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Sample records for ranolazine rasagiline mesilate

  1. Rasagiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M Asif A; Plosker, Greg L

    2005-01-01

    Rasagiline is a second-generation potent, irreversible and selective inhibitor of monoamine-oxidase type B (MAO-B), which has been evaluated for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Rasagiline also possesses neuroprotective properties that are independent of its MAO inhibitory activity. Unlike selegiline, rasagiline has no amphetamine-like metabolites and its major metabolite, 1-(R)-aminoindan, has demonstrated favourable pharmacological activity in experimental studies. Rasagiline has shown significant beneficial effects as monotherapy in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease. Monotherapy with rasagiline 1 or 2 mg once daily significantly attenuated the worsening of symptoms, compared with placebo, in patients with early Parkinson's disease in a randomised, double-blind trial (n = 404). Furthermore, patients treated with rasagiline for 12 months had less functional decline than patients whose treatment was delayed for 6 months (n = 371). In patients with moderate-to-advanced disease receiving background therapy with levodopa and additional anti-parkinsonian medications (n = 1159), rasagiline 0.5 or 1 mg once daily reduced the daily 'off' time by 0.49-0.94 hours relative to that in placebo recipients in two randomised, double-blind trials. The efficacy of rasagiline 1 mg once daily was similar to entacapone 200 mg administered with each levodopa dose. Rasagiline was generally well tolerated in clinical trials as both monotherapy and when administered with other antiparkinsonian drugs. Adverse events with rasagiline were generally similar in frequency to those seen in placebo or entacapone recipients.

  2. Rasagiline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an arm or leg hallucinating (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist) extreme restlessness difficulty thinking clearly or understanding reality Rasagiline may cause other side effects. Call ...

  3. Update on ranolazine in the management of angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codolosa, J Nicolás; Acharjee, Subroto; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Mortality rates attributable to coronary heart disease have declined in recent years, possibly related to changes in clinical presentation patterns and use of proven secondary prevention strategies. Chronic stable angina (CSA) remains prevalent, and the goal of treatment is control of symptoms and reduction in cardiovascular events. Ranolazine is a selective inhibitor of the late sodium current in myocytes with anti-ischemic and metabolic properties. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2006 for use in patients with CSA. Multiple, randomized, placebo-controlled trials have shown that ranolazine improves functional capacity and decreases anginal episodes in CSA patients, despite a lack of a significant hemodynamic effect. Ranolazine did not improve cardiovascular mortality or affect incidence of myocardial infarction in the MERLIN (Metabolic Efficiency with Ranolazine for Less Ischemia in Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome)-TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) 36 trial, but significantly decreased the incidence of recurrent angina. More recently, ranolazine has been shown to have beneficial and potent antiarrhythmic effects, both on supraventricular and ventricular tachyarrhythmias, largely due to its inhibition of the late sodium current. Randomized controlled trials testing these effects are underway. Lastly, ranolazine appears to be cost-effective due to its ability to decrease angina-related hospitalizations and improve quality of life.

  4. Update on ranolazine in the management of angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codolosa JN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available J Nicolás Codolosa,1 Subroto Acharjee,1 Vincent M Figueredo1,2 1Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, 2Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Mortality rates attributable to coronary heart disease have declined in recent years, possibly related to changes in clinical presentation patterns and use of proven secondary prevention strategies. Chronic stable angina (CSA remains prevalent, and the goal of treatment is control of symptoms and reduction in cardiovascular events. Ranolazine is a selective inhibitor of the late sodium current in myocytes with anti-ischemic and metabolic properties. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2006 for use in patients with CSA. Multiple, randomized, placebo-controlled trials have shown that ranolazine improves functional capacity and decreases anginal episodes in CSA patients, despite a lack of a significant hemodynamic effect. Ranolazine did not improve cardiovascular mortality or affect incidence of myocardial infarction in the MERLIN (Metabolic Efficiency with Ranolazine for Less Ischemia in Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome-TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 36 trial, but significantly decreased the incidence of recurrent angina. More recently, ranolazine has been shown to have beneficial and potent antiarrhythmic effects, both on supraventricular and ventricular tachyarrhythmias, largely due to its inhibition of the late sodium current. Randomized controlled trials testing these effects are underway. Lastly, ranolazine appears to be cost-effective due to its ability to decrease angina-related hospitalizations and improve quality of life. Keywords: ranolazine, chronic stable angina, coronary artery disease

  5. Ranolazine attenuation of CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia.

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    Casey, Gregory P; Roberts, Jomar S; Paul, Dennis; Diamond, Ivan; Gould, Harry J

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether ranolazine, a new anti-angina medication, could be an effective analgesic agent in complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) produces an extended period of hyperalgesia that is associated with a dramatic up-regulation of Na(v) 1.7 sodium channels in populations of large and small dorsal root ganglion neurons related to the injection site. Ranolazine appears to produce its anti-angina effect through blocking the late sodium current associated with the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5. Because ranolazine also inhibits Na(v) 1.7, and 1.8, we sought to determine whether it could be an effective analgesic agent in CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Baseline determinations of withdrawal from thermal and mechanical stimulation were made in Sprague-Dawley rats ( approximately 300-350 x g). Following determination of baseline, one hindpaw in each group was injected with 0.1 mL of CFA. The contralateral paw received saline. Thermal and mechanical stimulation was repeated on the third day post-injection. Vehicle (0.9% isotonic saline; pH 3.0) or ranolazine was then administered in randomized and blinded doses either by intraperitoneal (ip) injection (0, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) or by oral gavage (po; 0, 20, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg). Animals were again tested 30 minutes (ip) and 1 hour (po) after drug administration. Ranolazine produced dose-dependant analgesia on mechanical allodynia induced by CFA injection, but had no effect on thermal hyperalgesia. Ranolazine's potential as a new option for managing both angina and chronic inflammatory pain warrants further study.

  6. Ranolazin--ny behandling af kronisk stabil angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2009-01-01

    Ranolazine sustained-release tablets were recently approved in the EU for chronic stable angina as add-on therapy when symptoms are not controlled with first-line agents. The mechanism of action is thought to involve inhibition of late sodium influx in the heart, which can reduce abnormalities...... of contractility and repolarisation associated with ischaemia. Ranolazine increases the exercise capacity, reduces angina, and diminishes the use of nitroglycerine. The drug has an excellent safety profile and may be a valuable addition to the treatment of chronic stable angina....

  7. Impact of ranolazine on clinical outcomes and healthcare resource utilization in patients with refractory angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hua; Packard, Kathleen A; Burns, Tammy L; Hilleman, Daniel E

    2013-12-01

    Ranolazine is a novel antianginal medication approved for the treatment of chronic angina. There are only limited data concerning the efficacy of ranolazine in reducing healthcare resource utilization in patients with refractory angina pectoris. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in refractory angina pectoris. In addition, the impact of ranolazine on healthcare resource utilization was assessed. Consecutive patients with refractory angina pectoris treated with ranolazine at two cardiology practices in the state of Nebraska were included in this analysis. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina class and frequency and type of healthcare resource consumption were determined during the 12 months prior to and the 12 months after initiation of ranolazine. A total of 150 pts (64 % men) with a mean age of 66 ± 12 years were included in this analysis. All patients had previously undergone coronary revascularization. Nitrates, β-adrenoceptor antagonists (β-blockers), and calcium antagonists (calcium channel blockers) were being used in 83, 97, and 75 % of patients, respectively. During ranolazine treatment, a significant improvement in CCS angina class was observed, with 23 patients improving by one class and no patient experiencing a deterioration in functional class (p = 0.025). A total of 53 side effects occurred in 28 (19 %) patients receiving ranolazine. Of those patients with side effects, four required dose reduction and seven required drug discontinuation. The frequency of clinic visits and emergency room visits was lower during ranolazine treatment, but the differences in frequency were not significant. The number of patients hospitalized and the number of hospitalizations were significantly lower during ranolazine therapy than in the pre-ranolazine study period (p = 0.002). Ranolazine improved the CCS angina class and reduced hospitalizations over a 12-month follow-up period in a group

  8. The use of rasagiline in Parkinson's disease.

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    Schapira, A H V

    2006-01-01

    Rasagiline is a novel, potent, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidative B developed for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug has shown efficacy in improving motor features in both early and advanced Parkinson's disease patients. The drug appears to be well tolerated and its once daily fixed dose formulation should make for excellent compliance. Rasagiline has also demonstrated important neuroprotective properties in both in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies. A provisional study of neuroprotection in a delayed start clinical trial of early PD patients has also suggested that this benefit may be translated to the clinic. Additional clinical trials are underway to confirm this.

  9. Adjunctive therapy in Parkinson's disease: the role of rasagiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaines KD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn D Gaines,1 Vanessa K Hinson21Department of Neurology, Aurora Advanced Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, 2Department of Neurosciences, Movement Disorders Program, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, currently affecting 1.5 million people in the US. In this review, we describe the diagnostic and pathological features of Parkinson's disease, as well as its clinical course. We then review pharmacologic treatments for the disease, with a particular focus on therapies adjunctive to levodopa and specifically the role of rasagiline. We review the four pivotal rasagiline trials, and discuss rasagiline and its use as adjunctive therapy for Parkinson's disease. Finally, we discuss potential side effects, drug interactions, and other practical aspects concerning the use of rasagiline in Parkinson's disease.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, treatment, rasagiline, clinical trials

  10. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegwater-Kim, Julie; Bortan, Elena

    2010-05-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor which has been approved for treatment of PD. Rasagiline inhibits MAO-B more potently than selegiline and has the advantage of once-daily dosing. In several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy as monotherapy in early PD and as adjunctive therapy in advanced PD. In addition, rasagiline has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies. The recently completed delayed-start ADAGIO (Attenuation of Disease Progression with Azilect Given Once-daily) trial suggests a potential disease-modifying effect for rasagiline 1 mg/day, though the clinical import of this finding has yet to be established.

  11. Efficacy of ranolazine in preventing atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery: Results from a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintan Trivedi, MD, MPH

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Ranolazine may prove beneficial in POAF prevention following cardiac surgeries. Although the pooled treatment effect is quite impressive with a reduction of more than 50% of risk of developing POAF, small number of studies and variation in ranolazine dose regimen in each study make our results inconclusive, but worthy of further investigation. That is why this result has to be interpreted as only hypothesis generating, rather than conclusion drawing.

  12. Drug Interaction between Sirolimus and Ranolazine in a Kidney Transplant Patient

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    Joanna C. Masters

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The case of a kidney transplant recipient who experienced a probable drug interaction between sirolimus and ranolazine is reported. Summary. The narrow therapeutic window of immunosuppressive therapy in transplant recipients requires close monitoring for potential drug-drug interactions. The patient, a 57-year-old Caucasian male kidney transplant recipient, was stable for years on sirolimus as his primary immunosuppressive agent and had a history of chronic angina, for which he was prescribed ranolazine. Upon addition and dose escalation of ranolazine, whole blood sirolimus levels more than tripled, rising to immeasurably high concentrations. After holding sirolimus on multiple occasions and reducing dosage more than 50%, blood levels returned to therapeutic range, while continuing ranolazine. Conclusion. Since ranolazine is a documented P-GP and CYP3A inhibitor, and sirolimus a known substrate for both pathways, it is proposed that ranolazine inhibition of P-GP and CYP3A4 contributed to the significant elevation in sirolimus exposure. No alternative causes for the rise in sirolimus exposure were found, and assessment with the Drug Interaction Probability Scale finds this interaction to be probable. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for this interaction to cause elevated sirolimus exposure and subsequent increase in clinical effect or toxicity, in this case overimmunosuppression.

  13. Efficacy of camostat mesilate against dyspepsia associated with non-alcoholic mild pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai, J.K.; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Matsumura, Yuji; Inami, Koichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential efficacy of camostat mesilate, a protease inhibitor, against dyspepsia associated with non-alcoholic mild pancreatic disease. Patients with upper abdominal pain suggesting pancreatic disease (persistent over hours, pain aggravated by ingestion of food, epigastric pain radiating to the back), without a history of alcohol consumption and who exhibited no abnormalities regarding serum amylase and lipase, ultrasonography, CT and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, were prescribed 200 mg camostat mesilate three times daily for 2 weeks. The patients were subjected to endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) while under treatment and were distributed into those who had 4 or more suggestive findings of chronic pancreatitis (suspected pancreatic disease group), 2 or 3 (equivalent group) and those with 1 or no findings (control group). Symptom severity was recorded before and after treatment using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Among 95 patients, 40 were in the suspected pancreatic disease group, 30 were in the equivalent group and 25 served as controls. A significant intra- and inter-group improvement of symptoms was observed not only in the suspected pancreatic disease group but also in the equivalent group. Camostat mesilate may serve as a therapeutic agent for patients with dyspepsia associated with mild pancreatic disease, who do not habitually drink alcohol. (author)

  14. Effects of Ranolazine on Astrocytes and Neurons in Primary Culture.

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    Martin Aldasoro

    Full Text Available Ranolazine (Rn is an antianginal agent used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris when angina is not adequately controlled by other drugs. Rn also acts in the central nervous system and it has been proposed for the treatment of pain and epileptic disorders. Under the hypothesis that ranolazine could act as a neuroprotective drug, we studied its effects on astrocytes and neurons in primary culture. We incubated rat astrocytes and neurons in primary cultures for 24 hours with Rn (10-7, 10-6 and 10-5 M. Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue exclusion assay, MTT conversion assay and LDH release assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase 3 activity assay. The effects of Rn on pro-inflammatory mediators IL-β and TNF-α was determined by ELISA technique, and protein expression levels of Smac/Diablo, PPAR-γ, Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD by western blot technique. In cultured astrocytes, Rn significantly increased cell viability and proliferation at any concentration tested, and decreased LDH leakage, Smac/Diablo expression and Caspase 3 activity indicating less cell death. Rn also increased anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ protein expression and reduced pro-inflammatory proteins IL-1 β and TNFα levels. Furthermore, antioxidant proteins Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD significantly increased after Rn addition in cultured astrocytes. Conversely, Rn did not exert any effect on cultured neurons. In conclusion, Rn could act as a neuroprotective drug in the central nervous system by promoting astrocyte viability, preventing necrosis and apoptosis, inhibiting inflammatory phenomena and inducing anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents.

  15. Ranolazine for the treatment of chronic stable angina: a cost-effectiveness analysis from the UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Craig I; Freemantle, Nick; Kohn, Christine G

    2015-11-06

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of ranolazine when added to standard-of-care (SoC) antianginals compared with SoC alone in patients with stable coronary disease experiencing ≥3 attacks/week. An economic model utilising a UK health system perspective, a 1-month cycle-length and a 1-year time horizon. Patients with stable coronary disease experiencing ≥3 attacks/week starting in 1 of 4 angina frequency health states based on Seattle Angina Questionnaire Angina Frequency (SAQAF) scores (100=no; 61-99=monthly; 31-60=weekly; 0-30=daily angina). Ranolazine added to SoC or SoC alone. Patients were allowed to transition between SAQAF states (first cycle only) or death (any cycle) based on probabilities derived from the randomised, controlled Efficacy of Ranolazine in Chronic Angina trial and other studies. Patients not responding to ranolazine in month 1 (not improving ≥1 SAQAF health state) discontinued ranolazine and were assumed to behave like SoC patients. Costs (£2014) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for patients receiving and not receiving ranolazine. Ranolazine patients lived a mean of 0.701 QALYs at a cost of £5208. Those not receiving ranolazine lived 0.662 QALYs at a cost of £5318. The addition of ranolazine to SoC was therefore a dominant economic strategy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was sensitive to ranolazine cost; exceeding £20,000/QALY when ranolazine's cost was >£203/month. Ranolazine remained a dominant strategy when indirect costs were included and mortality rates were assumed to increase with worsening severity of SAQAF health states. Monte Carlo simulation found ranolazine to be a dominant strategy in ∼71% of 10,000 iterations. Although UK-specific data on ranolazine's efficacy and safety are lacking, our analysis suggest ranolazine added to SoC in patients with weekly or daily angina is likely cost-effective from a UK health system perspective. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  16. Rasagiline in treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Nayak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Lakshmi Nayak1, Claire Henchcliffe21Department of Neurology; 2Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USAAbstract: Rasagiline (N-propargyl-1 (R-aminoindan is a novel propargylamine, irreversible, selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor for treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD, a progressive condition associated with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Rasagiline inhibits striatal dopamine metabolism, thereby providing relief from motor symptoms of PD. It may be dosed once daily and, unlike selegiline, it is metabolized to non-amphetamine compounds. In a large clinical trial, rasagiline has proved effective, safe, and well tolerated in early PD as monotherapy. In two phase III clinical trials in advanced PD with motor fluctuations, rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa significantly decreases “off” time. In animal models of PD, data supports a neuroprotective effect of rasagiline, and its active metabolite aminoindan. Analysis of delayed-start clinical trial suggests the potential for disease modification, and further trials are examining this effect.Keywords: rasagiline, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, propargylamine, Parkinson’s disease

  17. Effects of ranolazine on ischemic threshold, coronary sinus blood flow, and myocardial metabolism in coronary artery disease.

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    Bagger, J P; Bøtker, H E; Thomassen, A; Nielsen, T T

    1997-07-01

    Cytoprotection or metabolic modulation is a new principle in the treatment of angina pectoris. The effect of ranolazine (a cytoprotective drug) on ischemic threshold, coronary sinus blood flow, and myocardial metabolism was evaluated by means of two pacing sequences in nine male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and in eight male controls. Ranolazine was given as an intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion; the mean total dose was 32.7 mg and 31.7 mg in patients and controls, respectively. Angina pectoris was relieved in two patients after ranolazine but pacing time to pain was unchanged in the remaining patients. Maximal ST depression was lower (p = 0.02), but pacing time to maximal and to 1-mm ST depression remained unchanged after the drug. Ranolazine had no overall influence on coronary sinus blood flow, cardiac oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and heart rate. Cardiac uptake of free fatty acids (FFA) was reduced (p = 0.01), and net uptakes of glucose (p = 0.07) and lactate (p = 0.06) tended to be lower after ranolazine in CAD patients and controls. Ranolazine had no direct influence on cardiac exchange of glutamate, alanine, and citrate or on the arterial concentration of any metabolite. In the present study ranolazine had minimal clinical effects. A decrease in myocardial FFA utilization, however, allows greater myocardial glucose oxidation, which may increase the energy production in relation to oxygen availability.

  18. Rasagiline for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Fossati, Chiara; Torti, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Rasagiline is a potent, selective, irreversible Monoamine Oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitor, developed to prolong the action of dopamine in the brain. It has been demonstrated that rasagiline can improve motor and some non-motor symptoms (NMS) in both early and advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and it also exhibits neuroprotective and antiapoptotic properties. The objective of this review, performed by a Medline search on the most recent papers investigating the therapeutic effects of rasagiline, is to describe the role of rasagiline in the schedule of treatment of early and advanced PD patients. It will then focus on its role in treating NMS, fatigue, early morning off and cognitive decline, which heavily affect quality of life for PD patients. Rasagiline is an efficacious, well-tolerated, easy to use drug. The drug has been extensively studied and has proven its efficacy in monotherapy and in combination with any other antiparkinsonian therapy. It proved to be efficacious in reducing 'off' time and in improving early morning 'off' but also some NMS, thus enhancing the therapeutic approach to PD.

  19. Long-term efficacy of rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Mark F; Hauser, Robert A; Hurtig, Howard I; Ondo, William G; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Goren, Tamar; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl J

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to follow the long-term efficacy, safety, and tolerability of rasagiline for Parkinson's disease (PD) with data collected from all patients who had ever taken rasagiline during the 12-month TEMPO monotherapy trial (N = 398) and subsequent open-label extension. Patients were followed for up to 6.5 years with a mean of 3.5 +/- 2.1 years. After 12 months, additional PD medications were added as required. Of patients remaining in the trial at 2 years, 46% were maintained on rasagiline monotherapy. The majority of patients received a dopamine agonist prior to levodopa as the first additional dopaminergic agent. Analysis using a Kaplan-Meier method indicated that by 5.4 years only 25% of patients progressed to Hoehn & Yahr stage III. Rasagiline was well tolerated, with 11.3% of patients (45/398) withdrawing because of an adverse event. Rasagiline therapy for PD was effective, well tolerated, and safe in this long-term trial.

  20. Efficacy of rasagiline for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Li-Bo; Li, Dan; Lei, Ke; Liu, Song-Yan

    2017-08-01

    Rasagiline is a second-generation potent selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B. The aim of the study was to analyze the effectiveness of rasagiline in treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), both as monotherapy and combination therapy. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until 9 March 2016 using the keywords: Rasagiline, Azilect, Parkinson's disease. Randomized controlled trials of patients with PD who were randomized to treatment with rasagiline or placebo were included. Outcomes were unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) and the three subscales. Ten studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 2709 patients were evaluated. The overall analysis revealed a significant improvement in change of total UPDRS scores in 1 mg/day and 2 mg/day rasagiline groups compared to placebo. Significant improvement in Part I (Mentation) of UPDRS scores was observed in 1 mg/day, but not in 2 mg/day rasagiline treatment group. Part II (ADL) and Part III (Motor) subscales significantly improved with both doses of rasagiline. Both monotherapy and combination therapy significantly improved total UPDRS scores. Our results confirm the efficacy of rasagiline in PD. Further studies are required to establish the optimal dose of rasagiline, as well as to determine its effectiveness in different combination therapy protocols. KEY MESSAGES Rasagiline treatment was associated with significant improvement of UPDRS scores and the scores of the subscales. Both monotherapy and combination therapy significantly improved total UPDRS scores. Effect of rasagiline on total UPDRS scores was not dose-dependent.

  1. Rasagiline in the pharmacotherapy of Parkinson's disease--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascol, Olivier

    2005-10-01

    Despite the current efficacious symptomatic approaches, the search is on for new therapies for Parkinson's disease that can control the cardinal symptoms of the disease (tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia), control/prevent motor complications induced by long-term levodopa, act on non-motor disease symptoms (dementia, dysautonomia, pain, insomnia, falls) and halt disease progression. Rasagiline is a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor that has demonstrated efficacy against the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease when used as monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease, and as an adjunct to levodopa in advanced disease stages. It reduces the duration and severity of poor symptom response episodes in fluctuating patients. Preliminary results allow discussion of putative effects of rasagiline on some non-motor signs and disease progression. This article outlines the evidence surrounding the efficacy and safety of rasagiline, and discusses its potential to address some of the currently unmet needs of Parkinson's disease therapy.

  2. Antiarrhythmic Effects of Combining Dofetilide and Ranolazine in a Model of Acutely Induced Atrial Fibrillation in Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helena; Kjær, Line; Haugaard, Maria Mathilde

    2018-01-01

    reducing the likelihood of adverse side effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effective doses of dofetilide and ranolazine can be reduced if the drugs are combined. METHODS: Dofetilide, ranolazine, and a combination of these were administered in 4 incremental dosing regimens...... to horses with acutely pacing-induced AF. Time to cardioversion, atrial effective refractory period, and AF vulnerability and duration were assessed. RESULTS: Of 8 horses, 6 cardioverted to sinus rhythm after infusion with a combination of 0.889 μg/kg dofetilide and 0.104 mg/kg ranolazine. Two horses...... cardioverted with 0.104 mg/kg ranolazine alone, and 3 cardioverted with 0.889 μg/kg dofetilide alone. The combination therapy decreased AF vulnerability (P effective refractory period was detected with any of the drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The combination...

  3. Ranolazine for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic angina pectoris in Greece: a cost-utility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Parissis, John; Kanakakis, John; Gourzoulidis, George; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2015-12-18

    To conduct an economic evaluation comparing ranolazine as add-on therapy to standard-of-care (SoC) with SoC alone in patients with stable angina who did not respond adequately to first line therapy, in Greece. A decision tree model was locally adapted in the Greek setting to evaluate the cost-utility of ranolazine during a 6-month period. The analysis was conducted from a third-party payer perspective. The clinical inputs were extracted from the published literature. The cost inputs considered in the model reflect drug acquisition, hospitalizations, vascular interventions and monitoring of patients. The resource utilization data were obtained from 3 local experts. All costs refer to the year 2014. Cost-effectiveness was assessed by means of the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained with the ranolazine as add-on therapy relative to SoC alone (ICER). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed. Ranolazine as add-on therapy was more costly compared to SoC alone, as the 6-month total cost per patient was €1170 and € 984, respectively. Patients received ranolazine plus SoC and SoC alone gained 0.3155 QALYs and 0.2752 QALYs, respectively. Ranolazine plus SoC resulted in an ICER equal to €4620 per QALY gained, well below the threshold of €34,000 per QALY gained. The PSA showed that the likelihood of ranolazine plus SoC being cost-effective at the threshold of €34,000 per QALY gained was 100 %. Τhe results suggest that ranolazine as add-on treatment may be a cost-effective alternative for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic stable angina in Greece.

  4. Evaluation of different substrates for inkjet printing of rasagiline mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Janßen, Eva Maria; Breitenbach, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate applicability of the different model substrates, namely orodispersible films (ODFs), porous copy paper sheets, and water impermeable transparency films (TFs) in preparation of the inkjet-printed drug-delivery systems. Rasagiline mesylate (RM...

  5. Rapid onset of efficacy of rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Vitaliani, Roberta; Volpe, Daniele; Capozzoli, Francesca; Baroni, Luciana; Belgrado, Enrico; Borsato, Carlo; Gioulis, Manuela; Marchini, Corrado; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Rasagiline is a monoamine oxidase type-B inhibitor used as monotherapy or in addition to levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). This naturalistic single-blind study was aimed at evaluating the rapidity of onset effect of rasagiline on motor symptoms in a cohort of early relatively elderly PD patients. 102 outpatients (55 males, median age 71 years) have been selected: 26 were PD therapy-naive and 76 received rasagiline as add-on therapy. The third section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSIII) and the Hoehn-Yahr (HY) scale were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 4 weeks thereafter. The mean UPDRS III total score (-6.7 at week 1 and -8.9 at week 4) and single items, as well as mean HY score (-0.40 at week 1 and -0.67 at week 4), significantly decreased from baseline (p or ≤71 years. Rasagiline had a rapid therapeutic effect from the first week of therapy, which further improved at 4 weeks. The rapid onset of action and the absence of a dose titration are important issues in the management of the PD patient.

  6. Rasagiline. Parkinson's disease: a simple me-too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease, rasagiline, either alone (in early stage disease) or combined with levodopa, provides nothing new in terms of efficacy or tolerability. It is better to continue using one of the many anti-parkinson drugs with which we have more experience rather than expose patients to a new drug which offers no advantages.

  7. Expression of c-kit receptor in human cholangiocarcinoma and in vivo treatment with imatinib mesilate in chimeric mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenz, Thomas; Caca, Karel; Blüthner, Thilo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Mössner, Joachim; Wiedmann, Marcus

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the c-kit expression in biliary tract cancer cell lines and histological sections from patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vitro treatment with imatinib mesilate. METHODS: The protein expression of c-kit in the human biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 and histological sections from 19 patients with extrahepatic CC was assessed by immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. The anti-proliferative effect of imatinib mesilate on biliary tract cancer cell lines Mz-ChA-2 and EGI-1 was studied in vitro by automated cell counting. In addition, immunodeficient NMRI mice (TaconicTM) were subcutaneously injected with 5 x 106 cells of cell lines MzChA-2 and EGI-1. After having reached a tumour volume of 200 mm3, daily treatment was started intraperitoneally with imatinib mesilate at a dose of 50 mg/kg or normal saline (NS). Tumor volume was calculated with a Vernier caliper. After 14 d, mice were sacrificed with tumors excised and tumor mass determined. RESULTS: Immunoblotting revealed presence of c-kit in Mz-ChA-2 and absence in EGI-1 cells. Immunocytochemistry with c-kit antibodies displayed a cytoplasmatic and membraneous localization of receptor protein in Mz-ChA-2 cells and absence of c-kit in EGI-1 cells. c-kit was expressed in 7 of 19 (37%) extrahepatic human CC tissue samples, 2 showed a moderate and 5 a rather weak immunostaining. Imatinib mesilate at a low concentration of 5 µmol/L caused a significant growth inhibition in the c-kit positive cell line Mz-ChA-2 (31%), but not in the c-kit negative cell line EGI-1 (0%) (P < 0.05). Imatinib mesilate at an intermediate concentration of 10 µmol/L inhibited cellular growth of both cell lines (51% vs 57%). Imatinib mesilate at a higher concentration of 20 µmol/L seemed to have a general toxic effect on both cell lines. The IC50 values were 9.7 µmol/L and 11 µmol/L, respectively. After 14 d of in vitro

  8. Randomized trial of betahistine mesilate tablets as augmentation for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine in treating vestibular paroxysmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue H

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hui Xue,1,2 Wenping Xiang,2 Yichuan Yu,3 Guorong Liu,2 Yi Chong,2 Jiying Zhou1 1Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 2Department of Neurology, Baotou Central Hospital, Inner Mongolia, Baotou, China; 3Department of Emergency, Yongchuan Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China Background: Vestibular paroxysmia (VP is a rare episodic peripheral vestibular disorder. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and acceptability of carbamazepine (CBZ plus betahistine mesilate tablets (BMT (CBZ+BMT and oxcarbazepine (OXC plus BMT (OXC+BMT in treating VP, and investigated whether the synergistic effect could be increased along with the increased dose of BMT.Methods: VP patients were recruited and randomly assigned to receive CBZ+BMT or OXC+BMT. The doses of CBZ and OXC were set to 200 and 300 mg/time, twice daily, respectively. The doses of BMT were set to 12 and 18 mg/time, twice daily. Half of the patients in each group received BMT 12 mg/time and the other half received BMT 18 mg/time. The treatment was continued for 12 weeks. The vertigo frequency, vertigo score, vertigo duration, response rate, and drug-related side effects were analyzed.Results: In total, 92 patients in the CBZ+BMT group and 93 patients in the OXC+BMT group completed this trial. After 12 weeks of treatment, the two groups had similar average vertigo frequency, average vertigo score, average vertigo duration, and response rate. But the incidence of side effects was significantly higher in the CBZ+BMT group than in the OXC+BMT group (p=0.04. Subgroup analysis found that patients receiving BMT (18 mg had greater reductions in average vertigo frequency, average vertigo duration, and average vertigo score, and higher response rates than patients receiving BMT (12 mg.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that OXC+BMT may be suitable as an alternative method in VP patients with CBZ

  9. [Rasagiline is not for all Parkinson disease patients: the ADAGIO study].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, T. van; Boon, A.J.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Rasagiline is a MAO-B inhibitor that is currently registered for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson disease. The ADAGIO trial studied the potential disease-modifying properties of rasagiline in 1100 patients with Parkinson disease, using an innovative 'delayed start' design. Patients were

  10. A literature review to evaluate the economic value of ranolazine for the symptomatic treatment of chronic angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellopoulou, Katerina; Kourlaba, Georgia; Maniadakis, Nikos; Vardas, Panagiotis

    2016-05-15

    To conduct a systematic review of the evidence regarding the economic value of ranolazine relative to standard-of-care (SOC) for the treatment of symptomatic chronic stable angina (CSA). Electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords. The identified studies were independently reviewed by two investigators against pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Their data were extracted using a relevant form and consequently were synthesized. Studies were also evaluated using the Quality of Health Economic Studies scale. The main outcomes considered were the cost and effectiveness for each comparator and the incremental cost per quality-adjusted-life year (QALY) gained. Six studies were included in the review. Five of these assessed the cost-utility of ranolazine added to SOC, compared to SOC alone, using decision trees or Markov models whereas one was a retrospective cost evaluation study. The analysis was conducted from a payer perspective in five studies and from a societal perspective in one study with the time horizon varying between six months and a year. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), ranged from €4000 to €15,000 per QALY gained. Ranolazine appears to be dominant or cost-effective, mainly due to its ability to decrease angina-related hospitalizations and also due to a marginal improvement in quality of life. The acquisition cost of ranolazine was the variable with the greatest impact upon the ICER. The existing evidence, although limited, indicates that ranolazine may be a dominant or cost-effective therapy option, for the treatment of patients with symptomatic CSA. Further research is required to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ranolazine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leegwater-Kim, Julie; Bortan, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor which has been approved for treatment of PD. Rasagiline inhibits MAO-B more potently than selegiline and has the advantage of once-daily dosing. In several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy as monotherapy in early PD and as adjunctive therapy in advanced PD. In addition, rasagiline has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies. The recently completed delayed-start ADAGIO (Attenuation of Disease Progression with Azilect Given Once-daily) trial suggests a potential disease-modifying effect for rasagiline 1 mg/day, though the clinical import of this finding has yet to be established. PMID:20517484

  12. Determining the efficacy of rasagiline in reducing bradykinesia among Parkinson's disease patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Dee E; Buck, Philip O

    2011-09-01

    Bradykinesia has a significant impact on the lives of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Consequently, treating this symptom is of particular concern for patients and clinicians. A number of studies have documented the efficacy of rasagiline in reducing the severity of PD symptoms. To summarize studies that specifically examined the impact of rasagiline on bradykinesia symptoms in PD patients across disease severity. The EMBASE database was searched for relevant articles published between 2000 and November 2010. Three studies were identified that explicitly examined the effect of rasagiline on the bradykinesia subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor examination. In each, 1 mg/day rasagiline significantly reduced bradykinesia scores in patients. As a monotherapy or an adjunctive therapy, rasagiline is an effective drug for reducing the severity of bradykinesia in PD patients. Copyright © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  13. Clinical trials with rasagiline: evidence for short-term and long-term effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew

    2006-05-23

    Rasagiline (N-propargyl-1 (R)-aminoindan) is a selective, potent irreversible inhibitor of MAO-B that possesses neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic properties in a variety of in vitro and in vivo animal models relevant to Parkinson's disease (PD). Several randomized controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of rasagiline as monotherapy in PD and as adjunctive therapy for patients receiving levodopa. In addition, the 1-year randomized, delayed-start analysis of the TEMPO study suggests that rasagiline may slow the rate of progression of PD. The randomized delayed-start paradigm has potential to differentiate short-term symptomatic effects from long-term effects of anti-parkinsonian agents. In the future, long-term trials to examine the potential disease-modifying effects of rasagiline, which incorporate biological markers as well as clinical endpoints, may further elucidate the role of rasagiline in the treatment of both early and advanced PD.

  14. Ranolazine for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic angina pectoris in Greece: a cost-utility study

    OpenAIRE

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Parissis, John; Kanakakis, John; Gourzoulidis, George; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Background To conduct an economic evaluation comparing ranolazine as add-on therapy to standard-of-care (SoC) with SoC alone in patients with stable angina who did not respond adequately to first line therapy, in Greece. Methods A decision tree model was locally adapted in the Greek setting to evaluate the cost-utility of ranolazine during a 6-month period. The analysis was conducted from a third-party payer perspective. The clinical inputs were extracted from the published literature. The co...

  15. Rasagiline: A second-generation monoamine oxidase type-B inhibitor for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack J; Ly, Anh-Vuong

    2006-05-15

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and safety of rasagiline are reviewed. Rasagiline is a novel, investigational propargylamine that irreversibly and selectively inhibits monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B). Rasagiline demonstrates complete and selective inhibition of MAO-B and is at least five times more potent than selegiline. Unlike selegiline, which is metabolized to amphetamine derivatives, rasagiline is biotransformed to the nonamphetamine compound aminoindan. Clinical studies have revealed that rasagiline is associated with improved outcomes in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD) and also reduces "off" time in patients with moderate to advanced PD with motor fluctuations. Rasagiline is rapidly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract and readily crosses the blood-brain barrier. The optimal therapeutic dosage is 0.5-1 mg administered orally once daily. Rasagiline appears to be well tolerated, although elderly patients may be more prone to treatment-emergent adverse cardiovascular and psychiatric effects. At the recommended therapeutic dosage of up to 1 mg once daily, tyramine restriction is unnecessary. In addition to MAO-B inhibition, rasagiline has demonstrated neuroprotective properties in experimental laboratory models. The mechanisms whereby rasagiline exerts neuroprotective effects are multifactorial and include upregulation of cellular antioxidant activity and antiapoptotic factors. Rasagiline is an investigational selective and irreversible inhibitor of MAO-B that has demonstrated efficacy and safety for the treatment of PD. Whether rasagiline is associated with clinically significant neuroprotection is the subject of ongoing clinical trials.

  16. Randomized trial of betahistine mesilate tablets as augmentation for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine in treating vestibular paroxysmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Xiang, Wenping; Yu, Yichuan; Liu, Guorong; Chong, Yi; Zhou, Jiying

    2018-01-01

    Vestibular paroxysmia (VP) is a rare episodic peripheral vestibular disorder. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and acceptability of carbamazepine (CBZ) plus betahistine mesilate tablets (BMT) (CBZ+BMT) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) plus BMT (OXC+BMT) in treating VP, and investigated whether the synergistic effect could be increased along with the increased dose of BMT. VP patients were recruited and randomly assigned to receive CBZ+BMT or OXC+BMT. The doses of CBZ and OXC were set to 200 and 300 mg/time, twice daily, respectively. The doses of BMT were set to 12 and 18 mg/time, twice daily. Half of the patients in each group received BMT 12 mg/time and the other half received BMT 18 mg/time. The treatment was continued for 12 weeks. The vertigo frequency, vertigo score, vertigo duration, response rate, and drug-related side effects were analyzed. In total, 92 patients in the CBZ+BMT group and 93 patients in the OXC+BMT group completed this trial. After 12 weeks of treatment, the two groups had similar average vertigo frequency, average vertigo score, average vertigo duration, and response rate. But the incidence of side effects was significantly higher in the CBZ+BMT group than in the OXC+BMT group ( p =0.04). Subgroup analysis found that patients receiving BMT (18 mg) had greater reductions in average vertigo frequency, average vertigo duration, and average vertigo score, and higher response rates than patients receiving BMT (12 mg). These results demonstrated that OXC+BMT may be suitable as an alternative method in VP patients with CBZ hypersensitivity, and the synergistic effect could be increased along with the increased dose of BMT.

  17. Double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of rasagiline as monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Matthew B; Marek, Kenneth L; Friedman, Joseph; Hauser, Robert A; LeWitt, Peter A; Tarsy, Daniel; Olanow, C Warren

    2004-08-01

    Rasagiline (N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan) mesylate is a potent, selective, and irreversible monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor. This study was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of rasagiline monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease (PD) patients not receiving levodopa. The study was performed as a multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, 10-week study. Fifty-six PD patients were randomly assigned to rasagiline mesylate 1, 2, or 4 mg once daily, or placebo. A 3-week dose-escalation period was followed by a 7-week maintenance phase. At week 10, the mean (+/-SE) changes from baseline in total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score were -1.8 (+/-1.3), -3.6 (+/-1.7), -3.6 (+/-1.2), and -0.5 (+/-0.8) in the rasagiline 1, 2, and 4 mg/day and placebo groups, respectively. Analysis of responders showed that 28% of patients (12 of 43) receiving rasagiline had an improvement in total UPDRS score of greater than 30%, compared with none of the patients receiving placebo (P rasagiline-treated and placebo-treated patients were similar. These results suggest that rasagiline monotherapy is well tolerated and efficacious in early PD. Copyright 2004 Movement Disorder Society

  18. Rationale and design of the ranolazine PH-RV study: a multicentred randomised and placebo-controlled study of ranolazine to improve RV function in patients with non-group 2 pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuchi; Forfia, Paul R; Vaidya, Anjali; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Park, Myung H; Ramani, Gautam; Chan, Stephen Y; Waxman, Aaron B

    2018-01-01

    A major determining factor on outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is right ventricular (RV) function. Ranolazine, which is currently approved for chronic stable angina, has been shown to improve RV function in an animal model and has been shown to be safe in small human studies with PAH. We aim to study the effect of ranolazine on RV function using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with pulmonary hypertension (non-group 2 patients) and monitor the effect of ranolazine on metabolism using metabolic profiling and changes of microRNA. This study is a longitudinal, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre proof-of-concept study in 24 subjects with pulmonary hypertension and RV dysfunction treated with ranolazine over 6 months. Subjects who meet the protocol definition of RV dysfunction (CMR RV ejection fraction (EF) <45%) will be randomised to ranolazine or placebo with a ratio of 2:1. Enrolled subjects will be assessed for functional class, 6 min walk test and health outcome based on SF-36 tool. Peripheral blood will be obtained for N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide, metabolic profiling, and microRNA at baseline and the conclusion of the treatment period. CMR will be performed at baseline and the conclusion of the treatment period. The primary outcome is change in RVEF. The exploratory outcomes include clinical, other CMR parameters, metabolic and microRNA changes. The trial protocol was approved by Institutional Review Boards. The trial findings will be disseminated in scientific journals and meetings. NCT01839110 and NCT02829034; Pre-results.

  19. A controlled, randomized, delayed-start study of rasagiline in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Treatment with rasagiline mesylate, an irreversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, improves symptoms of early Parkinson disease (PD). Preclinical studies suggest that this compound may also modify the progression of PD. To compare the effects of early and later initiation of rasagiline on progression of disability in patients with PD. Double-blind, parallel-group, randomized, delayed-start clinical trial. Four hundred four subjects with early PD, not requiring dopaminergic therapy, enrolled at 32 sites in the United States and Canada. Subjects were randomized to receive rasagiline, 1 or 2 mg/d, for 1 year or placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months. Change in total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score from baseline to 12 months. Three hundred seventy-one subjects were included in the 1-year efficacy analysis. Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 1 year had a 2.29-unit smaller increase in mean adjusted total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score compared with subjects treated with placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months (P =.01). The mean adjusted difference between the placebo/rasagiline, 2 mg/d, group and those receiving rasagiline, 1 mg/d, for 1 year was -1.82 unit on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (P =.05). Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 and 1 mg/d, for 12 months showed less functional decline than subjects whose treatment was delayed for 6 months.

  20. Effect of rasagiline as adjunct therapy to levodopa on severity of OFF in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, F; Rabey, J M

    2011-12-01

    The LARGO study demonstrated that rasagiline 1 mg/day as adjunct to levodopa significantly reduces OFF time to the same magnitude as adjunct entacapone. This substudy of LARGO aimed to assess the effect of rasagiline and entacapone on the motor symptoms of PD during the practically defined OFF state. LARGO was a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial that assessed the efficacy and safety of rasagiline (1 mg/day), entacapone (200 mg with each levodopa dose), and placebo in 687 levodopa-treated PD patients with motor fluctuations. A substudy of LARGO measured UPDRS motor scores in the practically defined OFF state in 32 rasagiline, 36 entacapone, and 37 placebo patients. Treatment with rasagiline produced a significant improvement over placebo of 5.64 units in UPDRS motor OFF score (P = 0.013 vs. placebo). By contrast, the effect of adjunct entacapone was not significant (P = 0.14 vs. placebo). Whereas rasagiline also showed a trend in reducing the UPDRS-ADL OFF score (P = 0.058 vs. placebo), no such trend was noted for entacapone (P = 0.26 vs. placebo). Retrospective analysis, using the Bonferroni correction, of UPDRS motor subdomains further revealed that rasagiline, but not entacapone, significantly improved bradykinesia (P rasagiline 1 mg/day is effective in reducing the severity of motor symptoms in the OFF state. This suggests a continuous effect of rasagiline 1 mg/day throughout the day and night and is consistent with its extended duration of therapeutic action. © 2011 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  1. Rasagiline in Parkinson's disease: a review based on meta-analysis of clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez-Mínguez, Sara; Solís-García Del Pozo, Julián; Jordán, Joaquín

    2013-08-01

    Rasagiline (Azilect(®)) is a selective and irreversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, which is well tolerated, safe, improves motor symptoms, and prevents motor complications in Parkinson's disease (PD). Rasagiline is effective in monotherapy and as an adjunct to levodopa-therapy, with beneficial effects on quality-of-life parameters in early and late stages of PD. In this review, we compare the efficacy of rasagiline versus placebo for decreasing PD symptoms. Major databases (Medline, the Cochrane Library) were systematically searched to identify and select clinical randomized control trials of rasagiline. The Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) for rasagiline monotherapy and reduction in off-time for combined treatment were the outcomes assessed. Rasagiline monotherapy, in early stages of the disease, reduces the UPDRS score [-3.06 (95% CI -3.81 to -2.31, prasagiline 1mg/day]. In combination with levodopa, 1mg/day of rasagiline reduced off-time [-0.93h (95% CI -1.17 to -0.69, prasagiline reduces the UPDRS score [-0.89 (95% CI from -1.78 to 0, p=0.05)] in trials with a delayed-start design, we found a disagreement between studies and doses, making it difficult to interpret this result. In conclusion, our results confirm the efficacy of rasagiline in PD, but the clinical significance of these data remains to be established. Furthermore, the delayed-start study design did not establish with certainty the neuroprotective effect of rasagiline. It is advisable to carry out comparative trials with other drugs used in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cost-utility of ranolazine for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic angina pectoris in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Vega, Alvaro; Ramos-Goñi, Juan Manuel; Villoro, Renata

    2014-12-01

    Ranolazine is an antianginal agent that was approved in the EU in 2008 as an add-on therapy for symptomatic chronic angina pectoris treatment in patients who are inadequately controlled by, or are intolerant to, first-line antianginal therapies. These patients' quality of life is significantly affected by more frequent angina events, which increase the risk of revascularization. To assess the cost-utility of ranolazine versus placebo as an add-on therapy for the symptomatic treatment of patients with chronic angina pectoris in Spain. A decision tree model with 1-year time horizon was designed. Transition probabilities and utility values for different angina frequencies were obtained from the literature. Costs were obtained from Spanish official DRGs for patients with chronic angina pectoris. We calculated the incremental cost-utility ratio of using ranolazine compared with a placebo. Sensitivity analyses, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, were performed. Acceptability curves and expected value of perfect information were calculated. The incremental cost-utility ratio was €8,455 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) per patient in Spain. Sensitivity analyses showed that if the decision makers' willingness to pay is €15,000 per QALY, the treatment with ranolazine will be cost effective at a 95 % level of confidence. The incremental cost-utility ratio is particularly sensitive to changes in utility values of those non-hospitalized patients with mild or moderate angina frequency. Ranolazine is a highly efficient add-on therapy for the symptomatic treatment of chronic angina pectoris in patients who are inadequately controlled by, or intolerant to, first-line antianginal therapies in Spain.

  3. The Use Of Oral Ranolazine To Convert New Or Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Review Of Experience With Implications For Possible "Pill In The Pocket" Approach To Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Murdock

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia requiring treatment. High dose oral anti-arrhythmics may cardiovert some paroxysmal AF. This "pill in pocket" approach has allowed patients to treat themselves on an as needed basis. Pro-arrhythmic concerns have limited the usefulness of this approach to patients without structural heart disease. Ranolazine is an anti-anginal agent, which inhibits abnormal late Na+ channel currents in cardiomyocytes and decreases sodium-calcium overload. Ranolazine is a potent inhibitor of after-depolarizations, which have been implicated in the initiation and propagation of AF. Because ranolazine has no known pro-arrhythmic effects, it could be useful as a safe "pill in the pocket" agent if it were effective in converting AF. We describe our experience using oral ranolazine to convert new or paroxysmal AF. Method: 2000 mg of ranolazine were administered to 18 patients with new (11 patients or paroxysmal (7 patients AF of at least 3, but not greater than 48 hours duration. Most patients (14 were in the hospital at the time ranolazine was administered. Age, sex, echocardiographic data, associated health conditions and structural heart disease were recorded. Successful conversion was defined as restoring sinus rhythm within 6 hours of ranolazine administration. Results: All but 1 patient had some form of structural heart disease and all but 2 patients had left atrial enlargement. Thirteen of 18 patients converted to sinus rhythm. No pro-arrhythmic effects, hemodynamic instability, adverse rate effects, or perceived intolerance (other than constipation were noted. The 72% conversion rate was comparable to other reported "pill in the pocket" protocols. Conclusion: High dose oral ranolazine shows utility as a possible safe agent to convert new or paroxysmal AF. Lack of blinded controls and small numbers limits the power of this observation.

  4. Role of rasagiline in treating Parkinson?s disease: Effect on disease progression

    OpenAIRE

    Malaty, Irene A; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2009-01-01

    Rasagiline is a second generation, selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor. It has demonstrated efficacy in monotherapy for early Parkinson?s disease (PD) patients in one large randomized, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson?s Disease Outpatients), and has shown ability to reduce off time in more advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations in two large placebo-controlled trials (Parkinson?s Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety in the Tr...

  5. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of rasagiline as adjunctive therapy in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, E; Stern, M B

    2012-02-01

    Rasagiline, an MAO-B inhibitor, is indicated for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this post hoc analysis, the efficacy, safety and tolerability of rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa were compared with placebo in elderly (≥70 years) and younger (Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety on the Treatment of 'OFF' and Lasting effect in Adjunct therapy with Rasagiline Given Once daily randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with the primary efficacy end-point being the reduction from baseline in daily OFF time. Secondary efficacy end-points included scores for Clinical Global Improvement (CGI)-Examiner during ON time, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)-ADL during OFF time, UPDRS-Motor during ON time and total daily ON time with and without troublesome dyskinesia. Tolerability was evaluated from adverse events (AEs) in the two age groups. Rasagiline decreased daily OFF time versus placebo (Prasagiline but were not significant. Between-group comparisons (≥70 vs. efficacy was unaffected by age for all end-points (P>0.1), and rasagiline was well tolerated amongst both groups of patients with a comparable incidence of total and dopaminergic AEs (P>0.1). Adjunct rasagiline is efficacious and well tolerated in elderly non-demented patients (≥70 years) with moderate to advanced PD. Confirmation of the efficacy and safety of rasagiline in the elderly patient subgroup is especially relevant because of the increasing number of elderly patients with PD. © 2011 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  6. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leegwater-Kim, Julie; Bortan, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson?s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor which has been approved for treatment of PD. Rasagiline inhibits MAO-B more potently than selegiline and has the advantage of once-daily dosing. In several large, randomiz...

  7. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Leegwater-Kim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Julie Leegwater-Kim1, Elena Bortan21Tufts University School of Medicine and Department of Neurology, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA, USAAbstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B inhibitor which has been approved for treatment of PD. Rasagiline inhibits MAO-B more potently than selegiline and has the advantage of once-daily dosing. In several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy as monotherapy in early PD and as adjunctive therapy in advanced PD. In addition, rasagiline has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo studies. The recently completed delayed-start ADAGIO (Attenuation of Disease Progression with Azilect Given Once-daily trial suggests a potential disease-modifying effect for rasagiline 1 mg/day, though the clinical import of this finding has yet to be established.Keywords: rasagiline, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, Parkinson’s disease

  8. Rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in an alpha-synuclein mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine H Petit

    Full Text Available Impaired olfaction is an early pre-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease. The neuropathology underlying olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is unknown, however α-synuclein accumulation/aggregation and altered neurogenesis might play a role. We characterized olfactory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease expressing human wild-type α-synuclein under the control of the mouse α-synuclein promoter. Preliminary clinical observations suggest that rasagiline, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, improves olfaction in Parkinson's disease. We therefore examined whether rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in this Parkinson's disease model and investigated the role of olfactory bulb neurogenesis. α-Synuclein mice were progressively impaired in their ability to detect odors, to discriminate between odors, and exhibited alterations in short-term olfactory memory. Rasagiline treatment rescued odor detection and odor discrimination abilities. However, rasagiline did not affect short-term olfactory memory. Finally, olfactory changes were not coupled to alterations in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We conclude that rasagiline reverses select olfactory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The findings correlate with preliminary clinical observations suggesting that rasagiline ameliorates olfactory deficits in Parkinson's disease.

  9. A controlled trial of rasagiline in early Parkinson disease: the TEMPO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    Monotherapy with rasagiline mesylate may be useful in early Parkinson disease (PD). To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the selective monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline. Multicenter, 26-week, parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Academically based movement disorders clinics. Patients with early PD not requiring dopaminergic therapy (n = 404). Research participants were randomized to rasagiline mesylate at dosages of 1 mg or 2 mg per day or matching placebo. A 1-week escalation period was followed by a 25-week maintenance period. The primary prespecified measure of efficacy was the change in the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scal score between baseline and 26 weeks of treatment, comparing each active treatment group with the placebo group. Monotherapy with rasagiline was effective in this 26-week study. The adjusted effect size for the total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was -4.20 units comparing 1 mg of rasagiline and placebo (95% confidence interval, -5.66 to -2.73 units; PRasagiline is effective as monotherapy for patients with early PD. The 2 dosages in this trial were both effective relative to placebo. Further study is warranted to evaluate the longer-term effects of rasagiline in PD.

  10. Comprehensive review of rasagiline, a second-generation monoamine oxidase inhibitor, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack J; Swope, David M; Dashtipour, Khashayar

    2007-09-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with selectivity and specificity for MAO type B (MAO-B) prolong the duration of action of both endogenously and exogenously derived dopamine. Rasagiline [N-propargyl-l(R)-aminoindan] is a second-generation propargylamine pharmacophore that selectively and irreversibly inhibits brain MAO-B and is specifically designed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to review the pharmacology, tolerability, and clinical efficacy of rasagiline in the treatment of PD. MEDLINE (1966-April 2007), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-April 2007) were searched for original research and review articles published in English. The search terms were monoamine oxidase, neuroprotection, Parkinson disease, propargylamine, rasagiline, and selegiline. The reference lists of articles were also consulted, as was information provided by the manufacturer of rasagiline. Data from 63 clinical and laboratory studies were analyzed. Based on the results from those studies, we concluded that rasagiline PO QD, at the therapeutic dosage range of 0.5 to 1 rag/d, is effective and well tolerated and completely, selectively, and specifically inhibited MAO-B. Pharmacologically, rasagiline was found to be Rasagiline was effective both as monotherapy in early PD and as adjunctive treatment in patients with advancing PD and motor fluctuations. As monotherapy, rasagiline provided modest yet clinically meaningful benefit. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study found that, after 26 weeks of treatment, the adjusted effect size for total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score was -4.20 (95% CI, -5.66 to -2.73) for rasagiline 1 mg/d versus placebo (P rasagiline is initiated early (before the need for dopaminergic agents) rather than later. In patients with more advanced disease who received treatment with dopaminergic agents, rasagiline and entacapone were associated

  11. Rasagiline (TVP-1012): a new selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, David R P

    2006-12-01

    This article reviews the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, tolerability, drug-interaction potential, indications, dosing, and potential role of rasagiline mesylate, a new selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B (MAO-B) inhibitor, in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. A MEDLINE/PUBMED search (1986 through September 2006) was conducted to identify studies involving rasagiline written in English. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of these studies. All studies evaluating any aspect of rasagiline, including in vitro, in vivo (animal), and human studies, were reviewed. Rasagiline mesylate was developed with the goal of producing a selective MAO-B inhibitor that is not metabolized to (presumed) toxic metabolites (eg, amphetamine and methamphetamine, which are byproducts of the metabolism of selegiline, another selective MAO-B inhibitor). In vitro and in vivo data have confirmed the drug's selectivity for MAO-B. Rasagiline is almost completely eliminated by oxidative metabolism (catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 [CYP] isozyme 1A2) followed by renal excretion of conjugated parent compound and metabolites. Drug clearance is sufficiently slow to allow once-daily dosing. Several studies have documented its efficacy as monotherapy for early-stage disease and as adjunctive therapy in L-dopa recipients with motor fluctuations. As monotherapy, rasagiline is well tolerated with an adverse-effect profile similar to that of placebo. As adjunctive therapy, it exhibits the expected adverse effects of dopamine excess, which can be ameliorated by reducing the L-dopa dosage. CYP1A2 inhibitors slow the elimination of rasagiline and mandate dosage reduction. Hepatic impairment has an analogous effect. The recommended dosage regimens for monotherapy and adjunctive therapy are 1 and 0.5 mg PO QD, respectively. Despite the well-documented selectivity of rasagiline, the manufacturer recommends virtually all of the dietary (vis

  12. Rasagiline: a review of its use in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Sheridan M; Keating, Gillian M

    2012-03-26

    Rasagiline (Azilect®), a selective, irreversible, monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, is available in the EU, the US and in several other countries worldwide, including Canada and Israel. It is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to levodopa in patients [corrected]with end-of-dose fluctuations in the EU and for the treatment of adult patients with the signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson's disease in the US. This article reviews the pharmacological properties, therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease. Oral rasagiline as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to levodopa was effective in the symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease participating in double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational studies. In patients with early Parkinson's disease, monotherapy with rasagiline 1 mg/day (recommended dosage) significantly slowed the rate of worsening (i.e. an increase in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS] score) in the ADAGIO and TEMPO studies, with the results from the ADAGIO study for rasagiline 1 mg/day suggesting a slowing of clinical progression. However, at the higher dosage of 2 mg/day, rasagiline met the primary endpoint in the TEMPO study and the first, but not the second, of three hierarchical primary endpoints in the ADAGIO study. Compared with delayed-start rasagiline monotherapy, early initiation was associated with a slower long-term progression of the clinical signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease in the TEMPO study. As adjunctive therapy to levodopa in the LARGO and PRESTO studies, rasagiline 0.5 and/or 1 mg/day significantly reduced the total daily 'off' time (primary efficacy endpoint) and significantly improved the Clinical Global Impression score, the UPDRS activities of daily living subscale score during 'off' time and the UPDRS

  13. Myocardial tissue deformation is reduced in subjects with coronary microvascular dysfunction but not rescued by treatment with Ranolazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael D.; Sharif, Behzad; Shaw, Jaime L.; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Wei, Janet; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Mehta, Puja K.; Thomson, Louise EJ; Berman, Daniel S.; Thompson, Richard B.; Handberg, Eileen M.; Pepine, Carl J.; Li, Debiao; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) often have diastolic dysfunction, representing an important therapeutic target. Ranolazine—a late-sodium current inhibitor—improves diastolic function in animal models, and subjects with obstructive CAD. We hypothesized that ranolazine would beneficially alter diastolic function in CMD. Methods To test this hypothesis, we performed retrospective tissue tracking analysis to evaluate systolic/diastolic strain, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging cine images: a) acquired in a recently completed, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of short-term ranolazine in subjects with CMD, and b) from 43 healthy reference controls. Results Diastolic strain rate was impaired in CMD vs. controls (circumferential diastolic strain rate: 99.9 ± 2.5%/s vs. 120.1 ± 4.0%/s, p=0.0003; radial diastolic strain rate: −199.5 ± 5.5%/s vs. −243.1 ± 9.6%/s, p=0.0008, case vs. control). Moreover, peak systolic circumferential (CS) and radial (RS) strain were also impaired in cases vs. controls (CS: −18.8 ± 0.3% vs. −20.7 ± 0.3%; RS: 35.8 ± 0.7% vs. 41.4 ± 0.9%; respectively; both p < 0.0001), despite similar and preserved ejection fraction. In contrast to our hypothesis however, we observed no significant changes in left ventricular diastolic function in CMD cases after two weeks of ranolazine vs. placebo. Conclusions The case-control comparison both confirms and extends our prior observations of diastolic dysfunction in CMD. That CMD cases were also found to have sub-clinical systolic dysfunction is a novel finding, highlighting the utility of this retrospective approach. In contrast to previous studies in obstructive CAD, ranolazine did not improve diastolic function in CMD. PMID:28004395

  14. Rasagiline for mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: A placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Daniel; Hauser, Robert A; Elm, Jordan J; Pagan, Fernando; Davis, Matthew D; Choudhry, Azhar

    2016-05-01

    This study's aims were to determine the efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline, a selective monoamine oxidase inhibitor B, for PD patients with mild cognitive impairment. Patients on stable dopaminergic therapy were randomized to adjunct rasagiline 1 mg/day or placebo in this 24-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multisite study. The primary endpoint was mean change from baseline to week 24 on the Scales for Outcomes of Parkinson's Disease-Cognition total score. Key secondary measures included changes in cognition, activities of daily living, motor scores, and Clinical Global Impression of Change, as well as safety and tolerability measures. Of the 170 patients randomized, 151 (88.2%) completed the study. Change in Scales for Outcomes of Parkinson's Disease-Cognition scores were not significantly different in the rasagiline and placebo groups (adjusted mean: 1.6 [standard error {SE} = 0.5] vs. 0.8 [SE = 0.5] points; LS means difference = 0.8; 95% confidence interval: -0.48, 2.05; P = 0.22). There were no between-group differences in change in the MoCA (p=0.84) or Penn Daily Activities Questionnaire (P = 0.48) scores or in the distribution of Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change modified for mild cognitive impairment (P = 0.1). Changes in motor (UPDRS part III; P = 0.02) and activities of daily living (UPDRS part II; P rasagiline. Rasagiline was well tolerated; the most common adverse events in both groups were falls and dizziness. Rasagiline treatment in PD patients with mild cognitive impairment was not associated with cognitive improvement. Rasagiline did not worsen cognition, improved motor symptoms and activities of daily living, and was well tolerated in elderly cognitively impaired patients. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Comparative efficacy of selegiline versus rasagiline in the treatment of early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, S; Zwingers, T

    2014-07-01

    The monoamine oxidase B inhibitors selegiline and rasagiline have not been compared in head-to-head clinical trials in patients with early Parkinson's disease.  The aim of this review was to compare the efficacy of these two agents in this setting. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials with an endpoint of the mean change from baseline in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total score were included. Analysis included calculation of the standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and Forest Plot analyses for comparisons of pooled results. Five studies with selegiline (n = 1029) and four with rasagiline (n = 820) were included. Treatment duration was 2.5-9 months. Both selegiline and rasagiline showed significant SMDs versus placebo (-0.690, 95% CI -0.811, -0.569 and -1.025, 95% CI -1.230, -0.820; respectively), indicating a significant effect of both drugs on UPDRS. The SMD between selegiline and rasagiline was not significantly different (SMD 0.079; 95% CI -0.010, +0.167). It appears that selegiline and rasagiline have comparable efficacy in improving Parkinsonian symptoms in patients with early stage disease.

  16. Rasagiline for dysexecutive symptoms during wearing-off in Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Domiziana; Assogna, Francesca; Sforza, Michela; Tagliente, Stefania; Pontieri, Francesco E

    2018-01-01

    Wearing-off refers to the predictable worsening of motor and sometimes non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease occurring at the end of levodopa dose that improves with the next drug dose. Here, we investigated the efficacy of rasagiline on executive functions at the end of levodopa dose in patients displaying symptoms of wearing-off. Rasagiline was well-tolerated and produced a significant improvement at the Frontal Assessment Battery, together with improvement of motor symptoms at the end of levodopa dose. These results suggest that treatment of motor symptoms of wearing-off with rasagiline may be accompanied by improvement of executive functions, and further support the need for optimizing dopamine replacement therapy in fluctuating Parkinson's disease patients.

  17. Cost-utility model of rasagiline in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Joumana; Rinne, Juha O; Keränen, Tapani; Eckert, Laurent; Cochran, John M

    2006-04-01

    The economic burden of Parkinson's disease (PD) is high, especially in patients experiencing motor fluctuations. Rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy against symptoms of PD in early and advanced stages of the disease. To assess the cost-utility of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa versus standard levodopa care in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. A 2 year probabilistic Markov model with 3 health states: "25% or less off-time/day," "greater than 25% off-time/day," and "dead" was used. Off-time represents time awake with poor or absent motor function. Model inputs included transition probabilities from randomized clinical trials, utilities from a preference measurement study, and costs and resources from a Finnish cost-of-illness study. Effectiveness measures were quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and number of months spent with 25% or less off-time/day. Uncertainty around parameters was taken into account by Monte Carlo simulations. Over 2 years from a societal perspective, rasagiline or entacapone as adjunctive therapies to levodopa showed greater effectiveness than levodopa alone at no additional costs. Benefits after 2 years were 0.13 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.17) additional QALYs and 5.2 (3.6 to 6.7) additional months for rasagiline and 0.12 (0.08 to 0.17) QALYs and 5.1 (3.5 to 6.6) months for entacapone, both in adjunct to levodopa compared with levodopa alone. The results of this study support the use of rasagiline and entacapone as adjunctive cost-effective alternatives to levodopa alone in PD patients with motor fluctuations in Finland. With a different mode of action, rasagiline is a valuable therapeutic alternative to entacapone at no additional charge to society.

  18. Efficacy and acceptability of oxcarbazepine vs. carbamazepine with betahistine mesilate tablets in treating vestibular paroxysmia: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chong; Wenping, Xiang; Hui, Xue; Xin, He; Xiue, Li; Jun, Zhang; Shangyong, Geng

    2016-06-01

    Vestibular paroxysmia (VP) is a rare episodic peripheral vestibular disorder that can cause acute short attacks of vertigo. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and acceptability of carbamazepine (CBZ), CBZ plus betahistine mesilate tablets (BMT) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) plus BMT in treating VP within 12 weeks. A retrospective analysis of data from 196 VP patients treated in our hospital was conducted. There were 73 patients receiving CBZ, 65 patients receiving CBZ+BMT and 58 patients receiving OXC+BMT. The frequency of vertigo, vertigo duration, vertigo score, response rate (RR) and side effects were compared between groups to assess efficacy and acceptability at the end of 12(th) week. After 12 weeks' treatment, the CBZ+BMT group had a greater reduction in the frequency of vertigo, vertigo duration and vertigo score than the other two groups. The RR was highest in the CBZ+BMT group, second in the OXC+BMT group and lowest in the CBZ group. The incidence of side-effects was highest in the CBZ group, second in the CBZ+BMT group and lowest in the OXC+BMT group. Two patients in the CBZ group were withdrawn. These results indicated that using BMT as an augmentation for CBZ or OXC might be a good choice in treating VP.

  19. The dose of nafamostat mesilate during plasma exchange with continuous hemodiafiltration in the series-parallel circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Hajime; Igarashi, Toshiko; Tajimi, Kimitaka

    2006-06-01

    We studied nafamostat mesilate (NM) and interleukin (IL)-18 levels to determine whether the dose of NM is reduced during plasma exchange (PE) with continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) when the series-parallel circuit is used. The subjects of the current study included four patients with acute hepatic failure who underwent PE with CHDF. The four patients underwent a total 15 PE + CHDF procedures, and for each procedure, they were randomized to receive either a half-dose of NM or no NM in the CHDF circuit. Eight procedures were carried out with NM administration, and seven were carried out without NM administration. The dose of NM in the NM group was significantly higher than that in the non-NM group (P = 0.040). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in the inlet NM concentration, the outlet NM concentration, or the rate of IL-18 removal. No statistical correlation was observed between the IL-18 level and the NM dose, the inlet NM concentration, or the outlet NM concentration. There was no blood access difficulty such as catheter failure or clotting of the filter. Thus, it might be possible to carry out PE and CHDF with the series-parallel method without administration of NM in the CHDF circuit.

  20. From a Parkinson's disease expert: Rasagiline and the Future of Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract John Finberg is a professor of pharmacology at the Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, home of Israel's two Nobel laureates. He and his colleague Prof. Moussa Youdim were instrumental in the early clinical development of the anti-Parkinson drug rasagiline, which gained UK- and EU-marketing authorization in 2005 and US FDA approval in 2006. In our interview, Finberg reflects on his clinical research to develop rasagiline as a commercial drug and its proposed pharmacological mechanisms of action. Moreover, he elucidates the current state of anti-Parkinson drug discovery and offers direction for future research.

  1. An effective novel delivery strategy of rasagiline for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Marcos; Negro, Sofía; Slowing, Karla; Fernández-Carballido, Ana; Barcia, Emilia

    2011-10-31

    This is the first report on the efficacy of a new controlled release system developed for rasagiline mesylate (RM) in a rotenone-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). PLGA microspheres in vitro released RM at a constant rate of 62.3 μg/day for two weeks. Intraperitoneal injection of rotenone (2 mg/kg/day) to Wistar rats produced typical PD symptoms. Catalepsy, akinesia and swim tests outcomes in animals receiving RM either in solution or within microspheres showed a reversal in descent latency when compared to rotenone-treated animals, being this reversal specially pronounced in animals receiving RM microspheres (dose equivalent to 1 mg/kg/day RM injected i.p. every 15 days). Nissl-staining of brain sections showed selective degeneration of the substantia nigra (SNc) dopaminergic neurons in rotenone-treated animals which was markedly reverted by RM microspheres. PET/CT with (18)F-DG resulted in mean increases of accumulation of radiotracer in striatum and SNc of around 40% in animals treated with RM microspheres which also had significant beneficial effects on Bcl-2, Bax, TNF-α mRNA and SOD2 levels as detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results confirm the robust effect achieved by the new controlled release system developed for RM which exhibited better in vivo efficacy than RM given in solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shammas NW

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W Shammas,1 Gail A Shammas,1 Kathleen Keyes,2 Shawna Duske,1 Ryan Kelly,1 Michael Jerin3 1Midwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 2Cardiovascular Medicine, Private Corporation, 3St Ambrose University, Davenport, IA, USA Background: Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients.Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40% were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker, and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ, or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS. Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test.Results: Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%; prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%; prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%; prior myocardial infarction (82.1%; diabetes (67.9%; and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20 (P≥0.05. There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients (P=0.058, quality of life (8/10 patients (P=0.048, and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10 (P=0.047 with ranolazine

  3. Symptomatic efficacy of rasagiline monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease: post-hoc analyses from the ADAGIO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph; Berkovich, Elijahu; Eyal, Eli; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The ADAGIO study included a large cohort of patients with early PD (baseline total-UPDRS = 20) who were initially randomized to rasagiline and placebo, thereby allowing analyses of symptomatic efficacy. Post-hoc analyses comparing the efficacy of rasagiline 1 mg/day (n = 288) versus placebo (n = 588) on key symptoms at 36 weeks, and on total-UPDRS scores over 72 weeks (completer population: rasagiline 1 mg/day n = 221, placebo n = 392) were performed. Treatment with rasagiline resulted in significantly better tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural-instability-gait-difficulty scores at week 36 versus placebo. Whereas the placebo group experienced progressive deterioration from baseline (2.6 UPDRS points at week 36), patients in the rasagiline group were maintained at baseline values at week 60 (UPDRS-change of 0.3 points). At week 72, patients who had received continuous monotherapy with rasagiline experienced a worsening of only 1.6 points. Treatment with rasagiline maintained motor function to baseline values for at least a year with significant benefits observed in all key PD motor symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. BDNF levels are increased by aminoindan and rasagiline in a double lesion model of Parkinson׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledreux, Aurélie; Boger, Heather A; Hinson, Vanessa K; Cantwell, Kelsey; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-01-15

    The anti-Parkinsonian drug rasagiline is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase and is used in the treatment of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Its postulated neuroprotective effects may be attributed to MAO inhibition, or to its propargylamine moiety. The major metabolite of rasagiline, aminoindan, has shown promising neuroprotective properties in vitro but there is a paucity of studies investigating in vivo effects of this compound. Therefore, we examined neuroprotective effects of rasagiline and its metabolite aminoindan in a double lesion model of PD. Male Fisher 344 rats received i.p. injections of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 and intra-striatal stereotaxic microinjections of the dopamine neurotoxin 6-OHDA. Saline, rasagiline or aminoindan (3mg/kg/day s.c.) were delivered via Alzet minipumps for 4 weeks. Rats were then tested for spontaneous locomotion and a novel object recognition task. Following behavioral testing, brain tissue was processed for ELISA measurements of growth factors and immunohistochemistry. Double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan had reduced behavioral deficits, both in motor and cognitive tasks compared to saline-treated double-lesioned rats. BDNF levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus and striatum of the rasagiline- and aminoindan-lesioned groups compared to the saline-treated lesioned group. Double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan exhibited a sparing in the mitochondrial marker Hsp60, suggesting mitochondrial involvement in neuroprotection. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry revealed a sparing of TH-immunoreactive terminals in double-lesioned rats treated with rasagiline or aminoindan in the striatum, hippocampus, and substantia nigra. These data provide evidence of neuroprotection by aminoindan and rasagiline via their ability to enhance BDNF levels. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Ranolazine for the treatment of chronic stable angina: a cost-effectiveness analysis from the UK perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Craig I; Freemantle, Nick; Kohn, Christine G

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the cost-effectiveness of ranolazine when added to standard-of-care (SoC) antianginals compared with SoC alone in patients with stable coronary disease experiencing ?3 attacks/week. Setting An economic model utilising a UK health system perspective, a 1-month cycle-length and a 1-year time horizon. Participants Patients with stable coronary disease experiencing ?3 attacks/week starting in 1 of 4 angina frequency health states based on Seattle Angina Questionnaire Angina...

  6. Inactivation of purified human recombinant monoamine oxidases A and B by rasagiline and its analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubálek, Frantisek; Binda, Claudia; Li, Min; Herzig, Yaacov; Sterling, Jeffrey; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mattevi, Andrea; Edmondson, Dale E

    2004-03-25

    The inactivation of purified human recombinant monoamine oxidases (MAO) A and B by rasagiline [N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan] and four of its analogues [N-propargyl-1(S)-aminoindan (S-PAI), 6-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-HPAI), N-methyl-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-MPAI), and 6-(N-methyl-N-ethyl carbamoyloxy)-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan (R-CPAI)] has been investigated. All compounds tested, with the exception of R-CPAI, form stoichiometric N(5) flavocyanine adducts with the FAD moiety of either enzyme. No H(2)O(2) is produced during either MAO A or MAO B inactivation, which demonstrates that covalent addition occurs in a single turnover. Rasagiline has the highest specificity for MAO B, as demonstrated by a 100-fold higher inhibition potency (k(inact)/K(i)) compared to MAO A, with the remaining compounds exhibiting lower isozyme specificities. MAO B and MAO A are more selective for the R-enantiomer (rasagiline) compared to the S-enantiomer (S-PAI) by 2500-fold and 17-fold, respectively. Differences in UV/vis and CD spectral data of the complexes of the studied compounds with both MAO A and MAO B are interpreted in light of crystallographic data of complexes of MAO B with rasagiline and its analogues (Binda, C.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 2004, 47, 1767-1774.

  7. Reversed-Phase UHPLC Enantiomeric Separation of Rasagiline Salts Using a Chiralpak® AGP Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Balaji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the first rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic (UHPLC enantiomeric reversed-phase separation of rasagiline mesylate and its tartrate salts using a Chiralpak® AGP column (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 5 μm as a stationary phase. This method was developed as an alternative to the usage of previously reported normal-phase chiral LC columns for isomer separation. Our method is based on an isocratic approach using a mixture of ammonium acetate and isopropyl alcohol (90:10, v/v as the mobile phase (0.6 mL/min flow rate. The detection limit (at a detection wavelength of 210 nm and quantification limit for the rasagiline enantiomers were 0.06 and 0.2 μg/mL, respectively. This method is compatible with the UHPLC-MS technique. The successful separation of rasagiline and its enantiomer was confirmed by determining the corresponding specific optical rotation values. Our method will be applicable for detecting rasagiline enantiomers during the control of manufacturing processes, and for use in rapid analysis for quality control in pharmaceutical industry to obtain optically pure pharmaceutical substances. This method was validated in terms of its precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy, robustness, ruggedness, specificity, forced degradation, and solution stability, according to International Council on Harmonization Validation Guidelines Q2 (R1.

  8. Role of rasagiline in treating Parkinson’s disease: effect on disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene A Malaty

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Irene A Malaty, Hubert H FernandezUniversity of Florida Movement Disorders Center, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Rasagiline is a second generation, selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B inhibitor. It has demonstrated efficacy in monotherapy for early Parkinson’s disease (PD patients in one large randomized, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson’s Disease Outpatients, and has shown ability to reduce off time in more advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations in two large placebo-controlled trials (Parkinson’s Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety in the Treatment of “Off”, and Lasting Effect in Adjunct Therapy With Rasagiline Given Once Daily. Preclinical data abound to suggest potential for neuroprotection by this compound against a variety of neurotoxic insults in cell cultures and in animals. The lack of amphetamine metabolites provides an advantage over the first generation MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. One large trial has investigated the potential for disease modification in PD patients (Attenuation of Disease progression with Azilect Given Once-daily and preliminary results maintain some possible advantage to earlier initiation of the 1 mg/day dose. The clinical significance of the difference detected remains a consideration.Keywords: rasagiline, Parkinson’s disease, neuroprotection, selegiline

  9. Randomized, controlled trial of rasagiline as an add-on to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Silver, Dee; Choudhry, Azhar; Eyal, Eli; Isaacson, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    Dopamine agonists (DA) are often used as first-line monotherapy for the symptomatic control of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, DA monotherapy typically becomes inadequate within a few years, at which time the DA dosage must be increased or other antiparkinsonian medications added. Adding a monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitor to DA monotherapy might improve symptomatic control while maintaining good safety and tolerability. We conducted an 18-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rasagiline 1 mg/d as an add-on to DA therapy (ropinirole ≥ 6 mg/d or pramipexole ≥ 1.0 mg/d) in early PD patients whose conditions were not adequately controlled on their current treatment regimen. The primary efficacy variable was the change in total Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score (sum of parts I, II, and III) from baseline to week 18, comparing rasagiline and placebo groups. The modified intent-to-treat (ITT) population included 321 subjects whose mean ± SD age was 62.6 ± 9.7, and duration of PD was 2.1 ± 2.1 years. Results demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in total UPDRS scores from baseline to week 18 in the rasagiline group compared with the placebo group (least squares [LS] mean difference ± SE, -2.4 ± 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.3, -0.5; P = 0.012). Mean improvement (LS mean ± SE) was -3.6 ± 0.68 in the rasagiline group and -1.2 ± 0.68 in the placebo group. Rasagiline was well tolerated, and the most common adverse events (AEs; rasagiline vs. placebo) were dizziness (7.4% vs. 6.1%), somnolence (6.8% vs. 6.7%), and headache (6.2% vs. 4.3%). Rasagiline 1 mg/d provided statistically significant improvement when added to dopamine agonist therapy and was well tolerated. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. A Synthetic Serine Protease Inhibitor, Nafamostat Mesilate, Is a Drug Potentially Applicable to the Treatment of Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hidekazu; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-09-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) has been a great concern worldwide because of its high mortality. EVD usually manifests with fever, diarrhea and vomiting, as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). To date, there is neither a licensed Ebola vaccine nor a promising therapeutic agent, although clinical trials are ongoing. For replication inside the cell, Ebola virus (EBOV) must undergo the proteolytic processing of its surface glycoprotein in the endosome by proteases including cathepsin B (CatB), followed by the fusion of the viral membrane and host endosome. Thus, the proteases have been considered as potential targets for drugs against EVD. However, no protease inhibitor has been presented as effective clinical drug against it. A synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesilate (NM), reduced the release of CatB from the rat pancreas. Furthermore, it has anticoagulant activities, such as inhibition of the factor VIIa complex, and has been used for treating DIC in Japan. Thus, NM could be considered as a drug candidate for the treatment of DIC induced by EBOV infection, as well as for the possible CatB-related antiviral action. Moreover, the drug has a history of large-scale production and clinical use, and the issues of safety and logistics might have been cleared. We advocate in vitro and in vivo experiments using active EBOV to examine the activities of NM against the infection and the DIC induced by the infection. In addition, we suggest trials for comparison among anti-DIC drugs including the NM in EVD patients, in parallel with the experiments.

  11. Rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease and motor fluctuations (LARGO, Lasting effect in Adjunct therapy with Rasagiline Given Once daily, study): a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Rascol, O.; Brooks, D.J.; Melamed, E.; Oertel, W.; Poewe, W.; Stocchi, F.; Tolosa, E.; LARGO study group

    2005-01-01

    Lancet. 2005 Mar 12-18;365(9463):947-54. Rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease and motor fluctuations (LARGO, Lasting effect in Adjunct therapy with Rasagiline Given Once daily, study): a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Rascol O, Brooks DJ, Melamed E, Oertel W, Poewe W, Stocchi F, Tolosa E; LARGO study group. Clinical Investigation Centre, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital, Toulouse, France. ...

  12. Effects of rasagiline on freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease - an open-label, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulcik, Frantisek; Benetin, Jan; Kurca, Egon; Grofik, Milan; Dvorak, Miloslav; Richter, Denis; Donath, Vladimir; Kothaj, Jan; Minar, Michal; Valkovic, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom in advanced Parkinson's disease. Positive effects have been suggested with MAO-B inhibitors. We report on an open label clinical study on the efficacy of rasagiline as add-on therapy on freezing of gait and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Forty two patients with freezing of gait were treated with 1 mg rasagiline daily as an add-on therapy. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months of treatment. Freezing of gait severity was assessed using the Freezing of Gait Questionnaire, motor impairment by the modified MDS UPDRS part III, and quality of life using the PDQ-39 questionnaire. Patients treated with rasagiline had a statistically significant decrease in FoG-Q score and modified MDS UPDRS score after 1, 2 and 3 months of therapy. A moderately strong (r = 0.686, P = 0.002) correlation between the effects on mobility and freezing of gait was found. We also observed a statistically significant improvement in global QoL and in the subscales mobility, ADL, stigma and bodily discomfort in patients after 3 months of rasagiline therapy. A significant correlation (r = 0.570, P = 0.02) between baseline FoG-Q score and the baseline score for the PDQ Mobility subscale was found. In our study rasagiline as add-on antiparkinsonian therapy significantly improved mobility, freezing of gait and quality of life. The positive effect on freezing of gait appears to be related to improvement of mobility.

  13. [Efficacy of rasagiline in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuation (azimut study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, O S; Boĭko, A N; Ivanov, A K

    2010-01-01

    An open observational 3-month study of efficacy and safety of selective MAO B inhibitor rasagiline (АZIlect) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with mоtor fluctuations on the long-term levodopa therapy (the "АZIMUT" study) has been conducted. Forty five non-demented patients with PD (mean age 64,7±8,4 years, mean duration of disease 9,5±4,0 years, mean Hoehn-Yahr stage 3,0±0,4, mean levodopa dose 673,9 mg/d) have been included in the study. All patients received rasagiline at a dose of 1 mg once daily as an adjunct to a stable anti-parkinsonian therapy. Patient's clinical state has been assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 months of therapy. Forty two (93%) patients have completed the study. At the end of the third month of therapy, the daily off-time was decreased by 1,7 h. The ADL score (off-state) decreased by 22%, and the UPDRS-III score (on-state) decreased by 10%. The Global Clinical Improvement Scale revealed the marked improvement in 12% patients and moderate improvement in 43% patients. The severity of freezing of gait declined by 15%. Moreover, the initial severity of freezing seems to be a predictor of rasagiline clinical efficacy. The clinical effect of rasagiline steadily increased over 3 months. The fair tolerability of the drug and low rate of dyskinesias and other complications were demonstrated. In conclusion, the study has shown that rasagiline effectively reduces the off-time duration as well as the disability in off- and on-time and optimizes levodopa efficacy at the routine clinical practice setting.

  14. Rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease and motor fluctuations (LARGO, Lasting effect in Adjunct therapy with Rasagiline Given Once daily, study): a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascol, O; Brooks, D J; Melamed, E; Oertel, W; Poewe, W; Stocchi, F; Tolosa, E

    Rasagiline mesylate is a novel drug for Parkinson's disease with selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor activity, and is effective as monotherapy in early disease. This study investigated rasagiline efficacy and safety in levodopa-treated patients with Parkinson's disease and motor fluctuations. In an 18-week, double-blind, multicentre (74 hospitals and academic centres in Israel, Argentina, and Europe) trial, 687 outpatients were randomly assigned to oral rasagiline (231 individuals; 1 mg once daily), entacapone (227; 200 mg with every levodopa dose), or placebo (229). Primary outcome was change in total daily off-time (intention-to-treat population). Other measures included the clinical global improvement (CGI) score and unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) scores. Analysis was by intention to treat. 88 (13%) patients who were assigned treatment did not complete the study (23 rasagiline, 30 entacapone, 35 placebo), mainly because of withdrawal of consent (n=34) and adverse events (n=34). Both rasagiline and entacapone reduced mean daily off-time (-1.18 h rasagiline and -1.2 h entacapone vs placebo -0.4 h; p=0.0001, prasagiline and -0.72 entacapone vs -0.37 placebo; prasagiline reduces mean daily off-time and improves symptoms of Parkinson's disease in levodopa-treated patients with motor fluctuations, an effect similar to that of entacapone.

  15. Cardiovascular activity of rasagiline, a selective and potent inhibitor of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase B: comparison with selegiline

    OpenAIRE

    Abassi, Zaid A; Binah, Ofer; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2004-01-01

    Selegiline is used for treating Parkinson's disease. Despite its efficacy, the clinical use of selegiline in combination with L-dihydroxphenylalanine in Parkinsonian patients is hampered by cardiovascular complications, such as hypotension. This study was designed to compare in rats the cardiovascular effects of selegiline and rasagiline, their metabolites L-methamphetamine and aminoindan (TVP-136), respectively, and the second rasagiline metabolite non-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor TVP-1...

  16. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline on depressive symptoms in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barone, P; Santangelo, G.; Morgante, L.; Onofrj, M.; Meco, G.; Abbruzzese, G.; Bonuccelli, U.; Cossu, G.; Pezzoli, G.; Stanzione, P.; Lopiano, Leonardo; Antonini, A.; Tinazzi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Depressed mood is a common psychiatric problem associated with Parkinson?s disease (PD), and studies have suggested a benefit of rasagiline treatment. Methods ACCORDO (see the 1) was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline 1?mg/day on depressive symptoms and cognition in non-demented PD patients with depressive symptoms. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 in depressive symptoms measured b...

  17. Rasagiline for sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schettino C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carla Schettino,1,2,* Clemente Dato,1,2,* Guglielmo Capaldo,1,2 Simone Sampaolo,1,2 Giuseppe Di Iorio,1,2 Mariarosa AB Melone1,2 1Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic Sciences, and Aging, 2Division of Neurology and InterUniversity Center for Research in Neurosciences, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitor that ameliorates the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD by inhibiting striatal dopamine metabolism. There is also evidence that monoamine oxidase B inhibitors increase melatonin levels in the pineal gland and may have a beneficial effect on sleep disorders, which are a common feature in patients with PD.Methods: This single-center, prospective, observational, 12-week study compared the effect of combination therapy with levodopa 200–300 mg/d + rasagiline 1 mg/d (n=19 with levodopa 200–300 mg/d alone (n=19 in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with idiopathic PD.Results: After 12 weeks’ treatment, mean sleep latency was significantly (P<0.001 lower and the improvement in sleep latency from baseline was significantly (P=0.001 greater in patients receiving levodopa + rasagiline than in patients receiving levodopa alone. Similarly, at the end of the study, the mean total sleep time was significantly (P=0.002 longer and the improvement from baseline in mean total sleep time was significantly (P=0.026 greater in patients receiving levodopa + rasagiline than levodopa alone. There were no significant differences between treatment groups for the mean number of awakenings reported at week 12 nor the change from baseline to week 12 in mean number of awakenings.Conclusion: Adding rasagiline to levodopa improved sleep outcomes and may be an appropriate option for patients with PD experiencing sleep disorders. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, rasagiline, sleep disorders, Parkinson

  18. Cardiotoxic effects of the novel approved anti-ErbB2 agents and reverse cardioprotective effects of ranolazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lorenzo C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Claudia De Lorenzo,1,2,* Rolando Paciello,1,2,* Gennaro Riccio,3 Domenica Rea,4 Antonio Barbieri,4 Carmela Coppola,4 Nicola Maurea4 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Ceinge, Biotecnologie Avanzate s.c.a.r.l., Naples, Italy; 3Department of Pharmacy, Federico II University, Naples, Italy; 4Division of Cardiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori – Irccs Fondazione G. Pascale, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Pertuzumab, a novel anti-epidermal growth factor receptor 2 humanized monoclonal antibody, and trastuzumab-emtansine (TDM1, a novel antibody–drug conjugate made up of trastuzumab covalently linked to the highly potent microtubule inhibitory agent DM1, have been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for increasing the efficiency and safety of breast cancer therapy with trastuzumab. We investigated for the first time the potential cardiotoxic effects of pertuzumab and TDM1, which are not yet fully elucidated, and we tested whether ranolazine could blunt their cardiotoxicity.Methods: The cardiotoxic effects were tested in vitro on rat cardiomyoblasts, human fetal cardiomyocytes, adult-like cardiomyocytes, and in vivo on a mouse model.Results: All the treated cardiac cell lines were significantly affected by treatment with the tested drugs. Surprisingly, TDM1 showed stronger inhibitory effects on cardiac cells with respect to trastuzumab and pertuzumab by more significantly reducing the cell viability and by changing the morphology of these cells. TDM1 also affected the beating phenotype of adult-like cardiomyocytes in vitro and reduced fractional shortening and ejection fraction in vivo in a mouse model. We also found that ranolazine attenuated not only the cardiotoxic side effects of trastuzumab but also those of pertuzumab and TDM1, when used in combinatorial treatments both in vitro and in vivo, as

  19. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of rasagiline in levodopa-treated patients with Parkinson disease and motor fluctuations: the PRESTO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Rasagiline (n-propargyl-1[R]-aminoindan) mesylate is a novel irreversible selective monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, previously demonstrated to improve symptoms in early Parkinson disease (PD). To determine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of rasagiline in levodopa-treated patients with PD and motor fluctuations. Multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study. Parkinson disease patients (N = 472) with at least 21/2 hours of daily "off" (poor motor function) time, despite optimized treatment with other anti-PD medications. Rasagiline, 1.0 or 0.5 mg/d, or matching placebo. Change from baseline in total daily off time measured by patients' home diaries during 26 weeks of treatment, percentage of patients completing 26 weeks of treatment, and adverse event frequency. During the treatment period, the mean adjusted total daily off time decreased from baseline by 1.85 hours (29%) in patients treated with 1.0 mg/d of rasagiline, 1.41 hours (23%) with 0.5 mg/d rasagiline, and 0.91 hour (15%) with placebo. Compared with placebo, patients treated with 1.0 mg/d rasagiline had 0.94 hour less off time per day, and patients treated with 0.5 mg/d rasagiline had 0.49 hour less off time per day. Prespecified secondary end points also improved during rasagiline treatment, including scores on an investigator-rated clinical global impression scale and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (activities of daily living in the off state and motor performance in the "on" state). Rasagiline was well tolerated. Rasagiline improves motor fluctuations and PD symptoms in levodopa-treated PD patients. In light of recently reported benefits in patients with early illness, rasagiline is a promising new treatment for PD.

  20. Cardiovascular activity of rasagiline, a selective and potent inhibitor of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase B: comparison with selegiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Zaid A; Binah, Ofer; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2004-10-01

    Selegiline is used for treating Parkinson's disease. Despite its efficacy, the clinical use of selegiline in combination with l-dihydroxphenylalanine in Parkinsonian patients is hampered by cardiovascular complications, such as hypotension. This study was designed to compare in rats the cardiovascular effects of selegiline and rasagiline, their metabolites l-methamphetamine and aminoindan (TVP-136), respectively, and the second rasagiline metabolite non-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor TVP-1022 (N-propargyl-1S(-)aminoindan). Intravenous (i.v.) administration of selegiline and rasagiline (1 mg kg(-1)) to anaesthetized rats (thiobutabarbital, 100 mg kg(-1), i.p.) did not affect mean arterial pressure (MAP), carotid blood flow (CBF) or carotid vascular resistance (CVR). Selegiline (10 mg kg(-1), i.v.) decreased MAP, CBF and increased CVR. In contrast, rasagiline (10 mg kg(-1), i.v.) caused a small transient decrease in MAP, while CBF and CVR were unchanged. l-methamphetamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.v.) administration provoked a dramatic and long-lasting depressor response, decreased CBF and increased CVR. In contrast, injection of aminoindan or TVP-1022 at a similar dose produced gradual nonsignificant decreases in MAP and CBF. Chronic oral treatment (21 days) of awake rats with selegiline at 10 mg kg(-1) decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and MAP, whereas heart rate was unaffected. Since the effective MAO-B inhibitory and clinical dose of rasagiline is about one-tenth that of selegiline, administration of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1) rasagiline resulted in moderate decreases in SBP, DBP, and MAP, which were significantly lower than those caused by the 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) dose of selegiline. These findings indicate that rasagiline, when given at doses equivalent to selegiline, is less likely to be hypotensive.

  1. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline on depressive symptoms in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, P; Santangelo, G; Morgante, L; Onofrj, M; Meco, G; Abbruzzese, G; Bonuccelli, U; Cossu, G; Pezzoli, G; Stanzione, P; Lopiano, L; Antonini, A; Tinazzi, M

    2015-08-01

    Depressed mood is a common psychiatric problem associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and studies have suggested a benefit of rasagiline treatment. ACCORDO (see the ) was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline 1 mg/day on depressive symptoms and cognition in non-demented PD patients with depressive symptoms. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 in depressive symptoms measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-IA) total score. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline to week 12 in cognitive function as assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological battery; Parkinson's disease quality of life questionnaire (PDQ-39) scores; Apathy Scale scores; and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) subscores. One hundred and twenty-three patients were randomized. At week 12 there was no significant difference between groups for the reduction in total BDI-IA score (primary efficacy variable). However, analysis at week 4 did show a significant difference in favour of rasagiline (marginal means difference ± SE: rasagiline -5.46 ± 0.73 vs. placebo -3.22 ± 0.67; P = 0.026). There were no significant differences between groups on any cognitive test. Rasagiline significantly improved UPDRS Parts I (P = 0.03) and II (P = 0.003) scores versus placebo at week 12. Post hoc analyses showed the statistical superiority of rasagiline versus placebo in the UPDRS Part I depression item (P = 0.04) and PDQ-39 mobility (P = 0.007) and cognition domains (P = 0.026). Treatment with rasagiline did not have significant effects versus placebo on depressive symptoms or cognition in PD patients with moderate depressive symptoms. Although limited by lack of correction for multiple comparisons, post hoc analyses signalled some improvement in patient-rated cognitive and depression outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European

  2. Role of rasagiline in treating Parkinson’s disease: effect on disease progression

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Hubert; Malaty,

    2009-01-01

    Irene A Malaty, Hubert H FernandezUniversity of Florida Movement Disorders Center, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Rasagiline is a second generation, selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor. It has demonstrated efficacy in monotherapy for early Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients in one large randomized, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson’s Disease Outpatients), and has shown ability to reduce off time in more advan...

  3. The role of rasagiline in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leegwater-Kim, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Julie Leegwater-Kim1, Elena Bortan21Tufts University School of Medicine and Department of Neurology, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, MA, USAAbstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1% to 2% of people older than 60 years. Treatment of PD consists of symptomatic therapies while neuroprotective strategies have remained elusive. Rasagiline is a novel, potent, and irreversible...

  4. Role of rasagiline in treating Parkinson's disease: Effect on disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaty, Irene A; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2009-08-01

    Rasagiline is a second generation, selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor. It has demonstrated efficacy in monotherapy for early Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in one large randomized, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson's Disease Outpatients), and has shown ability to reduce off time in more advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations in two large placebo-controlled trials (Parkinson's Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety in the Treatment of "Off", and Lasting Effect in Adjunct Therapy With Rasagiline Given Once Daily). Preclinical data abound to suggest potential for neuroprotection by this compound against a variety of neurotoxic insults in cell cultures and in animals. The lack of amphetamine metabolites provides an advantage over the first generation MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. One large trial has investigated the potential for disease modification in PD patients (Attenuation of Disease progression with Azilect Given Once-daily) and preliminary results maintain some possible advantage to earlier initiation of the 1 mg/day dose. The clinical significance of the difference detected remains a consideration.

  5. Role of rasagiline in treating Parkinson’s disease: Effect on disease progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaty, Irene A; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2009-01-01

    Rasagiline is a second generation, selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitor. It has demonstrated efficacy in monotherapy for early Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients in one large randomized, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson’s Disease Outpatients), and has shown ability to reduce off time in more advanced PD patients with motor fluctuations in two large placebo-controlled trials (Parkinson’s Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety in the Treatment of “Off”, and Lasting Effect in Adjunct Therapy With Rasagiline Given Once Daily). Preclinical data abound to suggest potential for neuroprotection by this compound against a variety of neurotoxic insults in cell cultures and in animals. The lack of amphetamine metabolites provides an advantage over the first generation MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. One large trial has investigated the potential for disease modification in PD patients (Attenuation of Disease progression with Azilect Given Once-daily) and preliminary results maintain some possible advantage to earlier initiation of the 1 mg/day dose. The clinical significance of the difference detected remains a consideration. PMID:19753135

  6. Bio-analytical method development and validation of Rasagiline by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection and its application to pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar Konda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The most suitable bio-analytical method based on liquid–liquid extraction has been developed and validated for quantification of Rasagiline in human plasma. Rasagiline-13C3 mesylate was used as an internal standard for Rasagiline. Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 (2.1 mm×50 mm, 3.5 μm column provided chromatographic separation of analyte followed by detection with mass spectrometry. The method involved simple isocratic chromatographic condition and mass spectrometric detection in the positive ionization mode using an API-4000 system. The total run time was 3.0 min. The proposed method has been validated with the linear range of 5–12000 pg/mL for Rasagiline. The intra-run and inter-run precision values were within 1.3%–2.9% and 1.6%–2.2% respectively for Rasagiline. The overall recovery for Rasagiline and Rasagiline-13C3 mesylate analog was 96.9% and 96.7% respectively. This validated method was successfully applied to the bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic study of human volunteers under fasting condition. Keywords: High performance liquid chromatography, Mass spectrometry, Rasagiline, Liquid–liquid extraction

  7. Combined rasagiline and antidepressant use in Parkinson disease in the ADAGIO study: effects on nonmotor symptoms and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kara M; Eyal, Eli; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Depression, cognitive impairment, and other nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) are common early in Parkinson disease (PD) and may be in part due to disease-related dopamine deficiency. Many patients with PD are treated with antidepressants for NMSs, and the effect of the combination of PD medications that enhance dopamine neurotransmission and antidepressants on NMSs has not been studied. We report the effects of the addition of a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, rasagiline, to antidepressant treatment in PD. To evaluate the effect of rasagiline on depression, cognition, and other PD NMSs in patients taking an antidepressant in the Attenuation of Disease Progression With Azilect Given Once Daily (ADAGIO) study. The ADAGIO study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, delayed-start trial of rasagiline in de novo PD. In this exploratory post hoc analysis, we analyzed patients taking an antidepressant during the 36-week phase 1 period, in which patients were randomized to rasagiline (1 or 2 mg/d) or placebo. We evaluated the change in NMSs in patients taking an antidepressant and rasagiline compared with those taking placebo. The NMSs were assessed by Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Nonmotor Experiences of Daily Living, the original Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and the Parkinson Fatigue Scale. A total of 191 of the 1174 patients (16.3%) were treated with antidepressants during phase 1 and provided efficacy data. Depression and cognition scores revealed significantly less worsening in the rasagiline group compared with the placebo group (differences in Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale item-adjusted means [SEs], -0.19 [0.10], P = .048, and -0.20 [0.05], P rasagiline group compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant trend toward less worsening in apathy and no significant between-group differences in anxiety or sleep. The effect on

  8. No synergism between bis(propyl-cognitin and rasagiline on protecting dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-you Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasagiline, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, and bis(propyl-cognitin (B3C, a novel dimer are reported to be neuroprotective. Herein, the synergistical neuroprotection produced by rasagiline and B3C was investigated in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-induced mice of Parkinsonism. By using neurobehavioural tests, high-performance liquid chromatography and western blot assay, we showed that B3C at 0.3 mg/kg, rasagiline at 0.02 mg/kg, as well as co-treatment with B3C and rasagiline prevented MPTP-induced behavioural abnormities, increased the concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum, and up-regulated the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the substantia nigra. However, the neuroprotective effects of co-treatment were not significantly improved when compared with those of B3C or rasagiline alone. Collectively, we have demonstrated that B3C at 0.3 mg/kg and rasagline at 0.02 mg/kg could not produce synergistic neuroprotective effects

  9. Efficacy of rasagiline in patients with the parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poewe, Werner; Seppi, Klaus; Fitzer-Attas, Cheryl J; Wenning, Gregor K; Gilman, Sid; Low, Phillip A; Giladi, Nir; Barone, Paolo; Sampaio, Cristina; Eyal, Eli; Rascol, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a complex neurodegenerative disorder for which no effective treatment exists. We aimed to assess the effect of rasagiline on symptoms and progression of the parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy. We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial between Dec 15, 2009, and Oct 20, 2011, at 40 academic sites specialised in the care of patients with multiple systemic atrophy across 12 countries. Eligible participants aged 30 years or older with possible or probable parkinsonian variant multiple system atrophy were randomly assigned (1:1), via computer-generated block randomisation (block size of four), to receive either rasagiline 1 mg per day or placebo. Randomisation was stratified by study centre. The investigators, study funder, and personnel involved in patient assessment, monitoring, analysis and data management were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was change from baseline to study end in total Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS) score (parts I and II). Analysis was by modified intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00977665. We randomly assigned 174 participants to the rasagiline group (n=84) or the placebo group (n=90); 21 (25%) patients in the rasagiline group and 15 (17%) in the placebo group withdrew from the study early. At week 48, patients in the rasagiline group had progressed by an adjusted mean of 7·2 (SE 1·2) total UMSARS units versus 7·8 (1·1) units in those in the placebo group. This treatment difference of -0·60 (95% CI -3·68 to 2·47; p=0·70) was not significant. 68 (81%) patients in the rasagiline group and 67 (74%) patients in the placebo group reported adverse events, and we recorded serious adverse events in 29 (35%) versus 23 (26%) patients. The most common adverse events in the rasagiline group were dizziness (n=10 [12%]), peripheral oedema (n=9 [11%]), urinary tract infections (n=9 [11%]), and orthostatic

  10. Efficacy of rasagiline in early Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of data from the TEMPO and ADAGIO studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Abler, Victor; Eyal, Eli; Eliaz, Rom E

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of rasagiline versus placebo in a pooled population of patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD). TEMPO and ADAGIO were Phase III studies that evaluated the symptomatic efficacy of rasagiline versus placebo in patients with early PD. This meta-analysis included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) observations from weeks 12, 24 and 36 in ADAGIO and from weeks 14 and 26 in TEMPO; TEMPO visits were recoded to weeks 12 and 24, respectively. The present analysis includes all patients who received rasagiline 1 mg/day, 2 mg/day or placebo, and had ≥1 post-baseline observations and a subgroup of patients whose baseline UPDRS Total scores were ≥27 (Upper Quartile population). Change from baseline in UPDRS scores were evaluated using mixed models repeated measures analyses. Of the 1578 patients randomized to the two studies, 1546 patients met criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Effects on UPDRS Total, motor and activities of daily living scores were significantly better for both doses of rasagiline compared with placebo at all time periods. The Upper Quartile population included 402 patients with a UPDRS Total score ≥27 at baseline. These patients generally demonstrated a larger magnitude of treatment effect than was seen in the full population. This meta-analysis confirms the efficacy of rasagiline monotherapy over 36 weeks. Although TEMPO and ADAGIO are considered studies of "very early" PD, both contained a sizeable pool of patients with more severe disease. In addition, the meta-analysis showed a larger magnitude of effect in patients with more severe baseline disease.

  11. Efficacy of rasagiline and selegiline in Parkinson's disease: a head-to-head 3-year retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Emanuele; Cilia, Roberto; Canesi, Margherita; Tesei, Silvana; Mariani, Claudio Bruno; Zecchinelli, Anna Lena; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, such as selegiline and rasagiline, can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy to levodopa in Parkinson's disease (PD). Data on long-term efficacy of MAO-B inhibitors are limited with no head-to-head comparison available to date. The aim of this case-control retrospective study was to analyze data from patients with PD attending the Parkinson Institute (Milan, Italy) over a 6-year period (2009-2015) and compare the effects of selegiline and rasagiline on levodopa treatment outcomes. Patients with PD treated with either selegiline (n = 85) or rasagiline (n = 85) for 3 years as well as a control group of patients (N = 170) who have never received MAO-B inhibitors, were matched for gender, disease duration (±1 year) and age (±1 year) at baseline assessment (ratio 1:1:2). The Unified PD Rating Scale and the Hoehn-Yahr staging system were used for clinical comparisons. At baseline, mean PD duration was 6.5 years and clinical features were comparable across all three groups. After a mean follow-up of approximately 37 months, no differences in clinical progression of motor and non-motor symptoms were observed between the three groups. However, MAO-B inhibitor use was associated with ~2-fold lower change in daily dose of levodopa (p rasagiline. Long-term use of MAO-B inhibitors resulted in a significant reduction in levodopa requirements and a lower frequency of dyskinesias in patients with PD. Selegiline and rasagiline had equal efficacy in controlling motor symptoms in PD patients on optimized therapy.

  12. An in vivo approach for globally estimating the drug flow between blood and tissue for nafamostat mesilate: the main hydrolysis site determination in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan-Guang; Chen, Yuan-Cheng; Hao, Kun; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Xiao-Quan

    2008-11-01

    Nafamostat mesilate, an ester drug with extensive hydrolysis in vivo, exhibits species difference in the relative contribution for its hydrolysis in blood and tissues. For the rat, the main hydrolysis site may be blood and human may be tissue (mainly by liver). The paper gave in vivo evidence that human tissue may give more contribution for its hydrolysis. In the initial phase of drug administration, the drug accumulating level in tissue was low; the efflux fraction from tissue into blood can be ignorable comparing with the drug influx into tissue. Based on urine and plasma metabolite analysis, we concluded that in the initial phase almost all the drug hydrolysis in blood was excreted into urine. Then according to the initial urine metabolite analysis, we can estimate the drug hydrolysis rate in blood. The rate of drug diffusion from blood into tissues can be deduced based on the mass balance analysis of the initial blood drug. With the estimated rate constants, the drug efflux from tissues into blood was calculated according to equation: OFT-B (efflux from tissues) = OFB-U (blood hydrolysis fraction)+OFB-T (influx into tissues)-DB (hydrolysis in blood). The net flow (influent flux minus effluent flux) represented the drug hydrolysis fraction in tissue. As the result indicated, in human about 20% drug administrated was hydrolyzed in blood and nearly 80% in tissues. The relative hydrolysis fraction indicated that the main hydrolysis site in human body may locate in tissue, which was different to rats.

  13. Combination therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor telmisartan and serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate provides further renoprotection in a rat chronic kidney disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Narita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that camostat mesilate (CM had renoprotective and antihypertensive effects in rat CKD models. In this study, we examined if CM has a distinct renoprotective effect from telmisartan (TE, a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS inhibitor, on the progression of CKD. We evaluated the effect of CM (400 mg/kg/day and/or TE (10 mg/kg/day on renal function, oxidative stress, renal fibrosis, and RAS components in the adenine-induced rat CKD model following 5-weeks treatment period. The combination therapy with CM and TE significantly decreased the adenine-induced increase in serum creatinine levels compared with each monotherapy, although all treatment groups showed similar reduction in blood pressure. Similarly, adenine-induced elevation in oxidative stress markers and renal fibrosis markers were significantly reduced by the combination therapy relative to each monotherapy. Furthermore, the effect of the combination therapy on plasma renin activity (PRA and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC was similar to that of TE monotherapy, and CM had no effect on both PRA and PAC, suggesting that CM has a distinct pharmacological property from RAS inhibition. Our findings indicate that CM could be a candidate drug for an add-on therapy for CKD patients who had been treated with RAS inhibitors.

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline in daily clinical use--a post-marketing observational study in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, H; Jost, W H

    2010-09-01

    The MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), and its use is supported by evidence from large-scale, controlled clinical studies. The post-marketing observational study presented here investigated the efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline treatment (monotherapy or combination therapy) in daily clinical practice. The study included patients with idiopathic PD who received rasagiline (recommended dose 1 mg, once daily) as monotherapy or combination therapy. The treatment and observation period was approximately 4 months. Outcome measures included the change from baseline in the Columbia University Rating Scale (CURS), the Unified PD Rating Scale fluctuation subscale, daily OFF time (patient home diaries) and the PD Questionnaire-39. Adverse drug reactions/adverse events (ADRs/AEs) and the physician's global judgement of tolerability and efficacy were also examined. Overall, 754 patients received rasagiline during the study. Patients treated with rasagiline (monotherapy or combination therapy) showed significant improvements from baseline in symptom severity (including classical motor and non-classical motor/non-motor symptoms) and quality of life (QoL). Patients receiving combination therapy also experienced significant reductions in daily OFF time. Tolerability was rated as good/very good in over 90% of patients. In daily clinical practice, monotherapy or combination therapy with rasagiline is able to improve PD symptoms, reduce OFF time, and improve QoL, whilst demonstrating favourable tolerability. In addition, rasagiline has a simple dosing schedule of one tablet, once daily, with no titration. These results are consistent with the pivotal rasagiline clinical studies (TEMPO, LARGO and PRESTO).

  15. Efficacy and safety of rasagiline as an adjunct to levodopa treatment in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomized, double-blind, parallel-controlled, multi-centre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Zhiqin; Chen, Yangmei; Qin, Xinyue; Zhou, Huadong; Zhang, Chaodong; Sun, Hongbin; Tang, Ronghua; Zheng, Jinou; Yi, Lin; Deng, Liying; Li, Jinfang

    2013-08-01

    Rasagiline mesylate is a highly potent, selective and irreversible monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB) inhibitor and is effective as monotherapy or adjunct to levodopa for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few studies have evaluated the efficacy and safety of rasagiline in the Chinese population. This study was designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of rasagiline as adjunctive therapy to levodopa treatment in Chinese PD patients. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multi-centre trial conducted over a 12-wk period that enrolled 244 PD patients with motor fluctuations. Participants were randomly assigned to oral rasagiline mesylate (1 mg) or placebo, once daily. Altogether, 219 patients completed the trial. Rasagiline showed significantly greater efficacy compared with placebo. During the treatment period, the primary efficacy variable--mean adjusted total daily off time--decreased from baseline by 1.7 h in patients treated with 1.0 mg/d rasagiline compared to placebo (p rasagiline treatment. Rasagiline was well tolerated. This study demonstrated that rasagiline mesylate is effective and well tolerated as an adjunct to levodopa treatment in Chinese PD patients with fluctuations.

  16. [Rasagiline in daily clinical use. Results of a treatment study of Parkinson patients with a combination treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, W H; Klasser, M; Reichmann, H

    2008-10-01

    Rasagiline (Azilect) is a potent, highly selective and irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type B of the second generation. Rasagiline is indicated for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) as monotherapy (without levodopa) or as adjunct therapy (with levodopa) in patients with end of dose fluctuations. The efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline has been demonstrated in large-scale, controlled clinical studies in patients with early PD as well as with more advanced PD. This multicentred post-marketing observational study included an investigation of the efficacy and tolerability of rasagiline in a large patient population under conditions of the daily routine in neurologic practice with a special attention on the collection of data regarding a patients' subjective evaluation of quality of life. A total of 754 patients with Parkinson's disease were enrolled, 545 of the patients (63% male patients, mean age 68 years, mean duration of PD 6 years, Hoehn & Yahr stage II to III in 69% of the patients) started rasagiline 1 mg/day as adjunct therapy for up to 4 months. The PD symptoms were rated by the physicians using the Columbia University Rating Scale (CURS) and the clinical fluctuations subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, part IV B). Different aspects of quality of life were rated by the patients using the self-rating Parkinson's Disease Questionaire (PDQ-39). In addition, patients documented the number of hours spend in the OFF-state in "24-hour" home diaries prior to each of the assessment visits. During the treatment period rasagiline was most frequently co-administered with levodopa/DCI (81.7%) and/or dopamine agonists (65.8%). The mean treatment duration was 117.4 (+/-36.4) days, during which PD medication remained unchanged in 86.6% of the cases. The improvement rates in each of the CURS items ranged between 31.1% to 48.4% and the total score was reduced by 22% under the therapy of rasagiline. In the motor part (tremor

  17. Rasagiline in the Treatment of the Persistent Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert W; Weiner, Elaine; Kelly, Deanna L; Gold, James M; Keller, William R; Waltz, James A; McMahon, Robert P; Gorelick, David A

    2015-07-01

    The current study examined the efficacy and safety of rasagiline, a selective MAO-B inhibitor, for the treatment of persistent negative symptoms. Sixty people with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, who met a priori criteria for persistent negative symptoms, were randomized to receive rasagiline, 1mg/d (n = 31) or placebo (n = 29) in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) total score was used to assess change in negative symptoms. The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), N-Back test, a probabilistic learning task, and a delayed discounting task were used to assess cognition. In a mixed model analysis of covariance (MM-ANCOVA), with time as a continuous variable, there was a significant treatment × time effect for SANS total score (F = 5.61(df = 1,40.3), P = .023). The treatment × time interaction effect was also significant for the SANS avolition subscale score (F(1,40.2) = 10.41, P = .002). In a post hoc MM-ANCOVA analyses, with time as a categorical variable, group differences were significant at week 12 for SANS total score (t(37.3) = 2.15; P = .04; d = -0.41) and SANS avolition subscale score (t(49.0) = 3.06; P = .004; d = -0.46). There was a significant difference in number of participants with a ≥20% reduction in SANS avolition score (χ(2)(1) = 10.94; P = .0009), but not in SANS total score (χ(2)(1) = 1.11; P = .29). There were no significant group differences on the RBANS, N-Back, probabilistic learning, or delayed discounting tasks. Study results support future studies of the utility of rasagiline for the treatment of negative symptoms, including avolition (clinicaltrials.gov trial number: NCT00492336). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  18. Safety and efficacy of rasagiline in addition to levodopa for the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiang-Ping; Chen, Wan-Jin; Lin, Yu; Cai, Bin; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of rasagiline for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) among individuals currently receiving levodopa. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing rasagiline with placebo/no treatment in individuals with PD currently receiving levodopa. Outcome measures included improvement in motor functions; symptomatic improvement; improvement in quality of life; adverse effects. Random-effect meta-analytical techniques were conducted for the outcome measure and subgroup analyses. Three RCTs were included (n = 1002). The results showed significantly greater improvements in daily 'on' time without dyskinesia in levodopa-treated participants with idiopathic PD receiving 1 mg/day rasagiline compared to placebo (n = 712, 2 RCTs, MD 0.80, CI 0.45 to 1.15; p rasagiline (0.5 mg/day: n = 282, MD -2.91, CI -4.59 to -1.23; p = 0.0007; 1 mg/day: n = 712, 2 RCTs, MD -2.91, CI -4.02 to -1.80; p rasagiline in addition to levodopa is a safe and well-tolerated combination therapy for individuals with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Pharmacology of Rasagiline, a New MAO-B Inhibitor Drug for the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease with Neuroprotective Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P.M. Finberg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Rasagiline (Azilect is a highly selective and potent propargylamine inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO type B. Like other similar propargylamine inhibitors, rasagiline binds covalently to the N5 nitrogen of the flavin residue of MAO, resulting in irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. Therapeutic doses of the drug which inhibit brain MAO-B by 95% or more cause minimal inhibition of MAO-A, and do not potentiate the pressor or other pharmacological effects of tyramine. Metabolic conversion of the compound in vivo is by hepatic cytochrome P450-1A2, with generation of 1-aminoindan as the major metabolite. Rasagiline possesses no amphetamine-like properties, by contrast with the related compound selegiline (Deprenyl, Jumex, Eldepryl. Although the exact distribution of MAO isoforms in different neurons and tissues is not known, dopamine behaves largely as a MAO-A substrate in vivo, but following loss of dopaminergic axonal varicosities from the striatum, metabolism by glial MAO-B becomes increasingly important. Following subchronic administration to normal rats, rasagiline increases levels of dopamine in striatal microdialysate, possibly by the build-up of β-phenylethylamine, which is an excellent substrate for MAO-B, and is an effective inhibitor of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT. Both of these mechanisms may participate in the anti-Parkinsonian effect of rasagiline in humans. Rasagiline possesses neuroprotective properties in a variety of primary neuronal preparations and neuron-like cell lines, which is not due to MAO inhibition. Recent clinical studies have also demonstrated possible neuroprotective properties of the drug in human Parkinsonian patients, as shown by a reduced rate of decline of symptoms over time.

  20. Development and Validation of Spectrophotometric Methods for the Determination of Rasagiline in Pharmaceutical Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Evrim Kepekci Tekkeli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents three simple, rapid, and accurate spectrophotometric methods for the determination of Rasagiline (RSG in pharmaceutical preparations. The determination procedures depend on the reaction of RSG with chloranilic acid for method A, tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone for method B, and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane for method C. The colored products were quantitated spectrophotometrically at 524, 535, and 843 nm for methods A, B, and C, respectively. Different variables affecting the reaction were optimized. Linearity ranges of the methods with good correlation coefficients (0.9988–0.9996 were observed as 25–300 µg mL−1, 25–350 µg mL−1, and 50–500 µg mL−1 for methods A, B, and C, respectively. The formation of products takes place through different mechanisms. The sites of interaction were confirmed by elemental analysis using IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The validation of the methods was carried out in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, robustness, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation. No interference was observed from concomitants usually present in dosage forms. The methods were applied successfully to the determination of RSG in pharmaceutical preparations.

  1. Effect of gamma-irradiation on biodegradable microspheres loaded with rasagiline mesylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Marcos; Barcia, Emilia; Negro, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the influence of gamma-irradiation was evaluated on the physicochemical characteristics and in vitro release of rasagiline mesylate (RM), a selective MAO-B inhibitor used in Parkinson's disease, from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Microspheres were prepared using PLGA 50:50 by the solvent evaporation technique (O/W emulsion). Microspheres were sterilized by gamma-irradiation and their influence was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser light diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro drug release. Gamma-irradiation of RM-loaded microspheres did not affect EE, DSC and XRD patterns. After gamma-irradiation, changes on the surface were observed by SEM, but no significant difference in mean particle size was observed. GPC measurements showed a decrease in molecular weight of the polymer after five days of in vitro release. The similarity factor value between irradiated and non-irradiates microspheres was <50, indicating the non-similarity of the release profiles. The sterilization technique had an effect on the integrity of polymeric system, significantly affecting in vitro release of RM from PLGA microspheres. Therefore, from our results we conclude that gamma-irradiation is not a suitable sterilization procedure for this formulation

  2. A randomized trial of a low-dose Rasagiline and Pramipexole combination (P2B001) in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanow, C Warren; Kieburtz, Karl; Leinonen, Mika; Elmer, Lawrence; Giladi, Nir; Hauser, Robert A; Klepiskaya, Olga S; Kreitzman, David L; Lew, Mark F; Russell, David S; Kadosh, Shaul; Litman, Pninit; Friedman, Hadas; Linvah, Nurit; The P B Study Group, For

    2017-05-01

    Rasagiline and pramipexole act to improve striatal dopaminergic transmission in PD via distinct and potentially synergistic mechanisms. We performed a placebo-controlled study to determine whether 2 doses of a novel slow-release, low-dose combination of rasagiline and pramipexole (P2B001) are effective and have a good safety profile in patients with early untreated PD. Previously untreated patients with early PD were randomized (1:1:1) to once-daily treatment with P2B001 (0.3 mg pramipexole/0.75 mg rasagiline), P2B001 (0.6 mg pramipexole/0.75 mg rasagiline) or placebo in a 12-week multicenter double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline to final visit in Total-UPDRS score versus placebo. Secondary measures included responder analyses of patients achieving ≥4 UPDRS point reduction, and changes in Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Scale-39 and UPDRS activities of daily living and motor scores. A total of 149 participants were randomized and 136 (91.3%) completed the study. Adjusted mean change from baseline to final visit versus placebo in Total-UPDRS score was -4.67 ± 1.28 points for the P2B001 0.6/0.75 mg group (P = .0004) and -3.84 ± 1.25 points for the 0.3/0.75 mg group (P = .003). Significant benefits were also observed for both doses in the responder analysis (P = .0002 and P = .0001), Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Scale-39 scores (P = .05 and P = .01), and the UPDRS motor (P = .02 and P = .006) and activities of daily living (P = .005 and P = .0004) subscores. Adverse events of P2B001 were comparable to placebo apart from transient nausea and somnolence, which were more common with P2B001 treatment. P2B001 offers a promising treatment option for patients with early PD with good clinical efficacy and a low risk of adverse events. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder

  3. Synthesis of a Parkinson's Disease Treatment Drug, the "R,R"-Tartrate Salt "of R"-Rasagiline: A Three Week Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Noberto; Garcia, Billy; Cunningham, Mark; David, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    A synthesis of the "R,R"-tartrate salt of the popular anti-Parkinson's drug "R"-rasagiline (Azilect) was adapted to introduce the organic laboratory student to a medically relevant synthesis. It makes use of concepts found in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum, appropriately fits into three approximately 4 h lab…

  4. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline on depressive symptoms in non-demented Parkinson’s disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, P; Santangelo, G; Morgante, L; Onofrj, M; Meco, G; Abbruzzese, G; Bonuccelli, U; Cossu, G; Pezzoli, G; Stanzione, P; Lopiano, L; Antonini, A; Tinazzi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Depressed mood is a common psychiatric problem associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and studies have suggested a benefit of rasagiline treatment. Methods ACCORDO (see the 1) was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline 1 mg/day on depressive symptoms and cognition in non-demented PD patients with depressive symptoms. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 in depressive symptoms measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-IA) total score. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline to week 12 in cognitive function as assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological battery; Parkinson’s disease quality of life questionnaire (PDQ-39) scores; Apathy Scale scores; and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) subscores. Results One hundred and twenty-three patients were randomized. At week 12 there was no significant difference between groups for the reduction in total BDI-IA score (primary efficacy variable). However, analysis at week 4 did show a significant difference in favour of rasagiline (marginal means difference ± SE: rasagiline −5.46 ± 0.73 vs. placebo −3.22 ± 0.67; P = 0.026). There were no significant differences between groups on any cognitive test. Rasagiline significantly improved UPDRS Parts I (P = 0.03) and II (P = 0.003) scores versus placebo at week 12. Post hoc analyses showed the statistical superiority of rasagiline versus placebo in the UPDRS Part I depression item (P = 0.04) and PDQ-39 mobility (P = 0.007) and cognition domains (P = 0.026). Conclusions Treatment with rasagiline did not have significant effects versus placebo on depressive symptoms or cognition in PD patients with moderate depressive symptoms. Although limited by lack of correction for multiple comparisons, post hoc analyses signalled some improvement in patient-rated cognitive and depression outcomes. PMID:25962410

  5. Brain targeted nanoparticulate drug delivery system of rasagiline via intranasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Deepti; Md, Shadab; Hasan, Quamrul; Fazil, Mohammad; Ali, Asgar; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate a rasagiline-loaded chitosan glutamate nanoparticles (RAS-CG-NPs) by ionic gelation of CG with tripolyphosphate anions (TPP). RAS-loaded CG-NPs were characterized for particle size, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The mean particles size, polydispersity index (PDI) and encapsulation efficiency was found to be 151.1 ± 10.31, 0.380 ± 0.01 and 96.43 ± 4.23, respectively. Biodistribution of RAS formulations in the brain and blood of mice following intranasal (i.n.) and intravenous (i.v.) administration was performed using HPLC analytical method. The drug concentrations in brain following the i.n. of CG-NPs were found to be significantly higher at all the time points compared to both drug (i.n.) and drug CG-NPs (i.v.). The Cmax (999.25 ng/ml) and AUC (2086.60 ng h/ml) of formulation CG-NPs (i.n) were found to be significantly higher than CG-NPs (i.v.) and RAS solution (i.n.). The direct transport percentage (DTP%) values of RAS-loaded CG-NPs (i.n.) as compared to drug solution (i.n.) increased from 66.27 ± 1.8 to 69.27 ± 2.1%. The results showed significant enhancement of bioavailability in brain, after administration of the RAS-loaded CG-NPs which could be a substantial achievement of direct nose to brain targeting in Parkinson's disease therapy.

  6. A stereoselective, catalytic strategy for the in-flow synthesis of advanced precursors of rasagiline and tamsulosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, Davide; Pirola, Margherita; Raimondi, Laura; Burke, Anthony J; Benaglia, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The diastereoselective, trichlorosilane-mediate reduction of imines, bearing different and removable chiral auxiliaries, in combination either with achiral bases or catalytic amounts of chiral Lewis bases, was investigated to afford immediate precursors of chiral APIs (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients). The carbon-nitrogen double bond reduction was successfully performed in batch and in flow mode, in high yields and almost complete stereocontrol. By this metal-free approach, the formal synthesis of rasagiline and tamsulosin was successfully accomplished in micro(meso) flow reactors, under continuous flow conditions. The results of these explorative studies represent a new, important step towards the development of automated processes for the preparation of enantiopure biologically active compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of adjunctive rasagiline in Japanese Parkinson's disease patients with wearing-off phenomena: A phase 2/3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Nobutaka; Takeda, Atsushi; Takeda, Shinichi; Nishimura, Akira; Kato, Masafumi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Nagai, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2018-04-27

    Rasagiline, a selective, irreversible monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, is in development in Japan as adjunctive therapy to levodopa. This Phase 2/3 trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of adjunctive rasagiline in Japanese patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and wearing-off phenomena. Patients aged 30-79 years with diagnosed PD and stable levodopa use were randomized 1:1:1 to rasagiline (0.5/1 mg/day) or placebo for 26 weeks. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in mean daily OFF-time during the treatment period. In total, 141, 134, and 129 patients were randomized to placebo, rasagiline 0.5 mg, or rasagiline 1 mg, respectively. Baseline characteristics were well balanced. Least squares (LS) mean differences vs. placebo for change from baseline in mean daily OFF-time were -0.84 h (rasagiline 1 mg/day) and -0.60 h (rasagiline 0.5 mg/day); both differences were statistically significant. LS mean differences vs. placebo for change from baseline in Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part II and Part III total scores (in ON-state) and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 Summary Index Score were: -1.27, -1.74, and -2.51 (0.5 mg/day) and -1.27, -2.14, and -3.84 (1 mg/day); all statistically significant. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) occurred in 50.4/69.9/73.6% of the placebo, 0.5 mg/day, and 1 mg/day groups, respectively (most common TEAEs were nasopharyngitis [9.2/18.0/14.7%] and dyskinesia [7.1/8.3/16.3%]). As an adjunct to levodopa, rasagiline reduced OFF-time and improved PD symptoms/signs (MDS-UPDRS scores) and quality of life in Japanese patients with PD and wearing-off phenomena. No important safety concerns were raised. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Site-activated chelators derived from anti-Parkinson drug rasagiline as a potential safer and more effective approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hailin; Fridkin, Mati; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2010-12-01

    chelators can modulate β-amyloid accumulation, protect against tau hyperphosphorylation, and block metal-related oxidative stress, and thereby hold considerable promise as effective anti-AD drugs. At present, a growing interest is focusing on increasing the efficacy and targeting of chelators through drug design. To this end, we have developed a new class of multifunctional prochelators from three FDA- approved drugs rasagiline, rivastigmine, and donepezil or tacrine. HLA20 A was designed by merging the important pharmacophores of rasagiline, rivastigmine, and donepezil into our newly developed multifunctional chelator HLA20. M30D was constructed using the key pharmacophoric moieties from rasagiline, rivastigmine, and tacrine. Experiments showed that both compounds possess potent anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in vitro with weak inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and without significant metal-binding activity. M30D was found also to be a highly potent MAO A inhibitor with moderate inhibition of MAO B in vitro. Both HLA20 and M30D can be activated by inhibition of AChE to release active chelators HLA20 and M30, respectively. HLA20 and M30 have been shown to be able to modulate amyloid precursor protein regulation and beta-amyloid reduction, suppress oxidative stress, and passivate excess metal ions (Fe, Cu, and Zn). Compared with the activated chelator HLA20 or M30, both HLA20A and M30D exhibited lower cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, substantiating the prochelator strategy for minimizing toxicity associated with poor targeted chelators.

  9. Efficacy of rasagiline and selegiline in Parkinson?s disease: a head-to-head 3-year retrospective case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Cereda, Emanuele; Cilia, Roberto; Canesi, Margherita; Tesei, Silvana; Mariani, Claudio Bruno; Zecchinelli, Anna Lena; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, such as selegiline and rasagiline, can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy to levodopa in Parkinson?s disease (PD). Data on long-term efficacy of MAO-B inhibitors are limited with no head-to-head comparison available to date. The aim of this case?control retrospective study was to analyze data from patients with PD attending the Parkinson Institute (Milan, Italy) over a 6-year period (2009?2015) and compare the effects of selegiline and rasa...

  10. I1 imidazoline receptor: novel potential cytoprotective target of TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron D Barac

    Full Text Available TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline (Azilect® (N-propargyl-1R-aminoindan, exerts cyto/cardio-protective effects in a variety of experimental cardiac and neuronal models. Previous studies have demonstrated that the protective activity of TVP1022 and other propargyl derivatives involve the activation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. In the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of action and signaling pathways of TVP1022 which may account for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of the drug. Using specific receptor binding and enzyme assays, we demonstrated that the imidazoline 1 and 2 binding sites (I(1 & I(2 are potential targets for TVP1022 (IC(50 =9.5E-08 M and IC(50 =1.4E-07 M, respectively. Western blotting analysis showed that TVP1022 (1-20 µM dose-dependently increased the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated p42 and p44 MAPK in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM. This effect of TVP1022 was significantly attenuated by efaroxan, a selective I(1 imidazoline receptor antagonist. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of TVP1022 demonstrated in NRVM against serum deprivation-induced toxicity was markedly inhibited by efaroxan, thus suggesting the importance of I(1imidazoline receptor in mediating the cardioprotective activity of the drug. Our findings suggest that the I(1imidazoline receptor represents a novel site of action for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of TVP1022.

  11. I1 imidazoline receptor: novel potential cytoprotective target of TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Yaron D; Bar-Am, Orit; Liani, Esti; Amit, Tamar; Frolov, Luba; Ovcharenko, Elena; Angel, Itzchak; Youdim, Moussa B H; Binah, Ofer

    2012-01-01

    TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline (Azilect®) (N-propargyl-1R-aminoindan), exerts cyto/cardio-protective effects in a variety of experimental cardiac and neuronal models. Previous studies have demonstrated that the protective activity of TVP1022 and other propargyl derivatives involve the activation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of action and signaling pathways of TVP1022 which may account for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of the drug. Using specific receptor binding and enzyme assays, we demonstrated that the imidazoline 1 and 2 binding sites (I(1) & I(2)) are potential targets for TVP1022 (IC(50) =9.5E-08 M and IC(50) =1.4E-07 M, respectively). Western blotting analysis showed that TVP1022 (1-20 µM) dose-dependently increased the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated p42 and p44 MAPK in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). This effect of TVP1022 was significantly attenuated by efaroxan, a selective I(1) imidazoline receptor antagonist. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of TVP1022 demonstrated in NRVM against serum deprivation-induced toxicity was markedly inhibited by efaroxan, thus suggesting the importance of I(1)imidazoline receptor in mediating the cardioprotective activity of the drug. Our findings suggest that the I(1)imidazoline receptor represents a novel site of action for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of TVP1022.

  12. Safety and efficacy of rasagiline as an add-on therapy to riluzole in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Albert C; Schuster, Joachim; Dorst, Johannes; Dupuis, Luc; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Kassubek, Jan; Weiland, Ulrike; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Schrank, Berthold; Boentert, Matthias; Emmer, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas; Zeller, Daniel; Prudlo, Johannes; Winkler, Andrea S; Grehl, Torsten; Heneka, Michael T; Wollebæk Johannesen, Siw; Göricke, Bettina

    2018-06-18

    Rasagiline, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor with neuroprotective potential in Parkinson's disease, has shown a disease-modifying effect in the SOD1-Gly93Ala low-expressing mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, both alone and in combination with riluzole. We sought to test whether or not rasagiline 1 mg/day can prolong survival in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also receiving riluzole. Patients with possible, probable, or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were enrolled to our randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, double-blind, phase 2 trial from 15 German network for motor neuron diseases (MND-NET) centres (university hospitals or clinics). Eligible patients were aged at least 18 years, had onset of progressive weakness within the 36 months before the study, had disease duration of more than 6 months and less than 3 years, and had a best-sitting slow vital capacity of at least 50%. After a 4-week screening period, eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either rasagiline (1 mg/day) or placebo in addition to riluzole (100 mg/day), after stratification for site of onset (bulbar or spinal) and study centre. Patients and all personnel assessing outcome parameters were masked to treatment allocation. Patients were followed up 2, 6, 12, and 18 months after randomisation. The primary endpoint was survival time, defined as the time to death or time to study cutoff date (ie, the last patient's last visit plus 14 days). Analyses of primary outcome and safety measures were done in all patients who received at least one dose of trial treatment (intention-to-treat population). The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01879241. Between July 2, 2013, and Nov 11, 2014, 273 patients were screened for eligibility, and 252 patients were randomly assigned to receive rasagiline (n=127) or placebo (n=125). 126 patients taking rasagiline and 125 taking placebo were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. For the

  13. Prediction of Multi-Target Networks of Neuroprotective Compounds with Entropy Indices and Synthesis, Assay, and Theoretical Study of New Asymmetric 1,2-Rasagiline Carbamates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Romero Durán

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a multi-target complex network, the links (Lij represent the interactions between the drug (di and the target (tj, characterized by different experimental measures (Ki, Km, IC50, etc. obtained in pharmacological assays under diverse boundary conditions (cj. In this work, we handle Shannon entropy measures for developing a model encompassing a multi-target network of neuroprotective/neurotoxic compounds reported in the CHEMBL database. The model predicts correctly >8300 experimental outcomes with Accuracy, Specificity, and Sensitivity above 80%–90% on training and external validation series. Indeed, the model can calculate different outcomes for >30 experimental measures in >400 different experimental protocolsin relation with >150 molecular and cellular targets on 11 different organisms (including human. Hereafter, we reported by the first time the synthesis, characterization, and experimental assays of a new series of chiral 1,2-rasagiline carbamate derivatives not reported in previous works. The experimental tests included: (1 assay in absence of neurotoxic agents; (2 in the presence of glutamate; and (3 in the presence of H2O2. Lastly, we used the new Assessing Links with Moving Averages (ALMA-entropy model to predict possible outcomes for the new compounds in a high number of pharmacological tests not carried out experimentally.

  14. Multi criteria decision making to select the best method for the preparation of solid lipid nanoparticles of rasagiline mesylate using analytic hierarchy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveksarathi Kunasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to select best method for the development of rasagiline mesylate (RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles using analytic hierarchy process (AHP. Improper method selection may lead to waste of time, loss of material and financial resources. One of the possibilities to overcome these difficulties, AHP was employed to find the suitable method. In the AHP, a decision of hierarchy was constructed with a goal, criteria, sub-criteria, and alternatives. After constructing the AHP, the expert choice software was used to compute the overall priority of criteria, sub-criteria and alternatives. The best alternative selected was based on the highest priority. Nanoscale solid lipid particles of RM was formulated by the selected microemulsion method (M4 and it shows the particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential were within acceptable limits. Drug content and entrapment efficiency of the RM-solid lipid nanoparticles were 97.26% and 86.57%, respectively. This study concludes that the AHP was viable and effective tool for selecting a most suitable method for the fabrication of RM loaded nanoscale solid lipid particles.

  15. Update on ranolazine in the management of angina

    OpenAIRE

    Figueredo, Vincent; Codolosa,Jose; Acharjee,Subroto

    2014-01-01

    J Nicolás Codolosa,1 Subroto Acharjee,1 Vincent M Figueredo1,2 1Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Health, Einstein Medical Center, 2Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Mortality rates attributable to coronary heart disease have declined in recent years, possibly related to changes in clinical presentation patterns and use of proven secondary prevention strategies. Chronic stable angina (CSA) remains prevalent, and the goal of treatment is control of sym...

  16. Emerging treatment options for refractory angina pectoris: ranolazine, shock wave treatment, and cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Marco; Gambini, Elisa; Bassetti, Beatrice; Capogrossi, Maurizio; Pompilio, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A challenge of modern cardiovascular medicine is to find new, effective treatments for patients with refractory angina pectoris, a clinical condition characterized by severe angina despite optimal medical therapy. These patients are not candidates for surgical or percutaneous revascularization. Herein we review the most up-to-date information regarding the modern approach to the patient with refractory angina pectoris, from conventional medical management to new medications and shock wave therapy, focusing on the use of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) in the treatment of this condition. Clinical limitations of the efficiency of conventional approaches justify the search for new therapeutic options. Regenerative medicine is considered the next step in the evolution of organ replacement therapy. It is driven largely by the same health needs as transplantation and replacement therapies, but it aims further than traditional approaches, such as cell-based therapy. Increasing knowledge of the role of circulating cells derived from bone marrow (EPCs) on cardiovascular homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions has prompted the clinical use of these cells to relieve ischemia. The current state of therapeutic angiogenesis still leaves many questions unanswered. It is of paramount importance that the treatment is delivered safely. Direct intramyocardial and intracoronary administration has demonstrated acceptable safety profiles in early trials, and may represent a major advance over surgical thoracotomy. The combined efforts of bench and clinical researchers will ultimately answer the question of whether cell therapy is a suitable strategy for treatment of patients with refractory angina.

  17. The modulation of TRPM7 currents by nafamostat mesilate depends directly upon extracellular concentrations of divalent cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xuanmao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concentrations of extracellular divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+ fall substantially during intensive synaptic transmission as well as during some pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. Here we report that a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesylate (NM, and several of its analogues, block recombinant TRPM7 currents expressed in HEK293T cells in inverse relationship to the concentration of extracellular divalent cations. Lowering extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ also evokes a divalent-sensitive non-selective cation current that is mediated by TRPM7 expression in hippocampal neurons. In cultured hippocampal neurons, NM blocked these TRPM7-mediated currents with an apparent affinity of 27 μM, as well as the paradoxical Ca2+ influx associated with lowering extracellular Ca2+. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure to NM strongly potentiated TRPM7 currents. In the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular divalent cations, NM activates TRPM7. The stimulating effects of NM on TRPM7 currents are also inversely related to extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+. DAPI and HSB but not netropsin, blocked and stimulated TRPM7. In contrast, mono-cationic, the metabolites of NM, p-GBA and AN, as well as protease inhibitor leupeptin and gabexate failed to substantially modulate TRPM7. NM thus provides a molecular template for the design of putative modulators of TRPM7.

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  19. Dgroup: DG01967 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available de (INN) ... D00502 ... Pergolide mesylate (USP); Pergolide mesilate (JAN) ... D07836 ... Dihydroergocryptine mesilate DG00862 ... Ropini...role ... D08489 ... Ropinirole (USAN/INN) ... D00784 ... Ropinirole hydrochlo

  20. Neuropsychiatrie disorders in Parkinson's disease and their correction with the MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline (Azilect®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Nodel

    2011-01-01

    sleeping scale, and the PD quality of life scale (PDQ-39. Results. There were reductions in the severity of nocturnal and morning hypokinesia, daytime off periods, depression, insomnia, overfatigue and improved quality of life. The positive effect of therapy was stable within further 6 follow-up months.

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0584 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0584 ref|ZP_04036341.1| hypothetical protein MesilDRAFT_23170 [Meiothermus silva...nus DSM 9946] ref|ZP_04037358.1| hypothetical protein MesilDRAFT_33590 [Meiothermus silvanus DSM 9...946] gb|EEJ87931.1| hypothetical protein MesilDRAFT_33590 [Meiothermus silvanus DSM 9946] gb|EEJ88921.1| hyp...othetical protein MesilDRAFT_23170 [Meiothermus silvanus DSM 9946] ZP_04036341.1 2.5 28% ...

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    -globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; LA-419, lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lidocaine/prilocaine, liposomal cisplatin, lutropin alfa; Matuzumab, MBP(82-98), mecasermin, MGCD-0103, MMR-V, morphine hydrochloride, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, neridronic acid, nesiritide, nilotinib, NSC-330507; O6-benzylguanine, olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, omalizumab; Panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pemetrexed disodium, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, posaconazole, pramiconazole, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine; rAAV-GAD65, raclopride, rasagiline mesilate, retapamulin, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, rufinamide; SarCNU, SB-743921, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; TachoSil, tadalafil, talampanel, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, temsirolimus, tenatoprazole, teriflunomide, tetrathiomolybdate, ticilimumab, timcodar dimesilate, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TPI, tramiprosate, trifluridine/TPI, trimethoprim; Ularitide, Urocortin 2; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valproate magnesium, valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vitespen, vofopitant hydrochloride, volociximab, vorinostat; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent.

  3. Aplasia irreversible por el tratamiento con mesilato de Imatinib en una leucemia mieloide crónica: Presentación de un caso Irreversible aplasia due to the treatment with imatinib mesilate in a chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Agramonte Llanes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una paciente de 45 años de edad diagnosticada en marzo de 1984 como una leucemia mieloide crónica Ph + , BCR/ABL positivo, que llevó tratamiento con busulfán, hidroxiurea, interferón y arabinósido de citosina durante 15 años. En marzo del 2003 se diagnosticó fase de transformación y en abril se comenzó la administración de Imatinib en dosis de 600mg diarios. Evolutivamente presentó dolores óseos ligeros, edema palpebral y en el día 35 pancitopenia severa, que provocó la suspensión del tratamiento. Se tomaron muestras para medulograma y biopsia de médula ósea y se diagnosticó una aplasia medular severa. Se administró tratamiento con antibioticoterapia de amplio espectro, hemoderivados y factor estimulador de colonias granulocíticas. A pesar de estas medidas terapéuticas, la paciente falleció a los 46 días de suspendido el tratamiento con Imatinib, con un cuadro clínico de aplasia medular irreversible y distrés respiratorio, complicaciones atribuibles al ImatinibA 45-year-old female patient who was diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia Ph+ in March 1984, and had treatment with busulfan, hydroxyurea, interferon and cytosine arabinoside during 15 years is presented. In March 2003, the transformation stage was diagnosed and, in April, she began to receive imatinib at daily doses of 600 mg. Evolutively, she had mild bone pain, palpebral edema and, on the 35th day, severe pancytopenia that caused the suspension of the treatment. Bone marrow samples were taken by aspiration and biopsy, and a severe medular aplasia was diagnosed. Treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotic therapy, hemoderivates, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was applied. In spite of these therapeutic measures, the patient died 46 days after interrupting the treatment with imatinib, with a clinical picture of irreversible medular aplasia and respiratory distress, complications attributable to Imatinib

  4. Improved myocardial perfusion after transmyocardial laser revascularization in a patient with microvascular coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Mesbah Oskui

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of angina that was refractory to medical management. Although her cardiac catheterization revealed microvascular coronary artery disease, her symptoms were refractory to optimal medical management that included ranolazine. After undergoing transmyocardial revascularization, her myocardial ischemia completely resolved and her symptoms dramatically improved. This case suggests that combination of ranolazine and transmyocardial revascularization can be applied to patients with microvascular coronary artery disease.

  5. Dgroup: DG00879 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hioproperazine mesilate (JAN) Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01905 ... Phenothiazine antipsychotics ... DG01478 ... Dopami...ne antagonist ... DG01474 ... Dopamine D2-receptor antagonist ATC code: N05AB08 Phenothiazine antipsychotics DRD2 [HSA:1813] [KO:K04145] ...

  6. Dgroup: DG00973 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG00973 Chemical ... DGroup Lisdexamfetamine ... D08130 ... Lisdexamfetamine (INN) D04747 ... Lisdexamfe...tamine dimesylate (USAN); Lisdexamfetamine mesilate (JAN) ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01970 ... Age...nts for ADHD ATC code: N06BA12 Psychostimulant, Central sympathomimetic agent Active form of prodrug: Dextroamphetamine (Dexamfe

  7. Functional mechanism of neuroprotection by inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako

    2009-08-01

    Neuroprotective therapy has been proposed for age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Inhibitors of type B monoamine oxidase (MAOB-Is), rasagiline and (-)deprenyl, are the most promising candidate neuroprotective drugs. Clinical trials of rasagiline in patients with Parkinson's disease suggest that rasagiline may have some disease-modifying effects. Results using animal and cellular models have proved that the MAOB-Is protect neurons by the intervention of 'intrinsic' mitochondrial apoptotic cascade and the induction of prosurvival antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. Rasagiline-related MAOB-Is prevent mitochondrial permeability transition induced by various insults and activation of subsequent apoptotic cascades: cytochrome c release, casapase activation, and condensation and fragmentation of nuclear DNA. MAOB-Is increase transcription of prosurvival genes through activating the nuclear transcription factor-(NF) system. Rasagiline increases the protein and mRNA levels of GDNF in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, whereas (-)deprenyl increases those of BDNF. Systemic administration of (-)deprenyl and rasagiline increases these neurotrophic factors in the cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease and nonhuman primates. This review presents recent advances in our understanding of the neuroprotection offered by MAOB-Is and possible evaluation of neuroprotective efficacy in clinical samples is discussed.

  8. Monamine oxidase inhibitors: current and emerging agents for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Hubert H; Chen, Jack J

    2007-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) is the predominant isoform responsible for the metabolic breakdown of dopamine in the brain. Selective inhibition of brain MAO-B results in elevation of synaptosomal dopamine concentrations. Data have been reported regarding the selective MAO-B inhibitors, rasagiline and selegiline, for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). Selegiline has demonstrated efficacy as monotherapy in patients with early PD (Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism study), but evidence of selegiline efficacy as adjunctive treatment in levodopa-treated PD patients with motor fluctuations is equivocal. A new formulation of selegiline (Zydis selegiline) has been evaluated in 2 small, placebo-controlled studies as adjunctive therapy to levodopa. The Zydis formulation allows pregastric absorption of selegiline, minimizing first-pass metabolism, and thereby increasing selegiline bioavailability and reducing the concentration of amphetamine metabolites. Rasagiline is a selective, second-generation, irreversible MAO-B inhibitor, with at least 5 times the potency of selegiline in vitro and in animal models. Rasagiline has demonstrated efficacy in 1 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (TVP-1012 in Early Monotherapy for Parkinson's Disease Outpatients) as initial monotherapy in patients with early PD, and in 2 large, controlled trials (Parkinson's Rasagiline: Efficacy and Safety in the Treatment of "Off," Lasting Effect in Adjunct Therapy With Rasagiline Given Once Daily) as adjunctive treatment in levodopa-treated PD patients with motor fluctuations. Unlike selegiline, rasagiline is an aminoindan derivative with no amphetamine metabolites. A randomized clinical trial is underway to confirm preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggesting rasagiline has disease-modifying effects.

  9. Effect of a protease inhibitor on the stability of catalase in liver and blood from acatalasemic and normal mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Ogata, Masana

    1991-01-01

    Effects of Gabexate mesilate (GM) (([ethyl-4-(6-guanidino hexanoyloxy) benzoate] methane sulfonate)), a protease inhibitor, on the activities of catalase in liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice were examined. Preincubation without GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min lowered the catalase activities of liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice, to 24%, 40% and 10% of the initial levels, respectively. But, preincubation with GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min de...

  10. Spontaneous rupture of pheochromocytoma and its clinical features: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Mayumi; Sato, Haruhiro; Yagame, Mitsunori; Shoji, Sunao; Terachi, Toshiro; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2008-09-20

    Rupture of adrenal pheochromocytoma is extremely rare and can be lethal because of dramatic changes in the circulation. We describe a 58-year-old Japanese man who suffered rupture of a pheochromocytoma. The patient was referred to our hospital because of severe hypertension (256/127 mmHg) and a left adrenal tumor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity in the 50-mm left adrenal tumor. Endocrinological examinations showed elevated plasma and urinary catecholamine levels. These findings suggested that the left adrenal tumor was a pheochromocytoma. Phentolamine mesilate was administered intravenously. This resulted in a decrease of the systolic blood pressure to 100 mmHg. On the third hospital day, the patient complained of left back pain, and abdominal computed tomography showed rupture of the pheochromocytoma. Pulmonary congestion and effusion, and paralytic small-intestinal ileus occurred. Blood pressure was controlled, small-intestinal decompression was done with a Miller-Abbot tube, and body water was controlled by fluid replacement. After the general condition of the patient had became stable, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed. Phentolamine mesilate is a useful α-adrenergic blocker. However, care is needed with its administration, because rupture of pheochromocytoma may be related to a decrease in blood pressure induced by phentolamine mesilate.

  11. Israel’s Technology Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Copaxone), Azilect– Rasagiline , a therapy for Parkinson’s disease. Teva’s introduction of this drug presaged its growing interest in biotechnology, an...models. Cell Cure has shown the efficacy of embryonic stem-cell–derived dopaminergic cells, which are used to treat Parkinson’s disease, in animal

  12. The new inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, M30, has a neuroprotective effect against dexamethasone-induced brain cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakevia Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress detrimentally affects the brain and body and can lead to or be accompanied by depression. Although stress and depression may contribute to each other, the exact molecular mechanism underlying the effects is unclear. However, there is a correlation between stress and an increase in glucocorticoid secretion which causes a subsequent increase in monoamine oxidase (MAO activity during stress. Consequently, MAO inhibitors have been used as traditional antidepressant drugs. Cellular treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (a cellular stressor, has been reported to markedly increase both MAO A and MAO B catalytic activities, as well as apoptosis. This study compares the neuroprotective abilities of M30 (a new generation inhibitor of both MAO A and MAO B with rasagiline (Azilect®, another new MAO B inhibitor and selegiline (Deprenyl®, a traditional MAO B inhibitor in the prevention of dexamethasone-induced brain cell death and MAO activity in human neuroblastoma cells, SH-SY5Y. M30 demonstrated the highest inhibitory effect on MAO A; however, M30 showed the lowest inhibitory effect on MAO B enzymatic activity in comparison to rasagiline and selegiline. Although, M30 exhibited the greatest neuroprotective effect by decreasing cell death rates and apoptotic DNA damage compared to rasagiline and selegiline, these neuroprotective effects of M30 were, overall, similar to rasagiline. Summarily, M30 has a generally greater impact on neuroprotection than the MAO B inhibitors, selegiline and rasagiline. Our results suggest that M30 may have great potential in alleviating disorders involving increases in both MAO A and MAO B, such as stress-induced disorders.

  13. Randomized trial of preladenant, given as monotherapy, in patients with early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Rascol, Olivier; Hauser, Robert A; Huyck, Susan; Tzontcheva, Anjela; Capece, Rachel; Ho, Tony W; Sklar, Peter; Lines, Christopher; Michelson, David; Hewitt, David J

    2017-06-06

    To evaluate the adenosine 2a receptor antagonist preladenant as a nondopaminergic drug for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) when given as monotherapy. This was a randomized, 26-week, placebo- and active-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, double-blind trial conducted in adults diagnosed with PD for rasagiline 1 mg (active-control) once daily, or placebo. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline at week 26 in the sum of UPDRS parts 2 (activities of daily living) and 3 scores (UPDRS 2+3 ). The number of patients treated was 1,007. Neither preladenant nor rasagiline was superior to placebo after 26 weeks. The differences vs placebo (95% confidence interval) in UPDRS 2+3 scores (with a negative difference indicating improvement vs placebo) were preladenant 2 mg = 2.60 (0.86, 4.30), preladenant 5 mg = 1.30 (-0.41, 2.94), preladenant 10 mg = 0.40 (-1.29, 2.11), and rasagiline 1 mg = 0.30 (-1.35, 2.03). Post hoc analyses did not identify a single causal factor that could explain the finding of a failed trial. Preladenant was generally well-tolerated with few patients discontinuing due to adverse events (preladenant 7%, rasagiline 3%, placebo 4%). No evidence supporting the efficacy of preladenant as monotherapy was observed in this phase 3 trial. The lack of efficacy of the active control rasagiline makes it difficult to interpret the results. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01155479. This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with early PD, preladenant is not effective as monotherapy at the doses studied (2, 5, 10 mg). © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  15. The autocrine role of tryptase in pressure overload-induced mast cell activation, chymase release and cardiac fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    2016-03-01

    Results and conclusion: The results indicate the presence of PAR-2 on MCs and that tryptase inhibition and nedocromil prevented TAC-induced fibrosis and increases in MC density, activation, and chymase release. Tryptase also significantly increased chymase concentration in ventricular slice culture media, which was prevented by the tryptase inhibitor. Hydroxyproline concentration in culture media was significantly increased with tryptase incubation as compared to the control group and the tryptase group incubated with nafamostat mesilate or chymostatin. We conclude that tryptase contributes to TAC-induced cardiac fibrosis primarily via activation of MCs and the amplified release of chymase.

  16. Tryptase-positive mast cells correlate with angiogenesis in early breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Girolamo; Ammendola, Michele; Patruno, Rosa; Celano, Giuseppe; Zito, Francesco Alfredo; Montemurro, Severino; Rella, Addolorata; Di Lecce, Valentina; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Battista De Sarro, Giovanni; Ribatti, Domenico

    2009-07-01

    Literature data indicate that mast cells (MCs) are involved in tumor angiogenesis due to the release of several pro-angiogenetic factors among which tryptase, a serine protease stored in MCs granules, is one of the most active. However, no data are available concerning the role of MCs in angiogenesis in primary human breast cancer. In this study, we have evaluated the correlations between the number of MCs positive to tryptase (MCDPT), the area occupied by MCs positive to tryptase (MCAPT) and microvascular density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA) in a series of 88 primary T1-3, N0-2 M0 female breast cancer, by means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods. Data demonstrated a significant (r = from 0.78 to 0.89; p-value from 0.001 to 0.002 by Pearson's analysis respectively) correlation between MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD, EA to each other. No correlation concerning MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD, EA and the main clinicopathological features was found. Our results suggest that tryptase-positive MCs play a role in breast cancer angiogenesis. In this context several tryptase inhibitors such as gabexate mesilate and nafamostat mesilate might be evaluated in clinical trials as a new anti-angiogenetic approach.

  17. The Effect of Serine Protease Inhibitors on Airway Inflammation in a Chronic Allergen-Induced Asthma Mouse Model

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    Chih-Che Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors reportedly attenuated airway inflammation and had antioxidant in multiorgan. However, the effects of the serine protease inhibitors nafamostat mesilate (FUT, gabexate mesilate (FOY, and ulinastatin (UTI on a long-term challenged mouse model of chronic asthma are unclear. BALB/c mice (6 mice/group were intratracheally inoculated with five doses of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p; 50 μL, 1 mg/mL at one-week intervals. Therapeutic doses of FUT (0.0625 mg/kg, FOY (20 mg/kg, or UTI (10,000 U/kg were, respectively, injected intraperitoneally into these mice. Control mice received sterile PBS. At 3 days after the last challenge, mice were sacrificed to assess airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, remodeling, and inflammation; lung histological features; and cytokine expression profiles. Compared with untreated controls, mice treated with FUT, FOY, and UTI had decreased AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia, decreased eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration, decreased Der p-induced IL-4 levels in serum and IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-17 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and inhibited nuclear factor (NF-κB activity in lung tissues. The serine protease inhibitors FUT, FOY, and UTI have potential therapeutic benefits for treating asthma by downregulating Th2 cytokines and Th17 cell function and inhibiting NF-κB activation in lung tissue.

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-05-01

    (-)-Gossypol; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, ACAM-1000, ACE-011, Agomelatine, AGS-004, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-317, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BMS-387032, BMS-690514, Bortezomib; Casopitant mesylate, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, CK-1827452, Clofarabine, Conivaptan hydrochloride; Dabigatran etexilate, DADMe-Immucillin-H, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, DC-WT1, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Denosumab, Dienogest, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Edoxaban tosilate, Elacytarabine, Elesclomol, Eltrombopag olamine, Enfuvirtide, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine; Flibanserin, Fludarabine, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, Genistein; I-131-L19-SIP, Idrabiotaparinux sodium, Imatinib mesylate, IMGN-901, Ipilimumab; Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal cisplatin, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Maraviroc, MDV-3100, Mecasermin rinfabate, MP-470, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxcinod, NB-002, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NK-012; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pitavastatin calcium, PL-3994, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, PM-10450; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, ReoT3D, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rozrolimupab; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, Salinosporamide A, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine, Live, Sorafenib; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Tipifarnib, Tipranavir, Trabectedin, Trifluridine/TPI; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vinflunine, Volociximab, Vorinostat; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate

  19. Chick embryo partial ischemia model: a new approach to study ischemia ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamantak Majumder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ischemia is a pathophysiological condition due to blockade in blood supply to a specific tissue thus damaging the physiological activity of the tissue. Different in vivo models are presently available to study ischemia in heart and other tissues. However, no ex vivo ischemia model has been available to date for routine ischemia research and for faster screening of anti-ischemia drugs. In the present study, we took the opportunity to develop an ex vivo model of partial ischemia using the vascular bed of 4(th day incubated chick embryo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ischemia was created in chick embryo by ligating the right vitelline artery using sterile surgical suture. Hypoxia inducible factor- 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha, creatine phospho kinase-MB and reactive oxygen species in animal tissues and cells were measured to confirm ischemia in chick embryo. Additionally, ranolazine, N-acetyl cysteine and trimetazidine were administered as an anti-ischemic drug to validate the present model. Results from the present study depicted that blocking blood flow elevates HIF-1alpha, lipid peroxidation, peroxynitrite level in ischemic vessels while ranolazine administration partially attenuates ischemia driven HIF-1alpha expression. Endothelial cell incubated on ischemic blood vessels elucidated a higher level of HIF-1alpha expression with time while ranolazine treatment reduced HIF-1alpha in ischemic cells. Incubation of caprine heart strip on chick embryo ischemia model depicted an elevated creatine phospho kinase-MB activity under ischemic condition while histology of the treated heart sections evoked edema and disruption of myofibril structures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study concluded that chick embryo partial ischemia model can be used as a novel ex vivo model of ischemia. Therefore, the present model can be used parallel with the known in vivo ischemia models in understanding the mechanistic insight of ischemia development and in

  20. Carbon monoxide induces cardiac arrhythmia via induction of the late Na+ current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Mark L; Yang, Zhaokang; Boyle, John P; Boycott, Hannah E; Scragg, Jason L; Milligan, Carol J; Elies, Jacobo; Duke, Adrian; Thireau, Jérôme; Reboul, Cyril; Richard, Sylvain; Bernus, Olivier; Steele, Derek S; Peers, Chris

    2012-10-01

    Clinical reports describe life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias after environmental exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) or accidental CO poisoning. Numerous case studies describe disruption of repolarization and prolongation of the QT interval, yet the mechanisms underlying CO-induced arrhythmias are unknown. To understand the cellular basis of CO-induced arrhythmias and to identify an effective therapeutic approach. Patch-clamp electrophysiology and confocal Ca(2+) and nitric oxide (NO) imaging in isolated ventricular myocytes was performed together with protein S-nitrosylation to investigate the effects of CO at the cellular and molecular levels, whereas telemetry was used to investigate effects of CO on electrocardiogram recordings in vivo. CO increased the sustained (late) component of the inward Na(+) current, resulting in prolongation of the action potential and the associated intracellular Ca(2+) transient. In more than 50% of myocytes these changes progressed to early after-depolarization-like arrhythmias. CO elevated NO levels in myocytes and caused S-nitrosylation of the Na(+) channel, Na(v)1.5. All proarrhythmic effects of CO were abolished by the NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME, and reversed by ranolazine, an inhibitor of the late Na(+) current. Ranolazine also corrected QT variability and arrhythmias induced by CO in vivo, as monitored by telemetry. Our data indicate that the proarrhythmic effects of CO arise from activation of NO synthase, leading to NO-mediated nitrosylation of Na(V)1.5 and to induction of the late Na(+) current. We also show that the antianginal drug ranolazine can abolish CO-induced early after-depolarizations, highlighting a novel approach to the treatment of CO-induced arrhythmias.

  1. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Robottom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J RobottomDepartment of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.Keywords: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, rasagiline, selegiline, Parkinson's disease, efficacy, safety

  2. Phenotypic variability in LQT3 human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and their response to antiarrhythmic pharmacologic therapy: An in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Michelangelo; Passini, Elisa; Severi, Stefano; Hyttinen, Jari; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-11-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are in vitro models with the clear advantages of their human origin and suitability for human disease investigations. However, limitations include their incomplete characterization and variability reported in different cell lines and laboratories. The purpose of this study was to investigate in silico ionic mechanisms potentially explaining the phenotypic variability of hiPSC-CMs in long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) and their response to antiarrhythmic drugs. Populations of in silico hiPSC-CM models were constructed and calibrated for control (n = 1,463 models) and LQT3 caused by I NaL channelopathy (n = 1,401 models), using experimental recordings for late sodium current (I NaL ) and action potentials (APs). Antiarrhythmic drug therapy was evaluated by simulating mexiletine and ranolazine multichannel effects. As in experiments, LQT3 hiPSC-CMs yield prolonged action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD 90 ) (+34.3% than controls) and large electrophysiological variability. LQT3 hiPSC-CMs with symptomatic APs showed overexpression of I CaL , I K1 , and I NaL , underexpression of I Kr , and increased sensitivity to both drugs compared to asymptomatic LQT3 models. Simulations showed that both mexiletine and ranolazine corrected APD prolongation in the LQT3 population but also highlighted differences in drug response. Mexiletine stops spontaneous APs in more LQT3 hiPSC-CMs models than ranolazine (784/1,401 vs 53/1,401) due to its stronger action on I Na . In silico simulations demonstrate our ability to recapitulate variability in LQT3 and control hiPSC-CM phenotypes, and the ability of mexiletine and ranolazine to reduce APD prolongation, in agreement with experiments. The in silico models also identify potential ionic mechanisms of phenotypic variability in LQT3 hiPSC-CMs, explaining APD prolongation in symptomatic vs asymptomatic LQT3 hiPSC-CMs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  3. The increasing role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in Parkinson's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Lawrence W; Bertoni, John M

    2008-11-01

    The role of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease has expanded with the new monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets. As primary therapy in early disease monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce motor disability and delay the need for levodopa. In more advanced disease requiring levodopa, adjunctive monoamine oxidase B inhibitors reduce 'off' time and may improve gait and freezing. Rasagiline and selegiline oral disintegrating tablets may reduce the safety risks associated with the amfetamine and methamfetamine metabolites of conventional oral selegiline while retaining or improving therapeutic efficacy. Articles were identified by searches of PubMed and searches on the Internet and reviewed. All articles and other referenced materials were retrieved using the keywords 'Parkinson's disease', 'treatment' and 'monoamine oxidase B inhibitor' and were published between 1960 and 2007, with older references selected for historical significance. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Accumulating data support the use of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors as monotherapy for early and mild Parkinson's disease and as adjunctive therapy for more advanced Parkinson's disease with levodopa-associated motor fluctuations. The recently released monoamine oxidase B inhibitor rasagiline and a new formulation, selegiline oral disintegrating tablets, have potential advantages over conventional oral selegiline.

  4. Crystal structures of monoamine oxidase B in complex with four inhibitors of the N-propargylaminoindan class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda, Claudia; Hubálek, Frantisek; Li, Min; Herzig, Yaacov; Sterling, Jeffrey; Edmondson, Dale E; Mattevi, Andrea

    2004-03-25

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) is an outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arylalkylamine neurotransmitters. The crystal structures of MAO B in complex with four of the N-propargylaminoindan class of MAO covalent inhibitors (rasagiline, N-propargyl-1(S)-aminoindan, 6-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan, and N-methyl-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan) have been determined at a resolution of better than 2.1 A. Rasagiline, 6-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan, and N-methyl-N-propargyl-1(R)-aminoindan adopt essentially the same conformation with the extended propargyl chain covalently bound to the flavin and the indan ring located in the rear of the substrate cavity. N-Propargyl-1(S)-aminoindan binds with the indan ring in a flipped conformation with respect to the other inhibitors, which causes a slight movement of the Tyr326 side chain. Four ordered water molecules are an integral part of the active site and establish H-bond interactions to the inhibitor atoms. These structural studies may guide future drug design to improve selectivity and efficacy by introducing appropriate substituents on the rasagiline molecular scaffold.

  5. Drug-printing by flexographic printing technology--a new manufacturing process for orodispersible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Eva Maria; Schliephacke, Ralf; Breitenbach, Armin; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2013-01-30

    Orodispersible films (ODFs) are intended to disintegrate within seconds when placed onto the tongue. The common way of manufacturing is the solvent casting method. Flexographic printing on drug-free ODFs is introduced as a highly flexible and cost-effective alternative manufacturing method in this study. Rasagiline mesylate and tadalafil were used as model drugs. Printing of rasagiline solutions and tadalafil suspensions was feasible. Up to four printing cycles were performed. The possibility to employ several printing cycles enables a continuous, highly flexible manufacturing process, for example for individualised medicine. The obtained ODFs were characterised regarding their mechanical properties, their disintegration time, API crystallinity and homogeneity. Rasagiline mesylate did not recrystallise after the printing process. Relevant film properties were not affected by printing. Results were comparable to the results of ODFs manufactured with the common solvent casting technique, but the APIs are less stressed through mixing, solvent evaporation and heat. Further, loss of material due to cutting jumbo and daughter rolls can be reduced. Therefore, a versatile new manufacturing technology particularly for processing high-potent low-dose or heat sensitive drugs is introduced in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the Efficacy of Different Drugs on Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease: a Network Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Dong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: A network meta-analysis is used to compare the efficacy of ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, apomorphine, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil and levodopa, with placebo as a control, for non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods: PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched from their establishment dates up to January 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs investigating the efficacy of the above ten drugs on the non-motor symptoms of PD. A network meta-analysis combined the evidence from direct comparisons and indirect comparisons and evaluated the pooled weighted mean difference (WMD values and surfaces under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA. The network meta-analysis included 21 RCTs. Results: The analysis results indicated that, using the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III, the efficacies of placebo, ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole and levodopa in treating PD were lower than that of apomorphine (WMD = -10.90, 95% CI = -16.12∼-5.48; WMD = -11.85, 95% CI = -17.31∼-6.16; WMD = -11.15, 95% CI = -16.64∼-5.04; WMD = -11.70, 95% CI = -16.98∼-5.60; WMD = -11.04, 95% CI = -16.97∼-5.34; WMD = -13.27, 95% CI = -19.22∼-7.40; WMD = -10.25, 95% CI = -15.66∼-4.32; and WMD = -11.60, 95% CI = -17.89∼-5.57, respectively. Treatment with ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil or levodopa, with placebo as a control, on PD exhibited no significant differences on PD symptoms when the UPDRS II was used for evaluation. Moreover, using the UPDRS III, the SUCRA values indicated that a pomorphine had the best efficacy on the non-motor symptoms of PD (99.0%. Using the UPDRS II, the SUCRA values for ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil and levodopa treatments, with placebo as a control, indicated that

  7. Comparison of the Efficacy of Different Drugs on Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease: a Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Dong; Cui, Jing-Jun; Song, Jia; Qi, Ce; Ma, Pei-Feng; Wang, Ya-Rong; Bai, Jing

    2018-01-01

    A network meta-analysis is used to compare the efficacy of ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, apomorphine, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil and levodopa, with placebo as a control, for non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched from their establishment dates up to January 2017 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of the above ten drugs on the non-motor symptoms of PD. A network meta-analysis combined the evidence from direct comparisons and indirect comparisons and evaluated the pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) values and surfaces under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA). The network meta-analysis included 21 RCTs. The analysis results indicated that, using the United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III, the efficacies of placebo, ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole and levodopa in treating PD were lower than that of apomorphine (WMD = -10.90, 95% CI = -16.12∼-5.48; WMD = -11.85, 95% CI = -17.31∼-6.16; WMD = -11.15, 95% CI = -16.64∼-5.04; WMD = -11.70, 95% CI = -16.98∼-5.60; WMD = -11.04, 95% CI = -16.97∼-5.34; WMD = -13.27, 95% CI = -19.22∼-7.40; WMD = -10.25, 95% CI = -15.66∼-4.32; and WMD = -11.60, 95% CI = -17.89∼-5.57, respectively). Treatment with ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil or levodopa, with placebo as a control, on PD exhibited no significant differences on PD symptoms when the UPDRS II was used for evaluation. Moreover, using the UPDRS III, the SUCRA values indicated that a pomorphine had the best efficacy on the non-motor symptoms of PD (99.0%). Using the UPDRS II, the SUCRA values for ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil and levodopa treatments, with placebo as a control, indicated that bromocriptine showed the best efficacy on the non

  8. A multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binde, C D; Tvete, I F; Gåsemyr, J; Natvig, B; Klemp, M

    2018-05-30

    To the best of our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews or meta-analyses that compare rasagiline, selegiline and safinamide. Therefore, we aimed to perform a drug class review comparing all available monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors in a multiple treatment comparison. We performed a systematic literature search to identify randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of MAO-B inhibitors in patients with Parkinson's disease. MAO-B inhibitors were evaluated either as monotherapy or in combination with levodopa or dopamine agonists. Endpoints of interest were change in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score and serious adverse events. We estimated the relative effect of each MAO-B inhibitor versus the comparator drug by creating three networks of direct and indirect comparisons. For each of the networks, we considered a joint model. The systematic literature search and study selection process identified 27 publications eligible for our three network analyses. We found the relative effects of rasagiline, safinamide and selegiline treatment given alone and compared to placebo in a model without explanatory variables to be 1.560 (1.409, 1.734), 1.449 (0.873, 2.413) and 1.532 (1.337, 1.757) respectively. We also found all MAO-B inhibitors to be efficient when given together with levodopa. When ranking the MAO-B inhibitors given in combination with levodopa, selegiline was the most effective and rasagiline was the second best. All of the included MAO-B inhibitors were effective compared to placebo when given as monotherapy. Combination therapy with MAO-B inhibitors and levodopa showed that all three MAO-B inhibitors were effective compared to placebo, but selegiline was the most effective drug. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. International Parkinson and movement disorder society evidence-based medicine review: Update on treatments for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H; Katzenschlager, Regina; Lim, Shen-Yang; Barton, Brandon; de Bie, Rob M A; Seppi, Klaus; Coelho, Miguel; Sampaio, Cristina

    2018-03-23

    The objective of this review was to update evidence-based medicine recommendations for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Committee recommendations for treatments of PD were first published in 2002 and updated in 2011, and we continued the review to December 31, 2016. Level I studies of interventions for motor symptoms were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion and quality scoring were as previously reported. Five clinical indications were considered, and conclusions regarding the implications for clinical practice are reported. A total of 143 new studies qualified. There are no clinically useful interventions to prevent/delay disease progression. For monotherapy of early PD, nonergot dopamine agonists, oral levodopa preparations, selegiline, and rasagiline are clinically useful. For adjunct therapy in early/stable PD, nonergot dopamine agonists, rasagiline, and zonisamide are clinically useful. For adjunct therapy in optimized PD for general or specific motor symptoms including gait, rivastigmine is possibly useful and physiotherapy is clinically useful; exercise-based movement strategy training and formalized patterned exercises are possibly useful. There are no new studies and no changes in the conclusions for the prevention/delay of motor complications. For treating motor fluctuations, most nonergot dopamine agonists, pergolide, levodopa ER, levodopa intestinal infusion, entacapone, opicapone, rasagiline, zonisamide, safinamide, and bilateral STN and GPi DBS are clinically useful. For dyskinesia, amantadine, clozapine, and bilateral STN DBS and GPi DBS are clinically useful. The options for treating PD symptoms continues to expand. These recommendations allow the treating physician to determine which intervention to recommend to an individual patient. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Preladenant as an Adjunctive Therapy With Levodopa in Parkinson Disease: Two Randomized Clinical Trials and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Rascol, Olivier; Huyck, Susan B; Capece, Rachel; Ho, Tony W; Sklar, Peter; Lines, Christopher; Michelson, David; Hewitt, David

    2015-12-01

    Preladenant is an adenosine 2A receptor antagonist that reduced "off" time in a placebo-controlled phase 2b trial in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). We sought to confirm its efficacy in phase 3 trials. To evaluate preladenant as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with PD and motor fluctuations. Two 12-week, phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials performed from July 15, 2010, to April 16, 2013. The setting included neurology clinics, clinical research centers, and hospitals in the Americas, the European Union, Eastern Europe, India, and South Africa. Participants included patients with moderate to severe PD taking levodopa who were experiencing motor fluctuations. In trial 1, a total of 778 eligible patients were randomized to the addition of preladenant (2 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg twice daily), placebo, or rasagiline mesylate (1 mg/d) in a 1:1:1:1:1 ratio. In trial 2, a total of 476 eligible patients were randomized to the addition of preladenant (2 mg or 5 mg twice daily) or placebo in a 1:1:1 ratio. The primary outcome measure was change in off time from baseline to week 12. In trial 1, neither preladenant nor rasagiline was superior to placebo in reducing off time from baseline to week 12. The differences vs placebo were -0.10 hour (95% CI, -0.69 to 0.46 hour) for preladenant 2 mg twice daily, -0.20 hour (95% CI, -0.75 to 0.41 hour) for preladenant 5 mg twice daily, -0.00 hour (95% CI, -0.62 to 0.53 hour) for preladenant 10 mg twice daily, and -0.30 hour (95% CI, -0.90 to 0.26 hour) for rasagiline mesylate 1 mg/d. In trial 2, preladenant was not superior to placebo in reducing off time from baseline to week 12. The differences vs placebo were -0.20 hour (95% CI, -0.72 to 0.35 hour) for preladenant 2 mg twice daily and -0.30 hour (95% CI, -0.86 to 0.21 hour) for preladenant 5 mg twice daily. Preladenant was well tolerated, with the most common adverse event that showed an increase over placebo in both trials being constipation (6%-8% for

  11. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robottom, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors. PMID:21423589

  12. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robottom, Bradley J

    2011-01-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.

  13. Antianginal Therapy for Stable Ischemic Heart Disease: A Contemporary Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padala, Santosh K; Lavelle, Michael P; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Cabral, Katherine P; Morrone, Doralisa; Boden, William E; Toth, Peter P

    2017-11-01

    Chronic angina pectoris is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, especially if treated suboptimally. For many patients, aggressive pharmacologic intervention is necessary in order to alleviate anginal symptoms. The optimal treatment of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) should be the prevention of angina and ischemia, with the goal of maximizing both quality and quantity of life. In addition to effective risk factor modification with lifestyle changes, intensive pharmacologic secondary prevention is the therapeutic cornerstone in managing patients with SIHD. Current guidelines recommend a multifaceted therapeutic approach with β-blockers as first-line treatment. Another important pharmacologic intervention for managing SIHD is nitrates. Nitrates can provide both relief of acute angina and can be used prophylactically before exposure to known triggers of myocardial ischemia to prevent angina. Additional therapeutic options include calcium channel blockers and ranolazine, an inhibitor of the late inward sodium current, that can be used alone or in addition to nitrates or β-blockers when these agents fail to alleviate symptoms. Ranolazine appears to be particularly effective for patients with microvascular angina and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, certain antianginal therapies are approved in Europe and have been shown to improve symptoms, including ivabradine, nicorandil, and trimetazidine; however, these have yet to be approved in the United States. Ultimately, there are several different medications available to the physician for managing the patient with SIHD having chronic angina, when either used alone or in combination. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most important therapeutic approaches to optimizing contemporary treatment in response to individual patient needs.

  14. Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Nataraj, Parvathi S; Bartos, Daniel C; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Anderson, Corey L; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-11-01

    KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubule-dependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4-5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant-negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential.

  15. [Drug treatment of early-stage (de novo and "honeymoon") Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P; Defebvre, L

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we discuss the management of motor symptoms during the early phases of Parkinson's disease, excluding that of any other clinical manifestation. We relied primarily upon recently published data and do not describe older publications relating to anticholinergic drugs or amantadine. The initial pharmacological treatment of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is symptomatic and remains based upon dopaminergic drugs. However, the development of new drugs has broadened the range of strategic options and improved overall patient management. Announcing the diagnosis is a critical moment, as pointed out by patients' associations. Patients should be advised to maintain personal, professional, social and physical activities as long as possible. The potential benefit of early pharmacological treatment should be explained, focusing on the possible disease-modifying effect of drugs such as rasagiline. According to current guidelines, L-Dopa is preferred in patients above 65years of age, while those below 65 should be treated with dopamine agonists. Like monoamine oxidase inhibitors B (MAOI-B), synthetic dopamine agonists exhibit several advantages: easy-to-use treatment with a once-daily administration, delayed L-Dopa initiation, significant efficacy on motor symptoms (although lower than that of L-Dopa). MOAI can be prescribed in association with L-Dopa or dopamine agonists. Rasagiline also delays L-Dopa initiation, and consequently motor complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Selegiline Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Mice Lacking the CD157/BST1 Gene, a Risk Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

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    Satoka Kasai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD, a neurodegenerative disorder, is accompanied by various non-motor symptoms including depression and anxiety, which may precede the onset of motor symptoms. Selegiline is an irreversible monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B inhibitor, and is widely used in the treatment of PD and major depression. However, there are few reports about the effects of selegiline on non-motor symptoms in PD. The aim of this study was to explore the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of selegiline, using CD157/BST1 knockout (CD157 KO mouse, a PD-related genetic model displaying depression and anxiety, compared with other antiparkinsonian drugs and an antidepressant, and was to investigate the effects of selegiline on biochemical parameters in emotion-related brain regions. A single administration of selegiline (1–10 mg/kg dose-dependently reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST in CD157 KO mice, but not C57BL/6N wild-type (WT mice. At 10 mg/kg, but not 3 mg/kg, selegiline significantly increased climbing time in CD157 KO mice. A single administration of the antiparkinsonian drugs pramipexole (a dopamine (DA D2/D3 receptor agonist or rasagiline (another MAO-B inhibitor, and repeated injections of a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA, mirtazapine, also decreased immobility time, but did not increase climbing time, in CD157 KO mice. The antidepressant-like effects of 10 mg/kg selegiline were comparable to those of 10 mg/kg rasagiline, and tended to be stronger than those of 1 mg/kg rasagiline. After the FST, CD157 KO mice showed decreases in striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT content, cortical norepinephrine (NE content, and plasma corticosterone concentration. A single administration of selegiline at 10 mg/kg returned striatal 5-HT, cortical NE, and plasma corticosterone levels to those observed in WT mice. In the open field test (OFT, repeated administration of mirtazapine had anxiolytic effects

  17. Fracture-free surfaces of CAD/CAM lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic using micro-slurry jet erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Baba, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the use of micro-slurry jet erosion (MSJE) on CAD/CAM lithium mesilicate glass ceramic (LMGC) that is capable of achieving the fracture-free surface quality. A computer-controlled MSJE process using a low-pressure and low-concentration alumina slurry was applied to diamond-ground LMGC surfaces with surface and subsurface damage. The MSJE processed and diamond-ground LMGC surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine surface morphology, fractures, and residual defects. 3D confocal laser microscopy (CLM) was used to quantitatively characterize all machined surface textures as a function of processing conditions. Our results show that surface and subsurface damage induced in diamond-ground surfaces were significantly diminished after 50-cycle MSJE processing. Fracture-free surfaces were obtained after 100 MSJE cycles. Our measured parameters of the 3D surface topography included the average surface roughness, maximum peak-valley height, highest peak height, lowest valley height, and kurtosis and absolute skewness of height distributions. All these parameters were significantly reduced with the increase of MSJE cycles. This work implies that MSJE promises to be an effective manufacturing technique for the generation of fracture-free LMGC surfaces which are crucial for high-quality monolithic restorations made from the material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical evaluation of a new synthetic protease inhibitor in open heart surgery. Effect on plasma serotonin and histamine release and blood conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Y; Nakano, S; Kaneko, M; Takano, H; Matsuda, H

    1992-01-01

    To achieve more physiologically successful cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the effects of a new synthetic protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesilate (FUT), were examined in open heart surgery. Thirty adult patients were divided into two groups. In Group F (GpF; n = 15), 2 mg/kg/hr of FUT was administered continuously during CPB and 0.2 mg/kg/hr before and after CPB. FUT was not given to Group C patients (GpC; n = 15), who acted as controls. Serotonin and histamine levels in plasma, platelet counts, platelet adhesive function levels, and alpha 2 plasmin inhibitor-plasmin complexes (PIC) were serially measured. The serotonin level in GpF was significantly lower at 5 min of CPB than in GpC. Histamine levels in GpC decreased remarkably after starting CPB, then later recovered; by contrast, they did not decrease in GpF during CPB. At 1 hr after CPB, platelet counts were higher (p platelet adhesion was lower (p platelets and inhibiting fibrinolysis during CPB.

  19. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Hara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL, pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L, and lipase (332 IU/L. There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy.

  20. A clinical examination of antibiotics in continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A prospective randomized controlled trial of BIPM and IPM/CS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shigemichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Kamitani, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy using both protease inhibitors and antibiotics are one of the specific therapeutic methods for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). As for the administered antibiotics, imipenem/cilastatin sodium (IPM/CS) is generally chosen as a first step, but there are only a few reports comparing IPM/CS with other antibiotics. Therefore, we performed a prospective randomized controlled trial between biapenem (BIPM) and IPM/CS as CRAI antibiotics. Twelve patients with SAP were admitted to our institution during April, 2009 since August, 2006, and were randomized into two groups. They were treated with 120 mg/day of nafamostat mesilate and either 1.2 g/day of BIPM (n=6) or 2.0 g/day of IPM/CS (n=6) for CRAI therapy within 48 hours after the administration. The clinical data, inflammatory markers (WBC, CRP), serum pancreatic enzymes (lipase, tripsin, phospholipase A2, elastase 1 and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and contrast-enhanced abdominal Computed Tomography findings were compared between the two groups and the adverse effects were monitored. CRAI therapy was performed for seven days. The curative effect of this therapy was evaluated at the beginning of the treatment, the day 7 and the day 14. Our results suggested that BIPM was a non-recessive antibiotic which had an equal effect in CRAI therapy in comparison with IPM/CS. (author)

  1. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells. Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation.

  2. [Case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following open heart surgery for thoracic aortic aneurysm with parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Maiko; Sakamoto, Mik; Shindo, Yuki; Ando, Yumi; Tateda, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    An 80-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease was scheduled for open heart surgery to repair thoracic aortic aneurysm. Parkinson's symptoms were normally treated using oral levodopa (200 mg), selegiline-hydrochloride (5 mg), bromocriptine-mesilate (2 mg), and amantadine-hydrochloride (200 mg) daily. On the day before surgery, levodopa 50mg was infused intravenously. Another 25 mg of levodopa was infused immediately after surgery. Twenty hours later, the patient developed tremors, heyperventilation, but no obvious muscle rigidity. Two days after surgery, the patient exhibited high fever, hydropoiesis, elevated creatine kinase, and a rise in blood leukocytes. She was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. She was intubated, and received dantrolene sodium. Symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome disappeared on the fourth postoperative day. The stress of open heart surgery, specifically extracorporeal circulation and concomitant dilution of levodopa, triggered neuroleptic malignant syndrome in this patient. Parkinson's patients require higher doses of levodopa prior to surgery to compensate and prevent neuroleptic malignant syndrome after surgery.

  3. The Promise of Neuroprotective Agents in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith ePotashkin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease is characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. Since there are limited treatment options for PD, neuroprotective agents are currently being tested as a means to slow disease progression. Agents targeting oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are prime candidates for neuroprotection. This review identifies Rasagiline, Minocycline and creatine, as the most promising neuroprotective agents for PD, and they are all currently in phase III trials. Other agents possessing protective characteristics in delaying PD include stimulants, vitamins, supplements, and other drugs. Additionally, combination therapies also show benefits in slowing PD progression. The identification of neuroprotective agents for PD provides us with therapeutic opportunities for modifying the course of disease progression and, perhaps, reducing the risk of onset when preclinical biomarkers become available.

  4. A systematic review and mixed treatment comparison of monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease: implications for Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Cruz, Maribel; Díaz-Martínez, Juan Pablo; Soto-Molina, Herman; De Saráchaga, Adib Jorge; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. There are no clinical trials comparing all available pharmacological therapies for the treatment of early PD. The objective of this review is to indirectly analyze the efficacy of antiparkinson drugs currently available in Latin America. A systematic review was performed exploring only placebo-controlled randomized trials comparing antiparkinson monotherapy (levodopa, pramipexole, rasagiline, or selegiline) in patients with PD on Hoehn and Yahr stages I through III published from January 1994 to May 2014. The primary outcome was the mean change in the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) I, II and III. A mixed treatment comparison analysis (indirect comparisons) through a random-effects model was performed. Levodopa demonstrated the highest effects in terms of UPDRS score improvement both from baseline and when compared to other treatments. Levodopa showed a 60.1% probability of granting the greatest reduction in UPDRS I, II and III.

  5. Synthesis of enantiomerically enriched drug precursors and an insect pheromone via reduction of ketones using commercially available carbonyl reductase screening kit "Chiralscreen® OH".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Toshiya; Sakurai, Saki; Natori, Naoki; Hataoka, Manaka; Kinoshita, Takako; Inoue, Hiroyoshi; Hanaya, Kengo; Shoji, Mitsuru; Sugai, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Commercially available "Chiralscreen® OH" starter kit containing five types of carbonyl reductases (E001, E007, E031, E039, and E078) was used for the reduction of several aromatic and aliphatic ketones to obtain enantiomerically enriched drug precursors and an insect pheromone. Almost stereochemically pure secondary alcohols, used in the synthesis of drugs such as (R)-rasagiline mesylate, (S)-rivastigmine, (R)-chlorphenesin carbamate, and (R)-mexiletine, and the insect pheromone (4S,5R)-sitophilure, were conveniently obtained. The enzymes worked well with ketones containing at least one non-bulky substituent at the carbonyl group. The diverse stereochemical preference of the above five carbonyl reductases was clarified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent advances in the management of chronic stable angina II. Anti-ischemic therapy, options for refractory angina, risk factor reduction, and revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kones

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard KonesThe Cardiometabolic Research Institute, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: The objectives in treating angina are relief of pain and prevention of disease ­progression through risk reduction. Mechanisms, indications, clinical forms, doses, and side effects of the traditional antianginal agents – nitrates, ß-blockers, and calcium channel ­blockers – are reviewed. A number of patients have contraindications or remain unrelieved from anginal discomfort with these drugs. Among newer alternatives, ranolazine, recently approved in the United States, indirectly prevents the intracellular calcium overload involved in cardiac ischemia and is a welcome addition to available treatments. None, however, are disease-modifying agents. Two options for refractory angina, enhanced external counterpulsation and spinal cord stimulation (SCS, are presented in detail. They are both well-studied and are effective means of treating at least some patients with this perplexing form of angina. Traditional modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD – smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, ­diabetes, and obesity – account for most of the population-attributable risk. Individual therapy of high-risk patients differs from population-wide efforts to prevent risk factors from appearing or reducing their severity, in order to lower the national burden of disease. Current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines to lower risk in patients with chronic angina are reviewed. The Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE trial showed that in patients with stable angina, optimal medical therapy alone and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with medical therapy were equal in preventing myocardial infarction and death. The integration of COURAGE results into current practice is discussed. For patients who are unstable, with very high risk, with left main coronary artery lesions, in

  7. The Use of Ratiometric Fluorescence Measurements of the Voltage Sensitive Dye Di-4-ANEPPS to Examine Action Potential Characteristics and Drug Effects on Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortigon-Vinagre, M P; Zamora, V; Burton, F L; Green, J; Gintant, G A; Smith, G L

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) and higher throughput platforms have emerged as potential tools to advance cardiac drug safety screening. This study evaluated the use of high bandwidth photometry applied to voltage-sensitive fluorescent dyes (VSDs) to assess drug-induced changes in action potential characteristics of spontaneously active hiPSC-CM. Human iPSC-CM from 2 commercial sources (Cor.4U and iCell Cardiomyocytes) were stained with the VSD di-4-ANEPPS and placed in a specialized photometry system that simultaneously monitors 2 wavebands of emitted fluorescence, allowing ratiometric measurement of membrane voltage. Signals were acquired at 10 kHz and analyzed using custom software. Action potential duration (APD) values were normally distributed in cardiomyocytes (CMC) from both sources though the mean and variance differed significantly (APD 90 : 229 ± 15 ms vs 427 ± 49 ms [mean ± SD, P < 0.01]; average spontaneous cycle length: 0.99 ± 0.02 s vs 1.47 ± 0.35 s [mean ± SD, P < 0.01], Cor.4U vs iCell CMC, respectively). The 10-90% rise time of the AP (T rise ) was ∼6 ms and was normally distributed when expressed as 1/[Formula: see text] in both cell preparations. Both cell types showed a rate dependence analogous to that of adult human cardiac cells. Furthermore, nifedipine, ranolazine, and E4031 had similar effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology in both cell types. However, ranolazine and E4031 induced early after depolarization-like events and high intrinsic firing rates at lower concentrations in iCell CMC. These data show that VSDs provide a minimally invasive, quantitative, and accurate method to assess hiPSC-CM electrophysiology and detect subtle drug-induced effects for drug safety screening while highlighting a need to standardize experimental protocols across preparations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of

  8. One For All? Hitting multiple Alzheimer’s Disease targets with one drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ellen Hughes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs. Intended as a introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key multi-target drug design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch and also the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer’s Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

  9. New frontiers in the pharmacological management of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Mildred D; Aminoff, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Rasagiline, a selective COMT inhibitor, and rotigotine, a transdermal dopamine (D2) agonist, are two new agents that have been approved in the U.S. and Europe for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Rasagiline is approved in the U.S. for both monotherapy and as an adjunct to levodopa. Its role in preventing disease progression has yet to be proven, but a large-scale study (ADAGIO) is under way. Rotigotine is approved for early-stage disease in Europe and the U.S. but is only approved in Europe for late-stage disease. It has recently been recalled due to the formation of insoluble crystals that interfere with absorption and may reduce its efficacy. Measures are being taken by the manufacturer to solve this problem. Istradefylline, and adenosine receptor antagonist, showed early promise but efficacy has not been demonstrated consistently, possibly due to higher than expected placebo effect. This has resulted in a nonapprovable letter from the FDA. With regard to perampanel, additional studies are needed to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Sanifamide and pardoprunox are agents that target multiple receptors that may modulate dyskinesia and other nonmotor symptoms in addition to motor symptoms, but phase III data are not yet available. Lusuride is an older dopamine agonist that has been reformulated as a transdermal patch and as a subcutaneous injection and may offer advantages in refractory patients with motor fluctuations. Sphermaine is a novel cell therapy designed to provide a localized source of levodopa directly to the brain. Gene therapies including AAV-GAD, AAV-AADC and AAV2-neurturin are in early stages of development in patients with advanced-stage disease but early safety data are promising. Copyright 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel multifunctional neuroprotective iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor drugs for neurodegenerative diseases: in vitro studies on antioxidant activity, prevention of lipid peroxide formation and monoamine oxidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hailin; Gal, Shunit; Weiner, Lev M; Bar-Am, Orit; Warshawsky, Abraham; Fridkin, Mati; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2005-10-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative stress, elevated levels of iron and of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B activity, and depletion of antioxidants in the brain may be major pathogenic factors in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. Accordingly, iron chelators, antioxidants and MAO-B inhibitors have shown efficacy in a variety of cellular and animal models of CNS injury. In searching for novel antioxidant iron chelators with potential MAO-B inhibitory activity, a series of new iron chelators has been designed, synthesized and investigated. In this study, the novel chelators were further examined for their activity as antioxidants, MAO-B inhibitors and neuroprotective agents in vitro. Three of the selected chelators (M30, HLA20 and M32) were the most effective in inhibiting iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates with IC50 values (12-16 microM), which is comparable with that of desferal, a prototype iron chelator that is not has orally active. Their antioxidant activities were further confirmed using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In PC12 cell culture, the three novel chelators at 0.1 microM were able to attenuate cell death induced by serum deprivation and by 6-hydroxydopamine. M30 possessing propargyl, the MAO inhibitory moiety of the anti-Parkinson drug rasagiline, displayed greater neuroprotective potency than that of rasagiline. In addition, in vitro, M30 was a highly potent non-selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitor (IC50 < 0.1 microM). However, HLA20 was more selective for MAO-B but had poor MAO inhibition, with an IC50 value of 64.2 microM. The data suggest that M30 and HLA20 might serve as leads in developing drugs with multifunctional activities for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsi, Livia; Vecsei, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence increasing with age. Oxidative stress and glutamate toxicity are involved in its pathomechanism. There are still many unmet needs of PD patients, including the alleviation of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, and the development of therapies with neuroprotective potential. To give an overview of the pharmacological properties, the efficacy and safety of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors in the treatment of PD, with special focus on the results of randomized clinical trials. A literature search was conducted in PubMed for 'PD treatment', 'MAO-B inhibitors', 'selegiline', 'rasagiline', 'safinamide' and 'clinical trials' with 'MAO-B inhibitors' in 'Parkinson' disease'. MAO-B inhibitors have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, improve the dopamine deficient state and may have neuroprotective properties. Safinamide exhibits an anti-glutamatergic effect as well. When applied as monotherapy, MAO-B inhibitors provide a modest, but significant improvement of motor function and delay the need for levodopa. Rasagiline and safinamide were proven safe and effective when added to a dopamine agonist in early PD. As add-on to levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors significantly reduced off-time and were comparable in efficacy to COMT inhibitors. Improvements were achieved as regards certain non-motor symptoms as well. Due to the efficacy shown in clinical trials and their favorable side-effect profile, MAO-B inhibitors are valuable drugs in the treatment of PD. They are recommended as monotherapy in the early stages of the disease and as add-on therapy to levodopa in advanced PD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Fatima; Agarwal, Anushree; Samad, Zainab

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m 2 ), smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the management of SIHD in women.

  13. One pot phytosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Genipa americana fruit extract and its biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Smita, Kumari; Cumbal, Luis; Camacho, Javier; Hernández-Gallegos, Elisabeth; Guadalupe Chávez-López, María de; Grijalva, Marcelo; Andrade, Kleber

    2016-01-01

    In this article, rapid one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using an eco-friendly extract of Genipa americana L. fruit is described. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies demonstrated that small molecules such as genipin, genipaol, geniposide and ranolazine can act as reducer as well as stabilizers. The monodispersed, spherical GNPs were further characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy at λ max = 535 nm, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. This synthetic approach offers a greener and alternate route to the preparation of GNPs free from toxic chemical components and stable for 6–7 months under room temperature. The green synthesized GNPs showed weak antioxidant efficacy against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and no cytotoxicity against A-549 and HeLa human cancer cell lines, from lung and cervix. This study opens a new industrial scope of G. americana fruit in nanoscience and as surface modified GNPs can be developed into a successful drug carrier for future pharmaceutical products. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized by Genipa americana fruit extract. • TEM-DLS analysis confirmed that the average particle size is 30.4 ± 14.9 nm. • Nanoparticles showed weak antioxidant and no cytotoxicity activity.

  14. One pot phytosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Genipa americana fruit extract and its biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Brajesh, E-mail: krmbraj@gmail.com [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Av. Gral. Rumiñahui s/n, Sangolqui, P.O. BOX 171-5-231B (Ecuador); Smita, Kumari; Cumbal, Luis [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Av. Gral. Rumiñahui s/n, Sangolqui, P.O. BOX 171-5-231B (Ecuador); Camacho, Javier [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Av. Gral. Rumiñahui s/n, Sangolqui, P.O. BOX 171-5-231B (Ecuador); Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Departamento de Farmacología, C.P. 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Hernández-Gallegos, Elisabeth; Guadalupe Chávez-López, María de [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Departamento de Farmacología, C.P. 07360 Mexico City (Mexico); Grijalva, Marcelo; Andrade, Kleber [Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE, Av. Gral. Rumiñahui s/n, Sangolqui, P.O. BOX 171-5-231B (Ecuador)

    2016-05-01

    In this article, rapid one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using an eco-friendly extract of Genipa americana L. fruit is described. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies demonstrated that small molecules such as genipin, genipaol, geniposide and ranolazine can act as reducer as well as stabilizers. The monodispersed, spherical GNPs were further characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy at λ{sub max} = 535 nm, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. This synthetic approach offers a greener and alternate route to the preparation of GNPs free from toxic chemical components and stable for 6–7 months under room temperature. The green synthesized GNPs showed weak antioxidant efficacy against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and no cytotoxicity against A-549 and HeLa human cancer cell lines, from lung and cervix. This study opens a new industrial scope of G. americana fruit in nanoscience and as surface modified GNPs can be developed into a successful drug carrier for future pharmaceutical products. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized by Genipa americana fruit extract. • TEM-DLS analysis confirmed that the average particle size is 30.4 ± 14.9 nm. • Nanoparticles showed weak antioxidant and no cytotoxicity activity.

  15. Sexual function in patients with chronic angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A; Henderson, Luana

    2013-06-01

    Drugs for erectile dysfunction (ED) may be contraindicated with nitrates commonly used to treat patients with angina pectoris, and certain antianginal therapies may worsen ED. The American Heart Association and the Princeton Consensus Conference panel of experts recommend that patients with coronary artery disease and ED who experience angina pectoris undergo full medical evaluations to assess the cardiovascular risks associated with resuming sexual activity before being prescribed therapy for ED. Current antianginal therapies include β blockers, calcium channel blockers, short- and long-acting nitrates, and ranolazine, a late sodium current inhibitor. Short- and long-acting nitrates remain a contraindication with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors commonly used to treat patients with ED, and the benefits of the other antianginal therapies must be weighed against their effects on cardiovascular health and erectile function. In conclusion, patients with coronary artery disease and ED who wish to initiate phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy and need to discontinue nitrate therapy need treatment options that manage their angina pectoris effectively, maintain their cardiovascular health, and provide the freedom to maintain their sexual function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Breakdown of mucin as barrier to digestive enzymes in the ischemic rat small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Chang

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the epithelial/mucosal barrier in the small intestine has been associated with different pathologies that originate and/or develop in the gastrointestinal tract. We showed recently that mucin, the main protein in the mucus layer, is disrupted during early periods of intestinal ischemia. This event is accompanied by entry of pancreatic digestive enzymes into the intestinal wall. We hypothesize that the mucin-containing mucus layer is the main barrier preventing digestive enzymes from contacting the epithelium. Mucin breakdown may render the epithelium accessible to pancreatic enzymes, causing its disruption and increased permeability. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of mucin as a protection for epithelial integrity and function. A rat model of 30 min splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO was used to study the degradation of two mucin isoforms (mucin 2 and 13 and two epithelial membrane proteins (E-cadherin and toll-like receptor 4, TLR4. In addition, the role of digestive enzymes in mucin breakdown was assessed in this model by luminal inhibition with acarbose, tranexamic acid, or nafamostat mesilate. Furthermore, the protective effect of the mucin layer against trypsin-mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelium was studied in vitro. Rats after SAO showed degradation of mucin 2 and fragmentation of mucin 13, which was not prevented by protease inhibition. Mucin breakdown was accompanied by increased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran as well as degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4. Addition of mucin to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro protected against trypsin-mediated degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4 and reduced permeability of FITC-dextran across the monolayer. These results indicate that mucin plays an important role in the preservation of the mucosal barrier and that ischemia but not digestive enzymes disturbs mucin integrity, while digestive enzymes actively mediate epithelial cell

  17. Mechanism of As2O3-Induced Action Potential Prolongation and Using hiPS-CMs to Evaluate the Rescue Efficacy of Drugs With Different Rescue Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meng; Feng, Lifang; Shi, Yanhui; Wang, Junnan; Liu, Yan; Li, Fengmei; Li, Baoxin

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been verified as a breakthrough in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia in recent decades. However, cardiotoxicity, especially long QT syndrome (LQTS) has become the most important issue during As2O3 treatment. The characterized mechanisms behind this adverse effect are inhibition of cardiac hERG channel trafficking and increase of cardiac calcium currents. In our study, we found a new pathway underlying As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity that As2O3 accelerates lysosomal degradation of hERG on plasma membrane after using brefeldin A (BFA) to block protein trafficking. Then we explored pharmacological rescue strategies on As2O3-induced LQTS, and found that 4 therapeutic agents exert rescue efficacy via 3 different pathways: fexofenadine and astemizole facilitate hERG trafficking via promotion of channel-chaperone formation after As2O3 incubation; ranolazine slows hERG degradation in the presence of As2O3; and resveratrol shows significant attenuation on calcium current increase triggered by As2O3. Moreover, we used human-induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) to evaluate the rescue effects of the above agents on As2O3-induced prolongation of action potential duration (APD) and demonstrated that fexofenadine and resveratrol significantly ameliorate the prolonged APD. These observations suggested that pharmacological chaperone like fexofenadine and resveratrol might have the potential to protect against the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Direct toxic effects of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke on cardiac myocytes at clinically relevant concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shigeyuki; Zhang Xiuquan; Kadono, Toshie; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Rollins, Douglas; Badger, Troy; Rodesch, Christopher K.; Barry, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Our goal was to determine if clinically relevant concentrations of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke (CSE) have direct deleterious effects on ventricular myocytes during simulated ischemia, and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Methods: CSE was prepared with a smoking chamber. Ischemia was simulated by metabolic inhibition (MI) with cyanide (CN) and 0 glucose. Adult rabbit and mouse ventricular myocyte [Ca 2+ ] i was measured by flow cytometry using fluo-3. Mitochondrial [Ca 2+ ] was measured with confocal microscopy, and Rhod-2 fluorescence. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) was detected by TMRM fluorescence and myocyte contracture. Myocyte oxidative stress was quantified by dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence with confocal microscopy. Results: CSE 0.1% increased myocyte contracture caused by MI. The nicotine concentration (HPLC) in 0.1% CSE was 15 ng/ml, similar to that in humans after smoking cigarettes. CSE 0.1% increased mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake, and increased the susceptibility of mitochondria to the MPT. CSE 0.1% increased DCF fluorescence in isolated myocytes, and increased [Ca 2+ ] i in paced myocytes exposed to 2.0 mM CN, 0 glucose (P-MI). These effects were inhibited by the superoxide scavenger Tiron. The effect of CSE on [Ca 2+ ] i during P-MI was also prevented by ranolazine. Conclusions: CSE in clinically relevant concentrations increases myocyte [Ca 2+ ] i during simulated ischemia, and increases myocyte susceptibility to the MPT. These effects appear to be mediated at least in part by oxidative radicals in CSE, and likely contribute to the effects of cigarette smoke to increase myocardial infarct size, and to decrease angina threshold

  19. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchrist, Kristin H., E-mail: kgilchrist@rti.org; Lewis, Gregory F.; Gay, Elaine A.; Sellgren, Katelyn L.; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5 minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. - Highlights: • Six parameters describing arrhythmia were defined and measured for known compounds. • Software for efficient parameter extraction from large MEA data sets was developed. • The proposed cellular parameter set is predictive of clinical drug proarrhythmia.

  20. Residual Angina After Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinsky, Anna; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Philip G; McGuire, Darren K; Spertus, John A; Beltrame, John F; Jang, Jae-Sik; Goyal, Abhinav; Butala, Neel M; Yeh, Robert W; Arnold, Suzanne V

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that among patients with stable coronary artery disease, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have less angina and more silent ischemia when compared with those without DM. However, the burden of angina in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has not been recently examined. In a 10-site US PCI registry, we assessed angina before and at 1, 6, and 12 months after elective PCI with the Seattle Angina Questionnaire angina frequency score (range, 0-100, higher=better). We also examined the rates of antianginal medication prescriptions at discharge. A multivariable, repeated-measures Poisson model was used to examine the independent association of DM with angina over the year after treatment. Among 1080 elective PCI patients (mean age, 65 years; 74.7% men), 34.0% had DM. At baseline and at each follow-up, patients with DM had similar angina prevalence and severity as those without DM. Patients with DM were more commonly prescribed calcium channel blockers and long-acting nitrates at discharge (DM versus not: 27.9% versus 20.9% [ P =0.01] and 32.8% versus 25.5% [ P =0.01], respectively), whereas β-blockers and ranolazine were prescribed at similar rates. In the multivariable, repeated-measures model, the risk of angina was similar over the year after PCI in patients with versus without DM (relative risk, 1.04; range, 0.80-1.36). Patients with stable coronary artery disease and DM exhibit a burden of angina that is at least as high as those without DM despite more antianginal prescriptions at discharge. These findings contradict the conventional teachings that patients with DM experience less angina because of silent ischemia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  2. A shift in myocardial substrate, improved endothelial function, and diminished sympathetic activity may contribute to the anti-anginal impact of very-low-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M F

    2004-01-01

    A new category of anti-anginal drug - exemplified by ranolazine - is believed to work by partially inhibiting cardiac oxidation of fatty acids; oxidation of glucose requires less oxygen per mol of ATP generated, and thus is preferable to fat oxidation when oxygen availability is limiting in underperfused cardiac tissue. Unfortunately, there is no reason to believe that these drugs inhibit fat oxidation selectively in the heart; thus, chronic use of these drugs can be expected to increase body fat stores until the original rate of fat oxidation is restored by mass action - presumably negating the therapeutic benefit in angina, while exacerbating the manifold adverse effects of insulin resistance syndrome. The rational way to decrease cardiac metabolic reliance on fatty acids is to consume a very-low-fat quasi-vegan diet (i.e., 10% fat calories). Indeed, such diets are known to have a rapid and substantial therapeutic impact on anginal symptoms, while concurrently benefiting insulin sensitivity, markedly improving serum lipid profile, promoting leanness, and lessening coronary risk. A reduction in diurnal insulin secretion might also be achieved, which would be expected to decrease sympathetic activity. While reduced myocardial demand for oxygen doubtless contributes to the beneficial impact of such diets on angina, it is likely that improved cardiac perfusion consequent to improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation also plays a role in this regard. Supplemental carnitine, also beneficial in angina, appears to improve utilization of glucose in the ischemic myocardium by lowering elevated acetyl-coA levels and thereby disinhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase. Certain other nutraceuticals may aid control of angina by improving endothelial function. In the longer term, these measures have the potential to slow or reverse the progression of stenotic lesions that underlie most cases of angina. These safe and relatively inexpensive nutritional strategies for coping with

  3. Treatment of Angina and Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samim, Arang; Nugent, Lynn; Mehta, Puja K.; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD) is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac ischemia and angina, more commonly diagnosed in women. Patients with MCD present with the triad of persistent chest pain, ischemic changes on stress testing, and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) on cardiac catheterization. Data from National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study has shown that the diagnosis of MCD is not benign, with a 2.5% annual risk of adverse cardiac events including myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, or death. The gold standard diagnostic test for MCD is an invasive coronary reactivity test (CRT), which uses acetylcholine, adenosine, and nitroglycerin to test the endothelial dependent and independent, microvascular and macrovascular coronary function. The CRT allows for diagnostic and treatment options as well as further risk stratifying patients for future cardiovascular events. Treatment of angina and MCD should be aimed at ischemia disease management to reduce risk of adverse cardiac events, ameliorating symptoms to improve quality of life, and to decrease the morbidity from unnecessary and repeated cardiac catheterization in patients with open coronary arteries. A comprehensive treatment approach aimed at risk factor managment, including lifestyle counseling regarding smoking cessation, nutrition and physical activity should be initiated. Current pharmacotherapy for MCD can include the treatment of microvascular endothelial dysfunction (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, low dose aspirin), as well as treatment for angina and myocardial ischemia (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, ranolazine). Additional symptom management techniques can include tri-cyclic medication, enhanced external counterpulsation, autogenic training, and spinal cord stimulation. While our current therapies are effective in the treatment

  4. Effects of expiring reimbursability of pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN, pentalong®) on anti-anginal therapy: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmsmann, Thomas; Chenot, Jean-François; Angelow, Aniela

    2015-08-01

    Pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN) was the most commonly prescribed long-acting nitrate in Germany. We aimed to assess whether the discontinuation of PETN reimbursability in 2011 resulted in alternative prescriptions of anti-anginal medications or in a discontinuation of anti-anginal therapy. This is an observational study using health claims data from one German federal state analysing all patients discontinuing a PETN treatment. Patients starting a new alternative anti-anginal treatment (long-acting nitrates, molsidome, ivabradine and ranolazine) were compared with patients without a new anti-anginal treatment with respect to use of short-acting nitrates, beta blockers (BBs) and calcium channel blockers (CCBs). Out of 12,909 patients, 12,763 (99%) discontinued PETN until 12/2012. Of these, 52% started an alternative anti-anginal treatment, 43% did not receive any alternative treatment and 5% were excluded from analysis. Before termination of PETN reimbursability, 65% of patients received BBs, 29% CCBs and 10% short-acting nitrates. In patients started on alternative anti-anginal treatment, prescription rates for short-acting nitrates, BBs and CCBs remained constant after discontinuing PETN. In patients without any alternative anti-anginal treatment, prescription rates for BBs and CCBs did not change meaningfully (<3%), and prescription rates for short-acting nitrates decreased from 9% to 6%. Half of the patients discontinued PETN without alternative. This did not lead to increased prescription rates of standard IHD medications or total medication number indicating that there might still be a high percentage of ischaemic heart disease patients treated unnecessarily with long-acting nitrates. The undertreatment with prognostically relevant first-line medications indicates a need for better guideline implementation activities. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatima Samad,1 Anushree Agarwal,2 Zainab Samad3 1Aurora Cardiovascular Services, Aurora Sinai/Aurora St Luke’s Medical Centers, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m2, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the

  6. Dynamic Action Potential Restitution Contributes to Mechanical Restitution in Right Ventricular Myocytes From Pulmonary Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Matthew E L; Pervolaraki, Eleftheria; Bernus, Olivier; White, Ed

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the steepened dynamic action potential duration (APD) restitution of rats with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) and right ventricular (RV) failure and tested whether the observed APD restitution properties were responsible for negative mechanical restitution in these myocytes. PAH and RV failure were provoked in male Wistar rats by a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT) and compared with saline-injected animals (CON). Action potentials were recorded from isolated RV myocytes at stimulation frequencies between 1 and 9 Hz. Action potential waveforms recorded at 1 Hz were used as voltage clamp profiles (action potential clamp) at stimulation frequencies between 1 and 7 Hz to evoke rate-dependent currents. Voltage clamp profiles mimicking typical CON and MCT APD restitution were applied and cell shortening simultaneously monitored. Compared with CON myocytes, MCT myocytes were hypertrophied; had less polarized diastolic membrane potentials; had action potentials that were triggered by decreased positive current density and shortened by decreased negative current density; APD was longer and APD restitution steeper. APD90 restitution was unchanged by exposure to the late Na + -channel blocker (5 μM) ranolazine or the intracellular Ca 2+ buffer BAPTA. Under AP clamp, stimulation frequency-dependent inward currents were smaller in MCT myocytes and were abolished by BAPTA. In MCT myocytes, increasing stimulation frequency decreased contraction amplitude when depolarization duration was shortened, to mimic APD restitution, but not when depolarization duration was maintained. We present new evidence that the membrane potential of PAH myocytes is less stable than normal myocytes, being more easily perturbed by external currents. These observations can explain increased susceptibility to arrhythmias. We also present novel evidence that negative APD restitution is at least in part responsible for the negative mechanical restitution in PAH myocytes. Thus

  7. Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B in Psychiatry and Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Maurice Finberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B are in clinical use for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders respectively. Elucidation of the molecular structure of the active sites of the enzymes has enabled a precise determination of the way in which substrates and inhibitor molecules are metabolized, or inhibit metabolism of substrates, respectively. Despite the knowledge of the strong antidepressant efficacy of irreversible MAO inhibitors, their clinical use has been limited by their side effect of potentiation of the cardiovascular effects of dietary amines (cheese effect. A number of reversible MAO-A inhibitors which are devoid of cheese effect have been described in the literature, but only one, moclobemide, is currently in clinical use. The irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B, selegiline and rasagiline, are used clinically in treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and a recently introduced reversible MAO-B inhibitor, safinamide, has also been found efficacious. Modification of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of selegiline by transdermal administration has led to the development of a new drug form for treatment of depression. The clinical potential of MAO inhibitors together with detailed knowledge of the enzyme’s binding site structure should lead to future developments with these drugs.

  8. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2006-01-01

    The current development of emerging pharmacological treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), front preclinical to launch, is summarized. Advances over the past year are highlighted, including the significant progress of several drugs through various stages of development. Several agents have been discontinued from development, either because of adverse effects or lack of clinical efficacy. The methyl-esterified form of L-DOPA (melevodopa) and the monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline have both been launched. With regard to the monoamine re-uptake inhibitors, many changes have been witnessed, with new agents reaching preclinical development and pre-existing ones being discontinued or having no development reported. Of the dopamine agonists, many continue to progress successfully through clinical trials. Others have struggled to demonstrate a significant advantage over currently available treatments and have been discontinued. The field of non-dopaminergic treatments remains dynamic. The alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists and the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists remain in clinical trials. Trials of the neuronal' synchronization modulator levetiracetam are at an advanced stage, and there has also been a new addition to the class (ie, seletracetam). There has been a change in the landscape of neuroprotective agents that modulate disease progression. Candidates from the classes of growth factors and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors have been discontinued, or no development has been reported, and the mixed lineage kinase inhibitor CEP-1347 has been discontinued for PD treatment. Other drugs in this field, such as neuroimmunophilins, estrogens and alpha-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors, remain in development.

  9. Effect of medical and surgical interventions on health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Deuschl, Günther

    2007-04-30

    Motor-related parameters are the standard outcome parameters for treatment interventions. Nonetheless, subjective appraisals about the consequences of treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are meanwhile established and may uncover important aspects of interventions. We have reviewed the literature with a defined search strategy and collected 61 clinical trials, which have used HRQoL as a planned outcome parameter. The articles were rated similarly as for the Task Force report of the Movement Disorder Society on interventions for Parkinson's disease (PD), but the relevant outcome parameter was HRQoL. We found that unilateral pallidotomy, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, and rasagiline are efficacious to improve the HRQoL of PD patients. For many other interventions, the efficacy to improve HRQoL in the PD setting cannot be considered to be proven so far. HRQoL should be part of future trial designs and more research is necessary to understand the determinants of QoL in PD.

  10. Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B in Psychiatry and Neurology.

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    Finberg, John P M; Rabey, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B are in clinical use for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders respectively. Elucidation of the molecular structure of the active sites of the enzymes has enabled a precise determination of the way in which substrates and inhibitor molecules are metabolized, or inhibit metabolism of substrates, respectively. Despite the knowledge of the strong antidepressant efficacy of irreversible MAO inhibitors, their clinical use has been limited by their side effect of potentiation of the cardiovascular effects of dietary amines ("cheese effect"). A number of reversible MAO-A inhibitors which are devoid of cheese effect have been described in the literature, but only one, moclobemide, is currently in clinical use. The irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B, selegiline and rasagiline, are used clinically in treatment of Parkinson's disease, and a recently introduced reversible MAO-B inhibitor, safinamide, has also been found efficacious. Modification of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of selegiline by transdermal administration has led to the development of a new drug form for treatment of depression. The clinical potential of MAO inhibitors together with detailed knowledge of the enzyme's binding site structure should lead to future developments with these drugs.

  11. Medical management of Parkinson's disease: focus on neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Marie-Catherine; Alcaraz-Zubeldia, Mireya; Rios, Camilo

    2011-06-01

    Neuroprotection refers to the protection of neurons from excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis as principal mechanisms of cell loss in a variety of diseases of the central nervous system. Our interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment is focused on drugs with neuroprotective properties in preclinical experiments and evidence-based efficacy in human subjects. To this date, neuroprotection has never been solidly proven in clinical trials but recent adequate markers and/or strategies to study and promote this important goal are described. A myriad of compounds with protective properties in cell cultures and animal models yield to few treatments in clinical practice. At present, markers of neuronal vitality, disease modifying effects and long term clinical stability are the elements searched for in clinical trials. This review highlights new strategies to monitor patients with PD. Currently, neuroprotection in subjects has not been solidly achieved for selegiline and pramipexole; however, a recent rasagiline trial design is showing new indications of disease course modifying effects. In neurological practice, it is of utmost importance to take into account the potential neuroprotection exerted by a treatment in conjunction with its symptomatic efficacy.

  12. TVP1022 and propargylamine protect neonatal rat ventricular myocytes against doxorubicin-induced and serum starvation-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Yana; Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Berdichevski, Alexandra; Liani, Esti; Maor, Gila; Reiter, Irina; Youdim, Moussa B H; Binah, Ofer

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported that propargylamine derivatives such as rasagiline (Azilect) and its S-isomer TVP1022 are neuroprotective. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the neuroprotective agents TVP1022 and propargylamine (the active moiety of propargylamine derivatives) are also cardioprotective. We specifically investigated the protective efficacy of TVP1022 and propargylamine in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) against apoptosis induced by the anthracycline chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin and by serum starvation. We demonstrated that pretreatment of NRVM cultures with TVP1022 or propargylamine attenuated doxorubicin-induced and serum starvation-induced apoptosis, inhibited the increase in cleaved caspase 3 levels, and reversed the decline in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These cytoprotective effects were shown to reside in the propargylamine moiety. Finally, we showed that TVP1022 neither caused proliferation of the human cancer cell lines HeLa and MDA-231 nor interfered with the anti-cancer efficacy of doxorubicin. These results suggest that TVP1022 should be considered as a novel cardioprotective agent against ischemic insults and against anthracycline cardiotoxicity and can be coadministered with doxorubicin in the treatment of human malignancies.

  13. Therapeutic advances in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Poewe, Werner; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Krismer, Florian

    2015-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative diseases leading to severe disability and ultimately death within less than 10 y. Despite increasing efforts in basic and clinical research, effective therapies for these atypical parkinsonian disorders are lacking. Although earlier small clinical studies in MSA and PSP mainly focused on symptomatic treatment, advances in the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these diseases and in the search for biomarkers have paved the way for the first large and well-designed clinical trials aiming at disease modification. Targets of intervention in these trials have included α-synuclein inclusion pathology in the case of MSA and tau-related mechanisms in PSP. Since 2013, four large randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind disease-modification trials have been completed and published, using rasagiline (MSA), rifampicin (MSA), tideglusib (PSP), or davunetide (PSP). All of these failed to demonstrate signal efficacy with regard to the primary outcome measures. In addition, two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials have studied the efficacy of droxidopa in the symptomatic treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, including patients with MSA, with positive results in one trial. This review summarizes the design and the outcomes of these and other smaller trials published since 2013 and attempts to highlight priority areas of future therapeutic research in MSA and PSP. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Pharmacotherapy for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack J; Swope, David M

    2007-12-01

    The available pharmacotherapies for Parkinson's disease address symptomatology because no agent has been demonstrated to provide definite neuroprotection against the disease. Choice of pharmacotherapy must include consideration of short-term benefits as well as long-term consequences. Patients with mild Parkinson's disease often function adequately without symptomatic treatment. However, recent data suggest that initiation of treatment with a well-tolerated agent (e.g., the monoamine oxidase [MAO]-B inhibitor rasagiline) in the absence of functional impairment is associated with improved long-term outcomes. Consideration should also be given to many patient-specific factors, including patient expectations, level of disability, employment status, functional as well as chronologic age, expected efficacy and tolerability of drugs, and response to previous Parkinson's disease therapies. Increasingly, initial monotherapy begins with a nondopaminergic agent or, if the patient is considered functionally young, a dopamine agonist. Since Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder, adjustments to pharmacotherapy must be expected over time. When greater symptomatic relief is desired, or in the more frail elderly patient, levodopa therapy should be considered. If motor fluctuations develop, addition of a catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor or MAO-B inhibitor should be considered. For management of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, addition of amantadine is an option. Surgery may be considered when patients need additional symptomatic control or are experiencing severe motor complications despite pharmacologically optimized therapy.

  15. TVP1022 attenuates cardiac remodeling and kidney dysfunction in experimental volume overload-induced congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Zaid A; Barac, Yaron D; Kostin, Sawa; Roguin, Ariel; Ovcharenko, Elena; Awad, Hoda; Blank, Ayelet; Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Schaper, Jutta; Youdim, Moussa; Binah, Ofer

    2011-07-01

    Despite the availability of many pharmacological and mechanical therapies, the mortality rate among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remains high. We tested the hypothesis that TVP1022 (the S-isomer of rasagiline; Azilect), a neuroprotective and cytoprotective molecule, is also cardioprotective in the settings of experimental CHF in rats. In rats with volume overload-induced CHF, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of TVP1022 (7.5 mg/kg) on cardiac function, structure, biomarkers, and kidney function. Treatment with TVP1022 for 7 days before CHF induction prevented the increase in left ventricular end-diastolic area and end-systolic area, and the decrease in fractional shortening measured 14 days after CHF induction. Additionally, TVP1022 pretreatment attenuated CHF-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, plasma and ventricular B-type natriuretic peptide levels, and reactive oxygen species expression. Further, in CHF rats, TVP1022 decreased cytochrome c and caspase 3 expression, thereby contributing to the cardioprotective efficacy of the drug. TVP1022 also enhanced the urinary Na(+) excretion and improved the glomerular filtration rate. Similar cardioprotective effects were obtained when TVP1022 was given to rats after CHF induction. TVP1022 attenuated the adverse functional, structural, and molecular alterations in CHF, rendering this drug a promising candidate for improving cardiac and renal function in this disease state.

  16. Outcomes from switching from rotigotine patch to alternate therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Shilpa; Jaffery, Manall; Dewey, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    When rotigotine patch was withdrawn from the US market, we prospectively gathered data on efficacy, side effects, and daytime sedation on patients while taking rotigotine and following the switch to alternate therapies. Patients rated the efficacy of rotigotine on a scale of 0-5 (ineffective to extremely effective) and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. At a follow-up visit a mean of 3 months later, patients rated their change in efficacy and side effects on a scale of -3 to +3 (much worse to much better) and again completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Thirty-three patients were switched to a single alternate treatment. On rotigotine, the average efficacy score was 3.5, and after switching, the average change in efficacy was -0.67 (worsening). Average change scores for efficacy and adverse effects were 0.25 and 0.38 for levodopa, -0.88 and -0.25 for ropinirole IR, -1.2 and -0.83 for ropinirole XL, -0.80 and 1.0 for pramipexole, and -1.0 and 0.50 for rasagiline, respectively. Average change in Epworth score on each alternate agent was -3.9, -2.3, 1.3, 3.0, and 1. Rotigotine was an effective treatment with all groups deteriorating after switch except for the levodopa group. Fifty-eight percent of patients preferred rotigotine versus 36% preferring the alternate treatment.

  17. Therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph; Poewe, Werner

    2012-08-01

    This review examines currently available therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease, emphasizing evidence-based data as well as a patient-centered approach to the treatment of motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although clinical trials of disease-modifying approaches have been thus far disappointing, steady advances are being made in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. In this review, we focus on recent studies with monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors (selegiline and rasagiline), coenzyme Q10, creatine, and exercise in early Parkinson's disease. We also discuss the relative merits and disadvantages of delaying the initiation of levodopa therapy, the role of dopamine agonists, particularly ropinirole and pramipexole, and management of motor and behavioral complications, such as fluctuations, dyskinesias and impulse-control disorders. Novel formulations and delivery approaches for conventional and new drugs are also discussed. Finally, we review recent studies of surgical treatments of Parkinson's disease, such as deep brain stimulation. Numerous clinical trials have provided evidence that health-related quality of life can be substantially improved with early diagnosis and institution of exercise and other physical measures, appropriate timing of dopaminergic therapy, and strategies to delay and treat levodopa-related motor complications and nonmotor Parkinson's disease-related symptoms.

  18. A reductive aminase from Aspergillus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleku, Godwin A.; France, Scott P.; Man, Henry; Mangas-Sanchez, Juan; Montgomery, Sarah L.; Sharma, Mahima; Leipold, Friedemann; Hussain, Shahed; Grogan, Gideon; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2017-10-01

    Reductive amination is one of the most important methods for the synthesis of chiral amines. Here we report the discovery of an NADP(H)-dependent reductive aminase from Aspergillus oryzae (AspRedAm, Uniprot code Q2TW47) that can catalyse the reductive coupling of a broad set of carbonyl compounds with a variety of primary and secondary amines with up to >98% conversion and with up to >98% enantiomeric excess. In cases where both carbonyl and amine show high reactivity, it is possible to employ a 1:1 ratio of the substrates, forming amine products with up to 94% conversion. Steady-state kinetic studies establish that the enzyme is capable of catalysing imine formation as well as reduction. Crystal structures of AspRedAm in complex with NADP(H) and also with both NADP(H) and the pharmaceutical ingredient (R)-rasagiline are reported. We also demonstrate preparative scale reductive aminations with wild-type and Q240A variant biocatalysts displaying total turnover numbers of up to 32,000 and space time yields up to 3.73 g l-1 d-1.

  19. [New orientations in the management of advanced, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): combination of surgery and systemic therapy with imatinib in a case of primary gastric location].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; De Milito, Ritanna; Simi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are rare neoplasms originating from connective tissue in the digestive tract with an incidence of less than 1% and account for most non-epithelial primitive digestive tumours. Metastasis diagnosed at the time of disease discovery confirms GIST malignancy. Kit protein, a trans-membrane tyrosine kinase receptor of staminal cells, is characteristically expressed by GIST. Most GIST have a mutation in the kit proto-oncogene. Resistance to conventional chemotherapy is commonly shown by malignant GIST. Most patients with advanced malignant GIST achieve clinical benefit with imatinib mesilate, an orally administered selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor. We treated a 43-year-old male patient suffering from a gastric GIST diagnosed during a surgical emergency operation for peritonitis caused by gastric perforation. At the time of the first operation the patient had lost 10 kg body weight over the previous months and was seriously cachectic. During the emergency operation the perforation was sutured. The biopsy results showed the presence of CD1 17 (c-kit) and CD34 markers. A total body CT scan documented the substantial size of the gastric wall lesion, an increased volume of abdominal lymph nodes and compression of the splenic vein with alternative collateral circulation. The liver presented no less than 5 large metastases distributed in both the left and right lobes. There was also a pulmonary metastasis. Because of frequent spontaneous bleeding and starvation the patient was seriously anaemic. Considering the action mechanism of imatinib and the extent of the lesion we decided to perform a total gastrectomy procedure. At the time of the operation the stomach seemed to have a modified volume and shape: it appeared to be divided into two sacs, the larger and deeper of which was the original gastric cavity, while the superficial, smaller one seemed to be a protrusion of the organ. The stomach was indistinguishable from

  20. Impact of newer pharmacological treatments on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Gallagher, David A; Schrag, Anette

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common progressive neurodegenerative condition with multiple motor and nonmotor features contributing to impairment of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). Pharmacological treatments have been directed primarily at dopamine replacement with levodopa and agents to improve its bioavailability, including DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors, as well as synthetic dopamine agonists. These treatments to restore motor function are often very successful in early Parkinson's disease, with objective improvement and concomitant improvement in subjective HR-QOL scores. However, as the disease progresses, motor complications and nonmotor symptoms predominate and are often refractory to therapeutic interventions. Antiparkinsonian medications have been shown to improve motor severity and motor complications of advancing disease, and there is increasing evidence that this can be translated into subjective improvement of HR-QOL from a patient's point of view. However, the degree of improvement is less marked on HR-QOL scores than on motor scores, and some studies do not show improvement of HR-QOL in parallel to motor improvements. A number of explanations are possible, including limitations of the scales used, trial designs and lack of clinical improvement from the patients' point of view. This review concentrates on clinical trials with an index of HR-QOL as an outcome measure, with particular emphasis on well designed, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled or active comparator-controlled methodology. Drugs that have been more recently added to the armamentarium of Parkinson's disease, including the oral (pramipexole, ropinirole and piribedil) and transdermal (rotigotine) non-ergotamine-derived dopamine agonists, the novel MAO-B inhibitor rasagiline and the COMT inhibitors tolcapone and entacapone, were included. The effect of each of these agents on overall HR

  1. The algorithmic performance of J-Tpeak for drug safety clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Simon C; Gregg, Richard E

    The interval from J-point to T-wave peak (JTp) in ECG is a new biomarker able to identify drugs that prolong the QT interval but have different ion channel effects. If JTp is not prolonged, the prolonged QT may be associated with multi ion channel block that may have low torsade de pointes risk. From the automatic ECG measurement perspective, accurate and repeatable measurement of JTp involves different challenges than QT. We evaluated algorithm performance and JTp challenges using the Philips DXL diagnostic 12/16/18-lead algorithm. Measurement of JTp represents a different use model. Standard use of corrected QT interval is clinical risk assessment on patients with cardiac disease or suspicion of heart disease. Drug safety trials involve a very different population - young healthy subjects - who commonly have J-waves, notches and slurs. Drug effects include difficult and unusual morphology such as flat T-waves, gentle notches, and multiple T-wave peaks. The JTp initiative study provided ECGs collected from 22 young subjects (11 males and females) in randomized testing of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine, verapamil and placebo. We compare the JTp intervals between DXL algorithm and the FDA published measurements. The lead wise, vector-magnitude (VM), root-mean-square (RMS) and principal-component-analysis (PCA) representative beats were used to measure JTp and QT intervals. We also implemented four different methods for T peak detection for comparison. We found that JTp measurements were closer to the reference for combined leads RMS and PCA than individual leads. Differences in J-point location led to part of the JTp measurement difference because of the high prevalence of J-waves, notches and slurs. Larger differences were noted for drug effect causing multiple distinct T-wave peaks (Tp). The automated algorithm chooses the later peak while the reference was the earlier peak. Choosing among different algorithmic strategies in T peak measurement results in the

  2. [Modifications in myocardial energy metabolism in diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, A

    2001-11-01

    The capacity of cardiac myocyte to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. Because FA is the main heart fuel (although the most expensive one in oxygen, and prompt to induce deleterious effects), this process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Several pathological situations are associated with an accumulation of FA or derivatives, or with an excessive b-oxidation. The diabetic cardiomyocyte is characterised by an over consumption of FA. The control of the FA/glucose balance clearly appears as a new strategy for cytoprotection, particularly in diabetes and requires a reduced FA contribution to ATP production. Cardiac myocytes can control FA mitochondrial entry, but display weak ability to control FA uptake, thus the fate of non beta-oxidized FA appear as a new impairment for the cell. Both the trigger and the regulation of cardiac contraction result from membrane activity, and the other major FA function in the myocardium is their role in membrane homeostasis, through the phospholipid synthesis and remodeling pathways. Sudden death, hypercatecholaminemia, diabetes and heart failure have been associated with an altered PUFA content in cardiac membranes. Experimental data suggest that the 2 metabolic pathways involved in membrane homeostasis may represent therapeutic targets for cytoprotection. The drugs that increase cardiac phospholipid turnover (trimétazidine, ranolazine,...) display anti-ischemic non hemodynamic effect. This effect is based on a redirection of FA utilization towards phospholipid synthesis, which decrease their availability for energy production. A nutritional approach gave also promising results. Besides its anti-arrhythmic effect, the dietary docosahexaenoic acid is able to reduce FA energy consumption and hence oxygen demand. The cardiac metabolic pathways involving FA should be considered as a whole, precariously balanced. The diabetic heart being characterised by

  3. Impulse control disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease under dopamine agonist therapy: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Herranz Barcenas, Antonio; Vela, Lydia; Sanchez Alonso, Pilar; Mata, Marina; Olmedilla Gonzalez, Nuria; Mahillo Fernandez, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) encompass a wide spectrum of abnormal behaviour frequently found in cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) treated with dopamine agonists (DAs). The main aim of this study was to analyse ICD prevalence with different DAs. We carried out a multicentre transversal study to evaluate the presence of ICDs in patients with PD chronically treated (>6 months) with a single non-ergolinic DA (pramipexole, ropinirole, or rotigotine). Clinical assessment of ICD was performed using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's disease. Thirty-nine per cent of patients (91/233) fulfilled the clinical criteria for ICD. The group of patients with ICD symptoms (ICD+) differed from those without ICD symptoms (ICD-) in younger age and type of DA intake. Oral DA treatment (pramipexole and ropinirole) was associated with higher risk of ICDs compared with transdermal DA (rotigotine): 84/197 (42%) patients treated with oral DA developed ICD, versus 7/36 (19%) patients treated with transdermal DA (Fisher's exact text <0.01). In univariate analysis, a younger age (p<0.01), treatment with rasagiline (p<0.05), and especially treatment with an oral DA (pramipexole or ropinirole) (p<0.01) were significantly associated with ICD. Multivariate analysis confirmed that oral DA remained significantly associated with ICD (p: 0.014, OR: 3.14; 1.26-7.83). ICD was significantly associated with the use of the non-ergolinic oral DA (pramipexole and ropinirole) when compared with transdermal non-ergolinic DA (rotigotine). Since pramipexole, ropinirole and rotigotine are non-ergolinic DAs with very similar pharmacodynamic profiles, it is likely that other factors including route of administration (transdermal vs oral) explain the difference in risk of ICD development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parkinson’s Disease: From Pathogenesis to Pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Cacabelos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second most important age-related neurodegenerative disorder in developed societies, after Alzheimer’s disease, with a prevalence ranging from 41 per 100,000 in the fourth decade of life to over 1900 per 100,000 in people over 80 years of age. As a movement disorder, the PD phenotype is characterized by rigidity, resting tremor, and bradykinesia. Parkinson’s disease -related neurodegeneration is likely to occur several decades before the onset of the motor symptoms. Potential risk factors include environmental toxins, drugs, pesticides, brain microtrauma, focal cerebrovascular damage, and genomic defects. Parkinson’s disease neuropathology is characterized by a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, with widespread involvement of other central nervous system (CNS structures and peripheral tissues. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with genomic, epigenetic and environmental factors lead to conformational changes and deposits of key proteins due to abnormalities in the ubiquitin–proteasome system together with dysregulation of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Conventional pharmacological treatments for PD are dopamine precursors (levodopa, l-DOPA, l-3,4 dihidroxifenilalanina, and other symptomatic treatments including dopamine agonists (amantadine, apomorphine, bromocriptine, cabergoline, lisuride, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine, monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors (selegiline, rasagiline, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT inhibitors (entacapone, tolcapone. The chronic administration of antiparkinsonian drugs currently induces the “wearing-off phenomenon”, with additional psychomotor and autonomic complications. In order to minimize these clinical complications, novel compounds have been developed. Novel drugs and bioproducts for the treatment of PD should address dopaminergic neuroprotection to reduce premature neurodegeneration in

  6. Switch from Immediate-release Pramipexole to Extended-release Pramipexole: The Safety and Efficacy Characteristics of Sixty-eight Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müge Kuzu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of switching from immediate-release pramipexole (pex to extended-release pramipexole (pex-ER. Materials and Methods: Pex-ER became available in Turkey about a year ago, since then we documented satisfactory information on patients (26 women; 38% who were switched from pex to pex-ER. We recorded pre- and post-switch pex and levodopa, equivalent doses of other anti-parkinsonian medication, and analyzed the frequency and nature of reported adverse effects. Results: The mean age of the patients was 63.3 years (range, 44-88 years, and the mean disease duration was 7.1 years (range, 1-27 years. The other drugs were levodopa (57 patients, 82.6%, entacapone (24 patients, 34.58%, rasagiline (20 patients, 29%, amantadine (18 patients, 26.1%, and apomorphine (six patients, 8.7%. Switch from pex to pex-ER was uneventful in 62 (91.2% patients. Adverse events were reported in six (8.8% patients: ankle swelling (two patients, nausea (one patient, dyskinesia (one patient, hypersexuality (one patient, and psychosis (one patient. Problems resolved with further medication change in two patients. Four patients preferred to return to pex. Conclusion: The great majority of patients (91.2% switched from three times daily pex to once daily pex-ER uneventfully. A slight increase in pex daily dose, which was tailored according to patients’ symptomatic needs, resulted in an increase in post-switch levodopa equivalent doses. Our experience is compatible with previously reported studies.

  7. Controversies in Neurology: why monoamine oxidase B inhibitors could be a good choice for the initial treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichmann Heinz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early initiation of pharmacotherapy in Parkinson's disease (PD is nowadays widely advocated by experts since the delay of treatment has shown to be associated with a significant deterioration of health related quality of life in affected patients. Due to marked advances in PD treatment during the last decades, physicians are nowadays fortunately equipped with a variety of substances that can effectively ameliorate emerging motor symptoms of the disease, among them levodopa, dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B inhibitors. Despite numerous drug intervention trials in early PD, there is however still ongoing controversy among neurologists which substance to use for the initial treatment of the disease. Discussion In multiple studies, MAO-B inhibitors, such as selegiline and rasagiline, have shown to provide mild symptomatic effects, delay the need for levodopa, and to reduce the incidence of motor fluctuations. Although their symptomatic efficacy is inferior compared to dopamine agonists and levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors undoubtedly have fewer side effects and are easy to administer. In contrary to their competitors, MAO-B inhibitors may furthermore offer a chance for disease modification, which so far remains a major unmet need in the management of PD and eventually makes them ideal candidates for the early treatment of the disease. Summary MAO-B inhibitors may constitute a preferable therapeutic option for early PD, mainly due to their favourable safety profile and their putative neuroprotective capabilities. Since the symptomatic effects of MAO-B inhibitors are comparatively mild, dopamine agonists and levodopa should however be considered for initial treatment in those PD patients, in whom robust and immediate symptomatic relief needs to be prioritized.

  8. The cardioprotective efficacy of TVP1022 against ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiac remodeling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Assaf; Ertracht, Offir; Bachner-Hinenzon, Noa; Reiter, Irina; Binah, Ofer

    2016-12-01

    Following acute myocardial infarction (MI), early and successful reperfusion is the most effective strategy for reducing infarct size and improving the clinical outcome. However, immediate restoration of blood flow to the ischemic zone results in myocardial damage, defined as "reperfusion-injury". Whereas we previously reported that TVP1022 (the S-isomer of rasagiline, FDA-approved anti-Parkinson drug) decreased infarct size 24 h post ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats, in this study we investigated the chronic cardioprotective efficacy of TVP1022 14 days post-I/R. To simulate the clinical settings of acute MI followed by reperfusion therapy, we employed a rat model of left anterior descending artery occlusion for 30 min followed by reperfusion and a follow-up for 14 days. TVP1022 was initially administered postocclusion-prereperfusion, followed by chronic daily administrations. Cardiac performance and remodeling were evaluated using customary and advanced echocardiographic methods, hemodynamic measurements by Millar Mikro-Tip ® catheter, and histopathological techniques. TVP1022 administration markedly decreased the remodeling process as illustrated by attenuation of left ventricular enlargement and cardiac hypertrophy (both at the whole heart and the cellular level). Furthermore, TVP1022 inhibited cardiac fibrosis and reduced ventricular BNP levels. Functionally, TVP1022 treatment preserved cardiac wall motion. Specifically, the echocardiographic and most of the direct hemodynamic measures were pronouncedly improved by TVP1022. Collectively, these findings indicate that TVP1022 provides prominent cardioprotection against I/R injury and post-MI remodeling in this I/R model.

  9. The cardioprotective efficacy of TVP1022 in a rat model of ischaemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertracht, Offir; Liani, Esti; Bachner-Hinenzon, Noa; Bar-Am, Orit; Frolov, Luba; Ovcharenko, Elena; Awad, Huda; Blum, Shany; Barac, Yaron; Amit, Tamar; Adam, Dan; Youdim, Moussa; Binah, Ofer

    2011-06-01

    Because myocardial infarction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, protecting the heart from the ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) damage is the focus of intense research. Based on our in vitro findings showing that TVP1022 (the S-enantiomer of rasagiline, an anti-Parkinsonian drug) possesses cardioprotective effects, in the present study we investigated the hypothesis that TVP1022 can attenuate myocardial damage in an I/R model in rats. The model consisted of 30-min occlusion of the left anterior descending artery followed by 4 or 24 h reperfusion. In addition, we investigated the possible mechanisms of cardioprotection in H9c2 cells and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) exposed to oxidative stress induced by H(2) O(2) . TVP1022 (20 and 40 mg·kg(-1) ) administered 5 min before reperfusion followed by an additional dose 4 h after reperfusion reduced the infarct size and attenuated the decline in ventricular function. TVP1022 also attenuated I/R-induced deterioration in cardiac mitochondrial integrity evaluated by mitochondrial swelling capacity. In vitro, using H9c2 cells and NRVM, TVP1022 attenuated both serum free- and H(2) O(2) -induced damage, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2 levels, inhibited mitochondrial cytochrome c release and the increase in cleaved caspase 9 and 3 levels, and enhanced the phosphorylation of protein kinase C and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. TVP1022 provided cardioprotection in a model of myocardial infarction, and therefore should be considered as a novel adjunctive therapy for attenuating myocardial damage resulting from I/R injuries. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-target genes in cortical neurons by the novel multifunctional iron chelator anti-Alzheimer drug, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Y; Bar-Am, O; Amit, T; Youdim, M B H; Weinreb, O

    2010-06-01

    Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelator, M30, possessing the neuroprotective propargylamine moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline (Azilect) and antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of our iron chelator, VK28. M30 was recently found to confer potential neuroprotective effects in vitro and in various preclinical neurodegenerative models and regulate the levels and processing of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein and its toxic amyloidogenic derivative, Abeta. Here, we show that M30 activates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha signaling pathway, thus promoting HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as increasing transcription of HIF-1alpha-dependent genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, enolase-1, p21 and tyrosine hydroxylase in rat primary cortical cells. In addition, M30 also increased the expression levels of the transcripts of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Regarding aspects of relevance to Alzheimer's disease (AD), western blotting analysis of glycogen synthase kinase- 3beta (GSK-3beta) signaling pathway revealed that M30 enhanced the levels of phospho-AKT (Ser473) and phospho- GSK-3beta (Ser9) and attenuated Tau phosphorylation. M30 was also shown to protect cultured cortical neurons against Abeta(25-35) toxicity. All these multimodal pharmacological activities of M30 might be beneficial for its potent efficacy in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and AD in which oxidative stress and iron-mediated toxicity are involved.

  11. TVP1022 Protects Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes against Doxorubicin-Induced Functional Derangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevski, Alexandra; Meiry, Gideon; Milman, Felix; Reiter, Irena; Sedan, Oshra; Eliyahu, Sivan; Duffy, Heather S.; Youdim, Moussa B.; Binah, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies demonstrated that propargylamine derivatives such as rasagiline (Azilect, Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-Parkinson drug) and its S-isomer TVP1022 protect cardiac and neuronal cell cultures against apoptotic-inducing stimuli. Studies on structure-activity relationship revealed that their neuroprotective effect is associated with the propargylamine moiety, which protects mitochondrial viability and prevents apoptosis by activating Bcl-2 and protein kinase C-ε and by down-regulating the proapoptotic protein Bax. Based on the established cytoprotective and neuroprotective efficacies of propargylamine derivatives, as well as on our recent study showing that TVP1022 attenuates serum starvation-induced and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs), we tested the hypothesis that TVP1022 will also provide protection against doxorubicin-induced NRVM functional derangements. The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of NRVMs with TVP1022 (1 μM, 24 h) prevented doxorubicin (0.5 μM, 24 h)-induced elevation of diastolic [Ca2+]i, the slowing of [Ca2+]i relaxation kinetics, and the decrease in the rates of myocyte contraction and relaxation. Furthermore, pretreatment with TVP1022 attenuated the doxorubicin-induced reduction in the protein expression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca2+) ATPase, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1, and total connexin 43. Finally, TVP1022 diminished the inhibitory effect of doxorubicin on gap junctional intercellular coupling (measured by means of Lucifer yellow transfer) and on conduction velocity, the amplitude of the activation phase, and the maximal rate of activation (dv/dtmax) measured by the Micro-Electrode-Array system. In summary, our results indicate that TVP1022 acts as a novel cardioprotective agent against anthracycline cardiotoxicity, and therefore potentially can be coadmhence, the inistered with doxorubicin in the treatment of malignancies in humans. PMID:19915070

  12. Practice Parameter: treatment of Parkinson disease with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, R; Factor, S A; Lyons, K E; Ondo, W G; Gronseth, G; Bronte-Stewart, H; Hallett, M; Miyasaki, J; Stevens, J; Weiner, W J

    2006-04-11

    To make evidence-based treatment recommendations for the medical and surgical treatment of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) with levodopa-induced motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. To that end, five questions were addressed. 1. Which medications reduce off time? 2. What is the relative efficacy of medications in reducing off time? 3. Which medications reduce dyskinesia? 4. Does deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus interna (GPi), or ventral intermediate (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus reduce off time, dyskinesia, and antiparkinsonian medication usage and improve motor function? 5. Which factors predict improvement after DBS? A 10-member committee including movement disorder specialists and general neurologists evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases from 1965 through June 2004. 1. Entacapone and rasagiline should be offered to reduce off time (Level A). Pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, and tolcapone should be considered to reduce off time (Level B). Apomorphine, cabergoline, and selegiline may be considered to reduce off time (Level C). 2. The available evidence does not establish superiority of one medicine over another in reducing off time (Level B). Sustained release carbidopa/levodopa and bromocriptine may be disregarded to reduce off time (Level C). 3. Amantadine may be considered to reduce dyskinesia (Level C). 4. Deep brain stimulation of the STN may be considered to improve motor function and reduce off time, dyskinesia, and medication usage (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the efficacy of DBS of the GPi or VIM nucleus of the thalamus in reducing off time, dyskinesia, or medication usage, or to improve motor function. 5. Preoperative response to levodopa predicts better outcome after DBS of the STN (Level B).

  13. Evidence-based medical review update: pharmacological and surgical treatments of Parkinson's disease: 2001 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Sampaio, Cristina

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study is to update a previous evidence-based medicine (EBM) review on Parkinson's disease (PD) treatments, adding January 2001 to January 2004 information. The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force prepared an EBM review of PD treatments covering data up to January 2001. The authors reviewed Level I (randomized clinical trials) reports of pharmacological and surgical interventions for PD, published as full articles in English (January 2001-January 2004). Inclusion criteria and ranking followed the original program and adhered to EBM methodology. For Efficacy Conclusions, treatments were designated Efficacious, Likely Efficacious, Non-Efficacious, or Insufficient Data. Four clinical indications were considered for each intervention: prevention of disease progression; treatment of Parkinsonism, as monotherapy and as adjuncts to levodopa where indicated; prevention of motor complications; treatment of motor complications. Twenty-seven new studies qualified for efficacy review, and others covered new safety issues. Apomorphine, piribedil, unilateral pallidotomy, and subthalamic nucleus stimulation moved upward in efficacy ratings. Rasagiline, was newly rated as Efficacious monotherapy for control of Parkinsonism. New Level I data moved human fetal nigral transplants, as performed to date, from Insufficient Data to Non- efficacious for the treatment of Parkinsonism, motor fluctuations, and dyskinesias. Selegiline was reassigned as Non-efficacious for the prevention of dyskinesias. Other designations did not change. In a field as active in clinical trials as PD, frequent updating of therapy-based reviews is essential. We consider a 3-year period a reasonable time frame for published updates and are working to establish a Web-based mechanism to update the report in an ongoing manner. Copyright 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Effect of Concomitant Medications on the Safety and Efficacy of Extended-Release Carbidopa-Levodopa (IPX066) in Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease: A Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWitt, Peter A; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Rubens, Robert; Khanna, Sarita; Kell, Sherron; Gupta, Suneel

    Extended-release (ER) carbidopa-levodopa (CD-LD) (IPX066/RYTARY/NUMIENT) produces improvements in "off" time, "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia, and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores compared with immediate-release (IR) CD-LD or IR CD-LD plus entacapone (CLE). Post hoc analyses of 2 ER CD-LD phase 3 trials evaluated whether the efficacy and safety of ER CD-LD relative to the respective active comparators were altered by concomitant medications (dopaminergic agonists, monoamine oxidase B [MAO-B] inhibitors, or amantadine). ADVANCE-PD (n = 393) assessed safety and efficacy of ER CD-LD versus IR CD-LD. ASCEND-PD (n = 91) evaluated ER CD-LD versus CLE. In both studies, IR- and CLE-experienced patients underwent a 6-week, open-label dose-conversion period to ER CD-LD prior to randomization. For analysis, the randomized population was divided into 3 subgroups: dopaminergic agonists, rasagiline or selegiline, and amantadine. For each subgroup, changes from baseline in PD diary measures ("off" time and "on" time with and without troublesome dyskinesia), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale Parts II + III scores, and adverse events were analyzed, comparing ER CD-LD with the active comparator. Concomitant dopaminergic agonist or MAO-B inhibitor use did not diminish the efficacy (improvement in "off" time and "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia) of ER CD-LD compared with IR CD-LD or CLE, whereas the improvement with concomitant amantadine failed to reach significance. Safety and tolerability were similar among the subgroups, and ER CD-LD did not increase troublesome dyskinesia. For patients on oral LD regimens and taking a dopaminergic agonist, and/or a MAO-B inhibitor, changing from an IR to an ER CD-LD formulation provides approximately an additional hour of "good" on time.

  15. The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H; Katzenschlager, Regina; Lim, Shen-Yang; Ravina, Bernard; Seppi, Klaus; Coelho, Miguel; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Goetz, Christopher G; Sampaio, Cristina

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to update previous evidence-based medicine reviews of treatments for motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease published between 2002 and 2005. Level I (randomized, controlled trial) reports of pharmacological, surgical, and nonpharmacological interventions for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease between January 2004 (2001 for nonpharmacological) and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion, clinical indications, ranking, efficacy conclusions, safety, and implications for clinical practice followed the original program outline and adhered to evidence-based medicine methodology. Sixty-eight new studies qualified for review. Piribedil, pramipexole, pramipexole extended release, ropinirole, rotigotine, cabergoline, and pergolide were all efficacious as symptomatic monotherapy; ropinirole prolonged release was likely efficacious. All were efficacious as a symptomatic adjunct except pramipexole extended release, for which there is insufficient evidence. For prevention/delay of motor fluctuations, pramipexole and cabergoline were efficacious, and for prevention/delay of dyskinesia, pramipexole, ropinirole, ropinirole prolonged release, and cabergoline were all efficacious, whereas pergolide was likely efficacious. Duodenal infusion of levodopa was likely efficacious in the treatment of motor complications, but the practice implication is investigational. Entacapone was nonefficacious as a symptomatic adjunct to levodopa in nonfluctuating patients and nonefficacious in the prevention/delay of motor complications. Rasagiline conclusions were revised to efficacious as a symptomatic adjunct, and as treatment for motor fluctuations. Clozapine was efficacious in dyskinesia, but because of safety issues, the practice implication is possibly useful. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, bilateral globus pallidus stimulation, and unilateral pallidotomy were updated to efficacious for motor complications. Physical therapy was revised

  16. Determination of minimal clinically important change in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Auinger, Peggy

    2011-04-01

    Two common primary efficacy outcome measures in Parkinson's disease (PD) are change in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores in early PD and change in "off" time in patients with motor fluctuations. Defining the minimal clinically important change (MCIC) in these outcome measures is important to interpret the clinical relevance of changes observed in clinical trials and other situations. We analyzed data from 2 multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of rasagiline; TEMPO studied 404 early PD subjects, and PRESTO studied 472 levodopa-treated subjects with motor fluctuations. An anchor-based approach using clinical global impression of improvement (CGI-I) was used to determine MCIC for UPDRS scores and daily "off" time. MCIC was defined as mean change in actively treated subjects rated minimally improved on CGI-I. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves defined optimal cutoffs discriminating between changed and unchanged subjects. MCIC for improvement in total UPDRS score (parts I-III) in early PD was determined to be -3.5 points based on mean scores and -3.0 points based on ROC curves. In addition, we found an MCIC for reduction in "off" time of 1.0 hours as defined by mean reduction in "off" time in active treated subjects self-rated as minimally improved on CGI-I minus mean reduction in "off" time in placebo-treated subjects self-rated as unchanged (1.9-0.9 hours). We hypothesize that many methodological factors can influence determination of the MCIC, and a range of values is likely to emerge from multiple studies. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Controversies in neurology: why monoamine oxidase B inhibitors could be a good choice for the initial treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhle, Matthias; Reichmann, Heinz

    2011-09-22

    Early initiation of pharmacotherapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) is nowadays widely advocated by experts since the delay of treatment has shown to be associated with a significant deterioration of health related quality of life in affected patients. Due to marked advances in PD treatment during the last decades, physicians are nowadays fortunately equipped with a variety of substances that can effectively ameliorate emerging motor symptoms of the disease, among them levodopa, dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors. Despite numerous drug intervention trials in early PD, there is however still ongoing controversy among neurologists which substance to use for the initial treatment of the disease. In multiple studies, MAO-B inhibitors, such as selegiline and rasagiline, have shown to provide mild symptomatic effects, delay the need for levodopa, and to reduce the incidence of motor fluctuations. Although their symptomatic efficacy is inferior compared to dopamine agonists and levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors undoubtedly have fewer side effects and are easy to administer. In contrary to their competitors, MAO-B inhibitors may furthermore offer a chance for disease modification, which so far remains a major unmet need in the management of PD and eventually makes them ideal candidates for the early treatment of the disease. MAO-B inhibitors may constitute a preferable therapeutic option for early PD, mainly due to their favourable safety profile and their putative neuroprotective capabilities. Since the symptomatic effects of MAO-B inhibitors are comparatively mild, dopamine agonists and levodopa should however be considered for initial treatment in those PD patients, in whom robust and immediate symptomatic relief needs to be prioritized.

  18. Levodopa delivery systems: advancements in delivery of the gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi; Pillay, Viness; Du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence; Choonara, Yahya; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh

    2010-02-01

    Despite the fact that Parkinson's disease (PD) was discovered almost 200 years ago, its treatment and management remain immense challenges because progressive loss of dopaminergic nigral neurons, motor complications experienced by the patients as the disease progresses and drawbacks of pharmacotherapeutic management still persist. Various therapeutic agents have been used in the management of PD, including levodopa (l-DOPA), selegiline, amantadine, bromocriptine, entacapone, pramipexole dihydrochloride and more recently istradefylline and rasagiline. Of all agents, l-DOPA although the oldest, remains the most effective. l-DOPA is easier to administer, better tolerated, less expensive and is required by almost all PD patients. However, l-DOPA's efficacy in advanced PD is significantly reduced due to metabolism, subsequent low bioavailability and irregular fluctuations in its plasma levels. Significant strides have been made to improve the delivery of l-DOPA in order to enhance its bioavailability and reduce plasma fluctuations as well as motor complications experienced by patients purportedly resulting from pulsatile stimulation of the striatal dopamine receptors. Drug delivery systems that have been instituted for the delivery of l-DOPA include immediate release formulations, liquid formulations, dispersible tablets, controlled release formulations, dual-release formulations, microspheres, infusion and transdermal delivery, among others. In this review, the l-DOPA-loaded drug delivery systems developed over the past three decades are elaborated. The ultimate aim was to assess critically the attempts made thus far directed at improving l-DOPA absorption, bioavailability and maintenance of constant plasma concentrations, including the drug delivery technologies implicated. This review highlights the fact that neuropharmaceutics is at a precipice, which is expected to spur investigators to take that leap to enable the generation of innovative delivery systems for the

  19. Molecular insights into human monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition by 1,4-naphthoquinone: evidences for menadione (vitamin K3) acting as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of MAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo Augusto; Diniz, Cristiane; Petry do Canto, Vanessa; Follmer, Cristian

    2011-12-15

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic and exogenous amines and its inhibitors have therapeutic value for several conditions including affective disorders, stroke, neurodegenerative diseases and aging. The discovery of 2,3,6-trimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (TMN) as a nonselective and reversible inhibitor of MAO, has suggested 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) as a potential scaffold for designing new MAO inhibitors. Combining molecular modeling tools and biochemical assays we evaluate the kinetic and molecular details of the inhibition of human MAO by 1,4-NQ, comparing it with TMN and menadione. Menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a multitarget drug that acts as a precursor of vitamin K and an inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition. Herein we show that MAO-B was inhibited competitively by 1,4-NQ (K(i)=1.4 μM) whereas MAO-A was inhibited by non-competitive mechanism (K(i)=7.7 μM). Contrasting with TMN and 1,4-NQ, menadione exhibited a 60-fold selectivity for MAO-B (K(i)=0.4 μM) in comparison with MAO-A (K(i)=26 μM), which makes it as selective as rasagiline. Fluorescence and molecular modeling data indicated that these inhibitors interact with the flavin moiety at the active site of the enzyme. Additionally, docking studies suggest the phenyl side groups of Tyr407 and Tyr444 (for MAO-A) or Tyr398 and Tyr435 (for MAO-B) play an important role in the interaction of the enzyme with 1,4-NQ scaffold through forces of dispersion as verified for menadione, TMN and 1,4-NQ. Taken together, our findings reveal the molecular details of MAO inhibition by 1,4-NQ scaffold and show for the first time that menadione acts as a competitive and reversible inhibitor of human MAO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Histamine H3 receptors and its antagonism as a novel mechanism for antipsychotic effect: a current preclinical & clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Danish

    2016-10-01

    Histamine H 3 receptors are present as autoreceptors on histaminergic neurons and as heteroreceptors on nonhistaminergic neurones. They control the release and synthesis of histamine and several other key neurotransmitters in the brain. H 3 antagonism may be a novel approach to develop a new class of antipsychotic medications given the gathering evidence reporting therapeutic efficacy in several central nervous system disorders. Several medications such as cariprazine, lurasidone, LY214002, bexarotene, rasagiline, raloxifene, BL-1020 and ITI-070 are being developed to treat the negative symptoms and cognitive impairments of schizophrenia. These medications works through diverse mechanisms which include agonism at metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3), partial agonism at dopamine D 2 , D 3 and serotonin 5-HT 1A receptors, antagonism at D 2 , 5-HT 2A, 5-HT 2B and 5-HT 7 receptors, combined dopamine antagonism with GABA agonist activity, inhibition of monoamine oxidase-B, modulation of oestrogen receptor, and activation of nuclear retinoid X receptor. However, still specific safe therapy for psychosis remains at large. Schizophrenia is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder result both from hyper- and hypo-dopaminergic transmission causing positive and negative symptoms, respectively. Pharmacological stimulation of dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex has been a viable approach in treating negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia symptoms that are currently not well treated and continue to represent significant unmet medical challenges. Administration of H 3 antagonists/inverse agonists increase extracellular dopamine concentrations in rat prefrontal cortex, but not in the striatum suggesting that antagonism via H 3 receptor may be a potential target for treating negative symptoms and cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Further, insights are emerging into the potential role of histamine H 3 receptors as a target of antiobesity

  1. Molecular mechanism of the relation of monoamine oxidase B and its inhibitors to Parkinson's disease: possible implications of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, T; Sawada, M

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO A and MAO B) are the major enzymes that catalyze the oxidative deamination of monoamine neurotaransmitters such as dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, and serotonin in the central and peripheral nervous systems. MAO B is mainly localized in glial cells. MAO B also oxidizes the xenobiotic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to a parkinsonism-producing neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+). MAO B may be closely related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), in which neuromelanin-containing DA neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum in the brain selectively degenerate. MAO B degrades the neurotransmitter DA that is deficient in the nigro-striatal region in PD, and forms H2O2 and toxic aldehyde metabolites of DA. H2O2 produces highly toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Fenton reaction that is catalyzed by iron and neuromelanin. MAO B inhibitors such as L-(-)-deprenyl (selegiline) and rasagiline are effective for the treatment of PD. Concerning the mechanism of the clinical efficacy of MAO B inhibitors in PD, the inhibition of DA degradation (a symptomatic effect) and also the prevention of the formation of neurotoxic DA metabolites, i.e., ROS and dopamine derived aldehydes have been speculated. As another mechanism of clinical efficacy, MAO B inhibitors such as selegiline are speculated to have neuroprotective effects to prevent progress of PD. The possible mechanism of neuroprotection of MAO B inhibitors may be related not only to MAO B inhibition but also to induction and activation of multiple factors for anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis: i.e., catalase, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, thioredoxin, Bcl-2, the cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and binding to glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Furthermore, it should be noted that selegiline increases production of neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and glial

  2. Medical management of levodopa-associated motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph; Stacy, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 1% of people over the age of 60 years. Levodopa is standard, and often initial, therapy for patients with this condition; however, with continued treatment and as the disease progresses, up to 80% of patients experience 'wearing-off' symptoms, dyskinesias and other motor complications. These levodopa-associated problems may become disabling and profoundly affect quality of life. Medications commonly used to manage these symptoms include monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors, the NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine and dopamine receptor agonists. Agents that block MAO-B, such as rasagiline and selegiline, are used as both initial and adjunctive therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease. These medications increase concentrations of dopamine in the brain by blocking its reuptake from the synaptic cleft, a mechanism that can slow motor decline, increase 'on' time and improve symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Adverse events with these agents can include confusion, hallucination and orthostatic hypotension. MAO-B inhibition may elicit drug-drug interactions if administered with TCAs, SSRIs or SNRIs. Conventional oral selegiline is associated with potentially harmful plasma concentrations of three major amphetamine metabolites, although metabolite concentrations are significantly lower with a new orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) selegiline formulation. Selegiline ODT is also absorbed more efficiently and shows less pharmacokinetic variability than conventional oral selegiline.COMT mediates peripheral catabolism of levodopa. Therefore, agents that block COMT, such as tolcapone and entacapone, increase the elimination half-life of levodopa. Given adjunctively with levodopa, COMT inhibitors can decrease 'off' time and increase 'on' time, as well as lower the daily levodopa dose. Although more potent than entacapone, tolcapone requires

  3. Crotalaria (Crotalaria juncea L.) Heavy Metal Uptake in Eastern Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    Summary: Soil condition, plant production and ecological protection are most important parts of the sustainable agricultural activity on all over the world nowadays. Soils, their fertility, their content of different macro-, mezo-, micro-, trace elements have almost always dictated the spread of agricultural farmlands, including the plant production-, yield harvest levels and yield element contents possible. The success of agriculturists in the 20th and 21th century, particularly in the Europe has relied on inproved soil fertility managements, appropriate crop production and environmental protection. We can test and improve the situations by using different plant species (Crotalaria juncea L.) x macro nutrients (nitrogen) x chelating agents (Desferal as deferoxamine-mesilate: C25H48N6O8-CH4O3S) methods. Crotalaria has a very potential and important role in soil fertility as a green manure crop in the design of plant rotation to field plant production, in the animal foraging as a fodder-crop with a high protein content (30%) and in the pytoremediation possibilities. Field experiment was carried out on a calcareous chernozem meadow soil (Kunság-region of Hungary, Kunmadaras) in partly of crotalaria experiment series (5 years) in 2001. The agrochemical parameters of the ploughed layer of the region soils were as follows: humus 2.5-3.0%, pH (H2O) 7.7, pH (KCl) 7.0, LE (Lakanen & Erviö 1971 [3])-P2O5 183-218 mg kg-1, LE-K2O 82-115 mg kg-1, LE-Ca 1.3%, LE-Mg 56-60 mg kg-1, LE-Mn 45 mg kg-1 according to soil analysis. Nitrogen (N) x Desferal ("D"-Novartis Pharma AG Basie [7], Switzerland, Suiza 500 mg) x Genotype ("G"-India-University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore) x Time (T) experiment involved The N levels were 0, 100, 200 and 300 kg ha-1 year-1, and Desferal 0 and 20 kg ha-1 year-1. The plot size had an area of 4x2=8 m2. Experimental datas were estimated by MANOVA of SPSS. The main results can be summarised as follows: a., At harvest, total air dry phytomass

  4. Proarrhythmic and antiarrhythmic effects of multiple ion channel inhibitors modulated by the late sodium current%多离子通道阻滞剂抗心律失常与致心律失常机制中晚钠电流的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任璐; 褚延鹏; 于善栋; 吴林

    2016-01-01

    rabbit hearts were isolated and perfused in Langendorff mode.Hearts were paced at a rate of 1 Hz after themo-ablation of AV node.Monophasic action potential(MAP)from the left ventricular epicardium and ECG signals were recorded in normal hearts and in hearts pretreated with an INaL enhancer ATX-Ⅱ before and after exposure of increasing concentrations of dronedarone(DRON,1 nmol/L-10 μmol/L),amiodarone(AMIO,1 nmol/L-10 μmol/L)and ranolazine(RAN,0.1-100 μmol/L)in cumulative concentration manners.Results DRON,AMIO and RAN caused concentrationdependent "monotonic" prolongations of MAPD90(n =8,P<0.05).AMIO alone prolonged MAPD90 at the concentration of 0.01 μmol/L and shortened MAPD90 at the concentration of 10 μmol/L(n =10,P<0.05).However,in the presence of 3 nmol/L ATX-Ⅱ,a stepwise increase in the concentrations of DRON and AMIO was associated with biphasic responses.DRON and AMIO significantly increased MAPD90 at concentrations of 0.1 μmoL/L and 0.03 μmol/L(n =4 and 12,P<0.05),inducing TdP in 75.0% and 83.3% hearts,respectively.But they decreased MAPD90 at higher concentrations and suppressed arrhythmias.When hearts were pretreated with 1 nmol/L ATX-Ⅱ,the prolongation of MAPD90 by RAN was only(43±14)ms(n=6,P<0.05),which was lower than that in hearts treated with RAN alone.When hearts were pretreated with 3 nmol/L ATX-Ⅱ,RANsignificantly shortened MAPD90(n=11,P<0.05).No arrhythmia was observed in hearts treated with RAN.Conclusions The effects of multichannel blocking drugs on MAPD depend on the relative concentration of suppressing IKr and late INa.These drugs prolong MAPD and may cause arrhythmias at lower concentration of inhibiting IKr,while shorten MAPD and eliminate arrhythmic activities at concentration when late INa was suppressed.