapamycin induced a rapid recombination, reaching 100% by 48-72 h, with an EC50 of 0.02 nM. Thus, ligand-induced dimerization can efficiently regulate Cre, and should be useful to achieve a tight temporal control of its activity, such as in the case of the creation of conditional knock-out animals.

  5. Placentome Nutrient Transporters and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Proteins Are Altered by the Methionine Supply during Late Gestation in Dairy Cows and Are Associated with Newborn Birth Weight.

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    Batistel, Fernanda; Alharthi, Abdulrahman Sm; Wang, Ling; Parys, Claudia; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Cardoso, Felipe C; Loor, Juan J

    2017-09-01

    Background: To our knowledge, most research demonstrating a link between maternal nutrition and both fetal growth and offspring development after birth has been performed with nonruminants. Whether such relationships exist in large ruminants is largely unknown. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether increasing the methionine supply during late pregnancy would alter uteroplacental tissue nutrient transporters and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and their relation with newborn body weight. Methods: Multiparous Holstein cows were used in a randomized complete block design experiment. During the last 28 d of pregnancy, cows were fed a control diet or the control diet plus ethylcellulose rumen-protected methionine (0.9 g/kg dry matter intake) (Mepron; Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH) to achieve a 2.8:1 ratio of lysine to methionine in the metabolizable protein reaching the small intestine. We collected placentome samples at parturition and used them to assess mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation status of mTOR pathway proteins. Results: Newborn body weight was greater in the methionine group than in the control group (44.1 kg and 41.8 kg, respectively; P ≤ 0.05). Increasing the methionine supply also resulted in greater feed intake (15.8 kg/d and 14.6 kg/d), plasma methionine (11.9 μM and 15.3 μM), and plasma insulin (1.16 μg/L and 0.81 μg/L) in cows during late pregnancy. As a result, mRNA expression of genes involved in neutral amino acid transport [solute carrier (SLC) family members SLC3A2 , SLC7A5 , SLC38A1 , and SLC38A10 ], glucose transport [ SLC2A1 , SLC2A3 , and SLC2A4 ], and the mTOR pathway [mechanistic target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinase B1] were upregulated ( P ≤ 0.07) in methionine-supplemented cows. Among 6 proteins in the mTOR pathway, increasing the methionine supply led to greater ( P ≤ 0.09) protein expression of α serine-threonine kinase (AKT), phosphorylated (p)-AKT, p-eukaryotic elongation factor 2

  6. Theobromine, the primary methylxanthine found in Theobroma cacao, prevents malignant glioblastoma proliferation by negatively regulating phosphodiesterase-4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B.

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    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Miwa, Shinji; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Theobromine, a caffeine derivative, is the primary methylxanthine produced by Theobroma cacao. We previously showed that methylxanthines, including caffeine and theophylline, have antitumor and antiinflammatory effects, which are in part mediated by their inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE). A member of the PDE family, PDE4, is widely expressed in and promotes the growth of glioblastoma, the most common type of brain tumor. The purpose of this study was to determine whether theobromine could exert growth inhibitory effects on U87-MG, a cell line derived from human malignant glioma. We show that theobromine treatment elevates intracellular cAMP levels and increases the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, whereas it attenuates p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathways. It also inhibits cell proliferation. These results suggest that foods and beverages containing cocoa bean extracts, including theobromine, might be extremely effective in preventing human glioblastoma.

  7. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway and response to everolimus in endocrine receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer – A retrospective pilot analysis and viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Bajpai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomarkers predictive of response to mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, in endocrine receptor (ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC are a work in progress. We evaluated the feasibility of directly measuring mTOR activity and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN expression and correlating their expression with response and survival. Materials and Methods: MBC patients who received everolimus with endocrine therapy (ET after progression on an aromatase inhibitor and had adequate tissue preservation for estimation of mTOR activity and PTEN expression were selected for analysis from a prospectively maintained database. Progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were estimated by Kaplan–Meier method, and correlation between mTOR activity and PTEN expression with survival was done by log-rank test. Results: Thirteen ER-positive MBC patients were available for analysis. PTEN expression was lost in 11/13 (84.6% patients and retained in 2/13 patients (15.4%. mTOR activity was absent in four patients (30.7%, weak in six patients (46.1%, and moderate in 3 patients (23.2%. Median PFS for the entire population was 2.5 months while median OS was not reached. Patients with an absent mTOR activity showed a longer PFS (5 vs. 1.5 vs. 2 months than those with weak and moderate activity, respectively (P = 0.043. There was no correlation between loss of PTEN expression and PFS. Conclusions: Measurement of direct mTOR activity in patients with MBC receiving everolimus/ET combination appears feasible. Absent mTOR activity may predict for longer PFS with everolimus-ET combination and requires further study.

  8. A hexane fraction of guava Leaves (Psidium guajava L.) induces anticancer activity by suppressing AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Nae Hyung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Sung-Moo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Mosaddik, Ashik; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer effects of guava leaf extracts and its fractions. The chemical compositions of the active extracts were also determined. In the present study, we set out to determine whether the anticancer effects of guava leaves are linked with their ability to suppress constitutive AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation pathways in human prostate cancer cells. We found that guava leaf hexane fraction (GHF) was the most potent inducer of cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in PC-3 cells. The molecular mechanism or mechanisms of GHF apoptotic potential were correlated with the suppression of AKT/mTOR/S6K1 and MAPK signaling pathways. This effect of GHF correlated with down-regulation of various proteins that mediate cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Analysis of GHF by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry tentatively identified 60 compounds, including β-eudesmol (11.98%), α-copaene (7.97%), phytol (7.95%), α-patchoulene (3.76%), β-caryophyllene oxide (CPO) (3.63%), caryophylla-3(15),7(14)-dien-6-ol (2.68%), (E)-methyl isoeugenol (1.90%), α-terpineol (1.76%), and octadecane (1.23%). Besides GHF, CPO, but not phytol, also inhibited the AKT/mTOR/S6K1 signaling pathway and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Overall, these findings suggest that guava leaves can interfere with multiple signaling cascades linked with tumorigenesis and provide a source of potential therapeutic compounds for both the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  9. The Effects of Glucagon-like Peptide-2 on the Tight Junction and Barrier Function in IPEC-J2 Cells through Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Protein Kinase B–Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway

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    Changsong Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2 is important for intestinal barrier function and regulation of tight junction (TJ proteins, but the intracellular mechanisms of action remain undefined. The purpose of this research was to determine the protective effect of GLP-2 mediated TJ and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER in lipopolysaccharide (LPS stressed IPEC-J2 cells and to test the hypothesis that GLP-2 regulate TJ and TER through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway in IPEC-J2 cells. Wortmannin and LY294002 are specific inhibitors of PI3K. The results showed that 100 μg/mL LPS stress decreased TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1 and zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1 mRNA, proteins expressions (p<0.01 respectively. GLP-2 (100 nmol/L promote TER and TJ proteins occludin, claudin-1, and zo-1 mRNA, proteins expressions in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells (p<0.01 respectively. In normal cells, both wortmannin and LY294002, PI3K inhibitors, prevented the mRNA and protein expressions of Akt and mTOR increase induced by GLP-2 (p<0.01 following with the significant decreasing of occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 mRNA and proteins expressions and TER (p<0.01. In conclusion, these results indicated that GLP-2 can promote TJ’s expression and TER in LPS stressed and normal IPEC-J2 cells and GLP-2 could regulate TJ and TER through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  10. Addition of rapamycin and hydroxychloroquine to metronomic chemotherapy as a second line treatment results in high salvage rates for refractory metastatic solid tumors: a pilot safety and effectiveness analysis in a small patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Ko, Hui-Ling; Yang, Kai-Lin; Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin; Kao, Shang-Jyh

    2015-06-30

    Autophagy is an important oncotarget that can be modulated during anti-cancer therapy. Enhancing autophagy using chemotherapy and rapamycin (Rapa) treatment and then inhibiting it using hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) could synergistically improve therapy outcome in cancer patients. It is still unclear whether addition of Rapa and HCQ to chemotherapy could be used for reversing drug resistance. Twenty-five stage IV cancer patients were identified. They had no clinical response to first-line metronomic chemotherapy; the patients were salvaged by adding an autophagy inducer (Rapa, 2 mg/day) and an autophagosome inhibitor (HCQ, 400 mg/day) to their current metronomic chemotherapy for at least 3 months. Patients included 4 prostate, 4 bladder, 4 lung, 4 breast, 2 colon, and 3 head and neck cancer patients as well as 4 sarcoma patients. Chemotherapy was administered for a total of 137 months. The median duration of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 months (95% confidence interval, 3-7 months). The overall response rate to this treatment was of 40%, with an 84% disease control rate. The most frequent and clinically significant toxicities were myelotoxicities. Grade ≥3 leucopenia occurred in 6 patients (24%), grade ≥3 thrombocytopenia in 8 (32%), and anemia in 3 (12%). None of them developed febrile neutropenia. Non-hematologic toxicities were fatigue (total 32%, with 1 patient developing grade 3 fatigue), diarrhea (total 20%, 1 patient developed grade 3 fatigue), reversible grade 3 cardiotoxicity (1 patient), and grade V liver toxicity from hepatitis B reactivation (1 patient). Our results of Rapa, HCQ and chemotherapy triplet combination suggest autophagy is a promising oncotarget and warrants further investigation in phase II studies.

  11. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

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    Cathy Chia-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  12. A kinase-dead knock-in mutation in mTOR leads to early embryonic lethality and is dispensable for the immune system in heterozygous mice

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    Cavender Druie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin protein (mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved kinase that regulates protein synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation in response to various environmental cues. As a critical downstream mediator of PI3K signaling, mTOR is important for lymphocyte development and function of mature T and B-cells. Most studies of mTOR in immune responses have relied on the use of pharmacological inhibitors, such as rapamycin. Rapamycin-FKBP12 complex exerts its immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative effect by binding outside the kinase domain of mTOR, and subsequently inhibiting downstream mTOR signaling. Results To determine the requirement for mTOR kinase activity in the immune system function, we generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation (D2338 in the catalytic domain of mTOR. While homozygous mTOR kd/kd embryos died before embryonic day 6.5, heterozygous mTOR+/kd mice appeared entirely normal and are fertile. mTOR +/kd mice exhibited normal T and B cell development and unaltered proliferative responses of splenocytes to IL-2 and TCR/CD28. In addition, heterozygousity for the mTOR kinase-dead allele did not sensitize T cells to rapamycin in a CD3-mediated proliferation assay. Unexpectedly, mTOR kinase activity towards its substrate 4E-BP1 was not decreased in hearts and livers from heterozygous animals. Conclusion Altogether, our findings indicate that mTOR kinase activity is indispensable for the early development of mouse embryos. Moreover, a single wild type mTOR allele is sufficient to maintain normal postnatal growth and lymphocyte development and proliferation.

  13. Direct implantation of rapamycin-eluting stents with bioresorbable drug carrier technology utilising the Svelte coronary stent-on-a-wire: the DIRECT II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheye, Stefan; Khattab, Ahmed A; Carrie, Didier; Stella, Pieter; Slagboom, Ton; Bartunek, Jozef; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-08-05

    Our aim was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the Svelte sirolimus-eluting coronary stent-on-a-wire Integrated Delivery System (IDS) with bioresorbable drug coating compared to the Resolute Integrity zotarolimus-eluting stent with durable polymer in patients with de novo coronary artery lesions. Direct stenting, particularly in conjunction with transradial intervention (TRI), has been associated with reduced bleeding complications, procedure time, radiation exposure and contrast administration compared to conventional stenting with wiring and predilatation. The low-profile Svelte IDS is designed to facilitate TRI and direct stenting, reducing the number of procedural steps, time and cost associated with coronary stenting. DIRECT II was a prospective, multicentre trial which enrolled 159 patients to establish non-inferiority of the Svelte IDS versus Resolute Integrity using a 2:1 randomisation. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late lumen loss (LLL) at six months. Target vessel failure (TVF), as well as secondary clinical endpoints, will be assessed annually up to five years. At six months, in-stent LLL was 0.09±0.31 mm in the Svelte IDS group compared to 0.13±0.27 mm in the Resolute Integrity group (p<0.001 for non-inferiority). TVF at one year was similar across the Svelte IDS and Resolute Integrity groups (6.5% vs. 9.8%, respectively). DIRECT II demonstrated the non-inferiority of the Svelte IDS to Resolute Integrity with respect to in-stent LLL at six months. Clinical outcomes at one year were comparable between the two groups.

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase protein associated with Myc (Pam) regulates mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in vivo through N- and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangyeul; Kim, Sun; Bahl, Samira; Li, Lin; Burande, Clara F; Smith, Nicole; James, Marianne; Beauchamp, Roberta L; Bhide, Pradeep; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2012-08-31

    Pam and its homologs (the PHR protein family) are large E3 ubiquitin ligases that function to regulate synapse formation and growth in mammals, zebrafish, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Phr1-deficient mouse models (Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan), with deletions in the N-terminal putative guanine exchange factor region and the C-terminal ubiquitin ligase region, respectively) exhibit axon guidance/outgrowth defects and striking defects of major axon tracts in the CNS. Our earlier studies identified Pam to be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins, ubiquitinating TSC2 and regulating mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Here, we examine the potential involvement of the TSC/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) signaling pathway in Phr1-deficient mouse models. We observed attenuation of mTORC1 signaling in the brains of both Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mouse models. Our results establish that Pam regulates TSC/mTOR signaling in vitro and in vivo through two distinct domains. To further address whether Pam regulates mTORC1 through two functionally independent domains, we undertook heterozygous mutant crossing between Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mice to generate a compound heterozygous model to determine whether these two domains can complement each other. mTORC1 signaling was not attenuated in the brains of double mutants (Phr1(Δ8,9/Mag)), confirming that Pam displays dual regulation of the mTORC1 pathway through two functional domains. Our results also suggest that although dysregulation of mTORC1 signaling may be responsible for the corpus callosum defects, other neurodevelopmental defects observed with Phr1 deficiency are independent of mTORC1 signaling. The ubiquitin ligase complex containing Pam-Fbxo45 likely targets additional synaptic and axonal proteins, which may explain the overlapping neurodevelopmental defects observed in Phr1 and Fbxo45 deficiency.

  15. Distinct human and mouse membrane trafficking systems for sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3.

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    Shimizu, Madoka; Goto, Masao; Kawai, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsuko; Kusakabe, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The sweet taste receptors T1r2 and T1r3 are included in the T1r taste receptor family that belongs to class C of the G protein-coupled receptors. Heterodimerization of T1r2 and T1r3 is required for the perception of sweet substances, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heterodimerization, including membrane trafficking. We developed tagged mouse T1r2 and T1r3, and human T1R2 and T1R3 and evaluated membrane trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We found that human T1R3 surface expression was only observed when human T1R3 was coexpressed with human T1R2, whereas mouse T1r3 was expressed without mouse T1r2 expression. A domain-swapped chimera and truncated human T1R3 mutant showed that the Venus flytrap module and cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of human T1R3 contain a region related to the inhibition of human T1R3 membrane trafficking and coordinated regulation of human T1R3 membrane trafficking. We also found that the Venus flytrap module of both human T1R2 and T1R3 are needed for membrane trafficking, suggesting that the coexpression of human T1R2 and T1R3 is required for this event. These results suggest that the Venus flytrap module and CRD receive taste substances and play roles in membrane trafficking of human T1R2 and T1R3. These features are different from those of mouse receptors, indicating that human T1R2 and T1R3 are likely to have a novel membrane trafficking system.

  16. Conditional transgenesis using Dimerizable Cre (DiCre).

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    Jullien, Nicolas; Goddard, Isabelle; Selmi-Ruby, Samia; Fina, Jean-Luc; Cremer, Harold; Herman, Jean-Paul

    2007-12-26

    Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. We have recently developed a conceptually new approach to regulate Cre recombinase, that we have called Dimerizable Cre or DiCre. It is based on splitting Cre into two inactive moieties and fusing them to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein) and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12-rapamycin associated protein), respectively. These latter can be efficiently hetero-dimerized by rapamycin, leading to the reinstatement of Cre activity. We have been able to show, using in vitro approaches, that this ligand-induced dimerization is an efficient way to regulate Cre activity, and presents a low background activity together with a high efficiency of recombination following dimerization. To test the in vivo performance of this system, we have, in the present work, knocked-in DiCre into the Rosa26 locus of mice. To evaluate the performance of the DiCre system, mice have been mated with indicator mice (Z/EG or R26R) and Cre-induced recombination was examined following activation of DiCre by rapamycin during embryonic development or after birth of progenies. No recombination could be observed in the absence of treatment of the animals, indicating a lack of background activity of DiCre in the absence of rapamycin. Postnatal rapamycin treatment (one to five daily injection, 10 mg/kg i.p) induced recombination in a number of different tissues of progenies such as liver, heart, kidney, muscle, etc. On the other hand, recombination was at a very low level following in utero treatment of DiCrexR26R mice. In conclusion, DiCre has indeed the potentiality to be used to establish conditional Cre-deleter mice. An added advantage of this system is that, contrary to other modulatable Cre systems, it offers the possibility of obtaining regulated recombination in a combinatorial manner, i.e. induce recombination at

  17. Conditional transgenesis using Dimerizable Cre (DiCre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Jullien

    Full Text Available Cre recombinase is extensively used to engineer the genome of experimental animals. However, its usefulness is still limited by the lack of an efficient temporal control over its activity. We have recently developed a conceptually new approach to regulate Cre recombinase, that we have called Dimerizable Cre or DiCre. It is based on splitting Cre into two inactive moieties and fusing them to FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein and FRB (binding domain of the FKBP12-rapamycin associated protein, respectively. These latter can be efficiently hetero-dimerized by rapamycin, leading to the reinstatement of Cre activity. We have been able to show, using in vitro approaches, that this ligand-induced dimerization is an efficient way to regulate Cre activity, and presents a low background activity together with a high efficiency of recombination following dimerization. To test the in vivo performance of this system, we have, in the present work, knocked-in DiCre into the Rosa26 locus of mice. To evaluate the performance of the DiCre system, mice have been mated with indicator mice (Z/EG or R26R and Cre-induced recombination was examined following activation of DiCre by rapamycin during embryonic development or after birth of progenies. No recombination could be observed in the absence of treatment of the animals, indicating a lack of background activity of DiCre in the absence of rapamycin. Postnatal rapamycin treatment (one to five daily injection, 10 mg/kg i.p induced recombination in a number of different tissues of progenies such as liver, heart, kidney, muscle, etc. On the other hand, recombination was at a very low level following in utero treatment of DiCrexR26R mice. In conclusion, DiCre has indeed the potentiality to be used to establish conditional Cre-deleter mice. An added advantage of this system is that, contrary to other modulatable Cre systems, it offers the possibility of obtaining regulated recombination in a combinatorial manner, i.e. induce

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Substudy of A Prospective Multicenter Randomized Post-Market Trial to Assess the Safety and Effectiveness of the Firehawk™ Rapamycin Target Eluting Cobalt Chromium Coronary Stent System for the Treatment of Atherosclerotic Lesions: TARGET All Comers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Andreas; Lansky, Alexandra J; Onuma, Yoshi; Asano, Taku; Johnson, Thomas; Anderson, Richard; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Zheng, Ming; Van Royen, Niels; Slagboom, Ton; Vlachojannis, Georg; Xu, Bo; Serruys, Patrick; Wijns, William

    2018-06-12

    Durable polymer drug-eluting stents (DP DES) may contribute to persistent inflammation, delayed endothelial healing and subsequent late DES thrombosis. The aim of this Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) sub-study was to compare healing and neointimal coverage of a novel bioabsorbable polymer sirolimus-eluting stent (FIREHAWK®) (BP DES) versus the DP DES (XIENCE) at 90 days in an all comers patient population. The TARGET All Comers study is a prospective multicenter randomised post-market trial of 1656 patients randomised 1:1 to FIREHAWK or XIENCE at 21 centers in 10 European countries. The TARGET OCT sub-study enrolled 36 consecutive patients with 52 lesions at 6 centers proficient in OCT. Follow-up OCT was performed at 3 months or prior to revascularisation when occurring before the 3-month window. The substudy was designed for non-inferiority of the primary endpoint of neointimal thickness. At follow-up, the mean neointimal thickness by OCT (52 lesions, Firehawk, n=24; Xience, n=28), was not significantly different between groups (Firehawk 75.5μm vs Xience V 82.3 μm) meeting the primary endpoint of non-inferiority (Pnoninferiority<0.001). The percentage of stent strut coverage was high in both groups (strut level: 99.9% ± 0.3 vs 100% ± 0.1, p=0.26), and the proportion of malapposed struts (1.0±1.6% vs. 1.2±2.0%, p=0.51) was low in both groups. Based on OCT, the FIREHAWK BP DES has a similar healing response 3 months after implantation compared to the DP DES, with near complete strut coverage, moderate neointima formation and minimal strut malapposition.

  19. Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Papers in this session describe the concept of mined geologic disposal system and methods for ensuring that the system, when developed, will meet all technical requirements. Also presented in the session are analyses of system parameters, such as cost and nuclear criticality potential, as well as a technical analysis of a requirement that the system permit retrieval of the waste for some period of time. The final paper discusses studies under way to investigate technical alternatives or complements to the mined geologic disposal system. Titles of the presented papers are: (1) Waste Isolation System; (2) Waste Isolation Economics; (3) BWIP Technical Baseline; (4) Criticality Considerations in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Waste; (5) Retrieving Nuclear Wastes from Repository; (6) NWTS Programs for the Evaluation of Technical Alternatives or Complements to Mined Geologic Repositories - Purpose and Objectives

  20. systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Leonessa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear robust control-system design framework predicated on a hierarchical switching controller architecture parameterized over a set of moving nominal system equilibria is developed. Specifically, using equilibria-dependent Lyapunov functions, a hierarchical nonlinear robust control strategy is developed that robustly stabilizes a given nonlinear system over a prescribed range of system uncertainty by robustly stabilizing a collection of nonlinear controlled uncertain subsystems. The robust switching nonlinear controller architecture is designed based on a generalized (lower semicontinuous Lyapunov function obtained by minimizing a potential function over a given switching set induced by the parameterized nominal system equilibria. The proposed framework robustly stabilizes a compact positively invariant set of a given nonlinear uncertain dynamical system with structured parametric uncertainty. Finally, the efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a jet engine propulsion control problem with uncertain pressure-flow map data.

  1. IGF system targeted therapy: Therapeutic opportunities for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liefers-Visser, J A L; Meijering, R A M; Reyners, A K L; van der Zee, A G J; de Jong, S

    2017-11-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system comprises multiple growth factor receptors, including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), insulin receptor (IR) -A and -B. These receptors are activated upon binding to their respective growth factor ligands, IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin, and play an important role in development, maintenance, progression, survival and chemotherapeutic response of ovarian cancer. In many pre-clinical studies anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies proved effective in reducing growth of ovarian cancer models. In addition, anti-IGF-1R targeted strategies potentiated the efficacy of platinum based chemotherapy. Despite the vast amount of encouraging and promising pre-clinical data, anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies lacked efficacy in the clinic. The question is whether targeting the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway still holds therapeutic potential. In this review we address the complexity of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway, including receptor heterodimerization within and outside the IGF system and downstream signaling. Further, we discuss the implications of this complexity on current targeted strategies and indicate therapeutic opportunities for successful targeting of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway in ovarian cancer. Multiple-targeted approaches circumventing bidirectional receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) compensation and prevention of system rewiring are expected to have more therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Swarnalatha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis of urban aquatic systems due to heavy metals turns significant due to their peculiar properties viz. persis tence, non-degradab ility, toxicity, and accumulation. Akkulam Veli (AV, an urba n tropical lake in south India is subjected to various environmental stresses due to multiple waste discharge, sand mining, developmental activities, tour ism related activitie s etc. Hence, a comprehensive approach is adopted for risk assessment using modified degree of contamination factor, toxicity units based on numerical sediment quality guidelines (SQGs, and potentialecological risk indices. The study revealed the presence of toxic metals such as Cr, C d, Pb and As and the lake is rated under ‘low ecological risk’ category.

  3. Systemic and Nonrenal Adverse Effects Occurring in Renal Transplant Patients Treated with mTOR Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I, sirolimus and everolimus, are immunosuppressive drugs largely used in renal transplantation. The main mechanism of action of these drugs is the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a regulatory protein kinase involved in lymphocyte proliferation. Additionally, the inhibition of the crosstalk among mTORC1, mTORC2, and PI3K confers the antineoplastic activities of these drugs. Because of their specific pharmacological characteristics and their relative lack of nephrotoxicity, these inhibitors are valid option to calcineurine inhibitors (CNIs for maintenance immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy. However, as other immunosuppressive drugs, mTOR-I may induce the development of several adverse effects that need to be early recognized and treated to avoid severe illness in renal transplant patients. In particular, mTOR-I may induce systemic nonnephrological side effects including pulmonary toxicity, hematological disorders, dysmetabolism, lymphedema, stomatitis, cutaneous adverse effects, and fertility/gonadic toxicity. Although most of the adverse effects are dose related, it is extremely important for clinicians to early recognize them in order to reduce dosage or discontinue mTOR-I treatment avoiding the onset and development of severe clinical complications.

  4. A conserved non-reproductive GnRH system in chordates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro G Kusakabe

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a neuroendocrine peptide that plays a central role in the vertebrate hypothalamo-pituitary axis. The roles of GnRH in the control of vertebrate reproductive functions have been established, while its non-reproductive function has been suggested but less well understood. Here we show that the tunicate Ciona intestinalis has in its non-reproductive larval stage a prominent GnRH system spanning the entire length of the nervous system. Tunicate GnRH receptors are phylogenetically closest to vertebrate GnRH receptors, yet functional analysis of the receptors revealed that these simple chordates have evolved a unique GnRH system with multiple ligands and receptor heterodimerization enabling complex regulation. One of the gnrh genes is conspicuously expressed in the motor ganglion and nerve cord, which are homologous structures to the hindbrain and spinal cord of vertebrates. Correspondingly, GnRH receptor genes were found to be expressed in the tail muscle and notochord of embryos, both of which are phylotypic axial structures along the nerve cord. Our findings suggest a novel non-reproductive role of GnRH in tunicates. Furthermore, we present evidence that GnRH-producing cells are present in the hindbrain and spinal cord of the medaka, Oryzias latipes, thereby suggesting the deep evolutionary origin of a non-reproductive GnRH system in chordates.

  5. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-03-02

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance.

  6. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyin Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag, HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI-resistance.

  7. A Hepatic GAbp-AMPK Axis Links Inflammatory Signaling to Systemic Vascular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Niopek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased pro-inflammatory signaling is a hallmark of metabolic dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Although both inflammatory and energy substrate handling processes represent critical layers of metabolic control, their molecular integration sites remain largely unknown. Here, we identify the heterodimerization interface between the α and β subunits of transcription factor GA-binding protein (GAbp as a negative target of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α signaling. TNF-α prevented GAbpα and β complex formation via reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to the non-energy-dependent transcriptional inactivation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK β1, which was identified as a direct hepatic GAbp target. Impairment of AMPKβ1, in turn, elevated downstream cellular cholesterol biosynthesis, and hepatocyte-specific ablation of GAbpα induced systemic hypercholesterolemia and early macro-vascular lesion formation in mice. As GAbpα and AMPKβ1 levels were also found to correlate in obese human patients, the ROS-GAbp-AMPK pathway may represent a key component of a hepato-vascular axis in diabetic long-term complications.

  8. Synthesis, Molecular Modelling and Biological Evaluation of Novel Heterodimeric, Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and Amyloid Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Hebda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinesterases and amyloid beta are one of the major biological targets in the search for a new and efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The study describes synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of new compounds designed as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Among the synthesized compounds, two deserve special attention—compounds 42 and 13. The former is a saccharin derivative and the most potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (EeAChE IC50 = 70 nM. Isoindoline-1,3-dione derivative 13 displays balanced inhibitory potency against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE (EeAChE IC50 = 0.76 μM, EqBuChE IC50 = 0.618 μM, and it inhibits amyloid beta aggregation (35.8% at 10 μM. Kinetic studies show that the developed compounds act as mixed or non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. According to molecular modelling studies, they are able to interact with both catalytic and peripheral active sites of the acetylcholinesterase. Their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB was confirmed in vitro in the parallel artificial membrane permeability BBB assay. These compounds can be used as a solid starting point for further development of novel multifunctional ligands as potential anti-Alzheimer’s agents.

  9. A coordinated molecular 'fishing' mechanism in heterodimeric kinesin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Ruizheng; Wang, Zhisong

    2010-01-01

    Kar3 is a kinesin motor that facilitates chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike many members of the kinesin superfamily, Kar3 forms a heterodimer with non-motor protein Vik1 or Cik1 in vivo. The heterodimers show ATP-driven minus-end directed motility along a microtubule (MT) lattice, and also serve as depolymerase at the MT ends. The molecular mechanisms behind this dual functionality remain mysterious. Here, a molecular mechanical model for the Kar3/Vik1 heterodimer based on structural, kinetic and motility data reveals a long-range chemomechanical transmission mechanism that resembles a familiar fishing tactic. By this molecular 'fishing', ATP-binding to Kar3 dissociates catalytically inactive Vik1 off MT to facilitate minus-end sliding of the dimer on the MT lattice. When the dimer binds the frayed ends of MT, the fishing channels ATP hydrolysis energy into MT deploymerization by a mechanochemical effect. The molecular fishing thus provides a unified mechanistic ground for Kar3's dual functionality. The fishing-promoted depolymerization differs from the depolymerase mechanisms found in homodimeric kinesins. The fishing also enables intermolecular coordination with a chemomechanical coupling feature different from the paradigmatic pattern of homodimeric motors. This study rationalizes some puzzling experimental observation, and suggests new experiments for further elucidation of the fishing mechanism

  10. Differential action of small molecule HER kinase inhibitors on receptor heterodimerization: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, M; Pandiella, A

    2012-07-01

    Deregulation of ErbB/HER receptor tyrosine kinases has been linked to several types of cancer. The mechanism of activation of these receptors includes establishment of receptor dimers. Here, we have analyzed the action of different small molecule HER tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) on HER receptor dimerization. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with distinct TKIs and the formation of HER2-HER3 dimers was analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation and western blot or by Förster resonance energy transfer assays. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was analyzed by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell viability. Lapatinib and neratinib interfered with ligand-induced dimerization of HER receptors; while pelitinib, gefitinib, canertinib or erlotinib did not. Moreover, lapatinib and neratinib were able to disrupt previously formed receptor dimers. Structural analyses allowed the elucidation of the mechanism by which some TKIs prevent the formation of HER receptor dimers, while others do not. Experiments aimed at defining the functional importance of dimerization indicated that TKIs that impeded dimerization prevented down-regulation of HER2 receptors, and favored the action of trastuzumab. We postulate that TKIs that prevent dimerization and down-regulation of HER2 may augment the antitumoral action of trastuzumab, and this mechanism of action should be considered in the treatment of HER2 positive tumors which combine TKIs with antireceptor antibodies. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  11. Metabolic stress regulates ERK activity by controlling KSR-RAF heterodimerization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verlande, A.; Krafčíková, M.; Potěšil, D.; Trantírek, L.; Zdráhal, Z.; Elkalaf, M.; Trnka, J.; Souček, Karel; Rauch, N.; Rauch, J.; Kolch, W.; Uldrijan, S.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2018), s. 320-336 ISSN 1469-221X Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : cell-cycle arrest * 14-3-3 binding * kinase suppressor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 8.568, year: 2016

  12. Pathophysiology of GPCR Homo- and Heterodimerization: Special Emphasis on Somatostatin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K. Somvanshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are cell surface proteins responsible for translating >80% of extracellular reception to intracellular signals. The extracellular information in the form of neurotransmitters, peptides, ions, odorants etc is converted to intracellular signals via a wide variety of effector molecules activating distinct downstream signaling pathways. All GPCRs share common structural features including an extracellular N-terminal, seven-transmembrane domains (TMs linked by extracellular/intracellular loops and the C-terminal tail. Recent studies have shown that most GPCRs function as dimers (homo- and/or heterodimers or even higher order of oligomers. Protein-protein interaction among GPCRs and other receptor proteins play a critical role in the modulation of receptor pharmacology and functions. Although ~50% of the current drugs available in the market target GPCRs, still many GPCRs remain unexplored as potential therapeutic targets, opening immense possibility to discover the role of GPCRs in pathophysiological conditions. This review explores the existing information and future possibilities of GPCRs as tools in clinical pharmacology and is specifically focused for the role of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs in pathophysiology of diseases and as the potential candidate for drug discovery.

  13. Trace Oxygen Sensitive Material Based on Two Porphyrin Derivatives in a Heterodimeric Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Fagadar-Cosma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The successful preparation of a novel dimer complex formed between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-porphyrin Fe(III chloride and (5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphinato dichlorophosphorus(V chloride using the well-known reactivity of the P–X bond is reported. The obtained complex was characterized by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, fluorescence, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and 31P-NMR spectroscopic techniques and also by additional Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC and Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC experiments in order to correctly assign the NMR signals. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX quantifications completed the characterizations. This novel porphyrin dimer complex demonstrated fluorescence sensing of H2O2 in water for low oxygen concentrations in the range of 40–90 µM proving medical relevance for early diagnosis of diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and even cancer because higher concentrations of H2O2 than 50 μM are consideredcytotoxic for life. Due to its optical properties, this novel metalloporphyrin–porphyrin based complex is expected to show PDT and bactericidal activity under visible-light irradiation.

  14. Functional pharmacology of cloned heterodimeric GABA-B receptors expressed in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1999-01-01

    reported in different tissues, and this study thus provides a functional assay of cloned GABAB receptors which should be a valuable tool for further characterization of GABAB ligands. Finally, we can conclude that the functional pharmacological profiles of the two GABABR1 splice variants are very similar....

  15. Toxicidade pulmonar induzida pela rapamicina Lung toxicity induced by rapamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Damas

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available As doenças pulmonares induzidas por fármacos constituem uma causa crescente de morbilidade, tendo sido descritas diferentes formas de toxicidade associadas a inúmeras substâncias. O sirolimus (rapamicina é um fármaco imunossupressor usado de forma crescente no contexto do transplante de órgãos sólidos, nomeadamente no transplante renal. A toxicidade pulmonar tem sido descrita como um dos potenciais efeitos laterais, nomeadamente causando formas de pneumonite intersticial ou, mais raramente, hemorragia alveolar. Os autores descrevem os casos de quatro doentes (3 do sexo masculino, 1 do sexo feminino com idades compreendidas entre os 46-71 anos, recipientes de transplante renal (rim cadáver há 3 anos (1 doente e 7 anos (3 doentes. A imunosupressão consistia em micofenolato mofetil, prednisolona e rapamicina. Os quatro doentes foram admitidos por febre, tosse produtiva (2 e dispneia (3. Apresentavam imagem radiológica de infiltrados pulmonares bilaterais de predomínio basal. O LBA mostrou alveolite linfocítica em 3 doentes, tendo-se observado no entanto diferentes relações CD4/CD8., para além de neutrofilia em 2 deles. No restante doente, observou-se hemorragia alveolar grave. Não houve em nenhum dos casos qualquer isolamento de micro organismos patogénicos no LBA. As queixas apresentadas, bem como as alterações radiológicas regrediram com a suspensão do fármaco. Estes quatro casos revelaram alguma variedade, quer na apresentação clínica, quer nos achados dos exames subsidiários efectuados, nomeadamente no LBA. Este facto pode ter como causa diferentes mecanismos fisiopatológicos a nível do pulmão induzidos pelo sirolimus.Drug induced lung diseases (DILD are an increasingly cause of morbidity. Many drugs have been described, causing several patterns of injury. Sirolimus is an immunosuppressive agent increasingly used in renal and other solid organ transplantation. Pulmonary toxicity has been recognised as a potential complication associated to this medication. Interstitial pneumonitis and more rarely alveolar haemorrhage have been described. The authors describe 4 cases (3 men and 1 woman between 46-71 years, transplanted three years ago (1 patient and 7 years ago (3 patients. All of them were medicated with micofenolato mofetil, prednisone and sirolimus. All patients had fever at admission, 3 patients had dyspnoea and 2 productive cough. Diffuse pulmonary infiltrates with basal predominance in HRCT scan were present in the four patients. BAL showed lymphocytic alveolitis in 3 cases, however with a different CD4/CD8 ratio. In additio to lymphocytosis, neutrophilia was observed in 2 patients. One patient showed serious alveolar haemorrhage in BAL. Pulmonary infections were ruled out by specific BAL staining and cultures. After drug suspension, all patients showed a clear improvement. These case studies show some diversity in clinical presentation and in the features of some exams, namely in BAL. This may suggest different underlying pathophysiology entities induced by sirolimus.

  16. On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 (T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Kokabu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The special sense of taste guides and guards food intake and is essential for body maintenance. Salty and sour tastes are sensed via ion channels or gated ion channels while G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs of the taste receptor type 1 (T1R family sense sweet and umami tastes and GPCRs of the taste receptor type 2 (T2R family sense bitter tastes. T1R and T2R receptors share similar downstream signaling pathways that result in the stimulation of phospholipase-C-β2. The T1R family includes three members that form heterodimeric complexes to recognize either amino acids or sweet molecules such as glucose. Although these functions were originally described in gustatory tissue, T1R family members are expressed in numerous non-gustatory tissues and are now viewed as nutrient sensors that play important roles in monitoring global glucose and amino acid status. Here, we highlight emerging evidence detailing the function of T1R family members in the musculoskeletal system and review these findings in the context of the musculoskeletal diseases sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which are major public health problems among the elderly that affect locomotion, activities of daily living, and quality of life. These studies raise the possibility that T1R family member function may be modulated for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Engineering of Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimers Using Yeast Surface-Displayed Combinatorial Fc Library Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Ji Choi

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers, which are useful scaffolds for the generation of bispecific antibodies, have been mostly generated through structure-based rational design methods that introduce asymmetric mutations into the CH3 homodimeric interface to favor heterodimeric Fc formation. Here, we report an approach to generate heterodimeric Fc variants through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. We developed a combinatorial heterodimeric Fc library display system by mating two haploid yeast cell lines, one haploid cell line displayed an Fc chain library (displayed FcCH3A with mutations in one CH3 domain (CH3A on the yeast cell surface, and the other cell line secreted an Fc chain library (secreted FcCH3B with mutations in the other CH3 domain (CH3B. In the mated cells, secreted FcCH3B is displayed on the cell surface through heterodimerization with the displayed FcCH3A, the detection of which enabled us to screen the library for heterodimeric Fc variants. We constructed combinatorial heterodimeric Fc libraries with simultaneous mutations in the homodimer-favoring electrostatic interaction pairs K370-E357/S364 or D399-K392/K409 at the CH3 domain interface. High-throughput screening of the libraries using flow cytometry yielded heterodimeric Fc variants with heterodimer-favoring CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, some of them showed high heterodimerization yields (~80-90% with previously unidentified CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions. Our study provides a new approach for engineering Fc heterodimers that could be used to engineer other heterodimeric protein-protein interactions through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display.

  18. Signaling through IL-17C/IL-17RE is dispensable for immunity to systemic, oral and cutaneous candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R; Whibley, Natasha; Coleman, Bianca M; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal microbe of the human orogastrointestinal tract and skin. C. albicans causes multiple forms of disease in immunocompromised patients, including oral, vaginal, dermal and disseminated candidiasis. The cytokine IL-17 (IL-17A) and its receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC, are required for protection to most forms of candidiasis. The importance of the IL-17R pathway has been observed not only in knockout mouse models, but also in humans with rare genetic mutations that impact generation of Th17 cells or the IL-17 signaling pathway, including Hyper-IgE Syndrome (STAT3 or TYK2 mutations) or IL17RA or ACT1 gene deficiency. The IL-17 family of cytokines is a distinct subclass of cytokines with unique structural and signaling properties. IL-17A is the best-characterized member of the IL-17 family to date, but far less is known about other IL-17-related cytokines. In this study, we sought to determine the role of a related IL-17 cytokine, IL-17C, in protection against oral, dermal and disseminated forms of C. albicans infection. IL-17C signals through a heterodimeric receptor composed of the IL-17RA and IL-17RE subunits. We observed that IL-17C mRNA was induced following oral C. albicans infection. However, mice lacking IL-17C or IL-17RE cleared C. albicans infections in the oral mucosa, skin and bloodstream at rates similar to WT littermate controls. Moreover, these mice demonstrated similar gene transcription profiles and recovery kinetics as WT animals. These findings indicate that IL-17C and IL-17RE are dispensable for immunity to the forms of candidiasis evaluated, and illustrate a surprisingly limited specificity of the IL-17 family of cytokines with respect to systemic, oral and cutaneous Candida infections.

  19. Signaling through IL-17C/IL-17RE is dispensable for immunity to systemic, oral and cutaneous candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R Conti

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a commensal fungal microbe of the human orogastrointestinal tract and skin. C. albicans causes multiple forms of disease in immunocompromised patients, including oral, vaginal, dermal and disseminated candidiasis. The cytokine IL-17 (IL-17A and its receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC, are required for protection to most forms of candidiasis. The importance of the IL-17R pathway has been observed not only in knockout mouse models, but also in humans with rare genetic mutations that impact generation of Th17 cells or the IL-17 signaling pathway, including Hyper-IgE Syndrome (STAT3 or TYK2 mutations or IL17RA or ACT1 gene deficiency. The IL-17 family of cytokines is a distinct subclass of cytokines with unique structural and signaling properties. IL-17A is the best-characterized member of the IL-17 family to date, but far less is known about other IL-17-related cytokines. In this study, we sought to determine the role of a related IL-17 cytokine, IL-17C, in protection against oral, dermal and disseminated forms of C. albicans infection. IL-17C signals through a heterodimeric receptor composed of the IL-17RA and IL-17RE subunits. We observed that IL-17C mRNA was induced following oral C. albicans infection. However, mice lacking IL-17C or IL-17RE cleared C. albicans infections in the oral mucosa, skin and bloodstream at rates similar to WT littermate controls. Moreover, these mice demonstrated similar gene transcription profiles and recovery kinetics as WT animals. These findings indicate that IL-17C and IL-17RE are dispensable for immunity to the forms of candidiasis evaluated, and illustrate a surprisingly limited specificity of the IL-17 family of cytokines with respect to systemic, oral and cutaneous Candida infections.

  20. Signaling through IL-17C/IL-17RE Is Dispensable for Immunity to Systemic, Oral and Cutaneous Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R.; Whibley, Natasha; Coleman, Bianca M.; Garg, Abhishek V.; Jaycox, Jillian R.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal microbe of the human orogastrointestinal tract and skin. C. albicans causes multiple forms of disease in immunocompromised patients, including oral, vaginal, dermal and disseminated candidiasis. The cytokine IL-17 (IL-17A) and its receptor subunits, IL-17RA and IL-17RC, are required for protection to most forms of candidiasis. The importance of the IL-17R pathway has been observed not only in knockout mouse models, but also in humans with rare genetic mutations that impact generation of Th17 cells or the IL-17 signaling pathway, including Hyper-IgE Syndrome (STAT3 or TYK2 mutations) or IL17RA or ACT1 gene deficiency. The IL-17 family of cytokines is a distinct subclass of cytokines with unique structural and signaling properties. IL-17A is the best-characterized member of the IL-17 family to date, but far less is known about other IL-17-related cytokines. In this study, we sought to determine the role of a related IL-17 cytokine, IL-17C, in protection against oral, dermal and disseminated forms of C. albicans infection. IL-17C signals through a heterodimeric receptor composed of the IL-17RA and IL-17RE subunits. We observed that IL-17C mRNA was induced following oral C. albicans infection. However, mice lacking IL-17C or IL-17RE cleared C. albicans infections in the oral mucosa, skin and bloodstream at rates similar to WT littermate controls. Moreover, these mice demonstrated similar gene transcription profiles and recovery kinetics as WT animals. These findings indicate that IL-17C and IL-17RE are dispensable for immunity to the forms of candidiasis evaluated, and illustrate a surprisingly limited specificity of the IL-17 family of cytokines with respect to systemic, oral and cutaneous Candida infections. PMID:25849644

  1. Elucidation of the Specific Formation of Homo- and Heterodimeric Forms of ThbZIP1 and Its Role in Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianguang Nie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein–protein interactions are important for the molecular understanding of the biological processes of proteins. The dimerization of bZIPs (basic leucine zipper proteins is involved in modifying binding site specificities, altering dimer stability, and permitting a new set of specific protein-to-protein interactions to occur at the promoter. In the present study, we studied the whether ThbZIP1 form homo- and heterodimers using the yeast two-hybrid method. Five bZIP genes were cloned from Tamarix hispida to investigate their interaction with ThbZIP1. Our results showed that ThbZIP1 can form homodimers with itself, and three out of five bZIPs could interact with the ThbZIP1 protein to form heterodimers. Real-time RT-PCR results suggested that these ThbZIPs can all respond to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid (ABA, and shared very similar expression patterns in response to NaCl, ABA or PEG6000. Subcellular localization studies showed that all ThbZIPs are targeted to the nucleus. Our results showed that ThbZIP1 are dimeric proteins, which can form homo- or heterodimers.

  2. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 leads to cooperative trans-activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Wu, C L; Fattaey, A R

    1993-01-01

    the hypophosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB). The other protein, murine DP-1, was purified from an E2F DNA-affinity column, and it was subsequently shown to bind the consensus E2F DNA-binding site. To study a possible interaction between E2F-1 and DP-1, we have now isolated a cDNA for the human...

  3. Abrogation of the presenilin 1/beta-catenin interaction and preservation of the heterodimeric presenilin 1 complex following caspase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, G; Kim, T W; Diehlmann, A; Beyreuther, K; Tanzi, R E

    1998-12-18

    beta-Catenin has previously been shown to interact with presenilin 1 (PS1) in transfected cells. Here we report that beta-catenin co-immunoprecipitates with the endogenous C-terminal fragment of presenilin 1 (PS1-CTF) but not with the endogenous CTF of presenilin 2 (PS2-CTF) in H4 human neuroglioma cells. During staurosporine (STS)-induced cell death, beta-catenin and PS1-CTF undergo a caspase-mediated cleavage. After 12 h of STS treatment, the beta-catenin.PS1-CTF interaction is abrogated. While PS1-CTF immunoprecipitated with all caspase-cleaved species of beta-catenin, beta-catenin holoprotein did not co-immunoprecipitate with the "alternative" caspase-derived PS1-CTF (PS1-aCTF). Thus, the abrogation of the beta-catenin.PS1-CTF complex was due to caspase cleavage of PS1-CTF. beta-Catenin co-immunoprecipitated with PS1-NTF, but only when PS1-NTF was associated with PS1-CTF. Even though PS1-NTF.CTF complex stability was not altered by caspase cleavage, its ability to bind beta-catenin was abolished. Thus, while the PS1-NTF.CTF complex is preserved after caspase cleavage, it may no longer be fully functional.

  4. δ-opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor-4 heterodimerization: possible implications in modulation of pain associated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K Somvanshi

    Full Text Available Pain relief is the principal action of opioids. Somatostatin (SST, a growth hormone inhibitory peptide is also known to alleviate pain even in cases when opioids fail. Recent studies have shown that mice are prone to sustained pain and devoid of analgesic effect in the absence of somatostatin receptor 4 (SSTR4. In the present study, using brain slices, cultured neurons and HEK-293 cells, we showed that SSTR4 and δ-Opioid receptor (δOR exist in a heteromeric complex and function in synergistic manner. SSTR4 and δOR co-expressed in cortical/striatal brain regions and spinal cord. Using cultured neuronal cells, we describe the heterogeneous complex formation of SSTR4 and δOR at neuronal cell body and processes. Cotransfected cells display inhibition of cAMP/PKA and co-activation of SSTR4 and δOR oppose receptor trafficking induced by individual receptor activation. Furthermore, downstream signaling pathways either associated with withdrawal or pain relief are modulated synergistically with a predominant role of SSTR4. Inhibition of cAMP/PKA and activation of ERK1/2 are the possible cellular adaptations to prevent withdrawal induced by chronic morphine use. Our results reveal direct intra-membrane interaction between SSTR4 and δOR and provide insights for the molecular mechanism for the anti-nociceptive property of SST in combination with opioids as a potential therapeutic approach to avoid undesirable withdrawal symptoms.

  5. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Christopher J.; Mayekar, Manasi K.; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L.; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C.; Quiñones, Octavio A.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg−/− mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg−/− mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells. PMID:26667036

  6. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1 essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; (2 glutamine; (3 palmitic acid; and (4 bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases.

  7. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1) essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs); (2) glutamine; (3) palmitic acid; and (4) bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases. PMID:26225961

  8. Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in MHC I Antigen Presentation After Lentivector Expression of a Gene Regulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Vogel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapamycin-inducible gene regulation system was designed to minimize immune reactions in man and may thus be suited for gene therapy. We assessed whether this system indeed induces no immune responses. The protein components of the regulation system were produced in the human cell lines HEK 293T, D407, and HER 911 following lentiviral transfer of the corresponding genes. Stable cell lines were established, and the peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules on transduced and wild-type (wt cells were compared by differential mass spectrometry. In all cell lines examined, expression of the transgenes resulted in prominent changes in the repertoire of MHC I-presented self-peptides. No MHC I ligands originating from the transgenic proteins were detected. In vitro analysis of immunogenicity revealed that transduced D407 cells displayed slightly higher capacity than wt controls to promote proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. These results indicate that therapeutic manipulations within the genome of target cells may affect pathways involved in the processing of peptide antigens and their presentation by MHC I. This makes the genomic modifications visible to the immune system which may recognize these events and respond. Ultimately, the findings call attention to a possible immune risk.

  9. Quantitative transcript analysis of the inducible expression system pSIP: comparison of the overexpression of Lactobacillus spp. β-galactosidases in Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijsink Vincent GH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two sets of overlapping genes, lacLMReu and lacLMAci, encoding heterodimeric β-galactosidases from Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively, have previously been cloned and expressed using the pSIP vector system and Lactobacillus plantarum WCSF1 as host. Despite the high similarity between these lacLM genes and the use of identical cloning and expression strategies, strains harboring lacLMReu produced about twenty-fold more β-galactosidase than strains containing lacLMAci. Results In this study, the plasmid copy numbers (PCN of expression vectors pEH9R (lacLMReu and pEH9A (lacLMAci as well as the transcription levels of both lacLM genes were compared using quantitative PCR methods. Analyses of parallel fermentations of L. plantarum harboring either pEH9R or pEH9A showed that the expression plasmids were present in similar copy numbers. However, transcript levels of lacLM from L. reuteri (pEH9R were up to 18 times higher than those of lacLM from L. acidophilus (pEH9A. As a control, it was shown that the expression levels of regulatory genes involved in pheromone-induced promoter activation were similar in both strains. Conclusion The use of identical expression strategies for highly similar genes led to very different mRNA levels. The data indicate that this difference is primarily caused by translational effects that are likely to affect both mRNA synthesis rates and mRNA stability. These translational effects thus seem to be a dominant determinant for the success of gene expression efforts in lactobacilli.

  10. Coincidence of tuberous sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Cubero, Carmen; Bejarano Moguel, Verónica; Fernández Gil, M Ángeles; Álvarez Vega, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis, also called Bourneville Pringle disease, is a phakomatosis with potential dermal, nerve, kidney and lung damage. It is characterized by the development of benign proliferations in many organs, which result in different clinical manifestations. It is associated with the mutation of two genes: TSC1 (hamartin) and TSC2 (tuberin), with the change in the functionality of the complex target of rapamycin (mTOR). MTOR activation signal has been recently described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its inhibition could be beneficial in patients with lupus nephritis. We report the case of a patient who began with clinical manifestations of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 30 years after the onset of SLE with severe renal disease (tipe IV nephritis) who improved after treatment with iv pulses of cyclophosphamide. We found only two similar cases in the literature, and hence considered the coexistence of these two entities of great interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Networking in autism: leveraging genetic, biomarker and model system findings in the search for new treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Blakely, Randy D

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder affecting approximately 1% of children. ASD is defined by core symptoms in two domains: negative symptoms of impairment in social and communication function, and positive symptoms of restricted and repetitive behaviors. Available treatments are inadequate for treating both core symptoms and associated conditions. Twin studies indicate that ASD susceptibility has a large heritable component. Genetic studies have identified promising leads, with converging insights emerging from single-gene disorders that bear ASD features, with particular interest in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-linked synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Mouse models of these disorders are revealing not only opportunities to model behavioral perturbations across species, but also evidence of postnatal rescue of brain and behavioral phenotypes. An intense search for ASD biomarkers has consistently pointed to elevated platelet serotonin (5-HT) levels and a surge in brain growth in the first 2 years of life. Following a review of the diversity of ASD phenotypes and its genetic origins and biomarkers, we discuss opportunities for translation of these findings into novel ASD treatments, focusing on mTor- and 5-HT-signaling pathways, and their possible intersection. Paralleling the progress made in understanding the root causes of rare genetic syndromes that affect cognitive development, we anticipate progress in models systems using bona fide ASD-associated molecular changes that have the potential to accelerate the development of ASD diagnostics and therapeutics.

  12. Mutually exclusive STAT1 modifications identified by Ubc9/substrate dimerization-dependent SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnik, Susan; Gaestel, Matthias; Niedenthal, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    Post-translational modifications control the physiological activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT1. While phosphorylation at tyrosine Y701 is a prerequisite for STAT1 dimerization, its SUMOylation represses the transcriptional activity. Recently, we have demonstrated that SUMOylation at lysine K703 inhibits the phosphorylation of nearby localized Y701 of STAT1. Here, we analysed the influence of phosphorylation of Y701 on SUMOylation of K703 in vivo. For that reason, an Ubc9/substrate dimerization-dependent SUMOylation (USDDS) system was developed, which consists of fusions of the SUMOylation substrate and of the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 to the chemically activatable heterodimerization domains FKBP and FRB, respectively. When FKBP fusion proteins of STAT1, p53, CRSP9, FOS, CSNK2B, HES1, TCF21 and MYF6 are coexpressed with Ubc9-FRB, treatment of HEK293 cells with the rapamycin-related dimerizer compound AP21967 induces SUMOylation of these proteins in vivo. For STAT1-FKBP and p53-FKBP we show that this SUMOylation takes place at their specific SUMOylation sites in vivo. Using USDDS, we then demonstrate that STAT1 phosphorylation at Y701 induced by interferon-beta treatment inhibits SUMOylation of K703 in vivo. Thus, pY701 and SUMO-K703 of STAT1 represent mutually exclusive modifications, which prevent signal integration at this molecule and probably ensure the existence of differentially modified subpopulations of STAT1 necessary for its regulated nuclear cytoplasmic activation/inactivation cycle.

  13. System Budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1996-01-01

    The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers.......The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers....

  14. Relação da expressão de fatores de crescimento celular (IGF-1 e (SCF com fatores prognósticos e o alvo da rapamicina em mamíferos (m-TOR em mastocitomas cutâneos caninos IGF-1 and SCF protein expression in cutaneous mast cell tumors in dogs and relation to prognostic factors and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel B. Ferioli

    2013-04-01

    protein expression of insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1, steam cell factor (SCF and theit relationship with tyrosine kinase receptor (c-KIT, mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR, histological classification (KI-67, proliferative and mitotic index and epidemiological data in MTCs. In this study 133 MTC samples from 133 animals were used, arranged in tissue microarray (TMA slides. The TMA was used for evaluation the proteins. An association was observed between SCF and histological grade proposed in 2011, mitotic index, cell proliferation, IGF-1, lesion site, age of the animals, and immunohistochemical pattern c-KIT receptor. The dependence relationship was also observed between IGF-1 and animal size, mitotic index, m-TOR and c-KIT. The SCF protein expression was related to canine MTCs aggressiveness, since it is more frequent in MCTs with c-KIT cytoplasmic. The relationship between the expression of IGF-1, SCF, c-KIT e m-TOR can be associated with the integration of its actions ways. The IGF-1 expression is associated with large dog breeds MTCs.

  15. Ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossler

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with - controlled area ventilation systems - ventilation systems for switchgear-building and control-room - other ventilation systems for safety equipments - service systems for ventilation systems. (orig./RW)

  16. Inhibited Carnitine Synthesis Causes Systemic Alteration of Nutrient Metabolism in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Min; Li, Ling-Yu; Qin, Xuan; Degrace, Pascal; Demizieux, Laurent; Limbu, Samwel M; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Li, Dong-Liang; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation has been correlated with many metabolic syndromes, and the metabolic characteristics of the mammalian models of mitochondrial dysfunction have also been intensively studied. However, the effects of the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation on systemic metabolism in teleost have never been investigated. In the present study, we established a low-carnitine zebrafish model by feeding fish with mildronate as a specific carnitine synthesis inhibitor [0.05% body weight (BW)/d] for 7 weeks, and the systemically changed nutrient metabolism, including carnitine and triglyceride (TG) concentrations, fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation capability, and other molecular and biochemical assays of lipid, glucose, and protein metabolism, were measured. The results indicated that mildronate markedly decreased hepatic carnitine concentrations while it had no effect in muscle. Liver TG concentrations increased by more than 50% in mildronate-treated fish. Mildronate decreased the efficiency of liver mitochondrial β-oxidation, increased the hepatic mRNA expression of genes related to FA β-oxidation and lipolysis, and decreased the expression of lipogenesis genes. Mildronate decreased whole body glycogen content, increased glucose metabolism rate, and upregulated the expression of glucose uptake and glycolysis genes. Mildronate also increased whole body protein content and hepatic mRNA expression of mechanistic target of rapamycin ( mtor ), and decreased the expression of a protein catabolism-related gene. Liver, rather than muscle, was the primary organ targeted by mildronate. In short, mildronate-induced hepatic inhibited carnitine synthesis in zebrafish caused decreased mitochondrial FA β-oxidation efficiency, greater lipid accumulation, and altered glucose and protein metabolism. This reveals the key roles of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in nutrient metabolism in fish, and this low-carnitine zebrafish model could also be

  17. Inhibited Carnitine Synthesis Causes Systemic Alteration of Nutrient Metabolism in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Min Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation has been correlated with many metabolic syndromes, and the metabolic characteristics of the mammalian models of mitochondrial dysfunction have also been intensively studied. However, the effects of the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation on systemic metabolism in teleost have never been investigated. In the present study, we established a low-carnitine zebrafish model by feeding fish with mildronate as a specific carnitine synthesis inhibitor [0.05% body weight (BW/d] for 7 weeks, and the systemically changed nutrient metabolism, including carnitine and triglyceride (TG concentrations, fatty acid (FA β-oxidation capability, and other molecular and biochemical assays of lipid, glucose, and protein metabolism, were measured. The results indicated that mildronate markedly decreased hepatic carnitine concentrations while it had no effect in muscle. Liver TG concentrations increased by more than 50% in mildronate-treated fish. Mildronate decreased the efficiency of liver mitochondrial β-oxidation, increased the hepatic mRNA expression of genes related to FA β-oxidation and lipolysis, and decreased the expression of lipogenesis genes. Mildronate decreased whole body glycogen content, increased glucose metabolism rate, and upregulated the expression of glucose uptake and glycolysis genes. Mildronate also increased whole body protein content and hepatic mRNA expression of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mtor, and decreased the expression of a protein catabolism-related gene. Liver, rather than muscle, was the primary organ targeted by mildronate. In short, mildronate-induced hepatic inhibited carnitine synthesis in zebrafish caused decreased mitochondrial FA β-oxidation efficiency, greater lipid accumulation, and altered glucose and protein metabolism. This reveals the key roles of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in nutrient metabolism in fish, and this low-carnitine zebrafish model

  18. Embedded Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Embedded system, micro-con- troller ... Embedded systems differ from general purpose computers in many ... Low cost: As embedded systems are extensively used in con- .... operating systems for the desktop computers where scheduling.

  19. Thermal systems; Systemes thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalot, S. [Valenciennes Univ. et du Hainaut Cambresis, LME, 59 (France); Lecoeuche, S. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. GIP, 59 - Douai (France)]|[Lille Univ. des Sciences et Technologies, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ahmad, M.; Sallee, H.; Quenard, D. [CSTB, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Gascoin, N.; Gillard, P.; Bernard, S. [Laboratoire d' Energetique, Explosion, Structure, 18 - Bourges (France); Gascoin, N.; Toure, Y. [Laboratoire Vision et Robotique, 18 - Bourges (France); Daniau, E.; Bouchez, M. [MBDA, 18 - Bourges (France); Dobrovicescu, A.; Stanciu, D. [Bucarest Univ. Polytechnique, Faculte de Genie Mecanique (Romania); Stoian, M. [Reims Univ. Champagne Ardenne, Faculte des Sciences, UTAP/LTM, 51 (France); Bruch, A.; Fourmigue, J.F.; Colasson, S. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. Greth, 38 (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Voicu, I.; Mare, T.; Miriel, J. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), LGCGM, IUT, 35 - Rennes (France); Galanis, N. [Sherbrooke Univ., Genie Mecanique, QC (Canada); Nemer, M.; Clodic, D. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre Energetique et Procedes, 75 (France); Lasbet, Y.; Auvity, B.; Castelain, C.; Peerhossaini, H. [Nantes Univ., Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Thermocinetiquede Nantes, UMR-CNRS 6607, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about thermal systems gathers 26 articles dealing with: neural model of a compact heat exchanger; experimental study and numerical simulation of the thermal behaviour of test-cells with walls made of a combination of phase change materials and super-insulating materials; hydraulic and thermal modeling of a supercritical fluid with pyrolysis inside a heated channel: pre-dimensioning of an experimental study; energy analysis of the heat recovery devices of a cryogenic system; numerical simulation of the thermo-hydraulic behaviour of a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow inside a vertical tube; mixed convection inside dual-tube exchangers; development of a nodal approach with homogenization for the simulation of the brazing cycle of a heat exchanger; chaotic exchanger for the cooling of low temperature fuel cells; structural optimization of the internal fins of a cylindrical generator; a new experimental approach for the study of the local boiling inside the channels of exchangers with plates and fins; experimental study of the flow regimes of boiling hydrocarbons on a bundle of staggered tubes; energy study of heat recovery exchangers used in Claude-type refrigerating systems; general model of Carnot engine submitted to various operating constraints; the free pistons Stirling cogeneration system; natural gas supplied cogeneration system with polymer membrane fuel cell; influence of the CRN coating on the heat flux inside the tool during the wood unrolling process; transport and mixture of a passive scalar injected inside the wake of a Ahmed body; control of a laser welding-brazing process by infrared thermography; 2D self-adaptative method for contours detection: application to the images of an aniso-thermal jet; exergy and exergy-economical study of an 'Ericsson' engine-based micro-cogeneration system; simplified air-conditioning of telephone switching equipments; parametric study of the 'low-energy' individual dwelling; brief synthesis of

  20. The mTORC1-4E-BP-eIF4E axis controls de novo Bcl6 protein synthesis in T cells and systemic autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Woelsung; Gupta, Sanjay; Ricker, Edd; Manni, Michela; Jessberger, Rolf; Chinenov, Yurii; Molina, Henrik; Pernis, Alessandra B

    2017-08-15

    Post-transcriptional modifications can control protein abundance, but the extent to which these alterations contribute to the expression of T helper (T H ) lineage-defining factors is unknown. Tight regulation of Bcl6 expression, an essential transcription factor for T follicular helper (T FH ) cells, is critical as aberrant T FH cell expansion is associated with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show that lack of the SLE risk variant Def6 results in deregulation of Bcl6 protein synthesis in T cells as a result of enhanced activation of the mTORC1-4E-BP-eIF4E axis, secondary to aberrant assembly of a raptor-p62-TRAF6 complex. Proteomic analysis reveals that this pathway selectively controls the abundance of a subset of proteins. Rapamycin or raptor deletion ameliorates the aberrant T FH cell expansion in mice lacking Def6. Thus deregulation of mTORC1-dependent pathways controlling protein synthesis can result in T-cell dysfunction, indicating a mechanism by which mTORC1 can promote autoimmunity.Excessive expansion of the T follicular helper (T FH ) cell pool is associated with autoimmune disease and Def6 has been identified as an SLE risk variant. Here the authors show that Def6 limits proliferation of T FH cells in mice via alteration of mTORC1 signaling and inhibition of Bcl6 expression.

  1. S6K1 in the central nervous system regulates energy expenditure via MC4R/CRH pathways in response to deprivation of an essential amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tingting; Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Fei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Shanghai; Guo, Feifan

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that the central nervous system (CNS), especially the hypothalamus, plays an important role in regulating energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. We have previously shown that hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is critical for stimulating fat loss in response to dietary leucine deprivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying the CNS regulation of leucine deprivation-stimulated fat loss are, however, still largely unknown. Here, we used intracerebroventricular injection of adenoviral vectors to identify a novel role for hypothalamic p70 S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), a major downstream effector of the kinase mammalian target of rapamycin, in leucine deprivation stimulation of energy expenditure. Furthermore, we show that the effect of hypothalamic S6K1 is mediated by modulation of Crh expression in a melanocortin-4 receptor-dependent manner. Taken together, our studies provide a new perspective for understanding the regulation of energy expenditure by the CNS and the importance of cross-talk between nutritional control and regulation of endocrine signals.

  2. A hepatic amino acid/mTOR/S6K-dependent signalling pathway modulates systemic lipid metabolism via neuronal signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kenji; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Kaneko, Keizo; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2015-08-13

    Metabolism is coordinated among tissues and organs via neuronal signals. Levels of circulating amino acids (AAs), which are elevated in obesity, activate the intracellular target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1)/S6kinase (S6K) pathway in the liver. Here we demonstrate that hepatic AA/mTORC1/S6K signalling modulates systemic lipid metabolism via a mechanism involving neuronal inter-tissue communication. Hepatic expression of an AA transporter, SNAT2, activates the mTORC1/S6K pathway, and markedly elevates serum triglycerides (TGs), while downregulating adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic Rheb or active-S6K expression have similar metabolic effects, whereas hepatic expression of dominant-negative-S6K inhibits TG elevation in SNAT2 mice. Denervation, pharmacological deafferentation and β-blocker administration suppress obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia with adipose LPL upregulation, suggesting that signals are transduced between liver and adipose tissue via a neuronal pathway consisting of afferent vagal and efferent sympathetic nerves. Thus, the neuronal mechanism uncovered here serves to coordinate amino acid and lipid levels and contributes to the development of obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  4. EXPERT SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiana Marin; Mihai Catalin Andrei

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades IT and computer systems have evolved rapidly in economic informatics field. The goal is to create user friendly information systems that respond promptly and accurately to requests. Informatics systems evolved into decision assisted systems, and such systems are converted, based on gained experience, in expert systems for creative problem solving that an organization is facing. Expert systems are aimed at rebuilding human reasoning on the expertise obtained from experts, sto...

  5. Novel nervous and multi-system regenerative therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus with mTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Maiese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the globe, diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing in incidence with limited therapies presently available to prevent or resolve the significant complications of this disorder. DM impacts multiple organs and affects all components of the central and peripheral nervous systems that can range from dementia to diabetic neuropathy. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is a promising agent for the development of novel regenerative strategies for the treatment of DM. mTOR and its related signaling pathways impact multiple metabolic parameters that include cellular metabolic homeostasis, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, pancreatic β-cell function, and programmed cell death with apoptosis and autophagy. mTOR is central element for the protein complexes mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTOR Complex 2 (mTORC2 and is a critical component for a number of signaling pathways that involve phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K, protein kinase B (Akt, AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SIRT1, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1, and growth factors. As a result, mTOR represents an exciting target to offer new clinical avenues for the treatment of DM and the complications of this disease. Future studies directed to elucidate the delicate balance mTOR holds over cellular metabolism and the impact of its broad signaling pathways should foster the translation of these targets into effective clinical regimens for DM.

  6. Multibody Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens

    1999-01-01

    Multibody Systems is one area, in which methods for solving DAEs are of special interst. This chapter is about multibody systems, why they result in DAE systems and what kind of problems that can arise when dealing with multibody systems and formulating their corresponding DAE system....

  7. Transgene regulation using the tetracycline-inducible TetR-KRAB system after AAV-mediated gene transfer in rodents and nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Guiner

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of the Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV-based gene delivery platform in vivo. The control of transgene expression in many protocols is highly desirable for therapeutic applications and/or safety reasons. To date, the tetracycline and the rapamycin dependent regulatory systems have been the most widely evaluated. While the long-term regulation of the transgene has been obtained in rodent models, the translation of these studies to larger animals, especially to nonhuman primates (NHP, has often resulted in an immune response against the recombinant regulator protein involved in transgene expression regulation. These immune responses were dependent on the target tissue and vector delivery route. Here, using AAV vectors, we evaluated a doxycyclin-inducible system in rodents and macaques in which the TetR protein is fused to the human Krüppel associated box (KRAB protein. We demonstrated long term gene regulation efficiency in rodents after subretinal and intramuscular administration of AAV5 and AAV1 vectors, respectively. However, as previously described for other chimeric transactivators, the TetR-KRAB-based system failed to achieve long term regulation in the macaque after intramuscular vector delivery because of the development of an immune response. Thus, immunity against the chimeric transactivator TetR-KRAB emerged as the primary limitation for the clinical translation of the system when targeting the skeletal muscle, as previously described for other regulatory proteins. New developments in the field of chimeric drug-sensitive transactivators with the potential to not trigger the host immune system are still needed.

  8. Rapamycin regulates autophagy and cell adhesion in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming is a stressful process, which requires cells to engulf somatic features and produce and maintain stemness machineries. Autophagy is a process to degrade unwanted proteins and is required for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, the role of autophagy during iPSC maintenance remains undefined.

  9. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 regulates muscle glucose uptake during exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    Exercise increases glucose uptake into insulin-resistant muscle. Thus, elucidating the exercise signalling network in muscle may uncover new therapeutic targets. mTORC2, a regulator of insulin-controlled glucose uptake, has been reported to interact with Rac1, which plays a role in exercise-induc...

  10. PREDICTION OF THE COURSE OF OSTEOARTHROSIS FROM mTOR (MAMMALIAN TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Chetina

    2012-01-01

    Results. Analysis of gene expression in the outpatients with OA identified two subgroups: in one subgroup (n = 13 mTOR expression was considerably much less than that in the control group; the expression of ATG1 and p21 did not differ greatly from the control and that of caspase 3 and TNF-α was significantly higher. The other outpatients (n = 20 and all the examined patients needing endoprosthetic replacement were ascertained to have a higher gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, caspase 3, and TNF-α than in the control group. Before endoprosthetic replacement, severe joint destruction in patients with OA was associated with enhanced gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, and caspase 3. Conclusion. In early-stage disease, increased mTOR gene expression may serve as a prognostic marker of the severity of the disease and articular cartilage destruction.

  11. System dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Hun; Mun, Tae Hun; Kim, Dong Hwan

    1999-02-01

    This book introduces systems thinking and conceptual tool and modeling tool of dynamics system such as tragedy of single thinking, accessible way of system dynamics, feedback structure and causal loop diagram analysis, basic of system dynamics modeling, causal loop diagram and system dynamics modeling, information delay modeling, discovery and application for policy, modeling of crisis of agricultural and stock breeding products, dynamic model and lesson in ecosystem, development and decadence of cites and innovation of education forward system thinking.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral Blood From Kidney Transplant Recipients for the Early Detection of Digestive System Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, M; Okamoto, M; Takenaka, M; Sasaki, H; Fukami, N; Kataoka, K; Ito, T; Kenmochi, T; Hoshinaga, K; Shiroki, R

    2017-06-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing cancer in comparison with the general population. To effectively manage post-transplantation malignancies, it is essential to proactively monitor patients. A long-term intensive screening program was associated with a reduced incidence of cancer after transplantation. This study evaluated the usefulness of the gene expression profiling of peripheral blood samples obtained from kidney transplant patients and adopted a screening test for detecting cancer of the digestive system (gastric, colon, pancreas, and biliary tract). Nineteen patients were included in this study and a total of 53 gene expression screening tests were performed. The gene expression profiles of blood-delivered total RNA and whole genome human gene expression profiles were obtained. We investigated the expression levels of 2665 genes associated with digestive cancers and counted the number of genes in which expression was altered. A hierarchical clustering analysis was also performed. The final prediction of the cancer possibility was determined according to an algorithm. The number of genes in which expression was altered was significantly increased in the kidney transplant recipients in comparison with the general population (1091 ± 63 vs 823 ± 94; P = .0024). The number of genes with altered expression decreased after the induction of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (1484 ± 227 vs 883 ± 154; P = .0439). No cases of possible digestive cancer were detected in this study period. The gene expression profiling of peripheral blood samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic tool that allows for the early detection of cancer of the digestive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structure of heterodimeric hexaprenyl diphosphate synthase from Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 reveals that the small subunit is directly involved in the product chain length regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Okuyama, Naomi; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Noike, Motoyoshi; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Miki, Kunio

    2011-02-04

    Hexaprenyl diphosphate synthase from Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 (Ml-HexPPs) is a heterooligomeric type trans-prenyltransferase catalyzing consecutive head-to-tail condensations of three molecules of isopentenyl diphosphates (C(5)) on a farnesyl diphosphate (FPP; C(15)) to form an (all-E) hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP; C(30)). Ml-HexPPs is known to function as a heterodimer of two different subunits, small and large subunits called HexA and HexB, respectively. Compared with homooligomeric trans-prenyltransferases, the molecular mechanism of heterooligomeric trans-prenyltransferases is not yet clearly understood, particularly with respect to the role of the small subunits lacking the catalytic motifs conserved in most known trans-prenyltransferases. We have determined the crystal structure of Ml-HexPPs both in the substrate-free form and in complex with 7,11-dimethyl-2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-yl diphosphate ammonium salt (3-DesMe-FPP), an analog of FPP. The structure of HexB is composed of mostly antiparallel α-helices joined by connecting loops. Two aspartate-rich motifs (designated the first and second aspartate-rich motifs) and the other characteristic motifs in HexB are located around the diphosphate part of 3-DesMe-FPP. Despite the very low amino acid sequence identity and the distinct polypeptide chain lengths between HexA and HexB, the structure of HexA is quite similar to that of HexB. The aliphatic tail of 3-DesMe-FPP is accommodated in a large hydrophobic cleft starting from HexB and penetrating to the inside of HexA. These structural features suggest that HexB catalyzes the condensation reactions and that HexA is directly involved in the product chain length control in cooperation with HexB.

  14. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 is required for binding to the adenovirus E4 (ORF6/7) protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1994-01-01

    Adenovirus infection leads to E1A-dependent activation of the transcription factor E2F. E2F has recently been identified in complexes with cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the two pRB family members p107 and p130. E1A dissociates E2F from these cellular proteins...

  15. Development of multifunctional, heterodimeric isoindoline-1,3-dione derivatives as cholinesterase and β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors with neuroprotective properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzior, Natalia; Bajda, Marek; Skrok, Mirosław; Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Lewiński, Krzysztof; Brus, Boris; Pišlar, Anja; Kos, Janko; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-03-06

    The presented study describes the synthesis, pharmacological evaluation (AChE and BuChE inhibition, beta amyloid anti-aggregation effect and neuroprotective effect), molecular modeling and crystallographic studies of a novel series of isoindoline-1,3-dione derivatives. The target compounds were designed as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with an arylalkylamine moiety binding at the catalytic site of the enzyme and connected via an alkyl chain to a heterocyclic fragment, capable of binding at the peripheral anionic site of AChE. Among these molecules, compound 15b was found to be the most potent and selective AChE inhibitor (IC50EeAChE = 0.034 μM). Moreover, compound 13b in addition to AChE inhibition (IC50 EeAChE = 0.219 μM) possesses additional properties, such as the ability to inhibit Aβ aggregation (65.96% at 10 μM) and a neuroprotective effect against Aβ toxicity at 1 and 3 μM. Compound 13b emerges as a promising multi-target ligand for the further development of the therapy for age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on the aquatic larvae of Chironomus riparius based on gene expression assays related to the endocrine system, the stress response and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planelló, Rosario; Herrero, Oscar; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), two of the most extensively used phthalates, were studied in Chironomus riparius under acute short-term treatments, to compare their relative toxicities and identify genes sensitive to exposure. The ecotoxicity of these phthalates was assessed by analysis of the alterations in gene expression profiles of selected inducible and constitutive genes related to the endocrine system, the cellular stress response and the ribosomal machinery. Fourth instar larvae, a model system in aquatic toxicology, were experimentally exposed to five increasing concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100mg/L) of DEHP and BBP for 24h. Gene expression was analysed by the changes in levels of transcripts, using RT-PCR techniques with specific gene probes. The exposures to DEHP or BBP were able to rapidly induce the hsp70 gene in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the cognate form hsc70 was not altered by either of these chemicals. Transcription of ribosomal RNA as a measure of cell viability, quantified by the levels of ITS2, was not affected by DEHP, but was slightly, yet significantly, downregulated by BBP at the highest concentrations tested. Finally, as these phthalates are classified as endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), their potential effect on the ecdysone endocrine system was studied by analysing the two genes, EcR and usp, of the heterodimeric ecdysone receptor complex. It was found that BBP provoked the overexpression of the EcR gene, with significant increases from exposures of 0.1mg/L and above, while DEHP significantly decreased the activity of this gene at the highest concentration. These data are relevant as they show for the first time the ability of phthalates to interfere with endocrine marker genes in invertebrates, demonstrating their potential capacity to alter the ecdysone signalling pathway. Overall, the study clearly shows a differential gene-toxin interaction

  17. Coupling component systems towards systems of systems

    OpenAIRE

    Autran , Frédéric; Auzelle , Jean-Philippe; Cattan , Denise; Garnier , Jean-Luc; Luzeaux , Dominique; Mayer , Frédérique; Peyrichon , Marc; Ruault , Jean-René

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Systems of systems (SoS) are a hot topic in our "fully connected global world". Our aim is not to provide another definition of what SoS are, but rather to focus on the adequacy of reusing standard system architecting techniques within this approach in order to improve performance, fault detection and safety issues in large-scale coupled systems that definitely qualify as SoS, whatever the definition is. A key issue will be to secure the availability of the services pr...

  18. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  19. Auxiliary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Systems included under the heading ''Reactor Auxillary Systems'' are those immediately involved with the reactor operation. These include the systems for dosing and letdown of reactor coolant, as well as for the chemical dosing, purification and treatment of the reactor coolant and the cooling system in the controlled area. The ancillary systems are mainly responsible for liquid and gaseous treatment and the waste treatment for final storage. (orig.)

  20. Comparative Study on the Cellular and Systemic Nutrient Sensing and Intermediary Metabolism after Partial Replacement of Fishmeal by Meat and Bone Meal in the Diet of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fei; Xu, Dandan; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; He, Gen

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the cellular and systemic nutrient sensing mechanisms as well as the intermediary metabolism responses in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) fed with fishmeal diet (FM diet), 45% of FM replaced by meat and bone meal diet (MBM diet) or MBM diet supplemented with essential amino acids to match the amino acid profile of FM diet (MBM+AA diet). During the one month feeding trial, feed intake was not affected by the different diets. However, MBM diet caused significant reduction of specific growth rate and nutrient retentions. Compared with the FM diet, MBM diet down-regulated target of rapamycin (TOR) and insulin-like growth factor (IGFs) signaling pathways, whereas up-regulated the amino acid response (AAR) signaling pathway. Moreover, MBM diet significantly decreased glucose and lipid anabolism, while increased muscle protein degradation and lipid catabolism in liver. MBM+AA diet had no effects on improvement of MBM diet deficiencies. Compared with fasted, re-feeding markedly activated the TOR signaling pathway, IGF signaling pathway and glucose, lipid metabolism, while significantly depressed the protein degradation signaling pathway. These results thus provided a comprehensive display of molecular responses and a better explanation of deficiencies generated after fishmeal replacement by other protein sources.

  1. Bitcoin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lánský

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptocurrency systems are purely digital and decentralized systems that use cryptographic principles to confirm transactions. Bitcoin is the first and also the most widespread cryptocurrency. The aim of this article is to introduce Bitcoin system using a language understandable also to readers without computer science education. This article captures the Bitcoin system from three perspectives: internal structure, network and users. Emphasis is placed on brief and clear definitions (system components and their mutual relationships. A new system view of the stated terms constitutes author’s own contribution.

  2. JOSHUA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honeck, H.C.

    1975-04-01

    A major computational system called JOSHUA has been under development at the Savannah River Laboratory since 1968. The JOSHUA System has two major parts: the Operating System and the Application System. The Operating System has been in production use since 1970 and provides data management, terminal, and job execution facilities. The Application System uses these facilities in solving problems in reactor physics and engineering. Features of the Application System are the two-dimensional lattice physics and three-dimensional transient reactor physics capabilities, which have been in use since 1971 and 1974, respectively. The capabilities of the JOSHUA System are summarized, and statistics on size, use, and development effort are provided. (U.S.)

  3. Systems thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Derek; Colosi, Laura; Lobdell, Claire

    2008-08-01

    Evaluation is one of many fields where "systems thinking" is popular and is said to hold great promise. However, there is disagreement about what constitutes systems thinking. Its meaning is ambiguous, and systems scholars have made diverse and divergent attempts to describe it. Alternative origins include: von Bertalanffy, Aristotle, Lao Tsu or multiple aperiodic "waves." Some scholars describe it as synonymous with systems sciences (i.e., nonlinear dynamics, complexity, chaos). Others view it as taxonomy-a laundry list of systems approaches. Within so much noise, it is often difficult for evaluators to find the systems thinking signal. Recent work in systems thinking describes it as an emergent property of four simple conceptual patterns (rules). For an evaluator to become a "systems thinker", he or she need not spend years learning many methods or nonlinear sciences. Instead, with some practice, one can learn to apply these four simple rules to existing evaluation knowledge with transformative results.

  4. Cognitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The tutorial will discuss the definition of cognitive systems as the possibilities to extend the current systems engineering paradigm in order to perceive, learn, reason and interact robustly in open-ended changing environments. I will also address cognitive systems in a historical perspective...... to be modeled within a limited set of predefined specifications. There will inevitably be a need for robust decisions and behaviors in novel situations that include handling of conflicts and ambiguities based on the capability and knowledge of the artificial cognitive system. Further, there is a need...... in cognitive systems include e.g. personalized information systems, sensor network systems, social dynamics system and Web2.0, and cognitive components analysis. I will use example from our own research and link to other research activities....

  5. Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  6. Filter systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanin, V.R.

    1990-01-01

    The multidetector systems for high resolution gamma spectroscopy are presented. The observable parameters for identifying nuclides produced simultaneously in the reaction are analysed discussing the efficiency of filter systems. (M.C.K.)

  7. Expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldy, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The definitions of the terms 'artificial intelligence' and 'expert systems', the methodology, areas of employment and limits of expert systems are discussed. The operation of an expert system is described, especially the presentation and organization of knowledge as well as interference and control. Methods and tools for expert system development are presented and their application in nuclear energy are briefly addressed. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  8. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge b...... for the application of expert systems, but also raises issues regarding privacy and legal liability....

  9. Retrofitting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the different retrofitting possibilities that are available today. The report looks at both external and internal systems for external wall constructions, roof constructions, floor constructions and foundations. All systems are described in detail in respect to use...... and methods, and the efficiency of the different systems are discussed....

  10. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer system for measuring dynamic protein-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Wang, Yao; Song, Yunhong; Wang, Tietao; Li, Changfu; Wei, Yahong; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Shen, Xihui

    2014-05-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important for virtually every biological process, and a number of elegant approaches have been designed to detect and evaluate such interactions. However, few of these methods allow the detection of dynamic and real-time protein-protein interactions in bacteria. Here we describe a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) system based on the bacterial luciferase LuxAB. We found that enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) accepts the emission from LuxAB and emits yellow fluorescence. Importantly, BRET occurred when LuxAB and eYFP were fused, respectively, to the interacting protein pair FlgM and FliA. Furthermore, we observed sirolimus (i.e., rapamycin)-inducible interactions between FRB and FKBP12 and a dose-dependent abolishment of such interactions by FK506, the ligand of FKBP12. Using this system, we showed that osmotic stress or low pH efficiently induced multimerization of the regulatory protein OmpR and that the multimerization induced by low pH can be reversed by a neutralizing agent, further indicating the usefulness of this system in the measurement of dynamic interactions. This method can be adapted to analyze dynamic protein-protein interactions and the importance of such interactions in bacterial processes such as development and pathogenicity. Real-time measurement of protein-protein interactions in prokaryotes is highly desirable for determining the roles of protein complex in the development or virulence of bacteria, but methods that allow such measurement are not available. Here we describe the development of a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology that meets this need. The use of endogenous excitation light in this strategy circumvents the requirement for the sophisticated instrument demanded by standard fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Furthermore, because the LuxAB substrate decanal is membrane permeable, the assay can be performed without lysing the bacterial cells

  11. Multifunction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauthier, J.; Fiori, R.

    1990-01-01

    The development, the characteristics and the applications of a multifunction system are presented. The system is used on the RBES laboratory pipes, at Marcoule. The system was developed in order to allow, without time loss, the modification of the circuit function by replacing only one component. The following elements form the multifunction system: a fixed base, which is part of the tube, a removable piece, which is inserted into the base, a cover plate and its locking system. The material, chosen among commercial trade marks, required small modifications in order to be used in the circuit [fr

  12. Operating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tsichritzis, Dionysios C; Rheinboldt, Werner

    1974-01-01

    Operating Systems deals with the fundamental concepts and principles that govern the behavior of operating systems. Many issues regarding the structure of operating systems, including the problems of managing processes, processors, and memory, are examined. Various aspects of operating systems are also discussed, from input-output and files to security, protection, reliability, design methods, performance evaluation, and implementation methods.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of what constitutes an operating system, followed by a discussion on the definition and pr

  13. Systems integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemieniuch, C E; Sinclair, M A

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a view of systems integration, from an ergonomics/human factors perspective, emphasising the process of systems integration as is carried out by humans. The first section discusses some of the fundamental issues in systems integration, such as the significance of systems boundaries, systems lifecycle and systems entropy, issues arising from complexity, the implications of systems immortality, and so on. The next section outlines various generic processes for executing systems integration, to act as guides for practitioners. These address both the design of the system to be integrated and the preparation of the wider system in which the integration will occur. Then the next section outlines some of the human-specific issues that would need to be addressed in such processes; for example, indeterminacy and incompleteness, the prediction of human reliability, workload issues, extended situation awareness, and knowledge lifecycle management. For all of these, suggestions and further readings are proposed. Finally, the conclusions section reiterates in condensed form the major issues arising from the above.

  14. Ternary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, D.N.; Hubberstey, P.; Barker, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the experimental and theoretical studies carried out on multicomponent alkali metal systems. Solid-liquid phase equilibria studies are mainly concerned with the systems Na-K-Rb and Na-K-Cs, and data on the liquidus temperatures in these systems are presented. The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Na-K-Cs eutectic system have been determined experimentally, and the enthalpy, heat capacity and excess functions of the alloy are given. An analysis of calculational methods used in determining thermodynamic functions of ternary liquid metals systems is described. Finally, data are tabulated for the density, compressibility, saturated vapour pressure, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the ternary Na-K-Cs eutectic system. (UK)

  15. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  16. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  17. Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, William W.

    2016-01-01

    The term “systems engineering” when entered into the Google search page, produces a significant number of results, evidence that systems engineering is recognized as being important for the success of essentially all products. Since most readers of this item will be rather well versed in documents concerning systems engineering, I have elected to share some of the points made on this subject in a document developed by the European Cooperation for Space Standardization (ECSS), a component of t...

  18. RNA-based ovarian cancer research from 'a gene to systems biomedicine' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Esra; Kori, Medi; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2017-08-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death from a gynecologic malignancy, and treatment of this disease is harder than any other type of female reproductive cancer. Improvements in the diagnosis and development of novel and effective treatment strategies for complex pathophysiologies, such as ovarian cancer, require a better understanding of disease emergence and mechanisms of progression through systems medicine approaches. RNA-level analyses generate new information that can help in understanding the mechanisms behind disease pathogenesis, to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets and in new drug discovery. Whole RNA sequencing and coding and non-coding RNA expression array datasets have shed light on the mechanisms underlying disease progression and have identified mRNAs, miRNAs, and lncRNAs involved in ovarian cancer progression. In addition, the results from these analyses indicate that various signalling pathways and biological processes are associated with ovarian cancer. Here, we present a comprehensive literature review on RNA-based ovarian cancer research and highlight the benefits of integrative approaches within the systems biomedicine concept for future ovarian cancer research. We invite the ovarian cancer and systems biomedicine research fields to join forces to achieve the interdisciplinary caliber and rigor required to find real-life solutions to common, devastating, and complex diseases such as ovarian cancer. CAF: cancer-associated fibroblasts; COG: Cluster of Orthologous Groups; DEA: disease enrichment analysis; EOC: epithelial ovarian carcinoma; ESCC: oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma; GSI: gamma secretase inhibitor; GO: Gene Ontology; GSEA: gene set enrichment analyzes; HAS: Hungarian Academy of Sciences; lncRNAs: long non-coding RNAs; MAPK/ERK: mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases; NGS: next-generation sequencing; ncRNAs: non-coding RNAs; OvC: ovarian cancer; PI3K

  19. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  20. Intelligent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J David

    2011-01-01

    Technology has now progressed to the point that intelligent systems are replacing humans in the decision making processes as well as aiding in the solution of very complex problems. In many cases intelligent systems are already outperforming human activities. Artificial neural networks are not only capable of learning how to classify patterns, such images or sequence of events, but they can also effectively model complex nonlinear systems. Their ability to classify sequences of events is probably more popular in industrial applications where there is an inherent need to model nonlinear system

  1. Systemic darwinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Rasmus Grønfeldt

    2008-08-19

    Darwin's 19th century evolutionary theory of descent with modification through natural selection opened up a multidimensional and integrative conceptual space for biology. We explore three dimensions of this space: explanatory pattern, levels of selection, and degree of difference among units of the same type. Each dimension is defined by a respective pair of poles: law and narrative explanation, organismic and hierarchical selection, and variational and essentialist thinking. As a consequence of conceptual debates in the 20th century biological sciences, the poles of each pair came to be seen as mutually exclusive opposites. A significant amount of 21st century research focuses on systems (e.g., genomic, cellular, organismic, and ecological/global). Systemic Darwinism is emerging in this context. It follows a "compositional paradigm" according to which complex systems and their hierarchical networks of parts are the focus of biological investigation. Through the investigation of systems, Systemic Darwinism promises to reintegrate each dimension of Darwin's original logical space. Moreover, this ideally and potentially unified theory of biological ontology coordinates and integrates a plurality of mathematical biological theories (e.g., self-organization/structure, cladistics/history, and evolutionary genetics/function). Integrative Systemic Darwinism requires communal articulation from a plurality of perspectives. Although it is more general than these, it draws on previous advances in Systems Theory, Systems Biology, and Hierarchy Theory. Systemic Darwinism would greatly further bioengineering research and would provide a significantly deeper and more critical understanding of biological reality.

  2. Essential amino acid enriched high-protein enteral nutrition modulates insulin-like growth factor-1 system function in a rat model of trauma-hemorrhagic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Xia

    Full Text Available Nutrition support for critically ill patients supplemented with additional modular protein may promote skeletal muscle protein anabolism in addition to counteracting acute nitrogen loss. The present study was designed to investigate whether the essential amino acid (EAA enriched high-protein enteral nutrition (EN modulates the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 system and activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR anabolic signaling pathway in a trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T-HS rat model.Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 90, 278.18 ± 0.94 g were randomly assigned to 5 groups: (1 normal control, (2 pair-fed, (3 T-HS, (4 T-HS and standard EN, and (5 T-HS and EAA enriched high-protein EN. Six animals from each group were harvested on days 2, 4, and 6 for serum, gastrocnemius, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus sample collection. T-HS significantly reduced muscle mass. Nutrition support maintained muscle mass, especially the EAA enriched high-protein EN. Meanwhile, a pronounced derangement in IGF-1-IGFBPs axis as well as impaired mTOR transduction was observed in the T-HS group. Compared with animals receiving standard EN, those receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN presented 18% higher serum free IGF-1 levels following 3 days of nutrition support and 22% higher after 5 days. These changes were consistent with the concomitant elevation in serum insulin and reduction in corticosterone levels. In addition, phosphorylations of downstream anabolic signaling effectors - including protein kinase B, mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 - increased significantly in rats receiving EAA enriched high-protein EN.Our findings firstly demonstrate the beneficial effect of EAA enriched high-protein EN on the metabolic modulation of skeletal muscle protein anabolism by regulating the IGF-1 system and downstream anabolic signaling transduction.

  3. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-02-18

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  5. Recommender systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lu L.; Medo M.; Yeung C.H.; Zhang Y.-C.; Zhang Z.-K.; Zhou T.

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing rapid expansion of the Internet greatly increases the necessity of effective recommender systems for filtering the abundant information. Extensive research for recommender systems is conducted by a broad range of communities including social and computer scientists, physicists, and interdisciplinary researchers. Despite substantial theoretical and practical achievements, unification and comparison of different approaches are lacking, which impedes further advances. In this article...

  6. GEOMASS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuya; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2009-03-01

    As a part of the research and development regarding characterisation of deep geological environment, the GEOMASS (GEOLOGICAL MODELLING ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION SOFTWARE) system has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to carry out geological and hydrogeological modelling and groundwater flow simulation and so on. The GEOMASS system integrates a commercial geological interpretation system (EarthVision), which is used for geological modelling and visualisation, with a proprietary code for groundwater flow (FracAffinity). This integrated system allows users to make rapid improvement of models as data increases. Also, it is possible to perform more realistic groundwater flow simulation due to the capability of modelling the rock mass as a continuum with discrete hydro-structural features in the rock mass. This paper consists of 'Overview of GEOMASS system', FracAffinity Theoretical Background' and 'FracAffinity User Guide' and is edited as a GEOMASS system manual. 'Overview of GEOMASS system' describes the outline of this system. 'FracAffinity Theoretical Background' describes the information of technical background of FracAffinity software. FracAffinity User Guide' describes the structure of the FracAffinity input files, the usage of FracAffinity Interface and flow-solver. Updating of the FracAffinity has been continued as needed and FracAffinity version3.3 is the latest version at present (July 2008). (author)

  7. Systems integration (automation system). System integration (automation system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K; Komori, T; Fukuma, Y; Oikawa, M [Nippon Steal Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-09-26

    This paper introduces business activities on an automation systems integration (SI) started by a company in July,1988, and describes the SI concepts. The business activities include, with the CIM (unified production carried out on computers) and AMENITY (living environment) as the mainstays, a single responsibility construction ranging from consultation on structuring optimal systems for processing and assembling industries and intelligent buildings to system design, installation and after-sales services. With an SI standing on users {prime} position taken most importantly, the business starts from a planning and consultation under close coordination. On the conceptual basis of structuring optimal systems using the ompany {prime}s affluent know-hows and tools and adapting and applying with multi-vendors, open networks, centralized and distributed systems, the business is promoted with the accumulated technologies capable of realizing artificial intelligence and neural networks in its background, and supported with highly valuable business results in the past. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Creative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette; Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Opsamling af diskussioner på konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems i september/oktober 2007. Konferencen og Udstillingen Creative Systems sætter fokus på systemer som en positiv drivkraft i den kreative skabelsesproces. CINARK inviterede fire internationale kapaciteter, som indenfor hver...... deres felt har beskæftiget sig med udviklingen af systemer. Kieran Timberlake, markant amerikansk tegnestue; Mark West, Professor på University of Manitoba, Canada, og pioner indenfor anvendelse af tekstilforskalling til betonstøbninger; Matilda McQuaid, Arkitekturhistoriker og kurator på udstillingen...... om Extreme Textiles på amerikanske Cooper Hewit Design Museum, samt Professor Ludger Hovestadt, ved ETH, Zürich der fokuserer på udvikling og anvendelse af logaritmiske systemtilgange. Udstillingen diskuterede ud fra deres meget forskellige arbejder, det kreative potentiale i anvendelsen af systemer...

  9. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  10. Upgraded RECOVER system - CASDAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoichi; Koyama, Kinji

    1992-03-01

    The CASDAC (Containment And Surveillance Data Authenticated Communication) system has been developed by JAERI for nuclear safeguards and physical protection of nuclear material. This system was designed and constructed as an upgraded RECOVER system, design concept of which was based on the original RECOVER system and also the TRANSEAVER system. Both of them were developed several years ago as a remote monitoring system for continual verification of security and safeguards status of nuclear material. The system consists of two subsystems, one of them is a Grand Command Center (GCC) subsystem and the other is a facility subsystem. Communication between the two subsystems is controlled through the international telephone line network. Therefore all communication data are encrypted to prevent access by an unauthorized person who may intend to make a falsification, or tapping. The facility subsystem has an appropriate measure that ensure data security and reliable operation under unattended mode of operator. The software of this system is designed so as to be easily used in other different types of computers. This report describes the outline of the CASDAC system and the results of its performance test. This work has been carried out in the framework of Japan Support Programme for Agency Safeguards (JASPAS) as a project, JA-1. (author)

  11. Watchdog System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann; Bahnsen, Chris Holmberg; Jensen, Morten Bornø

    This deliverable is part of WP4. Overall WP4 is motivated by the need for automatic systems that can ease the task of annotating massive amounts of traffic data. Concretely this deliverable is related to WP4.2 - the watchdog system. The idea with the watchdog is to develop a system that can remov...... huge chunks of video data where no events/interactions of interest are occurring and hence let a user focus on manually annotation of only the interesting stuff....

  12. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  13. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surfaces have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  14. Water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, R.

    1981-01-01

    The present paper describes the coolant chemistry and its consequences for 1300 MWsub(e) KWU PWR plants. Some selected systems, i.e. primary heat transport system, steam water cycle and cooling water arrangements, are chosen for this description. Various aspects of coolant chemistry regarding general corrosion, selective types of corrosion and deposits on heat transfer surface have been discussed. The water supply systems necessary to fulfill the requirements of the coolant chemistry are discussed as well. It has been concluded that a good operating performance can only be achieved when - beside other factors - the water chemistry has been given sufficient consideration. (orig./RW)

  15. Imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froggatt, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a two dimensional imaging system in which a pattern of radiation falling on the system is detected to give electrical signals for each of a plurality of strips across the pattern. The detection is repeated for different orientations of the strips and the whole processed by compensated back projection. For a shadow x-ray system a plurality of strip x-ray detectors are rotated on a turntable. For lower frequencies the pattern may be rotated with a Dove prism and the strips condensed to suit smaller detectors with a cylindrical lens. (author)

  16. Kaonic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oset E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I make a short review of the situation of the kaonic systems, with novel information supporting the two Λ(1405 states from the K-d → nπΣ reaction. A review is made of the K¯$ar K$NN system with recent calculations converging to smaller bindings and larger widths. Novel systems involving two kaons and one nucleon or three kaons are also reported and finally a short discussion is made of the analogous state DNN for which recent studies find a large binding and a small width.

  17. The systems integration modeling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.; Williams, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the systems integration modeling system (SIMS), an analysis tool for the detailed evaluation of the structure and related performance of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) and its interface with waste generators. It's use for evaluations in support of system-level decisions as to FWMS configurations, the allocation, sizing, balancing and integration of functions among elements, and the establishment of system-preferred waste selection and sequencing methods and other operating strategies is presented. SIMS includes major analysis submodels which quantify the detailed characteristics of individual waste items, loaded casks and waste packages, simulate the detailed logistics of handling and processing discrete waste items and packages, and perform detailed cost evaluations

  18. ring system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1,3,2-DIAZABORACYCLOALKANE. RING SYSTEM. Negussie Retta" and Robert H. Neilson. 'Department of Chemistry, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Department of Chemistry, Texas Christian University.

  19. Septic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The web site provides guidance and technical assistance for homeowners, government officials, industry professionals, and EPA partners about how to properly develop and manage individual onsite and community cluster systems that treat domestic wastewater.

  20. Respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  1. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  2. Systems Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    study and understand the function of biological systems, particu- larly, the response of such .... understand the organisation and behaviour of prokaryotic sys- tems. ... relationship of the structure of a target molecule to its ability to bind a certain ...

  3. Bricks / Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    At first glance, this book may appear eclectic. It contains writings from architectural practice in a language and structure based on subjective views and experiences, combined with research contributions based on systematic design investigations of discrete computational systems. Discussions range......, and it aims to illustrate and identify new modes of working in architecture, particularly with regards to brickwork and other complex systems of modular assemblies, whether physical or digital....

  4. Expert Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, P.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Expert systems mimic the problem-solving activity of human experts in specialized domains by capturing and representing expert knowledge. Expert systems include a knowledge base, an inference engine that derives conclusions from the knowledge, and a user interface. Knowledge may be stored as if-then rules, orusing other formalisms such as frames and predicate logic. Uncertain knowledge may be represented using certainty factors, Bayesian networks, Dempster-Shafer belief functions, or fuzzy se...

  5. Nanorobotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Dong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two strategies towards the realization of nanotechnology have been presented, i.e., top-down and bottom up. The former one is mainly based on nanofabrication and includes technologies such as nano-lithography, nano-imprint, and etching. Presently, they are still 2D fabrication processes with low resolution. The later one is an assembly-based technique. At present, it includes such items as self-assembly, dip-pen lithography, and directed self-assembly. These techniques can generate regular nano patterns in large scales. To fabricate 3D complex nano devices there are still no effective ways by so far. Here we show our effort on the development of a nano laboratory, a prototype nanomanufacturing system, based on nanorobotic manipulations. In which, we take a hybrid strategy as shown in Fig. 1. In this system, nano fabrication and nano assembly can be performed in an arbitrary order to construct nano building blocks and finally nano devices. The most important feature in this system is that the products can be fed back into the system to shrink the system part by part leading to nanorobots. Property characterization can be performed in each intermediate process. Due to the nanorobotic manipulation system, dynamic measurement can be performed rather than conventional static observations.

  6. Fiscal system analysis - contractual systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Production sharing contracts are one of the most popular forms of contractual system used in petroleum agreements around the world, but the manner in which the fiscal terms and contract parameters impact system measures is complicated and not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the influence of private and market uncertainty in contractual fiscal systems. A meta-modelling approach is employed that couples the results of a simulation model with regression analysis to construct numerical functionals that quantify the fiscal regime. Relationships are derived that specify how the present value, rate of return, and take statistics vary as a function of the system parameters. The deepwater Girassol field development in Angola is taken as a case study. (author)

  7. Reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  8. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway as a risk factor of central nervous system metastasis in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Bertrand, Nicolas; Dumont, Aurélie; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Mailliez, Audrey; Preusser, Matthias; Weller, Michael; Revillion, Françoise; Bonneterre, Jacques

    2017-12-01

    The PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway may be involved in the development of central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer. Accordingly, herein we explored whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of this pathway are associated with altered risk of CNS metastasis formation in metastatic breast cancer patients. The GENEOM study (NCT00959556) included blood sample collection from breast cancer patients treated in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant or metastatic setting. We identified patients with CNS metastases for comparison with patients without CNS metastasis, defined as either absence of neurological symptoms or normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before death or during 5-year follow-up. Eighty-eight SNPs of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway genes were selected for analysis: AKT1 (17 SNPs), AKT2 (4), FGFR1 (2), mTOR (7), PDK1 (4), PI3KR1 (11), PI3KCA (20), PTEN (17), RPS6KB1 (6). Of 342 patients with metastases, 207 fulfilled the inclusion criteria: One-hundred-and-seven patients remained free of CNS metastases at last follow-up or date of death whereas 100 patients developed CNS metastases. Among clinical parameters, hormonal and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status as well as vascular tumour emboli was associated with risk of CNS metastasis. Only PI3KR1-rs706716 was associated with CNS metastasis in univariate analysis after Bonferroni correction (p patients and could be included in a predictive composite score to detect early CNS metastasis irrespective of breast cancer subtype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ARAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.F.; Wyman, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    In spite of the remarkable safety record of the nuclear industry as a whole, recent public concern over the potential impact of the industry's accelerated growth has prompted ERDA to expand its emergency response procedures. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, ARAC, is a computer communications system designed to enhance the existing emergency response capability of ERDA nuclear facilities. ARAC will add at least two new functions to this capability: centralized, real-time data acquisition and storage, and simulation of the long range atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. To perform these functions, ARAC employs four major sub-systems or facilities: the site facility, the central facility, the global weather center and the regional model. The system has been under development for the past two years at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California

  10. Microbiology System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Technology originating in a NASA-sponsored study of the measurement of microbial growth in zero gravity led to the development of Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.'s VITEK system. VITEK provides a physician with accurate diagnostic information and identifies the most effective medication. Test cards are employed to identify organisms and determine susceptibility to antibiotics. A photo-optical scanner scans the card and monitors changes in the growth of cells contained within the card. There are two configurations - VITEK and VITEK JR as well as VIDAS, a companion system that detects bacteria, viruses, etc. from patient specimens. The company was originally created by McDonnell Douglas, the NASA contractor.

  11. Spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, W J

    1989-01-01

    This book is about spin systems as models for magnetic materials, especially antiferromagnetic lattices. Spin-systems are well-defined models, for which, in special cases, exact properties may be derived. These special cases are for the greater part, one- dimensional and restricted in their applicability, but they may give insight into general properties that also exist in higher dimension. This work pays special attention to qualitative differences between spin lattices of different dimensions. It also replaces the traditional picture of an (ordered) antiferromagnetic state of a Heisenberg sy

  12. Distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Van Steen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    For this third edition of "Distributed Systems," the material has been thoroughly revised and extended, integrating principles and paradigms into nine chapters: 1. Introduction 2. Architectures 3. Processes 4. Communication 5. Naming 6. Coordination 7. Replication 8. Fault tolerance 9. Security A separation has been made between basic material and more specific subjects. The latter have been organized into boxed sections, which may be skipped on first reading. To assist in understanding the more algorithmic parts, example programs in Python have been included. The examples in the book leave out many details for readability, but the complete code is available through the book's Website, hosted at www.distributed-systems.net.

  13. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Immune System Print en español El sistema inmunitario Whether you're stomping through the showers ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  14. Operating Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    areas in which this type is useful are multimedia, virtual reality, and advanced scientific projects such as undersea exploration and planetary rovers. Because of the expanded uses for soft real-time functionality, it is finding its way into most current operating systems, including major versions of Unix and Windows NT OS.

  15. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  16. Systems Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  17. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  18. Quorum Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattenhofer, Roger; Förster, Klaus-Tycho

    2016-01-01

    What happens if a single server is no longer powerful enough to service all your customers? The obvious choice is to add more servers and to use the majority approach (e.g. Paxos, Chapter 2) to guarantee consistency. However, even if you buy one million servers, a client still has to access more ...... study the theory behind overlapping sets, known as quorum systems....

  19. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  20. System Description:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Poswolsky, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Delphin is a functional programming language [Adam Poswolsky and Carsten Schürmann. Practical programming with higher-order encodings and dependent types. In European Symposium on Programming (ESOP), 2008] utilizing dependent higher-order datatypes. Delphin's two-level type-system cleanly separates...

  1. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  2. Bioenergy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a bioenergy system has to be considered as an integrated process in which each stage or step interacts with other steps in the overall process. There are a number of stages in the supply and conversion of woody biomass for energy. Each step in the chain has implications for the next step and for overall system efficiency. The resource can take many forms and will have varying physical and chemical characteristics which will influence the efficiency and cost of conversion. The point in the supply chain at which size and moisture content is reduced and the manner in which it is done is influential in determining feedstock delivered cost and overall system costs. To illustrate the interactions within the overall system, the influence of the nature, size and moisture content of delivered feedstocks on costs of generating electricity via thermal conversion processes is examined using a model developed to investigate the inter-relationships between the stages in the supply chain. (author)

  3. Urogenital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Asbach, P.; Beyersdorff, D.; Hein, P.; Zaspel, U.

    2007-01-01

    The book is focussed on the radiological diagnostics of diseases in the urogential system. The description of the specific diseases, the identification by modern imaging techniques, the interpretation of examinatory results and therapeutic options are systematically treated in 4 chapters: kidney and adrenal glands, urinary tract, male genitals, female genitals

  4. Mirror systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogassi, Leonardo; Ferrari, Pier Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons are a class of visuomotor neurons, discovered in the monkey premotor cortex and in an anatomically connected area of the inferior parietal lobule, that activate both during action execution and action observation. They constitute a circuit dedicated to match actions made by others with the internal motor representations of the observer. It has been proposed that this matching system enables individuals to understand others' behavior and motor intentions. Here we will describe the main features of mirror neurons in monkeys. Then we will present evidence of the presence of a mirror system in humans and of its involvement in several social-cognitive functions, such as imitation, intention, and emotion understanding. This system may have several implications at a cognitive level and could be linked to specific social deficits in humans such as autism. Recent investigations addressed the issue of the plasticity of the mirror neuron system in both monkeys and humans, suggesting also their possible use in rehabilitation. WIREs Cogn Sci 2011 2 22-38 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.89 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Systemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    This book presents principles and methodology for planning in a complex world. It sets out a so-called systemic approach to planning, among other things, by applying “hard” and “soft” methodologies and methods in combination. The book is written for Ph.D and graduate students in engineering...

  6. Energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, W.

    1974-01-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  7. Energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefele, W [Nuclear Research Centre, Applied Systems Analysis and Reactor Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)

    1974-07-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  8. Are invertebrates relevant models in ageing research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    is an evolutionary conserved key protein kinase in the TOR pathway that regulates growth, proliferation and cell metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and stress. Comparing the ageing process in invertebrate model organisms with relatively short lifespan with mammals provides valuable information about...... the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process faster than mammal systems. Inhibition of the TOR pathway activity via either genetic manipulation or rapamycin increases lifespan profoundly in most invertebrate model organisms. This contribution will review the recent findings in invertebrates concerning...... the TOR pathway and effects of TOR inhibition by rapamycin on lifespan. Besides some contradictory results, the majority points out that rapamycin induces longevity. This suggests that administration of rapamycin in invertebrates is a promising tool for pursuing the scientific puzzle of lifespan...

  9. TUBO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, H.J.C.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.; Toledo, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings recently incorporated to TUBO system like the seismic analysis and the stress verification acccording to ASME-Boiler Rule and Pressure Vessel Code-section III are presented. The seismic analysis comprehend the consideration of uniform motion of the support, its multiple excitation, and the attainment of the spectral response for both cases. The module for stress verification uses stresses resulting fromthe combination of the loads specified by the user, in the automatic verification of permissible stresses for the pipings class 1 and 2, based on criteria NB-3650 and NC-3650 of ASME. The implementation of these proceedings in the TUBO system are discussed and a numerical example that covers the different phases of a stress analysis in a piping is presented [pt

  10. Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  11. Bilateral system. The ABACC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Ruben O.

    2001-01-01

    After relating the antecedents of the creation of the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the paper describes the common system of accounting and control set up by Argentina and Brazil. The organization of ABACC is also outlined

  12. Physical system requirements: Overall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy (DOE) the responsibility for managing the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for that purpose. The Secretary of Energy, in his November 1989 report to Congress (DOE/RW-0247), announced three new initiatives for conduct of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program. One of these initiatives was to establish improved management structure and procedures. In response, OCRWM performed a management study and the Direct subsequently issued the Management Systems Improvement Strategy (MSIS) on August 10, 1990, calling for a rigorous implementation of systems engineering principles with a special emphasis on functional analysis. This approach establishes a framework for integrating the program management efforts with the technical requirements analysis into a single, unified, and consistent program. The functional analysis approach recognizes that just the facilities and equipment comprising the physical waste management system must perform certain functions, so must certain programmatic and management functions be performed within the program in order to successfully bring the physical system into being

  13. Security system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Mark J.; Kuca, Michal; Aragon, Mona L.

    2016-02-02

    A security system includes a structure having a structural surface. The structure is sized to contain an asset therein and configured to provide a forceful breaching delay. The structure has an opening formed therein to permit predetermined access to the asset contained within the structure. The structure includes intrusion detection features within or associated with the structure that are activated in response to at least a partial breach of the structure.

  14. Cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Grosh, J.

    1984-01-01

    Invasive cardiovascular diagnostic procedures involve a finite risk and therefore can be recommended only when the benefit appears to exceed the risk by a substantial margin. The risk/benefit ratio varies not only with the procedure concerned but with the status of the vascular system, concomitant diseases, and the risks of both the suspected illness and its treatment. The risks inherent in the procedures per se are detailed in the sections to follow

  15. Priority Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gössler , Gregor; Sifakis , Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Projet POP_ART; We present a framework for the incremental construction of deadlock-free systems meeting given safety properties. The framework borrows concepts and basic results from the controller synthesis paradigm by considering a step in the construction process as a controller synthesis problem. We show that priorities are expressive enough to represent restrictions induced by deadlock-free controllers preserving safety properties. We define a correspondence between such restrictions an...

  16. Imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushbrooke, J.G.; Ansorge, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    A moving object such as a container on a conveyor belt is imaged by an optical system onto a charge coupled device array in which the lines of the array are arranged perpendicular to the direction of motion of the object. The speed of movement of the object is sensed to generate electrical signals which are processed to provide shift signals enabling the shifting of data row to row in the array in synchronism with the movement of the container. The electrical charge associated with a given point on the array is transferred from one line to the other until it appears at the last line of the array, from which it is read out in known manner in conjunction with all other electrical charges associated with the row of charge coupled devices in the last line of the array. Due to the integrating effect achieved, the aperture of the imaging system can be much smaller than otherwise would be required, and/or the level of light illumination can be reduced. The imaging system can be applied to X-ray inspection devices, aerial surveillance or scanning of moving documents in copying processes. (author)

  17. Braking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  18. Protecting information in systems of systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivellato, D.

    2012-01-01

    Systems of systems are coalitions of autonomous and heterogeneous systems that collaborate to achieve a common goal. The component systems of a system of systems often belong to different security domains, which are governed by different authorities (hereafter called parties). Furthermore, systems

  19. Oxidative regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figtree, Gemma A; Keyvan Karimi, Galougahi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2012-12-15

    The Na(+)-K(+) pump is an essential heterodimeric membrane protein, which maintains electrochemical gradients for Na(+) and K(+) across cell membranes in all tissues. We have identified glutathionylation, a reversible posttranslational redox modification, of the Na(+)-K(+) pump's β1 subunit as a regulatory mechanism of pump activity. Oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump by angiotensin II- and β1-adrenergic receptor-coupled signaling via NADPH oxidase activation demonstrates the relevance of this regulatory mechanism in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. This has implications for dysregulation of intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) as well as increased oxidative stress in heart failure, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, and regulation of vascular tone under conditions of elevated oxidative stress. Treatment strategies that are able to reverse this oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump have the potential for cardiovascular-protective effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Birkhoff, George D

    1927-01-01

    His research in dynamics constitutes the middle period of Birkhoff's scientific career, that of maturity and greatest power. -Yearbook of the American Philosophical Society The author's great book€¦is well known to all, and the diverse active modern developments in mathematics which have been inspired by this volume bear the most eloquent testimony to its quality and influence. -Zentralblatt MATH In 1927, G. D. Birkhoff wrote a remarkable treatise on the theory of dynamical systems that would inspire many later mathematicians to do great work. To a large extent, Birkhoff was writing about his o

  1. Nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Todreas, Neil E

    2011-01-01

    Principal Characteristics of Power ReactorsIntroductionPower CyclesPrimary Coolant SystemsReactor CoresFuel AssembliesAdvanced Water- and Gas-Cooled Reactors (Generation III And III+)Advanced Thermal and Fast Neutron Spectrum Reactors (Generation IV)ReferencesProblemsThermal Design Principles and ApplicationIntroductionOverall Plant Characteristics Influenced by Thermal Hydraulic ConsiderationsEnergy Production and Transfer ParametersThermal Design LimitsThermal Design MarginFigures of Merit for Core Thermal PerformanceThe Inverted Fuel ArrayThe Equivalent Annulus ApproximationReferencesProble

  2. Videobasierte Systeme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Peter

    Videosensoren spielen für Fahrerassistenz systeme eine zentrale Rolle, da sie die Interpretation visueller Informationen (Objektklassifikation) gezielt unterstützen. Im Heckbereich kann die Video sensorik in der einfachsten Variante die ultraschallbasierte Einparkhilfe bei Einpark- und Rangiervorgängen unterstützen. Beim Nachtsichtsystem NightVision wird das mit Infrarotlicht angestrahlte Umfeld vor dem Fahrzeug mit einer Frontkamera aufgenommen und im Fahrzeugcockpit auf einem Display dem Fahrer angezeigt (s. Nachtsichtsysteme). Andere Fahrerassistenzsysteme verarbeiten die Videosignale und generieren daraus gezielt Informationen, die für eigenständige Funktionen (z. B. Spurverlassenswarner) oder aber als Zusatzinformation für andere Funktionen ausgewertet werden (Sensordatenfusion).

  3. Relaxation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  4. Bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  5. Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    stand.    CV CS x dAvvdVov dt d F   (18-1) Where  denotes density and vx is the velocity in the x-direction. The first term on the...by  but to avoid confusion with  from Eqs. 18-7 to 10, it is denoted k in this formula . Ru is the universal gas constant (8.314472 J/mol K), pe is...Russian Federation Used on Phobos spacecraft as main engines 74 1.03 NTO/ UDMH 13.73-19.61 316-325 Orbital Maneuvering System 1 Aerojet Shuttle

  6. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  7. System analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seung Hui

    2004-02-01

    This book deals with information technology and business process, information system architecture, methods of system development, plan on system development like problem analysis and feasibility analysis, cases for system development, comprehension of analysis of users demands, analysis of users demands using traditional analysis, users demands analysis using integrated information system architecture, system design using integrated information system architecture, system implementation, and system maintenance.

  8. Posting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, S.

    1983-01-01

    A system for posting hazardous materials into and out of an enclosure, such as a glovebox, through a port in a wall of the enclosure. The port is normally closed by a door which cooperates with a removable end closure, on a container or the like when the latter is presented to and secured at the port. The container is secured in position at the port by means of a rotatable coupling ring. A single interlock ensures that the door cannot be opened in the absence of a container at the port and also that the container cannot be removed from the port when the door is open. In place of the container, a glove secured to a rigid sleeve may be used to enable the operator to perform a work function within the glovebox. (author)

  9. hydrothermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bayón

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we revise the classical formulation of the problem depriving it of the concepts that are superfluous from the mathematical point of view. We observe that a number of power stations can be substituted by a single one that behaves equivalently to the entire set. Proceeding in this way, we obtain a variational formulation in its purest sense (without restrictions. This formulation allows us to employ the theory of calculus of variations to the highest degree. We then calculate the equivalent minimizer in the case where the cost functions are second-order polynomials. We prove that the equivalent minimizer is a second-order polynomial with piece-wise constant coefficients. Moreover, it belongs to the class C1. Finally, we present various examples prompted by real systems and perform the proposed algorithms using Mathematica.

  10. Nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Palmero, Faustino; Lemos, M; Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Casado-Pascual, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the most recent advances in nonlinear science. It provides a unified view of nonlinear properties in many different systems and highlights many  new developments. While volume 1 concentrates on mathematical theory and computational techniques and challenges, which are essential for the study of nonlinear science, this second volume deals with nonlinear excitations in several fields. These excitations can be localized and transport energy and matter in the form of breathers, solitons, kinks or quodons with very different characteristics, which are discussed in the book. They can also transport electric charge, in which case they are known as polarobreathers or solectrons. Nonlinear excitations can influence function and structure in biology, as for example, protein folding. In crystals and other condensed matter, they can modify transport properties, reaction kinetics and interact with defects. There are also engineering applications in electric lattices, Josephson junction a...

  11. Posting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    A posting system for the movement of equipment, such as a manipulator, into and out of an enclosure e.g. a cell or glovebox, for toxic or radioactive materials has the manipulator arranged within a collapsible bellows-like container with an end of the container cooperating with a port entry to the enclosure. The collapsible container isolates the manipulator from the environment outside the enclosure and allows the manipulator to enter and leave the contaminated enclosure without breach of the containment. A particular construction of cell for use with radioactive material is described, having a thick wall of shielding material such as concrete provided with a door normally closed by a Pb shutter and having a cylindrical gamma shield block located over the shutter on the exterior of the wall. (author)

  12. Systems engineering simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Cloutier, Robert; Bone, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionOverviewDiscussion of Common TerminologyThe Case for Systems EngineeringA Brief History of Systems EngineeringSystem ExamplesSummaryThe System Life CycleManaging System Development-The Vee ModelSystem ProductionSystem Utilization and SupportSystem Retirement and DisposalOther Systems Engineering Development ModelsSpiral ModelAgile Model for Systems EngineeringSystem of InterestAbstraction and DecompositionIntegrationDeveloping and Managing RequirementsCyclone Requiremen