WorldWideScience

Sample records for ranking chemical structures

  1. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-04-17

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse structure, we assume that each multimedia object could be represented as a sparse linear combination of all other objects, and combination coefficients are regarded as a similarity measure between objects and used to regularize their ranking scores. Moreover, we propose to learn the sparse combination coefficients and the ranking scores simultaneously. A unified objective function is constructed with regard to both the combination coefficients and the ranking scores, and is optimized by an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two multimedia database retrieval data sets demonstrate the significant improvements of the propose algorithm over state-of-the-art ranking score learning algorithms.

  2. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds.

  3. Ranking structures and Rank-Rank Correlations of Countries. The FIFA and UEFA cases

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2014-01-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures, in both cases.

  4. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  5. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  6. Risk ranking of chemical hazards in food - A case study on antibiotics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Spiegel, van der M.; Noordam, M.Y.; Pikkemaat, M.G.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Part of risk based control is the prioritization of hazard-food combinations for monitoring food safety. The aim of the current study was to develop a method for risk ranking of chemical food safety hazards using a structured and transparent approach. The method established is semi-quantitative and

  7. Using Weighted Entropy to Rank Chemicals in Quantitative High Throughput Screening Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) experiments can simultaneously produce concentration-response profiles for thousands of chemicals. In a typical qHTS study, a large chemical library is subjected to a primary screen in order to identify candidate hits for secondary screening, validation studies or prediction modeling. Different algorithms, usually based on the Hill equation logistic model, have been used to classify compounds as active or inactive (or inconclusive). However, observed concentration-response activity relationships may not adequately fit a sigmoidal curve. Furthermore, it is unclear how to prioritize chemicals for follow-up studies given the large uncertainties that often accompany parameter estimates from nonlinear models. Weighted Shannon entropy can address these concerns by ranking compounds according to profile-specific statistics derived from estimates of the probability mass distribution of response at the tested concentration levels. This strategy can be used to rank all tested chemicals in the absence of a pre-specified model structure or the approach can complement existing activity call algorithms by ranking the returned candidate hits. The weighted entropy approach was evaluated here using data simulated from the Hill equation model. The procedure was then applied to a chemical genomics profiling data set interrogating compounds for androgen receptor agonist activity. PMID:24056003

  8. The 2010 Rankings of Chemical Education and Science Education Journals by Faculty Engaged in Chemical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Marcy H.; Kraft, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Faculty active in chemical education research from around the world ranked 22 journals publishing research in chemical education and science education. The results of this survey can be used to supplement impact factors that are often used to compare the quality of journals in a field. Knowing which journals those in the field rank as top tier is…

  9. Ranking influential nodes in complex networks with structural holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Mei, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Ranking influential nodes in complex networks is of great theoretical and practical significance to ensure the safe operations of networks. In view of the important role structural hole nodes usually play in information spreading in complex networks, we propose a novel ranking method of influential nodes using structural holes called E-Burt method, which can be applied to weighted networks. This method fully takes into account the total connectivity strengths of the node in its local scope, the number of the connecting edges and the distributions of the total connectivity strengths on its connecting edges. The simulation results on the susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) dynamics suggest that the proposed E-Burt method can rank influential nodes more effectively and accurately in complex networks.

  10. On the ranking of chemicals based on their PBT characteristics: comparison of different ranking methodologies using selected POPs as an illustrative example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Zhakupbekova, Arai; Amutova, Farida; Carlsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the environmental behavior of chemicals is a fundamental part of the risk assessment process. The present paper discusses various methods of ranking of a series of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) according to the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) characteristics. Traditionally ranking has been done as an absolute (total) ranking applying various multicriteria data analysis methods like simple additive ranking (SAR) or various utility functions (UFs) based rankings. An attractive alternative to these ranking methodologies appears to be partial order ranking (POR). The present paper compares different ranking methods like SAR, UF and POR. Significant discrepancies between the rankings are noted and it is concluded that partial order ranking, as a method without any pre-assumptions concerning possible relation between the single parameters, appears as the most attractive ranking methodology. In addition to the initial ranking partial order methodology offers a wide variety of analytical tools to elucidate the interplay between the objects to be ranked and the ranking parameters. In the present study is included an analysis of the relative importance of the single P, B and T parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ranking ecological risks of multiple chemical stressors on amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenkova, Anastasia; Vonk, J Arie; Lenders, H J Rob; Creemers, Raymond C M; Breure, Anton M; Hendriks, A Jan

    2012-06-01

    Populations of amphibians have been declining worldwide since the late 1960s. Despite global concern, no studies have quantitatively assessed the major causes of this decline. In the present study, species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were developed to analyze the sensitivity of anurans for ammonium, nitrate, heavy metals (cadmium, copper), pesticides (18 compounds), and acidification (pH) based on laboratory toxicity data. Ecological risk (ER) was calculated as the probability that a measured environmental concentration of a particular stressor in habitats where anurans were observed would exceed the toxic effect concentrations derived from the species sensitivity distributions. The assessment of ER was used to rank the stressors according to their potential risk to anurans based on a case study of Dutch freshwater bodies. The derived ERs revealed that threats to populations of anurans decreased in the sequence of pH, copper, diazinon, ammonium, and endosulfan. Other stressors studied were of minor importance. The method of deriving ER by combining field observation data and laboratory data provides insight into potential threats to species in their habitats and can be used to prioritize stressors, which is necessary to achieve effective management in amphibian conservation. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  12. COMPARISON OF CHEMICAL SCREENING AND RANKING APPROACHES: THE WASTE MINIMIZATION PRIORITIZATION TOOL VERSUS TOXIC EQUIVALENCY POTENTIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical screening in the United States is often conducted using scoring and ranking methodologies. Linked models accounting for chemical fate, exposure, and toxicological effects are generally preferred in Europe and in product Life Cycle Assessment. For the first time, a compar...

  13. Ranking beta sheet topologies with applications to protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    One reason why ab initio protein structure predictors do not perform very well is their inability to reliably identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To achieve reliable long-range interactions, all potential pairings of ß-strands (ß-topologies) of a given protein are enumerated...... of this paper is a method to deal with the inaccuracies of secondary structure predictors when enumerating potential ß-topologies. The results reported in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. They indicate that decoy generation can......, consistently top-ranks native ß-topologies. Since the number of potential ß-topologies grows exponentially with the number of ß-strands, it is unrealistic to expect that all potential ß-topologies can be enumerated for large proteins. The second result of this paper is an enumeration scheme of a subset of ß...

  14. A Preliminary Study for Chemical Ranking System in Terms of Soil and Groundwater Contamination by Chemical Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Jeong, Y. C.; Kim, K. E.; Lee, D.; Yoo, K.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.

    2015-12-01

    A variety of chemicals could affect human health and ecosystems by chemical accidents such as fire, explosion, and/or spill. Chemical accidents make chemicals spread to the environment via various routes such as dispersion into ambient air, soil, and surface/ground water media. Especially, soil and groundwater contamination by chemical accidents become a secondary source to have a long term effect on human health and environment. Strength of long term effect by soil and groundwater contamination depends largely on inherent characteristics of a chemical and its fate in soil and groundwater. Therefore, in this study, we developed a framework on how to determine what kind of chemicals is more important in management scheme in terms of soil and groundwater contamination during chemical accidents. We ranked approximately fifty chemicals using this framework which takes into account an exposure into soil and groundwater, toxicity, persistence, and bioaccumulation of a chemical. This framework helps to prepare systematically the management plan for chemical related facilities. Furthermore, results from our study can make a policy maker have interests in highly ranked chemicals and facilities.

  15. Ranking REACH registered neutral, ionizable and ionic organic chemicals based on their aquatic persistency and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, H P H; Brown, T N; Berger, U; Hale, S E

    2017-07-19

    The contaminants that have the greatest chances of appearing in drinking water are those that are mobile enough in the aquatic environment to enter drinking water sources and persistent enough to survive treatment processes. Herein a screening procedure to rank neutral, ionizable and ionic organic compounds for being persistent and mobile organic compounds (PMOCs) is presented and applied to the list of industrial substances registered under the EU REACH legislation as of December 2014. This comprised 5155 identifiable, unique organic structures. The minimum cut-off criteria considered for PMOC classification herein are a freshwater half-life >40 days, which is consistent with the REACH definition of freshwater persistency, and a log Doc organic carbon-water distribution coefficient). Experimental data were given the highest priority, followed by data from an array of available quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), and as a third resort, an original Iterative Fragment Selection (IFS) QSAR. In total, 52% of the unique REACH structures made the minimum criteria to be considered a PMOC, and 21% achieved the highest PMOC ranking (half-life > 40 days, log Doc < 1.0 between pH 4-10). Only 9% of neutral substances received the highest PMOC ranking, compared to 30% of ionizable compounds and 44% of ionic compounds. Predicted hydrolysis products for all REACH parents (contributing 5043 additional structures) were found to have higher PMOC rankings than their parents, due to increased mobility but not persistence. The fewest experimental data available were for ionic compounds; therefore, their ranking is more uncertain than neutral and ionizable compounds. The most sensitive parameter for the PMOC ranking was freshwater persistency, which was also the parameter that QSARs performed the most poorly at predicting. Several prioritized drinking water contaminants in the EU and USA, and other contaminants of concern, were identified as PMOCs. This

  16. Environmental and health hazard ranking and assessment of plastic polymers based on chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lithner, Delilah, E-mail: delilah.lithner@gmail.com; Larsson, Ake; Dave, Goeran

    2011-08-15

    Plastics constitute a large material group with a global annual production that has doubled in 15 years (245 million tonnes in 2008). Plastics are present everywhere in society and the environment, especially the marine environment, where large amounts of plastic waste accumulate. The knowledge of human and environmental hazards and risks from chemicals associated with the diversity of plastic products is very limited. Most chemicals used for producing plastic polymers are derived from non-renewable crude oil, and several are hazardous. These may be released during the production, use and disposal of the plastic product. In this study the environmental and health hazards of chemicals used in 55 thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers were identified and compiled. A hazard ranking model was developed for the hazard classes and categories in the EU classification and labelling (CLP) regulation which is based on the UN Globally Harmonized System. The polymers were ranked based on monomer hazard classifications, and initial assessments were made. The polymers that ranked as most hazardous are made of monomers classified as mutagenic and/or carcinogenic (category 1A or 1B). These belong to the polymer families of polyurethanes, polyacrylonitriles, polyvinyl chloride, epoxy resins, and styrenic copolymers. All have a large global annual production (1-37 million tonnes). A considerable number of polymers (31 out of 55) are made of monomers that belong to the two worst of the ranking model's five hazard levels, i.e. levels IV-V. The polymers that are made of level IV monomers and have a large global annual production (1-5 million tonnes) are phenol formaldehyde resins, unsaturated polyesters, polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, and urea-formaldehyde resins. This study has identified hazardous substances used in polymer production for which the risks should be evaluated for decisions on the need for risk reduction measures, substitution, or even phase out

  17. Environmental and health hazard ranking and assessment of plastic polymers based on chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithner, Delilah; Larsson, Ake; Dave, Göran

    2011-08-15

    Plastics constitute a large material group with a global annual production that has doubled in 15 years (245 million tonnes in 2008). Plastics are present everywhere in society and the environment, especially the marine environment, where large amounts of plastic waste accumulate. The knowledge of human and environmental hazards and risks from chemicals associated with the diversity of plastic products is very limited. Most chemicals used for producing plastic polymers are derived from non-renewable crude oil, and several are hazardous. These may be released during the production, use and disposal of the plastic product. In this study the environmental and health hazards of chemicals used in 55 thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers were identified and compiled. A hazard ranking model was developed for the hazard classes and categories in the EU classification and labelling (CLP) regulation which is based on the UN Globally Harmonized System. The polymers were ranked based on monomer hazard classifications, and initial assessments were made. The polymers that ranked as most hazardous are made of monomers classified as mutagenic and/or carcinogenic (category 1A or 1B). These belong to the polymer families of polyurethanes, polyacrylonitriles, polyvinyl chloride, epoxy resins, and styrenic copolymers. All have a large global annual production (1-37 million tonnes). A considerable number of polymers (31 out of 55) are made of monomers that belong to the two worst of the ranking model's five hazard levels, i.e. levels IV-V. The polymers that are made of level IV monomers and have a large global annual production (1-5 million tonnes) are phenol formaldehyde resins, unsaturated polyesters, polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, and urea-formaldehyde resins. This study has identified hazardous substances used in polymer production for which the risks should be evaluated for decisions on the need for risk reduction measures, substitution, or even phase out. Copyright

  18. Ranking of Chemicals Measured in Emissions from R&D Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.

    2011-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of multidisciplinary laboratory research facilities for the U. S. Department of Energy and has sampled air chemical emissions from some of these facilities since 1998. The primary purpose of this sampling is to obtain data to compare estimated release fractions to those used for emissions estimates, verifying that methods used to determine compliance with air regulations and permits conservatively predict actual emissions. Sampling also identifies and quantifies emissions of air toxics to compare with compliance limits established by regulatory agencies. Hundreds of samples have been taken from four different buildings (325, 329, 331, and EMSL) over a 10-year time period. Results from initial sampling campaigns were evaluated and reported by Woodruff, Benar, and McCarthy (2000) who summarized the compliance approach used by PNNL and described sampling and analytical measurements for the first sampling campaigns. Conclusions reported in this paper were that none of the measurements of the target compounds exceeded an acceptable source impact level (ASIL) (Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 173-460) even using significant overestimation factors, and that an average release fraction calculated from the data provided reasonable validation of the factor used in compliance assessments. Subsequent analysis compared chemical signatures from the buildings (Ballinger, Duchsherer, and Metoyer 2008). Results from this analysis showed that stack emissions from three of the four buildings had relatively similar chemical signatures but the fourth building differed from the other three significantly using the developed metric. This paper presents additional analyses of the measured air chemical emissions to 1) rank the chemical compounds that present the greatest risk to a potential downstream receptor and 2) determine whether the sampling parameters and detection limits provided sufficient resolution to

  19. Ranking transitive chemical-disease inferences using local network topology in the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin L; Davis, Allan Peter; Rosenstein, Michael C; Wiegers, Thomas C; Mattingly, Carolyn J

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to chemicals in the environment is believed to play a critical role in the etiology of many human diseases. To enhance understanding about environmental effects on human health, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org) provides unique curated data that enable development of novel hypotheses about the relationships between chemicals and diseases. CTD biocurators read the literature and curate direct relationships between chemicals-genes, genes-diseases, and chemicals-diseases. These direct relationships are then computationally integrated to create additional inferred relationships; for example, a direct chemical-gene statement can be combined with a direct gene-disease statement to generate a chemical-disease inference (inferred via the shared gene). In CTD, the number of inferences has increased exponentially as the number of direct chemical, gene and disease interactions has grown. To help users navigate and prioritize these inferences for hypothesis development, we implemented a statistic to score and rank them based on the topology of the local network consisting of the chemical, disease and each of the genes used to make an inference. In this network, chemicals, diseases and genes are nodes connected by edges representing the curated interactions. Like other biological networks, node connectivity is an important consideration when evaluating the CTD network, as the connectivity of nodes follows the power-law distribution. Topological methods reduce the influence of highly connected nodes that are present in biological networks. We evaluated published methods that used local network topology to determine the reliability of protein-protein interactions derived from high-throughput assays. We developed a new metric that combines and weights two of these methods and uniquely takes into account the number of common neighbors and the connectivity of each entity involved. We present several CTD inferences as case studies to

  20. Ranking transitive chemical-disease inferences using local network topology in the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L King

    Full Text Available Exposure to chemicals in the environment is believed to play a critical role in the etiology of many human diseases. To enhance understanding about environmental effects on human health, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org provides unique curated data that enable development of novel hypotheses about the relationships between chemicals and diseases. CTD biocurators read the literature and curate direct relationships between chemicals-genes, genes-diseases, and chemicals-diseases. These direct relationships are then computationally integrated to create additional inferred relationships; for example, a direct chemical-gene statement can be combined with a direct gene-disease statement to generate a chemical-disease inference (inferred via the shared gene. In CTD, the number of inferences has increased exponentially as the number of direct chemical, gene and disease interactions has grown. To help users navigate and prioritize these inferences for hypothesis development, we implemented a statistic to score and rank them based on the topology of the local network consisting of the chemical, disease and each of the genes used to make an inference. In this network, chemicals, diseases and genes are nodes connected by edges representing the curated interactions. Like other biological networks, node connectivity is an important consideration when evaluating the CTD network, as the connectivity of nodes follows the power-law distribution. Topological methods reduce the influence of highly connected nodes that are present in biological networks. We evaluated published methods that used local network topology to determine the reliability of protein-protein interactions derived from high-throughput assays. We developed a new metric that combines and weights two of these methods and uniquely takes into account the number of common neighbors and the connectivity of each entity involved. We present several CTD inferences as case

  1. Rapidity-Rank Structure of $p\\overline{p}$ Pairs in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidity-rank structure of \\ppb pairs is used to analyze the mechanism of baryon production in hadronic \\zz decay. The relative occurrence of the rapidity-ordered configuration \\pmpb, where $M$ is a meson, and that of \\ppb adjacent pairs is compared. The data are found to be consistent with predictions from a mechanism producing adjacent-rank \\ppb pairs, without requiring `string-ordered' \\pmpb configurations. An upper limit of 15\\% at 90\\% confidence is determined for the \\pmpb contribution.

  2. The structure of completely positive matrices according to their CP-rank and CP-plus-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, Peter James Clair; Bomze, Immanuel M.; Still, Georg J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the topological properties of the cp-rank operator $\\mathrm{cp}(A)$ and the related cp-plus-rank operator $\\mathrm{cp}^+(A)$ (which is introduced in this paper) in the set $\\mathcal{S}^n$ of symmetric $n\\times n$-matrices. For the set of completely positive matrices, $\\mathcal{CP}^n$, we

  3. Construction of a chemical ranking system of soil pollution substances for screening of priority soil contaminants in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2012-04-01

    The Korean government recently proposed expanding the number of soil-quality standards to 30 by 2015. The objectives of our study were to construct a reasonable protocol for screening priority soil contaminants for inclusion in the planned soil quality standard expansion. The chemical ranking system of soil pollution substances (CROSS) was first developed to serve as an analytical tool in chemical scoring and ranking of possible soil pollution substances. CROSS incorporates important parameters commonly used in several previous chemical ranking and scoring systems and the new soil pollution parameters. CROSS uses soil-related parameters in its algorithm, including information related to the soil environment, such as soil ecotoxicological data, the soil toxic release inventory (TRI), and soil partitioning coefficients. Soil TRI and monitoring data were incorporated as local specific parameters. In addition, CROSS scores the transportability of chemicals in soil because soil contamination may result in groundwater contamination. Dermal toxicity was used in CROSS only to consider contact with soil. CROSS uses a certainty score to incorporate data uncertainty. CROSS scores the importance of each candidate substance and assigns rankings on the basis of total scores. Cadmium was the most highly ranked. Generally, metals were ranked higher than other substances. Pentachlorophenol, phenol, dieldrin, and methyl tert-butyl ether were ranked the highest among chlorinated compounds, aromatic compounds, pesticides, and others, respectively. The priority substance list generated from CROSS will be used in selecting substances for possible inclusion in the Korean soil quality standard expansion; it will also provide important information for designing a soil-environment management scheme.

  4. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  5. Ranking the quality of protein structure models using sidechain based network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2014-01-01

    Determining the correct structure of a protein given its sequence still remains an arduous task with many researchers working towards this goal. Most structure prediction methodologies result in the generation of a large number of probable candidates with the final challenge being to select the best amongst these. In this work, we have used Protein Structure Networks of native and modeled proteins in combination with Support Vector Machines to estimate the quality of a protein structure model and finally to provide ranks for these models. Model ranking is performed using regression analysis and helps in model selection from a group of many similar and good quality structures. Our results show that structures with a rank greater than 16 exhibit native protein-like properties while those below 10 are non-native like. The tool is also made available as a web-server ( http://vishgraph.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/GraProStr/native_non_native_ranking.html), where, 5 modelled structures can be evaluated at a given time.

  6. Structured Document Retrieval, Multimedia Retrieval, and Entity Ranking Using PF/Tijah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsikrika (Theodora); P. Serdyukov; H. Rode (Henning); T.H.W. Westerveld (Thijs); R. Aly; D. Hiemstra; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); N. Fuhr; M. Lalmas; A. Trotman

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCWI and University of Twente used PF/Tijah, a flexible XML retrieval system, to evaluate structured document retrieval, multimedia retrieval, and entity ranking tasks in the context of INEX 2007. For the retrieval of textual and multimedia elements in the Wikipedia data, we investigated

  7. Structured Document Retrieval, Multimedia Retrieval, and Entity Ranking Using PF/Tijah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsikrika (Theodora); P. Serdyukov; H. Rode (Henning); T.H.W. Westerveld (Thijs); R. Aly; D. Hiemstra; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); N. Fuhr; M. Lalmas; A. Trotman; J. Kamps

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCWI and University of Twente used PF/Tijah, a flexible XML retrieval system, to evaluate structured document retrieval, multi-media retrieval, and entity ranking tasks in the context of INEX 2007. For the retrieval of textual and multimedia elements in the Wikipedia data, we investigated

  8. Structured Document Retrieval, Multimedia Retrieval, and Entity Ranking Using PF/Tijah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsikrika, Theodora; Serdyukov, Pavel; Rode, H.; Westerveld, T.H.W.; Aly, Robin; Hiemstra, Djoerd; de Vries, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    CWI and University of Twente used PF/Tijah, a flexible XML retrieval system, to evaluate structured document retrieval, multimedia retrieval, and entity ranking tasks in the context of INEX 2007. For the retrieval of textual and multimedia elements in the Wikipedia data, we investigated various

  9. Identification of Protein Complexes Using Weighted PageRank-Nibble Algorithm and Core-Attachment Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Wang, Jianxin; Zhao, Bihai; Wang, Lusheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes play a significant role in understanding the underlying mechanism of most cellular functions. Recently, many researchers have explored computational methods to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. One group of researchers focus on detecting local dense subgraphs which correspond to protein complexes by considering local neighbors. The drawback of this kind of approach is that the global information of the networks is ignored. Some methods such as Markov Clustering algorithm (MCL), PageRank-Nibble are proposed to find protein complexes based on random walk technique which can exploit the global structure of networks. However, these methods ignore the inherent core-attachment structure of protein complexes and treat adjacent node equally. In this paper, we design a weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm which assigns each adjacent node with different probability, and propose a novel method named WPNCA to detect protein complex from PPI networks by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm and core-attachment structure. Firstly, WPNCA partitions the PPI networks into multiple dense clusters by using weighted PageRank-Nibble algorithm. Then the cores of these clusters are detected and the rest of proteins in the clusters will be selected as attachments to form the final predicted protein complexes. The experiments on yeast data show that WPNCA outperforms the existing methods in terms of both accuracy and p-value. The software for WPNCA is available at "http://netlab.csu.edu.cn/bioinfomatics/weipeng/WPNCA/download.html".

  10. CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: tchangbedji@hotmail.com. CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURAL. PHOSPHATE OF HAHOTOE (TOGO). Gado Tchangbeddji1*, Gnande Djeteli1, Koffi Ani Kili1, Jean Michel Savariault2 and. Jean Louis Lacout3. 1Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux, ...

  11. Incorporating ToxCast and Tox21 datasets to rank biological activity of chemicals at Superfund sites in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Sloane K; Reif, David M; Fry, Rebecca C

    2017-04-01

    The Superfund program of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established in 1980 to address public health concerns posed by toxic substances released into the environment in the United States. Forty-two of the 1328 hazardous waste sites that remain on the Superfund National Priority List are located in the state of North Carolina. We set out to develop a database that contained information on both the prevalence and biological activity of chemicals present at Superfund sites in North Carolina. A chemical characterization tool, the Toxicological Priority Index (ToxPi), was used to rank the biological activity of these chemicals based on their predicted bioavailability, documented associations with biological pathways, and activity in in vitro assays of the ToxCast and Tox21 programs. The ten most prevalent chemicals found at North Carolina Superfund sites were chromium, trichloroethene, lead, tetrachloroethene, arsenic, benzene, manganese, 1,2-dichloroethane, nickel, and barium. For all chemicals found at North Carolina Superfund sites, ToxPi analysis was used to rank their biological activity. Through this data integration, residual pesticides and organic solvents were identified to be some of the most highly-ranking predicted bioactive chemicals. This study provides a novel methodology for creating state or regional databases of biological activity of contaminants at Superfund sites. These data represent a novel integrated profile of the most prevalent chemicals at North Carolina Superfund sites. This information, and the associated methodology, is useful to toxicologists, risk assessors, and the communities living in close proximity to these sites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Impact of hierarchical modular structure on ranking of individual nodes in directed networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Naoki [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Yoji [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Kori, Hiroshi [PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)], E-mail: masuda@mist.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-11-15

    Many systems, ranging from biological and engineering systems to social systems, can be modeled as directed networks, with links representing directed interaction between two nodes. To assess the importance of a node in a directed network, various centrality measures based on different criteria have been proposed. However, calculating the centrality of a node is often difficult because of the overwhelming size of the network or because the information held about the network is incomplete. Thus, developing an approximation method for estimating centrality measures is needed. In this study, we focus on modular networks; many real-world networks are composed of modules, where connection is dense within a module and sparse across different modules. We show that ranking-type centrality measures, including the PageRank, can be efficiently estimated once the modular structure of a network is extracted. We develop an analytical method to evaluate the centrality of nodes by combining the local property (i.e. indegree and outdegree of nodes) and the global property (i.e. centrality of modules). The proposed method is corroborated by real data. Our results provide a linkage between the ranking-type centrality values of modules and those of individual nodes. They also reveal the hierarchical structure of networks in the sense of subordination (not nestedness) laid out by connectivity among modules of different relative importance. The present study raises a novel motive for identifying modules in networks.

  13. Structure validation in chemical crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Anthony L.

    2009-01-01

    Automated structure validation was introduced in chemical crystallography about 12 years ago as a tool to assist practitioners with the exponential growth in crystal structure analyses. Validation has since evolved into an easy-to-use checkCIF/PLATON web-based IUCr service. The result of a crystal structure determination has to be supplied as a CIF-formatted computer-readable file. The checking software tests the data in the CIF for completeness, quality and consistency. In addition, the reported structure is checked for incomplete analysis, errors in the analysis and relevant issues to be verified. A validation report is generated in the form of a list of ALERTS on the issues to be corrected, checked or commented on. Structure validation has largely eliminated obvious problems with structure reports published in IUCr journals, such as refinement in a space group of too low symmetry. This paper reports on the current status of structure validation and possible future extensions. PMID:19171970

  14. Structural MRI-based detection of Alzheimer's disease using feature ranking and classification error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Iman; Demirel, Hasan; Farokhian, Farnaz; Yang, Chunlan; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on feature ranking for detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data. The proposed CAD system is composed of four systematic stages. First, global and local differences in the gray matter (GM) of AD patients compared to the GM of healthy controls (HCs) are analyzed using a voxel-based morphometry technique. The aim is to identify significant local differences in the volume of GM as volumes of interests (VOIs). Second, the voxel intensity values of the VOIs are extracted as raw features. Third, the raw features are ranked using a seven-feature ranking method, namely, statistical dependency (SD), mutual information (MI), information gain (IG), Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC), t-test score (TS), Fisher's criterion (FC), and the Gini index (GI). The features with higher scores are more discriminative. To determine the number of top features, the estimated classification error based on training set made up of the AD and HC groups is calculated, with the vector size that minimized this error selected as the top discriminative feature. Fourth, the classification is performed using a support vector machine (SVM). In addition, a data fusion approach among feature ranking methods is introduced to improve the classification performance. The proposed method is evaluated using a data-set from ADNI (130 AD and 130 HC) with 10-fold cross-validation. The classification accuracy of the proposed automatic system for the diagnosis of AD is up to 92.48% using the sMRI data. An automatic CAD system for the classification of AD based on feature-ranking method and classification errors is proposed. In this regard, seven-feature ranking methods (i.e., SD, MI, IG, PCC, TS, FC, and GI) are evaluated. The optimal size of top discriminative features is determined by the classification error estimation in the training phase. The experimental results indicate that

  15. Multi-shot multi-channel diffusion data recovery using structured low-rank matrix completion

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Merry; Kelley, Douglas; Magnotta, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for the recovery of multi-shot diffusion weighted (MS-DW) images from echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions. Methods: Current EPI-based MS-DW reconstruction methods rely on the explicit estimation of the motion- induced phase maps to recover the unaliased images. In the new formulation, the k-space data of the unaliased DWI is recovered using a structured low-rank matrix completion scheme, which does not require explicit estimation of the phase maps. The structured matrix is obtained as the lifting of the multi-shot data. The smooth phase-modulations between shots manifest as null-space vectors of this matrix, which implies that the structured matrix is low-rank. The missing entries of the structured matrix are filled in using a nuclear-norm minimization algorithm subject to the data-consistency. The formulation enables the natural introduction of smoothness regularization, thus enabling implicit motion-compensated recovery of fully-sampled as well as under-sampled MS-DW ...

  16. Text mining effectively scores and ranks the literature for improving chemical-gene-disease curation at the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allan Peter; Wiegers, Thomas C; Johnson, Robin J; Lay, Jean M; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; Murphy, Cynthia Grondin; Mattingly, Carolyn J

    2013-01-01

    The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) is a public resource that curates interactions between environmental chemicals and gene products, and their relationships to diseases, as a means of understanding the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD provides a triad of core information in the form of chemical-gene, chemical-disease, and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from scientific articles. To increase the efficiency, productivity, and data coverage of manual curation, we have leveraged text mining to help rank and prioritize the triaged literature. Here, we describe our text-mining process that computes and assigns each article a document relevancy score (DRS), wherein a high DRS suggests that an article is more likely to be relevant for curation at CTD. We evaluated our process by first text mining a corpus of 14,904 articles triaged for seven heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel). Based upon initial analysis, a representative subset corpus of 3,583 articles was then selected from the 14,094 articles and sent to five CTD biocurators for review. The resulting curation of these 3,583 articles was analyzed for a variety of parameters, including article relevancy, novel data content, interaction yield rate, mean average precision, and biological and toxicological interpretability. We show that for all measured parameters, the DRS is an effective indicator for scoring and improving the ranking of literature for the curation of chemical-gene-disease information at CTD. Here, we demonstrate how fully incorporating text mining-based DRS scoring into our curation pipeline enhances manual curation by prioritizing more relevant articles, thereby increasing data content, productivity, and efficiency.

  17. Text Mining Effectively Scores and Ranks the Literature for Improving Chemical-Gene-Disease Curation at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robin J.; Lay, Jean M.; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; Murphy, Cynthia Grondin; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) is a public resource that curates interactions between environmental chemicals and gene products, and their relationships to diseases, as a means of understanding the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD provides a triad of core information in the form of chemical-gene, chemical-disease, and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from scientific articles. To increase the efficiency, productivity, and data coverage of manual curation, we have leveraged text mining to help rank and prioritize the triaged literature. Here, we describe our text-mining process that computes and assigns each article a document relevancy score (DRS), wherein a high DRS suggests that an article is more likely to be relevant for curation at CTD. We evaluated our process by first text mining a corpus of 14,904 articles triaged for seven heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel). Based upon initial analysis, a representative subset corpus of 3,583 articles was then selected from the 14,094 articles and sent to five CTD biocurators for review. The resulting curation of these 3,583 articles was analyzed for a variety of parameters, including article relevancy, novel data content, interaction yield rate, mean average precision, and biological and toxicological interpretability. We show that for all measured parameters, the DRS is an effective indicator for scoring and improving the ranking of literature for the curation of chemical-gene-disease information at CTD. Here, we demonstrate how fully incorporating text mining-based DRS scoring into our curation pipeline enhances manual curation by prioritizing more relevant articles, thereby increasing data content, productivity, and efficiency. PMID:23613709

  18. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  19. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  20. Traveling salesman problems with PageRank Distance on complex networks reveal community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongzhou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuai

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for community detection problems (CDPs) based on traveling salesman problems (TSPs), labeled as TSP-CDA. Since TSPs need to find a tour with minimum cost, cities close to each other are usually clustered in the tour. This inspired us to model CDPs as TSPs by taking each vertex as a city. Then, in the final tour, the vertices in the same community tend to cluster together, and the community structure can be obtained by cutting the tour into a couple of paths. There are two challenges. The first is to define a suitable distance between each pair of vertices which can reflect the probability that they belong to the same community. The second is to design a suitable strategy to cut the final tour into paths which can form communities. In TSP-CDA, we deal with these two challenges by defining a PageRank Distance and an automatic threshold-based cutting strategy. The PageRank Distance is designed with the intrinsic properties of CDPs in mind, and can be calculated efficiently. In the experiments, benchmark networks with 1000-10,000 nodes and varying structures are used to test the performance of TSP-CDA. A comparison is also made between TSP-CDA and two well-established community detection algorithms. The results show that TSP-CDA can find accurate community structure efficiently and outperforms the two existing algorithms.

  1. Netter: re-ranking gene network inference predictions using structural network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyssinck, Joeri; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2016-02-09

    Many algorithms have been developed to infer the topology of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. These methods typically produce a ranking of links between genes with associated confidence scores, after which a certain threshold is chosen to produce the inferred topology. However, the structural properties of the predicted network do not resemble those typical for a gene regulatory network, as most algorithms only take into account connections found in the data and do not include known graph properties in their inference process. This lowers the prediction accuracy of these methods, limiting their usability in practice. We propose a post-processing algorithm which is applicable to any confidence ranking of regulatory interactions obtained from a network inference method which can use, inter alia, graphlets and several graph-invariant properties to re-rank the links into a more accurate prediction. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, we re-rank predictions of six different state-of-the-art algorithms using three simple network properties as optimization criteria and show that Netter can improve the predictions made on both artificially generated data as well as the DREAM4 and DREAM5 benchmarks. Additionally, the DREAM5 E.coli. community prediction inferred from real expression data is further improved. Furthermore, Netter compares favorably to other post-processing algorithms and is not restricted to correlation-like predictions. Lastly, we demonstrate that the performance increase is robust for a wide range of parameter settings. Netter is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be. Network inference from high-throughput data is a long-standing challenge. In this work, we present Netter, which can further refine network predictions based on a set of user-defined graph properties. Netter is a flexible system which can be applied in unison with any method producing a ranking from omics data. It can be tailored to specific prior

  2. Screening and ranking of POPs for global half-life: QSAR approaches for prioritization based on molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester

    2007-04-15

    Persistence in the environment is an important criterion in prioritizing hazardous chemicals and in identifying new persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Degradation half-life in various compartments is among the more commonly used criteria for studying environmental persistence, but the limited availability of experimental data or reliable estimates is a serious problem. Available half-life data for degradation in air, water, sediment, and soil, for a set of 250 organic POP-type chemicals, were combined in a multivariate approach by principal component analysis to obtain a ranking of the studied organic pollutants according to their relative overall half-life. A global half-life index (GHLI) applicable for POP screening purposes is proposed. The reliability of this index was verified in comparison with multimedia model results. This global index was then modeled as a cumulative end-point using a QSAR approach based on few theoretical molecular descriptors, and a simple and robust regression model externally validated for its predictive ability was derived. The application of this model could allow a fast preliminary identification and prioritization of not yet known POPs, just from the knowledge of their molecular structure. This model can be applied a priori also in the chemical design of safer and alternative non-POP compounds.

  3. Development of a risk-ranking framework to evaluate potential high-threat microorganisms, toxins, and chemicals in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, R; Tran, N; Paoli, G M; Jaykus, L A; Tompkin, B; Miliotis, M; Ruthman, T; Hartnett, E; Busta, F F; Petersen, B; Shank, F; McEntire, J; Hotchkiss, J; Wagner, M; Schaffner, D W

    2009-03-01

    Through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Institute of Food Technologists developed a risk-ranking framework prototype to enable comparison of microbiological and chemical hazards in foods and to assist policy makers, risk managers, risk analysts, and others in determining the relative public health impact of specific hazard-food combinations. The prototype is a bottom-up system based on assumptions that incorporate expert opinion/insight with a number of exposure and hazard-related risk criteria variables, which are propagated forward with food intake data to produce risk-ranking determinations. The prototype produces a semi-quantitative comparative assessment of food safety hazards and the impacts of hazard control measures. For a specific hazard-food combination the prototype can produce a single metric: a final risk value expressed as annual pseudo-disability adjusted life years (pDALY). The pDALY is a harmonization of the very different dose-response relationships observed for chemicals and microbes. The prototype was developed on 2 platforms, a web-based user interface and an Analytica(R) model (Lumina Decision Systems, Los Gatos, Calif., U.S.A.). Comprising visual basic language, the web-based platform facilitates data input and allows use concurrently from multiple locations. The Analytica model facilitates visualization of the logic flow, interrelationship of input and output variables, and calculations/algorithms comprising the prototype. A variety of sortable risk-ranking reports and summary information can be generated for hazard-food pairs, showing hazard and dose-response assumptions and data, per capita consumption by population group, and annual p-DALY.

  4. Ranking COMMPS chemical substances by an improved POT/RLE approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Irene; Combarro, Elías; Marinaro, Pasquale; Troiano, Luigi

    2013-12-23

    The combined monitoring-based and modeling-based priority setting (COMMPS) provides a procedure for the identification of priority hazardous substances outlined in the Working Document (ENV/191000/01 of January 16, 2001). This procedure is based on scoring a set of criteria which individually make substances more or less hazardous. The way scores are weighted and combined has been established by a panel of experts. Different authors outlined how such a procedure might be affected by subjectiveness of judgment, and alternative solutions based on partial order theory (POT) and random linear extensions (RLE) have been suggested. This method consists of generating a set of RLE and of averaging the rank given to each substance, so that a total order could be determined. Any POT/RLE approach must face the issue of covering as much as possible the space of linear extensions that, in the case of the 85 substances considered by COMMPS, becomes extremely large, and an exhaustive generation of linear extension is not feasible. Therefore, having a faster algorithm would help to consider a larger number of linear extensions in a given time frame. In this paper, we discuss this problem, and we outline a possible solution.

  5. How synergistic or antagonistic effects may influence the mutual hazard ranking of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Carlsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of various agents, including humic materials, nanomaterials, microplastics, or simply specific chemical compounds, may cause changes in the apparent persistence, bioaccumulation, and/or toxicity (PBT of a chemical compound leading to an either increased or decreased PBT characteristics and thus an increased or decreased hazard evaluation. In the present paper, a series chloro-containing obsolete pesticides is studied as an illustrative example. Partial order methodology is used to quantify how changed P, B, or T characteristics of methoxychlor (MEC influences the measure of the hazard of MEC, relative to the other 11 compounds in the series investigated. Not surprisingly, an increase in one of the three indicators (P, B, or T lead to an increased average order and thus an increased relative hazard as a result of a synergistic effect. A decrease in one of the indicator values analogously causes a decreased average order/relative hazard through an antagonistic effect; the effect, however, being less pronounced. It is further seen that the effect of changing the apparent value of the three indicators is different. Thus, persistence apparently is more important that bioaccumulation which again appears more important than toxicity, which is in agreement with previous work. The results are discussed with reference to the European chemicals framework on registration, evaluation and authorization of chemicals (REACH framework.

  6. Rank classification of linear line structures from images by trifocal tensor determinability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Chung, Chi-Kit Ronald

    2010-07-01

    The problem we address is: Given line correspondences over three views, what is the condition of the line correspondences for the spatial relation of the three associated camera positions to be uniquely recoverable? The observed set of lines in space is called critical if there are multiple projectively nonequivalent configurations of the camera positions that can picture the same image triplet of the lines. We tackle the problem from the perspective of trifocal tensor, a quantity that captures the relative pose of the cameras in relation to the captured views. We show that the rank of a matrix that leads to the estimation of the tensor is reduced to 7, 11, 15 if the observed lines come from a line pencil, a line bundle, and a line field, respectively, which are line families belonging to linear line space; and 12, 19, 23 if the lines come from a general linear ruled surface, a general linear line congruence, and a general linear line complex, which are subclasses of linear line structures. We show that the above line structures, with the exception of linear line congruence and linear line complex, ought to be critical line structures. All of these structures are quite typical in reality, and thus, the findings are important to the validity and stability of practically all algorithms related to structure from motion and projective reconstruction using line correspondences.

  7. Improving predicted protein loop structure ranking using a Pareto-optimality consensus method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaohang; Rata, Ionel; Chiu, See-wing; Jakobsson, Eric

    2010-07-20

    Accurate protein loop structure models are important to understand functions of many proteins. Identifying the native or near-native models by distinguishing them from the misfolded ones is a critical step in protein loop structure prediction. We have developed a Pareto Optimal Consensus (POC) method, which is a consensus model ranking approach to integrate multiple knowledge- or physics-based scoring functions. The procedure of identifying the models of best quality in a model set includes: 1) identifying the models at the Pareto optimal front with respect to a set of scoring functions, and 2) ranking them based on the fuzzy dominance relationship to the rest of the models. We apply the POC method to a large number of decoy sets for loops of 4- to 12-residue in length using a functional space composed of several carefully-selected scoring functions: Rosetta, DOPE, DDFIRE, OPLS-AA, and a triplet backbone dihedral potential developed in our lab. Our computational results show that the sets of Pareto-optimal decoys, which are typically composed of approximately 20% or less of the overall decoys in a set, have a good coverage of the best or near-best decoys in more than 99% of the loop targets. Compared to the individual scoring function yielding best selection accuracy in the decoy sets, the POC method yields 23%, 37%, and 64% less false positives in distinguishing the native conformation, indentifying a near-native model (RMSD functions based on Pareto optimality and fuzzy dominance, the POC method is effective in distinguishing the best loop models from the other ones within a loop model set.

  8. Smart materials and structures for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.

    2003-10-01

    The latest development of materials and technology for building smart chemical sensors has been presented. Different kinds of chemical sensors working on the principle of chemical and physical transductions have been individually discussed. The sensor mechanism in each case of detection of inorganic and organic vapors has been indicated. The merits and demerits of different materials and sensors structures have been mentioned. Finally the strategic applications of some innovative chemical sensors have been clearly cited.

  9. Metabolomics-based approach for ranking the candidate structures of unidentified peaks in capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kazunori

    2017-04-01

    One of the technical challenges encountered during metabolomics research is determining the chemical structures of unidentified peaks. We have developed a metabolomics-based chemoinformatics approach for ranking the candidate structures of unidentified peaks. Our approach uses information about the known metabolites detected in samples containing unidentified peaks and involves three discrete steps. The first step involves identifying "precursor/product metabolites" as potential reactants or products derived from the unidentified peaks. In the second step, candidate structures for the unidentified peak are searched against the PubChem database using a molecular formula. These structures are then ranked by structural similarity against precursor/product metabolites and candidate structures. In the third step, the migration time is predicted to refine the candidate structures. Two simulation studies were conducted to highlight the efficacy of our approach, including the use of 20 proteinogenic amino acids as pseudo-unidentified peaks, and leave-one-out experiments for all of the annotated metabolites with and without filtering against the Human Metabolome Database. We also applied our approach to two unidentified peaks in a urine sample, which were identified as glycocyamidine and N-acetylglycine. These results suggest that our approach could be used to identify unidentified peaks during metabolomics analysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A rational approach to selecting and ranking some pharmaceuticals of concern for the aquatic environment and their relative importance compared with other chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnachie, Rachel L; Johnson, Andrew C; Sumpter, John P

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic organisms can be exposed to thousands of chemicals discharged by the human population. Many of these chemicals are considered disruptive to aquatic wildlife, and the literature on the impacts of these chemicals grows daily. However, because time and resources are not infinite, research must focus on the chemicals that represent the greatest threat. One group of chemicals of increasing concern is pharmaceuticals, for which the primary challenge is to identify which represent the greatest threat. In the present study, a list of 12 pharmaceuticals was compiled based on scoring the prevalence of different compounds from previous prioritization reviews. These included rankings based on prescription data, environmental concentrations, predicted environmental concentration/predicted no-effect concentration (PEC/PNEC) ratios, persistency/bioaccumulation/(eco)toxicity (PBT), and fish plasma model approaches. The most frequently cited were diclofenac, paracetamol, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, naproxen, atenolol, ethinyl estradiol, aspirin, fluoxetine, propranolol, metoprolol, and sulfamethoxazole. For each pharmaceutical, literature on effect concentrations was compiled and compared with river concentrations in the United Kingdom. The pharmaceuticals were ranked by degree of difference between the median effect and median river concentrations. Ethinyl estradiol was ranked as the highest concern, followed by fluoxetine, propranolol, and paracetamol. The relative risk of these pharmaceuticals was compared with those of metals and some persistent organic pollutants. Pharmaceuticals appear to be less of a threat to aquatic organisms than some metals (Cu, Al, Zn) and triclosan, using this ranking approach. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  11. Image-Based Chemical Structure Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Brenner, Florian; Wieland, Karin; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Kirschner, Johannes; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Török, Szilvia; Döme, Balazs; Konegger, Thomas; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Hutter, Herbert; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Lohninger, Hans

    2017-07-28

    Chemical imaging is a powerful tool for understanding the chemical composition and nature of heterogeneous samples. Recent developments in elemental, vibrational, and mass-spectrometric chemical imaging with high spatial resolution (50-200 nm) and reasonable timescale (a few hours) are capable of providing complementary chemical information about various samples. However, a single technique is insufficient to provide a comprehensive understanding of chemically complex materials. For bulk samples, the combination of different analytical methods and the application of statistical methods for extracting correlated information across different techniques is a well-established and powerful concept. However, combined multivariate analytics of chemical images obtained via different imaging techniques is still in its infancy, hampered by a lack of analytical methodologies for data fusion and analysis. This study demonstrates the application of multivariate statistics to chemical images taken from the same sample via various methods to assist in chemical structure determination.

  12. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE INDEXING OF TOXICITY DATA ON ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standardized chemical structure annotation of public toxicity databases and information resources is playing an increasingly important role in the 'flattening' and integration of diverse sets of biological activity data on the Internet. This review discusses public initiatives that are accelerating the pace of this transformation, with particular reference to toxicology-related chemical information. Chemical content annotators, structure locator services, large structure/data aggregator web sites, structure browsers, International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) International Chemical Identifier (InChI) codes, toxicity data models and public chemical/biological activity profiling initiatives are all playing a role in overcoming barriers to the integration of toxicity data, and are bringing researchers closer to the reality of a mineable chemical Semantic Web. An example of this integration of data is provided by the collaboration among researchers involved with the Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) project, the Carcinogenic Potency Project, projects at the National Cancer Institute and the PubChem database. Standardizing chemical structure annotation of public toxicity databases

  13. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  14. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  15. Tensor Rank

    OpenAIRE

    Erdtman, Elias; Jönsson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    This master's thesis addresses numerical methods of computing the typical ranks of tensors over the real numbers and explores some properties of tensors over finite fields. We present three numerical methods to compute typical tensor rank. Two of these have already been published and can be used to calculate the lowest typical ranks of tensors and an approximate percentage of how many tensors have the lowest typical ranks (for some tensor formats), respectively. The third method was developed...

  16. Predicted binding site information improves model ranking in protein docking using experimental and computer-generated target structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2015-11-23

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the vast majority of biological processes, therefore, significant efforts have been directed to investigate PPIs to fully comprehend cellular functions. Predicting complex structures is critical to reveal molecular mechanisms by which proteins operate. Despite recent advances in the development of new methods to model macromolecular assemblies, most current methodologies are designed to work with experimentally determined protein structures. However, because only computer-generated models are available for a large number of proteins in a given genome, computational tools should tolerate structural inaccuracies in order to perform the genome-wide modeling of PPIs. To address this problem, we developed eRank(PPI), an algorithm for the identification of near-native conformations generated by protein docking using experimental structures as well as protein models. The scoring function implemented in eRank(PPI) employs multiple features including interface probability estimates calculated by eFindSite(PPI) and a novel contact-based symmetry score. In comparative benchmarks using representative datasets of homo- and hetero-complexes, we show that eRank(PPI) consistently outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms improving the success rate by ~10 %. eRank(PPI) was designed to bridge the gap between the volume of sequence data, the evidence of binary interactions, and the atomic details of pharmacologically relevant protein complexes. Tolerating structure imperfections in computer-generated models opens up a possibility to conduct the exhaustive structure-based reconstruction of PPI networks across proteomes. The methods and datasets used in this study are available at www.brylinski.org/erankppi.

  17. Diffusion phenomena in chemically stabilized multilayer structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, S.; Bruijn, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Multilayered thin film structures are widely applied as reflective coatings for optical elements in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength regime. In this thesis we investigate the structural and chemical changes that occur in Mo/Si based multilayers as a result of radiation induced thermal loads and

  18. Rank Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  19. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  20. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  1. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  2. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  3. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  4. Low-rank factorization of electron integral tensors and its application in electronic structure theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, we introduce the reverse Cuthill-McKee (RCM) algorithm, which is often used for the bandwidth reduction of sparse tensors, to transform the two-electron integral tensors to their block diagonal forms. By further applying the pivoted Cholesky decomposition (CD) on each of the diagonal blocks, we are able to represent the high-dimensional two-electron integral tensors in terms of permutation matrices and low-rank Cholesky vectors. This representation facilitates the low-rank factorization of the high-dimensional tensor contractions that are usually encountered in post-Hartree-Fock calculations. In this letter, we discuss the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) method and linear coupled- cluster model with doubles (L-CCD) as two simple examples to demonstrate the efficiency of the RCM-CD technique in representing two-electron integrals in a compact form.

  5. The PubChem chemical structure sketcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlenfeldt, Wolf D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2009-12-17

    PubChem is an important public, Web-based information source for chemical and bioactivity information. In order to provide convenient structure search methods on compounds stored in this database, one mandatory component is a Web-based drawing tool for interactive sketching of chemical query structures. Web-enabled chemical structure sketchers are not new, being in existence for years; however, solutions available rely on complex technology like Java applets or platform-dependent plug-ins. Due to general policy and support incident rate considerations, Java-based or platform-specific sketchers cannot be deployed as a part of public NCBI Web services. Our solution: a chemical structure sketching tool based exclusively on CGI server processing, client-side JavaScript functions, and image sequence streaming. The PubChem structure editor does not require the presence of any specific runtime support libraries or browser configurations on the client. It is completely platform-independent and verified to work on all major Web browsers, including older ones without support for Web2.0 JavaScript objects.

  6. The PubChem chemical structure sketcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihlenfeldt Wolf D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PubChem is an important public, Web-based information source for chemical and bioactivity information. In order to provide convenient structure search methods on compounds stored in this database, one mandatory component is a Web-based drawing tool for interactive sketching of chemical query structures. Web-enabled chemical structure sketchers are not new, being in existence for years; however, solutions available rely on complex technology like Java applets or platform-dependent plug-ins. Due to general policy and support incident rate considerations, Java-based or platform-specific sketchers cannot be deployed as a part of public NCBI Web services. Our solution: a chemical structure sketching tool based exclusively on CGI server processing, client-side JavaScript functions, and image sequence streaming. The PubChem structure editor does not require the presence of any specific runtime support libraries or browser configurations on the client. It is completely platform-independent and verified to work on all major Web browsers, including older ones without support for Web2.0 JavaScript objects.

  7. Pharmaceuticals, personal care products and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in U.S. surface and finished drinking waters: a proposed ranking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2010-11-01

    This study developed a comprehensive ranking system, for the first time as per authors' knowledge, for prioritizing the monitoring of pharmaceuticals and personal care products and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (together termed as EOCs, hereafter; a total of 100 EOCs considered) in U.S. stream water/source water and finished drinking water (termed as "EOCRank," hereafter). The EOCRank system was developed using a total of 4 criteria: (1) occurrence, (2) treatment in drinking water treatment plants, (3) ecological effects, and (4) health effects and characterized using 7 attributes: prevalence, frequency of detection, removal, bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity (for fish, daphnid, and algae aquatic indicator species), pregnancy effects, and health effects. The health effects attribute was characterized using 7 sub-attributes: carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, impairment of fertility, central nervous system acting, endocrine effects, immunotoxicity, and developmental effects. Rank scores of EOCs were calculated as summations of multiplications of importance weights and utility functions of multiple criteria and were arranged to highlight EOCs needing immediate attention. Two different ranking lists of EOCs were developed for U.S. finished drinking water and stream water/source water and observed to differ with each other, indicating the effect of water type on ranking of EOCs. A ranking list of priority EOCs, developed using a particular criterion, was observed to differ with that, developed using multiple criteria. Health effects and treatment criteria were observed to be important criteria influencing overall data gap rank scores and need further data collection. The generalized nature of the system could be customized for specific geographical locations (occurrence information and importance weights of different components). The developed database of the EOCRank system is available on: http://www.egr.msu.edu/~xagorara/research.html). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All

  8. Shape optimization on the nozzle of a spherical pressure vessel using the ranked bidirectional evolutionary structural optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Shin; Ryu, Chung Hyun [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    To reduce stress concentration around the intersection between a spherical pressure vessel and a cylindrical nozzle under various load conditions using less material, the optimization for the distribution of reinforcement has researched. The Ranked Bidirectional Evolutionary Structural Optimization(R-BESO) method is developed recently, which adds elements based on a rank, and the performance indicator which can estimate a fully stressed model. The R-BESO method can obtain the optimum design using less iteration number than iteration number of the BESO. In this paper, the optimized intersection shape is sought using R-BESO method for a flush and a protruding nozzle. The considered load cases are a radial compression, torque and shear force.

  9. Structural and Chemical Biology of Terpenoid Cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, David W

    2017-09-13

    The year 2017 marks the twentieth anniversary of terpenoid cyclase structural biology: a trio of terpenoid cyclase structures reported together in 1997 were the first to set the foundation for understanding the enzymes largely responsible for the exquisite chemodiversity of more than 80000 terpenoid natural products. Terpenoid cyclases catalyze the most complex chemical reactions in biology, in that more than half of the substrate carbon atoms undergo changes in bonding and hybridization during a single enzyme-catalyzed cyclization reaction. The past two decades have witnessed structural, functional, and computational studies illuminating the modes of substrate activation that initiate the cyclization cascade, the management and manipulation of high-energy carbocation intermediates that propagate the cyclization cascade, and the chemical strategies that terminate the cyclization cascade. The role of the terpenoid cyclase as a template for catalysis is paramount to its function, and protein engineering can be used to reprogram the cyclization cascade to generate alternative and commercially important products. Here, I review key advances in terpenoid cyclase structural and chemical biology, focusing mainly on terpenoid cyclases and related prenyltransferases for which X-ray crystal structures have informed and advanced our understanding of enzyme structure and function.

  10. CHEMICAL STRUCTURES AND THEORETICAL MODELS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. To better understand the chemistry involved in the lean-fuel combustion, the chemical structure ..... Neither methanol nor acrolein could be detected, even in the leanest flame. These species should be analysed on the first gas chromatograph with detection limit estimated to 100 ppm, so that it can be concluded ...

  11. Comparison of Chemical Nano Structure, Rheological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, chemical nano structures, rheological and mechanical properties of long oil alkyd resin which was synthesized using different polybasic acid catalysts have been studied. These catalyst were phosphoric acid, 1,2,4-benzene tricarboxylic acid and succinic acid. The new compounds were compared with ...

  12. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  13. On matrices with low-rank-plus-shift structure: Partial SVD and latent semantic indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, H.; Zhang, Z.

    1998-08-01

    The authors present a detailed analysis of matrices satisfying the so-called low-rank-plus-shift property in connection with the computation of their partial singular value decomposition. The application they have in mind is Latent Semantic Indexing for information retrieval where the term-document matrices generated from a text corpus approximately satisfy this property. The analysis is motivated by developing more efficient methods for computing and updating partial SVD of large term-document matrices and gaining deeper understanding of the behavior of the methods in the presence of noise.

  14. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer.

  15. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingyue; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer. PMID:26047514

  16. Quantum chemical studies of protein structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Quantum chemical methods now permit the prediction of many spectroscopic observables in proteins and related model systems, in addition to electrostatic properties, which are found to be in excellent accord with those determined from experiment. I discuss the developments over the past decade in these areas, including predictions of nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, chemical shielding tensors, scalar couplings and hyperfine (contact) shifts, the isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings in Mössbauer spectroscopy, molecular energies and conformations, as well as a range of electrostatic properties, such as charge densities, the curvatures, Laplacians and Hessians of the charge density, electrostatic potentials, electric field gradients and electrostatic field effects. The availability of structure/spectroscopic correlations from quantum chemistry provides a basis for using numerous spectroscopic observables in determining aspects of protein structure, in determining electrostatic properties which are not readily accessible from experiment, as well as giving additional confidence in the use of these techniques to investigate questions about chemical bonding and chemical reactions. PMID:16147526

  17. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  18. Quantum probability ranking principle for ligand-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Himmat, Mubarak; Ahmed, Ali; Saeed, Faisal

    2017-04-01

    Chemical libraries contain thousands of compounds that need screening, which increases the need for computational methods that can rank or prioritize compounds. The tools of virtual screening are widely exploited to enhance the cost effectiveness of lead drug discovery programs by ranking chemical compounds databases in decreasing probability of biological activity based upon probability ranking principle (PRP). In this paper, we developed a novel ranking approach for molecular compounds inspired by quantum mechanics, called quantum probability ranking principle (QPRP). The QPRP ranking criteria would make an attempt to draw an analogy between the physical experiment and molecular structure ranking process for 2D fingerprints in ligand based virtual screening (LBVS). The development of QPRP criteria in LBVS has employed the concepts of quantum at three different levels, firstly at representation level, this model makes an effort to develop a new framework of molecular representation by connecting the molecular compounds with mathematical quantum space. Secondly, estimate the similarity between chemical libraries and references based on quantum-based similarity searching method. Finally, rank the molecules using QPRP approach. Simulated virtual screening experiments with MDL drug data report (MDDR) data sets showed that QPRP outperformed the classical ranking principle (PRP) for molecular chemical compounds.

  19. Quantum probability ranking principle for ligand-based virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Himmat, Mubarak; Ahmed, Ali; Saeed, Faisal

    2017-04-01

    Chemical libraries contain thousands of compounds that need screening, which increases the need for computational methods that can rank or prioritize compounds. The tools of virtual screening are widely exploited to enhance the cost effectiveness of lead drug discovery programs by ranking chemical compounds databases in decreasing probability of biological activity based upon probability ranking principle (PRP). In this paper, we developed a novel ranking approach for molecular compounds inspired by quantum mechanics, called quantum probability ranking principle (QPRP). The QPRP ranking criteria would make an attempt to draw an analogy between the physical experiment and molecular structure ranking process for 2D fingerprints in ligand based virtual screening (LBVS). The development of QPRP criteria in LBVS has employed the concepts of quantum at three different levels, firstly at representation level, this model makes an effort to develop a new framework of molecular representation by connecting the molecular compounds with mathematical quantum space. Secondly, estimate the similarity between chemical libraries and references based on quantum-based similarity searching method. Finally, rank the molecules using QPRP approach. Simulated virtual screening experiments with MDL drug data report (MDDR) data sets showed that QPRP outperformed the classical ranking principle (PRP) for molecular chemical compounds.

  20. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  2. Chemical structure analyses of phosphorylated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaipeng; Liu, Qi

    2014-03-11

    Chemical modification of chitosan to generate new bio-functional materials can bring more desirable properties depending on the nature of the groups introduced. Phosphorylated chitosan has attracted interests in recent years. The literature has reported that the phosphorylation of chitosan could be achieved through three different reaction routes, namely, in the presence of H3PO4/urea, H3PO4/Et3PO4/P2O5, or P2O5/CH3SO3H. However, the exact chemical structure of phosphorylated chitosan synthesized by different reaction routes has not been systematically studied and compared. Meanwhile, the most common opinion is that the hydroxyl group in chitosan is the main substitution site. In this work, phosphorylated chitosan was synthesized using three different reaction routes, and the chemical structures of the products were studied by infrared, X-ray photoelectron and (13)C NMR spectroscopic characterization. It was observed that in the reaction routes using H3PO4/urea and H3PO4/Et3PO4/P2O5, the amino groups were substituted instead of the hydroxyl groups. In the reaction route using P2O5/CH3SO3H, the amino groups were shielded by the ionic binding with CH3SO3H, and the C-6 hydroxyl groups were phosphorylated. Different structures of the phosphorylated chitosan were proposed based on the characterization results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  4. Trends in information theory-based chemical structure codification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Bonchev, Danail

    2014-08-01

    This report offers a chronological review of the most relevant applications of information theory in the codification of chemical structure information, through the so-called information indices. Basically, these are derived from the analysis of the statistical patterns of molecular structure representations, which include primitive global chemical formulae, chemical graphs, or matrix representations. Finally, new approaches that attempt to go "back to the roots" of information theory, in order to integrate other information-theoretic measures in chemical structure coding are discussed.

  5. Ranking the quality of protein structure models using sidechain based network properties [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2eu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the correct structure of a protein given its sequence still remains an arduous task with many researchers working towards this goal. Most structure prediction methodologies result in the generation of a large number of probable candidates with the final challenge being to select the best amongst these. In this work, we have used Protein Structure Networks of native and modeled proteins in combination with Support Vector Machines to estimate the quality of a protein structure model and finally to provide ranks for these models. Model ranking is performed using regression analysis and helps in model selection from a group of many similar and good quality structures. Our results show that structures with a rank greater than 16 exhibit native protein-like properties while those below 10 are non-native like. The tool is also made available as a web-server (http://vishgraph.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/GraProStr/native_non_native_ranking.html, where, 5 modelled structures can be evaluated at a given time.

  6. Improving 3D structure prediction from chemical shift data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schot, G.; Zhang, Z.; Vernon, R.; Shen, Y.; Vranken, W.F.; Baker, D.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; Lange, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    We report advances in the calculation of protein structures from chemical shift nuclear magnetic resonance data alone. Our previously developed method, CSRosetta, assembles structures from a library of short protein fragments picked from a large library of protein structures using chemical shifts

  7. The Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI: A Hazard-Based Scoring and Ranking Tool for Chemicals and Products Used in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Verslycke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A large portfolio of chemicals and products is needed to meet the wide range of performance requirements of the oil and gas industry. The oil and gas industry is under increased scrutiny from regulators, environmental groups, the public, and other stakeholders for use of their chemicals. In response, industry is increasingly incorporating “greener” products and practices but is struggling to define and quantify what exactly constitutes “green” in the absence of a universally accepted definition. We recently developed the Chemistry Scoring Index (CSI which is ultimately intended to be a globally implementable tool that comprehensively scores and ranks hazards to human health, safety, and the environment for products used in oil and gas operations. CSI scores are assigned to products designed for the same use (e.g., surfactants, catalysts on the basis of product composition as well as intrinsic hazard properties and data availability for each product component. As such, products with a lower CSI score within a product use group are considered to have a lower intrinsic hazard compared to other products within the same use group. The CSI provides a powerful tool to evaluate relative product hazards; to review and assess product portfolios; and to aid in the formulation of products.

  8. Finding Chemical Structures Corresponding to a Set of Coordinates in Chemical Descriptor Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyao, Tomoyuki; Funatsu, Kimito

    2017-08-01

    When chemical structures are searched based on descriptor values, or descriptors are interpreted based on values, it is important that corresponding chemical structures actually exist. In order to consider the existence of chemical structures located in a specific region in the chemical space, we propose to search them inside training data domains (TDDs), which are dense areas of a training dataset in the chemical space. We investigated TDDs' features using diverse and local datasets, assuming that GDB11 is the chemical universe. These two analyses showed that considering TDDs gives higher chance of finding chemical structures than a random search-based method, and that novel chemical structures actually exist inside TDDs. In addition to those findings, we tested the hypothesis that chemical structures were distributed on the limited areas of chemical space. This hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that distances among chemical structures in several descriptor spaces were much shorter than those among randomly generated coordinates in the training data range. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Multiplex PageRank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Halu

    Full Text Available Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  10. Multiplex PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  11. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  12. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  13. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. ACToR Chemical Structure processing using Open Source ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) is a centralized database repository developed by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Free and open source tools were used to compile toxicity data from over 1,950 public sources. ACToR contains chemical structure information and toxicological data for over 558,000 unique chemicals. The database primarily includes data from NCCT research programs, in vivo toxicity data from ToxRef, human exposure data from ExpoCast, high-throughput screening data from ToxCast and high quality chemical structure information from the EPA DSSTox program. The DSSTox database is a chemical structure inventory for the NCCT programs and currently has about 16,000 unique structures. Included are also data from PubChem, ChemSpider, USDA, FDA, NIH and several other public data sources. ACToR has been a resource to various international and national research groups. Most of our recent efforts on ACToR are focused on improving the structural identifiers and Physico-Chemical properties of the chemicals in the database. Organizing this huge collection of data and improving the chemical structure quality of the database has posed some major challenges. Workflows have been developed to process structures, calculate chemical properties and identify relationships between CAS numbers. The Structure processing workflow integrates web services (PubChem and NIH NCI Cactus) to d

  15. CHANGES IN THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF THERMALLY TREATED WOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Birol Uner; Gokhan Gunduz; Ibrahim Tumen; Deniz Aydemir; Hakan Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the chemical structure of hornbeam and uludag fir woods during thermal treatment were investigated at three temperatures (170, 190, and 210 oC) and three durations (4, 8, and 12 hours). After thermal treatment, the extents of degradation in the chemical structure of the samples were determined, and the effects on the chemical composition of hornbeam wood and uludag fir wood were investigated. The data obtained were analyzed using variance analysis, and Tukey’s test was used to dete...

  16. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  17. Mapping chemical performance on molecular structures using locally interpretable explanations

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, Leanne S; Hudson, Corey M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present an application of Locally Interpretable Machine-Agnostic Explanations to 2-D chemical structures. Using this framework we are able to provide a structural interpretation for an existing black-box model for classifying biologically produced fuel compounds with regard to Research Octane Number. This method of "painting" locally interpretable explanations onto 2-D chemical structures replicates the chemical intuition of synthetic chemists, allowing researchers in the field to directly accept, reject, inform and evaluate decisions underlying inscrutably complex quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

  18. A script for automated 3-dimentional structure generation and conformer search from 2- dimentional chemical drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Building 3-dimensional (3D) molecules is the starting point in molecular modeling. Conformer search and identification of a global energy minimum structure are often performed computationally during spectral analysis of data from NMR, IR, and VCD or during rational drug design through ligand-based, structure-based, and QSAR approaches. I herein report a convenient script that allows for automated building of 3D structures and conformer searching from 2-dimensional (2D) drawing of chemical structures. With this Bash shell script, which runs on Mac OS X and the Linux platform, the tasks are consecutively and iteratively executed without a 3D molecule builder via the command line interface of the free (academic) software OpenBabel, Balloon, and MOPAC2012. A large number of 2D chemical drawing files can be processed simultaneously, and the script functions with stereoisomers. Semi-empirical quantum chemical calculation ensures reliable ranking of the generated conformers on the basis of energy. In addition to an energy-sorted list of file names of the conformers, their Gaussian input files are provided for ab initio and density functional theory calculations to predict rigorous electronic energies, structures, and properties. This script is freely available to all scientists.

  19. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2017-12-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often structure) and to significantly outperform other shift-based or threading-based structure determination methods (in terms of top template model accuracy)-with an average TM-score performance of 0.68 (vs. 0.50-0.62 for other methods). Coupled with recent developments in chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  20. Estimating the Potential Toxicity of Chemicals Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations Using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Erin E; Stanek, John; DeWoskin, Robert S; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-07-19

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified 1173 chemicals associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids, flowback, or produced water, of which 1026 (87%) lack chronic oral toxicity values for human health assessments. To facilitate the ranking and prioritization of chemicals that lack toxicity values, it may be useful to employ toxicity estimates from quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Here we describe an approach for applying the results of a QSAR model from the TOPKAT program suite, which provides estimates of the rat chronic oral lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL). Of the 1173 chemicals, TOPKAT was able to generate LOAEL estimates for 515 (44%). To address the uncertainty associated with these estimates, we assigned qualitative confidence scores (high, medium, or low) to each TOPKAT LOAEL estimate, and found 481 to be high-confidence. For 48 chemicals that had both a high-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimate and a chronic oral reference dose from EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database, Spearman rank correlation identified 68% agreement between the two values (permutation p-value =1 × 10(-11)). These results provide support for the use of TOPKAT LOAEL estimates in identifying and prioritizing potentially hazardous chemicals. High-confidence TOPKAT LOAEL estimates were available for 389 of 1026 hydraulic fracturing-related chemicals that lack chronic oral RfVs and OSFs from EPA-identified sources, including a subset of chemicals that are frequently used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

  1. Algorithmic Complexity and Reprogrammability of Chemical Structure Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Zenil, Hector

    2018-02-16

    Here we address the challenge of profiling causal properties and tracking the transformation of chemical compounds from an algorithmic perspective. We explore the potential of applying a computational interventional calculus based on the principles of algorithmic probability to chemical structure networks. We profile the sensitivity of the elements and covalent bonds in a chemical structure network algorithmically, asking whether reprogrammability affords information about thermodynamic and chemical processes involved in the transformation of different compound classes. We arrive at numerical results suggesting a correspondence between some physical, structural and functional properties. Our methods are capable of separating chemical classes that reflect functional and natural differences without considering any information about atomic and molecular properties. We conclude that these methods, with their links to chemoinformatics via algorithmic, probability hold promise for future research.

  2. Atomic structure of clusters through chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques for the probing of isolated metal cluster structure through adsorbate binding patterns will be described. The saturation of clusters with reagents such as ammonia and nitrogen provides information on the number of preferred binding sites for these reagents. The dependence of this number on cluster size can suggest particular structural themes. The equilibrium reaction with water can be used to identify cluster sizes having especially enhanced binding for the water molecule. Again, the sequence of cluster sizes showing such enhancement can point to specific cluster structure. The reaction with oxygen can identify cluster sizes having particularly high ionization potentials, and these can be compared to simple models for the electronic structure of metal clusters. Representative applications of these probes to iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper clusters will be discussed. 5 figs.

  3. Marine Chemical Ecology: Chemical Signals and Cues Structure Marine Populations, Communities, and Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical cues constitute much of the language of life in the sea. Our understanding of biotic interactions and their effects on marine ecosystems will advance more rapidly if this language is studied and understood. Here, I review how chemical cues regulate critical aspects of the behavior of marine organisms from bacteria to phytoplankton to benthic invertebrates and water column fishes. These chemically mediated interactions strongly affect population structure, community organization, and ecosystem function. Chemical cues determine foraging strategies, feeding choices, commensal associations, selection of mates and habitats, competitive interactions, and transfer of energy and nutrients within and among ecosystems. In numerous cases, the indirect effects of chemical signals on behavior have as much or more effect on community structure and function as the direct effects of consumers and pathogens. Chemical cues are critical for understanding marine systems, but their omnipresence and impact are inadequately recognized.

  4. Chemically distinct coupled Cu (II) dimers: Structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 3. Chemically distinct coupled Cu(II) dimers: Structure and physicochemical properties. R Srinivasan R Venkatesan T M Rajendiran P Sambasiva Rao. Volume 112 Issue 3 June 2000 pp 359-359 ...

  5. 3D Forest Structure Estimation from SAR Tomography by Means of a Full Rank Polarimetric Inversion Based on Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazcarra Bes, Victor; Tello-Alonso, Maria; Papathanassiou, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    SAR tomography (TomoSAR) techniques allow a direct 3D imaging by exploiting angular diversity with different passes of the sensor. One of the main drawbacks of SAR tomography is that the estimation of the vertical reflectivity profile has to be performed through a limited set of multibaseline acquisitions, which requires solving a highly underdetermined system of equations. In TomoSAR literature, the Capon and the Fourier beamforming spectral estimators are widely employed. As an alternative, the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) techniques to the estimation of forest profiles has been recently introduced. In this paper, a different algorithm based on CS is proposed. It performs a full rank polarimetric inversion, allowing thus an estimation of the 3D coherency matrices. To study the full rank polarimetric TomoSAR inversion, a temporal series of airborne data is used. The results of the 3D polarimetric inversion will be contrasted to in situ measurements and LIDAR data.

  6. Advanced photonic structures for biological and chemical detection

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xudong

    2009-01-01

    One of a series of books on Integrated Microanalytical Systems, this text discusses the latest applications of photonic technologies in bio/chemical sensing. The book is divided into four sections, each one being based on photonic structures.

  7. Chemical isomeric effects on propanol glassy structures

    CERN Document Server

    Cuello, G J; Bermejo, F J; Cabrillo, C

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the structure of both propanol isomers in their glassy and crystalline states by neutron diffraction. The glass-transition temperatures of 1- and 2-propanol are about 98 and 115 K, respectively and, surprisingly, even larger differences are observed for the melting temperatures of the stable crystals, which are 148 and 185 K, respectively. Their supercooled liquid phases show rather different relaxation spectra, 1-propanol manifesting strong deviations from Debye behavior, whereas 2-propanol shows a far weaker effect. We discuss the spectra obtained for the static structure factor and the static pair correlation function D(r). There is a noticeable difference in the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, which clearly indicates a density change, well correlated with the period of the intermolecular oscillations shown by D(r). (orig.)

  8. Ranking library materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper discusses ranking factors suitable for library materials and shows that ranking in general is a complex process and that ranking for library materials requires a variety of techniques. Design/methodology/approach: The relevant literature is reviewed to provide a systematic overview of suitable ranking factors. The discussion is based on an overview of ranking factors used in Web search engines. Findings: While there are a wide variety of ranking factors appl...

  9. Mercury capture by selected Bulgarian fly ashes: Influence of coal rank and fly ash carbon pore structure on capture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.J.; Hower, J.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury capture by fly ash C was investigated at five lignite- and subbituminous-coal-burning Bulgarian power plants (Republika, Bobov Dol, Maritza East 2, Maritza East 3, and Sliven). Although the C content of the ashes is low, never exceeding 1.6%, the Hg capture on a unit C basis demonstrates that the low-rank-coal-derived fly ash carbons are more efficient in capturing Hg than fly ash carbons from bituminous-fired power plants. While some low-C and low-Hg fly ashes do not reveal any trends of Hg versus C, the 2nd and, in particular, the 3rd electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows at the Republika power plant do have sufficient fly ash C range and experience flue gas sufficiently cool to capture measurable amounts of Hg. The Republika 3rd ESP row exhibits an increase in Hg with increasing C, as observed in other power plants, for example, in Kentucky power plants burning Appalachian-sourced bituminous coals. Mercury/C decreases with an increase in fly ash C, suggesting that some of the C is isolated from the flue gas stream and does not contribute to Hg capture. Mercury capture increases with an increase in Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore surface area. The differences in Hg capture between the Bulgarian plants burning low-rank coal and high volatile bituminous-fed Kentucky power plants suggests that the variations in C forms resulting from the combustion of the different ranks also influence the efficiency of Hg capture. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The observed chemical structure of L1544

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzano, S.; Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giuliano, B. M.; Lattanzi, V.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Prior to star formation, pre-stellar cores accumulate matter towards the centre. As a consequence, their central density increases while the temperature decreases. Understanding the evolution of the chemistry and physics in this early phase is crucial to study the processes governing the formation of a star. Aims: We aim to study the chemical differentiation of a prototypical pre-stellar core, L1544, by detailed molecular maps. In contrast with single-pointing observations, we performed a deep study on the dependencies of chemistry on physical and external conditions. Methods: Here we present the emission maps of 39 different molecular transitions belonging to 22 different molecules in the central 6.25 arcmin2 of L1544. We classified our sample into five families, depending on the location of their emission peaks within the core. To systematically study the correlations among different molecules, we have performed the principal component analysis (PCA) on the integrated emission maps. The PCA allows us to reduce the amount of variables in our dataset. Finally, we have compared the maps of the first three principal components with the H2 column density map, and the Tdust map of the core. Results: The results of our qualitative analysis is the classification of the molecules in our dataset in the following groups: (I) the c-C3H2 family (carbon chain molecules like C3H and CCS); (II) the dust peak family (nitrogen-bearing species like N2H+); (III) the methanol peak family (oxygen-bearing molecules like methanol, SO and SO2); (iv) the HNCO peak family (HNCO, propyne and its deuterated isotopologues). Only HC18O+ and 13CS do not belong in any of the above mentioned groups. The principal component maps allow us to confirm the (anti-)correlations among different families that were described in a first qualitative analysis, but also point out the correlation that could not be inferred before. For example, the molecules belonging to the dust peak and the HNCO peak

  11. Combination of metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of high-rank deformed coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ju, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Coal constitutes a large proportion of total energy supply in the world. Coalbed Methane (CBM) composes the greenhouse gases, which has attracted more and more scientists' concern and attention. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and mechanism of CBM on high-rank deformed coals are in favor of enhancing gas recovery, reducing coal mining accidents and carbon emission. Although the influence factors of CBM adsorption/desorption on different coals have been intensively studied, the combined action of metamorphism and deformation on high-rank coals have been rarely researched. Nevertheless. Metamorphism and deformation are the most fundamental driving forces that cause the changes of inner structures and compositions in coal strata, and then alter the adsorption/desorption capacities of CBM on different coalbeds. South of Qinshui Basin in Shanxi province developed with abundant high-rank coals is the first demonstrate area of CBM development in China. Meanwhile Southwest of Fujian province represents high metamorphic-deformed coals region due to the intense volcanic activities. Therefore samples were taken in both areas to elaborate the adsorption/desorption characteristics and mechanism of CBM. Based on hand specimens description, coal macerals testing, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and vitrinite reflectance testing, the physical properties and composition characteristics of high-rank deformed coals have been studied. Combined with liquid nitrogen adsorption experiments, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observation, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments, the results show that nano-pores increase and become homogenization with metamorphic-deformation enhancement, stacking of the macromolecular basic structural units (BSU) enhances, aromatic compound increases while aliphatic chain compound and oxygen-containing function groups decrease. Comparing to coal adsorption/desorption isotherm

  12. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model...... Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term......, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction....

  13. Extracting and connecting chemical structures from text sources using chemicalize.org.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southan, Christopher; Stracz, Andras

    2013-04-23

    Exploring bioactive chemistry requires navigating between structures and data from a variety of text-based sources. While PubChem currently includes approximately 16 million document-extracted structures (15 million from patents) the extent of public inter-document and document-to-database links is still well below any estimated total, especially for journal articles. A major expansion in access to text-entombed chemistry is enabled by chemicalize.org. This on-line resource can process IUPAC names, SMILES, InChI strings, CAS numbers and drug names from pasted text, PDFs or URLs to generate structures, calculate properties and launch searches. Here, we explore its utility for answering questions related to chemical structures in documents and where these overlap with database records. These aspects are illustrated using a common theme of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPPIV) inhibitors. Full-text open URL sources facilitated the download of over 1400 structures from a DPPIV patent and the alignment of specific examples with IC50 data. Uploading the SMILES to PubChem revealed extensive linking to patents and papers, including prior submissions from chemicalize.org as submitting source. A DPPIV medicinal chemistry paper was completely extracted and structures were aligned to the activity results table, as well as linked to other documents via PubChem. In both cases, key structures with data were partitioned from common chemistry by dividing them into individual new PDFs for conversion. Over 500 structures were also extracted from a batch of PubMed abstracts related to DPPIV inhibition. The drug structures could be stepped through each text occurrence and included some converted MeSH-only IUPAC names not linked in PubChem. Performing set intersections proved effective for detecting compounds-in-common between documents and merged extractions. This work demonstrates the utility of chemicalize.org for the exploration of chemical structure connectivity between documents and

  14. The Chemical Validation and Standardization Platform (CVSP): large-scale automated validation of chemical structure datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Karen; Batchelor, Colin; Sharpe, David; Tkachenko, Valery; Williams, Antony J

    2015-01-01

    There are presently hundreds of online databases hosting millions of chemical compounds and associated data. As a result of the number of cheminformatics software tools that can be used to produce the data, subtle differences between the various cheminformatics platforms, as well as the naivety of the software users, there are a myriad of issues that can exist with chemical structure representations online. In order to help facilitate validation and standardization of chemical structure datasets from various sources we have delivered a freely available internet-based platform to the community for the processing of chemical compound datasets. The chemical validation and standardization platform (CVSP) both validates and standardizes chemical structure representations according to sets of systematic rules. The chemical validation algorithms detect issues with submitted molecular representations using pre-defined or user-defined dictionary-based molecular patterns that are chemically suspicious or potentially requiring manual review. Each identified issue is assigned one of three levels of severity - Information, Warning, and Error - in order to conveniently inform the user of the need to browse and review subsets of their data. The validation process includes validation of atoms and bonds (e.g., making aware of query atoms and bonds), valences, and stereo. The standard form of submission of collections of data, the SDF file, allows the user to map the data fields to predefined CVSP fields for the purpose of cross-validating associated SMILES and InChIs with the connection tables contained within the SDF file. This platform has been applied to the analysis of a large number of data sets prepared for deposition to our ChemSpider database and in preparation of data for the Open PHACTS project. In this work we review the results of the automated validation of the DrugBank dataset, a popular drug and drug target database utilized by the community, and ChEMBL 17 data set

  15. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating e...... eigenvalues and eigenvectors. We give a number of different applications to regression and time series analysis, and show how the reduced rank regression estimator can be derived as a Gaussian maximum likelihood estimator. We briefly mention asymptotic results......The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  16. Using chemical shifts to assess transient secondary structure and generate ensemble structures of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtanov, Stepan; Borcherds, Wade; Wu, Hongwei; Daughdrill, Gary W; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2012-01-01

    The chemical shifts of backbone atoms in polypeptides are sensitive to the dihedral angles phi and psi and can be used to estimate transient secondary structure and to generate structural ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In this chapter, several of the random coil reference databases used to estimate transient secondary structure are described, and the procedure is outlined for using these databases to estimate transient secondary structure. A new protocol is also presented for generating a diverse ensemble of structures for an IDP and reweighting these structures to optimize the fit between simulated and experimental chemical shift values.

  17. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Belavic, D.; Hrovat, M.; G. Dolanc; M. Santo Zarnik; Holc, J.; K. Makarovic

    2012-01-01

    The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s), mixer(s), reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and...

  18. Utilization of low rank coal and agricultural by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, E.; Yardim, M.F.; Petrova, B.; Budinova, T.; Petrov, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The present investigation deals with alternative utilization processes to convert low rank coal and agricultural by products into solid, liquid and gaseous products for a more efficient exploitation of these materials. Low rank coals and different agricultural by-products were subjected to different thermochemical treatments. The composition and physico-chemical properties of liquid products obtained from agricultural by-products were investigated. The identified compounds are predominantly oxygen derivatives of phenol, dihydroxybenzenes, guaiacol, syringol, vanilin, veratrol, furan and acids. Liquids from low rank coals contain higher quality of aromatic compounds predominantly mono- and bicyclic. The amount of oxygen containing structures is high as well. By thermo-chemical treatment of liquid products from agricultural by-products, low rank coals and their mixtures with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} carbon adsorbents with very low ash and sulfur content are obtained. Using different activation reagents large scale carbon adsorbents are prepared from agricultural by-products and coals. The results of the investigations open-up possibilities for utilization of low rank coals and agricultural by-products. 18 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 5. Structural, optical and electrical properties of chemically ... R H Bari1 L A Patil1 P P Patil2. P.G. Department of Physics, Pratap College, Amalner 425 401, India; Department of Physical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon 425 001, India ...

  20. Quantum chemical investigation on structures and energetics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with a systematic study on WF species using ab initio density functional method. The geometrical features related to the equilibrium structures of WF species up to = 5 are highlighted and the effect of addition as well as removal of an electron is discussed. The chemical stability of these species ...

  1. Chemical structures and theoretical models of lean premixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To better understand the chemistry involved in the lean-fuel combustion, the chemical structure of lean premixed propene-oxygen-nitrogen flames stabilized on a flat-flame burner at atmospheric pressure was determined experimentally. The species mole fraction profiles were also computed by the Premix code and three ...

  2. Lincosamides: Chemical structure, biosynthesis, mechanism of action, resistance, and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 133, June 1 SI (2017), s. 20-28 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Lincosamides * Chemical structure * Biosynthesis and mechanism of action Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.581, year: 2016

  3. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 2. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and properties of ceramic insulators. Arman Sedghi Nastaran Riahi-Noori Naser Hamidnezhad Mohammad Reza Salmani. Electronic Supplementary Material Volume 37 Issue 2 April 2014 pp ...

  4. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  5. Global Materials Structure Search with Chemically Motivated Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosetti, Chiara; Krautgasser, Konstantin; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2015-12-09

    Identification of relevant reaction pathways in ever more complex composite materials and nanostructures poses a central challenge to computational materials discovery. Efficient global structure search, tailored to identify chemically relevant intermediates, could provide the necessary first-principles atomistic insight to enable a rational process design. In this work we modify a common feature of global geometry optimization schemes by employing automatically generated collective curvilinear coordinates. The similarity of these coordinates to molecular vibrations enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures for covalently bound systems. In the application to hydrogenated Si clusters, we concomitantly observe a significantly increased efficiency in identifying low-energy structures and exploit it for an extensive sampling of potential products of silicon-cluster soft landing on Si(001) surfaces.

  6. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  7. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF STRUCTURAL ALERTS (CHEMICAL FRAGMENTS IN (ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lepailleur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  9. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  10. Carotenoids Database: structures, chemical fingerprints and distribution among organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuzaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    To promote understanding of how organisms are related via carotenoids, either evolutionarily or symbiotically, or in food chains through natural histories, we built the Carotenoids Database. This provides chemical information on 1117 natural carotenoids with 683 source organisms. For extracting organisms closely related through the biosynthesis of carotenoids, we offer a new similarity search system 'Search similar carotenoids' using our original chemical fingerprint 'Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints'. These Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints describe the chemical substructure and the modification details based upon International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) semi-systematic names of the carotenoids. The fingerprints also allow (i) easier prediction of six biological functions of carotenoids: provitamin A, membrane stabilizers, odorous substances, allelochemicals, antiproliferative activity and reverse MDR activity against cancer cells, (ii) easier classification of carotenoid structures, (iii) partial and exact structure searching and (iv) easier extraction of structural isomers and stereoisomers. We believe this to be the first attempt to establish fingerprints using the IUPAC semi-systematic names. For extracting close profiled organisms, we provide a new tool 'Search similar profiled organisms'. Our current statistics show some insights into natural history: carotenoids seem to have been spread largely by bacteria, as they produce C30, C40, C45 and C50 carotenoids, with the widest range of end groups, and they share a small portion of C40 carotenoids with eukaryotes. Archaea share an even smaller portion with eukaryotes. Eukaryotes then have evolved a considerable variety of C40 carotenoids. Considering carotenoids, eukaryotes seem more closely related to bacteria than to archaea aside from 16S rRNA lineage analysis. : http://carotenoiddb.jp.

  11. Chemical modification of citrus pectin: Structural, physical and rheologial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracasso, Aline Francielle; Perussello, Camila Augusto; Carpiné, Danielle; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira; Haminiuk, Charles Windson Isidoro

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the physical, structural and rheological modifications caused by the chemical modification process of citrus pectin. Therefore, three commercial citrus pectins with different degree of esterification were chemically modified by sequential alkali and acidic hydrolytic process to produce modified citrus pectins (MCP) with special properties. The molar mass (M w ), degree of esterification (DE), monosaccharide composition, 13 C NMR spectra, homogeneity, morphology (SEM) and rheological behavior of both native and modified citrus pectins (MCP) were investigated. The chemical modification reduced the acid uronic content (up to 28.3%) and molar mass (up to 29.98%), however, showed little influence on the degree of esterification of native pectins. Modified citrus pectins presented higher amounts of neutral monosaccharides, mainly galactose, arabinose and rhamnose, typical of the Ramnogalacturonana-I (RG-I) region. Rheological tests indicated that the native and modified citrus pectins presented pseudoplastic behavior, however, the MCP samples were less viscous, compared to the native ones. Modified samples presented better dissolution in water and less strong gels, with good stability during oscillatory shearing at 25°C. This study aims to better understand the implications that chemical modifications may impose on the structure of citrus pectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  13. A regularized matrix factorization approach to induce structured sparse-low-rank solutions in the EEG inverse problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montoya-Martinez, Jair; Artes-Rodriguez, Antonio; Pontil, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the Brain Electrical Sources (BES) matrix from noisy electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements, commonly named as the EEG inverse problem. We propose a new method to induce neurophysiological meaningful solutions, which takes into account the smoothness, structured...... matrix and the squared Frobenius norm of the latent source matrix. We develop an alternating optimization algorithm to solve the resulting nonsmooth-nonconvex minimization problem. We analyze the convergence of the optimization procedure, and we compare, under different synthetic scenarios...

  14. Ranking the magnitude of crop and farming system effects on soil microbial biomass and genetic structure of bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Fliessbach, Andreas; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Widmer, Franco

    2006-09-01

    Biological soil characteristics such as microbial biomass, community structures, activities, and functions may provide important information on environmental and anthropogenic influences on agricultural soils. Diagnostic tools and detailed statistical approaches need to be developed for a reliable evaluation of these parameters, in order to allow classification and quantification of the magnitude of such effects. The DOK long-term agricultural field experiment was initiated in 1978 in Switzerland for the evaluation of organic and conventional farming practices. It includes three representative Swiss farming systems with biodynamic, bio-organic and conventional fertilization and plant protection schemes along with minerally fertilized and unfertilized controls. Effects on microbial soil characteristics induced by the long-term management at two different stages in the crop rotation, i.e. winter wheat after potato or corn, were investigated by analyzing soil bacterial community structures using analysis of PCR-amplified rRNA genes by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Application of farmyard manure consistently revealed the strongest influence on bacterial community structures and biomass contents. Effects of management and plant protection regimes occurred on an intermediate level, while the two stages in the crop rotation had a marginal influence that was not significant.

  15. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural studies of chemical constituents of Thithonia Tagetiflora Desv (Asteraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngoc Huynh, Vinh; Nguyen Thi Hoai, Thu; Phi Phung Nguyen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Tithonia tagetiflora Desv. (Asteraceae) is a widespread plant in Vietnam, and the species of Tithonia are known as plants containing many biologically active compounds. However, T. tagetiflora's chemical composition remains mostly unknown. Therefore, we now report the structural elucidation of tw......)-roseoside (4), and one glutinane type triterpene, epi-glutinol (5), from the leaves of T. tagetiflora. Their structures are established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, as well as ESI-MS analysis and comparison with literature data...

  17. Design of LTCC-based Ceramic Structure for Chemical Microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belavic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of ceramic chemical microreactor for the production of hydrogen needed in portable polymer-electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells is presented. The microreactor was developed for the steam reforming of liquid fuels with water into hydrogen. The complex three-dimensional ceramic structure of the microreactor includes evaporator(s, mixer(s, reformer and combustor. Low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology was used to fabricate the ceramic structures with buried cavities and channels, and thick-film technology was used to make electrical heaters, temperature sensors and pressure sensors. The final 3D ceramic structure consists of 45 LTCC tapes. The dimensions of the structure are 75 × 41 × 9 mm3 and the weight is about 73 g.

  18. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-02-02

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  19. Classification of Alzheimer's disease and prediction of mild cognitive impairment-to-Alzheimer's conversion from structural magnetic resource imaging using feature ranking and a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Iman; Demirel, Hasan; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that uses feature-ranking and a genetic algorithm to analyze structural magnetic resonance imaging data; using this system, we can predict conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-to-Alzheimer's disease (AD) at between one and three years before clinical diagnosis. The CAD system was developed in four stages. First, we used a voxel-based morphometry technique to investigate global and local gray matter (GM) atrophy in an AD group compared with healthy controls (HCs). Regions with significant GM volume reduction were segmented as volumes of interest (VOIs). Second, these VOIs were used to extract voxel values from the respective atrophy regions in AD, HC, stable MCI (sMCI) and progressive MCI (pMCI) patient groups. The voxel values were then extracted into a feature vector. Third, at the feature-selection stage, all features were ranked according to their respective t-test scores and a genetic algorithm designed to find the optimal feature subset. The Fisher criterion was used as part of the objective function in the genetic algorithm. Finally, the classification was carried out using a support vector machine (SVM) with 10-fold cross validation. We evaluated the proposed automatic CAD system by applying it to baseline values from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset (160 AD, 162 HC, 65 sMCI and 71 pMCI subjects). The experimental results indicated that the proposed system is capable of distinguishing between sMCI and pMCI patients, and would be appropriate for practical use in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maximum Waring ranks of monomials

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Erik; Plummer, Paul; Siegert, Jeremy; Teitler, Zach

    2013-01-01

    We show that monomials and sums of pairwise coprime monomials in four or more variables have Waring rank less than the generic rank, with a short list of exceptions. We asymptotically compare their ranks with the generic rank.

  1. Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to nanocellulose: structure and chemical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H V; Hamid, S B A; Zain, S K

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate's application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein.

  2. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.1. Corrosion of advanced structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowok, J.W.; Strobel, T.M.; Bieber, J.A.; Hurley, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In order to increase national energy self-sufficiency for the near future, energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and use more efficient energy cycles than those available today. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum steam temperature of 550{degrees}C and thus a conversion efficiency of 35%. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required, compelling subsystems to operate at much higher temperatures and, therefore, in much more corrosive environments than those currently used. Problems of special concern are corrosion and fatigue of direct-fired turbine blades, corrosion and blinding of hot-gas cleanup filters, catastrophic failure of high-temperature heat exchangers, and spalling and dissolution of refractory materials. The extreme conditions will require the use of advanced structural materials such as high-temperature ceramics for the construction of the subsystems. Unfortunately, little is known of the performance of these materials in actual coal combustion environments. Although some corrosion testing has been performed in the past, most has been done by groups experimenting with ash or slag stimulants composed of only one or two simple compounds. For this project performed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), actual coal ash and slag will be used in simulated combustion conditions so that more realistic determinations of the mechanisms of corrosion can be made. The work includes three main research areas focusing on two fossil energy subsystems: high-temperature heat exchangers and hot-gas cleanup filters. The first area involves developing existing abilities in thermodynamic equilibrium calculations to determine the most appropriate corroding agents to include in the tests; the second area involves coal slag corrosion of high temperature heat exchangers; and the third, lower-temperature ash and gas corrosion hot-gas cleanup filters.

  3. How to Rank Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows.

  4. Scoring and ranking of metabolic trees to computationally prioritize chemicals for testing using fit-for-purpose in vitro estrogen receptor assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing awareness about endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the environment has driven concern about their potential impact on human health and wildlife. Tens of thousands of natural and synthetic xenobiotics are presently in commerce with little to no toxicity data and t...

  5. A statistical approach towards the derivation of predictive gene sets for potency ranking of chemicals in the mouse embryonic stem cell test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, Sjors H W; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Tonk, Elisa C M; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2014-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is applied as a model system for detection of embryotoxicants. The application of transcriptomics allows a more detailed effect assessment compared to the morphological endpoint. Genes involved in cell differentiation, modulated by chemical exposures, may be useful

  6. Rank Modulation for Translocation Error Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Farnoud, Farzad; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2012-01-01

    We consider rank modulation codes for flash memories that allow for handling arbitrary charge drop errors. Unlike classical rank modulation codes used for correcting errors that manifest themselves as swaps of two adjacently ranked elements, the proposed \\emph{translocation rank codes} account for more general forms of errors that arise in storage systems. Translocations represent a natural extension of the notion of adjacent transpositions and as such may be analyzed using related concepts in combinatorics and rank modulation coding. Our results include tight bounds on the capacity of translocation rank codes, construction techniques for asymptotically good codes, as well as simple decoding methods for one class of structured codes. As part of our exposition, we also highlight the close connections between the new code family and permutations with short common subsequences, deletion and insertion error-correcting codes for permutations and permutation arrays.

  7. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d0=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d0.

  8. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d_{0}=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d_{0}.

  9. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way of describ......In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way...... of describing the core electrons employed - is also presented. The investigation of the binding of graphene on metallic model surfaces is presented comparing the results from traditional exchange and correlation functionals to the results obtained with a new type of non-local functional, which includes van der...... are easier to remove and therefore only zigzag edges are left. Finally, functionalized graphene has been investigated as catalyst for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to chemical fuels and comparisons are made with traditional transition-metal surfaces. The investigated porphyrin-like structures...

  10. Academic rankings: an approach to a Portuguese ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardino, Pedro; Marques,Rui

    2009-01-01

    The academic rankings are a controversial subject in higher education. However, despite all the criticism, academic rankings are here to stay and more and more different stakeholders use rankings to obtain information about the institutions’ performance. The two most well-known rankings, The Times and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings have different methodologies. The Times ranking is based on peer review, whereas the Shanghai ranking has only quantitative indicators and is mainly ba...

  11. Chemical structure and properties of low-molecular furin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Osadchuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of the relationship between a chemical structure and properties of low-molecular weight inhibitors of furin, the most studied proprotein convertase, which is involved in the development of some pathologies, such as oncologic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, etc. The latest data concerning the influence of peptides, pseudo-peptides, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, some natural ones such as flavonoids, coumarins, and others on enzyme inactivation are considered. The power of furin inhibition is shown to rise with the increasing number of positively charged groups in the structure of these compounds. Peptidomimetics (Ki = 5-8 pM are shown to be the most effective furin inhibitors. The synthesized substances, however, have not been used in practical application yet. Nowadays it is very important to find more selective inhibitors, improve their stability, bioavailability and safety for the human organism.

  12. AMBIT-SMARTS: Efficient Searching of Chemical Structures and Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Kochev, Nikolay

    2011-08-01

    We present new developments in the AMBIT open source software package for efficient searching of chemical structures and structural fragments. AMBIT-SMARTS is a Java based software built on top of The Chemistry Development Kit. The AMBIT-SMARTS parser implements the entire SMARTS language specification with several syntax extensions that enable support for custom modifications introduced by third party software packages such as OpenEye, MOE and OpenBabel. The goal of yet another open-source SMARTS parser implementation is to achieve better performance and compatibility with multiple existing flavours of the SMARTS language, as well as to provide utilities for running efficient SMARTS queries in large structural databases. We describe a combination of approaches towards lowering the computational cost and improving the response time of substructure queries. An exhaustive comparison of the AMBIT algorithm with several subgraph isomorphism implementations is performed. To demonstrate the performance of the entire system from an end-user point of view, response time statistics for Web service substructure search queries against a database of 4.5 M structures are also reported. The package has wide applicability in the implementation of various chemoinformatics tasks. It has already been used in several projects dealing with descriptor calculation and predictive algorithms, database queries, web applications and web services. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Physico-chemical properties and gasification reactivity of co-pyrolysis char from different rank of coal blended with lignocellulosic biomass: Effects of the cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuzhong; Luo, Zhengyuan; Chen, Lin; Meng, Haiyu; Zhao, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of cellulose on the physicochemical properties and the gasification reactivity of co-pyrolysis char was investigated. A specific surface area analyzer and an X-ray diffraction system were used to characterize the pore structure and the micro-crystalline structure of char. Fractal theory and deconvolution method were applied to quantitatively investigate the influence of cellulose on the structure of co-pyrolysis char. The results indicate that the improvements in the pore structure due to the presence of cellulose are more pronounced in the case of anthracite char with respect to bituminous char. Cellulose promotes the ordering of micro-scale structure and the uniformity of both anthracite and bituminous char, while the negative synergetic effect was observed during gasification of co-pyrolysis char. The exponential relationships between fractal dimension and specific surface area were determined, along with the relations between the gasification reactivity index and the microcrystalline structure parameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ranking Economic History Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study ranks - for the first time - 12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We...... also compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential...

  15. Ranking economic history journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    This study ranks-for the first time-12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We also...... compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential for economic...

  16. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  17. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  18. Evolution of polymer photovoltaic performances from subtle chemical structure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Li, Denghua; Lu, Kun; Zhu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Yajie; Yang, Yanlian; Wei, Zhixiang

    2012-11-21

    Conjugated polymers are promising replacements for their inorganic counterparts in photovoltaics due to their low cost, ease of processing, and straightforward thin film formation. New materials have been able to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells up to 8%. However, rules for rational material design are still lacking, and subtle chemical structure variations usually result in large performance discrepancies. The present paper reports a detailed study on the crystalline structure, morphology, and in situ optoelectronic properties of blend films of polythiophene derivatives and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester by changing the alkyl side chain length and position of polythiophene. The correlation among the molecular structure, mesoscopic morphology, mesoscopic optoelectronic property and macroscopic device performance (highest efficiency above 4%) was directly established. Both solubility and intermolecular interactions should be considered in rational molecular design. Knowledge obtained from this study can aid the selection of appropriate processing conditions that improve blend film morphology, charge transport property, and overall solar cell efficiency.

  19. Chemical structural analysis of diamondlike carbon films: II. Raman analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Susumu; Ješko, Radek; Shinohara, Masanori; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Rintaro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    The chemical structure of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, synthesized by photoemission-assisted glow discharge, has been analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Raman analysis in conjunction with the sp2 cluster model clarified the film structure. The sp2 clusters in DLC films synthesized at low temperature preferred various aliphatic structures. Sufficient argon-ion assist allowed for formation of less strained DLC films containing large amounts of hydrogen. As the synthesis temperature was increased, thermal desorption of hydrogen left carbon dangling bonds with active unpaired electrons in the films, and the reactions that followed created strained films containing aromatic sp2 clusters. In parallel, the desorption of methane molecules from the growing surface by chemisorption of hydrogen radicals prevented the action of argon ions, promoting internal strain of the films. However, in synthesis at very high temperature, where sp2 clusters are sufficiently dominant, the strain was dissolved gradually. In contrast, the DLC films synthesized at low temperature were more stable than other films synthesized at the same temperature because of stable hydrogen-carbon bonds in the films.

  20. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Nanocellulose: Structure and Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex biopolymer that is primary composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The presence of cellulose in biomass is able to depolymerise into nanodimension biomaterial, with exceptional mechanical properties for biocomposites, pharmaceutical carriers, and electronic substrate’s application. However, the entangled biomass ultrastructure consists of inherent properties, such as strong lignin layers, low cellulose accessibility to chemicals, and high cellulose crystallinity, which inhibit the digestibility of the biomass for cellulose extraction. This situation offers both challenges and promises for the biomass biorefinery development to utilize the cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass. Thus, multistep biorefinery processes are necessary to ensure the deconstruction of noncellulosic content in lignocellulosic biomass, while maintaining cellulose product for further hydrolysis into nanocellulose material. In this review, we discuss the molecular structure basis for biomass recalcitrance, reengineering process of lignocellulosic biomass into nanocellulose via chemical, and novel catalytic approaches. Furthermore, review on catalyst design to overcome key barriers regarding the natural resistance of biomass will be presented herein.

  1. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism.

  2. Asset ranking manager (ranking index of components)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, S.M.; Engle, A.M.; Morgan, T.A. [Applied Reliability, Maracor Software and Engineering (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Ranking Index of Components (RIC) is an Asset Reliability Manager (ARM), which itself is a Web Enabled front end where plant database information fields from several disparate databases are combined. That information is used to create a specific weighted number (Ranking Index) relating to that components health and risk to the site. The higher the number, the higher priority that any work associated with that component receives. ARM provides site Engineering, Maintenance and Work Control personnel with a composite real time - (current condition) look at the components 'risk of not working' to the plant. Information is extracted from the existing Computerized Maintenance management System (CMMS) and specific site applications and processed nightly. ARM helps to ensure that the most important work is placed into the workweeks and the non value added work is either deferred, frequency changed or deleted. This information is on the web, updated each night, and available for all employees to use. This effort assists the work management specialist when allocating limited resources to the most important work. The use of this tool has maximized resource usage, performing the most critical work with available resources. The ARM numbers are valued inputs into work scoping for the workweek managers. System and Component Engineers are using ARM to identify the components that are at 'risk of failure' and therefore should be placed into the appropriate work week schedule.

  3. DUTCH PRIORITY SETTING SYSTEM FOR EXISTING CHEMICALS: a systematic procedure for ranking chemicals according to increasing estimated hazards. To be incorporated into the UNIFORM SYSTEM FOR THE EVALUATION OF SUBSTANCES (USES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Meent D; Toet C

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Dutch PRiority Setting system for Existing Chemicals (PRISEC). PRISEC is designed to be incorporated into the Uniform System for Evaluation of Substances together with the Dutch Risk Assessment System for New Chemicals and the Dutch Risk Assessment System for Pesticides.

  4. Ranking of Rankings: Benchmarking Twenty-Five Higher Education Ranking Systems in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ingo; Hendel, Darwin D.; Horn, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ranking practices of 25 European higher education ranking systems (HERSs). Ranking practices were assessed with 14 quantitative measures derived from the Berlin Principles on Ranking of Higher Education Institutions (BPs). HERSs were then ranked according to their degree of congruence with the BPs.…

  5. Limitations of Structural Superlubricity: Chemical Bonds versus Contact Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Dirk; Brndiar, Ján; Štich, Ivan; Schirmeisen, André

    2017-08-22

    Structural superlubricity describes the state of virtually frictionless sliding if two atomically flat interfaces are incommensurate, that is, they share no common periodicity. Despite the exciting prospects of this low friction phenomenon, there are physical limitations to the existence of this state. Theory predicts that the contact size is one fundamental limit, where the critical size threshold mainly depends on the interplay between lateral contact compliance and interface interaction energies. Here we provide experimental evidence for this size threshold by measuring the sliding friction force of differently sized antimony particles on MoS 2 . We find that superlubric sliding with the characteristic linear decrease of shear stress with contact size prevails for small particles with contact areas below 15 000 nm 2 . Larger particles, however, show a transition toward constant shear stress behavior. In contrast, Sb particles on graphite show superlubricity over the whole size range. Ab initio simulations reveal that the chemical interaction energies for Sb/MoS 2 are much stronger than for Sb/HOPG and can therefore explain the different friction properties as well as the critical size thresholds. These limitations must be considered when designing low friction contacts based on structural superlubricity concepts.

  6. From rankings to mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Darrell G; Prescott, John E

    2013-08-01

    Since the 1980s, school ranking systems have been a topic of discussion among leaders of higher education. Various ranking systems are based on inadequate data that fail to illustrate the complex nature and special contributions of the institutions they purport to rank, including U.S. medical schools, each of which contributes uniquely to meeting national health care needs. A study by Tancredi and colleagues in this issue of Academic Medicine illustrates the limitations of rankings specific to primary care training programs. This commentary discusses, first, how each school's mission and strengths, as well as the impact it has on the community it serves, are distinct, and, second, how these schools, which are each unique, are poorly represented by overly subjective ranking methodologies. Because academic leaders need data that are more objective to guide institutional development, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has been developing tools to provide valid data that are applicable to each medical school. Specifically, the AAMC's Medical School Admissions Requirements and its Missions Management Tool each provide a comprehensive assessment of medical schools that leaders are using to drive institutional capacity building. This commentary affirms the importance of mission while challenging the leaders of medical schools, teaching hospitals, and universities to use reliable data to continually improve the quality of their training programs to improve the health of all.

  7. Build-up algorithm for atomic correspondence between chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2011-08-22

    Determining a one-to-one atom correspondence between two chemical compounds is important to measure molecular similarities and to find compounds with similar biological activities. This calculation can be formalized as the maximum common substructure (MCS) problem, which is well-studied and has been shown to be NP-complete. Although many rigorous and heuristic algorithms have been developed, none of these algorithms is sufficiently fast and accurate. We developed a new program, called "kcombu" using a build-up algorithm, which is a type of the greedy heuristic algorithms. The program can search connected and disconnected MCSs as well as topologically constrained disconnected MCS (TD-MCS), which is introduced in this study. To evaluate the performance of our program, we prepared two correct standards: the exact correspondences generated by the maximum clique algorithms and the 3D correspondences obtained from superimposed 3D structure of the molecules in a complex 3D structure with the same protein. For the five sets of molecules taken from the protein structure database, the agreement value between the build-up and the exact correspondences for the connected MCS is sufficiently high, but the computation time of the build-up algorithm is much smaller than that of the exact algorithm. The comparison between the build-up and the 3D correspondences shows that the TD-MCS has the best agreement value among the other types of MCS. Additionally, we observed a strong correlation between the molecular similarity and the agreement with the correct and 3D correspondences; more similar molecule pairs are more correctly matched. Molecular pairs with more than 40% Tanimoto similarities can be correctly matched for more than half of the atoms with the 3D correspondences.

  8. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  9. Molecule database framework: a framework for creating database applications with chemical structure search capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiener, Joos

    2013-01-01

    .... The involved scientists must be able to store this data and search it by chemical structure. There are commercial solutions for common needs like chemical registration systems or electronic lab notebooks...

  10. Protein structure refinement using a quantum mechanics-based chemical shielding predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2017-01-01

    chemical shielding values (ProCS15) can be used to refine protein structures using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, relating the chemical shielding values to the experimental chemical shifts probabilistically. Two kinds of MCMC structural refinement simulations were performed using force field...... the chemical shift RMSD by 1.0 and 0.7 ppm for CA and N. Conformational averaging has a relatively small effect (0.1–0.2 ppm) on the overall agreement with carbon chemical shifts but lowers the error for nitrogen chemical shifts by 0.4 ppm. If an amino acid specific offset is included the ProCS15 predicted...

  11. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  12. Modeling multi-typed structurally viewed chemicals with the UMLS Refined Semantic Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Morrey, C Paul; Gu, Huanying; Halper, Michael; Perl, Yehoshua

    2009-01-01

    Chemical concepts assigned multiple "Chemical Viewed Structurally" semantic types (STs) in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) are subject to ambiguous interpretation. The multiple assignments may denote the fact that a specific represented chemical (combination) is a conjugate, derived via a chemical reaction of chemicals of the different types, or a complex, composed of a mixture of such chemicals. The previously introduced Refined Semantic Network (RSN) is modified to properly model these varied multi-typed chemical combinations. The RSN was previously introduced as an enhanced abstraction of the UMLS's concepts. It features new types, called intersection semantic types (ISTs), each of which explicitly captures a unique combination of ST assignments in one abstract unit. The ambiguous ISTs of different "Chemical Viewed Structurally" ISTs of the RSN are replaced with two varieties of new types, called conjugate types and complex types, which explicitly denote the nature of the chemical interactions. Additional semantic relationships help further refine that new portion of the RSN rooted at the ST "Chemical Viewed Structurally." The number of new conjugate and complex types and the amount of changes to the type assignment of chemical concepts are presented. The modified RSN, consisting of 35 types and featuring 22 new conjugate and complex types, is presented. A total of 800 (about 98%) chemical concepts representing multi-typed chemical combinations from "Chemical Viewed Structurally" STs are uniquely assigned one of the new types. An additional benefit is the identification of a number of illegal ISTs and ST assignment errors, some of which are direct violations of exclusion rules defined by the UMLS Semantic Network. The modified RSN provides an enhanced abstract view of the UMLS's chemical content. Its array of conjugate and complex types provides a more accurate model of the variety of combinations involving chemicals viewed structurally. This

  13. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. OutRank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Steinhausen, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Outlier detection is an important data mining task for consistency checks, fraud detection, etc. Binary decision making on whether or not an object is an outlier is not appropriate in many applications and moreover hard to parametrize. Thus, recently, methods for outlier ranking have been proposed...

  15. A study of serial ranks via random graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Haeusler, Erich; Mason, David M.; Turova, Tatyana S.

    2000-01-01

    Serial ranks have long been used as the basis for nonparametric tests of independence in time series analysis. We shall study the underlying graph structure of serial ranks. This will lead us to a basic martingale which will allow us to construct a weighted approximation to a serial rank process. To show the applicability of this approximation, we will use it to prove two very general central limit theorems for Wald-Wolfowitz-type serial rank statistics.

  16. Building structural complexity in semiconductor nanocrystals through chemical transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Bryce Frederick

    2009-08-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions of a nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag 2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or Ag2S lattices were used to calculate interface formation energies. The formation energies indicate the

  17. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  18. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    ) fabricate graphene/metal interfaces and metal/graphene/metal sandwich structures evidencing classical anisotropic umpolung chemistry from carbon pz-orbrital charge pinning, and (Chapter 5) engineer graphene/dielectric interfaces showing electron depletion from carbon atoms at the HfO2/graphene interface. The fabrication of graphene interfaces remains a critical gap for successful commercialization of graphene-based devices, yet we demonstrate that interfacial hybridization, anisotropic charge redistribution, local chemical bonding, and discrete electronic hybridization regimes play a critical role in the electronic structure at graphene interfaces.

  19. Chemical structures and characteristics of animal manures and composts during composting and assessment of maturity indices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jieying Huang; Zixuan Yu; Hongjian Gao; Xiaoming Yan; Jiang Chang; Chengming Wang; Jingwei Hu; Ligan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Changes in physicochemical characteristics, chemical structures and maturity of swine, cattle and chicken manures and composts during 70-day composting without addition of bulking agents were investigated...

  20. Improving Ranking Using Quantum Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Melucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows that ranking information units by quantum probability differs from ranking them by classical probability provided the same data used for parameter estimation. As probability of detection (also known as recall or power) and probability of false alarm (also known as fallout or size) measure the quality of ranking, we point out and show that ranking by quantum probability yields higher probability of detection than ranking by classical probability provided a given probability of ...

  1. Protein structure refinement using a quantum mechanics-based chemical shielding predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratholm, Lars A; Jensen, Jan H

    2017-03-01

    The accurate prediction of protein chemical shifts using a quantum mechanics (QM)-based method has been the subject of intense research for more than 20 years but so far empirical methods for chemical shift prediction have proven more accurate. In this paper we show that a QM-based predictor of a protein backbone and CB chemical shifts (ProCS15, PeerJ , 2016, 3, e1344) is of comparable accuracy to empirical chemical shift predictors after chemical shift-based structural refinement that removes small structural errors. We present a method by which quantum chemistry based predictions of isotropic chemical shielding values (ProCS15) can be used to refine protein structures using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, relating the chemical shielding values to the experimental chemical shifts probabilistically. Two kinds of MCMC structural refinement simulations were performed using force field geometry optimized X-ray structures as starting points: simulated annealing of the starting structure and constant temperature MCMC simulation followed by simulated annealing of a representative ensemble structure. Annealing of the CHARMM structure changes the CA-RMSD by an average of 0.4 Å but lowers the chemical shift RMSD by 1.0 and 0.7 ppm for CA and N. Conformational averaging has a relatively small effect (0.1-0.2 ppm) on the overall agreement with carbon chemical shifts but lowers the error for nitrogen chemical shifts by 0.4 ppm. If an amino acid specific offset is included the ProCS15 predicted chemical shifts have RMSD values relative to experiments that are comparable to popular empirical chemical shift predictors. The annealed representative ensemble structures differ in CA-RMSD relative to the initial structures by an average of 2.0 Å, with >2.0 Å difference for six proteins. In four of the cases, the largest structural differences arise in structurally flexible regions of the protein as determined by NMR, and in the remaining two cases, the large structural

  2. Integrating Epistemological Perspectives on Chemistry in Chemical Education: The Cases of Concept Duality, Chemical Language, and Structural Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ebru; Erduran, Sibel

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we trace the work of some philosophers of chemistry to draw some implications for the improvement of chemical education. We examine some key features of chemical knowledge, and how these features are relevant for school chemistry teaching and learning. In particular, we examine Laszlo's ( Foundations of Chemistry 1:225-238, 1999) notion of concept duality, Jacob's ( HYLE-International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry 7:31-50, 2001) descriptions of chemical language and Goodwin's ( Foundations of Chemistry 10:117-127, 2008) explication of structural explanations in organic chemistry to highlight the particular ways in which chemical knowledge is structured. We use examples of textbooks and curricula to illustrate that even though the mentioned aspects of are relevant to and are covered in educational contexts, the philosophical dimensions of this coverage is absent in textbooks and curricula. The emphasis in the use of these features of chemical knowledge seems to be more on the conceptual definitions rather than on their "epistemological nature". We argue that chemical education will be improved through the inclusion of the philosophical perspectives in chemistry teaching and learning by highlighting the specific ways in which chemical knowledge functions.

  3. Fractional cointegration rank estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating the parame......We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating...... to control for stochastic trend estimation effects from the first step. The critical values of the tests proposed depend only on the number of common trends under the null, p - r, and on the interval of the cointegration degrees b allowed, but not on the true cointegration degree b0. Hence, no additional...

  4. Global Low-Rank Image Restoration With Gaussian Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Jiao, Licheng; Liu, Fang; Wang, Shuang

    2017-06-27

    Low-rank restoration has recently attracted a lot of attention in the research of computer vision. Empirical studies show that exploring the low-rank property of the patch groups can lead to superior restoration performance, however, there is limited achievement on the global low-rank restoration because the rank minimization at image level is too strong for the natural images which seldom match the low-rank condition. In this paper, we describe a flexible global low-rank restoration model which introduces the local statistical properties into the rank minimization. The proposed model can effectively recover the latent global low-rank structure via nuclear norm, as well as the fine details via Gaussian mixture model. An alternating scheme is developed to estimate the Gaussian parameters and the restored image, and it shows excellent convergence and stability. Besides, experiments on image and video sequence datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed method in image inpainting problems.

  5. Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer: substructure and similarity searching of molecules from Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Patiny, Luc; Sander, Thomas; Rufener, Christian; Zasso, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Wikipedia, the world's largest and most popular encyclopedia is an indispensable source of chemistry information. It contains among others also entries for over 15,000 chemicals including metabolites, drugs, agrochemicals and industrial chemicals. To provide an easy access to this wealth of information we decided to develop a substructure and similarity search tool for chemical structures referenced in Wikipedia. We extracted chemical structures from entries in Wikipedia and implemented a web system allowing structure and similarity searching on these data. The whole search as well as visualization system is written in JavaScript and therefore can run locally within a web page and does not require a central server. The Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer is accessible on-line at www.cheminfo.org/wikipedia and is available also as an open source project from GitHub for local installation. The web-based Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer provides a useful resource for research as well as for chemical education enabling both researchers and students easy and user friendly chemistry searching and identification of relevant information in Wikipedia. The tool can also help to improve quality of chemical entries in Wikipedia by providing potential contributors regularly updated list of entries with problematic structures. And last but not least this search system is a nice example of how the modern web technology can be applied in the field of cheminformatics. Graphical abstractWikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer allows substructure and similarity searches on molecules referenced in Wikipedia.

  6. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations...... of paired strands) of a given protein. We show that the beta-topology corresponding to the native structure is, with high probability, among the top-ranked. Since full enumeration is very time-consuming, we also suggest a method to deal with proteins with many beta-strands. The results reported...... in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. The top-ranked beta-topologies can be used to find initial conformations from which conformational searches can be started. They can also be used to filter decoys by removing those with poorly...

  7. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  8. Can College Rankings Be Believed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Davis

    Full Text Available The article summarizes literature on college and university rankings worldwide and the strategies used by various ranking organizations, including those of government and popular media. It traces the history of national and global rankings, indicators used by ranking systems, and the effect of rankings on academic programs and their institutions. Although ranking systems employ diverse criteria and most weight certain indicators over others, there is considerable skepticism that most actually measure educational quality. At the same time, students and their families increasingly consult these evaluations when making college decisions, and sponsors of faculty research consider reputation when forming academic partnerships. While there are serious concerns regarding the validity of ranking institutions when so little data can support differences between one institution and another, college rankings appear to be here to stay.

  9. Ranking Baltic States Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, using the h-index and the total number of citations, the best 10 Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian researchers from several disciplines are ranked. The list may be formed based on the h-index and the total number of citations, given in Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish Program and Google Scholar database. Data for the first 10 researchers are presented. Google Scholar is the most complete. Therefore, to define a single indicator, h-index calculated by Google Scholar may be a good and simple one. The author chooses the Google Scholar database as it is the broadest one.

  10. Sync-rank: Robust Ranking, Constrained Ranking and Rank Aggregation via Eigenvector and SDP Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    eigenvector of the associated Laplacian matrix (i.e., the Fiedler vector) matches that of the variables. In other words, this approach (reminiscent of...S1), i.e., Dii = ∑n j=1Gi,j is the degree of node i in the measurement graph G. 3: Compute the Fiedler vector of S (eigenvector corresponding to the...smallest nonzero eigenvalue of LS). 4: Output the ranking induced by sorting the Fiedler vector of S, with the global ordering (increasing or decreasing

  11. Rankings from Fuzzy Pairwise Comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.; Noppen, J.A.R.; Mohammadian, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new method for deriving rankings from fuzzy pairwise comparisons. It is based on the observation that quantification of the uncertainty of the pairwise comparisons should be used to obtain a better crisp ranking, instead of a fuzzified version of the ranking obtained from crisp pairwise

  12. PageRank (II): Mathematics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maths/stats

    INTRODUCTION. PageRank is Google's system for ranking web pages. A page with a higher PageRank is deemed more important and is more likely to be listed above a ... Felix U. Ogban, Department of Mathematics/Statistics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, University of ..... probability, 2004, 41, (3): 721-734.

  13. University Rankings and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  14. Block models and personalized PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloumann, Isabel M; Ugander, Johan; Kleinberg, Jon

    2017-01-03

    Methods for ranking the importance of nodes in a network have a rich history in machine learning and across domains that analyze structured data. Recent work has evaluated these methods through the "seed set expansion problem": given a subset [Formula: see text] of nodes from a community of interest in an underlying graph, can we reliably identify the rest of the community? We start from the observation that the most widely used techniques for this problem, personalized PageRank and heat kernel methods, operate in the space of "landing probabilities" of a random walk rooted at the seed set, ranking nodes according to weighted sums of landing probabilities of different length walks. Both schemes, however, lack an a priori relationship to the seed set objective. In this work, we develop a principled framework for evaluating ranking methods by studying seed set expansion applied to the stochastic block model. We derive the optimal gradient for separating the landing probabilities of two classes in a stochastic block model and find, surprisingly, that under reasonable assumptions the gradient is asymptotically equivalent to personalized PageRank for a specific choice of the PageRank parameter [Formula: see text] that depends on the block model parameters. This connection provides a formal motivation for the success of personalized PageRank in seed set expansion and node ranking generally. We use this connection to propose more advanced techniques incorporating higher moments of landing probabilities; our advanced methods exhibit greatly improved performance, despite being simple linear classification rules, and are even competitive with belief propagation.

  15. Sequential rank agreement methods for comparison of ranked lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jensen, Andreas Kryger

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...... are illustrated using gene rankings, and using data from two Danish ovarian cancer studies where we assess the within and between agreement of different statistical classification methods.......The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...

  16. Low Rank Approximation Algorithms, Implementation, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Markovsky, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Matrix low-rank approximation is intimately related to data modelling; a problem that arises frequently in many different fields. Low Rank Approximation: Algorithms, Implementation, Applications is a comprehensive exposition of the theory, algorithms, and applications of structured low-rank approximation. Local optimization methods and effective suboptimal convex relaxations for Toeplitz, Hankel, and Sylvester structured problems are presented. A major part of the text is devoted to application of the theory. Applications described include: system and control theory: approximate realization, model reduction, output error, and errors-in-variables identification; signal processing: harmonic retrieval, sum-of-damped exponentials, finite impulse response modeling, and array processing; machine learning: multidimensional scaling and recommender system; computer vision: algebraic curve fitting and fundamental matrix estimation; bioinformatics for microarray data analysis; chemometrics for multivariate calibration; ...

  17. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Masataka [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honmachi, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyodai Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  18. Structural characterization of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Lima, F.A. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas Ave Salvador Allende esq. Luaces, s/n, AP 6163, CP 10600, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gonzalez-Alfaro, Y. [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Larramendi, E.M. [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Fonseca Filho, H.D. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Maia da Costa, M.E.H. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lazaro@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br; Prioli, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Avillez, R.R. de [Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio do Janeiro, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silveira, E.F. da [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Calzadilla, O. [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Melo, O. de [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Pedrero, E. [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Hernandez, E. [Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-01-25

    Polycrystalline thin films of lead sulfide (PbS) grown using substrate colloidal coating chemical bath depositions were characterized by RBS, XPS, AFM and GIXRD techniques. The films were grown on glass substrates previously coated with PbS colloidal particles in a polyvinyl alcohol solution. The PbS films obtained with the inclusion of the polymer showed non-oxygen-containing organic contamination. All samples maintained the Pb:S 1:1 stoichiometry throughout the film. The amount of effective nucleation centers and the mean grain size have being controlled by the substrate colloidal coating. The analysis of the polycrystalline PbS films showed that a preferable (1 0 0) lattice plane orientation parallel to the substrate surface can be obtained using a substrate colloidal coating chemical bath deposition, and the orientation increases when a layer of colloid is initially dried on the substrate.

  19. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  20. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  1. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  2. Controlled modification of the structure of polymer surfaces by chemically grafting inorganic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Lambert Oréfice

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Many chemical and physical methods, such as plasma, e-beam, sputtering, CVD and others, have been used to modify the structure of polymer surfaces by depositing thin inorganic films. Most of these techniques are based upon the use of high energy sources that ultimately can damage either chemically or physically polymer surfaces. Moreover, these methods are usually not versatile enough to allow the design of structurally and chemically tailored surfaces through the control of the distribution of chemical functionalities throughout the surface. In this work, inorganic species were introduced onto polymer substrates in a controlled manner by performing a sequence of chemical reactions at the surface. Sulfonation followed by silanization reactions were used to graft alkoxysilane species at the surface of poly(aryl sulfones. The heterogeneous chemical modification of poly(aryl sulfones was monitored by FTIR-ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection - FTIR. Model compounds were used to study the chemical reactions occurring during the grafting procedure. The results showed that the developed procedure can allow a controlled introduction of inorganic species onto polymer surfaces. Furthermore, in order to prove that this procedure enables the deposition of specific chemical functionalities onto polymer surfaces that can be used to create chemically and structurally tailored surfaces, silicate films were deposited on previously silanated PAS bioactive glass composites. In vitro tests showed that the surface modified composite can enhance the rates of hydroxy-carbonate-apatite precipitation.

  3. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Job Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Moradi, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    The occupation of the people can influence the development of metabolic syndrome. To determine the association between metabolic syndrome and its determinants with the job rank in workers of a large car factory in Iran. 3989 male workers at a large car manufacturing company were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric data of the participants, including age, height, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured. Blood samples were taken to measure lipid profile and blood glucose level. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in each participant based on ATPIII 2001 criteria. The workers were categorized based on their job rank into 3 groups of (1) office workers, (2) workers with physical exertion, and (3) workers with chemical exposure. The study characteristics, particularly the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its determinants were compared among the study groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study was 7.7% (95% CI 6.9 to 8.5). HDL levels were significantly lower in those who had chemical exposure (p=0.045). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in those who had mechanical exertion (p=0.026). The frequency of metabolic syndrome in the office workers, workers with physical exertion, and workers with chemical exposure was 7.3%, 7.9%, and 7.8%, respectively (p=0.836). Seemingly, there is no association between metabolic syndrome and job rank.

  4. A Graph Theoretical and Topological Approach to Chemical Structure, Reactivity, and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    34The Pioneering Contributions of Cayley and Sylvester to the Mathematical Description of Chemical Structure," J. Mol. Struct. THEOCHEM, in press. 89. Lee...Superconductors II," (Eds., D.L. Nelson and T.F. George ), American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 1988, pp. 54-63. 94. King, R.B. "Metal Cluster

  5. NMR chemical shift data and ab initio shielding calculations : emerging tools for protein structure determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Frans A. A.; Filatov, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this tutorial review, we discuss the utilization of chemical shift information as well as ab initio calculations of nuclear shieldings for protein structure determination. Both the empirical and computational aspects of the chemical shift are reviewed and the role of molecular dynamics and the

  6. Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Mikko; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The ranking of scientific journals is important because of the signal it sends to scientists about what is considered most vital for scientific progress. Existing ranking systems focus on measuring the influence of a scientific paper (citations)—these rankings do not reward journals for publishing innovative work that builds on new ideas. We propose an alternative ranking based on the proclivity of journals to publish papers that build on new ideas, and we implement this ranking via a text-based analysis of all published biomedical papers dating back to 1946. In addition, we compare our neophilia ranking to citation-based (impact factor) rankings; this comparison shows that the two ranking approaches are distinct. Prior theoretical work suggests an active role for our neophilia index in science policy. Absent an explicit incentive to pursue novel science, scientists underinvest in innovative work because of a coordination problem: for work on a new idea to flourish, many scientists must decide to adopt it in their work. Rankings that are based purely on influence thus do not provide sufficient incentives for publishing innovative work. By contrast, adoption of the neophilia index as part of journal-ranking procedures by funding agencies and university administrators would provide an explicit incentive for journals to publish innovative work and thus help solve the coordination problem by increasing scientists' incentives to pursue innovative work. PMID:28713181

  7. Comparing quantum-chemical calculation methods for structural investigation of zeolite crystal structures by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Darren H; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Darton, Richard J; Morris, Russell E

    2010-12-01

    Combining quantum-chemical calculations and ultrahigh-field NMR measurements of (29)Si chemical shielding (CS) tensors has provided a powerful approach for probing the fine details of zeolite crystal structures. In previous work, the quantum-chemical calculations have been performed on 'molecular fragments' extracted from the zeolite crystal structure using Hartree-Fock methods (as implemented in Gaussian). Using recently acquired ultrahigh-field (29) Si NMR data for the pure silica zeolite ITQ-4, we report the results of calculations using recently developed quantum-chemical calculation methods for periodic crystalline solids (as implemented in CAmbridge Serial Total Energy Package (CASTEP) and compare these calculations to those calculated with Gaussian. Furthermore, in the context of NMR crystallography of zeolites, we report the completion of the NMR crystallography of the zeolite ITQ-4, which was previously solved from NMR data. We compare three options for the 'refinement' of zeolite crystal structures from 'NMR-solved' structures: (i) a simple target-distance based geometry optimization, (ii) refinement of atomic coordinates in which the differences between experimental and calculated (29)Si CS tensors are minimized, and (iii) refinement of atomic coordinates to minimize the total energy of the lattice using CASTEP quantum-chemical calculations. All three refinement approaches give structures that are in remarkably good agreement with the single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure of ITQ-4. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. CHEMICAL STRUCTURE INDEXING OF TOXICITY DATA ON THE INTERNET: MOVING TOWARDS A FLAT WORLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standardized chemical structure annotation of public toxicity databases and information resources is playing an increasingly important role in the 'flattening' and integration of diverse sets of biological activity data on the Internet. This review discusses public initiatives th...

  9. Chemical Structures and Bioactivities of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Stephen Ewart

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives from marine macroalgae have been shown to possess a variety of biological activities. The present paper will review the recent progress in research on the structural chemistry and the bioactivities of these marine algal biomaterials. In particular, it will provide an update on the structural chemistry of the major sulfated polysaccharides synthesized by seaweeds including the galactans (e.g., agarans and carrageenans, ulvans, and fucans. It will then review the recent findings on the anticoagulant/antithrombotic, antiviral, immuno-inflammatory, antilipidemic and antioxidant activities of sulfated polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application.

  10. Impacts of chemical gradients on microbial community structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hanke, Anna; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2017-01-01

    Succession of redox processes is sometimes assumed to define a basic microbial community structure for ecosystems with oxygen gradients. In this paradigm, aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation and sulfate reduction proceed in a thermodynamically determined order, known as the 'redox ...... Journal advance online publication, 17 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.175....... tower'. Here, we investigated whether redox sorting of microbial processes explains microbial community structure at low-oxygen concentrations. We subjected a diverse microbial community sampled from a coastal marine sediment to 100 days of tidal cycling in a laboratory chemostat. Oxygen gradients (both...

  11. Chemical structure of descriptors with an active hydrogen atom in certain bioregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchii, B A

    1996-01-01

    The chemical structure of descriptors (D) for some plant growth regulators (PGR), herbicides, pesticides and drugs is described. The presence of an active hydrogen atom in molecules is an essential factor determining biological activity of chemicals. The results obtained from the study of dependence existing between the structure of a certain substance and its biological activity may be used in designing of novel compounds which possess in biological activity.

  12. Significance of the sexual openings and supplementary structures on the phylogeny of brachyuran crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura), with new nomina for higher-ranked podotreme taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Danièle; Tavares, Marcos; Castro, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The patterns of complexity of the male and female sexual openings in Brachyura, which have been the source of uncertainties and conflicting opinions, are documented, together with a study of the morphologies of the coxal and sternal gonopores in both sexes, penises, spermathecae, and gonopods. The vulvae, male gonopores and penises are described among selected taxa of Eubrachyura, and their function and evolution examined in the context of a wide variety of mating behaviours. The location of female and male gonopores, the condition of the penis (coxal and sternal openings and modalities of protection), and related configurations of thoracic sternites 7 and 8, which are modified by the intercalation of a wide sternal part (thoracic sternites 7 and 8) during carcinisation, show evidence of deep homology. They represent taxonomic criteria at all ranks of the family-series and may be used to test lineages. Of particular significance are the consequences of the posterior expansion of the thoracic sternum, which influences the condition, shape, and sclerotisation of the penis, and its emergence from coxal (heterotreme) to coxo-sternal, which is actually still coxal (heterotreme), in contrast to a sternal emergence (thoracotreme). The heterotreme-thoracotreme distinction results from two different trajectories of the vas deferens and its ejaculatory duct via the P5 coxa (Heterotremata) or through the thoracic sternum (Thoracotremata). Dissections of males of several families have demonstrated that this major difference not only affects the external surface (perforation of the coxa or the sternum by the ejaculatory duct) but also the internal anatomy. There is no evidence for an ejaculatory duct passing through the articular membrane between the P5 coxa and the thoracic sternum in any Brachyura, even when the sternal male gonopore is very close to the P5 coxa. Trends towards the coxo-sternal condition are exemplified by multistate characters, varying from a shallow

  13. Structural evolution during chemical vapor deposition of diamond thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, G.; Cancel, L. M.; Figueroa, O. L.; González, J. A.; Weiner, B. R.

    2000-11-01

    In situ phase-modulated ellipsometry was employed to monitor the nucleation and growth processes of diamond thin films fabricated by chemical vapor deposition. The effective extinction coefficient (k) at 1.96 eV was used as a basis for dividing the deposition process into intervals. The film growth was aborted at various k values yielding diamond film samples that represent snapshots of the growth process at different stages. Ex situ characterization of the films was performed using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that the diamond film deposition process consists of various stages in which the crystalline quality, the net compressive stress, and the relative amount of non-sp3 carbon follow different trends. A correlation between the effective k value measured in situ and the film microstructure characterized ex situ was established which enables the monitoring of the diamond film growth process in real time.

  14. Rank of coal beds of the Narragansett basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, P.C.; Chase, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    Coal of the Narragansett basin generally has been considered to be anthracite and/or meta-anthracite. However, no single reliable method has been used to distinguish these two ranks in this basin. Three methods - chemical, X-ray, and petrographic - have been used with some degree of success on coal of the Narragansett basin, but too often the results are in conflict. Chemical methods have been limited by inadequate sampling on a coal-bed-by-coal-bed basis and by a lack of analyses made according to (American Society for Testing and Materials, 1974) standard specifications. In addition, when corrections are made by using the Parr formulas, as required by the ASTM (1974) procedures, the generally high to very high ash content of coal from the Narragansett basin causes the fixed-carbon content to appear higher than it actually is. X-ray methods using the degree of graphitization as a measure of rank are not reliable because some of the graphite is related to shearing and brecciation associated with folding and faulting. Petrographic methods using reflectance on vitrinite give results that are generally consistent with results from chemical determinations. However, it is not clear whether the mean maximum reflectance or mean bireflectance is a better indicator of similar rank of such high-rank coals that have been structurally deformed. Coal from the Cranston Mine, RI, is probably meta-anthracite and coal from the Portsmouth Mine is probably anthracite. These ranks are based on chemical,X-ray, and petrographic data and are supported by associated metamorphic mineral assemblages that indicate that the Cranston Mine is in a higher metamorphic zone than the zone containing the Porthmouth Mine. Interpretation of the rank of Mansfield, MA, coal on the basis of extant chemical data is difficult because it is an impure coal with an ash content of 33 to 50%. Reflectance data indicate that the Mansfield, Foxborough, and Plainville coals in the northern part of the Narragansett

  15. comparison of chemical nano structure, rheological and mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Although changing in formulation of long oil alkyd resin through replacing maleic anhydride with phetalic anhydride not only made the stereo structure of the alkyd molecule bigger but also reduced the condensation time of esterification reaction. Therefore the viscosity of resin increased within the same time interval (Vaso et ...

  16. Quantum chemical modeling of UV Spectra of Polyurethane Structural Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, M. A.; Umreiko, D. S.; Shundalau, M. B.

    2012-07-01

    Results of TDDFT calculations of characteristics for excited singlet states of mono- and diisocyanates and carbamates containing from one to three phenyl groups are presented. The influence of the structural composition of the isocyanate/carbamate on the formation of its UV absorption spectrum was analyzed.

  17. Surface Nano-Structuring by Adsorption and Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Tanaka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structuring of the surface caused by adsorption of molecules or atoms and by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species are reviewed from a chemistry viewpoint. Self-assembly of adsorbed species is markedly influenced by weak mutual interactions and the local strain of the surface induced by the adsorption. Nano-structuring taking place on the surface is well explained by the notion of a quasi-molecule provided by the reaction of surface atoms with adsorbed species. Self-assembly of quasi-molecules by weak internal bonding provides quasi-compounds on a specific surface. Various nano-structuring phenomena are discussed: (i self-assembly of adsorbed molecules and atoms; (ii self-assembly of quasi-compounds; (iii formation of nano-composite surfaces; (iv controlled growth of nano-materials on composite surfaces. Nano-structuring processes are not always controlled by energetic feasibility, that is, the formation of nano-composite surface and the growth of nano-particles on surfaces are often controlled by the kinetics. The idea of the “kinetic controlled molding” might be valuable to design nano-materials on surfaces.

  18. Impacts of chemical gradients on microbial community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.; Hanke, A.; Tegetmeyer, H.E.; Kattelmann, I.; Sharma, R.; Hamann, E.; Hargesheimer, T.; Kraft, B.; Lenk, S.; Geelhoed, J.S.; Hettich, R.L.; Strous, M.

    2017-01-01

    Succession of redox processes is sometimes assumed to define a basic microbial community structure for ecosystems with oxygen gradients. In this paradigm, aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation and sulfate reduction proceed in a thermodynamically determined order, known as the ‘redox

  19. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  20. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  1. Resolution of ranking hierarchies in directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Paolo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2018-01-01

    Identifying hierarchies and rankings of nodes in directed graphs is fundamental in many applications such as social network analysis, biology, economics, and finance. A recently proposed method identifies the hierarchy by finding the ordered partition of nodes which minimises a score function, termed agony. This function penalises the links violating the hierarchy in a way depending on the strength of the violation. To investigate the resolution of ranking hierarchies we introduce an ensemble of random graphs, the Ranked Stochastic Block Model. We find that agony may fail to identify hierarchies when the structure is not strong enough and the size of the classes is small with respect to the whole network. We analytically characterise the resolution threshold and we show that an iterated version of agony can partly overcome this resolution limit. PMID:29394278

  2. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen

    In this thesis, my work involving dierent aspects of protein structure determination by computer modeling is presented. Determination of several protein's native fold were carried out with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations in the PHAISTOS protein structure simulation framework, utilizing...... to within 3 A. Furthermore, a fast quantum mechanics based chemical shift predictor was developed together with methodology for using chemical shifts in structure simulations. The developed predictor was used for renement of several protein structures and for reducing the computational cost of quantum...

  3. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  4. Statistical methods for ranking data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvo, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced undergraduate, graduate students and practitioners to statistical methods for ranking data. An important aspect of nonparametric statistics is oriented towards the use of ranking data. Rank correlation is defined through the notion of distance functions and the notion of compatibility is introduced to deal with incomplete data. Ranking data are also modeled using a variety of modern tools such as CART, MCMC, EM algorithm and factor analysis. This book deals with statistical methods used for analyzing such data and provides a novel and unifying approach for hypotheses testing. The techniques described in the book are illustrated with examples and the statistical software is provided on the authors’ website.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence for the chemical structure of algal kerogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premovic, P.I.; Stojkovic, S.R.; Pugmire, R.J.; Woolfenden, W.R.; Rosenberger, H.; Scheler, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two Permo-Carboniferous aliginites (one sample is from Torbane Hill in Scotland and the other is from South Africa) have been examined by high-resolution /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance employing the techniques of magic angle spinning and cross polarization. This examination has shown that these algal kerogens have predominantly aliphatic-type structure with a relatively high proportion of polymethylene chains and concomitant low total aromatic content. The aliphatic nature of alginite is further confirmed by both /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy employing the magic angle spinning technique as well as Fourier transform infrared analysis. This work and other organic geochemical studies suggest that algal geologic materials tend to preserve their basic aliphatic structure after burial despite relatively extensive diagenetic evolution under mild/moderate geological conditions. This interpretation is of much interest in connection with the problems of the origin and nature of Precambrian life. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Aspergillus ficuum phytase: complete primary structure elucidation by chemical sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A H; Dischinger, H C

    1993-04-30

    The primary structure of Aspergillus ficuum phytase was deduced from overlaps in peptide sequences. The unglycosylated enzyme is a 441 residue protein with a molecular mass of 48.5-KDa, as calculated from the total covalent structure. The estimated pl of the protein is about 4.76. Of the 19 Asn residues, 9 were found to be glycosylated. The phytase consists of 37% non-polar, 42% polar, 11.5% acidic, and 9.5% basic amino acids. The putative active site of the enzyme containing the sequence RHG is located at the N-terminal region of the molecule and shows homology to the active site of both microbial and mammalian acid phosphatases, and phosphoglycerate mutase.

  7. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojkumar, P.A., E-mail: manoj@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chirayath, V.A.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Low energy nitrogen ion implantation in titanium was studied. • Chemical and defect states were analyzed using SIMS, XPS and PAS. • SIMS and depth resolved XPS data showed good agreement. • Depth resolved defect and chemical states information were revealed. • Formation of 3 layers of defect states proposed to fit PAS results. - Abstract: Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  8. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to obtain this agreement. The ProCS method thus offers a powerful new tool for refining the structures of hydrogen bonding networks to high accuracy with many potential applications such as protein flexibility in ligand......We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level......-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond ((h3) JNC' ) spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show...

  9. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Campos, Cássia Roberta; Dragone, Giuliano; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5%) were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6%) and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%). Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates), Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates), Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates), Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates), Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates), Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates), Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates) and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates) were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long) cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml. PMID:24031681

  10. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Teixeira Magalhães

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5% were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6% and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%. Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates, Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates, Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates, Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates, Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates, Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates, Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates, Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml.

  11. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  12. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  13. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Aridane G., E-mail: aridaneglez@gmail.com [GET (Géosciences Environnement Toulouse) UMR 5563CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Beike, Anna K. [Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Rosenstein 1, 70191 Stuttgart (Germany); Reski, Ralf [Plant Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); BIOSS—Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); FRIAS—Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Adamo, Paola [Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Naples (Italy); Pokrovsky, Oleg S. [GET (Géosciences Environnement Toulouse) UMR 5563CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); BIO-GEO-CLIM Laboratory, Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Russian Academy of Science, Arkhangelsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Cu{sup 2+} was adsorbed on four mosses used in moss-bag pollution monitoring technique. • Thermodynamic approach was used to model Cu speciation based on XAS results. • All studied mosses have ∼4.5 O/N atoms at ∼1.95 Å around Cu likely in a pseudo-square geometry. • Cu(II)-carboxylates and Cu(II)-phosphoryls are the main moss surface binding groups. • Moss growing in batch reactor yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu–S(CN) complexes. - Abstract: The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05–0.06 mmolg{sub dry}{sup −1} and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93–1.25 mmolg{sub dry}{sup −1} for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu{sup 2+} yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu–S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu{sup 2+}.

  14. Impacts of chemical gradients on microbial community structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hanke, Anna; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2017-01-01

    Succession of redox processes is sometimes assumed to define a basic microbial community structure for ecosystems with oxygen gradients. In this paradigm, aerobic respiration, denitrification, fermentation and sulfate reduction proceed in a thermodynamically determined order, known as the 'redox...... in space and time) led to the assembly of a microbial community dominated by populations that each performed aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in parallel. This was shown by metagenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and stable isotope incubations. Effective oxygen consumption combined with the formation...... of microaggregates sustained the activity of oxygen-sensitive anaerobic enzymes, leading to braiding of unsorted redox processes, within and between populations. Analyses of available metagenomic data sets indicated that the same ecological strategies might also be successful in some natural ecosystems.The ISME...

  15. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  16. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  17. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical structures and characteristics of animal manures and composts during composting and assessment of maturity indices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieying Huang

    Full Text Available Changes in physicochemical characteristics, chemical structures and maturity of swine, cattle and chicken manures and composts during 70-day composting without addition of bulking agents were investigated. Physicochemical characteristics were measured by routine analyses and chemical structures by solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR. Three manures were of distinct properties. Their changes in physicochemical characteristics, chemical structures, and maturity were different not only from each other but also from those with addition of bulking agents during composting. Aromaticity in chicken manure composts decreased at first, and then increased whereas that in cattle and swine manure composts increased. Enhanced ammonia volatilization occurred without addition of bulking agents. NMR structural information indicated that cattle and chicken composts were relatively stable at day 36 and 56, respectively, but swine manure composts were not mature up to day 70. Finally, the days required for three manures to reach the threshold values of different maturity indices were different.

  19. Chemical structures and characteristics of animal manures and composts during composting and assessment of maturity indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jieying; Yu, Zixuan; Gao, Hongjian; Yan, Xiaoming; Chang, Jiang; Wang, Chengming; Hu, Jingwei

    2017-01-01

    Changes in physicochemical characteristics, chemical structures and maturity of swine, cattle and chicken manures and composts during 70-day composting without addition of bulking agents were investigated. Physicochemical characteristics were measured by routine analyses and chemical structures by solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR. Three manures were of distinct properties. Their changes in physicochemical characteristics, chemical structures, and maturity were different not only from each other but also from those with addition of bulking agents during composting. Aromaticity in chicken manure composts decreased at first, and then increased whereas that in cattle and swine manure composts increased. Enhanced ammonia volatilization occurred without addition of bulking agents. NMR structural information indicated that cattle and chicken composts were relatively stable at day 36 and 56, respectively, but swine manure composts were not mature up to day 70. Finally, the days required for three manures to reach the threshold values of different maturity indices were different. PMID:28604783

  20. PageRank tracker: from ranking to tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Fu, Keren; Loza, Artur; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Video object tracking is widely used in many real-world applications, and it has been extensively studied for over two decades. However, tracking robustness is still an issue in most existing methods, due to the difficulties with adaptation to environmental or target changes. In order to improve adaptability, this paper formulates the tracking process as a ranking problem, and the PageRank algorithm, which is a well-known webpage ranking algorithm used by Google, is applied. Labeled and unlabeled samples in tracking application are analogous to query webpages and the webpages to be ranked, respectively. Therefore, determining the target is equivalent to finding the unlabeled sample that is the most associated with existing labeled set. We modify the conventional PageRank algorithm in three aspects for tracking application, including graph construction, PageRank vector acquisition and target filtering. Our simulations with the use of various challenging public-domain video sequences reveal that the proposed PageRank tracker outperforms mean-shift tracker, co-tracker, semiboosting and beyond semiboosting trackers in terms of accuracy, robustness and stability.

  1. Quantum chemical studies on structural, vibrational, nonlinear optical properties and chemical reactivity of indigo carmine dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mansy, M. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were performed on indigo carmine (IC) isomers using FT-IR spectral analysis along with DFT/B3LYP method utilizing Gaussian 09 software. GaussView 5 program has been employed to perform a detailed interpretation of vibrational spectra. Simulation of infrared spectra has led to an excellent overall agreement with the observed spectral patterns. Mulliken population analyses on atomic charges, MEP, HOMO-LUMO, NLO, first order hyperpolarizability and thermodynamic properties have been examined by (DFT/B3LYP) method with the SDD basis set level. Density of state spectra (DOS) were calculated using GaussSum 3 at the same level of theory. Molecular modeling approved that DOS Spectra are the most significant tools for differentiating between two IC isomers so far. Moreover, The IC isomers (cis-isomer) have shown an extended applicability for manufacturing both NLO and photovoltaic devices such as solar cells.

  2. Extended Functional Groups (EFG: An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Salmina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a classification system termed “extended functional groups” (EFG, which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  3. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Haniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4 fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures.

  4. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  5. Improvement of multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis by using wavelet-principal component analysis ranking variable selection and least-squares support vector machine regression: QSAR study of checkpoint kinase WEE1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormanich, Rodrigo A; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Freitas, Matheus P

    2009-02-01

    Inhibition of tyrosine kinase enzyme WEE1 is an important step for the treatment of cancer. The bioactivities of a series of WEE1 inhibitors have been previously modeled through comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA and CoMSIA), but a two-dimensional image-based quantitative structure-activity relationship approach has shown to be highly predictive for other compound classes. This method, called multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationship, was applied here to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship models. Whilst the well-known bilinear and multilinear partial least squares regressions (PLS and N-PLS, respectively) correlated multivariate image analysis descriptors with the corresponding dependent variables only reasonably well, the use of wavelet and principal component ranking as variable selection methods, together with least-squares support vector machine, improved significantly the prediction statistics. These recently implemented mathematical tools, particularly novel in quantitative structure-activity relationship studies, represent an important advance for the development of more predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models and, consequently, new drugs.

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF BANANA PSEUDO-STEM

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Li; Shiyu Fu; Huaiyu Zhan; Yao Zhan; Lucian A. Lucia

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of the chemical composition and anatomical structure of banana pseudo-stem was carried out using Light Microscopy (LM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The chemical analysis indicated there is a high holocellulose content and low lignin content in banana pseudo-stem compared with some other non-wood fiber resources. These results demonstrate that the banana pseudo-stem has potential value for pulping. In addition, we report for th...

  7. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  8. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Weibing; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the human society. By clicking the web pages of Forbes, you may find all kinds of rankings, such as world's most powerful people, world's richest people, top-paid tennis stars, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind, sports ranking systems in which players' scores and prize money are calculated based on their performances in attending various tournaments. A typical example is tennis. It is found that the distributions of both scores and prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports fields. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player will top the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simul...

  9. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain

  10. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  11. Denaturation of collagen structures and their transformation under the physical and chemical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, A.; Boldirev, V.; Fadeev, G.; Baburina, M.; Kulikovskii, A.; Vostrikova, N.

    2017-11-01

    The process of denaturation of collagen structures under the influence of physical and chemical factors play an important role in the manufacture of food technology and the production of drugs for medicine and cosmetology. The paper discussed the problem of the combined effects of heat treatment, mechanical dispersion and ultrasonic action on the structural changes of the animal collagen in the presence of weak protonated organic acids. Algorithm combined effects of physical and chemical factors as a result of the formation of the technological properties of products containing collagen has been shown.

  12. Homological characterisation of Lambda-ranks

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Susan

    1999-01-01

    If G is a pro-p, p-adic, Lie group and if $\\Lambda(G)$ denotes the Iwasawa algebra of G then we present a formula for determining the $\\Lambda(G)$-rank of a finitely generated $\\Lambda(G)$-module. This is given in terms of the G homology groups of the module. We explore some consequences of this for the structure of $\\Lambda(G)$-modules.

  13. PageRank of integers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, K. M.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is approximately inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows us to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers.

  14. Application of chemical structure and bonding of actinide oxide materials for forensic science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, Marianne Perry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in applying our understanding of actinide chemical structure and bonding to broaden the suite of analytical tools available for nuclear forensic analyses. Uranium- and plutonium-oxide systems form under a variety of conditions, and these chemical species exhibit some of the most complex behavior of metal oxide systems known. No less intriguing is the ability of AnO{sub 2} (An: U, Pu) to form non-stoichiometric species described as AnO{sub 2+x}. Environmental studies have shown the value of utilizing the chemical signatures of these actinide oxide materials to understand transport following release into the environment. Chemical speciation of actinide-oxide samples may also provide clues as to the age, source, or process history of the material. The scientific challenge is to identify, measure and understand those aspects of speciation of actinide analytes that carry information about material origin and history most relevant to forensics. Here, we will describe our efforts in material synthesis and analytical methods development that we will use to provide the fundamental science to characterize actinide oxide molecular structures for forensic science. Structural properties and initial results to measure structural variability of uranium oxide samples using synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Fine Structure will be discussed.

  15. Qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling for predicting blood-brain barrier permeability of structurally diverse chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Singh, K P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structure-activity relationship (SAR) models have been established for qualitative and quantitative prediction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemicals. The structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear structure in the data were tested. The predictive and generalization ability of the developed SAR models were tested through internal and external validation procedures. In complete data, the QSAR models rendered ternary classification accuracy of >98.15%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (r(2)) of >0.926 between the measured and the predicted BBB permeability values with the mean squared error (MSE) 82.7% and r(2) > 0.905 (MSE quantitative models for predicting the BBB permeability of chemicals. Moreover, these models showed predictive performance superior to those reported earlier in the literature. This demonstrates the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the BBB permeability of new chemicals, which can be used for initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process.

  16. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  17. Influence of Chemical Conditions on the Nanoporous Structure of Silicate Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Sinkó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica or various silicate aerogels can be characterized by highly porous, open cell, low density structures. The synthesis parameters influence the three-dimensional porous structures by modifying the kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis and condensation processes. Numerous investigations have shown that the structure of porous materials can be tailored by variations in synthesis conditions (e.g., the type of precursors, catalyst, and surfactants; the ratio of water/precursor; the concentrations; the medium pH; and the solvent. The objectives of this review are to summarize and elucidate the effects of chemical conditions on the nanoporous structure of sol-gel derived silicate aerogels.

  18. Using chemical shifts to generate structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins with converged distributions of secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytreberg, F Marty; Borcherds, Wade; Wu, Hongwei; Daughdrill, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    A short segment of the disordered p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) forms an amphipathic helix when bound to the E3 ubiquitin ligase, MDM2. In the unbound p53TAD, this short segment has transient helical secondary structure. Using a method that combines broad sampling of conformational space with re-weighting, it is shown that it is possible to generate multiple, independent structural ensembles that have highly similar secondary structure distributions for both p53TAD and a P27A mutant. Fractional amounts of transient helical secondary structure were found at the MDM2 binding site that are very similar to estimates based directly on experimental observations. Structures were identified in these ensembles containing segments that are highly similar to short p53 peptides bound to MDM2, even though the ensembles were re-weighted using unbound experimental data. Ensembles were generated using chemical shift data (alpha carbon only, or in combination with other chemical shifts) and cross-validated by predicting residual dipolar couplings. We think this ensemble generator could be used to predict the bound state structure of protein interaction sites in IDPs if there are detectable amounts of matching transient secondary structure in the unbound state.

  19. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  20. Glossary of Class Names of Polymers Based on Chemical Structure and Molecular Architecture (IUPAC Recommendations 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarm, V.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This IUPAC's document classifies 111 polymer classes into three groups according to their chemical structure and molecular architecture. For each class, its name, short definition, its characteristic structural feature, an example, and relations to other polymer classes, are given. As the first classification for numerous commonly used polymers (organic, inorganic, synthetic, natural this document improves the knowledge and communication in the field.

  1. Chemical and Structural Stability of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrode Materials under Electron Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Lin; Isaac M. Markus; Doeff, Marca M.; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of chemical and structural dynamics in battery materials is essential to elucidation of structure-property relationships for rational design of advanced battery materials. Spatially resolved techniques, such as scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), are widely applied to address this challenge. However, battery materials are susceptible to electron beam damage, complicating the data interpretation. In this study, we demonstrate that, under electron beam irradiati...

  2. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai [Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Institute of Pharmacy (Germany); Möller, Heiko M. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry (Germany); Exner, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.exner@uni-konstanz.de [Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Institute of Pharmacy (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-HSQC-NOESY-[{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73–82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign .

  3. Structures and Chemical Equilibria of Some N-Heterocycles Containing Amide Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Abd El Moneim

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Structures and chemical equilibria of 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (1, 5,6-diphenyl-3-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazine (2, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (3 and 2-mercapto-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine hydrochloride (4 are reported. Their electronic transitions are assigned and pK values are evaluated and discussed.

  4. Chemical and structural properties of Pd nanoparticle-decorated graphene-Electron spectroscopic methods and QUASES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Jiříček, Petr; Bieloshapka, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 404, May (2017), s. 300-309 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015088 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : graphite (Gr) * graphene oxide (GO) * reduced graphene oxide (RGO) * Pd nanoparticles * XPS * QUASES * REELS * chemical and structural properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  5. Relating polymer chemical structure to the stability of polymer: : fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doumon, Nutifafa Y.; Wang, Gongbao; Chiechi, Ryan; Koster, Lambert

    2017-01-01

    The design of novel polymers has brought more attention to bulk heterojunction polymer:fullerene solar cells in the past decade. A typical example is the synthesis, through chemical structure engineering, of the benzodithiophene-co-thieno[3,4-b]thiophene (BDT-TT) polymers leading to power conversion

  6. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...

  7. Elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from soybean and maize kernel cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this thesis was the elucidation of the chemical fine structure of polysaccharides from cell walls of soybean and maize kernel. The two species investigated represent different taxonomic groups, soybean belonging to the dicotyledonous and maize to the monocotyledonous plants.

  8. Structural and optical properties of chemically deposited Cd (S–Se ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) emission spectra and photoconductivity (PC), rise and decay studies are reported for Cd(S–Se) : CdCl2, Sm films prepared by chemical deposition method on glass substrates at 60°C in a water bath. SEM studies show ball-type structures ...

  9. Chemical signals turn on guest binding through structural reconfiguration of triangular helicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne; Castilla, Ana M.; Ronson, Tanya K.

    2013-01-01

    Be my guest: The function of a system based on self-assembled Zn(II) complexes can be controlled by external chemical stimuli. The complexes are based on a C3 -symmetric ligand that forms a unique triangular triple helicate structure 1. Upon subcomponent substitution, 1 is able to transform into ...... into a triangular double helicate 2 which, unlike 1, can encapsulate guests....

  10. Using Concept Mapping to Uncover Students' Knowledge Structures of Chemical Bonding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nikita L.; Mooring, Suazette Reid

    2015-01-01

    General chemistry is the first undergraduate course in which students further develop their understanding of fundamental chemical concepts. Many of these fundamental topics highlight the numerous conceptual interconnections present in chemistry. However, many students possess incoherent knowledge structures regarding these topics. Therefore,…

  11. Comparing and Ranking tourism websites performance based on e-satisfaction, e-trust, e-quality, and e-loyalty: A combined approach of structural equation modeling, fuzzy and analytical hierarchical process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sharifi-Tehrani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to rank the relative performance of tourism websites in terms of e-satisfaction, e-trust, e-quality, and e-loyalty variables. To this end, two major Iranian travel websites providing accommodation (Iran Hotel Online and tour packages (Marcopolo Corporation were chosen and their performances were evaluated based on the four above variables. This research comprises two independent surveys. The first survey administered to a sample of 155 university professors and website designers examined the relative weights of the study variables in explaining the e-performance of these websites through structural equation modeling (SEM. The results indicate that e-quality, e-loyalty, e-trust, and e-satisfaction have the strongest impact on the e-performance, respectively. The second survey examined relative weights of the e-performance based on the websites’ existing e-customers (two categories of 154 and 187 samples and also qualitative content analysis of the websites’ characteristics using fuzzy analytical hierarchical process (AHP. The findings served to inform that Marcopolo website obtained stronger weights for all four variables, compared with Iran Hotel Online, indicating its higher performance in all variables. At the end, the weight values from the SEM and AHP surveys were synthesized (0.580 and 0.418 for Marcopolo and Iran Hotel Online, respectively in order to rank the websites based on their e-performances. According to the findings, Marcopolo website outperforms its counterpart in all four variables. The current paper contributes to the literature by yielding some insights into how to benchmark websites in order to improve their e-performance based on perspectives of both customers and experts.

  12. University Ranking Systems; Criteria and Critiques

    OpenAIRE

    Saka, Yavuz; YAMAN, Süleyman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore international university ranking systems. As a compilation study this paper provides specific criteria that each ranking system uses and main critiques regarding these ranking systems. Since there are many ranking systems in this area of research, this study focused on only most cited and referred ranking systems. As there is no consensus in terms of the criteria that these systems use, this paper has no intention of identifying the best ranking system ...

  13. Social Bookmarking Induced Active Page Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keita

    Social bookmarking services have recently made it possible for us to register and share our own bookmarks on the web and are attracting attention. The services let us get structured data: (URL, Username, Timestamp, Tag Set). And these data represent user interest in web pages. The number of bookmarks is a barometer of web page value. Some web pages have many bookmarks, but most of those bookmarks may have been posted far in the past. Therefore, even if a web page has many bookmarks, their value is not guaranteed. If most of the bookmarks are very old, the page may be obsolete. In this paper, by focusing on the timestamp sequence of social bookmarkings on web pages, we model their activation levels representing current values. Further, we improve our previously proposed ranking method for web search by introducing the activation level concept. Finally, through experiments, we show effectiveness of the proposed ranking method.

  14. Low-rank quadratic semidefinite programming

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2013-04-01

    Low rank matrix approximation is an attractive model in large scale machine learning problems, because it can not only reduce the memory and runtime complexity, but also provide a natural way to regularize parameters while preserving learning accuracy. In this paper, we address a special class of nonconvex quadratic matrix optimization problems, which require a low rank positive semidefinite solution. Despite their non-convexity, we exploit the structure of these problems to derive an efficient solver that converges to their local optima. Furthermore, we show that the proposed solution is capable of dramatically enhancing the efficiency and scalability of a variety of concrete problems, which are of significant interest to the machine learning community. These problems include the Top-k Eigenvalue problem, Distance learning and Kernel learning. Extensive experiments on UCI benchmarks have shown the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method. © 2012.

  15. Probabilistic Low-Rank Multitask Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yu; Shao, Ming; Li, Kang; Fu, Yun

    2017-01-04

    In this paper, we consider the problem of learning multiple related tasks simultaneously with the goal of improving the generalization performance of individual tasks. The key challenge is to effectively exploit the shared information across multiple tasks as well as preserve the discriminative information for each individual task. To address this, we propose a novel probabilistic model for multitask learning (MTL) that can automatically balance between low-rank and sparsity constraints. The former assumes a low-rank structure of the underlying predictive hypothesis space to explicitly capture the relationship of different tasks and the latter learns the incoherent sparse patterns private to each task. We derive and perform inference via variational Bayesian methods. Experimental results on both regression and classification tasks on real-world applications demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in dealing with the MTL problems.

  16. Chemical and structural stability of lithium-ion battery electrode materials under electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Doeff, Marca M; Xin, Huolin L

    2014-07-16

    The investigation of chemical and structural dynamics in battery materials is essential to elucidation of structure-property relationships for rational design of advanced battery materials. Spatially resolved techniques, such as scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), are widely applied to address this challenge. However, battery materials are susceptible to electron beam damage, complicating the data interpretation. In this study, we demonstrate that, under electron beam irradiation, the surface and bulk of battery materials undergo chemical and structural evolution equivalent to that observed during charge-discharge cycling. In a lithiated NiO nanosheet, a Li2CO3-containing surface reaction layer (SRL) was gradually decomposed during electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) acquisition. For cycled LiNi(0.4)Mn(0.4)Co(0.18)Ti(0.02)O2 particles, repeated electron beam irradiation induced a phase transition from an layered structure to an rock-salt structure, which is attributed to the stoichiometric lithium and oxygen removal from 3a and 6c sites, respectively. Nevertheless, it is still feasible to preserve pristine chemical environments by minimizing electron beam damage, for example, using fast electron imaging and spectroscopy. Finally, the present study provides examples of electron beam damage on lithium-ion battery materials and suggests that special attention is necessary to prevent misinterpretation of experimental results.

  17. Ranking industries using a hybrid of DEA-TOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mehdiabadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ranking industry normally helps find hot sectors and attract potential investors to invest in appropriate plans. Ranking various industries is also a multiple criteria decision making problem. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to rank different industries using the art of data envelopment analysis (DEA. The inputs of our proposed DEA model include capital, employment and importance coefficient and outputs are exports, ecological effects and added value. In addition, exports, value added and environmental investment are used as outputs of DEA method. Since the results of DEA may consider more than one efficient unit, so we implement Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS technique to rank efficient units. In our case study, there were 15 different sectors from various industries and the implementation of DEA technique recommends 8 efficient units. The implementation of TOPSIS among these efficient units has suggested that Chemical industry could be considered as the most attracting industry for investment.

  18. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  19. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for estrogen receptor binding affinity of phenolic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Ying; Aizawa, Takako

    2003-03-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinities of 25 compounds including 15 industrial phenolic chemicals, two phytoestrogens, three natural steroids and one man-made steroid were detected by a binding competition assay. The 17 industrial phenolic chemicals were selected as objective compounds because they are possibly released from epoxy and polyester-styrene resins used in lacquer coatings of concrete tank and lining of steel pipe in water supply system. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for structurally diverse phenols, nine alkylphenols with only one alkyl group, four hydroxyl biphenyls, bisphenol A and four natural and man-made estrogens was established by applying a quantum chemical modeling method. Logarithm of octanol-water coefficient (logPow), molecular volume (V(m)), and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital ( epsilon (HOMO)) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ( epsilon (LUMO)) were selected as hydrophobic, steric (V(m)), and electronic chemical descriptors, respectively. Chemicals capable of ER binding had large V(m) and high epsilon (HOMO), while the effects of logPow and epsilon (LUMO) on the binding affinity could not be identified. The QSAR made successful predictions for the three phytoestrogens. Also, the successful prediction of ER-binding affinity for biochanin A, another phytoestrogen, two indicators of pH (phenolphthalin and phenolphthalein) and one alkylphenolic chemical with three alkyl groups (4-methyl-2,6-di-butyl-phenol), by amending the V(m) in the above-mentioned QSAR according to the electron-density distribution (or HOMO density) is an additional step in the elucidation of chemical steric and electronic parameters for predicting the binding affinities of phenolic compounds.

  20. Quantitative Survey and Structural Classification of Fracking Chemicals Reported in Unconventional Gas Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Martin; Schreglmann, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    additives reported for use in hydraulic fracturing. For the years 2005-2009 it is based on the Waxman report, and for the years 2011-2013 it relies on the database FracFocus, where it makes use of the data extracted and provided by the website "SkyTruth". For the first time, we list fracking chemicals according to their chemical structure and functional groups, because these properties are important as a starting point for (i) the design of analytical methods, (ii) to assess environmental fate and (iii) to understand why a given chemical is used at a certain stage of the fracturing process and what possible alternatives exist.

  1. Comparative analysis of chemical similarity methods for modular natural products with a hypothetical structure enumeration algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Franczak, Brian C; McNicholas, Paul D; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2017-08-16

    Natural products represent a prominent source of pharmaceutically and industrially important agents. Calculating the chemical similarity of two molecules is a central task in cheminformatics, with applications at multiple stages of the drug discovery pipeline. Quantifying the similarity of natural products is a particularly important problem, as the biological activities of these molecules have been extensively optimized by natural selection. The large and structurally complex scaffolds of natural products distinguish their physical and chemical properties from those of synthetic compounds. However, no analysis of the performance of existing methods for molecular similarity calculation specific to natural products has been reported to date. Here, we present LEMONS, an algorithm for the enumeration of hypothetical modular natural product structures. We leverage this algorithm to conduct a comparative analysis of molecular similarity methods within the unique chemical space occupied by modular natural products using controlled synthetic data, and comprehensively investigate the impact of diverse biosynthetic parameters on similarity search. We additionally investigate a recently described algorithm for natural product retrobiosynthesis and alignment, and find that when rule-based retrobiosynthesis can be applied, this approach outperforms conventional two-dimensional fingerprints, suggesting it may represent a valuable approach for the targeted exploration of natural product chemical space and microbial genome mining. Our open-source algorithm is an extensible method of enumerating hypothetical natural product structures with diverse potential applications in bioinformatics.

  2. XPS Study of the Chemical Structure of Plasma Biocopolymers of Pyrrole and Ethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel González-Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An XPS study about the structure of plasma biocopolymers synthesized with resistive radio frequency glow discharges and random combinations of ethylene glycol, pyrrole, and iodine, as a dopant, is presented in this work. The collisions of molecules produced structures with a great variety of chemical states based in the monomers, their combinations, crosslinking, doping, fragmentation, and oxidation at different levels in the plasma environment. Iodine appears bonded in the copolymers only at high power of synthesis, mainly as C–I and N–I chemical bonds. Multiple bonds as C≡C, C≡N, C=O, and C=N were found in the copolymers, without belonging to the initial reagents, and were generated by dehydrogenation of intermediate compounds during the polymerization. The main chemical states on PEG/PPy/I indicate that all atoms in pyrrole rings participate in the polymerization resulting in crosslinked, partially fragmented, and highly oxidized structures. This kind of analysis can be used to modify the synthesis of polymers to increase the participation of the most important chemical states in their biofunctions.

  3. Biomass Chars: The Effects of Pyrolysis Conditions on Their Morphology, Structure, Chemical Properties and Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamseddine Guizani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid char is a product of biomass pyrolysis. It contains a high proportion of carbon, and lower contents of H, O and minerals. This char can have different valorization pathways such as combustion for heat and power, gasification for Syngas production, activation for adsorption applications, or use as a soil amendment. The optimal recovery pathway of the char depends highly on its physical and chemical characteristics. In this study, different chars were prepared from beech wood particles under various pyrolysis operating conditions in an entrained flow reactor (500–1400 °C. Their structural, morphological, surface chemistry properties, as well as their chemical compositions, were determined using different analytical techniques, including elementary analysis, Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX, Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR, and Raman Spectroscopy. The biomass char reactivity was evaluated in air using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The yield, chemical composition, surface chemistry, structure, morphology and reactivity of the chars were highly affected by the pyrolysis temperature. In addition, some of these properties related to the char structure and chemical composition were found to be correlated to the char reactivity.

  4. Relationships between chemical structure, mechanical properties and materials processing in nanopatterned organosilicate fins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Gheorghe; Gates, Richard S; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Prater, Craig; Jit Singh, Kanwal; Mays, Ebony; King, Sean W

    2017-01-01

    The exploitation of nanoscale size effects to create new nanostructured materials necessitates the development of an understanding of relationships between molecular structure, physical properties and material processing at the nanoscale. Numerous metrologies capable of thermal, mechanical, and electrical characterization at the nanoscale have been demonstrated over the past two decades. However, the ability to perform nanoscale molecular/chemical structure characterization has only been recently demonstrated with the advent of atomic-force-microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) and related techniques. Therefore, we have combined measurements of chemical structures with AFM-IR and of mechanical properties with contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) to investigate the fabrication of 20-500 nm wide fin structures in a nanoporous organosilicate material. We show that by combining these two techniques, one can clearly observe variations of chemical structure and mechanical properties that correlate with the fabrication process and the feature size of the organosilicate fins. Specifically, we have observed an inverse correlation between the concentration of terminal organic groups and the stiffness of nanopatterned organosilicate fins. The selective removal of the organic component during etching results in a stiffness increase and reinsertion via chemical silylation results in a stiffness decrease. Examination of this effect as a function of fin width indicates that the loss of terminal organic groups and stiffness increase occur primarily at the exposed surfaces of the fins over a length scale of 10-20 nm. While the observed structure-property relationships are specific to organosilicates, we believe the combined demonstration of AFM-IR with CR-AFM should pave the way for a similar nanoscale characterization of other materials where the understanding of such relationships is essential.

  5. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  6. The role of chemical admixtures in the formation of the structure of cement stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sulfates and carbonates of potassium and sodium on the character of the formation of the microstructure of cement stone was studied. The role of cations in the structure formation of cement stone is shown. The efficiency of chemical additives, hardening accelerators, was estimated from the ratio of the volumes of gel and capillary micropores. The ratio of gel and capillary pores allows to determine the efficiency coefficient of the action of chemical additives. It is shown that the potassium carbonate for Portland cement is the most effective additive for hardening in terms of microstructure modification, and potassium sulfate for slag Portland cement.

  7. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  8. The use of interaction matrices for identification, structuring and ranking of FEPs in a repository system. Application on the far-field of a deep geological repository for spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta, Stockholm (Sweden); Stroem, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    The basic device in the Rock Engineering Systems approach, the interaction matrix, has been used to identify, structure and rank Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) describing barrier performance and radionuclide behaviour in the far-field of a deep geologic repository for spent fuel. The result is a first version of the Process System (PS), for the far-field of a deep repository, structured in an interaction matrix with supporting documentation. The documentation is compiled in databases, one containing matrix specific information and one containing general FEP descriptions. The study has shown that an interaction matrix is feasible to use both for the structuring of the PS and for visualisation of the PS. The developed documentation system increases the transparency of the system description and makes it possible to trace back the judgements made during the construction of the matrix. This will facilitate review work and future revisions as well as consistent treatment of different issues in the system. This study is a first step in the application of a systematic method to establish a structured description of the PS for a deep repository for spent fuel. The work could be seen as a part of the preparation for the forthcoming performance and safety analysis. The next step would be to develop the PS for the remaining parts of the repository system to the same level as has been done for the far-field system. Before the PS is evaluated for different selected system premises, a scientific review of the contents of the PS for the whole repository system would be beneficial. 5 refs.

  9. Ab initio studies of equations of state and chemical reactions of reactive structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava

    The motivations for the research issues addressed in this thesis are based on the needs of the aerospace structural analysis and the design community. The specific focus is related to the characterization and shock induced chemical reactions of multi-functional structural-energetic materials that are also known as the reactive structural materials and their reaction capabilities. Usually motivation for selection of aerospace structural materials is to realize required strength characteristics and favorable strength to weight ratios. The term strength implies resistance to loads experienced during the service life of the structure, including resistance to fatigue loads, corrosion and other extreme conditions. Thus, basically the structural materials are single function materials that resist loads experienced during the service life of the structure. However, it is desirable to select materials that are capable of offering more than one basic function of strength. Very often, the second function is the capability to provide functions of sensing and actuation. In this thesis, the second function is different. The second function is the energetic characteristics. Thus, the choice of dual functions of the material are the structural characteristics and energetic characteristics. These materials are also known by other names such as the reactive material structures or dual functional structural energetic materials. Specifically the selected reactive materials include mixtures of selected metals and metal oxides that are also known as thermite mixtures, reacting intermetallic combinations and oxidizing materials. There are several techniques that are available to synthesize these structural energetic materials or reactive material structures and new synthesis techniques constitute an open research area. The focus of this thesis, however, is the characterization of chemical reactions of reactive material structures that involve two or more solids (or condensed matter). The

  10. Highlighting Entanglement of Cultures via Ranking of Multilingual Wikipedia Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013 PMID:24098338

  11. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  12. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  13. Chemical and Conformational Diversity of Modified Nucleosides Affects tRNA Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Y. P. Väre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are central to all gene expression through the control of protein synthesis. Four major nucleosides, adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine, compose RNAs and provide sequence variation, but are limited in contributions to structural variation as well as distinct chemical properties. The ability of RNAs to play multiple roles in cellular metabolism is made possible by extensive variation in length, conformational dynamics, and the over 100 post-transcriptional modifications. There are several reviews of the biochemical pathways leading to RNA modification, but the physicochemical nature of modified nucleosides and how they facilitate RNA function is of keen interest, particularly with regard to the contributions of modified nucleosides. Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are the most extensively modified RNAs. The diversity of modifications provide versatility to the chemical and structural environments. The added chemistry, conformation and dynamics of modified nucleosides occurring at the termini of stems in tRNA’s cloverleaf secondary structure affect the global three-dimensional conformation, produce unique recognition determinants for macromolecules to recognize tRNAs, and affect the accurate and efficient decoding ability of tRNAs. This review will discuss the impact of specific chemical moieties on the structure, stability, electrochemical properties, and function of tRNAs.

  14. Descriptor Selection via Log-Sum Regularization for the Biological Activities of Chemical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Yong Xia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR model searches for a reliable relationship between the chemical structure and biological activities in the field of drug design and discovery. (1 Background: In the study of QSAR, the chemical structures of compounds are encoded by a substantial number of descriptors. Some redundant, noisy and irrelevant descriptors result in a side-effect for the QSAR model. Meanwhile, too many descriptors can result in overfitting or low correlation between chemical structure and biological bioactivity. (2 Methods: We use novel log-sum regularization to select quite a few descriptors that are relevant to biological activities. In addition, a coordinate descent algorithm, which uses novel univariate log-sum thresholding for updating the estimated coefficients, has been developed for the QSAR model. (3 Results: Experimental results on artificial and four QSAR datasets demonstrate that our proposed log-sum method has good performance among state-of-the-art methods. (4 Conclusions: Our proposed multiple linear regression with log-sum penalty is an effective technique for both descriptor selection and prediction of biological activity.

  15. Fixed versus dynamic co-occurrence windows in TextRank term weights for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Wei; Cheng, Qikai; Lioma, Christina

    2012-01-01

    this, and considers dynamically adjusted windows of term co-occurrence that follow the document structure on a sentence- and paragraph-level. The resulting TextRank term weights are used in a ranking function that re-ranks 1000 initially returned search results in order to improve the precision...

  16. 13C-detection in RNA bases: revealing structure-chemical shift relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farès, Christophe; Amata, Irene; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2007-12-26

    The chemical shifts of the unprotonated carbons in the proton-deficient nucleobases of RNA are rarely reported, despite the valuable information that they contain about base-pairing and base-stacking. We have developed 13C-detected 2D-experiments to identify the unprotonated 13C in the RNA bases and have assigned all the base nuclei of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled HIV-2 TAR-RNA. The 13C chemical shift distributions revealed perturbations correlated with the base-pairing and base-stacking properties of all four base-types. From this work, we conclude that the information contained in the chemical shift perturbations within the base rings can provide valuable restraint information for solving RNA structures, especially in conformational averaged regions, where NOE-based information is not available.

  17. Chemical structure of wood charcoal by infrared spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Nicole; Harper, David; Rials, Timothy; Elder, Thomas

    2006-05-17

    In this work, the effect of temperature on charcoal structure and chemical composition is investigated for four tree species. Wood charcoal carbonized at various temperatures is analyzed by mid infrared spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis and by thermogravimetric analysis to characterize the chemical composition during the carbonization process. The multivariate models of charcoal were able to distinguish between species and wood thermal treatments, revealing that the characteristics of the wood charcoal depend not only on the wood species, but also on the carbonization temperature. This work demonstrates the potential of mid infrared spectroscopy in the whiskey industry, from the identification and classification of the wood species for the mellowing process to the chemical characterization of the barrels after the toasting and charring process.

  18. From Structural Complexity to Structure-Property Relationships in Intermetallics: Development of Density Functional Theory-Chemical Pressure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelkemier, Joshua

    The unparalleled structural diversity of intermetallic compounds provides nearly unlimited potential for the discovery and optimization of materials with useful properties, such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, hydrogen storage, superelasticity, and catalysis. This same diversity, however, creates challenges for understanding and controlling the unpredictable structure of intermetallic phases. Moreover, the fundamental design principles that have proven so powerful in molecular chemistry do not have simple analogues for metallic, solid state materials. One of these basic principles is the concept of atomic size effects. Especially in densely packed crystal structures where the need to fill space is in competition with the atoms' preferences for ideal interatomic distances, substitution of one element in a compound for another with similar chemical properties yet different atomic size can have dramatic effects on the ordering of the atoms (which in turn affects the electronic structure, vibrational properties, and materials properties). But because the forces that hold metallic phases together are less easily understood from a local perspective than covalent or ionic interactions in other kinds of materials, it is usually unclear whether the atoms are organized to optimize stabilizing, bonding interactions or rather forced to be close together despite repulsive, steric interactions. This dissertation details the development of a theoretical method, called Density Functional Theory-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) analysis, to address this issue. It works by converting the distribution of total energy density from a DFT calculation into a map of chemical pressure through a numerical approximation of the first derivative of energy with respect to voxel volume. The CP distribution is then carefully divided into contact volumes between neighboring atoms, from which it is possible to determine whether atoms are too close together (positive CP) or too far

  19. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rank distributions: Frequency vs. magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Carlos; Robledo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We examine the relationship between two different types of ranked data, frequencies and magnitudes. We consider data that can be sorted out either way, through numbers of occurrences or size of the measures, as it is the case, say, of moon craters, earthquakes, billionaires, etc. We indicate that these two types of distributions are functional inverses of each other, and specify this link, first in terms of the assumed parent probability distribution that generates the data samples, and then in terms of an analog (deterministic) nonlinear iterated map that reproduces them. For the particular case of hyperbolic decay with rank the distributions are identical, that is, the classical Zipf plot, a pure power law. But their difference is largest when one displays logarithmic decay and its counterpart shows the inverse exponential decay, as it is the case of Benford law, or viceversa. For all intermediate decay rates generic differences appear not only between the power-law exponents for the midway rank decline but also for small and large rank. We extend the theoretical framework to include thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical concepts, such as entropies and configuration.

  1. Rankings Methodology Hurts Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In the 1980s, when the "U.S. News & World Report" rankings of colleges were based solely on reputation, the nation's public universities were well represented at the top. However, as soon as the magazine began including its "measures of excellence," statistics intended to define quality, public universities nearly disappeared from the top. As the…

  2. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  3. Structural and optical properties of nano-structured CdS thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Rekha, E-mail: rekha.mittal07@gmail.com; Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K. [Thin Film Laboratory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films have been deposited on conducting glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effect of precursor concentration on the structural, morphological, compositional, and optical properties of the CdS films has been studied. Crystal structure of these CdS films is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it reveals polycrystalline structure with mixture of cubic and wurtzite phases with grain size decreasing as precursor concentration is increased. Optical studies reveal that the CdS thin films have high transmittance in visible spectral region reaching 90% and the films possess direct optical band gap that decreases from 2.46 to 2.39 eV with decreasing bath concentration. Our study suggests that growth is nucleation controlled.

  4. Managing expectations: assessment of chemistry databases generated by automated extraction of chemical structures from patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Stefan; Bartek, Luca; Papadatos, George; Gaulton, Anna

    2015-12-01

    First public disclosure of new chemical entities often takes place in patents, which makes them an important source of information. However, with an ever increasing number of patent applications, manual processing and curation on such a large scale becomes even more challenging. An alternative approach better suited for this large corpus of documents is the automated extraction of chemical structures. A number of patent chemistry databases generated by using the latter approach are now available but little is known that can help to manage expectations when using them. This study aims to address this by comparing two such freely available sources, SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP (IBM Strategic Intellectual Property Insight Platform), with manually curated commercial databases. When looking at the percentage of chemical structures successfully extracted from a set of patents, using SciFinder as our reference, 59 and 51 % were also found in our comparison in SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP, respectively. When performing this comparison with compounds as starting point, i.e. establishing if for a list of compounds the databases provide the links between chemical structures and patents they appear in, we obtained similar results. SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP found 62 and 59 %, respectively, of the compound-patent pairs obtained from Reaxys. In our comparison of automatically generated vs. manually curated patent chemistry databases, the former successfully provided approximately 60 % of links between chemical structure and patents. It needs to be stressed that only a very limited number of patents and compound-patent pairs were used for our comparison. Nevertheless, our results will hopefully help to manage expectations of users of patent chemistry databases of this type and provide a useful framework for more studies like ours as well as guide future developments of the workflows used for the automated extraction of chemical structures from patents. The challenges we have encountered

  5. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World…

  6. Structural, morphological and sensing properties of layered polyaniline nanosheets towards hazardous phenol chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyung-Kee; Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Shin, Hyung Shik

    2013-01-30

    Reliable sensing properties towards hazardous phenol chemical were detected by the novel working electrode of layered polyaniline (PANI) nanosheets. The layered PANI nanosheets were synthesized by the chemical polymerization of aniline monomer in the presence of hydrochloric acid and ammonium persulphate at 5 °C. The morphological, structural, optical, electrical and electrochemical properties of layered PANI nanosheets were extensively studied. The electrochemical behavior of layered PANI nanosheets based electrode was demonstrated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclovoltametry (CV) measurements. The layered PANI nanosheets electrode showed reasonably good electrocatalytic activity towards the detection of phenol chemical, which resulted from the high redox current and low RCT. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were used to elucidate the sensing parameters of the fabricated phenol chemical sensor with layered PANI nanosheets electrode. The fabricated phenol chemical sensor with layered PANI nanosheets electrode significantly attained the high sensitivity of ~1485.3 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and the detection limit of ~4.43 μM with correlation coefficient (R) of ~0.9981 and short response time (10 s). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Preparedness of emergency departments in northwest England for managing chemical incidents: a structured interview survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Darren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of significant chemical incidents occur in the UK each year and may require Emergency Departments (EDs to receive and manage contaminated casualties. Previously UK EDs have been found to be under-prepared for this, but since October 2005 acute hospital Trusts have had a statutory responsibility to maintain decontamination capacity. We aimed to evaluate the level of preparedness of Emergency Departments in North West England for managing chemical incidents. Methods A face-to-face semi-structured interview was carried out with the Nurse Manager or a nominated deputy in all 18 Emergency Departments in the Region. Results 16/18 departments had a written chemical incident plan but only 7 had the plan available at interview. All had a designated decontamination area but only 11 felt that they were adequately equipped. 12/18 had a current training programme for chemical incident management and 3 had no staff trained in decontamination. 13/18 could contain contaminated water from casualty decontamination and 6 could provide shelter for casualties before decontamination. Conclusion We have identified major inconsistencies in the preparedness of North West Emergency Departments for managing chemical incidents. Nationally recognized standards on incident planning, facilities, equipment and procedures need to be agreed and implemented with adequate resources. Issues of environmental safety and patient dignity and comfort should also be addressed.

  8. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  9. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States); Yu, Wookyung [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Yonsei University, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry (Korea, Republic of); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-10-15

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  10. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu. PMID:22903636

  11. LET THE STUDENTS DECIDE: A PERSONALISED RANKING OF TURKISH UNIVERSITIES

    OpenAIRE

    MUTLUTÜRK, Meltem Emine

    2016-01-01

    Choosing a university from a vast range of choices is a major decision in every student’s life. There are various amounts of university ranking systems that mostly use academic indicators such as number of citations, number of publications and doctorate students in their ranking model, but other indicators such as socio-cultural and physical structure of the university also factor into their decision, especially when choosing between universities of the same league. In this paper, the multi-c...

  12. Top coalitions, common rankings, and semistrict core stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dinko Dimitrov

    2006-01-01

    The top coalition property of Banerjee et al. (2001) and the common ranking property of Farrell and Scotchmer (1988) are sufficient conditions for core stability in hedonic games. We introduce the semistrict core as a stronger stability concept than the core, and show that the top coalition property guarantees the existence of semistrictly core stable coalition structures. Moreover, for each game satisfying the common ranking property, the core and the semistrict core coincide.

  13. EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND LIGNIN STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF SIMAROUBA VERSICOLOR WOOD ON ITS PULPING PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Cristina F. Silva,; José Lívio Gomide; Ricardo Balleirini Santos

    2012-01-01

    Simarouba versicolor wood was evaluated relative to its kraft pulping ability and compared with Eucalyptus urograndis wood. Comprehensive chemical analysis of wood and milled wood lignin (MWL) was performed, aiming to correlate wood and lignin structural features with kraft pulping response. Wood characterization of S. versicolor revealed higher lignin content (37.3%) and lower cellulose content (45.1%) than E. urograndis. 13C NMR spectroscopy was performed to characterize MWL, and the result...

  14. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical, functional, and structural properties of spent coffee grounds and coffee silverskin

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesteros, Lina F.; J. A. Teixeira; Mussatto, Solange I.

    2014-01-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) and coffee silverskin (CS) represent a great pollution hazard if discharged into the environment. Taking this fact into account, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition, functional properties, and structural characteristics of these agro-industrial residues in order to identify the characteristics that allow their reutilization in industrial processes. According to the results, SCG and CS are both of lignocellulosic nature. Sugars polymeri...

  16. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  17. AptRank: an adaptive PageRank model for protein function prediction on   bi-relational graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Biaobin; Kloster, Kyle; Gleich, David F; Gribskov, Michael

    2017-06-15

    Diffusion-based network models are widely used for protein function prediction using protein network data and have been shown to outperform neighborhood-based and module-based methods. Recent studies have shown that integrating the hierarchical structure of the Gene Ontology (GO) data dramatically improves prediction accuracy. However, previous methods usually either used the GO hierarchy to refine the prediction results of multiple classifiers, or flattened the hierarchy into a function-function similarity kernel. No study has taken the GO hierarchy into account together with the protein network as a two-layer network model. We first construct a Bi-relational graph (Birg) model comprised of both protein-protein association and function-function hierarchical networks. We then propose two diffusion-based methods, BirgRank and AptRank, both of which use PageRank to diffuse information on this two-layer graph model. BirgRank is a direct application of traditional PageRank with fixed decay parameters. In contrast, AptRank utilizes an adaptive diffusion mechanism to improve the performance of BirgRank. We evaluate the ability of both methods to predict protein function on yeast, fly and human protein datasets, and compare with four previous methods: GeneMANIA, TMC, ProteinRank and clusDCA. We design four different validation strategies: missing function prediction, de novo function prediction, guided function prediction and newly discovered function prediction to comprehensively evaluate predictability of all six methods. We find that both BirgRank and AptRank outperform the previous methods, especially in missing function prediction when using only 10% of the data for training. The MATLAB code is available at https://github.rcac.purdue.edu/mgribsko/aptrank . gribskov@purdue.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Predicting physical-chemical properties of compounds from molecular structures by recursive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernazzani, Luca; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Mollica, Vincenzo; Sperduti, Alessandro; Starita, Antonina; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the potential of a recently developed neural network for structures applied to the prediction of physical chemical properties of compounds. The proposed recursive neural network (RecNN) model is able to directly take as input a structured representation of the molecule and to model a direct and adaptive relationship between the molecular structure and target property. Therefore, it combines in a learning system the flexibility and general advantages of a neural network model with the representational power of a structured domain. As a result, a completely new approach to quantitative structure-activity relationship/quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR/QSAR) analysis is obtained. An original representation of the molecular structures has been developed accounting for both the occurrence of specific atoms/groups and the topological relationships among them. Gibbs free energy of solvation in water, Delta(solv)G degrees , has been chosen as a benchmark for the model. The different approaches proposed in the literature for the prediction of this property have been reconsidered from a general perspective. The advantages of RecNN as a suitable tool for the automatization of fundamental parts of the QSPR/QSAR analysis have been highlighted. The RecNN model has been applied to the analysis of the Delta(solv)G degrees in water of 138 monofunctional acyclic organic compounds and tested on an external data set of 33 compounds. As a result of the statistical analysis, we obtained, for the predictive accuracy estimated on the test set, correlation coefficient R = 0.9985, standard deviation S = 0.68 kJ mol(-1), and mean absolute error MAE = 0.46 kJ mol(-1). The inherent ability of RecNN to abstract chemical knowledge through the adaptive learning process has been investigated by principal components analysis of the internal representations computed by the network. It has been found that the model recognizes the chemical compounds on the

  19. Improved performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell using the stack structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Qin, Bangyu; Luo, Yong; Hou, Yanping

    2012-07-01

    The microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) is a device to desalinate seawater, and produce acid and alkali. The objective of this study was to enhance the desalination and chemical-production performance of the MEDCC using two types of stack structure. Experiments were conducted with different membrane spacings, numbers of desalination chambers and applied voltages. Results showed that the stack construction in the MEDCC enhanced the desalination and chemical-production rates. The maximal desalination rate of 0.58 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which was 43% higher than that in the MEDCC, was achieved in the four-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 1.5mm. The maximal acid- and alkali-production rates of 0.079 ± 0.006 and 0.13 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which were 46% and 8% higher than that in the MEDCC, respectively, were achieved in the two-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the BPM-AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 3mm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding and quantitative (for predicting mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA; all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy-methyl]-6-(phenylthiothymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1 and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis, respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  1. In-silico bonding schemes to encode chemical bonds involving sharing of electrons in molecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnaivanam, Sankar; Sathiadhas, Jerome Pastal Raj; Panneerselvam, Vinoth

    2016-05-01

    Encoding of covalent and coordinate covalent bonds in molecular structures using ground state valence electronic configuration is achieved. The bonding due to electron sharing in the molecular structures is described with five fundamental bonding categories viz. uPair-uPair, lPair-uPair, uPair-lPair, vPair-lPair, and lPair-lPair. The involvement of lone pair electrons and the vacant electron orbitals in chemical bonding are explained with bonding schemes namely "target vacant promotion", "source vacant promotion", "target pairing promotion", "source pairing promotion", "source cation promotion", "source pairing double bond", "target vacant occupation", and "double pairing promotion" schemes. The bonding schemes are verified with a chemical structure editor. The bonding in the structures like ylides, PCl5, SF6, IF7, N-Oxides, BF4(-), AlCl4(-) etc. are explained and encoded unambiguously. The encoding of bonding in the structures of various organic compounds, transition metals compounds, coordination complexes and metal carbonyls is accomplished. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  3. [60]Fullerene-peptides: bio-nano conjugates with structural and chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    [60]Fullerene-peptides represent a simple yet chemically diverse example of a bio-nano conjugate. The C60 moiety provides the following attributes to the conjugate: (a) precise three-dimensional architecture, (b) a large hydrophobic mass and (c) unique electronic properties. Conversely, the peptide component provides: (a) structural diversity depending on the overall length and amino acids composition, (b) charge flexibility and (c) secondary structure and recognition. Recent advances in the synthetic strategy for [60]fullerene-peptide synthesis from both pre-formed peptides and using solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) are described. The effects of the hydrophobic C60 on the secondary structure of the peptide depend on the sequence of the latter, but in general the relative stability of particular structures is greatly enhanced. The ability of the [60]fullerene substituent to dramatically modify both cellular uptake and transdermal transport is discussed as is the effects on cell viability and antimicrobial activity.

  4. Simulation study on the effects of chemical structure and molecular size on the acceptor strength in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based copolymer with alternating donor and acceptor for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassamesard, Areefen; Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2017-02-01

    This research assessed the effects of various chemical structures and molecular sizes on the simulated geometric parameters, electron structures, and spectroscopic properties of single-chain complex alternating donor-acceptor (D-A) monomers and copolymers that are intended for use as photoactive layer in a polymer solar cell by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory with B3LYP exchange-correlation functional. The 3-hexylthiophene (3HT) was selected for electron donor, while eight chemicals, namely thiazole (Z), thiadiazole (D), thienopyrazine (TP), thienothiadiazole (TD), benzothiadiazole (BT), thiadiazolothieno-pyrazine (TPD), oxadiazole (OXD) and 5-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazole (TAZ), were employed as electron acceptor functional groups. The torsional angle, bridge bond length, intramolecular charge transfer, energy levels, and molecular orbitals were analyzed. The simulation results reveal that the geometry and electron structure of donor-acceptor monomer and copolymer are significantly impacted by heterocyclic rings, heteroatoms, fused rings, degree of steric hindrance and coplanarity of the acceptor molecular structure. Planar conformation was obtained from the D copolymer, and a pseudo-planar structure with the TD copolymer. The TAZ acceptor exhibited strong steric hindrance due to its bulky structure and non-planarity of its structure. An analysis of the electron structures indicated that the degree of intramolecular electron-withdrawing capability had the rank order TAZ  group provides a compromise in the characteristics of a donor-acceptor copolymer, useful in a polymeric candidate material for the photoactive layer in a polymer solar cell.

  5. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  6. Chemical engineering and structural and pharmacological characterization of the α-scorpion toxin OD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durek, Thomas; Vetter, Irina; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Motin, Leonid; Knapp, Oliver; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion α-toxins are invaluable pharmacological tools for studying voltage-gated sodium channels, but few structure-function studies have been undertaken due to their challenging synthesis. To address this deficiency, we report a chemical engineering strategy based upon native chemical ligation. The chemical synthesis of α-toxin OD1 was achieved by chemical ligation of three unprotected peptide segments. A high resolution X-ray structure (1.8 Å) of synthetic OD1 showed the typical βαββ α-toxin fold and revealed important conformational differences in the pharmacophore region when compared with other α-toxin structures. Pharmacological analysis of synthetic OD1 revealed potent α-toxin activity (inhibition of fast inactivation) at Nav1.7, as well as Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. In addition, OD1 also produced potent β-toxin activity at Nav1.4 and Nav1.6 (shift of channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction), indicating that OD1 might interact at more than one site with Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. Investigation of nine OD1 mutants revealed that three residues in the reverse turn contributed significantly to selectivity, with the triple OD1 mutant (D9K, D10P, K11H) being 40-fold more selective for Nav1.7 over Nav1.6, while OD1 K11V was 5-fold more selective for Nav1.6 than Nav1.7. This switch in selectivity highlights the importance of the reverse turn for engineering α-toxins with altered selectivity at Nav subtypes.

  7. Validating rankings in soccer championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Parracho Sant'Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The final ranking of a championship is determined by quality attributes combined with other factors which should be filtered out of any decision on relegation or draft for upper level tournaments. Factors like referees' mistakes and difficulty of certain matches due to its accidental importance to the opponents should have their influence reduced. This work tests approaches to combine classification rules considering the imprecision of the number of points as a measure of quality and of the variables that provide reliable explanation for it. Two home-advantage variables are tested and shown to be apt to enter as explanatory variables. Independence between the criteria is checked against the hypothesis of maximal correlation. The importance of factors and of composition rules is evaluated on the basis of correlation between rank vectors, number of classes and number of clubs in tail classes. Data from five years of the Brazilian Soccer Championship are analyzed.

  8. The influence of condensed tannin structure on rate of microbial mineralization and reactivity to chemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte E; Preston, Caroline M; Hogg, Karen E; Titus, Brian D

    2011-03-01

    We examined how tannin structure influences reactivity in tannin assays and carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Condensed tannins from the foliage of ten tree and shrub species and from pecan shells (Carya illinoensis) had different proportions of: (a) epicatechin (cis) and catechin (trans) isomers, (b) procyanidin (PC) and prodelphinidin (PD) monomers, and (c) different chain lengths. The response of each tannin to several widely used tannin assays was determined. Although there was some variation in response to proanthocyanidin (butanol/HCl) and Folin Ciocalteu assays, we did not deduce any predictable relationship between tannin structure and response to either assay. There was little variation in protein precipitation among the different tannins. To assess biological activity, six of the tannins were incubated with forest humus for 22 days. We determined that, while PC-based tannins remained at least partly extractable for the duration of the incubation, tannins with a high proportion of PD subunits rapidly became unextractable from soil. There was a positive correlation between net nitrogen mineralization and cis chemical structure. Carbon mineralization was enhanced initially by the addition of tannins to humus, but after 22 days, a negative correlation between the proportion of cis subunits and respiration was determined. Overall, we were not able to demonstrate consistent effects of structure on either microbial mineralization or reactivity to chemical assays; such relationships remain elusive.

  9. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  10. Prediction of drug disposition on the basis of its chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepensky, David

    2013-06-01

    The chemical structure of any drug determines its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Detailed understanding of relationships between the drug chemical structure and individual disposition pathways (i.e., distribution and elimination) is required for efficient use of existing drugs and effective development of new drugs. Different approaches have been developed for this purpose, ranging from statistics-based quantitative structure-property (or structure-pharmacokinetic) relationships (QSPR) analysis to physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. This review critically analyzes currently available approaches for analysis and prediction of drug disposition on the basis of chemical structure. Models that can be used to predict different aspects of disposition are presented, including: (a) value of the individual pharmacokinetic parameter (e.g., clearance or volume of distribution), (b) efficiency of the specific disposition pathway (e.g., biliary drug excretion or cytochrome P450 3A4 metabolism), (c) accumulation in a specific organ or tissue (e.g., permeability of the placenta or accumulation in the brain), and (d) the whole-body disposition in the individual patients. Examples of presented pharmacological agents include "classical" low-molecular-weight compounds, biopharmaceuticals, and drugs encapsulated in specialized drug-delivery systems. The clinical efficiency of agents from all these groups can be suboptimal, because of inefficient permeability of the drug to the site of action and/or excessive accumulation in other organs and tissues. Therefore, robust and reliable approaches for chemical structure-based prediction of drug disposition are required to overcome these limitations. PBPK models are increasingly being used for prediction of drug disposition. These models can reflect the complex interplay of factors that determine drug disposition in a mechanistically correct fashion and can be combined with other approaches, for example QSPR

  11. Surface structure and biomedical properties of chemically polished and electropolished NiTi shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China)], E-mail: clchu@seu.edu.cn; Wang, R.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China); Hu, T. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yin, L.H.; Pu, Y.P. [School of Public Health, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lin, P.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China); Wu, S.L.; Chung, C.Y.; Yeung, K.W.K.; Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-12-01

    The surface structure and biomedical properties of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) samples after undergoing electropolishing and chemical polishing are determined and compared employing scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, hemolysis analysis, blood platelet adhesion test, and MTT test. The results indicate that after chemical polishing, there is still a high Ni concentration on the surface of the NiTi SMA. On the other hand, electropolishing can form a thin surface titanium oxide film (about 10 nm thickness) with depleted Ni. In addition to the TiO{sub 2} phase, some titanium suboxides (TiO and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found in the surface film. Compared to chemical polishing, electropolishing can more effectively mitigate out-diffusion of Ni ions and the wettability, blood compatibility, and thromboresistance are also better. However, no difference on the cytocompatibility can be observed from samples that have been chemically polished or electropolished.

  12. Minkowski metrics in creating universal ranking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ameljańczyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a general procedure for creating the rankings of a set of objects, while the relation of preference based on any ranking function. The analysis was possible to use the ranking functions began by showing the fundamental drawbacks of commonly used functions in the form of a weighted sum. As a special case of the ranking procedure in the space of a relation, the procedure based on the notion of an ideal element and generalized Minkowski distance from the element was proposed. This procedure, presented as universal ranking algorithm, eliminates most of the disadvantages of ranking functions in the form of a weighted sum.[b]Keywords[/b]: ranking functions, preference relation, ranking clusters, categories, ideal point, universal ranking algorithm

  13. Combined Reduced-Rank Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Torokhti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose and justify a new approach to constructing optimal nonlinear transforms of random vectors. We show that the proposed transform improves such characteristics of {rank-reduced} transforms as compression ratio, accuracy of decompression and reduces required computational work. The proposed transform ${mathcal T}_p$ is presented in the form of a sum with $p$ terms where each term is interpreted as a particular rank-reduced transform. Moreover, terms in ${mathcal T}_p$ are represented as a combination of three operations ${mathcal F}_k$, ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ with $k=1,ldots,p$. The prime idea is to determine ${mathcal F}_k$ separately, for each $k=1,ldots,p$, from an associated rank-constrained minimization problem similar to that used in the Karhunen--Lo`{e}ve transform. The operations ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ are auxiliary for f/inding ${mathcal F}_k$. The contribution of each term in ${mathcal T}_p$ improves the entire transform performance. A corresponding unconstrained nonlinear optimal transform is also considered. Such a transform is important in its own right because it is treated as an optimal filter without signal compression. A rigorous analysis of errors associated with the proposed transforms is given.

  14. Functional Multiplex PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Rahmede, Christoph; Arenas, Alex; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-10-01

    Recently it has been recognized that many complex social, technological and biological networks have a multilayer nature and can be described by multiplex networks. Multiplex networks are formed by a set of nodes connected by links having different connotations forming the different layers of the multiplex. Characterizing the centrality of the nodes in a multiplex network is a challenging task since the centrality of the node naturally depends on the importance associated to links of a certain type. Here we propose to assign to each node of a multiplex network a centrality called Functional Multiplex PageRank that is a function of the weights given to every different pattern of connections (multilinks) existent in the multiplex network between any two nodes. Since multilinks distinguish all the possible ways in which the links in different layers can overlap, the Functional Multiplex PageRank can describe important non-linear effects when large relevance or small relevance is assigned to multilinks with overlap. Here we apply the Functional Page Rank to the multiplex airport networks, to the neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans, and to social collaboration and citation networks between scientists. This analysis reveals important differences existing between the most central nodes of these networks, and the correlations between their so-called pattern to success.

  15. Ranking Support Vector Machine with Kernel Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Rongchun; Dou, Yong; Liang, Zhengfa; Lv, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Learning to rank algorithm has become important in recent years due to its successful application in information retrieval, recommender system, and computational biology, and so forth. Ranking support vector machine (RankSVM) is one of the state-of-art ranking models and has been favorably used. Nonlinear RankSVM (RankSVM with nonlinear kernels) can give higher accuracy than linear RankSVM (RankSVM with a linear kernel) for complex nonlinear ranking problem. However, the learning methods for nonlinear RankSVM are still time-consuming because of the calculation of kernel matrix. In this paper, we propose a fast ranking algorithm based on kernel approximation to avoid computing the kernel matrix. We explore two types of kernel approximation methods, namely, the Nyström method and random Fourier features. Primal truncated Newton method is used to optimize the pairwise L2-loss (squared Hinge-loss) objective function of the ranking model after the nonlinear kernel approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method gets a much faster training speed than kernel RankSVM and achieves comparable or better performance over state-of-the-art ranking algorithms.

  16. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  17. Chemically stable and mechanically durable superamphiphobic aluminum surface with a micro/nanoscale binary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shan; Yang, Xiaojun; Tian, Dong; Deng, Wenli

    2014-09-10

    We developed a simple fabrication method to prepare a superamphiphobic aluminum surface. On the basis of a low-energy surface and the combination of micro- and nanoscale roughness, the resultant surface became super-repellent toward a wide range of liquids with surface tensions of 25.3-72.1 mN m(-1). The applied approach involved (1) the formation of an irregular microplateau structure on an aluminum surface, (2) the fabrication of a nanoplatelet structure, and (3) fluorination treatment. The chemical stability and mechanical durability of the superamphiphobic surface were evaluated in detail. The results demonstrated that the surface presented an excellent chemical stability toward cool corrosive liquids (HCl/NaOH solutions, 25 °C) and 98% concentrated sulfuric acid, hot liquids (water, HCl/NaOH solutions, 30-100 °C), solvent immersion, high temperature, and a long-term period. More importantly, the surface also exhibited robust mechanical durability and could withstand multiple-fold, finger-touch, intensive scratching by a sharp blade, ultrasonication treatment, boiling treatment in water and coffee, repeated peeling by adhesive tape, and even multiple abrasion tests under 500 g of force without losing superamphiphobicity. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface was also demonstrated to have excellent corrosion resistance. This work provides a simple, cost-effective, and highly efficient method to fabricate a chemically stable and mechanically robust superamphiphobic aluminum surface, which can find important outdoor applications.

  18. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  19. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Nicolosi, Valeria; Pennycook, Timothy J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S; Oxley, Mark P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-03-25

    Direct imaging and chemical identification of all the atoms in a material with unknown three-dimensional structure would constitute a very powerful general analysis tool. Transmission electron microscopy should in principle be able to fulfil this role, as many scientists including Feynman realized early on. It images matter with electrons that scatter strongly from individual atoms and whose wavelengths are about 50 times smaller than an atom. Recently the technique has advanced greatly owing to the introduction of aberration-corrected optics. However, neither electron microscopy nor any other experimental technique has yet been able to resolve and identify all the atoms in a non-periodic material consisting of several atomic species. Here we show that annular dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope optimized for low voltage operation can resolve and identify the chemical type of every atom in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride that contains substitutional defects. Three types of atomic substitutions were found and identified: carbon substituting for boron, carbon substituting for nitrogen, and oxygen substituting for nitrogen. The substitutions caused in-plane distortions in the boron nitride monolayer of about 0.1 A magnitude, which were directly resolved, and verified by density functional theory calculations. The results demonstrate that atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis of all radiation-damage-resistant atoms present in, and on top of, ultra-thin sheets has now become possible.

  20. A large scale analysis of information-theoretic network complexity measures using chemical structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Dehmer

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate information-theoretic network complexity measures which have already been intensely used in mathematical- and medicinal chemistry including drug design. Numerous such measures have been developed so far but many of them lack a meaningful interpretation, e.g., we want to examine which kind of structural information they detect. Therefore, our main contribution is to shed light on the relatedness between some selected information measures for graphs by performing a large scale analysis using chemical networks. Starting from several sets containing real and synthetic chemical structures represented by graphs, we study the relatedness between a classical (partition-based complexity measure called the topological information content of a graph and some others inferred by a different paradigm leading to partition-independent measures. Moreover, we evaluate the uniqueness of network complexity measures numerically. Generally, a high uniqueness is an important and desirable property when designing novel topological descriptors having the potential to be applied to large chemical databases.

  1. Ranking stability and super-stable nodes in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-07-19

    Pagerank, a network-based diffusion algorithm, has emerged as the leading method to rank web content, ecological species and even scientists. Despite its wide use, it remains unknown how the structure of the network on which it operates affects its performance. Here we show that for random networks the ranking provided by pagerank is sensitive to perturbations in the network topology, making it unreliable for incomplete or noisy systems. In contrast, in scale-free networks we predict analytically the emergence of super-stable nodes whose ranking is exceptionally stable to perturbations. We calculate the dependence of the number of super-stable nodes on network characteristics and demonstrate their presence in real networks, in agreement with the analytical predictions. These results not only deepen our understanding of the interplay between network topology and dynamical processes but also have implications in all areas where ranking has a role, from science to marketing.

  2. Weighted Discriminative Dictionary Learning based on Low-rank Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heyou; Zheng, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Low-rank representation has been widely used in the field of pattern classification, especially when both training and testing images are corrupted with large noise. Dictionary plays an important role in low-rank representation. With respect to the semantic dictionary, the optimal representation matrix should be block-diagonal. However, traditional low-rank representation based dictionary learning methods cannot effectively exploit the discriminative information between data and dictionary. To address this problem, this paper proposed weighted discriminative dictionary learning based on low-rank representation, where a weighted representation regularization term is constructed. The regularization associates label information of both training samples and dictionary atoms, and encourages to generate a discriminative representation with class-wise block-diagonal structure, which can further improve the classification performance where both training and testing images are corrupted with large noise. Experimental results demonstrate advantages of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art methods.

  3. Chemical and structural changes of quartz surfaces due to structuring by laser-induced backside wet etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitkovas, G; Deckert, V; Lippert, T; Raimondi, F; Schneider, C W; Wokaun, A

    2008-06-14

    Various physical and chemical processes which are involved in laser-induced backside wet etching are investigated. The surface of quartz etched by the laser-induced backside wet etching using a XeCl excimer laser at various fluences is analyzed by Raman microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fiber-tip attenuated total-reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The investigations reveal the formation of a high amount of amorphous carbon deposits at low laser fluences, which strongly adhere to the quartz surface. Combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that the quartz is also chemically and structurally modified due to a loss of oxygen and by a change of the quartz polymorph at intermediate and high laser fluences. These modification and their differences for different fluences are explained by the etching mechanisms itself, i.e. different magnitudes of temperature and pressure jumps. The results show clearly which conditions for etching must be applied to machine high-quality structures, e.g. micro-optical elements in quartz.

  4. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  5. Formation and characterization of wrinkle structures of chemically-derived graphene thin films and micropatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Ko, Yeongun; Cho, Sung-Rheb; Chang, Suk Tai

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we report a simple and effective process for the fabrication of wrinkle structures of chemically derived graphene thin films and patterns. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films/patterns formed on glass substrates are transferred to pre-strained elastomeric layers by improving adhesion strength at the rGO/PDMS interface with the assistance of oxygen plasma treatment. The morphology of rGO wrinkle structures is investigated in the various applied strains and film thicknesses. The experimental results were interpreted by theoretical models and well fitted to the estimated values. The techniques for such well-defined rGO wrinkle structures could be used for flexible and stretchable graphene-based electronic devices.

  6. Rapid calculation of protein chemical shifts using bond polarization theory and its application to protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovkin, Igor; Klipfel, Marco; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S; Luy, Burkhard; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2012-09-21

    Although difficult to analyze, NMR chemical shifts provide detailed information on protein structure. We have adapted the semi-empirical bond polarization theory (BPT) to protein chemical shift calculation and chemical shift driven protein structure refinement. A new parameterization for BPT amide nitrogen chemical shift calculation has been derived from MP2 ab initio calculations and successfully evaluated using crystalline tripeptides. We computed the chemical shifts of the small globular protein ubiquitin, demonstrating that BPT calculations can match the results obtained at the DFT level of theory at very low computational cost. In addition to the calculation of chemical shift tensors, BPT allows the calculation of chemical shift gradients and consequently chemical shift driven geometry optimizations. We applied chemical shift driven protein structure refinement to the conformational analysis of a set of Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness) tryparedoxin peroxidase Px III structures. We found that the interaction of Px III with its reaction partner Tpx seems to be governed by conformational selection rather than by induced fit.

  7. Chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry studies of the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins and receptors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskins, William E.; Leavell, Michael D.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr

    2005-03-01

    Membrane proteins make up a diverse and important subset of proteins for which structural information is limited. In this study, chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry were used to explore the structure of the G-protein-coupled photoreceptor bovine rhodopsin in the dark-state conformation. All experiments were performed in rod outer segment membranes using amino acid 'handles' in the native protein sequence and thus minimizing perturbations to the native protein structure. Cysteine and lysine residues were covalently cross-linked using commercially available reagents with a range of linker arm lengths. Following chemical digestion of cross-linked protein, cross-linked peptides were identified by accurate mass measurement using liquid chromatography-fourier transform mass spectrometry and an automated data analysis pipeline. Assignments were confirmed and, if necessary, resolved, by tandem MS. The relative reactivity of lysine residues participating in cross-links was evaluated by labeling with NHS-esters. A distinct pattern of cross-link formation within the C-terminal domain, and between loop I and the C-terminal domain, emerged. Theoretical distances based on cross-linking were compared to inter-atomic distances determined from the energy-minimized X-ray crystal structure and Monte Carlo conformational search procedures. In general, the observed cross-links can be explained by re-positioning participating side-chains without significantly altering backbone structure. One exception, between C3 16 and K325, requires backbone motion to bring the reactive atoms into sufficient proximity for cross-linking. Evidence from other studies suggests that residues around K325 for a region of high backbone mobility. These findings show that cross-linking studies can provide insight into the structural dynamics of membrane proteins in their native environment.

  8. Effect of Chemical Environment and pH on AC Corrosion of Cathodically Protected Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker-Holst, Andreas; Vendelbo Nielsen, Lars; Møller, Per

    2017-01-01

    AC corrosion of structures under cathodic protection (CP) is a major concern for pipelines in case of even minor AC perturbations. There are indications that the specific chemical environment has a large influence on the AC mitigation current density criteria outlined in EN 15280:2013 [1...... are observed as well as calcium hydroxides at high cathodic protection levels. This indicates a highly alkaline (pH > 11) environment locally. Corrosion rates at different cathodic potentials are measured using electrical resistance (ER) probes and a chemical and phase analysis of the calcareous deposits...... and corrosion products is made using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The findings suggest an AC corrosion mechanism highly dependent on the build-up and break-down of calcareous deposits at high CP, which is clearly reflected...

  9. Structure and chemical characteristics of natural mineral deposit Terbunskaya (Lipetsk region, Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyleva, S., E-mail: motyleva-svetlana@mail.ru; Mertvishcheva, M. [All-Russian Horticular Institute for Breeding, Agrotechnology and Nursery Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Moskow (Russian Federation); Shchuchka, R.; Gulidova, V. [Yelets state university named after I. A. Bunin, Yelets (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-22

    New knowledge about the mineralogical features Terbunsky mineral. Investigated 5 fractions isolated from the incision (2-2,5 m). Terbunskaya deposit belongs to minerals Santonian age. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of fractions isolated studied in detail. In the coarse fractions found ancient organic remains of algae and micro-organisms that have been sedimented together with the mineral component during geological periods. The share of organic inclusions does not exceed 1.5%. Chemical composition confirms the presence of silicon and carbonate organisms. Advantageously proportion of minerals having a layered structure with a plurality of micro and nano pore size 600 - 80-nm and an average chemical composition (wt%): Na (0,64), Mg (0,54), Al (13.48), Si (27 57), K (2.39) Ca (0.75)

  10. Innovative Strategies to Develop Chemical Categories Using a Combination of Structural and Toxicological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Batke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 1.AbstractInterest is increasing in the development of non-animal methods for toxicological evaluations. These methods are however, particularly challenging for complex toxicological endpoints such as repeated dose toxicity. European Legislation, e.g. the European Union´s Cosmetic Directive and REACH, demands the use of alternative methods. Frameworks, such as the Read-across Assessment Framework or the Adverse Outcome Pathway Knowledge Base, support the development of these methods. The aim of the project presented in this publication was to develop substance categories for a read-across with complex endpoints of toxicity based on existing databases. The basic conceptual approach was to combine structural similarity with shared mechanisms of action. Substances with similar chemical structure and toxicological profile form candidate categories suitable for read-across. We combined two databases on repeated dose toxicity, RepDose database and ELINCS database to form a common database for the identification of categories. The resulting database contained physicochemical, structural and toxicological data, which were refined and curated for cluster analyses. We applied the Predictive Clustering Tree (PCT approach for clustering chemicals based on structural and on toxicological information to detect groups of chemicals with similar toxic profiles and pathways/mechanisms of toxicity. As many of the experimental toxicity values were not available, this data was imputed by predicting them with a multi-label classification method, prior to clustering. The clustering results were evaluated by assessing chemical and toxicological similarities with the aim of identifying clusters with a concordance between structural information and toxicity profiles/mechanisms. From these chosen clusters, seven were selected for a quantitative read-across, based on a small ratio of NOAEL of the members with the highest and the lowest NOAEL in the cluster (<5. We discuss

  11. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xingyu; Guo, Xianglin; Liu, Guangcan; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-17

    While current block diagonal constrained subspace clustering methods are performed explicitly on the original data space, in practice it is often more desirable to embed the block diagonal prior into the reproducing kernel Hilbert feature space by kernelization techniques, as the underlying data structure in reality is usually nonlinear. However, it is still unknown how to carry out the embedding and kernelization in the models with block diagonal constraints. In this work, we shall take a step in this direction. First, we establish a novel model termed Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation (IBDLR), by incorporating the implicit feature representation and block diagonal prior into the prevalent Low-Rank Representation (LRR) method. Second, mostly important, we show that the model in IBDLR could be kernelized by making use of a smoothed dual representation and the specifics of a proximal gradient based optimization algorithm. Finally, we provide some theoretical analyses for the convergence of our optimization algorithm. Comprehensive experiments on synthetic and realworld datasets demonstrate the superiorities of our IBDLR over state-of-the-art methods.While current block diagonal constrained subspace clustering methods are performed explicitly on the original data space, in practice it is often more desirable to embed the block diagonal prior into the reproducing kernel Hilbert feature space by kernelization techniques, as the underlying data structure in reality is usually nonlinear. However, it is still unknown how to carry out the embedding and kernelization in the models with block diagonal constraints. In this work, we shall take a step in this direction. First, we establish a novel model termed Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation (IBDLR), by incorporating the implicit feature representation and block diagonal prior into the prevalent Low-Rank Representation (LRR) method. Second, mostly important, we show that the model in IBDLR could be

  13. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Aguilera, N. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica Medica, Instituto Estatal de Cancerologia ' Dr. Arturo Beltran Ortega' , Acapulco, Guerrero (Mexico); Torres-Garcia, E., E-mail: etorresg@uaemex.m [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR ({sup 137}Cs) and HDR ({sup 192}Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 192}Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2x2x3 mm{sup 3}. Four materials were considered in the VP-air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of {sup 192}Ir is more irregular than that of {sup 137}Cs but spatially better defined.

  14. Nanometer-resolved chemical analyses of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirner, Sabrina V.; Wirth, Thomas; Sturm, Heinz; Krüger, Jörg; Bonse, Jörn

    2017-09-01

    The chemical characteristics of two different types of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), so-called high and low spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL and LSFL), formed upon irradiation of titanium surfaces by multiple femtosecond laser pulses in air (30 fs, 790 nm, 1 kHz), are analyzed by various optical and electron beam based surface analytical techniques, including micro-Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The latter method was employed in a high-resolution mode being capable of spatially resolving even the smallest HSFL structures featuring spatial periods below 100 nm. In combination with an ion sputtering technique, depths-resolved chemical information of superficial oxidation processes was obtained, revealing characteristic differences between the two different types of LIPSS. Our results indicate that a few tens of nanometer shallow HSFL are formed on top of a ˜150 nm thick graded superficial oxide layer without sharp interfaces, consisting of amorphous TiO2 and partially crystallized Ti2O3. The larger LSFL structures with periods close to the irradiation wavelength originate from the laser-interaction with metallic titanium. They are covered by a ˜200 nm thick amorphous oxide layer, which consists mainly of TiO2 (at the surface) and other titanium oxide species of lower oxidation states underneath.

  15. Optimization of chemical structure of Schottky-type selection diode for crossbar resistive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Jeon, Woojin; Song, Seul Ji; Seok, Jun Yeong; Yoon, Jung Ho; Yoon, Kyung Jean; Park, Tae Joo; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2012-10-24

    The electrical performances of Pt/TiO(2)/Ti/Pt stacked Schottky-type diode (SD) was systematically examined, and this performance is dependent on the chemical structures of the each layer and their interfaces. The Ti layers containing a tolerable amount of oxygen showed metallic electrical conduction characteristics, which was confirmed by sheet resistance measurement with elevating the temperature, transmission line measurement (TLM), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis. However, the chemical structure of SD stack and resulting electrical properties were crucially affected by the dissolved oxygen concentration in the Ti layers. The lower oxidation potential of the Ti layer with initially higher oxygen concentration suppressed the oxygen deficiency of the overlying TiO(2) layer induced by consumption of the oxygen from TiO(2) layer. This structure results in the lower reverse current of SDs without significant degradation of forward-state current. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) analysis showed the current conduction through the local conduction paths in the presented SDs, which guarantees a sufficient forward-current density as a selection device for highly integrated crossbar array resistive memory.

  16. Sensing signatures mediated by chemical structure of molecular solids in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2015-03-03

    Laser ablation of organic compounds has been investigated for almost 30 years now, either in the framework of pulse laser deposition for the assembling of new materials or in the context of chemical sensing. Various monitoring techniques such as atomic and molecular fluorescence, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectroscopy have been used for plasma diagnostics in an attempt to understand the spectral signature and potential origin of gas-phase ions and fragments from organic plasmas. Photochemical and photophysical processes occurring within these systems are generally much more complex than those suggested by observation of optical emission features. Together with laser ablation parameters, the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules seem to be closely tied to the observed phenomena. The present manuscript, for the first time, discusses the role of molecular structure in the optical emission of organic plasmas. Factors altering the electronic distribution within the organic molecule have been found to have a direct impact on its ensuing optical emissions. The electron structure of an organic molecule, resulting from the presence, nature, and position of its atoms, governs the breakage of the molecule and, as a result, determines the extent of atomization and fragmentation that has proved to directly impact the emissions of CN radicals and C2 dimers. Particular properties of the molecule respond more positively depending on the laser irradiation wavelength, thereby redirecting the ablation process through photochemical or photothermal decomposition pathways. It is of paramount significance for chemical identification purposes how, despite the large energy stored and dissipated by the plasma and the considerable number of transient species formed, the emissions observed never lose sight of the original molecule.

  17. Ocean acidification affects marine chemical communication by changing structure and function of peptide signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggatz, Christina C; Lorch, Mark; Hardege, Jörg D; Benoit, David M

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification is a global challenge that faces marine organisms in the near future with a predicted rapid drop in pH of up to 0.4 units by the end of this century. Effects of the change in ocean carbon chemistry and pH on the development, growth and fitness of marine animals are well documented. Recent evidence also suggests that a range of chemically mediated behaviours and interactions in marine fish and invertebrates will be affected. Marine animals use chemical cues, for example, to detect predators, for settlement, homing and reproduction. But, while effects of high CO2 conditions on these behaviours are described across many species, little is known about the underlying mechanisms, particularly in invertebrates. Here, we investigate the direct influence of future oceanic pH conditions on the structure and function of three peptide signalling molecules with an interdisciplinary combination of methods. NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations were used to assess the direct molecular influence of pH on the peptide cues, and we tested the functionality of the cues in different pH conditions using behavioural bioassays with shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) as a model system. We found that peptide signalling cues are susceptible to protonation in future pH conditions, which will alter their overall charge. We also show that structure and electrostatic properties important for receptor binding differ significantly between the peptide forms present today and the protonated signalling peptides likely to be dominating in future oceans. The bioassays suggest an impaired functionality of the signalling peptides at low pH. Physiological changes due to high CO2 conditions were found to play a less significant role in influencing the investigated behaviour. From our results, we conclude that the change of charge, structure and consequently function of signalling molecules presents one possible mechanism to explain altered behaviour under future oceanic p

  18. Chemical and structural properties of polymorphous silicon thin films grown from dichlorosilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Macías, C.; Monroy, B.M.; Huerta, L.; Canseco-Martínez, M.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Picquart, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, A.P. 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, J. [Departamento de Física, CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, C.P. 07000 México, D.F. (Mexico); Sánchez, M.F. García [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria en Ingeniería y Tecnologías Avanzadas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. I.P.N. 2580, Gustavo A. Madero, 07340 México .D.F. (Mexico); Santana, G., E-mail: gsantana@iim.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    We have examined the effects of hydrogen dilution (R{sub H}) and deposition pressure on the morphological, structural and chemical properties of polymorphous silicon thin films (pm-Si:H), using dichlorosilane as silicon precursor in the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The use of silicon chlorinated precursors enhances the crystallization process in as grown pm-Si:H samples, obtaining crystalline fractions from Raman spectra in the range of 65–95%. Atomic Force Microscopy results show the morphological differences obtained when the chlorine chemistry dominates the growth process and when the plasma–surface interactions become more prominent. Augmenting R{sub H} causes a considerable reduction in both roughness and topography, demonstrating an enhancement of ion bombardment and attack of the growing surface. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy results show that, after ambient exposure, there is low concentration of oxygen inside the films grown at low R{sub H}, present in the form of Si-O, which can be considered as structural defects. Instead, oxidation increases with deposition pressure and dilution, along with film porosity, generating a secondary SiO{sub x} phase. For higher pressure and dilution, the amount of chlorine incorporated to the film decreases congruently with HCl chlorine extraction processes involving atomic hydrogen interactions with the surface. In all cases, weak silicon hydride (Si-H) bonds were not detected by infrared spectroscopy, while bonding configurations associated to the silicon nanocrystal surface were clearly observed. Since these films are generally used in photovoltaic devices, analyzing their chemical and structural properties such as oxygen incorporation to the films, along with chlorine and hydrogen, is fundamental in order to understand and optimize their electrical and optical properties.

  19. Soil microcosm for testing the effects of chemical pollutants on soil fauna communities and trophic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmelee, R.W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Entomology); Wentsel, R.S.; Phillips, C.T.; Checkai, R.T. (Army CRDEC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)); Simini, M. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A microcosm technique is presented that uses community and trophic-level analysis of soil nematodes and microarthropods to determine the effects of chemicals on soil systems. Forest soil was treated with either copper, p-nitrophenol, or trinitrotoluene. Nematodes were sorted into bacterivore, fungivore, herbivore, and omnivore-predator trophic groups, and a hatchling category. Microarthropods were sorted to the acarine suborders Prostigmata, Mesostigmata, and Oribatida; the insectan order Collembola; and a miscellaneous group. Omnivore-predator nematodes and meso-stigmatid and oribatid mites were the groups most sensitive to copper and were significantly reduced at levels as low as 100 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Total nematode and microarthropod numbers declined above 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Trophic structure analysis suggested that high sensitivity of nematode predators to intermediate levels of copper reduced predation on herbivore nematodes and resulted in greater numbers of nematodes compared to controls. p-Nitrophenol was very toxic to the nematode community, and all trophic groups were significantly reduced above 20 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. However, there was no effect of p-nitrophenol on microarthropods. Trinitrotoluene had no significant negative effect on total abundance of either groups of soil fauna, but oribatids were significantly reduced at 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. The results demonstrated that soil nematodes and microarthropods were sensitive indicators of environmental contaminants and that trophic-structure and community analysis has the potential to detect more subtle indirect effects of chemicals on soil food-web structure. The authors conclude that microcosms with field communities of soil microfauna offer high resolution of the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in complex soil systems.

  20. Pollen source effects on growth of kernel structures and embryo chemical compounds in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, W.; Mantese, A. I.; Maddonni, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies have reported effects of pollen source on the oil concentration of maize (Zea mays) kernels through modifications to both the embryo/kernel ratio and embryo oil concentration. The present study expands upon previous analyses by addressing pollen source effects on the growth of kernel structures (i.e. pericarp, endosperm and embryo), allocation of embryo chemical constituents (i.e. oil, protein, starch and soluble sugars), and the anatomy and histology of the embryos. Methods Maize kernels with different oil concentration were obtained from pollinations with two parental genotypes of contrasting oil concentration. The dynamics of the growth of kernel structures and allocation of embryo chemical constituents were analysed during the post-flowering period. Mature kernels were dissected to study the anatomy (embryonic axis and scutellum) and histology [cell number and cell size of the scutellums, presence of sub-cellular structures in scutellum tissue (starch granules, oil and protein bodies)] of the embryos. Key Results Plants of all crosses exhibited a similar kernel number and kernel weight. Pollen source modified neither the growth period of kernel structures, nor pericarp growth rate. By contrast, pollen source determined a trade-off between embryo and endosperm growth rates, which impacted on the embryo/kernel ratio of mature kernels. Modifications to the embryo size were mediated by scutellum cell number. Pollen source also affected (P < 0·01) allocation of embryo chemical compounds. Negative correlations among embryo oil concentration and those of starch (r = 0·98, P < 0·01) and soluble sugars (r = 0·95, P < 0·05) were found. Coincidently, embryos with low oil concentration had an increased (P < 0·05–0·10) scutellum cell area occupied by starch granules and fewer oil bodies. Conclusions The effects of pollen source on both embryo/kernel ratio and allocation of embryo chemicals seems to be related to the early

  1. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  2. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    A study analyzed the occupational structure and qualifications associated with the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the United Kingdom. The analysis included nine case studies based on interviews with firms in the chemicals and metals sectors. Information was gathered within an analytical framework that…

  3. Coulombic Interaction in Finnish Middle School Chemistry: A Systemic Perspective on Students' Conceptual Structure of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joki, Jarkko; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle; Aksela, Maija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel and holistic way to teach chemical bonding at the middle school level according to research on the teaching and learning of bonding. A further aim was to investigate high achieving middle school students' conceptual structures concerning chemical bonding by using a systemic perspective. Students in one…

  4. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  5. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  6. Synthesis, structure, chemical doping and high pressure studies of the SrPt3 P with unique structure features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawdat, Benmaan; Lv, Bing; Zhu, Xiyu; Xue, Yuyi; Chu, Ching

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity up to 8.4K was reported by Takayama et al.[3] in APt3P (A =Sr, Ca and La) in 2012 with structural information based only on X-ray powder refinement. The compounds are suggested to crystallize in an antiperovskite-based structure closely related to that of the heavy fermion superconductor CePt3Si but are nonpolar unlike CePt3Si. Both small single crystals and polycrystalline samples of SrPt3P, the compound with the highest Tc of this class of materials, are synthesized through solid state reactions. In this presentation, full and detailed structural information will be revealed based on X-ray single crystal analysis. Different chemical doping on different sites and high pressure studies have been carried out on the compound of SrPt3P. The results and its implication will be presented and discussed. Research at Houston is supported in part by US AFOSR, the State of Texas, T.L.L. Temple Foundation and John and Rebecca Moores Endowment.

  7. Structural and Chemical Characterization of Silica Spheres before and after Modification by Silanization for Trypsin Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo F. Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, silica particles of a variety of sizes and shapes have been characterized and chemically modified for several applications, from chromatographic separation to dental supplies. The present study proposes the use of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTS silanized silica particles to immobilize the proteolytic enzyme trypsin for the development of a bioreactor. The major advantage of the process is that it enables the polypeptides hydrolysis interruption simply by removing the silica particles from the reaction bottle. Silanized silica surfaces showed significant morphological changes at micro- and nanoscale level. Chemical characterization showed changes in elemental composition, chemical environment, and thermal degradation. Their application as supports for trypsin immobilization showed high immobilization efficiency at reduced immobilization times, combined with more acidic conditions. Indirect immobilization quantification by reversed-phase ultrafast high performance liquid chromatography proved to be a suitable approach due to its high linearity and sensitivity. Immobilized trypsin activities on nonmodified and silanized silica showed promising features (e.g., selective hydrolysis for applications in proteins/peptides primary structure elucidation for proteomics. Silanized silica system produced some preferential targeting peptides, probably due to the hydrophobicity of the nanoenvironment conditioned by silanization.

  8. Structure and Properties of Hydrophobic Aggregation Hydrogel with Chemical Sensitive Switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiufang Duan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels with chemical sensitive switch have control release properties in special environments. A series of polyacrylamide-octadecyl methacrylate hydrogels crosslinked by N,N′-bis (acryloyl cystamine were synthesized as potential chemical sensitive system. When this hydrogel encounters dithiothreitol it can change its quality. The properties of the hydrogels were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle, and scanning electron microscopy. The water absorption of the hydrogel has the maximum value of 475%, when the content of octadecyl methacrylate is 5 wt%. The amount of weight loss was changed from 34.6% to 17.2%, as the content of octadecyl methacrylate increased from 3 wt% to 9.4 wt%. At the same time, the stress of the hydrogel decreased from 67.01% to 47.61%; the strength of the hydrogel reaches to the maximum 0.367 Mpa at 7 wt% octadecyl methacrylate. The increasing content of octadecyl methacrylate from 3 wt% to 9.4 wt% can enhance the hydrophobicity of the hydrogel; the contact angle of water to hydrogel changed from 14.10° to 19.62°. This hydrogel has the porous structure which permits loading of oils into the gel matrix. The functionalities of the hydrogel make it have more widely potential applications in chemical sensitive response materials.

  9. Structure activity studies of an analgesic drug tapentadol hydrochloride by spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Tapentadol is a novel opioid pain reliever drug with a dual mechanism of action, having potency between morphine and tramadol. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for tapentadol hydrochloride (TAP.Cl) to determine the properties. The geometry is optimised and the structural properties of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the solid phase in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Frontier molecular orbital energies, LUMO-HOMO energy gap, ionisation potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness and chemical potential are also calculated. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalisation has been analysed using NBO analysis. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule are analysed.

  10. Structural and chemical diagnosis of magnetic multilayers by RAFS and XRF techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mai, Z H; Liu, C X; Li, M H; Jiang, H W; Lai, W Y; Wang, J; Ding, Y F; Hase, T P A; Fulthorpe, B D; Tanner, B K

    2003-01-01

    Elemental distribution of Ni, Mn and Co at the NiMn/Co and Co/NiMn interfaces of ultra-thin NiMn/Co multilayers and that of Bi in the Cu/NiFe/Bi/FeMn/Cu multilayers have been investigated by X-ray reflection anomalous fine structure (RAFS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) methods. For the as-grown sample of the NiMn/Co multilayers, a chemical intermixing region with the chemical component varying gradually from Co to CoMn is observed at the Co/NiMn interface, but not at the NiMn/Co interface. After annealing at 250 deg. C for 3, 10 and 20 h respectively, this gradual chemical component variation also appears at the NiMn/Co interface. For the Cu/NiFe/Bi/FeMn/Cu multilayers, the depth distributions of the Bi atoms of the samples with different thicknesses of Bi layer are obtained. The results show that the diffuse ability of Bi is strongly dependent on the thickness of the Bi layer.

  11. Local electronic structure and photoelectrochemical activity of partial chemically etched Ti-doped hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioult, Maxime; Belkhou, Rachid; Magnan, Hélène; Stanescu, Dana; Stanescu, Stefan; Maccherozzi, Francesco; Rountree, Cindy; Barbier, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The direct conversion of solar light into chemical energy or fuel through photoelectrochemical water splitting is promising as a clean hydrogen production solution. Ti-doped hematite (Ti:α-Fe2O3) is a potential key photoanode material, which despite its optimal band gap, excellent chemical stability, abundance, non-toxicity and low cost, still has to be improved. Here we give evidence of a drastic improvement of the water splitting performances of Ti-doped hematite photoanodes upon a HCl wet-etching. In addition to the topography investigation by atomic force microscopy, a detailed determination of the local electronic structure has been carried out in order to understand the phenomenon and to provide new insights in the understanding of solar water splitting. Using synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), we investigated the X-ray absorption spectral features at the L3 Fe edge of the as grown surface and of the wet-etched surface on the very same sample thanks to patterning. We show that HCl wet etching leads to substantial surface modifications of the oxide layer including increased roughness and chemical reduction (presence of Fe2 +) without changing the band gap. We demonstrate that these changes are profitable and correlated to the drastic changes of the photocatalytic activity.

  12. Ranking of phenols for abiotic oxidation in aqueous environment: a QSPR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Pilutti, Pamela; Papa, Ester

    2005-01-01

    The limited availability and variability of data related to the overall degradation of compounds in the environment is a very relevant issue in studies related to environmental fate and chemical behavior. The studied phenol data set consists of reaction rate constants of different oxidation reactions in surface waters, available either experimentally or, to fill the data gap, from our QSAR models reported herein. A PCA (Principal Component Analysis) model based on these oxidative degradations has been proposed to evaluate the degradability of chemicals. The score of the first Principal Component is modelled by theoretical molecular descriptors to obtain a multiple linear regression (MLR) model with high predictive power, both internally and externally validated. This modeling approach allows a fast and preliminary ranking of phenols according to their tendency to be degraded by oxidants in water, starting only from knowledge of their molecular structure.

  13. Structuring of DLC:Ag nanocomposite thin films employing plasma chemical etching and ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas, E-mail: Tomas.Tamulevicius@ktu.lt; Tamulevičienė, Asta; Virganavičius, Dainius; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Kopustinskas, Vitoldas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} dry etching of DLC:Ag films revealed the embedded Ag nanoparticles. • Plasma processed samples with more than 5 at.% Ag demonstrated Ostwald ripening. • 4 μm period patterns in aluminum and photoresist were imposed in the DLC:Ag film. • Different micro patterns are formed depending on the selected processing route. - Abstract: We analyze structuring effects of diamond like carbon based silver nanocomposite (DLC:Ag) thin films by CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} plasma chemical etching and Ar{sup +} sputtering. DLC:Ag films were deposited employing unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target with Ar{sup +} in C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas atmosphere. Films with different silver content (0.6–12.9 at.%) were analyzed. The films (as deposited and exposed to plasma chemical etching) were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDS), optical microscopy, ultraviolet–visible light (UV–VIS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After deposition, the films were plasma chemically etched in CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} mixture plasma for 2–6 min. It is shown that optical properties of thin films and silver nano particle size distribution can be tailored during deposition changing the magnetron current and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/Ar ratio or during following plasma chemical etching. The plasma etching enabled to reveal the silver filler particle size distribution and to control silver content on the surface that was found to be dependent on Ostwald ripening process of silver nano-clusters. Employing contact lithography and 4 μm period mask in photoresist or aluminum the films were patterned employing CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} mixture plasma chemical etching, direct Ar{sup +} sputtering or combined etching processes. It is shown that different processing recipes result in different final grating structures. Selective carbon etching in CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} gas mixture with

  14. Effects of low energy ions on the optical, structural and chemical properties of polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveesha P., M.; Nabhiraj P., Y.; Menon, Ranjini; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2017-05-01

    Low energy Argon (Ar+) and Hydrogen (H+) ions were made to fall on the surface of Polycarbonate (PC) films. The depth profile calculations of ions on the material were carried out using Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM-2008) code. The influence of bombarded ions with regard to the optical, structural and chemical properties was studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The obtained results from UV-Visible study show a slight shift in the absorption edge towards higher wavelength region. The optical band gap found to be decreased after irradiation. XRD analysis showed minor changes in the structural parameters. The obtained FTIR spectra show reduction in the intensity of vibration bands for irradiated samples.

  15. Structural, chemical and deformation changes in friction welded joint of dissimilar steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ratković

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental principles of friction welding of dissimilar steels (high speed and tempering steel from the aspect of metallurgical and chemical processes occurring in the joint zone are presented in this paper. Considering that phenomena accompanying the friction welding are interdependent, it was necessary to experimentally determine the process variable parameters, to establish the optimal welding regime. The experiments were set and realized so that all the variables were analyzed as a function of the friction time. The metallographic investigations included analysis of the joint zone microstructure through structural phases and hardness changes, due to influence of the heat treatment - annealing. The experimental work included analysis of the geometry changes, the joint zone structure and the basic mechanical characteristics of the joint realized by the friction welding.

  16. A systematic study of the chemical etching process on periodically poled lithium niobate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argiolas, N. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bazzan, M. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bernardi, A. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Cattaruzza, E. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mazzoldi, P. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Schiavuta, P. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Sada, C. [INFM-MATIS and Physics Department, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: sada@padova.infm.it; Hangen, U. [Surface, Rheinstr. 7, D-41836 Hueckelhoven (Germany)

    2005-04-25

    A systematic analysis on the dynamics of the chemical etching of periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) structures grown by off-center Czochralski technique was carried out on crystals prepared under different experimental growth conditions. The etched depth reaches values close to 600 nm and it does not further increase even after long etching times. However, the lateral etching cannot be neglected when the etching times are higher than 5 min. The estimation of the domain widths distribution can be affected by artifacts if the etching conditions are not properly chosen. The best structures are obtained for erbium oxide doping level of 0.3 mol% into the starting melt and the period depends on the pulling and rotational rates instead of on the growing rate. This results support the role of the thermoelectric field in the domain formation at the Curie isotherm.

  17. Chemical Constituents from Flueggea virosa and the Structural Revision of Dehydrochebulic Acid Trimethyl Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hua Chao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to study the chemical constituents from the twigs and leaves of Flueggea virosa, a new terpenoid, 9(10→20-abeo-ent-podocarpane, 3β,10α-dihydroxy-12-methoxy-13- methyl-9(10→20-abeo-ent-podocarpa-6,8,11,13-tetraene (1, as well as five known compounds were characterized. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. In addition, the structure of dehydrochebulic acid trimethyl ester was revised as (2S,3R-4E-dehydrochebulic acid trimethyl ester based on a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. The in vitro anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV activity and cytotoxicity against Huh7.5 cells for the isolated compounds were evaluated.

  18. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  19. Methodology, Meaning and Usefulness of Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross

    2008-01-01

    University rankings are having a profound effect on both higher education systems and individual universities. In this paper we outline these effects, discuss the desirable characteristics of a good ranking methodology and document existing practice, with an emphasis on the two main international rankings (Shanghai Jiao Tong and THES-QS). We take…

  20. Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis-Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis -Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles” (FA9550-12-1-0204) Robert M. Rioux...report The results from “Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis -Induced...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0321 Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Robert Rioux PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report

  1. Student Practices, Learning, and Attitudes When Using Computerized Ranking Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M.; Prather, E. E.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    Ranking Tasks are a novel type of conceptual exercise based on a technique called rule assessment. Ranking Tasks present students with a series of four to eight icons that describe slightly different variations of a basic physical situation. Students are then asked to identify the order, or ranking, of the various situations based on some physical outcome or result. The structure of Ranking Tasks makes it difficult for students to rely strictly on memorized answers and mechanical substitution of formulae. In addition, by changing the presentation of the different scenarios (e.g., photographs, line diagrams, graphs, tables, etc.) we find that Ranking Tasks require students to develop mental schema that are more flexible and robust. Ranking tasks may be implemented on the computer which requires students to order the icons through drag-and-drop. Computer implementation allows the incorporation of background material, grading with feedback, and providing additional similar versions of the task through randomization so that students can build expertise through practice. This poster will summarize the results of a study of student usage of computerized ranking tasks. We will investigate 1) student practices (How do they make use of these tools?), 2) knowledge and skill building (Do student scores improve with iteration and are there diminishing returns?), and 3) student attitudes toward using computerized Ranking Tasks (Do they like using them?). This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  2. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  3. Electronic structure and chemical bond nature in Cs2NpO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data and results of theoretical calculations for the NpO2Cl4 (D4h cluster, the electronic structure and the chemical bond nature in , was done in the binding Cs2NpO2Cl4 single crystal, containing the neptunyl group NpO2 energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV. The filled Np 5f electronic states were established to form in the valence band of Cs2NpO2Cl4. This was attributed to the direct participation of the Np 5f electrons in the chemical bonding. The Np 6p electrons were shown to participate in formation of both the inner valence band (~15 eV-~35 eV and the outer valence band (0 eV-~15 eV. The filled Np 6p and the O 2s, Cl 3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contribution to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in Cs2NpO2Cl4, were established. For the first time the quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for the NpO2Cl4 cluster in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV, was built. This scheme reflects neptunium close environment in the studied compound and is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2NpO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2NpO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the NpO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the outer valence molecular orbitals contribution - 73 %, and the inner valence molecular orbitals contribution - 27 %.

  4. Effects of the implantation of Sn ions on W matrix's chemical state, crystal structure and hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Z. X.; Sun, J. Z.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y. M.

    2017-09-01

    Prior to the practical application of liquid metals as facing material for fusion reactor, the nature of the interaction layer between liquid metal and tungsten substrate should be studied deeply. In the present work, by means of ion implantation technique using a metal vapor vacuum arc source (MEVVA), Sn ions were injected into a W matrix and a W-Sn modified layer was prepared. The chemical state, crystal structure and nano-indentation hardness of the modified layer were investigated and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and a nano-indentor. The results indicate that, after the injection of Sn ions into the W matrix, Sn atoms interacted intensively with W, leading to the generation of a large number of point defects (such as vacancies and self-interstitial atoms) and the decrease of average grain size from 16.7 to 11.9 nm. Additionally, chemical shifts appeared, i.e., the binding energy values of W 4f7/2, W 4f5/2, W 5p3/2 and W 4p1/2 in the modified layer was reduced by 0.3 eV, 0.3 eV, 0.4 eV, 1-1.4 eV, respectively. The binding energy values of Sn 3d5/2 and Sn 3d3/2 decreased, with a chemical shift of 0.6-0.7 eV and 0.1-0.3 eV, respectively. The nano-indentation hardness of the modified layer was enhanced; specifically, when the indentation depth was 26.3 nm, the hardness reached a peak value of 13.8 GPa. In the modified layer, the surface chemical states are quite complex, mainly including SnO, WO3, SnO2 and WC.

  5. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  6. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  7. System-level responses of lake ecosystems to chemical stresses using exergy and structural exergy as ecological indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fu-Liu; Dawson, R W; Tao, Shu; Li, Ben-Gang; Cao, Jun

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the system-level responses of experimental lake ecosystems to three chemical stresses (acidification, copper and pesticide contamination) using exergy and structural exergy as ecological indicators. The results indicate that the doses or toxicity of the three chemical stressors contributed to changes in both exergy and structural exergy. Remarkable changes in exergy and structural exergy occurred under acidic conditions and in the presence of Dursban, 24D-DMA, permethrin, bifenthrin, Carbaryl, TCP, PCP, trichlorethylene, benzene, and high doses of Cu, oil, and hexazinone. This seemed to indicate that the subject ecosystems were seriously contaminated by these chemical stressors. For low doses of Cu, oil, atrazine, HCBP, and hexazinone, exergy and structural exergy were either unchanged or only slightly changed, suggesting that the lake ecosystems were not significantly impacted by these chemical stressors. Discussion of the relationships between ecosystem-level changes and structural and functional changes in stressed lake ecosystems indicates that the above-mentioned ecosystem-level changes were in accordance with the changes in structure and function. The observed changes in exergy and structural exergy were also consistent with Odum's predictions of shortened food chains, reduced resource use efficiency, poor stability, low information, and high entropy in stressed aquatic ecosystems. The findings lead the authors to conclude that it is feasible for exergy and structural exergy to serve as ecological indicators when characterizing the system-level responses of experimental lake ecosystems to chemical stress. These results for experimental lake ecosystems would be extrapolated to actual lakes.

  8. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Structural interpretation of chemically synthesized ZnO nanorod and its application in lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Samapti; Sain, Sumanta [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research and Education Centre, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Kar, Tanusree [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032, West Bengal (India); Gunawardhana, Nanda, E-mail: nandagunawardhana@pdn.ac.lk [International Research Centre, Senate Building, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400 (Sri Lanka); Pradhan, Swapan Kumar, E-mail: skpradhan@phys.buruniv.ac.in [Materials Science Division, Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag, Burdwan 713104, West Bengal (India)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ZnO nanorods are synthesized at room temperature via a simple chemical route. • Growth direction of ZnO nanorods has been determined along 〈0 0 2〉. • ZnO nanorods constructed anode shows a high discharge capacity in first cycle. • It retains good reversible capacity compared to other ZnO morphologies. - Abstract: ZnO nanorods are synthesized at room temperature via a simple chemical route without using any template or capping agent and its importance is evaluated as a suitable candidate for anode material in lithium ion battery. Structural and microstructure characterizations of these nanorods are made by analyzing the X-ray diffraction data employing the Rietveld method of powder structure refinement. It reveals that the ZnO nanorods are grown up with a preferred orientation and elongated along 〈0 0 2〉. FESEM images reveal that these uniform cylindrical shaped nanorods are of different lengths and diameters. These synthesized ZnO nanorods are tested as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The nano grain size of the ZnO rods results in less volume expansion and/or contraction during the alloying/de-alloying process and causes in good cyclability. In addition, synthesized ZnO nanorods deliver high charge/discharge capacities compared to other reported ZnO materials.

  10. The chemical, physical and structural properties of estuarine ice in Great Bay, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, D.A.; Gow, A.J.; Mayewski, P.A.; Ficklin, W.; Loder, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide general information on the chemical, physical and structural properties of estuarine ice and show how it compares with sea ice found at higher latitudes in order to determine whether the ice in Great Bay can be used as an analog in the study of arctic sea ice. Ice cores and water samples were collected during the 1983-1984 winter season at Adams Point in Great Bay, New Hampshire. Concentrations of chloride, nitrogen (as nitrate and nitrite), bromide, phosphate, sulfate and silicate were determined for samples chosen on the basis of identifiable stratigraphic layers (i.e. bubble size and shape, sediment layers, etc.). Similarities between ice formation in Great Bay and those in the arctic regions include the nature of the freezing process and the ice types produced. In addition, the distribution and concentration of chemical constituents were found to be similar to those observed in arctic sea ice. Factors affecting the chemistry of the ice in Great Bay include rainfall during the freezing season, the presence of sediment layers in the ice cores, the nature of incorporation of brine into the crystal structure of the ice and the drainage of brine. ?? 1987.

  11. Chemical and electronic structure imaging of graphene on Cu: a NanoARPES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-05-01

    Electronic structure, which describes the distribution of electronic states in reciprocal space, is one of the most fundamental concepts in condensed matter physics, since it determines the electrical, optical and magnetic behaviours of materials. Graphene has great promise for both fundamental physics and future applications. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is currently the dominant technology for its scaled growth on metal foils. The polycrystalline nature of metal foil makes NanoARPES, one energy-momentum dispersion probe with spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers, a unique tool to study the intrinsic electronic structure of polycrystalline graphene films. In this topical review, we present the latest NanoARPES studies on graphene grains and films grown on copper foil by CVD. The comprehensive chemical and electronic images probed by NanoARPES provide deep insight about graphene and point out potential ways to functionalize graphene properties. This knowledge may stimulate us to look into the future of this field from both the material synthesis and the instrumental characterisation.

  12. Effect of oxygen ion irradiation on dielectric, structural, chemical and thermoluminescence properties of natural muscovite mica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhnandan; Singh, Surinder; Singh, Lakhwant

    2017-03-01

    Thin cleaved samples (~18µm) of natural muscovite mica were irradiated with 80MeV oxygen ion beam at fluence ranging from 1×1012 to 5×1013ion/cm2. The alterations in dielectric, structural, chemical and thermoluminescence properties of irradiated as well as pristine samples have been investigated. Dielectric constant decreases while other dielectric parameters such as dielectric loss, tanδ, ac conductivity, real and imaginary parts of electric modulus increase with increase of ion fluence. Williamson Hall investigation has been utilized to ascertain crystallite size and micro strain of pristine and irradiated samples. The XRD analysis revealed a significant increase in micro strain and dislocation density with an increase of ion fluence. The variations in dielectric properties upon irradiation are collaborated with structural modifications in the muscovite. No appreciable changes in characteristic bands (FTIR) have been observed after irradiation, indicating that natural muscovite mica is chemically stable. Natural muscovite mica has eminent applications in heavy ions dosimetry due to observation of well defined single peak at 303°C with activation energy of 1.24eV in TL spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  14. Interactions between structural and chemical biomimetism in synthetic stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Michele M; Raimondi, Manuela T; Credi, Caterina; De Marco, Carmela; Turri, Stefano; Cerullo, Giulio; Osellame, Roberto

    2015-01-16

    Advancements in understanding stem cell functions and differentiation are of key importance for the clinical success of stem-cell-based therapies. 3D structural niches fabricated by two-photon polymerization are a powerful platform for controlling stem cell growth and differentiation. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of further controlling stem cell fate by tuning the mechanical properties of such niches through coating with thin layers of biomimetic hyaluronan-based and gelatin-based hydrogels. We first assess the biocompatibility of chemical coatings and then study the interactions between structural and chemical biomimetism on the response of MSCs in terms of proliferation and differentiation. We observed a clear effect of the hydrogel coating on otherwise identical 3D scaffolds. In particular, in gelatin-coated niches we observed a stronger metabolic activity and commitment toward the osteo-chondral lineage with respect to hyaluronan-coated niches. Conversely, a reduction in the homing effect was observed in all the coated niches, especially in gelatin-coated niches. This study demonstrates the feasibility of controlling independently different mechanical cues, in bioengineered stem cell niches, i.e. the 3D scaffold geometry and the surface stiffness. This will allow, on the one hand, understanding their specific role in stem cell proliferation and differentiation and, on the other hand, finely tuning their synergistic effect.

  15. Anti-infectious drug repurposing using an integrated chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Clara; Hauptman, Ruth; Zhang, Yinliang; Bourne, Philip E; Xie, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug and extensive drug resistance of microbes to antibiotics poses a great threat to human health. Although drug repurposing is a promising solution for accelerating the drug development process, its application to anti-infectious drug discovery is limited by the scope of existing phenotype-, ligand-, or target-based methods. In this paper we introduce a new computational strategy to determine the genome-wide molecular targets of bioactive compounds in both human and bacterial genomes. Our method is based on the use of a novel algorithm, ligand Enrichment of Network Topological Similarity (ligENTS), to map the chemical universe to its global pharmacological space. ligENTS outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in identifying novel drug-target relationships. Furthermore, we integrate ligENTS with our structural systems biology platform to identify drug repurposing opportunities via target similarity profiling. Using this integrated strategy, we have identified novel P. falciparum targets of drug-like active compounds from the Malaria Box, and suggest that a number of approved drugs may be active against malaria. This study demonstrates the potential of an integrative chemical genomics and structural systems biology approach to drug repurposing.

  16. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2017-11-28

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  17. Biomimetic hydrophobic surface fabricated by chemical etching method from hierarchically structured magnesium alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jijia [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China); Wang, Yaming [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Han, Zhiwu, E-mail: zwhan@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China); Ren, Luquan [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-09-01

    As one of the lightest metal materials, magnesium alloy plays an important role in industry such as automobile, airplane and electronic product. However, magnesium alloy is hindered due to its high chemical activity and easily corroded. Here, inspired by typical plant surfaces such as lotus leaves and petals of red rose with super-hydrophobic character, the new hydrophobic surface is fabricated on magnesium alloy to improve anti-corrosion by two-step methodology. The procedure is that the samples are processed by laser first and then immersed and etched in the aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution concentrations of 0.1 mol/L, 0.3 mol/L and 0.5 mol/L for different times of 15 s, 40 s and 60 s, respectively, finally modified by DTS (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}Si(OCH{sub 3}){sub 3}). The microstructure, chemical composition, wettability and anti-corrosion are characterized by means of SEM, XPS, water contact angle measurement and electrochemical method. The hydrophobic surfaces with microscale crater-like and nanoscale flower-like binary structure are obtained. The low-energy material is contained in surface after DTS treatment. The contact angles could reach up to 138.4 ± 2°, which hydrophobic property is both related to the micro–nano binary structure and chemical composition. The results of electrochemical measurements show that anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy is improved. Furthermore, our research is expected to create some ideas from natural enlightenment to improve anti-corrosion property of magnesium alloy while this method can be easily extended to other metal materials.

  18. An Improved Approach to the PageRank Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a partition of the web pages particularly suited to the PageRank problems in which the web link graph has a nested block structure. Based on the partition of the web pages, dangling nodes, common nodes, and general nodes, the hyperlink matrix can be reordered to be a more simple block structure. Then based on the parallel computation method, we propose an algorithm for the PageRank problems. In this algorithm, the dimension of the linear system becomes smaller, and the vector for general nodes in each block can be calculated separately in every iteration. Numerical experiments show that this approach speeds up the computation of PageRank.

  19. Upgrading Electrical, Mechanical, and Chemical Properties of CNTs/Polybond® Nanocomposites: Pursuit of Electroconductive Structural Polymer Nanocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sarfraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconductive structural polymer-based nanocomposites (NCs were prepared by incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs into Polybond (PB matrix via melt compounding technique. Chemical structure of NCs, investigated via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, corroborated successful grafting of CNTs functional groups onto PB chains. The morphology of NCs, as examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, ensured their optimum state of dispersion. Electrical conductivity, melting transition temperatures, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of NCs were improved by incorporating CNTs into PB as established by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, high resistance meter (HRM, Universal Testing Machine (UTM, and chemical resistivity measurements, respectively.

  20. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Martínez-Santiago

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms. It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms.

  1. Structural and dynamical properties of water on chemically modified surfaces: The role of the instantaneous surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    Surfaces of polymers such as atactic polystyrene (aPS) represent very good model systems for amorphous material surfaces. Such polymer surfaces are usually modified either chemically or physically for a wide range of applications that include friction, lubrication and adhesion. It is thus quite important to understand the structural and dynamical properties of liquids that come in contact with them to achieve the desired functional properties. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water molecules in a slab of water in contact with atactic polystyrene surfaces of varying polarity. We find that the density of water molecules and the number distribution of hydrogen bonds as a function of distance relative to an instantaneous surface exhibit a structure indicative of a layering of water molecules near the water/PS interface. For the dynamics, we use time correlation functions of hydrogen bonds and the incoherent structure function for the water molecules. Our results indicate that the polarity of the surface dramatically affects the dynamics of the interfacial water molecules with the dynamics slowing down with increasing polarity. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR1410290.

  2. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Chemical-Bonding Analysis of BaZn(NCN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Corkett

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The ternary carbodiimide BaZn(NCN2 was prepared by a solid-state metathesis reaction between BaF2, ZnF2, and Li2NCN in a 1:1:2 molar ratio, and its crystal structure was determined from Rietveld refinement of X-ray data. BaZn(NCN2 represents the aristotype of the LiBa2Al(NCN4 structure which is unique to carbodiimide/cyanamide chemistry and is well regarded as being constructed from ZnN4 tetrahedra, sharing edges and vertices through NCN2− units to form corrugated layers with Ba2+ in the interlayer voids. Structural anomalies in the shape of the cyanamide units are addressed via IR spectrometry and DFT calculations, which suggest the presence of slightly bent N=C=N2− carbodiimide units with C2v symmetry. Moreover, chemical-bonding analysis within the framework of crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP reveals striking similarities between the bonding interactions in BaZn(NCN2 and SrZn(NCN2 despite their contrasting crystal structures. BaZn(NCN2 is only the second example of a ternary post-transition metal carbodiimide, and its realization paves the way for the preparation of analogues featuring divalent transition metals at the tetrahedral Zn2+ site.

  3. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  4. Comprehensive study on the chemical structure of dioxane lignin from plantation Eucalyptus globulus wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtuguin, D V; Neto, C P; Silva, A M; Domingues, P M; Amado, F M; Robert, D; Faix, O

    2001-09-01

    Results of a comprehensive study on the chemical structure of lignin from plantation Eucalyptus globulus Labill are presented. Lignin has been isolated by a modified mild acidolysis method and thoroughly characterized by functional group analysis, by a series of degradation techniques (nitrobenzene oxidation, permanganate oxidation, thioacidolysis, and Py-GC-MS), and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Plantation Eucalyptus globulus lignin was found to be of the S/G type with an extremely high proportion of syringyl (S) units (82-86%) and a minor proportion of p-hydrophenyl propane (H) units (roughly 2-3 mol %). Unknown C-6 substituted and 4-O-5' type syringyl substructures represent about 65% of lignin "condensed" structures. Eucalypt lignin showed high abundance of beta-O-4 (0.56/C(6)) structures and units linked by alpha-O-4 bonds (0.23/C(6)). The proportion of phenylcoumaran structures was relatively low (0.03/C(6)). Different kinds of beta-beta substructures (pino-/syringaresinol and isotaxiresinol types) in a total amount of 0.13/C(6) were detected. ESI-MS analysis revealed a wide molecular weight distribution of lignin with the center of gravity of mass distribution around 2500 u.

  5. Immunobiological properties of sesquiterpene lactones obtained by chemically transformed structural modifications of trilobolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmatha, Juraj; Vokáč, Karel; Buděšínský, Miloš; Zídek, Zdeněk; Kmoníčková, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Our previous research on immunostimulatory properties of trilobolide and its structurally related natural analogues isolated from Laser trilobum (L.) Borkh., encouraged us to investigate structurally related guaianolides belonging to a specific group of sesquiterpene lactones with characteristic glycol moiety attached to the lactone ring. Ever increasing attention has been paid to certain guaianolides such as thapsigargin and trilobolide for their promising anti-inflammatory, anticancer, anti-infectious and SERCA inhibitory activities. However, due to their alkylation capabilities, they might be cytotoxic. Search for compounds with preserved immunobiological properties and decreased cytotoxicity led us to transform some of their structural features, particularly those related to their side chain functionality. For this reason, we prepared a series of over 20 various deacylated, acyl modified, or relactonized derivatives of trilobolide. The immunobiological effects were screened in vitro using the rat peritoneal cells primed with lipopolysaccharide. Secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukins (IL) IL-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) production by Griess reagent. Relation between the molecular structure and immunobiological activity was investigated. Acetylation at 7-OH and 11-OH positions of the lactone ring, or acyl modification of the guaianolide functionalities (including relactonization) of trilobolide, led to inability to stimulate secretion of cytokines and production of NO. Interestingly, minor structural changes achieved by catalytic hydrogenation or hydrogenolysis retained the original immunoactivity of trilobolide. It can be concluded that several new chemically transformed sesquiterpene lactones resembling the immunobiological properties of trilobolide or thapsigargin were prepared and identified. The implication of the lactone vicinal diol (glycol) moiety, combined with other structure

  6. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  7. Gas separation performance of 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Wulin

    2013-10-01

    This work reports the gas separation performance of several 6FDA-based polyimides with different chemical structures, to correlate chemical structure with gas transport properties with a special focus on CO2 and CH 4 transport and plasticization stability of the polyimides membranes relevant to natural gas purification. The consideration of the other gases (He, O2 and N2) provided additional insights regarding effects of backbone structure on detailed penetrant properties. The polyimides studied include 6FDA-DAM, 6FDA-mPDA, 6FDA-DABA, 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2), 6FDA-DAM:mPDA (3:2) and 6FDA-mPDA:DABA (3:2). Both pure and binary gas permeation were investigated. The packing density, which is tunable by adjusting monomer type and composition of the various samples, correlated with transport permeability and selectivity. The separation performance of the polyimides for various gas pairs were also plotted for comparison to the upper bound curves, and it was found that this family of materials shows attractive performance. The CO 2 plasticization responses for the un-cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance to CO2/CH4 mixed gas with 10% CO2; however, only the cross-linked polyimides showed good plasticization resistance under aggressive gas feed conditions (CO 2/CH4 mixed gas with 50% CO2 or pure CO 2). For future work, asymmetric hollow fibers and carbon molecular sieve membranes based on the most attractive members of the family will be considered. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relations between the structure of storage and the transport of chemical compounds in karstic aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaute, L.; Drogue, C.; Garrelly, L.; Ghelfenstein, M.

    1997-12-01

    Study of the movement of chemical compounds naturally present in the water, or which result from pollution, are examined according to the reservoir structure in karstic aquifers. Structure is represented by a simple geometrical model; slow flow takes place in blocks with a network of low-permeability cracks. The blocks are separated by highly permeable karstic conduits that allow rapid flow, and these form the aquifer drainage system. The karst studied covers 110 km 2. It is fed by an interrupted stream draining a 35 km 2 non-karstic basin, contaminated at the entry to the karst by effluents from a sewage treatment station. The underground water reappears as a resurgence with an annual average flow of approximately 1 m 3 s -1, after an apparent underground course of 8 km in the karst. Several local sources of pollution (effluent from septic tanks) contaminate the underground water during its course. Sixteen measurement operations were performed at 12 water points, between the interrupted stream and the spring. Some sampling points were at drains, and others were in the low-permeability fissured blocks. Comparison at each point of the concentrations of 14 chemical compounds gave the following results: when pollutant discharge occurs in a permeable zone, movement is rapid in the drainage network formed by the karstic conduits, and does not reach the less permeable fissured blocks which are thus protected; however, if discharge is in a low-permeability zone, the flow does not allow rapid movement of the polluted water, and this increases the pollutant concentration at the discharge. This simple pattern can be upset by a reversal of the apparent piezometric gradient between a block and a conduit during floods or pumping; this may reverse flow directions and hence modify the movement of contaminants. The study made it possible to site five boreholes whose positions in the karstic structure were unknown, showing the interest of such an approach for the forecasting of the

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bonding in AmO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for americium dioxide (AmO2 valence electrons. The binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the Am63O216 and AmO8 (D4h cluster reflecting Am close environment in AmO2 were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-~15 eV binding energy and the inner (~15 eV-~35 eV binding energy valence molecular orbitals. The filled Am 5f electronic states were shown to form in the AmO2 valence band. The Am 6p electrons participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled Am 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. Contributions of electrons from different molecular orbitals to the chemical bond in the AmO8 cluster were evaluated. Composition and sequence order of molecular orbitals in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in AmO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for AmO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in americium dioxide and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of AmO2.

  10. Chemical thermodynamics of systemic self-organization towards life by nano-structured cosmic dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, F. R.; Kissel, J.

    2001-08-01

    Self-organization of chemicals to living systems demands for several necessary conditions as derived from far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. Autopoesis is not just self-replication of systems, but is orbital stability of growth, variability, and self-replication. Physically, this means a reaction-diffusion space-time boundary (in/out) problem. The solutions of such a system of related partial non-linear differential coupled equations exhibit orbital stability as needed only if some other conditions are at hand. Of course, template oriented synthesis is needed, however, onset of the cycle demands for high excess reaction energy. The type of non-linearity demands for chirality. The diffusion behaviour needs a nano-grained structure for onset of self-replication, together with critical spatial dimensions in the μm-regime. To meet all chemical and physical requirements the proticity and polarity of a mobile phase (such as liquid water), together with the right heterocatalytic backbone structure and organic precursors are prerequisites, too. To our knowledge only cosmic (esp. cometary or micrometeoritic) dust particles together with liquid water may cause that onset, as we calculated numerically for RNA and peptide life precursors as well. In order to test the dynamics of such a system model grains will be taylored which meet the requirements mentioned. Simple systems are to be prepared on the basis of nano-structured silica spheres. Loading of catalysts and precursors for autocatalytic (peptide or RNA) templates, and furtheron the onset of reaction by changing the liquid phase parameters, will be studied.

  11. Structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces and thin film structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lad, Robert J.

    1999-12-14

    This project focused on three different aspects of oxide thin film systems: (1) Model metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interface studies were carried out by depositing ultra-thin metal (Al, K, Mg) and oxide (MgO, AlO{sub x}) films on TiO{sub 2}, NiO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal oxide substrates. (2) Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) oxygen plasma deposition was used to fabricate AlO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates, and film growth mechanisms and structural characteristics were investigated. (3) The friction and wear characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates in unlubricated sliding contact were studied and correlated with film microstructure. In these studies, thin film and interfacial regions were characterized using diffraction (RHEED, LEED, XRD), electron spectroscopies (XPS, UPS, AES), microscopy (AFM) and tribology instruments (pin-on-disk, friction microprobe, and scratch tester). By precise control of thin film microstructure, an increased understanding of the structural and chemical stability of interface regions and tribological performance of ultra-thin oxide films was achieved in these important ceramic systems.

  12. Low-Rank Sparse Coding for Image Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a low-rank sparse coding (LRSC) method that exploits local structure information among features in an image for the purpose of image-level classification. LRSC represents densely sampled SIFT descriptors, in a spatial neighborhood, collectively as low-rank, sparse linear combinations of code words. As such, it casts the feature coding problem as a low-rank matrix learning problem, which is different from previous methods that encode features independently. This LRSC has a number of attractive properties. (1) It encourages sparsity in feature codes, locality in codebook construction, and low-rankness for spatial consistency. (2) LRSC encodes local features jointly by considering their low-rank structure information, and is computationally attractive. We evaluate the LRSC by comparing its performance on a set of challenging benchmarks with that of 7 popular coding and other state-of-the-art methods. Our experiments show that by representing local features jointly, LRSC not only outperforms the state-of-the-art in classification accuracy but also improves the time complexity of methods that use a similar sparse linear representation model for feature coding.

  13. Motif discovery in ranked lists of sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tataru, Paula; Madsen, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    . These features make Regmex well suited for a range of biological sequence analysis problems related to motif discovery, exemplified by microRNA seed enrichment, but also including enrichment problems involving complex motifs and combinations of motifs. We demonstrate a number of usage scenarios that take......Motif analysis has long been an important method to characterize biological functionality and the current growth of sequencing-based genomics experiments further extends its potential. These diverse experiments often generate sequence lists ranked by some functional property. There is therefore...... a growing need for motif analysis methods that can exploit this coupled data structure and be tailored for specific biological questions. Here, we present an exploratory motif analysis tool, Regmex (REGular expression Motif EXplorer), which offers several methods to evaluate the correlation of motifs...

  14. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  15. Atmospheric Black Carbon: Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Individual Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, M. K.; Tivanski, A. V.; Hopkins, R. J.; Marten, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of aerosols from both natural and anthropogenic sources affects the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. Aerosols containing black carbon (BC) that are released into the atmosphere from the burning of biomass, natural fires and the combustion of coals, diesel and jet fuels, contribute a large positive component to this radiative forcing, thus causing a heating of the atmosphere. A distinct type of biomass burn aerosol referred to as "tar balls" has recently been reported in the literature and is characterized by a spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. At present, very little is known about the exact nature and variation of the range of BC aerosols in the atmosphere with regards to optical, chemical and physical properties. Additionally, the similarity of these aerosols to surrogates used in the laboratory as atmospheric mimics remains unclear. The local chemical bonding, structural ordering and carbon-to-oxygen ratios of a plethora of black carbon standard reference materials (BC SRMs), high molecular mass humic-like substances (HULIS) and atmospheric aerosols from a variety of sources are examined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. STXM/NEXAFS enables single aerosol particles of diameter upwards of 100 nm to be studied, which allows the diversity of atmospheric aerosol collected during a variety of field missions to be assessed. We apply a semi-quantitative peak fitting method to the recorded NEXAFS spectral fingerprints allowing comparison of BC SRMs and HULIS to BC aerosol originating from anthropogenic combustion and biomass burning events. This method allows us to distinguish between anthropogenic combustion and biomass burn aerosol using both chemical bonding and structural ordering information. The STXM/NEXAFS technique has also been utilized to

  16. Filamentary structure in chemical tracer distributions near the subtropical jet following a wave breaking event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of observations and analyses of trace gas cross sections in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS. The spatially highly resolved (≈0.5 km vertically and 12.5 km horizontally cross sections of ozone (O3, nitric acid (HNO3, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, retrieved from the measurements of the CRISTA-NF infrared limb sounder flown on the Russian M55-Geophysica, revealed intricate layer structures in the region of the subtropical tropopause break. The chemical structure in this region shows an intertwined stratosphere and troposphere. The observed filaments in all discussed trace gases are of a spatial scale of less than 0.8 km vertically and about 200 km horizontally across the jet stream. Backward trajectory calculations confirm that the observed filaments are the result of a breaking Rossby wave in the preceding days. An analysis of the trace gas relationships between PAN and O3 identifies four distinct groups of air mass: polluted subtropical tropospheric air, clean tropical upper-tropospheric air, the lowermost stratospheric air, and air from the deep stratosphere. The tracer relationships further allow the identification of tropospheric, stratospheric, and the transitional air mass made of a mixture of UT and LS air. Mapping of these air mass types onto the geo-spatial location in the cross sections reveals a highly structured extratropical transition layer (ExTL. Finally, the ratio between the measured reactive nitrogen species (HNO3 + PAN + ClONO2 and O3 is analysed to estimate the influence of tropospheric pollution on the extratropical UTLS. In combination, these diagnostics provide the first example of a multi-species two-dimensional picture of the inhomogeneous distribution of chemical species within the UTLS region. Since Rossby wave breaking occurs frequently in the region of the tropopause break, these observed fine-scale filaments are likely ubiquitous in the region. The

  17. The chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A⋆⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpia, E.; Semenov, D. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Caux, E.

    2017-07-01

    Context. It is not well known what drives the chemistry of a protostellar envelope, in particular the role of the stellar mass and the protostellar outflows on the chemical enrichment of such environments. Aims: We study the chemical structure of the Class 0 protostellar envelope NGC 1333 IRAS 4A in order to (I) investigate the influence of the outflows on the chemistry; (II) constrain the age of our studied object; (III) compare it with a typical high-mass protostellar envelope. Methods: In our analysis we use JCMT line mapping (360-373 GHz) and HIFI pointed spectra (626.01-721.48 GHz). To study the influence of the outflow on the degree of deuteration, we compare JCMT maps of HCO+ and DCO+ with non-LTE (RADEX) models in a region that spatially covers the outflow activity of IRAS 4A. To study the envelope chemistry, we derive empirical molecular abundance profiles for the observed species using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (RATRAN) and adopting a 1D dust density/temperature profile from the literature. We use a combination of constant abundance profiles and abundance profiles that include jumps at two radii (T 100 K or T 30 K) to fit our observations. We compare our best-fit observed abundance profiles with the predictions from the time dependent gas grain chemical code (ALCHEMIC). Results: We detect CO, 13CO, C18O, CS, HCN, HCO+, N2H+, H2CO, CH3OH, H2O, H2S, DCO+, HDCO, D2CO, SO, SO2, SiO, HNC, CN, C2H and OCS. We divide the detected lines in three groups based on their line profiles: a) broad emission (FWHM = 4-11 km s-1), b) narrow emission (FWHMmaterial. Our maps provide information about the spatial and velocity structure of many of the molecules mentioned above, including the deuterated species, making it possible to distinguish between envelope and outflow structures also spatially. The derived abundance profiles are based only on the narrow component (envelope) of the species and are reproduced by a 1D pseudo-time-dependent gas-grain chemical

  18. CLiDE Pro: the latest generation of CLiDE, a tool for optical chemical structure recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Aniko T; Johnson, A Peter

    2009-04-01

    We present CLiDE Pro, the latest version of the output of the long-term CLiDE project for the development of tools for automatic extraction of chemical information from the literature. CLiDE Pro is concerned with the extraction of chemical structure and generic structure information from electronic images of chemical molecules available online as well as pages of scanned chemical documents. The information is extracted in three phases, first the image is segmented into text and graphical regions, then graphical regions are analyzed and where possible the connection tables are reconstructed, and finally any generic structures are interpreted by matching R-groups found in structure diagrams with the ones located in the text. The program has been tested on a large set of images of chemical structures originating from various sources. The results demonstrate good performance in the reconstruction of connection tables with few errors in the interpretation of the individual drawing features found in the structure diagrams. This full test set is presented for use in the validation of other similar systems.

  19. Antireflection subwavelength structures based on silicon nanowires arrays fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Niu, Gao; Yi, Yong; Zhou, Xiu-wen; Liu, Xu-dong; Sun, Lai-xi; Wang, Chao-yang

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we have obtained a series of large-area and different diameters nanosphere lithography (NSL) to obtain the required silicon nanowires (SiNWs) arrays. The single-crystalline SiNWs have been presented by combining nanosphere lithography (NSL) and metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE). The period of SiNW arrays can be controlled by adjusting the original diameter of polystyrene nanosphere (PSs) and the etching time during the NSL process. The special SiNWs structure obtained can be demonstrated to be significant for improving the antireflection properties of silicon substrate. The results show that SiNW arrays with various parameters, such as diameter, distance and height can be obtained by controlling the key etching parameter during the MACE process, which are important to obtain the structures of different parameters to adapt an appropriate value to decrease the light scattering. For a wide wavelength range of 300-1200 nm, the reflectance is below 10% or less, which is due to an ultra-high surface area. Especially, the reflectance of antireflection structure (ARS) surface reduces below 1% over a wavelength range of 300-400 nm. Furthermore, the silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with highly efficient antireflection obtained by MACE exhibit different surface roughness from the bottom to the top part of SiNWs by high resolution images, which is benefit for further improving the ARS of SiNWs.

  20. Structure and photoluminescence of molybdenum selenide nanomaterials grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Manufacturing Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Zhu, M.K. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@qut.edu.au [Plasma Nanoscience Laboratories, Manufacturing Flagship, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P. O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Shao, R.W.; Zheng, K. [Institute of Microstructure and Properties of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2015-10-25

    Molybdenum selenide nanomaterials with different structures are synthesized on silicon substrates coated with gold films by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) in nitrogen environment, where molybdenum trioxide and selenium powders are used as source materials. The structure and composition of the synthesized molybdenum selenide nanomaterials are studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that the structures of molybdenum selenide change from nanoflakes to nanoparticles with the increase of content of molybdenum trioxide precursor. The photoluminescence (PL) excitation using the 325 nm line of He–Cd laser as the excitation source generates green light with the wavelength of about 512–516 nm. The formation of molybdenum selenide nanomaterials is determined by the decomposition rates of molybdenum trioxide in HFCVD. The possible factors that affect the generation of green PL bands are analyzed. These outcomes of this work enrich our knowledge on the synthesis of transition metal dichalcogenides and contribute to the development of applications of these materials in optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Molybdenum selenide nanoflakes, nanoparticles and hybrids produced by HFCVD. • Uncommon MoO{sub 3} and Se precursor co-location and mixing and effective MoO{sub 3} decomposition. • Morphology change from nanoflakes to nanoparticles with higher ratio of MoO{sub 3} precursor. • Strong photoluminescence emission of green light with a wavelength of ∼512–516 nm.

  1. EDCs DataBank: 3D-Structure database of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-01-02

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a group of compounds that affect the endocrine system, frequently found in everyday products and epidemiologically associated with several diseases. The purpose of this work was to develop EDCs DataBank, the only database of EDCs with three-dimensional structures. This database was built on MySQL using the EU list of potential endocrine disruptors and TEDX list. It contains the three-dimensional structures available on PubChem, as well as a wide variety of information from different databases and text mining tools, useful for almost any kind of research regarding EDCs. The web platform was developed employing HTML, CSS and PHP languages, with dynamic contents in a graphic environment, facilitating information analysis. Currently EDCs DataBank has 615 molecules, including pesticides, natural and industrial products, cosmetics, drugs and food additives, among other low molecular weight xenobiotics. Therefore, this database can be used to study the toxicological effects of these molecules, or to develop pharmaceuticals targeting hormone receptors, through docking studies, high-throughput virtual screening and ligand-protein interaction analysis. EDCs DataBank is totally user-friendly and the 3D-structures of the molecules can be downloaded in several formats. This database is freely available at http://edcs.unicartagena.edu.co. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Manipulation of Optoelectronic Properties and Band Structure Engineering of Ultrathin Te Nanowires by Chemical Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ahin; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Tripathi, Shalini; Biswas, Sangram; Singh, Abhishek K; Bid, Aveek; Ravishankar, N

    2017-06-14

    Band structure engineering is a powerful technique both for the design of new semiconductor materials and for imparting new functionalities to existing ones. In this article, we present a novel and versatile technique to achieve this by surface adsorption on low dimensional systems. As a specific example, we demonstrate, through detailed experiments and ab initio simulations, the controlled modification of band structure in ultrathin Te nanowires due to NO2 adsorption. Measurements of the temperature dependence of resistivity of single ultrathin Te nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) devices exposed to increasing amounts of NO2 reveal a gradual transition from a semiconducting to a metallic state. Gradual quenching of vibrational Raman modes of Te with increasing concentration of NO2 supports the appearance of a metallic state in NO2 adsorbed Te. Ab initio simulations attribute these observations to the appearance of midgap states in NO2 adsorbed Te nanowires. Our results provide fundamental insights into the effects of ambient on the electronic structures of low-dimensional materials and can be exploited for designing novel chemical sensors.

  3. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid...

  4. Ranking of hair dye substances according to predicted sensitization potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, H; Basketter, D A; Estrada, E

    2004-01-01

    substances registered in Europe and to provide their tonnage data. The sensitization potential of each substance was then estimated by using a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model and the substances were ranked according to their predicted potency. A cluster analysis was performed...

  5. Limits of rank 4 Azumaya algebras and applications to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Essential use is made of Kneser's concept [8] of 'semi-regular quadratic module'. For any free quadratic module of odd rank, a formula linking the half-discriminant and the values of ..... A little bit of writing down shows that the canonical algebra structure on B corresponds to the diagonal morphism. AlgW/X. : AlgW↩→AlgW ...

  6. Limits of rank 4 Azumaya algebras and applications to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the schematic image of the scheme of Azumaya algebra structures on a vector bundle of rank 4 over any base scheme is separated, of finite type, smooth of relative dimension 13 and geometrically irreducible over that base and that this construction base-changes well. This fully generalizes Seshadri's ...

  7. Combinatorial conditions for low rank solutions in semidefinite programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this thesis we investigate combinatorial conditions that guarantee the existence of low-rank optimal solutions to semidefinite programs. Results of this type are important for approximation algorithms and for the study of geometric representations of graphs. The structure of the

  8. Combinatorial conditions for low rank solutions in semidefinite programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varvitsiotis, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate combinatorial conditions that guarantee the existence of low-rank optimal solutions to semidefinite programs. Results of this type are important for approximation algorithms and for the study of geometric representations of graphs. The structure of the thesis is as

  9. Reduced-Rank Regression: A Useful Determinant Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard

    We derive an identity for the determinant of a product involving non-squared matrices. The identity can be used to derive the maximum likelihood estimator in reduced-rank regres- sions with Gaussian innovations. Furthermore, the identity sheds light on the structure of the estimation problem...

  10. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  11. Antibacterial, Structural and Optical Characterization of Mechano-Chemically Prepared ZnO Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Manzoor

    Full Text Available Structural investigations, optical properties and antibacterial performance of the pure Zinc Oxide (ZnO nanoparticles (NPs synthesized by mechano-chemical method are presented. The morphology, dimensions and crystallinity of the ZnO NPs were controlled by tweaking the mechanical agitation of the mixture and subsequent thermal treatment. ZnO nanoparticles in small (< 20 nm dimensions with spherical morphology and narrow size distribution were successfully obtained after treating the mechano-chemically prepared samples at 250°C. However, higher temperature treatments produced larger particles. TEM, XRD and UV-Vis spectroscopy results suggested crystalline and phase pure ZnO. The NPs demonstrated promising antibacterial activity against Gram negative foodborne and waterborne bacterial pathogens i.e. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, Campylobacter jejuni and Vibrio cholerae as well as Gram positive methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, thus potential for medical applications. Scanning electron microscopy and survival assay indicated that most probably ZnO nanoparticles cause changes in cellular morphology which eventually causes bacterial cell death.

  12. Anti-oxidant behavior of functionalized chalcone-a combined quantum chemical and crystallographic structural investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Bijo; Adeniyi, Adebayo A.; Joy, Monu; Mathew, Githa Elizabeth; Singh-Pillay, Ashona; Sudarsanakumar, C.; Soliman, Mahmoud E. S.; Suresh, Jerad

    2017-10-01

    Compound (2E)-3-(methoxyphenyl)-1-(4-methylphenyl) prop-2-en-1-one (Ch) was synthesized by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation reaction between para-methylacetophenone and para-methoxybenzaldehyde under basic condition. The structure of the molecule was elucidated using X-ray diffraction. Compound (Ch) demonstrated higher antioxidant activities in the DPPH test and H2O2 assay (IC50 = 12.23 ± 0.53 and 15.62 ± 0.98) than with the standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 17.32 ± 0.44 and 19.07 ± 0.35). An evaluation of the atomic and molecular properties of ascorbic acid and Ch were computed based on their antioxidant activities. The molecular properties give insight into possible reasons for the enhanced antioxidant properties of Ch compared to ascorbic acid. The atomic properties provide further insight into chemical changes of the atoms of the compounds. Such changes include electronic shifting of the compounds electrophilic and/or nucleophilic states which highlight chemical moieties which characterize the antioxidant activity but do not directly relate to a variation in their antioxidant activities. The results obtained reflect oxygen atoms having significant nucleophilic interactions of each of the compounds. This was characterized by higher Fukui indices, isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine and orbital coupling stability energy.

  13. Chemical Structure And Glass Transition Temperature Of Ricinodendron Heudelotii Wood For Its Pulp Production Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolade M. Ogunleye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemical structure and glass transition temperature of Ricinodendron heudelotii wood were studied using Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared FTIR spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis DMA respectively. The thermal characteristic of R. heudelotii was conducted on N-methyl-2-pyrolidone saturated specimens while submerged under the same solvent at a temperature range from 130 to 0C at 3Cmin multi-frequencies of 0.1-10 Hz using DMA. Ratios of syringyl to guaiacyl associated bands along the longitudinal and radial positions of the wood differ significantly. Higher syringylguaiacyl ratio of the corewood than middlewood correlate well with lowering softening temperature. The findings in this research reveals that more chemical would be required to pulp R. heudelotii wood obtained from the base 10 of the merchantable height and outerwood because of the presence of high lignin content compared to the other longitudinal and radial positions respectively where wood were collected. Also outerwood favour pulp production compared to middlewood and corewood because of the high holocellulose content.

  14. Chemical structure of arsenic and chromium in CCA-treated wood: implications of environmental weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Peter S; Fendorf, Scott E; Lowney, Yvette W; Holm, Stewart E; Ruby, Michael V

    2004-10-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been used to treat lumber for over 60 years to increase the expected lifetime of CCA-treated wood. Because of the toxicity of the arsenic and chromium used in CCA treatment, regulatory and public attention has become focused on the potential risks from this exposure source. In particular, exposure of children to arsenic from CCA-treated wood used in decks and play sets has received considerable attention. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) was used to evaluate the chemical structure of As and Cr in three samples of CCA-treated materials: newly treated wood, aged wood (5 years as decking), and dislodgeable residue from aged (1-4 years as decking) CCA-treated wood. The form of the Cr and As in CCA-treated material is the same in fresh and aged samples, and between treated wood and dislodged residue. In all cases, the dominant oxidation state of the two elements is As(V) and Cr(III), and the local chemical environment of the two elements is best represented as a Cr/As cluster consisting of a Cr dimer bridged by an As(V) oxyanion. Long-term stability of the As/Cr cluster is suggested by its persistence from the new wood through the aged wood and the dislodgeable residue.

  15. Structural basis, chemical driving forces and biological implications of flavones as Cu(II) ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fang; Yan, Wen-Jing; Du, Yu-Ting; Bao, Xia-Zhen; Li, Xiu-Zhuang; Zhou, Bo

    2017-07-01

    A main biochemical property of cancer cells, compared with normal cells, is altered redox status including increased levels of copper to maintain their malignant phenotypes. Thus, increasing copper accumulation, by using ionophores, to disrupt abnormal redox homeostasis of cancer cells may be an important anticancer strategy. Naturally occurring molecules with extraordinarily diverse chemical scaffolds are an important source of inspiration for developing copper ionophores. Dietary flavonoids are well-characterized copper chelators and show cancer chemopreventive potential, but their ionophoric role for redox-active copper and the related biological implications have remained unknown. This study reports, for the first time, the structural basis, chemical driving forces and biological implications of flavones (a widely distributed subgroup of flavonoids) as Cu(II) ionophores, and also provides new insights into cancer chemopreventive mechanism of flavones bearing 3(or 5)-hydroxy-4-keto group. 3-Hydroxyflavone surfaced as a potent Cu(II) ionophore to induce the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells in a redox intervention fashion via sequential proton-loss Cu(II) chelation, GSH-driving releasing of copper and protonation-dependent efflux of the neutral ligand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory for Structured Chemical Product Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Yunus, Nor Alafiza Binti; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present new methods for design of chemicals based formulated products and their implementation in the software, the Virtual Product-Process Design Laboratory. The new products are tailor-made blended liquid products and emulsion-based products. The new software...... the design and analysis of a wide range of homogeneous formulated products: tailor-made blends, single phase liquid formulations and emulsion-based products. The decision making process is supported by dedicated property models and structured databases, specifically developed for each design problem scenario...... employs a template approach, where each template follows the same common steps in the workflow for design of formulated products, but has the option to employ different product specific property models, data and calculation routines, when necessary. With the new additions, the software is able to support...

  17. [Isolation and structure identification of chemical constituents from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Ping; Gao, Hui-Min; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2007-08-01

    The skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans, originated from Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor (Bufonidae), is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of hepatoma, lung cancer and etc. The preparation of the aqueous components has significant therapeutic effect against the digestive tract cancer. The water-soluble chemical constituents in the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans were then investigated to make clear the active compounds. Six compounds were isolated and purified by recrystallization and column chromatography on silica gel and ODS, their structures were elucidated as 4-amido-3-hydroxymethyl-cyclooctylamidezotetra-alpha-furanone (I), bufogargarizanine C (II), bufothionine (III), dehydrobufotenine hydrobromide (IV), suberic acid (V) and succinic acid (VI) on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral data (UV, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS). Of the above compounds, compounds I and II are new compounds and named bufogargarizanine B and C, respectively.

  18. Chemical expansion affected oxygen vacancy stability in different oxide structures from first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-03-01

    We study the chemical expansion for neutral and charged oxygen vacancies in fluorite, rocksalt, perovskite and pyrochlores materials using first principles calculations. We show that the neutral oxygen vacancy leads to lattice expansion whereas the charged vacancy leads to lattice contraction. In addition, we show that there is a window of strain within which an oxygen vacancy is stable; beyond that range, the vacancy can become unstable. Using CeO2|ZrO2 interface structure as an example, we show that the concentration of oxygen vacancies can be manipulated via strain, and the vacancies can be preferentially stabilized. These results could serve as guiding principles in predicting oxygen vacancy stability in strained systems and in the design of vacancy stabilized materials.

  19. Structural, Chemical and Biological Aspects of Antioxidants for Strategies Against Metal and Metalloid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J. S. Flora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of exposure to heavy metals/metalloid. Beneficial renal effects of some medications, such as chelation therapy depend at least partially on the ability to alleviate oxidative stress. The administration of various natural or synthetic antioxidants has been shown to be of benefit in the prevention and attenuation of metal induced biochemical alterations. These include vitamins, N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid, melatonin, dietary flavonoids and many others. Human studies are limited in this regard. Under certain conditions, surprisingly, the antioxidant supplements may exhibit pro-oxidant properties and even worsen metal induced toxic damage. To date, the evidence is insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements in subject with exposure to metals. Prospective, controlled clinical trials on safety and effectiveness of different therapeutic antioxidant strategies either individually or in combination with chelating agent are indispensable. The present review focuses on structural, chemical and biological aspects of antioxidants particularly related to their chelating properties.

  20. Chemical structures, production and enzymatic transformations of sapogenins and saponins from Centella asiatica (L.) Urban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azerad, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Centella asiatica (L.) Urban is a medicinal herb traditionally used in Asiatic countries for its multiple therapeutic properties, essentially due to its accumulation of specific pentacylic triterpenoid saponins, mainly asiaticoside and madecassoside and the corresponding sapogenins. This review summarizes the updated knowledge about the chemical structures of about forty centelloids, found as minor metabolites in Centella, and all derived from ursane and oleane ring patterns. Similarly, the most recent genetic and enzymatic features involved in their biosynthesis is reviewed, in relation with their biotechnological production developed, either from in vitro plant cultures or undifferentiated cells, in order to be independent of natural sources and to provide a continuous and reliable source of centelloids. Finally, a short survey of the biotransformations of some centelloids, either in animal, human or microorganisms is reviewed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Structural analysis of CdS thin films obtained by multiple dips of oscillating chemical bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez Lazos, C.D. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosendo, E., E-mail: erosendo@siu.buap.m [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Ortega, M. [Seccion de Electronica del Estado Solido, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Oliva, A.I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Tapia, O.; Diaz, T.; Juarez, H.; Garcia, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico); Rubin, M. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Computacion, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Col. San Manuel, C.P. 72570, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-11-25

    Highly oriented CdS thin films with thicknesses greater than 1 mum were deposited by multiple dips, using oscillating chemical bath deposition (OCBD) at the bath temperature of 75 deg. C, and deposition time ranging from 15 to 75 min for a single dip. Samples with different thickness were prepared by repeating the deposition process for two and three times. The films deposited by a single dip have the alpha-greenockite structure showing the (0 0 2) as preferred orientation, as indicated by the X-ray diffraction measurements. This notable characteristic is preserved in the samples obtained from two or three dips. The crystallite size for the samples deposited by a single dip depends on the deposition time, because it varied from 23 to 37 nm as the deposition time increased. Nevertheless for samples deposited by two and three dips, the grain size shows no noticeable change, being about 22 nm.

  2. Prediction of the temperature dependency of Henry's law constant from chemical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühne, Ralph; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2005-09-01

    A new model to estimate the temperature dependency of Henry's law constant in water for organic compounds from the two-dimensional structure is presented. Air/water partition enthalpies of 456 chemicals were fitted to 46 substructural parameters with a squared correlation coefficient r2 of 0.81 and a standard error of 7.1 kJ/mol. The compound set covers various organic compound classes with the atom types C, H, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, and S. Application of the model together with experimental data for 25 degrees C to a set of 462 compounds with 2119 experimental Henry's law constants at temperatures below 20 degrees C yields a predictive squared correlation coefficient q2 of 0.99 and a standard error of 0.21 logarithmic units. The prediction capability is further evaluated using cross validation and permutation.

  3. Comprehensive DFT study on molecular structures of Lewisites in support of the Chemical Weapons Convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Hamid; Sahandi, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    The structure of all of Lewisite's stereoisomers has been examined by B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) calculations. The geometry analysis for trans Lewisite L1-1 shows that the calculated bond angles, bond distances and dipole moment have a satisfactory relation compared with experimental values. HOMO-LUMO analysis of Lewisites reveals that L1-2 and L3-7 have the maximum and minimum electrophilicity index, respectively. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with experimental data, showing a very good agreement both for 1H and 13C. The vibrational and Raman frequencies of Lewisites have been precisely assigned and theoretical data were compared with the experimental vibrations. The bonding trends and Mulliken and atomic polar tensor charge distribution in Lewisites can be explained by the Bent's rule and the donor-acceptor interaction, respectively.

  4. Hazard-ranking of agricultural pesticides for chronic health effects in Yuma County, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeng, Anastasia J; Beamer, Paloma I; Lutz, Eric A; Rosales, Cecilia B

    2013-10-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam-sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hazard-Ranking of Agricultural Pesticides for Chronic Health Effects in Yuma County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeng, Anastasia J.; Beamer, Paloma I.; Lutz, Eric A.; Rosales, Cecilia B.

    2013-01-01

    With thousands of pesticides registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, it not feasible to sample for all pesticides applied in agricultural communities. Hazard-ranking pesticides based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize community-specific pesticide hazards. This study applied hazard-ranking schemes for cancer, endocrine disruption, and reproductive/developmental toxicity in Yuma County, Arizona. An existing cancer hazard-ranking scheme was modified, and novel schemes for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity were developed to rank pesticide hazards. The hazard-ranking schemes accounted for pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential based on chemical properties of each pesticide. Pesticides were ranked as hazards with respect to each health effect, as well as overall chronic health effects. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides for overall chronic health effects were maneb, metam sodium, trifluralin, pronamide, and bifenthrin. The relative pesticide rankings were unique for each health effect. The highest hazard-ranked pesticides differed from those most heavily applied, as well as from those previously detected in Yuma homes over a decade ago. The most hazardous pesticides for cancer in Yuma County, Arizona were also different from a previous hazard-ranking applied in California. Hazard-ranking schemes that take into account pesticide use, toxicity, and exposure potential can help prioritize pesticides of greatest health risk in agricultural communities. This study is the first to provide pesticide hazard-rankings for endocrine disruption and reproductive/developmental toxicity based on use, toxicity, and exposure potential. These hazard-ranking schemes can be applied to other agricultural communities for prioritizing community-specific pesticide hazards to target decreasing health risk. PMID:23783270

  6. Determination of contact maps in proteins: A combination of structural and chemical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: mc@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gómez-Sicilia, Àngel [Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Av. Doctor Arce, 37, 28002 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), C/Faraday 9, 28049 Cantoblanco (Madrid) (Spain)

    2015-12-28

    Contact map selection is a crucial step in structure-based molecular dynamics modelling of proteins. The map can be determined in many different ways. We focus on the methods in which residues are represented as clusters of effective spheres. One contact map, denoted as overlap (OV), is based on the overlap of such spheres. Another contact map, named Contacts of Structural Units (CSU), involves the geometry in a different way and, in addition, brings chemical considerations into account. We develop a variant of the CSU approach in which we also incorporate Coulombic effects such as formation of the ionic bridges and destabilization of possible links through repulsion. In this way, the most essential and well defined contacts are identified. The resulting residue-residue contact map, dubbed repulsive CSU (rCSU), is more sound in its physico-chemical justification than CSU. It also provides a clear prescription for validity of an inter-residual contact: the number of attractive atomic contacts should be larger than the number of repulsive ones — a feature that is not present in CSU. However, both of these maps do not correlate well with the experimental data on protein stretching. Thus, we propose to use rCSU together with the OV map. We find that the combined map, denoted as OV+rCSU, performs better than OV. In most situations, OV and OV+rCSU yield comparable folding properties but for some proteins rCSU provides contacts which improve folding in a substantial way. We discuss the likely residue-specificity of the rCSU contacts. Finally, we make comparisons to the recently proposed shadow contact map, which is derived from different principles.

  7. Structural, chemical and electrical characterisation of conductive graphene-polymer composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, Barry; Spencer, Steve J.; Belsey, Natalie A. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Faris, Tsegie [DZP Technologies Ltd., Future Business Centre, Cambridge, CB4 2HY (United Kingdom); Cronin, Harry [DZP Technologies Ltd., Future Business Centre, Cambridge, CB4 2HY (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Silva, S. Ravi P. [Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Sainsbury, Toby; Gilmore, Ian S. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Stoeva, Zlatka [DZP Technologies Ltd., Future Business Centre, Cambridge, CB4 2HY (United Kingdom); Pollard, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.pollard@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of the dispersion of graphene within graphene-polymer composites using the Na{sup +} signal. - Highlights: • Relation of properties of graphene flakes with electrical properties of composite. • Standardised characterisation method for structural properties of graphene flakes. • Structural and chemical characterisation of commercial graphene flakes. • ToF-SIMS used to determine dispersion of graphene in polymer. - Abstract: Graphene poly-acrylic and PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite films were produced using two alternative commercial graphene powders to explore how the graphene flake dimensions and chemical composition affected the electrical performance of the film. A range of analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), were employed to systematically analyse the initial graphene materials as well as the nanocomposite films. Electrical measurements indicated that the sheet resistance of the films was affected by the properties of the graphene flakes used. To further explore the composition of the films, ToF-SIMS mapping was employed and provided a direct means to elucidate the nature of the graphene dispersion in the films and to correlate this with the electrical analysis. These results reveal important implications for how the dispersion of the graphene material in films produced from printable inks can be affected by the type of graphene powder used and the corresponding effect on electrical performance of the nanocomposites. This work provides direct evidence for how accurate and comparable characterisation of the graphene material is required for real-world graphene materials to develop graphene enabled films and proposes a measurement protocol for comparing graphene materials that can be used for international

  8. PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhmakhchyan, L.; Shepelyansky, D.

    2013-12-01

    We consider a PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks, generated by the intermittency map and the typical Chirikov map. The Ulam networks generated by these maps have certain similarities with such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW), showing an algebraic decay of the PageRank probability. We find that the opinion formation process on Ulam networks has certain similarities but also distinct features comparing to the WWW. We attribute these distinctions to internal differences in network structure of the Ulam and WWW networks. We also analyze the process of opinion formation in the frame of generalized Sznajd model which protects opinion of small communities.

  9. Electronic structure and chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis of dicaesiumtetrachlorodioxoplutonate (Cs2PuO2Cl4 single crystal was done in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV on the basis of binding energies and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the PuO2Cl4 (D4h. This cluster reflects Pu close environment in Cs2PuO2Cl4 containing the plutonyl group PuO2. The many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine were shown to contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV binding energy spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV- ~35 eV binding energy one. The filled Pu 5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally con- firmed to present in the valence band of Cs2PuO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the Pu 5f electrons in the chemical bond. The Pu 6p atomic orbitals were shown to participate in formation of both the inner and the outer valence molecular orbitals (bands, while the filled Pu 6p and O 2s, Cl 3s electronic shells were found to take the largest part in formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals. The composition of molecular orbitals and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0-~35 eV in Cs2PuO2Cl4 were established. The quantitative scheme of molecular orbitals for Cs2PuO2Cl4 in the binding energy range 0-~15 eV was built on the basis of the experimental and theoretical data. It is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2PuO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2PuO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the PuO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the contribution of the outer valence molecular orbitals -66 %, the contribution of the inner valence molecular orbitals -34 %.

  10. Structure and properties of braided sleeve preforms for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Technology

    1998-04-01

    In all composites the properties and structure of the reinforcement strongly influence the performance of the material. For some composites, however, the reinforcement also affects the fabrication process itself exerting an additional, second order influence on performance. This is the case for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. In this process the matrix forms progressively as a solid deposit, first onto the fiber surfaces, then onto the previous layer of deposit, ultimately growing to fill the inter-fiber porosity. The transport of reactants to the surfaces and the evolved morphology of the matrix depend on the initial reinforcement structure. This structure can vary greatly and is controlled by such factors as fiber size and cross-section, the number of filaments and amount of twist per tow or yarn, and the weave or braid architecture. Often the choice of reinforcement is based on mechanical performance analysis or on the cost and availability of the material or on the temperature stability of the fiber. Given this choice, the composite densification process--CVI--must be optimized to attain a successful material. Ceramic fiber in the form of cylindrical braided sleeve is an attractive choice for fabrication of tube-form ceramic matrix composites. Multiple, concentric layers of sleeve can be placed over a tubular mandrel, compressed and fixed with a binder to form a freestanding tube preform. This fiber architecture is different than that created by layup of plain weave cloth--the material used in most previous CVI development. This report presents the results of the investigation of CVI densification of braided sleeve preforms and the evolution of their structure and transport properties during processing.

  11. Influence of ¹H chemical shift assignments of the interface residues on structure determinations of homodimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jan; Kirchner, Donata K; Güntert, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Homodimeric proteins pose a difficulty for NMR structure determination because the degeneracy of the chemical shifts in the two identical monomers implies an ambiguity in all assignments of distance restraints. For homodimeric proteins, residues involved in the interface between two monomers provide essential intermolecular NOEs. The structure determination of homodimeric proteins hence relies strongly on chemical shift assignments of these interface residues. Our paper discusses the influence of the extent of (1)H chemical shift assignments of interface residues on the structure determinations of homodimeric proteins using the CYANA program. The results reveal that successful structure determinations of homodimeric proteins with automated NOE assignment depend on the percentage of assigned interface residues and that a high completeness of around 80-90% of the (1)H chemical shift assignment in the interface is needed for reliable NMR structure determinations of homodimeric proteins for which no experimental distinction between intra- and intermolecular NOEs, e.g. by filtered NOESY experiments, is available. Our results also show that RMSD and target function values are insufficient to judge the quality of homodimeric structures determined using automated NOE assignment. Structure determinations of homodimeric proteins by NMR using conventional NOESY experiments are thus possible but more challenging than for monomeric proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Ranking Processes in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumm, Nicholas; Ghoshal, Gourab; Forró, Zalán; Schich, Maximilian; Bianconi, Ginestra; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-09-01

    The world is addicted to ranking: everything, from the reputation of scientists, journals, and universities to purchasing decisions is driven by measured or perceived differences between them. Here, we analyze empirical data capturing real time ranking in a number of systems, helping to identify the universal characteristics of ranking dynamics. We develop a continuum theory that not only predicts the stability of the ranking process, but shows that a noise-induced phase transition is at the heart of the observed differences in ranking regimes. The key parameters of the continuum theory can be explicitly measured from data, allowing us to predict and experimentally document the existence of three phases that govern ranking stability.

  13. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error.

  14. Structural and optical studied of nano structured lead sulfide thin films prepared by the chemical bath deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Din, Nasser Saad, E-mail: nsaadaldin@yahoo.com; Hussain, Nabiha, E-mail: nabihahssin@yahoo.com [Damascus University Faculty of Science, Department of physics, Homs (Syrian Arab Republic); Jandow, Nidhal, E-mail: nidhaljandow@yahoo.com [Al –Mustansiriyah University, College of Education, Department of physics, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2016-07-25

    Lead (II) Sulfide PbS thin films were deposited on glass substrates at 25°C by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The structural properties of the films were studied as a function of the concentration of Thiourea (CS (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}) as Source of Sulfide and deposition time. The surface morphology of the films was characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM. The obtained results showed that the as-deposited films Polycrystalline had cubic crystalline phase that belong to S.G: Fm3m. We found that they have preferred orientation [200]. Also the thickness of thin films decrease with deposition time after certain value and, it observed free sulfide had orthorhombic phase. Optical properties showed that the thin films have high transmission at visible range and low transmission at UV, IR range. The films of PbS have direct band gap (I.68 - 2.32 ev) at 300 K the values of band energy decreases with increases thickness of the Lead (II) Sulfide films.

  15. Image Re-Ranking Based on Topic Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueming; Lu, Dan; Wang, Yaxiong; Zhu, Li; Tang, Yuan Yan; Wang, Meng

    2017-08-01

    Social media sharing Websites allow users to annotate images with free tags, which significantly contribute to the development of the web image retrieval. Tag-based image search is an important method to find images shared by users in social networks. However, how to make the top ranked result relevant and with diversity is challenging. In this paper, we propose a topic diverse ranking approach for tag-based image retrieval with the consideration of promoting the topic coverage performance. First, we construct a tag graph based on the similarity between each tag. Then, the community detection method is conducted to mine the topic community of each tag. After that, inter-community and intra-community ranking are introduced to obtain the final retrieved results. In the inter-community ranking process, an adaptive random walk model is employed to rank the community based on the multi-information of each topic community. Besides, we build an inverted index structure for images to accelerate the searching process. Experimental results on Flickr data set and NUS-Wide data sets show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Ranking in Swiss system chess team tournaments

    OpenAIRE

    Csató, László

    2015-01-01

    The paper uses paired comparison-based scoring procedures for ranking the participants of a Swiss system chess team tournament. We present the main challenges of ranking in Swiss system, the features of individual and team competitions as well as the failures of official lexicographical orders. The tournament is represented as a ranking problem, our model is discussed with respect to the properties of the score, generalized row sum and least squares methods. The proposed procedure is illustra...

  17. A universal rank-size law

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    A mere hyperbolic law, like the Zipf's law power function, is often inadequate to describe rank-size relationships. An alternative theoretical distribution is proposed based on theoretical physics arguments starting from the Yule-Simon distribution. A modeling is proposed leading to a universal form. A theoretical suggestion for the "best (or optimal) distribution", is provided through an entropy argument. The ranking of areas through the number of cities in various countries and some sport competition ranking serves for the present illustrations.

  18. Ranking documents with a thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, R; Bicknell, E

    1989-09-01

    This article reports on exploratory experiments in evaluating and improving a thesaurus through studying its effect on retrieval. A formula called DISTANCE was developed to measure the conceptual distance between queries and documents encoded as sets of thesaurus terms. DISTANCE references MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and assesses the degree of match between a MeSH-encoded query and document. The performance of DISTANCE on MeSH is compared to the performance of people in the assessment of conceptual distance between queries and documents, and is found to simulate with surprising accuracy the human performance. The power of the computer simulation stems both from the tendency of people to rely heavily on broader-than (BT) relations in making decisions about conceptual distance and from the thousands of accurate BT relations in MeSH. One source for discrepancy between the algorithms' measurement of closeness between query and document and people's measurement of closeness between query and document is occasional inconsistency in the BT relations. Our experiments with adding non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT relations could improve document ranking, if DISTANCE were also appropriately revised to treat these relations differently from BT relations.

  19. Quantum chemical and experimental studies on the structure and vibrational spectra of an alkaloid-Corlumine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rashmi; Joshi, Bhawani Datt; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The study concentrates on an important natural product, phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid Corlumine (COR) [(6R)-6-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-methylisoquinolin-1-yl] furo [3,4-e]-1,3-benzodioxol-8(6H)-one] well known to exhibit spasmolytic and GABA antagonist activity. It was fully characterized by a variety of experimental methods including vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman), thermal analysis (DSC), UV and SEM. For a better interpretation and analysis of the results quantum chemical calculations employing DFT were also performed. TD-DFT was employed to elucidate electronic properties for both gaseous and solvent environment using IEF-PCM model. Graphical representation of HOMO and LUMO would provide a valuable insight into the nature of reactivity and some of the structural and physical properties of the title molecule. The structure-activity relationship have been interpreted by mapping electrostatic potential surface (MEP), which is valuable information for the quality control of medicines and drug-receptor interactions. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalisation has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Computation of thermodynamical properties would help to have a deep insight into the molecule for further applications.

  20. 3D printing in chemical engineering and catalytic technology: structured catalysts, mixers and reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Cabrera, Cesar; Achille, Clement; Kuhn, Simon; Ameloot, Rob

    2017-11-13

    Computer-aided fabrication technologies combined with simulation and data processing approaches are changing our way of manufacturing and designing functional objects. Also in the field of catalytic technology and chemical engineering the impact of additive manufacturing, also referred to as 3D printing, is steadily increasing thanks to a rapidly decreasing equipment threshold. Although still in an early stage, the rapid and seamless transition between digital data and physical objects enabled by these fabrication tools will benefit both research and manufacture of reactors and structured catalysts. Additive manufacturing closes the gap between theory and experiment, by enabling accurate fabrication of geometries optimized through computational fluid dynamics and the experimental evaluation of their properties. This review highlights the research using 3D printing and computational modeling as digital tools for the design and fabrication of reactors and structured catalysts. The goal of this contribution is to stimulate interactions at the crossroads of chemistry and materials science on the one hand and digital fabrication and computational modeling on the other.

  1. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-02

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS.

  2. Chemical composition and structural features of the macromolecular components of plantation Acacia mangium wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Paula C; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Pascoal Neto, Carlos

    2005-10-05

    The wood of Acacia mangium, a prominent fast-growing plantation species used in the pulp-and-paper industry and, so far, poorly investigated for its chemical structure, was submitted to a detailed characterization of its main macromolecular components. Lignin (28% wood weight) isolated by mild acidolysis and characterized by permanganate oxidation, 1H and 13C NMR, and GPC, showed a very low content of syringylpropane-derived units (S:G:H of 48:49:3), a high degree of condensation, a low content of beta-O-4 ( approximately 0.40-0.43 per C6) structures, and a Mw of 2230. Glucuronoxylan (14% wood weight) isolated by alkaline (KOH) or by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction was characterized by methylation analysis, 1H NMR, and GPC. About 10% of the xylopyranose (Xylp) units constituting the linear backbone were substituted at O-2 with 4-O-methylglucuronic acid residues. Almost half of the Xylp units (45%) were O-2 (18%), O-3 (24%) or O-2,3 (3%) acetylated. X-ray diffraction analysis of cellulose (46% wood weight), isolated according to the Kürschner-Hoffer method, showed a degree of crystallinity of 67.6%.

  3. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  4. Phytocenotic structure and physico-chemical properties of a small water body in agricultural landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Sender

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Small water bodies, until recently considered as wasteland, are an essential element of the so-called small water retention. Their main use can vary significantly, but they always play a positive role by increasing water resources and enhancing the natural values of the landscape. Moreover, by increasing bio- diversity thanks to plants forming habitats for many species of flora and fauna, small water bodies act as a biofilter, improving water quality. But these small reservoirs belong to the groups of waters that are most exposed to damage, especially within the catchment area. Because of the invaluable role of small farmland water bodies, a study was undertaken to investigate their phytocenotic structure. In addition, an attempt was made to assess the level of threats and to indicate their role in the development of habitat conditions. The investigated reservoir was created in 2007. Before that time, it functioned as a part of the Zemborzycki reservoir, as they were close to each other. Almost the entire surrounding of this small reservoir consisted of farmland. In 2011 a revitalization project was carried out in the reservoir. Plants typical for wetland habitats were mainly introduced, while synanthropic vegetation was removed. Based on chemical and physical analyses, it can be concluded that the investigated reservoir serves as a natural biofilter thanks to the qualitative and quantitative changes in the structure of macrophytes. After the revitalization project, the investigated pond gained new aesthetic and ecological qualities.

  5. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy. PMID:19640844

  6. Structural plasticity of malaria dihydroorotate dehydrogenase allows selective binding of diverse chemical scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Phillips, Margaret A

    2009-09-25

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  7. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.; (UWASH); (UTSMC)

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  8. Successful identification of key chemical structure modifications that lead to improved ADME profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurull-Sanchez, Lourdes

    2010-05-01

    The results of a new method developed to identify well defined structural transformations that are key to improve a certain ADME profile are presented in this work. In particular Naïve Bayesian statistics and SciTegic FCFP_6 molecular fingerprints have been used to extract, from a dataset of 1,169 compounds with known in vitro UGT glucuronidation clearance, those changes in chemical structure that lead to a significant increase in this property. The effectiveness in achieving that goal of the thus found 55,987 transformations has been quantified and compared to classical medicinal chemistry transformations. The conclusion is that on average the new transformations found via in silico methods induce increases of UGT clearance by twofold, whilst the classical transformations are on average unable to alter that endpoint significantly in any direction. When both types of transformations are combined via substructural searches (SSS) the average twofold increase in glucuronidation is maintained. The implications of these findings for the drug design process are also discussed, in particular when compared to other methods previously described in the literature to address the question `Which compound do I make next?'

  9. Chemical and structural characterization of char development during lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, Lihle D; Neomagus, Hein W J P; Everson, Raymond C; Strydom, Christien A; Carrier, Marion; Okolo, Gregory N; Bunt, John R

    2017-11-01

    The chemical and structural changes of three lignocellulosic biomass samples during pyrolysis were investigated using both conventional and advanced characterization techniques. The use of ATR-FTIR as a characterization tool is extended by the proposal of a method to determine aromaticity, the calculation of both CH2/CH3 ratio and the degree of aromatic ring condensation ((R/C)u). With increasing temperature, the H/C and O/C ratios, XA and CH2/CH3 ratio decreased, while (R/C)u and aromaticity increased. The micropore network developed with increasing temperature, until the coalescence of pores at 1100°C, which can be linked to increasing carbon densification, extent of aromatization and/or graphitization of the biomass chars. WAXRD-CFA measurements indicated the gradual formation of nearly parallel basic structural units with increasing carbonization temperature. The char development can be considered to occur in two steps: elimination of aliphatic compounds at low temperatures, and hydrogen abstraction and aromatic ring condensation at high temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sea Cucumber Glycosides: Chemical Structures, Producing Species and Important Biological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Rahman, M. Aminur; Islam, Mohamad Tofazzal

    2017-01-01

    Sea cucumbers belonging to echinoderm are traditionally used as tonic food in China and other Asian countries. They produce abundant biologically active triterpene glycosides. More than 300 triterpene glycosides have been isolated and characterized from various species of sea cucumbers, which are classified as holostane and nonholostane depending on the presence or absence of a specific structural unit γ(18,20)-lactone in the aglycone. Triterpene glycosides contain a carbohydrate chain up to six monosaccharide units mainly consisting of d-xylose, 3-O-methy-d-xylose, d-glucose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and d-quinovose. Cytotoxicity is the common biological property of triterpene glycosides isolated from sea cucumbers. Besides cytotoxicity, triterpene glycosides also exhibit antifungal, antiviral and hemolytic activities. This review updates and summarizes our understanding on diverse chemical structures of triterpene glycosides from various species of sea cucumbers and their important biological activities. Mechanisms of action and structural–activity relationships (SARs) of sea cucumber glycosides are also discussed briefly. PMID:29039760

  11. Communities in Large Networks: Identification and Ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study the problem of identifying and ranking the members of a community in a very large network with link analysis only, given a set of representatives of the community. We define the concept of a community justified by a formal analysis of a simple model of the evolution of a directed graph. ...... and its immediate surroundings. The members are ranked with a “local” variant of the PageRank algorithm. Results are reported from successful experiments on identifying and ranking Danish Computer Science sites and Danish Chess pages using only a few representatives....

  12. Citation graph based ranking in Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Marian, Ludmila; Rajman, Martin; Vesely, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Invenio is the web-based integrated digital library system developed at CERN. Within this framework, we present four types of ranking models based on the citation graph that complement the simple approach based on citation counts: time-dependent citation counts, a relevancy ranking which extends the PageRank model, a time-dependent ranking which combines the freshness of citations with PageRank and a ranking that takes into consideration the external citations. We present our analysis and results obtained on two main data sets: Inspire and CERN Document Server. Our main contributions are: (i) a study of the currently available ranking methods based on the citation graph; (ii) the development of new ranking methods that correct some of the identified limitations of the current methods such as treating all citations of equal importance, not taking time into account or considering the citation graph complete; (iii) a detailed study of the key parameters for these ranking methods. (The original publication is ava...

  13. Dynamics and structure of thermo-chemical mantle plumes: Are numerical models consistent with observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannberg, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    According to widely accepted models, plumes ascend from the core-mantle boundary and cause massive melting when they reach the base of the lithosphere. Most of these models consider plumes as purely thermal and predict flattening of the plume head to a disk-like structure, thin plume tails with a radius on the scale of 100 km and kilometer-scale topographic uplift before and during the eruption of flood basalts. However, several paleogeographic and paleotectonic field studies indicate significantly smaller surface uplift during the development of many LIPs, and seismic imaging reveals thicker plume tails as well as a more complex plume structure in the upper mantle including broad low-velocity anomalies up to 400 km depth and elongated low-velocity fingers. Moreover, geochemical data indicate a plume composition that differs from that of the average mantle and recent geodynamic models of plumes in the upper mantle show that plumes containing a large fraction of eclogite and therefore having very low buoyancy can explain the observations much better. Nevertheless, the question remains how such a low-buoyancy plume can rise through the whole mantle and how this ascent affects its dynamics. We perform numerical experiments in 2D axisymmetric geometry to systematically study the dynamics of the plume ascent as well as 2D and 3D models with prescribed velocity at the upper boundary to investigate the interaction between plume- and plate-driven flow. For that purpose, we use modified versions of the finite-element codes Citcom and Aspect. Our models employ complex material properties incorporating phase transitions with the accompanying density changes, Clapeyron slopes and latent heat effects for the peridotite and eclogite phase, mantle compressibility and a highly temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity. We study under which conditions (excess temperature, plume volume and eclogite content) thermo-chemical plumes can ascend through the whole mantle and what

  14. Structural and chemical variations in phlogopite from lamproitic rocks of the Central Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Giovanni O.; Bindi, Luca; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Conticelli, Sandro; Bonazzi, Paola

    2017-08-01

    Micas from mafic ultrapotassic rocks with lamproitic affinity from several localities of the Central Mediterranean region were studied through single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS); Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MöS), when feasible, was also applied to minimise the number of unknown variables and uncertainties. Analysed lamproitic samples cover the most important Central Mediterranean type localities, from Plan d'Albard (Western Alps) to Sisco (Corsica), Montecatini Val di Cecina and Orciatico (Tuscany, Italy) and Torre Alfina (Northern Latium, Italy). The studied crystals show distinctive chemical and structural features; all of them belong to the phlogopite-annite join and crystallise in the 1M polytype, except for micas from Torre Alfina, where both 1M and 2M1 polytypes were found. Studied micas have variable but generally high F and Ti contents, with Mg/(Mg + Fe) ranging from 0.5 to 0.9; 2M1 crystals from Torre Alfina radically differ in chemical composition, showing high contents of Ti and Fe as well as of Al in both tetrahedra and octahedra, leading to distinctive structural distortions, especially in tetrahedral sites. SIMS data indicate that studied micas are generally dehydrogenated with OH contents ranging from 0.2 apfu (atoms per formula unit) for Orciatico and Torre Alfina to 1.4 for Plan d'Albard crystals; this feature is also testified by the length of the c parameter, which decreases with the loss of hydrogen and/or the increase of the F → OH substitution. Chemical and structural data suggest that the entry of high charge octahedral cations is mainly balanced by an oxy mechanism and, to a lesser extent, by a M3 +,4 +-Tschermak substitution. Our data confirm that Ti preferentially partitions into the M2 site and that different Ti and F contents, as well as different K/Al values, are both dependant upon fH2O and the composition of magma rather than controlled by P and T

  15. Chemical structure influence on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mark C; Tick, Geoffrey R; Carroll, Kenneth C; Burke, William R

    2017-03-01

    The influence of chemical structure on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux was examined. The variability of measured and UNIFAC modeled NAPL activity coefficients as a function of mole fraction was compared for two NAPL mixtures containing structurally-different contaminants of concern including toluene (TOL) or trichloroethene (TCE) within a hexadecane (HEXDEC) matrix. The results showed that dissolution from the NAPL mixtures transitioned from ideality for mole fractions >0.05 to nonideality as mole fractions decreased. In particular, the TCE generally exhibited more ideal dissolution behavior except at lower mole fractions, and may indicate greater structural/polarity similarity between the two compounds. Raoult's Law and UNIFAC generally under-predicted the batch experiment results for TOL:HEXDEC mixtures especially for mole fractions ≤0.05. The dissolution rate coefficients were similar for both TOL and TCE over all mole fractions tested. Mass flux reduction (MFR) analysis showed that more efficient removal behavior occurred for TOL and TCE with larger mole fractions compared to the lower initial mole fraction mixtures (i.e. dissolution modeling analyses for the dynamic flushing experiments. TOL elution concentrations were modeled (predicted) reasonable well using ideal and equilibrium assumptions, but the TCE elution concentrations could not be predicted using the ideal model. Rather, the dissolution modeling demonstrated that TCE elution was better described by the nonideal model whereby NAPL-phase activity coefficient varied as a function of COC mole fraction. For dynamic column flushing experiments, dissolution rate kinetics can vary significantly with changes in NAPL volume and surface area. However, under conditions whereby NAPL volume and area are not significantly altered during dissolution, mixture nonideality effects may have a greater relative control on dissolution (elution) and MFR behavior

  16. My Research History on the Chemical Standpoint-From Molecular Structure to Surface Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshitada

    2015-06-01

    The structure of molecules using gas electron diffraction (GED) was my graduate study. However, I was making a new apparatus for precise measurements by GED and formulated a scheme for the least-squares analysis for a smooth continuous curve of scattering intensity. My research was completely shifted to the solid surface after moving to Gakushuin University, where I briefly studied the liquid structure of CCl4 molecules, and I then moved to the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. My studies of surface science were focused on the electronic properties and related phenomena, and various experimental methods were developed. The plasmon dispersions elucidated the initial oxidation of aluminum and one-dimensional metal on Si(001)2 × 1-K. Irreversible phase transition was discovered on MgO(001) using the LEED Kikuchi pattern. The electronic structure of the dislocation was observed on MgO(001) by the electron time-of-flight method. The phase transition on Si(001) and the rotational epitaxy in a K monoatomic layer on Cu(001) were found. Next, I changed to studies of the dynamical phenomena on the surface, where very low energy reactive ion scattering on metal surfaces and laser-induced desorption caused by electronic transition of NO and CO molecules from metal surfaces were observed, and the hydrogen atom location at the surface and interface was measured with a high depth resolution using a resonance nuclear reaction of (1) H + (15) N(2+) at 6.385 MeV. Finally, I moved to the University of Electro-Communications and studied thin single-crystal oxide layers on transition metals, in which the band-gap narrowing was found, and then a Pt monoatomic layer was prepared on the α-Al(2)O(3) film. Copyright © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPLEX CHEMICAL ADDITIVE CONTAINING THE STRUCTURED CARBON NANOMATERIAL ON PROPERTIES OF CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Sheyda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations on influence of domestic complex chemical additive containing structured carbon nanomaterial and characterized by a combination effect (curing acceleration and plasticizing on cement and cement stone properties. The purpose of the investigations, on the one hand, has been to confirm efficacy of УКД-1additive from the perspective for increasing the rate of gain, strength growth of cement concrete and additive influence on setting time with the purpose to preserve molding properties of concrete mixes in time, and on the other hand, that is to assess “mechanism” of the УКД-1 additive action in the cement concrete. The research results have revealed regularities in changes due to the additive of water requirements and time period of the cement setting. The reqularities are considered as a pre-requisite for relevant changes in molding properties of the concrete mixes. The paper also experimentally substantiates the possibility to decrease temperature of cement concrete heating with the УДК-1 additive. It has been done with the purpose to save energy resources under production conditions. In addition to this the paper proves the efficiency of the additive which is expressed in strength increase of cement stone up to 20–40 % in the rated age (28 days that is considered as a basis for strength growth of cement concrete. The paper confirms a hypothesis on physical nature of this phenomenon because the X-ray phase analysis method has shown that there are no changes in morphology of portland cement hydration products under the action of the additive agent containing a structured carbon nanomaterial. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations on УКД-1 additive efficiency have been proved by industrial approbation while fabricating precast concrete products and construction of monolithic structures under plant industrial conditions (Minsk, SS “Stroyprogress” JSC MAPID and on

  18. Structural determinant of chemical reactivity and potential health effects of quinones from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tingting; Giblin, Daryl; Gross, Michael L

    2011-09-19

    Although many phenols and catechols found as polyphenol natural products are antioxidants and have putative disease-preventive properties, others have deleterious health effects. One possible route to toxicity is the bioactivation of the phenolic function to quinones that are electrophilic, redox-agents capable of modifying DNA and proteins. The structure-property relationships of biologically important quinones and their precursors may help understand the balance between their health benefits and risks. We describe a mass-spectrometry-based study of four quinones produced by oxidizing flavanones and flavones. Those with a C2-C3 double bond on ring C of the flavonoid stabilize by delocalization of an incipient positive charge from protonation and render the protonated quinone particularly susceptible to nucleophilic attack. We hypothesize that the absence of this double bond is one specific structural determinant that is responsible for the ability of quinones to modify biological macromolecules. Those quinones containing a C2-C3 single bond have relatively higher aqueous stability and longer half-lives than those with a double bond at the same position; the latter have short half-lives at or below ∼1 s. Quinones with a C2-C3 double bond show little ability to depurinate DNA because they are rapidly hydrated to unreactive species. Molecular-orbital calculations support that quinone hydration by a highly structure-dependent mechanism accounts for their chemical properties. The evidence taken together support a hypothesis that those flavonoids and related natural products that undergo oxidation to quinones and are then rapidly hydrated are unlikely to damage important biological macromolecules.

  19. A Structural Determinant of Chemical Reactivity and Potential Health Effects of Quinones from Natural Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tingting; Giblin, Daryl; Gross, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Although many phenols and catechols found as polyphenol natural products are antioxidants and have putative disease-preventive properties, others have deleterious health effects. One possible route to toxicity is the bioactivation of the phenolic function to quinones that are electrophilic, redox-agents capable of modifying DNA and proteins. The structure-property relationships of biologically important quinones and their precursors may help understand the balance between their health benefits and risks. We describe a mass-spectrometry-based study of four quinones produced by oxidizing flavanones and flavones. Those with a C2-C3 double bond on ring C of the flavonoid stabilize by delocalization an incipient positive charge from protonation and render the protonated quinone particularly susceptible to nucleophilic attack. We hypothesize that the absence of this double bond is one specific structural determinant that is responsible for the ability of quinones to modify biological macromolecules. Those quinones containing a C2-C3 single bond have relative higher aqueous stability and longer half-lives than those with a double bond at the same position; the latter have short half-lives at or below ~ 1 s. Quinones with a C2-C3 double bond show little ability to depurinate DNA because they are rapidly hydrated to unreactive species. Molecular-orbital calculations support that quinone hydration by a highly structure-dependent mechanism accounts for their chemical properties. The evidence taken together support a hypothesis that those flavonoids and related natural products that undergo oxidation to quinones and are then rapidly hydrated are unlikely to damage important biological macromolecules. PMID:21721570

  20. Structure, surface reactivity and physico-chemical degradation of fluoride containing phospho-silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Santos, Luis F.; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2011-03-28

    We report on the structure, apatite-forming ability and physicochemical degradation of glasses along fluorapatite [FA; Ca5(PO4)3F] - diopside (Di; CaMgSi2O6) join. A series of glasses with varying FA/Di ratio have been synthesised by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous glasses could be obtained only for compositions up to 40 wt.% of FA. The detailed structural analysis of glasses has been made by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS-NMR). Silicon was predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species while phosphorus was found in orthophosphate type environment in all the investigated glasses. The apatite forming ability of glasses was investigated by immersion of glass powders in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1 h – 28 days. An extensive precipitation of calcite (CaCO3) after immersion in SBF was found in all the glasses which considerably masked the formation of hydroxyapatite [HA; Ca5(PO4)3OH] as depicted by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR. The possible mechanism favouring formation of calcite instead of HA has been explained on the basis of experimental results obtained for structure of glasses, leaching profile of glass powders in SBF solution and pH variation in SBF solution. Further, physico-chemical degradation of glasses has been studied in accordance with ISO 10993-14 “Biological evaluation of medical devices – Part 14: Identification and quantification of degradation products from ceramics” in Tris HCl and citric acid buffer. All the FA containing glasses exhibited a weight gain (instead of weight loss) after immersion in citric acid buffer due to the formation of different crystalline products.

  1. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein energetic conformational analysis from NMR chemical shifts (PECAN) and its use in determining secondary structural elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Wang Liya; Bahrami, Arash [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States); Assadi, Amir [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mathematics Department (United States); Markley, John L. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)], E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu

    2005-05-15

    We present an energy model that combines information from the amino acid sequence of a protein and available NMR chemical shifts for the purposes of identifying low energy conformations and determining elements of secondary structure. The model ('PECAN', Protein Energetic Conformational Analysis from NMR chemical shifts) optimizes a combination of sequence information and residue-specific statistical energy function to yield energetic descriptions most favorable to predicting secondary structure. Compared to prior methods for secondary structure determination, PECAN provides increased accuracy and range, particularly in regions of extended structure. Moreover, PECAN uses the energetics to identify residues located at the boundaries between regions of predicted secondary structure that may not fit the stringent secondary structure class definitions. The energy model offers insights into the local energetic patterns that underlie conformational preferences. For example, it shows that the information content for defining secondary structure is localized about a residue and reaches a maximum when two residues on either side are considered. The current release of the PECAN software determines the well-defined regions of secondary structure in novel proteins with assigned chemical shifts with an overall accuracy of 90%, which is close to the practical limit of achievable accuracy in classifying the states.

  3. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhipoor, S.; Magén, C.; Venkatesan, S.; Íñiguez, J.; Daumont, C. J. M.; Rubi, D.; Snoeck, E.; Mostovoy, M.; de Graaf, C.; Müller, A.; Döblinger, M.; Scheu, C.; Noheda, B.

    2014-11-01

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  4. Chemical structure of the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharides of the genus Pectinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, I M; Kilpeläinen, I; Vaara, M; Moran, A P; Lindner, B; Seydel, U

    1994-08-15

    The chemical structure of the lipid A components of smooth-type lipopolysaccharides isolated from the type strains of strictly anaerobic beer-spoilage bacteria Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus and Pectinatus frisingensis were analyzed. The hydrophilic backbone of lipid A was shown, by controlled degradation of lipopolysaccharide combined with chemical assays and 31P-NMR spectroscopy, to consist of the common beta 1-6-linked disaccharide of pyranosidic 2-deoxy-glucosamine (GlcN), phosphorylated at the glycosidic position and at position 4'. In de-O-acylated lipopolysaccharide, the latter phosphate was shown to be quantitatively substituted with 4-amino-4-deoxyarabinose, whereas the glycosidically linked phosphate was present as a monoester. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry of free dephosphorylated lipid A revealed that the distal (non-reducing) GlcN was substituted at positions 2' and 3' with (R)-3-(undecanoyloxy)tridecanoic acid, whereas the reducing GlcN carried two unsubstituted (R)-3-hydroxytetradecanoic acids at positions 2 and 3. The lipid A of both Pectinatus species were thus of the asymmetric hexaacyl type. The linkage of lipid A to polysaccharide in the lipopolysaccharide was relatively resistant to acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, enabling the preparation of a dephosphorylated and deacylated saccharide backbone. Methylation analysis of the backbone revealed that position 6' of the distal GlcN of lipid A was the attachment site of the polysaccharide. Despite the quantitative substitution of the lipid A 4'-phosphate by 4-amino-4-deoxyarabinose, which theoretically should render the bacteria resistant to polymyxin, P. cerevisiiphilus was shown to be susceptible to this antibiotic. P. cerevisiiphilus was, however, also susceptibile to vancomycin and bacitracin, indicating that the outer membrane of this bacterium does not act as an effective permeability barrier.

  5. Electronic, structural and chemical effects of charge-transfer at organic/inorganic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, R.; Vázquez de Parga, A. L.; Gallego, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    During the last decade, interest on the growth and self-assembly of organic molecular species on solid surfaces spread over the scientific community, largely motivated by the promise of cheap, flexible and tunable organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. These efforts lead to important advances in our understanding of the nature and strength of the non-bonding intermolecular interactions that control the assembly of the organic building blocks on solid surfaces, which have been recently reviewed in a number of excellent papers. To a large extent, such studies were possible because of a smart choice of model substrate-adsorbate systems where the molecule-substrate interactions were purposefully kept low, so that most of the observed supramolecular structures could be understood simply by considering intermolecular interactions, keeping the role of the surface always relatively small (although not completely negligible). On the other hand, the systems which are more relevant for the development of organic electronic devices include molecular species which are electron donors, acceptors or blends of donors and acceptors. Adsorption of such organic species on solid surfaces is bound to be accompanied by charge-transfer processes between the substrate and the adsorbates, and the physical and chemical properties of the molecules cannot be expected any longer to be the same as in solution phase. In recent years, a number of groups around the world have started tackling the problem of the adsorption, self- assembly and electronic and chemical properties of organic species which interact rather strongly with the surface, and for which charge-transfer must be considered. The picture that is emerging shows that charge transfer can lead to a plethora of new phenomena, from the development of delocalized band-like electron states at molecular overlayers, to the existence of new substrate-mediated intermolecular interactions or the strong modification of the chemical

  6. Chemical and Structural Differences in Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Two Monokaryotic Strains and Their Resulting Dikaryon of Agaricus bisporus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Mendoza C; Perez Cabo A; Calonje; Galan; Novaes-Ledieu

    1996-10-01

    Compatible monokaryotic strains of Agaricus bisporus ATCC 36975 and 36976 and the resulting dikaryon of their mating were grown in a liquid medium, and their respective cell walls were prepared. Significant differences were not found in the gross chemical composition of the three hyphal types. However, the neutral carbohydrate composition of the complete walls and their fractions was found to be somewhat different in each strain. More consistent differences were encountered in the chemical structure of the distinct polysaccharidic wall fractions in the three types of organisms. Some of these structural wall differences can be considered as characteristic markers for differentiating the mono- and dikaryotic types of A. bisporus.

  7. Thermo-chemical structures at the core-mantle boundary: A joint dynamical and seismological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnis, M.; Helmberger, D. V.; Tan, E.; Ni, S.

    2001-12-01

    The boundary between the core and mantle is a primary interface within the deep interior, and seismologists have revealed that the mantle side of this boundary (D") is extraordinarily complex with a myriad of fine structure. Thermal and chemical heterogeneity, phase transitions, anisotropy, and melting within the lower mantle may all be required to explain the observed fine structure. This strongly suggests that the lower boundary of the mantle is as complex as the mantle's top boundary. We use seismology in combination with dynamic models to better understand the nature of D". In this talk, we will focus on putative slabs at the core mantle boundary, large-scale low shear velocity structures which could be upwellings, and the boundary between the two. It is unlikely that D", manifest as a ~2% jump in S and P velocity ~200 km above the CMB is a simple, dense chemical layer; seismic body waveforms in association with tomography show that these jumps in seismic velocity are associated with putative slabs, opposite to predictions from dynamic models. Even for mantle models with a high-viscosity lower mantle, a phase transition at 660 km depth, depth-dependent thermal expansivity, and depth-dependent thermal diffusivity, ancient slabs could be associated with lateral temperature anomalies ~500C cooler than ambient mantle. Plausible increases of thermal conductivity with depth will not cause slabs to diffuse away in the lower mantle. However, regional spherical models with actual plate evolution, show that slabs are unlikely to be continuous from the upper mantle to D", even for radially simple mantle models. The observation from tomography showing only a few continuous slab-like features from the surface to the CMB may be a result of complex plate kinematics, not mantle layering. There are important consequences of deeply penetrating slabs. Plumes preferentially develop on the edge of slabs, consistent with the boundary between tomographically inferred high/low seismic

  8. Understanding boron through size-selected clusters: structure, chemical bonding, and fluxionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Alina P; Popov, Ivan A; Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2014-04-15

    Boron is an interesting element with unusual polymorphism. While three-dimensional (3D) structural motifs are prevalent in bulk boron, atomic boron clusters are found to have planar or quasi-planar structures, stabilized by localized two-center-two-electron (2c-2e) σ bonds on the periphery and delocalized multicenter-two-electron (nc-2e) bonds in both σ and π frameworks. Electron delocalization is a result of boron's electron deficiency and leads to fluxional behavior, which has been observed in B13(+) and B19(-). A unique capability of the in-plane rotation of the inner atoms against the periphery of the cluster in a chosen direction by employing circularly polarized infrared radiation has been suggested. Such fluxional behaviors in boron clusters are interesting and have been proposed as molecular Wankel motors. The concepts of aromaticity and antiaromaticity have been extended beyond organic chemistry to planar boron clusters. The validity of these concepts in understanding the electronic structures of boron clusters is evident in the striking similarities of the π-systems of planar boron clusters to those of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, naphthalene, coronene, anthracene, or phenanthrene. Chemical bonding models developed for boron clusters not only allowed the rationalization of the stability of boron clusters but also lead to the design of novel metal-centered boron wheels with a record-setting planar coordination number of 10. The unprecedented highly coordinated borometallic molecular wheels provide insights into the interactions between transition metals and boron and expand the frontier of boron chemistry. Another interesting feature discovered through cluster studies is boron transmutation. Even though it is well-known that B(-), formed by adding one electron to boron, is isoelectronic to carbon, cluster studies have considerably expanded the possibilities of new structures and new materials using the B(-)/C analogy. It is

  9. Speech Denoising in White Noise Based on Signal Subspace Low-rank Plus Sparse Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yuan Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new subspace speech enhancement method using low-rank and sparse decomposition is presented. In the proposed method, we firstly structure the corrupted data as a Toeplitz matrix and estimate its effective rank for the underlying human speech signal. Then the low-rank and sparse decomposition is performed with the guidance of speech rank value to remove the noise. Extensive experiments have been carried out in white Gaussian noise condition, and experimental results show the proposed method performs better than conventional speech enhancement methods, in terms of yielding less residual noise and lower speech distortion.

  10. Ranked Conservation Opportunity Areas for Region 7 (ECO_RES.RANKED_OAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The RANKED_OAS are all the Conservation Opportunity Areas identified by MoRAP that have subsequently been ranked by patch size, landform representation, and the...

  11. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens. PMID:27625608

  12. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  13. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-10-17

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  14. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  15. Entity Ranking using Wikipedia as a Pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kaptein; P. Serdyukov; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); J. Kamps

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about

  16. Entity ranking using Wikipedia as a pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Serdyukov, P.; de Vries, A.; Kamps, J.; Huang, X.J.; Jones, G.; Koudas, N.; Wu, X.; Collins-Thompson, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about these entities. Since

  17. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal

  18. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  19. Using centrality to rank web snippets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; de Rijke, M.; Peters, C.; Jijkoun, V.; Mandl, T.; Müller, H.; Oard, D.W.; Peñas, A.; Petras, V.; Santos, D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our participation in the WebCLEF 2007 task, targeted at snippet retrieval from web data. Our system ranks snippets based on a simple similarity-based centrality, inspired by the web page ranking algorithms. We experimented with retrieval units (sentences and paragraphs) and with the

  20. Generating and ranking of Dyck words

    CERN Document Server

    Kasa, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    A new algorithm to generate all Dyck words is presented, which is used in ranking and unranking Dyck words. We emphasize the importance of using Dyck words in encoding objects related to Catalan numbers. As a consequence of formulas used in the ranking algorithm we can obtain a recursive formula for the nth Catalan number.