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Sample records for rank order correlation

  1. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Andrea; Koenderink, Jan; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of "pictorial depth" in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of "depth" is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The pictorial space for this study was evoked by a capriccio (imaginary landscape) by Francesco Guardi (1712-1793). In such a drawing pictorial space is suggested by the artist through a small set of conventional depth cues. As a result typical Western observers tend to agree largely in their visual awareness when looking at such art. We rank depths for locations that are not on a single surface and far apart in pictorial space. We find that observers resolve about 40 distinct depth layers and agree largely in this. From a previous experiment we have metrical data for the same observers. The rank correlations between the results are high. Perhaps surprisingly, we find no correlation between the number of distinct depth layers and the total metrical depth range. Thus, the relation between subjective magnitude and discrimination threshold fails to hold for pictorial depth.

  2. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood: Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2015-06-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N = 1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both attitudes, reflecting an increased disagreement with economic redistribution and multiculturalism around late adolescence. Furthermore, attitudes became decreasingly polarized (i.e., less extreme) and increasingly stable with age. Finally, several effects of attitudes' correlates gradually changed: The effect of educational level on ethnocentrism increased with age, whereas the effect of gender diminished. Regional effects on ethnocentrism developed as youths resided in a new area. No age-related change was found in the effect of parental SES. Overall, these findings support the idea that attitudes mature during the formative phase of adolescence and that this process slows down during emerging adulthood. Furthermore, these results support developmental explanations for the association between attitudes and their correlates. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The connections between postural reactions, scoliosis postures and scoliosis in girls aged 12-15 years old examined using the Spearman’s Rank OrderCorrelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczyński Jacek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to analyse the Spearman's Rank Order Correlation between the postural reactions, scoliosis postures and scoliosis in girls aged 12-15 years old. Throughout the whole group of girls, positive correlations between attitude parameters in the frontal plane and the postural reactions were observed: The angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed with which eyes closed, angle of primary curvature /average speed with which eyes closed, angle of primary curvature /path length eyes closed, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X eyes closed, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/lateral speed eyes closed. Negative correlations occurred in cases: absolute value angle of secondary curvature/ mean loading point X eyes open, depth of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes open, length of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes open, angle of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes closed. Statistically significant correlations occurred more frequent when the Romberg’s test was held with eyes closed (CE: angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed, torso inclination angle/mean loading point X, angle of primary curvature/average speed, angle of primary curvature/path length, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/ lateral speed, angle of secondary curvature/mean loading point Y. Among the correlations with eyes closed six were positive: angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed, torso inclination angle/mean loading point X, angle of primary curvature/ average speed, angle of primary curvature/ path length, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/lateral speed, and one was negative: angle of secondary curvature/ mean loading point Y. Among the correlations with eyes open (OE only three negative correlations occurred: absolute value angle of secondary curvature

  4. Estimation of rank correlation for clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2017-06-30

    It is well known that the sample correlation coefficient (Rxy ) is the maximum likelihood estimator of the Pearson correlation (ρxy ) for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) bivariate normal data. However, this is not true for ophthalmologic data where X (e.g., visual acuity) and Y (e.g., visual field) are available for each eye and there is positive intraclass correlation for both X and Y in fellow eyes. In this paper, we provide a regression-based approach for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimator of ρxy for clustered data, which can be implemented using standard mixed effects model software. This method is also extended to allow for estimation of partial correlation by controlling both X and Y for a vector U_ of other covariates. In addition, these methods can be extended to allow for estimation of rank correlation for clustered data by (i) converting ranks of both X and Y to the probit scale, (ii) estimating the Pearson correlation between probit scores for X and Y, and (iii) using the relationship between Pearson and rank correlation for bivariate normally distributed data. The validity of the methods in finite-sized samples is supported by simulation studies. Finally, two examples from ophthalmology and analgesic abuse are used to illustrate the methods. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ranking structures and Rank-Rank Correlations of Countries. The FIFA and UEFA cases

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2014-01-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures, in both cases.

  6. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  7. Ranking Visualizations of Correlation Using Weber's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lane; Yang, Fumeng; Franconeri, Steven; Chang, Remco

    2014-12-01

    Despite years of research yielding systems and guidelines to aid visualization design, practitioners still face the challenge of identifying the best visualization for a given dataset and task. One promising approach to circumvent this problem is to leverage perceptual laws to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of a visualization design. Following previously established methodologies, we conduct a large scale (n=1687) crowdsourced experiment to investigate whether the perception of correlation in nine commonly used visualizations can be modeled using Weber's law. The results of this experiment contribute to our understanding of information visualization by establishing that: (1) for all tested visualizations, the precision of correlation judgment could be modeled by Weber's law, (2) correlation judgment precision showed striking variation between negatively and positively correlated data, and (3) Weber models provide a concise means to quantify, compare, and rank the perceptual precision afforded by a visualization.

  8. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, A.; Koenderink, J.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of “pictorial depth” in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of “depth” is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The

  9. Efficient nonrigid registration using ranked order statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennakoon, Ruwan B.; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    of research. In this paper we propose a fast and accurate non-rigid registration method for intra-modality volumetric images. Our approach exploits the information provided by an order statistics based segmentation method, to find the important regions for registration and use an appropriate sampling scheme...

  10. Examination Malpractice in Nigeria: Rank-ordering the Types ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although 'giraffing' and carrying of prepared materials into the examination hall were the most common forms of examination malpractice, bribery (ranked 4.5) was the anchor. Students, peer group and parents were the worst malpractitioners in a decreasing order of culpability. Overvaluing of certificates and teachers' ...

  11. Frames for exact inversion of the rank order coder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, Khaled; Antonini, Marc; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Our goal is to revisit rank order coding by proposing an original exact decoding procedure for it. Rank order coding was proposed by Thorpe et al. who stated that the order in which the retina cells are activated encodes for the visual stimulus. Based on this idea, the authors proposed in [1] a rank order coder/decoder associated to a retinal model. Though, it appeared that the decoding procedure employed yields reconstruction errors that limit the model bit-cost/quality performances when used as an image codec. The attempts made in the literature to overcome this issue are time consuming and alter the coding procedure, or are lacking mathematical support and feasibility for standard size images. Here we solve this problem in an original fashion by using the frames theory, where a frame of a vector space designates an extension for the notion of basis. Our contribution is twofold. First, we prove that the analyzing filter bank considered is a frame, and then we define the corresponding dual frame that is necessary for the exact image reconstruction. Second, to deal with the problem of memory overhead, we design a recursive out-of-core blockwise algorithm for the computation of this dual frame. Our work provides a mathematical formalism for the retinal model under study and defines a simple and exact reverse transform for it with over than 265 dB of increase in the peak signal-to-noise ratio quality compared to [1]. Furthermore, the framework presented here can be extended to several models of the visual cortical areas using redundant representations.

  12. A Rank-Ordered Marginal Filter for Deinterlacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Hoon Kang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new interpolation filter for deinterlacing, which is achievedby enhancing the edge preserving ability of the conventional edge-based line averagemethods. This filter consists of three steps: pre-processing step, fuzzy metric-based weightassignation step, and rank-ordered marginal filter step. The proposed method is able tointerpolate the missing lines without introducing annoying articles. Simulation results showthat the images filtered with the proposed algorithm restrain less annoying pixels than theones acquired by other methods.

  13. Second order analysis of two-stage rank tests for the one-sample problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a rank analogue to Stein's two-stage procedure. We analyze its behavior to second order using existing asymptotic expansions for fixed sample size rank tests and recent results on combinations of independent rank statistics.

  14. Correlation of Cognitive Abilities Level, Age and Ranks in Judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraček Stanislav

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to ascertain the correlation between selected cognitive abilities, age and performance of judokas according to ranking. The study group consisted of judokas in the age group 18 ± 2.4 years. The Stroop Color-Word Test - Victoria Version (VST was the instrument used to determine the level of cognitive abilities. The data obtained were measured by the Pearson Correlation (r correlation test. The results of the study show an associative relationship of indirect correlation (p < 0.01 between age and all of the three categories of the Stroop test. This is an indirect correlation, so the higher the age, the lower the time (better performance of the probands in the Stroop test. There was no statistically significant correlation between performance in the categories of the Stroop test and rankings. The outcomes show that the level of selected cognitive abilities depends on age, but the level of the selected cognitive abilities does not affect the ranking of the judokas.

  15. A new powerful nonparametric rank test for ordered alternative problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guogen Shan

    Full Text Available We propose a new nonparametric test for ordered alternative problem based on the rank difference between two observations from different groups. These groups are assumed to be independent from each other. The exact mean and variance of the test statistic under the null distribution are derived, and its asymptotic distribution is proven to be normal. Furthermore, an extensive power comparison between the new test and other commonly used tests shows that the new test is generally more powerful than others under various conditions, including the same type of distribution, and mixed distributions. A real example from an anti-hypertensive drug trial is provided to illustrate the application of the tests. The new test is therefore recommended for use in practice due to easy calculation and substantial power gain.

  16. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  17. Covariate-adjusted Spearman's rank correlation with probability-scale residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Li, Chun; Wanga, Valentine; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2017-11-13

    It is desirable to adjust Spearman's rank correlation for covariates, yet existing approaches have limitations. For example, the traditionally defined partial Spearman's correlation does not have a sensible population parameter, and the conditional Spearman's correlation defined with copulas cannot be easily generalized to discrete variables. We define population parameters for both partial and conditional Spearman's correlation through concordance-discordance probabilities. The definitions are natural extensions of Spearman's rank correlation in the presence of covariates and are general for any orderable random variables. We show that they can be neatly expressed using probability-scale residuals (PSRs). This connection allows us to derive simple estimators. Our partial estimator for Spearman's correlation between X and Y adjusted for Z is the correlation of PSRs from models of X on Z and of Y on Z, which is analogous to the partial Pearson's correlation derived as the correlation of observed-minus-expected residuals. Our conditional estimator is the conditional correlation of PSRs. We describe estimation and inference, and highlight the use of semiparametric cumulative probability models, which allow preservation of the rank-based nature of Spearman's correlation. We conduct simulations to evaluate the performance of our estimators and compare them with other popular measures of association, demonstrating their robustness and efficiency. We illustrate our method in two applications, a biomarker study and a large survey. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  18. Efficient implementation of the rank correlation merit function for 2D/3D registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figl, M; Bloch, C; Gendrin, C; Weber, C; Pawiro, S A; Hummel, J; Markelj, P; Pernus, F; Bergmann, H; Birkfellner, W, E-mail: michael.figl@meduniwien.ac.a, E-mail: christoph.bloch@meduniwien.ac.a, E-mail: wolfgang.birkfellner@meduniwien.ac.a [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University Vienna, AKH 4 L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Laboratory of Imaging Technologies, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-10-07

    A growing number of clinical applications using 2D/3D registration have been presented recently. Usually, a digitally reconstructed radiograph is compared iteratively to an x-ray image of the known projection geometry until a match is achieved, thus providing six degrees of freedom of rigid motion which can be used for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy or computer-assisted interventions. Recently, stochastic rank correlation, a merit function based on Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, was presented as a merit function especially suitable for 2D/3D registration. The advantage of this measure is its robustness against variations in image histogram content and its wide convergence range. The considerable computational expense of computing an ordered rank list is avoided here by comparing randomly chosen subsets of the DRR and reference x-ray. In this work, we show that it is possible to omit the sorting step and to compute the rank correlation coefficient of the full image content as fast as conventional merit functions. Our evaluation of a well-calibrated cadaver phantom also confirms that rank correlation-type merit functions give the most accurate results if large differences in the histogram content for the DRR and the x-ray image are present. (note)

  19. High order singular rank one perturbations of a positive operator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksma, A.; Kurasov, P.; Shondin, Yu.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper self-adjoint realizations in Hilbert and Pontryagin spaces of the formal expression Lα = L + α〈·, φ〉φ are discussed and compared. Here L is a positive self-adjoint operator in a Hilbert space H with inner product 〈· ,·〉, α is a real parameter, and φ in the rank one perturbation is a

  20. Sensitivity analysis of ranked data: from order statistics to quantiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidergott, B.F.; Volk-Makarewicz, W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we provide the mathematical theory for sensitivity analysis of order statistics of continuous random variables, where the sensitivity is with respect to a distributional parameter. Sensitivity analysis of order statistics over a finite number of observations is discussed before

  1. Some Health States Are Better Than Others: Using Health State Rank Order to Improve Probabilistic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Jalal, Hawre J

    2016-11-01

    Probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) may lead policy makers to take nonoptimal actions due to misestimates of decision uncertainty caused by ignoring correlations. We developed a method to establish joint uncertainty distributions of quality-of-life (QoL) weights exploiting ordinal preferences over health states. Our method takes as inputs independent, univariate marginal distributions for each QoL weight and a preference ordering. It establishes a correlation matrix between QoL weights intended to preserve the ordering. It samples QoL weight values from their distributions, ordering them with the correlation matrix. It calculates the proportion of samples violating the ordering, iteratively adjusting the correlation matrix until this proportion is below an arbitrarily small threshold. We compare our method with the uncorrelated method and other methods for preserving rank ordering in terms of violation proportions and fidelity to the specified marginal distributions along with PSA and expected value of partial perfect information (EVPPI) estimates, using 2 models: 1) a decision tree with 2 decision alternatives and 2) a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) Markov model with 3 alternatives. All methods make tradeoffs between violating preference orderings and altering marginal distributions. For both models, our method simultaneously performed best, with largest performance advantages when distributions reflected wider uncertainty. For PSA, larger changes to the marginal distributions induced by existing methods resulted in differing conclusions about which strategy was most likely optimal. For EVPPI, both preference order violations and altered marginal distributions caused existing methods to misestimate the maximum value of seeking additional information, sometimes concluding that there was no value. Analysts can characterize the joint uncertainty in QoL weights to improve PSA and value-of-information estimates using Open Source implementations of our method.

  2. Correlation Test Application of Supplier’s Ranking Using TOPSIS and AHP-TOPSIS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Yuniwati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The supplier selection process can be done using multi-criteria decision making (MCDM methods in firms. There are many MCDM Methods, but firms must choose the method suitable with the firm condition. Company A has analyzed supplier’s ranking using TOPSIS method. TOPSIS method has a marjor weakness in its subjective weighting. This flaw is overcome using AHP method weighting having undergone a consistency test. In this study, the comparison of supplier’s ranking using TOPSIS and AHP-TOPSIS method used correlation test. The aim of this paper is to determine different result from two methods. Data in suppliers’ ranking is ordinal data, so this process used Spearman’s rank and Kendall’s tau b correlation. If most of the ranked scored are same, Kendall’s tau b correlation should be used. The other way, Spearman rank should be used. The result of this study is that most of the ranked scored are different, so the process used Spearman rank p-value of Spearman’s rank correlation of 0.505. It is greater than 0.05, means there is no statistically significant correlation between two methods. Furthermore, increment or decrement of supplier’s ranking in one method is not significantly related to the increment or decrement of supplier’s ranking in the second method

  3. Nonrigid registration of volumetric images using ranked order statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennakoon, Ruwan; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza; Cao, Zhenwei

    2014-01-01

    burden and increase the registration accuracy has become an intensive area of research. In this paper we propose a fast and accurate non-rigid registration method for intra-modality volumetric images. Our approach exploits the information provided by an order statistics based segmentation method, to find......Non-rigid image registration techniques using intensity based similarity measures are widely used in medical imaging applications. Due to high computational complexities of these techniques, particularly for volumetric images, finding appropriate registration methods to both reduce the computation...... the important regions for registration and use an appropriate sampling scheme to target those areas and reduce the registration computation time. A unique advantage of the proposed method is its ability to identify the point of diminishing returns and stop the registration process. Our experiments...

  4. Relevance weighting of tier 1 endocrine screening endpoints by rank order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgert, Christopher J; Stuchal, Leah D; Mihaich, Ellen M; Becker, Richard A; Bentley, Karin S; Brausch, John M; Coady, Katie; Geter, David R; Gordon, Elliot; Guiney, Patrick D; Hess, Frederick; Holmes, Catherine M; LeBaron, Matthew J; Levine, Steve; Marty, Sue; Mukhi, Sandeep; Neal, Barbara H; Ortego, Lisa S; Saltmiras, David A; Snajdr, Suzanne; Staveley, Jane; Tobia, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Weight of evidence (WoE) approaches are recommended for interpreting various toxicological data, but few systematic and transparent procedures exist. A hypothesis-based WoE framework was recently published focusing on the U.S. EPA's Tier 1 Endocrine Screening Battery (ESB) as an example. The framework recommends weighting each experimental endpoint according to its relevance for deciding eight hypotheses addressed by the ESB. Here we present detailed rationale for weighting the ESB endpoints according to three rank ordered categories and an interpretive process for using the rankings to reach WoE determinations. Rank 1 was assigned to in vivo endpoints that characterize the fundamental physiological actions for androgen, estrogen, and thyroid activities. Rank 1 endpoints are specific and sensitive for the hypothesis, interpretable without ancillary data, and rarely confounded by artifacts or nonspecific activity. Rank 2 endpoints are specific and interpretable for the hypothesis but less informative than Rank 1, often due to oversensitivity, inclusion of narrowly context-dependent components of the hormonal system (e.g., in vitro endpoints), or confounding by nonspecific activity. Rank 3 endpoints are relevant for the hypothesis but only corroborative of Ranks 1 and 2 endpoints. Rank 3 includes many apical in vivo endpoints that can be affected by systemic toxicity and nonhormonal activity. Although these relevance weight rankings (WREL ) necessarily involve professional judgment, their a priori derivation enhances transparency and renders WoE determinations amenable to methodological scrutiny according to basic scientific premises, characteristics that cannot be assured by processes in which the rationale for decisions is provided post hoc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Choice Overload and Height Ranking of Menus in Partially-Ordered Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Basili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When agents face incomplete information and their knowledge about the objects of choice is vague and imprecise, they tend to consider fewer choices and to process a smaller portion of the available information regarding their choices. This phenomenon is well-known as choice overload and is strictly related to the existence of a considerable amount of option-pairs that are not easily comparable. Thus, we use a finite partially-ordered set (poset to model the subset of easily-comparable pairs within a set of options/items. The height ranking, a new ranking rule for menus, namely subposets of a finite poset, is then introduced and characterized. The height ranking rule ranks subsets of options in terms of the size of the longest chain that they include and is therefore meant to assess menus of available options in terms of the maximum number of distinct and easily-comparable alternative options that they offer.

  6. Interval estimation for rank correlation coefficients based on the probit transformation with extension to measurement error correction of correlated ranked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-02-10

    The Spearman (rho(s)) and Kendall (tau) rank correlation coefficient are routinely used as measures of association between non-normally distributed random variables. However, confidence limits for rho(s) are only available under the assumption of bivariate normality and for tau under the assumption of asymptotic normality of tau. In this paper, we introduce another approach for obtaining confidence limits for rho(s) or tau based on the arcsin transformation of sample probit score correlations. This approach is shown to be applicable for an arbitrary bivariate distribution. The arcsin-based estimators for rho(s) and tau (denoted by rho(s,a), tau(a)) are shown to have asymptotic relative efficiency (ARE) of 9/pi2 compared with the usual estimators rho(s) and tau when rho(s) and tau are, respectively, 0. In some nutritional applications, the Spearman rank correlation between nutrient intake as assessed by a reference instrument versus nutrient intake as assessed by a surrogate instrument is used as a measure of validity of the surrogate instrument. However, if only a single replicate (or a few replicates) are available for the reference instrument, then the estimated Spearman rank correlation will be downwardly biased due to measurement error. In this paper, we use the probit transformation as a tool for specifying an ANOVA-type model for replicate ranked data resulting in a point and interval estimate of a measurement error corrected rank correlation. This extends previous work by Rosner and Willett for obtaining point and interval estimates of measurement error corrected Pearson correlations. 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Su, Xiaoyan; Qian, Hong; Yang, Ning; Han, Wenhua

    2017-10-16

    In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (D-S theory) has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D-S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjian Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster–Shafer evidence theory (D–S theory has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D–S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Additive Representations on Rank-Ordered Sets. I. The Algebraic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper considers additive conjoint measurement on subsets of Cartesian products containing "rank-ordered" n-tuples. Contrary to what has often been thought, additive conjoint measurement on subsets of Cartesian products has characteristics different from additive conjoint measurement on full

  10. Population models and simulation methods: The case of the Spearman rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astivia, Oscar L Olvera; Zumbo, Bruno D

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of a population model in guiding the design and interpretation of simulation studies used to investigate the Spearman rank correlation. The Spearman rank correlation has been known for over a hundred years to applied researchers and methodologists alike and is one of the most widely used non-parametric statistics. Still, certain misconceptions can be found, either explicitly or implicitly, in the published literature because a population definition for this statistic is rarely discussed within the social and behavioural sciences. By relying on copula distribution theory, a population model is presented for the Spearman rank correlation, and its properties are explored both theoretically and in a simulation study. Through the use of the Iman-Conover algorithm (which allows the user to specify the rank correlation as a population parameter), simulation studies from previously published articles are explored, and it is found that many of the conclusions purported in them regarding the nature of the Spearman correlation would change if the data-generation mechanism better matched the simulation design. More specifically, issues such as small sample bias and lack of power of the t-test and r-to-z Fisher transformation disappear when the rank correlation is calculated from data sampled where the rank correlation is the population parameter. A proof for the consistency of the sample estimate of the rank correlation is shown as well as the flexibility of the copula model to encompass results previously published in the mathematical literature. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Knowledge extraction from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltic, Snjezana; Kasabov, Nikola

    2010-12-01

    This paper demonstrates how knowledge can be extracted from evolving spiking neural networks with rank order population coding. Knowledge discovery is a very important feature of intelligent systems. Yet, a disproportionally small amount of research is centered on the issue of knowledge extraction from spiking neural networks which are considered to be the third generation of artificial neural networks. The lack of knowledge representation compatibility is becoming a major detriment to end users of these networks. We show that a high-level knowledge can be obtained from evolving spiking neural networks. More specifically, we propose a method for fuzzy rule extraction from an evolving spiking network with rank order population coding. The proposed method was used for knowledge discovery on two benchmark taste recognition problems where the knowledge learnt by an evolving spiking neural network was extracted in the form of zero-order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy IF-THEN rules.

  12. ROCIT : a visual object recognition algorithm based on a rank-order coding scheme.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Antonio Ignacio; Reeves, Paul C.; Jones, John J.; Farkas, Benjamin D.

    2004-06-01

    This document describes ROCIT, a neural-inspired object recognition algorithm based on a rank-order coding scheme that uses a light-weight neuron model. ROCIT coarsely simulates a subset of the human ventral visual stream from the retina through the inferior temporal cortex. It was designed to provide an extensible baseline from which to improve the fidelity of the ventral stream model and explore the engineering potential of rank order coding with respect to object recognition. This report describes the baseline algorithm, the model's neural network architecture, the theoretical basis for the approach, and reviews the history of similar implementations. Illustrative results are used to clarify algorithm details. A formal benchmark to the 1998 FERET fafc test shows above average performance, which is encouraging. The report concludes with a brief review of potential algorithmic extensions for obtaining scale and rotational invariance.

  13. Quantum correlations with no causal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Caslav

    2012-01-01

    The idea that events obey a definite causal order is deeply rooted in our understanding of the world and at the basis of the very notion of time. But where does causal order come from, and is it a necessary property of nature? Here, we address these questions from the standpoint of quantum mechanics in a new framework for multipartite correlations that does not assume a pre-defined global causal structure but only the validity of quantum mechanics locally. All known situations that respect causal order, including space-like and time-like separated experiments, are captured by this framework in a unified way. Surprisingly, we find correlations that cannot be understood in terms of definite causal order. These correlations violate a 'causal inequality' that is satisfied by all space-like and time-like correlations. We further show that in a classical limit causal order always arises, which suggests that space-time may emerge from a more fundamental structure in a quantum-to-classical transition.

  14. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-10-01

    An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as "fuzzy," so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better.

  15. Charge order, superconducting correlations, and positive muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonier, J.E., E-mail: jsonier@sfu.ca

    2015-02-15

    The recent discoveries of short-range charge-density wave order in the normal state of several hole-doped cuprate superconductors constitute a significant addition to the known intrinsic properties of these materials. Besides likely being associated with the normal-state pseudogap, the charge-density wave order presumably influences the build-up of known superconducting correlations as the temperature is lowered toward the superconducting state. As a pure magnetic probe, muon spin rotation (μ SR) is not directly sensitive to charge order, but may sense its presence via the effect it has on the magnetic dipolar coupling of the muon with the host nuclei at zero or low magnetic field. At higher field where μ SR is completely blind to the effects of charge order, experiments have revealed a universal inhomogeneous normal-state response extending to temperatures well above T{sub c}. The measured inhomogeneous line broadening has been attributed to regions of superconducting correlations that exhibit varying degrees of fluctuation diamagnetism. Here, the compatibility of these results with other measurements showing charge order correlations or superconducting fluctuations above T{sub c} is discussed. - Highlights: • Superconducting fluctuations in high-T cuprates probed by positive muons are discussed. • Superconducting fluctuations are detected at higher temperatures than by other methods. • The muon experiments indicate that the superconducting fluctuations are inhomogeneous. • The compatibility with short-range charge order in the normal state is considered.

  16. High-order nonuniformly correlated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2018-02-01

    We have introduced a class of partially coherent beams with spatially varying correlations named high-order nonuniformly correlated (HNUC) beams, as an extension of conventional nonuniformly correlated (NUC) beams. Such beams bring a new parameter (mode order) which is used to tailor the spatial coherence properties. The behavior of the spectral density of the HNUC beams on propagation has been investigated through numerical examples with the help of discrete model decomposition and fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm. Our results reveal that by selecting the mode order appropriately, the more sharpened intensity maxima can be achieved at a certain propagation distance compared to that of the NUC beams, and the lateral shift of the intensity maxima on propagation is closed related to the mode order. Furthermore, analytical expressions for the r.m.s width and the propagation factor of the HNUC beams on free-space propagation are derived by means of Wigner distribution function. The influence of initial beam parameters on the evolution of the r.m.s width and the propagation factor, and the relation between the r.m.s width and the occurring of the sharpened intensity maxima on propagation have been studied and discussed in detail.

  17. Thalamo-Sensorimotor Functional Connectivity Correlates with World Ranking of Olympic, Elite, and High Performance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity studies have shown functional reorganization in participants with outstanding motor expertise. Little is known about neural plasticity associated with exceptionally long motor training or of its predictive value for motor performance excellence. The present study utilised resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI in a unique sample of world-class athletes: Olympic, elite, and internationally ranked swimmers (n=30. Their world ranking ranged from 1st to 250th: each had prepared for participation in the Olympic Games. Combining rs-fMRI graph-theoretical and seed-based functional connectivity analyses, it was discovered that the thalamus has its strongest connections with the sensorimotor network in elite swimmers with the highest world rankings (career best rank: 1–35. Strikingly, thalamo-sensorimotor functional connections were highly correlated with the swimmers’ motor performance excellence, that is, accounting for 41% of the individual variance in best world ranking. Our findings shed light on neural correlates of long-term athletic performance involving thalamo-sensorimotor functional circuits.

  18. A generalized rank-order method for nonparametric analysis of data from exercise science: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J R; Nelson, J K; Thomas, K T

    1999-03-01

    Frequent violations of the assumption that data are normally distributed occur in exercise science and other life and behavioral sciences. When this assumption is violated, parametric statistical analyses may be inappropriate for data analysis. We provide a rationale for using a generalized form of nonparametric analyses based on the Puri and Sen (1985) L treated as a chi 2 approximation. If data do not meet the assumption of normality, this nonparametric approach has substantial power and is easy to use. An advantage of this generalized technique is that ranked data may be used in standard parametric statistical programs widely available on desktop and mainframe computers, for example, regression, analysis of variance (ANOVA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) within BioMed, SAS, SPSS. Once the data are ranked and analyzed with these programs, the only adjustment required is to use a standard formula to calculate the nonparametric test statistic, L, instead of the parametric test statistic (e.g., F). Thus, rank-order nonparametric models become parallel with their parametric counterparts allowing the researcher to select between them based on characteristics of the data distribution. Examples of this approach are provided using data from exercise science for regression, ANOVA (including repeated measures) and MANOVA techniques from SPSSPC. Using these procedures, researchers can easily examine data distributions and make an appropriate decision about parametric or nonparametric analyses while continuing to use their regular statistical packages.

  19. Do Quantitative Measures of Research Productivity Correlate with Academic Rank in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Dodson, Thomas B; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Calotta, Nicholas; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-08-01

    Academic promotion is linked to research productivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States. The predictor variables were categorized as demographic (gender, medical degree, research doctorate, other advanced degree) and quantitative measures of academic productivity (total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single article, I-10 index [number of publications with ≥ 10 citations], and h-index [number of publications h with ≥ h citations each]). The outcome variable was current academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or endowed professor). Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed to evaluate associations between the predictors and academic rank. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were computed to identify thresholds for academic promotion. The sample consisted of 324 academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of whom 11.7% were female, 40% had medical degrees, and 8% had research doctorates. The h-index was the most strongly correlated with academic rank (ρ = 0.62, p research activity.

  20. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  1. Universality of rank-ordering distributions in the arts and sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Martínez-Mekler

    Full Text Available Searching for generic behaviors has been one of the driving forces leading to a deep understanding and classification of diverse phenomena. Usually a starting point is the development of a phenomenology based on observations. Such is the case for power law distributions encountered in a wealth of situations coming from physics, geophysics, biology, lexicography as well as social and financial networks. This finding is however restricted to a range of values outside of which finite size corrections are often invoked. Here we uncover a universal behavior of the way in which elements of a system are distributed according to their rank with respect to a given property, valid for the full range of values, regardless of whether or not a power law has previously been suggested. We propose a two parameter functional form for these rank-ordered distributions that gives excellent fits to an impressive amount of very diverse phenomena, coming from the arts, social and natural sciences. It is a discrete version of a generalized beta distribution, given by f(r = A(N+1-r(b/r(a, where r is the rank, N its maximum value, A the normalization constant and (a, b two fitting exponents. Prompted by our genetic sequence observations we present a growth probabilistic model incorporating mutation-duplication features that generates data complying with this distribution. The competition between permanence and change appears to be a relevant, though not necessary feature. Additionally, our observations mainly of social phenomena suggest that a multifactorial quality resulting from the convergence of several heterogeneous underlying processes is an important feature. We also explore the significance of the distribution parameters and their classifying potential. The ubiquity of our findings suggests that there must be a fundamental underlying explanation, most probably of a statistical nature, such as an appropriate central limit theorem formulation.

  2. Universality of rank-ordering distributions in the arts and sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Alvarez Martínez, Roberto; Beltrán del Río, Manuel; Mansilla, Ricardo; Miramontes, Pedro; Cocho, Germinal

    2009-01-01

    Searching for generic behaviors has been one of the driving forces leading to a deep understanding and classification of diverse phenomena. Usually a starting point is the development of a phenomenology based on observations. Such is the case for power law distributions encountered in a wealth of situations coming from physics, geophysics, biology, lexicography as well as social and financial networks. This finding is however restricted to a range of values outside of which finite size corrections are often invoked. Here we uncover a universal behavior of the way in which elements of a system are distributed according to their rank with respect to a given property, valid for the full range of values, regardless of whether or not a power law has previously been suggested. We propose a two parameter functional form for these rank-ordered distributions that gives excellent fits to an impressive amount of very diverse phenomena, coming from the arts, social and natural sciences. It is a discrete version of a generalized beta distribution, given by f(r) = A(N+1-r)(b)/r(a), where r is the rank, N its maximum value, A the normalization constant and (a, b) two fitting exponents. Prompted by our genetic sequence observations we present a growth probabilistic model incorporating mutation-duplication features that generates data complying with this distribution. The competition between permanence and change appears to be a relevant, though not necessary feature. Additionally, our observations mainly of social phenomena suggest that a multifactorial quality resulting from the convergence of several heterogeneous underlying processes is an important feature. We also explore the significance of the distribution parameters and their classifying potential. The ubiquity of our findings suggests that there must be a fundamental underlying explanation, most probably of a statistical nature, such as an appropriate central limit theorem formulation.

  3. Do Standard Bibliometric Measures Correlate with Academic Rank of Full-Time Pediatric Dentistry Faculty Members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Harlyn K; Dhar, Vineet; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between quantitative measures of research productivity and academic rank for full-time pediatric dentistry faculty members in accredited U.S. and Canadian residency programs. For each pediatric dentist in the study group, academic rank and bibliometric factors derived from publicly available databases were recorded. Academic ranks were lecturer/instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor. Bibliometric factors were mean total number of publications, mean total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single work, and h-index (a measure of the impact of publications, determined by total number of publications h that had at least h citations each). The study sample was comprised of 267 pediatric dentists: 4% were lecturers/instructors, 44% were assistant professors, 30% were associate professors, and 22% were professors. The mean number of publications for the sample was 15.4±27.8. The mean number of citations was 218.4±482.0. The mean h-index was 4.9±6.6. The h-index was strongly correlated with academic rank (r=0.60, p=0.001). For this sample, an h-index of ≥3 was identified as a threshold for promotion to associate professor, and an h-index of ≥6 was identified as a threshold for promotion to professor. The h-index was strongly correlated with the academic rank of these pediatric dental faculty members, suggesting that this index may be considered a measure for promotion, along with a faculty member's quality and quantity of research, teaching, service, and clinical activities.

  4. A Modular and Scalable Architecture for the Realization of High-speed Programmable Rank Order Filters Using Threshold Logic

    OpenAIRE

    İ. Hatirnaz; Gürkaynak, F. K.; Leblebici, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new scalable architecture for the realization of fully programmable rank order filters (ROF). Capacitive Threshold Logic (CTL) gates are utilized for the implementation of the multi-input programmable majority (voting) functions required in the architecture. The CTL-based realization of the majority gates used in the ROF architecture allows the filter rank as well as the window size to be user-programmable, using a much smaller silicon area, compared to conventional realizations ...

  5. Digital image comparison by subtracting contextual transformations—percentile rank order differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehde, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The common method of digital image comparison by subtraction imposes various constraints on the image contents. Precise registration of images is required to assure proper evaluation of surface locations. The attribute being measured and the calibration and scaling of the sensor are also important to the validity and interpretability of the subtraction result. Influences of sensor gains and offsets complicate the subtraction process. The presence of any uniform systematic transformation component in one of two images to be compared distorts the subtraction results and requires analyst intervention to interpret or remove it. A new technique has been developed to overcome these constraints. Images to be compared are first transformed using the cumulative relative frequency as a transfer function. The transformed images represent the contextual relationship of each surface location with respect to all others within the image. The process of differentiating between the transformed images results in a percentile rank ordered difference. This process produces consistent terrain-change information even when the above requirements necessary for subtraction are relaxed. This technique may be valuable to an appropriately designed hierarchical terrain-monitoring methodology because it does not require human participation in the process.

  6. The interplay between QSAR/QSPR studies and partial order ranking and formal concept analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2009-04-17

    The often observed scarcity of physical-chemical and well as toxicological data hampers the assessment of potentially hazardous chemicals released to the environment. In such cases Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships/Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSAR/QSPR) constitute an obvious alternative for rapidly, effectively and inexpensively generatng missing experimental values. However, typically further treatment of the data appears necessary, e.g., to elucidate the possible relations between the single compounds as well as implications and associations between the various parameters used for the combined characterization of the compounds under investigation. In the present paper the application of QSAR/QSPR in combination with Partial Order Ranking (POR) methodologies will be reviewed and new aspects using Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) will be introduced. Where POR constitutes an attractive method for, e.g., prioritizing a series of chemical substances based on a simultaneous inclusion of a range of parameters, FCA gives important information on the implications associations between the parameters. The combined approach thus constitutes an attractive method to a preliminary assessment of the impact on environmental and human health by primary pollutants or possibly by a primary pollutant well as a possible suite of transformation subsequent products that may be both persistent in and bioaccumulating and toxic. The present review focus on the environmental - and human health impact by residuals of the rocket fuel 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (heptyl) and its transformation products as an illustrative example.

  7. The Interplay between QSAR/QSPR Studiesand Partial Order Ranking and Formal Concept Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Carlsen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The often observed scarcity of physical-chemical and well as toxicological data hampers the assessment of potentially hazardous chemicals released to the environment. In such cases Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships/Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSAR/QSPR constitute an obvious alternative for rapidly, effectively and inexpensively generatng missing experimental values. However, typically further treatment of the data appears necessary, e.g., to elucidate the possible relations between the single compounds as well as implications and associations between the various parameters used for the combined characterization of the compounds under investigation. In the present paper the application of QSAR/QSPR in combination with Partial Order Ranking (POR methodologies will be reviewed and new aspects using Formal Concept Analysis (FCA will be introduced. Where POR constitutes an attractive method for, e.g., prioritizing a series of chemical substances based on a simultaneous inclusion of a range of parameters, FCA gives important information on the implications associations between the parameters. The combined approach thus constitutes an attractive method to a preliminary assessment of the impact on environmental and human health by primary pollutants or possibly by a primary pollutant well as a possible suite of transformation subsequent products that may be both persistent in and bioaccumulating and toxic.The present review focus on the environmental – and human health impact by residuals of the rocket fuel 1,1-dimethyl- hydrazine (heptyl and its transformation products as an illustrative example.

  8. Ten-year rank-order stability of personality traits and disorders in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Morey, Leslie C; Donnellan, M Brent; Samuel, Douglas B; Grilo, Carlos M; McGlashan, Thomas H; Shea, M Tracie; Zanarini, Mary C; Gunderson, John G; Skodol, Andrew E

    2013-06-01

    This study compares the 10-year retest stability of normal traits, pathological traits, and personality disorder dimensions in a clinical sample. Ten-year rank-order stability estimates for the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality, and Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders were evaluated before and after correcting for test-retest dependability and internal consistency in a clinical sample (N = 266). Dependability-corrected stability estimates were generally in the range of.60-.90 for traits and.25-.65 for personality disorders. The relatively lower stability of personality disorder symptoms may indicate important differences between pathological behaviors and relatively more stable self-attributed traits and imply that a full understanding of personality and personality pathology needs to take both traits and symptoms into account. The five-factor theory distinction between basic tendencies and characteristic adaptations provides a theoretical framework for the separation of traits and disorders in terms of stability in which traits reflect basic tendencies that are stable and pervasive across situations, whereas personality disorder symptoms reflect characteristic maladaptations that are a function of both basic tendencies and environmental dynamics. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sex-reversed correlation between stress levels and dominance rank in a captive non-breeder flock of crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Minami; Asaba, Akari; Miyazawa, Eri; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Group living has both benefits and costs to individuals; benefits include efficient acquisition of resources, and costs include stress from social conflicts among group members. Such social challenges result in hierarchical dominance ranking among group members as a solution to avoid escalating conflict that causes different levels of basal stress between individuals at different ranks. Stress-associated glucocorticoid (corticosterone in rodents and birds; CORT) levels are known to correlate with dominance rank in diverse taxa and to covary with various social factors, such as sex and dominance maintenance styles. Although there is much evidence for sex differences in the basal levels of CORT in various species, the correlation of sex differences in basal CORT with dominance rank is poorly understood. We investigated the correlation between CORT metabolites (CM) in the droppings and social factors, including rank and sex, in a captive non-breeder group of crows. In this group, all the single males dominated all the single females, and dominance ranks were stable among single males but relatively unstable among single females. CM levels and rank were significantly correlated in a sex-reversed fashion: males at higher rank (i.e., more dominant) had higher CM, whereas females at higher rank exhibited lower CM. This is the first evidence of sex-reversed patterns of CM-rank correlation in birds. The results suggest that different mechanisms of stress-dominance relationships operate on the sexes in non-breeder crow aggregations; in males, stress is associated with the cost of aggressive displays, whereas females experience subordination stress due to males' overt aggression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diversity of charge orderings in correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy; Barański, Jan; Ptok, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    The phenomenon associated with inhomogeneous distribution of electron density is known as a charge ordering. In this work, we study the zero-bandwidth limit of the extended Hubbard model, which can be considered as a simple effective model of charge ordered insulators. It consists of the on-site interaction U and the intersite density-density interactions W1 and W2 between nearest neighbors and next-nearest neighbors, respectively. We derived the exact ground state diagrams for different lattice dimensionalities and discuss effects of small finite temperatures in the limit of high dimensions. In particular, we estimated the critical interactions for which new ordered phases emerge (laminar or stripe and four-sublattice-type). Our analysis show that the ground state of the model is highly degenerated. One of the most intriguing finding is that the nonzero temperature removes these degenerations.

  11. Combinatoric Models of Information Retrieval Ranking Methods and Performance Measures for Weakly-Ordered Document Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation answers three research questions: (1) What are the characteristics of a combinatoric measure, based on the Average Search Length (ASL), that performs the same as a probabilistic version of the ASL?; (2) Does the combinatoric ASL measure produce the same performance result as the one that is obtained by ranking a collection of…

  12. Relative Performance Information, Rank Ordering and Employee Performance: A Research Note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, S.; Maas, V.S.; van Rinsum, M.

    2016-01-01

    We conduct a laboratory experiment to examine whether the provision of detailed relative performance information (i.e., information about the specific performance levels of peers) affects employee performance. We also investigate how – if at all – explicit ranking of performance levels affects how

  13. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-05-04

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. The reduced computational complexity is O(dLlogL), where L := max ini, i = 1

  14. A Methodology for Aggregation of Multiple Criteria Rank-Ordered Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    matrix method by Shannon [217], an extension beyond Shannon by Navarrete , et al. [185], a point system by Smith [2211, a branch and bound algorithm...Science Annual, Vol. 5, New York: The Bobbs Merrill Company, 1974. 36. Shisko, R., A Survey of Solution Concepts for Majority Rule Games, Santa Monica : The...Preferences," lat. Journal of Game Theory- Vol. 4, Issue 2, 1975, p. 95. 185. Navarrete , N. Jr., Fukushima, N., and Mine, H., "A New Ranking Method

  15. Sparse and smooth canonical correlation analysis through rank-1 matrix approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa-El-Bey, Abdeldjalil; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2017-12-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a well-known technique used to characterize the relationship between two sets of multidimensional variables by finding linear combinations of variables with maximal correlation. Sparse CCA and smooth or regularized CCA are two widely used variants of CCA because of the improved interpretability of the former and the better performance of the later. So far, the cross-matrix product of the two sets of multidimensional variables has been widely used for the derivation of these variants. In this paper, two new algorithms for sparse CCA and smooth CCA are proposed. These algorithms differ from the existing ones in their derivation which is based on penalized rank-1 matrix approximation and the orthogonal projectors onto the space spanned by the two sets of multidimensional variables instead of the simple cross-matrix product. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms are tested on simulated experiments. On these results, it can be observed that they outperform the state of the art sparse CCA algorithms.

  16. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-08

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. For separable covariance functions, the results are exact, and non-separable covariance functions can be approximated through sums of separable components. Speedup factor is 1e+8, problem sizes 1.5e+13 and 2e+15 estimation points for Kriging and spatial design.

  17. Kriging accelerated by orders of magnitude: combining low-rank with FFT techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    Kriging algorithms based on FFT, the separability of certain covariance functions and low-rank representations of covariance functions have been investigated. The current study combines these ideas, and so combines the individual speedup factors of all ideas. The reduced computational complexity is O(dLlogL), where L := max ini, i = 1..d. For separable covariance functions, the results are exact, and non-separable covariance functions can be approximated through sums of separable components. Speedup factor is 10 8, problem sizes 15e + 12 and 2e + 15 estimation points for Kriging and spatial design.

  18. Higher order correlation beams in atmosphere under strong turbulence conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, H; Monken, C H

    2016-02-08

    Higher order correlation beams, that is, two-photon beams obtained from the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by Hermite-Gauss or Laguerre-Gauss beams of any order, can be used to encode information in many modes, opening the possibility of quantum communication with large alphabets. In this paper we calculate, analytically, the fourth-order correlation function for the Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss coherent and partially coherent correlation beams propagating through a strong turbulent medium. We show that fourth-order correlation functions for correlation beams have, under certain conditions, expressions similar to those of intensities of classical beams and are degraded by turbulence in a similar way as the classical beams. Our results can be useful in establishing limits for the use of two-photon beams in quantum communications with larger alphabets under atmospheric turbulence.

  19. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHER H. TIENKEN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries’ rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum’s Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI. The study investigated the existence of relationships between international test rankings from three different time periods during the last 50 years of U.S. education policy development (i.e., 1957–1982, 1983–2000, and 2001–2006 and 2006 GCI ranks. It extends previous research on the topic by investigating how GCI rankings in the top 50 percent and bottom 50 percent relate to rankings on international tests for the countries that participated in each test. The study found that the relationship between ranks on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic strength is stronger among nations with lower-performing economies. Nations with strong economies, such as the United States, demonstrate a weaker, nonsignificant relationship.

  20. Detection of Crossing White Matter Fibers with High-Order Tensors and Rank-k Decompositions

    KAUST Repository

    Jiao, Fangxiang

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental to high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), is the estimation of a positive-semidefinite orientation distribution function (ODF) and extracting the diffusion properties (e.g., fiber directions). In this work we show that these two goals can be achieved efficiently by using homogeneous polynomials to represent the ODF in the spherical deconvolution approach, as was proposed in the Cartesian Tensor-ODF (CT-ODF) formulation. Based on this formulation we first suggest an estimation method for positive-semidefinite ODF by solving a linear programming problem that does not require special parameterization of the ODF. We also propose a rank-k tensor decomposition, known as CP decomposition, to extract the fibers information from the estimated ODF. We show that this decomposition is superior to the fiber direction estimation via ODF maxima detection as it enables one to reach the full fiber separation resolution of the estimation technique. We assess the accuracy of this new framework by applying it to synthetic and experimentally obtained HARDI data. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Ranking of Zahedan’s Five Districts in Order to Fulfill the Creative City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hafez Rezazadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Moving towards the development and realization of the creative city due to the status of the city as a place of forming knowledge society contexts, and the importance of cities in economic development is very necessary and important. This paper aims to examine the components of the creative city in Zahedan and tries to move toward urban creativity. Considering the components of this research, it is an applied study, which is conducted through a descriptive-analytical method. The research includes 20 indicators for the creative city. A researcher made questionnaire is used to collect data. In addition, SPSS and GIS softwares are used to analyze the data. The statistical population is the five districts of Zahedan City, in which 383 residents were selected and studied through cluster and systematic random sampling in all districts of the city. The ranking results of districts in the creative city indicators show that district 1 is the most desirable district and district 3 is the most undesirable and the most deprived district with informal and disturbed settlements. The effectiveness of each component of the creative city indicators was studied in the regression analysis. It was found that the effectiveness of all components is not identical in the realization of the creative city in Zahedan. They act in the form of a chain and the stability of the chain depends on the planning and investment in all of the sub-indicators of these components.

  2. Fuzzy multi-criteria approach to ordering policy ranking in a supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Danijela

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fuzzy multi-criteria mathematical model for the selection of the best among a finite number of ordering policy of raw material in a supply chain is developed. The problem treated is a part of the purchasing plan of a company in an uncertain environment and it is very common in business practice. Optimization criteria selected describe the performance measures of ordering policies and generally their relative importance is different. It is assumed that the values of the optimization criteria are vague and imprecise. They are described by discrete fuzzy numbers and by linguistic expressions. The linguistic expressions are modeled by discrete fuzzy sets. The measures of belief that one ordering policy is better than another are defined by comparing fuzzy numbers. An illustrative example is given.

  3. Effects of sample size on differential gene expression, rank order and prediction accuracy of a gene signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Stretch

    Full Text Available Top differentially expressed gene lists are often inconsistent between studies and it has been suggested that small sample sizes contribute to lack of reproducibility and poor prediction accuracy in discriminative models. We considered sex differences (69♂, 65 ♀ in 134 human skeletal muscle biopsies using DNA microarray. The full dataset and subsamples (n = 10 (5 ♂, 5 ♀ to n = 120 (60 ♂, 60 ♀ thereof were used to assess the effect of sample size on the differential expression of single genes, gene rank order and prediction accuracy. Using our full dataset (n = 134, we identified 717 differentially expressed transcripts (p<0.0001 and we were able predict sex with ~90% accuracy, both within our dataset and on external datasets. Both p-values and rank order of top differentially expressed genes became more variable using smaller subsamples. For example, at n = 10 (5 ♂, 5 ♀, no gene was considered differentially expressed at p<0.0001 and prediction accuracy was ~50% (no better than chance. We found that sample size clearly affects microarray analysis results; small sample sizes result in unstable gene lists and poor prediction accuracy. We anticipate this will apply to other phenotypes, in addition to sex.

  4. Rank-ordered multifractal spectrum of intermittent fluctuations in the cusp : a case study with Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Herve; Echim, Marius; Chang, Tom

    Data from the four Cluster spacecraft on 26th of February 2001 show that the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) of B 2 in the cusp are non-Gaussian and have an intermittent behavior at scales smaller than about 1 minute. PDFs obtained at various scales cannot be collapsed onto a master curve based on a single monofractal index, except in the central regions. We present here a more geometrical approach based on the multifractal analysis of these intermittent fluctuations using both structure functions and the partition function. These traditional multifractal methods based on the statistics of the full set of fluctuations indicate that the spectrum of the scaling exponents is multifractal. However, the fractal characteristics of large amplitude fluctuations (the less frequent ones) might be masked by those with small amplitude which are by far the dominant population. Chang & Wu (2007) recently proposed a new method of multifractal analysis, based on rank-ordered fractal index of fluctuations. This method subdivides the fluctuations into groups according to the range of their scaled sizes. We show preliminary results of this new multifractal analysis applied to Cluster data in the cusp. T. Chang and C.C. Wu, Rank-Ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations, arXiv:0712.4256v1 [astro-ph] 27 December 2007.

  5. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries' rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum's Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI).…

  6. Machine learning using a higher order correlation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.C.; Doolen, G.; Chen, H.H.; Sun, G.Z.; Maxwell, T.; Lee, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    A high-order correlation tensor formalism for neural networks is described. The model can simulate auto associative, heteroassociative, as well as multiassociative memory. For the autoassociative model, simulation results show a drastic increase in the memory capacity and speed over that of the standard Hopfield-like correlation matrix methods. The possibility of using multiassociative memory for a learning universal inference network is also discussed. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Personality traits in old age: measurement and rank-order stability and some mean-level change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, René; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Lothian Birth Cohorts, 1936 and 1921 were used to study the longitudinal comparability of Five-Factor Model (McCrae & John, 1992) personality traits from ages 69 to 72 years and from ages 81 to 87 years, and cross-cohort comparability between ages 69 and 81 years. Personality was measured using the 50-item International Personality Item Pool (Goldberg, 1999). Satisfactory measurement invariance was established across time and cohorts. High rank-order stability was observed in both cohorts. Almost no mean-level change was observed in the younger cohort, whereas Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Intellect declined significantly in the older cohort. The older cohort scored higher on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. In these cohorts, individual differences in personality traits continued to be stable even in very old age, mean-level changes accelerated.

  8. Male ruff colour as a rank signal in a monomorphic-horned mammal: behavioural correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovari, S.; Fattorini, N.; Boesi, R.; Bocci, A.

    2015-08-01

    Coexistence of individuals within a social group is possible through the establishment of a hierarchy. Social dominance is achieved through aggressive interactions, and, in wild sheep and goats, it is related mainly to age, body size and weapon size as rank signals. Adult male Himalayan tahr are much larger than females and subadult males. They have a prominent neck ruff, ranging in colour from yellow (5.5-9.5 years old, i.e. young adults, golden males) to brown (7.5-14.5 years old, i.e. older individuals, pale and dark brown males), with golden males being the most dominant. We investigated the social behaviour of male tahr and analysed the relationships between ruff colour, courtship and agonistic behaviour patterns during the rut. Colour classes varied in their use of several behaviour patterns (male dominance: approach, stare, horning vegetation; courtship: low stretch, naso- genital contact, rush). Golden-ruffed males used more threats than darker ones. Pale brown and dark brown males addressed threats significantly more often to males of lower or their own colour classes, respectively, whereas golden ones addressed threats to all colour classes, including their own. The courtship of dominant males was characterised by the assertive rush, whereas that of subordinates did not. Ruff colour of male Himalayan tahr may have evolved as a rank signal, homologous to horn size in wild sheep and goats.

  9. Evaluation of an automatic dry eye test using MCDM methods and rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro-Barral, Diego; Remeseiro, Beatriz; Méndez, Rebeca; Penedo, Manuel G

    2017-04-01

    Dry eye is an increasingly common disease in modern society which affects a wide range of population and has a negative impact on their daily activities, such as working with computers or driving. It can be diagnosed through an automatic clinical test for tear film lipid layer classification based on color and texture analysis. Up to now, researchers have mainly focused on the improvement of the image analysis step. However, there is still large room for improvement on the machine learning side. This paper presents a methodology to optimize this problem by means of class binarization, feature selection, and classification. The methodology can be used as a baseline in other classification problems to provide several solutions and evaluate their performance using a set of representative metrics and decision-making methods. When several decision-making methods are used, they may offer disagreeing rankings that will be solved by conflict handling in which rankings are merged into a single one. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of the proposed methodology in this domain. Also, its general purpose allows to adapt it to other classification problems in different fields such as medicine and biology.

  10. Stochastic rank correlation: a robust merit function for 2D/3D registration of image data obtained at different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Stock, Markus; Figl, Michael; Gendrin, Christelle; Hummel, Johann; Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Bergmann, Helmar

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the authors evaluate a merit function for 2D/3D registration called stochastic rank correlation (SRC). SRC is characterized by the fact that differences in image intensity do not influence the registration result; it therefore combines the numerical advantages of cross correlation (CC)-type merit functions with the flexibility of mutual-information-type merit functions. The basic idea is that registration is achieved on a random subset of the image, which allows for an efficient computation of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. This measure is, by nature, invariant to monotonic intensity transforms in the images under comparison, which renders it an ideal solution for intramodal images acquired at different energy levels as encountered in intrafractional kV imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. Initial evaluation was undertaken using a 2D/3D registration reference image dataset of a cadaver spine. Even with no radiometric calibration, SRC shows a significant improvement in robustness and stability compared to CC. Pattern intensity, another merit function that was evaluated for comparison, gave rather poor results due to its limited convergence range. The time required for SRC with 5% image content compares well to the other merit functions; increasing the image content does not significantly influence the algorithm accuracy. The authors conclude that SRC is a promising measure for 2D/3D registration in IGRT and image-guided therapy in general.

  11. The life story from age 26 to 32: Rank-order stability and mean-level change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengsavang, Sonia; Pratt, Michael W; Alisat, Susan; Sadler, Pamela

    2017-10-10

    In this longitudinal, mixed-methods project, the primary focus was to examine the rank-order stability and mean-level change in the life story during the period of emerging adulthood to young adulthood, while also investigating how the transition to parenthood may impact the life story. Seventy-two participants described three key life story scenes at age 26 and again at 32 (28% attrition from age 26 to 32). The narratives were coded for a range of features, including motivational themes (agency, communion), affective themes (emotional tone), an integrative meaning theme (coherent positive resolution), and a structural property (narrative complexity). Overall, there was moderate temporal stability and mean-level increase in several features of narrative identity over this key period. Positive changes in communion levels and overall emotional tone of life story scenes were especially evident for new parents at age 32. These longitudinal results suggested that adopting new social roles, in this case becoming a parent, predicted how the life story was expressed, just as they seemed to influence other levels of personality, such as traits, following the social investment principle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter egd(G), defined as the smallest integer r ≥ 1 for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of G, can be completed to a matrix in the convex hull

  13. Rank and Order: Evaluating the Performance of SNPs for Individual Assignment in a Non-Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Caroline G.; Pascal, Carita E.; Roberts, Steven B.; Templin, William D.; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are valuable tools for ecological and evolutionary studies. In non-model species, the use of SNPs has been limited by the number of markers available. However, new technologies and decreasing technology costs have facilitated the discovery of a constantly increasing number of SNPs. With hundreds or thousands of SNPs potentially available, there is interest in comparing and developing methods for evaluating SNPs to create panels of high-throughput assays that are customized for performance, research questions, and resources. Here we use five different methods to rank 43 new SNPs and 71 previously published SNPs for sockeye salmon: FST, informativeness (In), average contribution to principal components (LC), and the locus-ranking programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. We then tested the performance of these different ranking methods by creating 48- and 96-SNP panels of the top-ranked loci for each method and used empirical and simulated data to obtain the probability of assigning individuals to the correct population using each panel. All 96-SNP panels performed similarly and better than the 48-SNP panels except for the 96-SNP BELS panel. Among the 48-SNP panels, panels created from FST, In, and LC ranks performed better than panels formed using the top-ranked loci from the programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. The application of ranking methods to optimize panel performance will become more important as more high-throughput assays become available. PMID:23185290

  14. Second-order correlations in single-particle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembold, A.; Röpke, R.; Schütz, G.; Fortágh, J.; Stibor, A.; Günther, A.

    2017-10-01

    Interferometers with single particles are susceptible for dephasing perturbations from the environment, such as electromagnetic oscillations or mechanical vibrations. On the one hand, this limits sensitive quantum phase measurements as it reduces the interference contrast in the signal. On the other hand, it enables single-particle interferometers to be used as sensitive sensors for electromagnetic and mechanical perturbations. Recently, it was demonstrated experimentally, that a second-order correlation analysis of the spatial and temporal detection signal can decrease the electromagnetic shielding and vibrational damping requirements significantly. Thereby, the relevant matter-wave characteristics and the perturbation parameters could be extracted from the correlation analysis of a spatially ‘washed-out’ interference pattern and the original undisturbed interferogram could be reconstructed. This method can be applied to all interferometers that produce a spatial fringe pattern on a detector with high spatial and temporal single-particle resolution. In this article, we present and discuss in detail the used two-dimensional second-order correlation theory for multifrequency perturbations. The derivations of an explicit and approximate solution of the correlation function and corresponding amplitude spectra are provided. It is explained, how the numerical correlation function is extracted from the measurement data. Thereby, the influence of the temporal and spatial discretization step size on the extracted parameters, as contrast and perturbation amplitude, is analyzed. The influence of noise on the correlation function and corresponding amplitude spectrum is calculated and numerically cross-checked by a comparison of our theory with numerical single-particle simulations of a perturbed interference pattern. Thereby, an optimum spatial discretization step size is determined to achieve a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, which was used in former experiments to

  15. Universality, correlations, and rankings in the Brazilian universities national admission examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberto; Lamb, Luis C.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the scores obtained by students who have taken the ENEM examination, The Brazilian High School National Examination which is used in the admission process at Brazilian universities. The average high schools scores from different disciplines are compared through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different school subjects. Even though the students' scores in the ENEM form a Gaussian due to the standardization, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that cannot be used to evaluate and compare students performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and the economic level (based on the average family income) of the students. The ENEM scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance examination from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The analysis of the performance of the same individuals in both tests shows that the two tests not only select different abilities, but also lead to the admission of different sets of individuals. Our results indicate that standardized tests might be an interesting tool to compare performance of individuals over the years, but not of institutions.

  16. Reduced Rank Mixed Effects Models for Spatially Correlated Hierarchical Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lan

    2010-03-01

    Hierarchical functional data are widely seen in complex studies where sub-units are nested within units, which in turn are nested within treatment groups. We propose a general framework of functional mixed effects model for such data: within unit and within sub-unit variations are modeled through two separate sets of principal components; the sub-unit level functions are allowed to be correlated. Penalized splines are used to model both the mean functions and the principal components functions, where roughness penalties are used to regularize the spline fit. An EM algorithm is developed to fit the model, while the specific covariance structure of the model is utilized for computational efficiency to avoid storage and inversion of large matrices. Our dimension reduction with principal components provides an effective solution to the difficult tasks of modeling the covariance kernel of a random function and modeling the correlation between functions. The proposed methodology is illustrated using simulations and an empirical data set from a colon carcinogenesis study. Supplemental materials are available online.

  17. A neural model of sequential movement planning and control of eye movements: Item-Order-Rank working memory and saccade selection by the supplementary eye fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew R; Grossberg, Stephen; Bullock, Daniel; Histed, Mark H; Miller, Earl K

    2012-02-01

    How does working memory store multiple spatial positions to control sequences of eye movements, particularly when the same items repeat at multiple list positions, or ranks, during the sequence? An Item-Order-Rank model of working memory shows how rank-selective representations enable storage and recall of items that repeat at arbitrary list positions. Rank-related activity has been observed in many areas including the posterior parietal cortices (PPC), prefrontal cortices (PFC) and supplementary eye fields (SEF). The model shows how rank information, originating in PPC, may support rank-sensitive PFC working memory representations and how SEF may select saccades stored in working memory. It also proposes how SEF may interact with downstream regions such as the frontal eye fields (FEF) during memory-guided sequential saccade tasks, and how the basal ganglia (BG) may control the flow of information. Model simulations reproduce behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological data under multiple experimental paradigms, including visually- and memory-guided single and sequential saccade tasks. Simulations reproduce behavioral data during two SEF microstimulation paradigms, showing that their seemingly inconsistent findings about saccade latency can be reconciled. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating e...... eigenvalues and eigenvectors. We give a number of different applications to regression and time series analysis, and show how the reduced rank regression estimator can be derived as a Gaussian maximum likelihood estimator. We briefly mention asymptotic results......The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  19. Frustration and chiral orderings in correlated electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Cristian D; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Kamiya, Yoshitomo

    2016-08-01

    The term frustration refers to lattice systems whose ground state cannot simultaneously satisfy all the interactions. Frustration is an important property of correlated electron systems, which stems from the sign of loop products (similar to Wilson products) of interactions on a lattice. It was early recognized that geometric frustration can produce rather exotic physical behaviors, such as macroscopic ground state degeneracy and helimagnetism. The interest in frustrated systems was renewed two decades later in the context of spin glasses and the emergence of magnetic superstructures. In particular, Phil Anderson's proposal of a quantum spin liquid ground state for a two-dimensional lattice S  =  1/2 Heisenberg magnet generated a very active line of research that still continues. As a result of these early discoveries and conjectures, the study of frustrated models and materials exploded over the last two decades. Besides the large efforts triggered by the search of quantum spin liquids, it was also recognized that frustration plays a crucial role in a vast spectrum of physical phenomena arising from correlated electron materials. Here we review some of these phenomena with particular emphasis on the stabilization of chiral liquids and non-coplanar magnetic orderings. In particular, we focus on the ubiquitous interplay between magnetic and charge degrees of freedom in frustrated correlated electron systems and on the role of anisotropy. We demonstrate that these basic ingredients lead to exotic phenomena, such as, charge effects in Mott insulators, the stabilization of single magnetic vortices, as well as vortex and skyrmion crystals, and the emergence of different types of chiral liquids. In particular, these orderings appear more naturally in itinerant magnets with the potential of inducing a very large anomalous Hall effect.

  20. Effects of high-order correlations on personalized recommendations for bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Che, Hong-An; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified collaborative filtering (MCF) algorithm, which has remarkably higher accuracy than the standard collaborative filtering. In the MCF, instead of the cosine similarity index, the user-user correlations are obtained by a diffusion process. Furthermore, by considering the second-order correlations, we design an effective algorithm that depresses the influence of mainstream preferences. Simulation results show that the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, is further improved by 20.45% and 33.25% in the optimal cases of MovieLens and Netflix data. More importantly, the optimal value λ depends approximately monotonously on the sparsity of the training set. Given a real system, we could estimate the optimal parameter according to the data sparsity, which makes this algorithm easy to be applied. In addition, two significant criteria of algorithmic performance, diversity and popularity, are also taken into account. Numerical results show that as the sparsity increases, the algorithm considering the second-order correlation can outperform the MCF simultaneously in all three criteria.

  1. Correlated Spatio-Temporal Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Low Rank Matrix Approximation and Optimized Node Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglin Piao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging low rank matrix approximation (LRMA method provides an energy efficient scheme for data collection in wireless sensor networks (WSNs by randomly sampling a subset of sensor nodes for data sensing. However, the existing LRMA based methods generally underutilize the spatial or temporal correlation of the sensing data, resulting in uneven energy consumption and thus shortening the network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a correlated spatio-temporal data collection method for WSNs based on LRMA. In the proposed method, both the temporal consistence and the spatial correlation of the sensing data are simultaneously integrated under a new LRMA model. Moreover, the network energy consumption issue is considered in the node sampling procedure. We use Gini index to measure both the spatial distribution of the selected nodes and the evenness of the network energy status, then formulate and resolve an optimization problem to achieve optimized node sampling. The proposed method is evaluated on both the simulated and real wireless networks and compared with state-of-the-art methods. The experimental results show the proposed method efficiently reduces the energy consumption of network and prolongs the network lifetime with high data recovery accuracy and good stability.

  2. Change in ranking order of prescribing patterns by age and sex standardization of the practice population--audit may be misleading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen Nørskov

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate whether standardization of practice populations by age and sex changes the internal prescription ranking order of a group of practices. DESIGN: Data on the prescribing of cardiovascular drugs in a group of practices were obtained from a county-based database. Information...

  3. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-06-01

    Engagement in research and academic productivity are crucial components in the training of a neurosurgeon. This process typically begins in residency training. In this study, we analyzed individual resident productivity as it correlated to publications across all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery training programs in an attempt to identify how programs have developed and fostered a research culture and environment. We obtained a list of current neurosurgery residents in ACGME-accredited programs from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons database. An expanded PubMed and Scopus search was conducted for each resident through the present time. We tabulated all articles attributed to each resident. We then categorized the publications based on each neurosurgical subspecialty while in residency. A spreadsheet-based statistical analysis was performed. This formulated the average number of resident articles, h-indices, and most common subspecialty categories by training program. We analyzed 1352 current neurosurgery residents in 105 programs. There were a total of 10 645 publications, of which 3985 were resident first-author publications during the period of study. The most common subspecialties among all resident publications were vascular (24.9%), spine (16.9%), oncology (16.1%), pediatric (5.6%), functional (4.9%), and trauma (3.8%). The average resident published 2.9 first-author papers with average of 38.0 first-author publications by total residents at each program (range 0-241). The average h-index per resident is 2.47 ± 3.25. When comparing previously published faculty h-index program rankings against our resident h-index rankings, there is a strong correlation between the 2 datasets with a clear delineation between Top-20 productivity and that of other programs (average h-index 4.2 vs 1.7, respectively, P productivity on both the resident and faculty level (average h-index 1.6, 1.9, 3.9 for 1, 2, and

  4. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  5. Out-of-Time-Ordered Density Correlators in Luttinger Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Moessner, Roderich

    2017-07-01

    Information scrambling and the butterfly effect in chaotic quantum systems can be diagnosed by out-of-time-ordered (OTO) commutators through an exponential growth and large late time value. We show that the latter feature shows up in a strongly correlated many-body system, a Luttinger liquid, whose density fluctuations we study at long and short wavelengths, both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. We find rich behavior combining robustly universal and nonuniversal features. The OTO commutators display temperature- and initial-state-independent behavior and grow as t2 for short times. For the short-wavelength density operator, they reach a sizable value after the light cone only in an interacting Luttinger liquid, where the bare excitations break up into collective modes. This challenges the common interpretation of the OTO commutator in chaotic systems. We benchmark our findings numerically on an interacting spinless fermion model in 1D and find persistence of central features even in the nonintegrable case. As a nonuniversal feature, the short-time growth exhibits a distance-dependent power.

  6. Out-of-time-order correlators in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Murata, Keiju; Yoshii, Ryosuke

    2017-10-01

    The out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) is considered as a measure of quantum chaos. We formulate how to calculate the OTOC for quantum mechanics with a general Hamiltonian. We demonstrate explicit calculations of OTOCs for a harmonic oscillator, a particle in a one-dimensional box, a circle billiard and stadium billiards. For the first two cases, OTOCs are periodic in time because of their commensurable energy spectra. For the circle and stadium billiards, they are not recursive but saturate to constant values which are linear in temperature. Although the stadium billiard is a typical example of the classical chaos, an expected exponential growth of the OTOC is not found. We also discuss the classical limit of the OTOC. Analysis of a time evolution of a wavepacket in a box shows that the OTOC can deviate from its classical value at a time much earlier than the Ehrenfest time, which could be the reason of the difficulty for the numerical analyses to exhibit the exponential growth.

  7. Realizing the Now-or-Never bottleneck and Chunk-and-Pass processing with Item-Order-Rank working memories and masking field chunking networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Christiansen & Chater's (C&C's) key goals for a language system have been realized by neural models for short-term storage of linguistic items in an Item-Order-Rank working memory, which inputs to Masking Fields that rapidly learn to categorize, or chunk, variable-length linguistic sequences, and choose the contextually most predictive list chunks while linguistic inputs are stored in the working memory.

  8. On the Kendall Correlation Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we first discuss the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. In continuous case, we define the Kendall rank correlation coefficient in terms of the concomitants of order statistics, find the expected value of the Kendall rank correlation coefficient and show that the later is free of n. We also prove that in continuous case the Kendall correlation coefficient converges in probability to its expected value. We then propose to consider the expected value of the Kendall rank ...

  9. Quantifying aflatoxins in peanuts using fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with multi-way methods: Resurrecting second-order advantage in excitation-emission matrices with rank overlap problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, S. Maryam; Abdollahi, Hamid; Rahmanian, Reza; Bagheri, Leila

    2016-03-01

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive method using fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with multi-way methods for the determination of aflatoxins B1 and B2 in peanuts has been developed. In this method, aflatoxins are extracted with a mixture of water and methanol (90:10), and then monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy producing EEMs. Although the combination of EEMs and multi-way methods is commonly used to determine analytes in complex chemical systems with unknown interference(s), rank overlap problem in excitation and emission profiles may restrain the application of this strategy. If there is rank overlap in one mode, there are several three-way algorithms such as PARAFAC under some constraints that can resolve this kind of data successfully. However, the analysis of EEM data is impossible when some species have rank overlap in both modes because the information of the data matrix is equivalent to a zero-order data for that species, which is the case in our study. Aflatoxins B1 and B2 have the same shape of spectral profiles in both excitation and emission modes and we propose creating a third order data for each sample using solvent as a new additional selectivity mode. This third order data, in turn, converted to the second order data by augmentation, a fact which resurrects the second order advantage in original EEMs. The three-way data is constructed by stacking augmented data in the third way, and then analyzed by two powerful second order calibration methods (BLLS-RBL and PARAFAC) to quantify the analytes in four kinds of peanut samples. The results of both methods are in good agreement and reasonable recoveries are obtained.

  10. On the definition of bond orders at correlated level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, R. C.; Lain, L.; Torre, A.

    2003-06-01

    Most often bond orders have heuristically been defined. In this work we follow a rigorous theoretical procedure looking for an appropriate definition of this concept. The study points out the exchange part of the pair density as a suitable starting point to set up a bond order definition, while the definitions based on the fluctuation of electron populations should be restricted to noncorrelated state functions. Numerical calculations are reported to illustrate these conclusions.

  11. Rank Order Coding: a Retinal Information Decoding Strategy Revealed by Large-Scale Multielectrode Array Retinal Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Geoffrey; Barrett, John M; Hilgen, Gerrit; Masquelier, Timothée; Maccione, Alessandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Berdondini, Luca; Kornprobst, Pierre; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    How a population of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) encodes the visual scene remains an open question. Going beyond individual RGC coding strategies, results in salamander suggest that the relative latencies of a RGC pair encode spatial information. Thus, a population code based on this concerted spiking could be a powerful mechanism to transmit visual information rapidly and efficiently. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mouse by recording simultaneous light-evoked responses from hundreds of RGCs, at pan-retinal level, using a new generation of large-scale, high-density multielectrode array consisting of 4096 electrodes. Interestingly, we did not find any RGCs exhibiting a clear latency tuning to the stimuli, suggesting that in mouse, individual RGC pairs may not provide sufficient information. We show that a significant amount of information is encoded synergistically in the concerted spiking of large RGC populations. Thus, the RGC population response described with relative activities, or ranks, provides more relevant information than classical independent spike count- or latency- based codes. In particular, we report for the first time that when considering the relative activities across the whole population, the wave of first stimulus-evoked spikes is an accurate indicator of stimulus content. We show that this coding strategy coexists with classical neural codes, and that it is more efficient and faster. Overall, these novel observations suggest that already at the level of the retina, concerted spiking provides a reliable and fast strategy to rapidly transmit new visual scenes.

  12. Tensor Rank

    OpenAIRE

    Erdtman, Elias; Jönsson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    This master's thesis addresses numerical methods of computing the typical ranks of tensors over the real numbers and explores some properties of tensors over finite fields. We present three numerical methods to compute typical tensor rank. Two of these have already been published and can be used to calculate the lowest typical ranks of tensors and an approximate percentage of how many tensors have the lowest typical ranks (for some tensor formats), respectively. The third method was developed...

  13. Exchange–correlation errors at harmonic and anharmonic orders ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... using both the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Thermal effects are treated within the quasiharmonic approximation. We find that the LDA and GGA errors for anharmonic quantities are an order of magnitude smaller than for harmonic quantities; we argue that this might ...

  14. English Language Use at the Internationalised Universities of Northern Europe: Is There a Correlation between Englishisation and World Rank?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Anna Kristina

    2014-01-01

    European universities have, since the late 1990s, undergone dramatic changes centred on internationalisation, harmonisation and competition. This paper is concerned with two specific consequences of these changes and their interrelationship: rankings and Englishisation, the latter defined as an increase in the use of English at universities of…

  15. Rank Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  16. Optimal gene partition into operons correlates with gene functional order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Mayo, Avi; Ronen, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Gene arrangement into operons varies between bacterial species. Genes in a given system can be on one operon in some organisms and on several operons in other organisms. Existing theories explain why genes that work together should be on the same operon, since this allows for advantageous lateral gene transfer and accurate stoichiometry. But what causes the frequent separation into multiple operons of co-regulated genes that act together in a pathway? Here we suggest that separation is due to benefits made possible by differential regulation of each operon. We present a simple mathematical model for the optimal distribution of genes into operons based on a balance of the cost of operons and the benefit of regulation that provides 'just-when-needed' temporal order. The analysis predicts that genes are arranged such that genes on the same operon do not skip functional steps in the pathway. This prediction is supported by genomic data from 137 bacterial genomes. Our work suggests that gene arrangement is not only the result of random historical drift, genome re-arrangement and gene transfer, but has elements that are solutions of an evolutionary optimization problem. Thus gene functional order may be inferred by analyzing the operon structure across different genomes.

  17. Experimental characterization of a quantum many-body system via higher-order correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigler, Thomas; Kasper, Valentin; Erne, Sebastian; Mazets, Igor; Rauer, Bernhard; Cataldini, Federica; Langen, Tim; Gasenzer, Thomas; Berges, Jürgen; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2017-05-01

    Quantum systems can be characterized by their correlations. Higher-order (larger than second order) correlations, and the ways in which they can be decomposed into correlations of lower order, provide important information about the system, its structure, its interactions and its complexity. The measurement of such correlation functions is therefore an essential tool for reading, verifying and characterizing quantum simulations. Although higher-order correlation functions are frequently used in theoretical calculations, so far mainly correlations up to second order have been studied experimentally. Here we study a pair of tunnel-coupled one-dimensional atomic superfluids and characterize the corresponding quantum many-body problem by measuring correlation functions. We extract phase correlation functions up to tenth order from interference patterns and analyse whether, and under what conditions, these functions factorize into correlations of lower order. This analysis characterizes the essential features of our system, the relevant quasiparticles, their interactions and topologically distinct vacua. From our data we conclude that in thermal equilibrium our system can be seen as a quantum simulator of the sine-Gordon model, relevant for diverse disciplines ranging from particle physics to condensed matter. The measurement and evaluation of higher-order correlation functions can easily be generalized to other systems and to study correlations of any other observable such as density, spin and magnetization. It therefore represents a general method for analysing quantum many-body systems from experimental data.

  18. Personality correlates (BAS-BIS), self-perception of social ranking, and cortical (alpha frequency band) modulation in peer-group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pagani, Silvia

    2014-06-22

    The perception and interpretation of social hierarchies are a key part of our social life. In the present research we considered the activation of cortical areas, mainly the prefrontal cortex, related to social ranking perception in conjunction with some personality components (BAS - Behavioral Activation System - and BIS - Behavioral Inhibition System). In two experiments we manipulated the perceived superior/inferior status during a competitive cognitive task. Indeed, we created an explicit and strongly reinforced social hierarchy based on incidental rating in an attentional task. Specifically, a peer group comparison was undertaken and improved (Experiment 1) or decreased (Experiment 2) performance was artificially manipulated by the experimenter. For each experiment two groups were compared, based on a BAS and BIS dichotomy. Alpha band modulation in prefrontal cortex, behavioral measures (performance: error rate, ER; response times, RTs), and self-perceived ranking were considered. Repeated measures ANOVAs and regression analyses showed in Experiment 1 a significant improved cognitive performance (decreased ER and RTs) and higher self-perceived ranking in high-BAS participants. Moreover, their prefrontal activity was increased within the left side (alpha band decreasing). Conversely, in Experiment 2 a significant decreased cognitive performance (increased ER and RTs) and lower self-perceived ranking was observed in higher-BIS participants. Their prefrontal right activity was increased in comparison with higher BAS. The regression analyses confirmed the significant predictive role of alpha band modulation with respect of subjects' performance and self-perception of social ranking, differently for BAS/BIS components. The present results suggest that social status perception is directly modulated by cortical activity and personality correlates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Second-order differential equations for bosons with spin j ≥ 1 and in the bases of general tensor-spinors of rank 2j

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda Guzmán, V. M.; Kirchbach, M.

    2016-09-01

    A boson of spin j≥ 1 can be described in one of the possibilities within the Bargmann-Wigner framework by means of one sole differential equation of order twice the spin, which however is known to be inconsistent as it allows for non-local, ghost and acausally propagating solutions, all problems which are difficult to tackle. The other possibility is provided by the Fierz-Pauli framework which is based on the more comfortable to deal with second-order Klein-Gordon equation, but it needs to be supplemented by an auxiliary condition. Although the latter formalism avoids some of the pathologies of the high-order equations, it still remains plagued by some inconsistencies such as the acausal propagation of the wave fronts of the (classical) solutions within an electromagnetic environment. We here suggest a method alternative to the above two that combines their advantages while avoiding the related difficulties. Namely, we suggest one sole strictly D^{(j,0)oplus (0,j)} representation specific second-order differential equation, which is derivable from a Lagrangian and whose solutions do not violate causality. The equation under discussion presents itself as the product of the Klein-Gordon operator with a momentum-independent projector on Lorentz irreducible representation spaces constructed from one of the Casimir invariants of the spin-Lorentz group. The basis used is that of general tensor-spinors of rank 2 j.

  20. How to Rank Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows.

  1. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood : Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2015-01-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N=1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both

  2. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood : Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N = 1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both

  3. Ranking Economic History Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study ranks - for the first time - 12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We...... also compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential...

  4. Ranking economic history journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    This study ranks-for the first time-12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We also...... compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential for economic...

  5. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf

    2015-03-23

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective: The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods: We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results: There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions: ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  6. Ranking adverse drug reactions with crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-03-23

    There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  7. Higher-Order Statistical Correlations and Mutual Information Among Particles in a Quantum Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yépez, V. S.; Sagar, R. P.; Laguna, H. G.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of wave function symmetry on statistical correlation is studied for the case of three non-interacting spin-free quantum particles in a unidimensional box, in position and in momentum space. Higher-order statistical correlations occurring among the three particles in this quantum system is quantified via higher-order mutual information and compared to the correlation between pairs of variables in this model, and to the correlation in the two-particle system. The results for the higher-order mutual information show that there are states where the symmetric wave functions are more correlated than the antisymmetric ones with same quantum numbers. This holds in position as well as in momentum space. This behavior is opposite to that observed for the correlation between pairs of variables in this model, and the two-particle system, where the antisymmetric wave functions are in general more correlated. These results are also consistent with those observed in a system of three uncoupled oscillators. The use of higher-order mutual information as a correlation measure, is monitored and examined by considering a superposition of states or systems with two Slater determinants.

  8. Biometric verification by cross-correlation analysis of 12-lead ECG patterns: Ranking of the most reliable peripheral and chest leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Abächerli, Roger

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-based biometrics relies on the most stable and unique beat patterns, i.e. those with maximal intra-subject and minimal inter-subject waveform differences seen from different leads. We investigated methodology to evaluate those differences, aiming to rank the most prominent single and multi-lead ECG sets for biometric verification across a large population. A clinical standard 12-lead resting ECG database, including 460 pairs of remote recordings (distanced 1year apart) was used. Inter-subject beat waveform differences were studied by cross-correlation and amplitude relations of average PQRST (500ms) and QRS (100ms) patterns, using 8 features/lead in 12-leads. Biometric verification models based on stepwise linear discriminant classifier were trained on the first half of records. True verification rate (TVR) on the remaining test data was further reported as a common mean of the correctly verified equal subjects (true acceptance rate) and correctly rejected different subjects (true rejection rate). In single-lead ECG human identity applications, we found maximal TVR (87-89%) for the frontal plane leads (I, -aVR, II) within (0-60°) sector. Other leads were ranked: inferior (85%), lateral to septal (82-81%), with intermittent V3 drop (77.6%), suggesting anatomical landmark displacements. ECG pattern view from multi-lead sets improved TVR: chest (91.3%), limb (94.6%), 12-leads (96.3%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of TCP based EUD to rank and compare lung radiotherapy plans: in-silico study to evaluate the correlation between TCP with physical quality indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Balosso, Jacques

    2017-06-01

    To apply the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) radiobiological model to estimate the tumor control probability (TCP) scores for treatment plans using different radiobiological parameter settings, and to evaluate the correlation between TCP and physical quality indices of the treatment plans. Ten radiotherapy treatment plans for lung cancer were generated. The dose distributions were calculated using anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA). Dose parameters and quality indices derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) for target volumes were evaluated. The predicted TCP was computed using EUD model with tissue-specific parameter (a=-10). The assumed radiobiological parameter setting for adjuvant therapy [tumor dose to control 50% of the tumor (TCD50) =36.5 Gy and γ50=0.72] and curative intent (TCD50=51.24 Gy and γ50=0.83) were used. The bootstrap method was used to estimate the 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The coefficients (ρ) from Spearman's rank test were calculated to assess the correlation between quality indices with TCP. Wilcoxon paired test was used to calculate P value. The 95% CI of TCP were 70.6-81.5 and 46.6-64.7, respectively, for adjuvant radiotherapy and curative intent. The TCP outcome showed a positive and good correlation with calculated dose to 95% of the target volume (D95%) and minimum dose (Dmin). Consistently, TCP correlate negatively with heterogeneity indices. This study confirms that more relevant and robust radiobiological parameters setting should be integrated according to cancer type. The positive correlation with quality indices gives chance to improve the clinical out-come by optimizing the treatment plans to maximize the Dmin and D95%. This attempt to increase the TCP should be carried out with the respect of dose constraints for organs at risks. However, the negative correlation with heterogeneity indices shows that the optimization of beam arrangements could be also useful. Attention should be paid to obtain an appropriate

  10. Intergenerational Correlations in Educational Attainment: Birth Order and Family Size Effects Using Canadian Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Anindya; Clemente, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We exploit the 1986, 1994, and 2001 waves of the Canadian general social surveys in order to estimate intergenerational correlations in education. The use of these specific data is important because of available information on the final educational attainment of survey respondents and both parents, as well as family size and birth order. OLS…

  11. Photoinduced melting of magnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, A. D.; Först, M.; Scherwitzl, R.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Mankowsky, R.; Singla, R.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Krupin, O.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Dakovski, G. L.; Minitti, M. P.; Robinson, J.; Scagnoli, V.; Wilkins, S. B.; Cavill, S. A.; Gibert, M.; Gariglio, S.; Zubko, P.; Triscone, J.-M.; Hill, J. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2013-12-01

    Using ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction, we demonstrate photoinduced melting of antiferromagnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO3. Time-dependent analysis of the resonant diffraction spectra allows us to follow the temporal evolution of the charge imbalance between adjacent Ni sites. A direct correlation between the melting of magnetic order and charge rebalancing is found. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the magnetic ordering on the Ni and Nd sites, which are locked together in equilibrium, become decoupled during this nonthermal process.

  12. Unitarity corrections to short-range order long-range rapidity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Capella, A

    1978-01-01

    Although the effective hadronic forces have short range in rapidity space, one nevertheless expects long-range dynamical correlations induced by unitarity constraints. This paper contains a thorough discussion of long-range rapidity correlations in high-multiplicity events. In particular, the authors analyze in detail the forward- backward multiplicity correlations, measured recently in the whole CERN ISR energy range. They find from these data that the normalized variance of the number n of exchanged cut Pomerons, ((n/(n)-1)/sup 2/) , is most probably in the range 0.32 to 0.36. They show that such a number is obtained from Reggeon theory in the eikonal approximation. The authors also predict a very specific violation of local compensation of charge in multiparticle events: The violation should appear in the fourth-order zone correlation function and is absent in the second-order correlation function, the only one measured until now. (48 refs).

  13. A redshift distortion free correlation function at third order in the nonlinear regime

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Kelai; Pan, Jun; Szapudi, Istvan; Feng, Longlong

    2010-01-01

    The zeroth-order component of the cosine expansion of the projected three-point correlation function is proposed for clustering analysis of cosmic large scale structure. These functions are third order statistics but can be measured similarly to the projected two-point correlations. Numerical experiments with N-body simulations indicate that the advocated statistics are redshift distortion free within 10% in the non-linear regime on scales ~0.2-10Mpc/h. Halo model prediction of the zeroth-ord...

  14. Satisfaction with Information Centers, E-Journals and Specilized Databases and their Correlation with the Age and Academic Rank of Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Salajegheh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study intends to study the extent of utilization of information centers and e-journals as well as satisfaction rate and to correlate these with age and academic status of faculty members at medical schools in Iranian medical universities. A questionnaire was used for data collection. 700 faculty members were selected using regular random sampling. Results indicate that faculty members use e-journals more than printed journals. Satisfaction rate with databases as well as their utilization is high. Digital libraries are used heavily for document access. A combination of digital library and print library comes second, followed by using print libraries exclusively. The study further demonstrates that there is a link between variables such as age and using e-journals, age and using information centers, age and satisfaction with specialized databases. There was no correlation between academic status and e-journal usage, academic status and satisfaction with electronic databases and academic ranking with using information centers.

  15. A cross-order integration hypothesis for the neural correlate of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Uriah

    2007-12-01

    One major problem many hypotheses regarding the neural correlate of consciousness (NCC), face is what we might call "the why question": why would this particular neural feature, rather than another, correlate with consciousness? The purpose of the present paper is to develop an NCC hypothesis that answers this question. The proposed hypothesis is inspired by the cross-order integration (COI) theory of consciousness, according to which consciousness arises from the functional integration of a first-order representation of an external stimulus and a second-order representation of that first-order representation. The proposal comes in two steps. The first step concerns the "general shape" of the NCC and can be directly derived from COI theory. The second step is a concrete hypothesis that can be arrived at by combining the general shape with empirical considerations.

  16. Computer Simulation for Calculating the Second-Order Correlation Function of Classical and Quantum Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facao, M.; Lopes, A.; Silva, A. L.; Silva, P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an undergraduate numerical project for simulating the results of the second-order correlation function as obtained by an intensity interference experiment for two kinds of light, namely bunched light with Gaussian or Lorentzian power density spectrum and antibunched light obtained from single-photon sources. While the algorithm for…

  17. Photoinduced melting of magnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caviglia, A.D.; Först, M.; Scherwitzl, R.; Khanna, V.; Bromberger, H.; Mankowsky, R.; Singla, R.; Chuang, Y.D.; Lee, W.S.; Krupin, O.; Schlotter, W.F.; Turner, J.J.; Dakovski, G.L.; Minitti, M.P.; Robinson, J.; Scagnoli, V.; Wilkins, S.B.; Cavill, S.A.; Gibert, M.; Gariglio, S.; Zubko, P.; Triscone, J.M.; Hill, J.P.; Dhesi, S.S.; Cavalleri, A.

    2013-01-01

    Using ultrafast resonant soft x-ray diffraction, we demonstrate photoinduced melting of antiferromagnetic order in the correlated electron insulator NdNiO 3 . Time-dependent analysis of the resonant diffraction spectra allows us to follow the temporal evolution of the charge imbalance between

  18. Spatio-chromatic adaptation via higher-order canonical correlation analysis of natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U Gutmann

    Full Text Available Independent component and canonical correlation analysis are two general-purpose statistical methods with wide applicability. In neuroscience, independent component analysis of chromatic natural images explains the spatio-chromatic structure of primary cortical receptive fields in terms of properties of the visual environment. Canonical correlation analysis explains similarly chromatic adaptation to different illuminations. But, as we show in this paper, neither of the two methods generalizes well to explain both spatio-chromatic processing and adaptation at the same time. We propose a statistical method which combines the desirable properties of independent component and canonical correlation analysis: It finds independent components in each data set which, across the two data sets, are related to each other via linear or higher-order correlations. The new method is as widely applicable as canonical correlation analysis, and also to more than two data sets. We call it higher-order canonical correlation analysis. When applied to chromatic natural images, we found that it provides a single (unified statistical framework which accounts for both spatio-chromatic processing and adaptation. Filters with spatio-chromatic tuning properties as in the primary visual cortex emerged and corresponding-colors psychophysics was reproduced reasonably well. We used the new method to make a theory-driven testable prediction on how the neural response to colored patterns should change when the illumination changes. We predict shifts in the responses which are comparable to the shifts reported for chromatic contrast habituation.

  19. Short-range second order screened exchange correction to RPA correlation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Matthias; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Direct random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energies have become increasingly popular as a post-Kohn-Sham correction, due to significant improvements over DFT calculations for properties such as long-range dispersion effects, which are problematic in conventional density functional theory. On the other hand, RPA still has various weaknesses, such as unsatisfactory results for non-isogyric processes. This can in parts be attributed to the self-correlation present in RPA correlation energies, leading to significant self-interaction errors. Therefore a variety of schemes have been devised to include exchange in the calculation of RPA correlation energies in order to correct this shortcoming. One of the most popular RPA plus exchange schemes is the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) correction. RPA + SOSEX delivers more accurate absolute correlation energies and also improves upon RPA for non-isogyric processes. On the other hand, RPA + SOSEX barrier heights are worse than those obtained from plain RPA calculations. To combine the benefits of RPA correlation energies and the SOSEX correction, we introduce a short-range RPA + SOSEX correction. Proof of concept calculations and benchmarks showing the advantages of our method are presented.

  20. Statistical methods for ranking data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvo, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced undergraduate, graduate students and practitioners to statistical methods for ranking data. An important aspect of nonparametric statistics is oriented towards the use of ranking data. Rank correlation is defined through the notion of distance functions and the notion of compatibility is introduced to deal with incomplete data. Ranking data are also modeled using a variety of modern tools such as CART, MCMC, EM algorithm and factor analysis. This book deals with statistical methods used for analyzing such data and provides a novel and unifying approach for hypotheses testing. The techniques described in the book are illustrated with examples and the statistical software is provided on the authors’ website.

  1. Formation of charge and spin ordering in strongly correlated electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Farkašovsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present results of our theoretical study of charge and spin ordering in strongly correlated electron systems obtained within various generalizations of the Falicov-Kimball model. The primary goal of this study was to identify crucial interactions that lead to the stabilization of various types of charge ordering in these systems, like the axial striped ordering, diagonal striped ordering, phase-separated ordering, phase-segregated ordering, etc. Among the major interactions that come into account, we have examined the effect of local Coulomb interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, long-range and correlated hopping of itinerant electrons, long-range Coulomb interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, local Coulomb interaction between itinerant electrons, local Coulomb interaction between localized electrons, spin-dependent interaction between localized and itinerant electrons, both for zero and nonzero temperatures, as well as for doped and undoped systems. Finally, the relevance of resultant solutions for a description of rare-earth and transition-metal compounds is discussed.

  2. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J V; Valeev, Edward F

    2017-09-28

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  3. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J. V.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2017-09-01

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  4. Large-order perturbation theory for the electromagnetic current-current correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.S.; Yaffe, L.G.; Zhai, C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-11-15

    The constraints imposed by asymptotic freedom and analyticity on the large-order behavior of perturbation theory for the electromagnetic current-current correlation function are examined. By suitably applying the renormalization group, the coefficients of the asymptotic expansion in the deep Euclidean region may be expressed explicitly in terms of the perturbative coefficients of the Minkowski space discontinuity (the {ital R} ratio in {ital e}{sup +}{ital e{minus}} scattering). This relation yields a generic'' prediction for the large-order behavior of the Euclidean perturbation series and suggests the presence of nonperturbative 1/{ital q}{sup 2} correction in the Euclidean correlation function. No such generic'' prediction can be made for the physically measurable {ital R} ratio. A novel functional method is developed to obtain these results.

  5. SENTENCE ORDERING USING CLUSTER CORRELATION AND PROBABILITY IN MULTI-DOCUMENTS SUMMARIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Agung Socrates Adi Guna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the document summary are arranged extractive by taking important sentences from the document. Extractive based summarization often not consider the connection sentence.  A good sentence ordering should aware about rhetorical relations such as cause-effect relation, topical relevancy and chronological sequence which exist between the sentences.  Based on this problem, we propose a new method for sentence ordering in multi document summarization using cluster correlation and probability for English documents. Sentences of multi-documents are grouped based on similarity into clusters. Sentence extracted from each cluster to be a summary that will be listed based on cluster correlation and probability. User evaluation showed that the summary result of proposed method easier to understanding than the previous method. The result of ROUGE method also shows increase on sentence arrangement compared to previous method.

  6. Azimuthal correlations and mixed higher order flow harmonics from CMS at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Stojanovic, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Two-particle correlations measurements of $v_{n}$ (n=2-4) in 8.16 TeV pPb collisions, and event-by-event correlations of different $v_{n}$ measured using symmetric cumulants in 13 TeV pp, 5.02 and 8.16TeV pPb and 5.02 TeV PbPb collisions at the LHC. These new results give important insights to the origin of collectivity observed in small collision systems. Additionally, using the scalar product method and the method of two-particle correlations, the mixed higher order flow harmonics and extracted nonlinear response coefficients of charged particles are measured for the first time as a function of $p_{T}$ and centrality in 2.76 and 5.02 TeV PbPb collisions. The obtained results are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  7. LDA+DMFT approach to ordering phenomena and the structural stability of correlated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuneš, J.; Leonov, I.; Augustinský, P.; Křápek, V.; Kollar, M.; Vollhardt, D.

    2017-07-01

    Materials with correlated electrons often respond very strongly to external or internal influences, leading to instabilities and states of matter with broken symmetry. This behavior can be studied theoretically either by evaluating the linear response characteristics, or by simulating the ordered phases of the materials under investigation. We developed the necessary tools within the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) to search for electronic instabilities in materials close to spin-state crossovers and to analyze the properties of the corresponding ordered states. This investigation, motivated by the physics of LaCoO3, led to a discovery of condensation of spinful excitons in the two-orbital Hubbard model with a surprisingly rich phase diagram. The results are reviewed in the first part of the article. Electronic correlations can also be the driving force behind structural transformations of materials. To be able to investigate correlation-induced phase instabilities we developed and implemented a formalism for the computation of total energies and forces within a fully charge self-consistent combination of density functional theory and DMFT. Applications of this scheme to the study of structural instabilities of selected correlated electron materials such as Fe and FeSe are reviewed in the second part of the paper.

  8. Smokes and obscurants: A health and environmental effects data base assessment: A first-order, environmental screening and ranking of Army smokes and obscurants: Phase 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinn, J.H.; Martins, S.A.; Cederwall, P.L.; Gratt, L.B.

    1985-03-01

    An initial environmental screening and ranking is provided for each Army smoke and obscurant (S and O) depending on smoke type and smoke-generating device. This was done according to the magnitude of the impact area, the characteristic environmental concentration, the relative inhalation toxicity, the relative toxicity when ingested by animals, the aquatic toxicity, the environmental mobility when freshly deposited, and the ultimate mobility and fate in the environment. The major smoke types considered were various forms of white phosphorus (WP), red phosphorus (RP), hexachloroethane-derived smokes (HC), fog oil (SGF-2), diesel fuel smokes (DF), and some infrared obscuring agents (IR).

  9. Stability and change of personality across the life course: the impact of age and major life events on mean-level and rank-order stability of the Big Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Jule; Egloff, Boris; Schmukle, Stefan C

    2011-10-01

    Does personality change across the entire life course, and are those changes due to intrinsic maturation or major life experiences? This longitudinal study investigated changes in the mean levels and rank order of the Big Five personality traits in a heterogeneous sample of 14,718 Germans across all of adulthood. Latent change and latent moderated regression models provided 4 main findings: First, age had a complex curvilinear influence on mean levels of personality. Second, the rank-order stability of Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Openness, and Agreeableness all followed an inverted U-shaped function, reaching a peak between the ages of 40 and 60 and decreasing afterward, whereas Conscientiousness showed a continuously increasing rank-order stability across adulthood. Third, personality predicted the occurrence of several objective major life events (selection effects) and changed in reaction to experiencing these events (socialization effects), suggesting that personality can change due to factors other than intrinsic maturation. Fourth, when events were clustered according to their valence, as is commonly done, effects of the environment on changes in personality were either overlooked or overgeneralized. In sum, our analyses show that personality changes throughout the life span, but with more pronounced changes in young and old ages, and that this change is partly attributable to social demands and experiences. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  10. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy by Considering Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenqin; Bi, Huimin; Pan, Sichen; Meng, Lingyi; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-11-17

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful tool to investigate molecular diffusion and relaxations, which may be utilized to study many problems such as molecular size and aggregation, chemical reaction, molecular transportation and motion, and various kinds of physical and chemical relaxations. This article focuses on a problem related to using the relaxation term to study a reaction. If two species with different fluorescence photon emission efficiencies are connected by a reaction, the kinetic and equilibrium properties will be manifested in the relaxation term of the FCS curve. However, the conventional FCS alone cannot simultaneously determine the equilibrium constant (K) and the relative fluorescence brightness (Q), both of which are indispensable in the extraction of thermodynamic and kinetic information from the experimental data. To circumvent the problem, an assumption of Q = 0 is often made for the weak fluorescent species, which may lead to numerous errors when the actual situation is not the case. We propose to combine the third-order FCS with the conventional second-order FCS to determine K and Q without invoking other resources. The strategy and formalism are verified by computer simulations and demonstrated in a classical example of the hairpin DNA-folding process.

  11. Point model equations for neutron correlation counting: Extension of Böhnel's equations to any order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Andrea; Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Various methods of autocorrelation neutron analysis may be used to extract information about a measurement item containing spontaneously fissioning material. The two predominant approaches being the time correlation analysis (that make use of a coincidence gate) methods of multiplicity shift register logic and Feynman sampling. The common feature is that the correlated nature of the pulse train can be described by a vector of reduced factorial multiplet rates. We call these singlets, doublets, triplets etc. Within the point reactor model the multiplet rates may be related to the properties of the item, the parameters of the detector, and basic nuclear data constants by a series of coupled algebraic equations - the so called point model equations. Solving, or inverting, the point model equations using experimental calibration model parameters is how assays of unknown items is performed. Currently only the first three multiplets are routinely used. In this work we develop the point model equations to higher order multiplets using the probability generating functions approach combined with the general derivative chain rule, the so called Faà di Bruno Formula. Explicit expression up to 5th order are provided, as well the general iterative formula to calculate any order. This work represents the first necessary step towards determining if higher order multiplets can add value to nondestructive measurement practice for nuclear materials control and accountancy.

  12. High-resolution x-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in highly correlated electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghazi, M E

    2002-01-01

    addition, another very weak satellites with wavevector (1/2, 1, 1/2) were observed possibly due to spin ordering. two-dimensional in nature both by measurements of their correlation lengths and by measurement of the critical exponents of the charge stripe melting transition with an anomaly at x = 0.25. The results show by decreasing the hole concentration from the x = 0.33 to 0.2, the well-correlated charge stripes change to a glassy state at x = 0.25. The electronic transition into the charge stripe phase is second-order without any corresponding structural transition. Above the second-order transition critical scattering was observed due to fluctuations into the charge stripe phase. In a single-crystal of Nd sub 1 sub / sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub / sub 2 MnO sub 3 a series of phase transitions were observed using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering. Above the charge ordering transition temperature, T sub C sub O , by measuring the peak profiles of Bragg reflections as a function of temperature, it was foun...

  13. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Jovanović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  14. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Stojan; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs) are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  15. On the Entropy Based Associative Memory Model with Higher-Order Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nakagawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an entropy based associative memory model will be proposed and applied to memory retrievals with an orthogonal learning model so as to compare with the conventional model based on the quadratic Lyapunov functional to be minimized during the retrieval process. In the present approach, the updating dynamics will be constructed on the basis of the entropy minimization strategy which may be reduced asymptotically to the above-mentioned conventional dynamics as a special case ignoring the higher-order correlations. According to the introduction of the entropy functional, one may involve higer-order correlation effects between neurons in a self-contained manner without any heuristic coupling coefficients as in the conventional manner. In fact we shall show such higher order coupling tensors are to be uniquely determined in the framework of the entropy based approach. From numerical results, it will be found that the presently proposed novel approach realizes much larger memory capacity than that of the quadratic Lyapunov functional approach, e.g., associatron.

  16. Fission Multiplicity Detection with Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination from Higher-Order Time Correlation Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberer, Richard B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The current practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile materials using neutrons is dominated by the 3He detector. This has been the case since the mid 1980s when Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) was replaced with thermal well counters and neutron multiplicity counting (NMC). The thermal well counters detect neutrons by neutron capture in the 3He detector subsequent to moderation. The process of detection requires from 30 to 60 μs. As will be explained in Section 3.3 the rate of detecting correlated neutrons (signal) from the same fission are independent of this time but the rate of accidental correlations (noise) are proportional to this time. The well counters are at a distinct disadvantage when there is a large source of uncorrelated neutrons present from (α, n) reactions for example. Plastic scintillating detectors, as were used in FMD, require only about 20 ns to detect neutrons from fission. One thousandth as many accidental coincidences are therefore accumulated. The major problem with the use of fast-plastic scintillation detectors, however, is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable in these detectors. For this thesis, a new technique was developed to use higher-order time correlation statistics to distinguish combinations of neutron and gamma ray detections in fast-plastic scintillation detectors. A system of analysis to describe these correlations was developed based on simple physical principles. Other sources of correlations from non-fission events are identified and integrated into the analysis developed for fission events. A number of ratios and metric are identified to determine physical properties of the source from the correlations. It is possible to determine both the quantity being measured and detection efficiency from these ratios from a single measurement without a separate calibration. To account for detector dead-time, an alternative analytical technique

  17. A generative spike train model with time-structured higher order correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eTrousdale

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging technologies are revealing the spiking activity in ever larger neural ensembles. Frequently, this spiking is far from independent, with correlations in the spike times of different cells. Understanding how such correlations impact the dynamics and function of neural ensembles remains an important open problem.Here we describe a new, generative model for correlated spike trains that can exhibit many of the features observed in data. Extending prior work in mathematical finance, this generalized thinning and shift (GTaS model creates marginally Poisson spike trains with diverse temporal correlation structures.We give several examples which highlight the model's flexibility and utility. For instance, we use it to examine how a neural network responds to highly structured patterns of inputs.We then show that the GTaS model is analytically tractable, and derive cumulant densities of all orders in terms of model parameters. The GTaS framework can therefore be an important tool in the experimental and theoretical exploration of neural dynamics.

  18. Microscopic model of quantum butterfly effect: Out-of-time-order correlators and traveling combustion waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiner, Igor L.; Faoro, Lara; Ioffe, Lev B.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the Keldysh technique to enable the computation of out-of-time order correlators such as . We show that the behavior of these correlators is described by equations that display initially an exponential instability which is followed by a linear propagation of the decoherence between two initially identically copies of the quantum many body systems with interactions. At large times the decoherence propagation (quantum butterfly effect) is described by a diffusion equation with non-linear dissipation known in the theory of combustion waves. The solution of this equation is a propagating non-linear wave moving with constant velocity despite the diffusive character of the underlying dynamics. Our general conclusions are illustrated by the detailed computations for the specific models describing the electrons interacting with bosonic degrees of freedom (phonons, two-level-systems etc.) or with each other.

  19. Exact out-of-time-ordered correlation functions for an interacting lattice fermion model

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuji, Naoto; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    An exact solution for local equilibrium and nonequilibrium out-of-time-ordered correlation (OTOC) functions is obtained for a lattice fermion model with on-site interactions, namely the Falicov-Kimball (FK) model, in the large dimensional and thermodynamic limit. Our approach is based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory generalized to an extended Kadanoff-Baym contour. We find that the OTOC is enhanced at intermediate coupling around the metal-insulator phase transition, implying that the system is most scrambled in that regime. In the high-temperature limit, the OTOC remains nontrivially finite, even though dynamical charge correlations probed by an ordinary response function are suppressed. We propose an experiment to measure OTOCs of fermionic lattice systems including the FK and Hubbard models in ultracold atomic systems.

  20. Explicitly correlated frequency-independent second-order green's function for accurate ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ya; Ten-No, Seiichiro

    2016-10-15

    Explicitly correlated second-order Green's function (GF2-F12) is presented and applied to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oligothiophene, and porphyrins. GF2 suffers from slow convergence of orbital expansions as in the ordinary post Hartree-Fock methods in ab initio theory, albeit the method is capable of providing quantitatively accurate ionization energies (IE) near the complete basis set limit. This feature is significantly mitigated by introducing F12 terms of explicitly correlated electronic structure theory. It is demonstrated that GF2-F12 presents accurate IE with augmented triple-zeta quality of basis sets. The errors from experimental results are typically less than 0.15 eV for PAHs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Infinite-order diagrammatic summation approach to explicitly correlated congruent transformed Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Bayne, Mike; Chakraborty, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    A resolution of identity approach to explicitly correlated congruent transformed Hamiltonian (CTH) is presented. One of the principle challenges associated with the congruent transformation of the many-electron Hamiltonian is the generation of three, four, five, and six particle operators. Successful application of the congruent transformation requires efficient implementation of the many-particle operators. In this work, we present the resolution of identity congruent transformed Hamiltonian (RI-CTH) method to handle many-particle operators. The resolution of identity was used to project the explicitly correlated operator in a N-particle finite basis to avoid explicit computation of the many-particle operators. Single-particle states were obtained by performing Hartee-Fock calculations, which were then used for construction of many-particle states. The limitation of the finite nature of the resolution of identity was addressed by developing partial infinite order (PIOS) diagrammatic summation technique. In t...

  2. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Majkut, S.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  3. Electrophysiological correlates of associative learning in smokers: a higher-order conditioning experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littel Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical conditioning has been suggested to play an important role in the development, maintenance, and relapse of tobacco smoking. Several studies have shown that initially neutral stimuli that are directly paired with smoking are able to elicit conditioned responses. However, there have been few human studies that demonstrate the contribution of higher-order conditioning to smoking addiction, although it is assumed that higher-order conditioning predominates learning in the outside world. In the present study a higher-order conditioning task was designed in which brain responses of smokers and non-smokers were conditioned by pairing smoking-related and neutral stimuli (CS1smoke and CS1neutral with two geometrical figures (CS2smoke and CS2neutral. ERPs were recorded to all CSs. Results Data showed that the geometrical figure that was paired with smoking stimuli elicited significantly larger P2 and P3 waves than the geometrical figure that was paired with neutral stimuli. During the first half of the experiment this effect was only present in smokers whereas non-smokers displayed no significant differences between both stimuli, indicating that neutral cues paired with motivationally relevant smoking-related stimuli gain more motivational significance even though they were never paired directly with smoking. These conclusions are underscored by self-reported evidence of enhanced second-order conditioning in smokers. Conclusions It can be concluded that smokers show associative learning for higher-order smoking-related stimuli. The present study directly shows the contribution of higher-order conditioning to smoking addiction and is the first to reveal its electrophysiological correlates. Although results are preliminary, they may help in understanding the etiology of smoking addiction and its persistence.

  4. Electrophysiological correlates of associative learning in smokers: a higher-order conditioning experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littel, Marianne; Franken, Ingmar Ha

    2012-01-11

    Classical conditioning has been suggested to play an important role in the development, maintenance, and relapse of tobacco smoking. Several studies have shown that initially neutral stimuli that are directly paired with smoking are able to elicit conditioned responses. However, there have been few human studies that demonstrate the contribution of higher-order conditioning to smoking addiction, although it is assumed that higher-order conditioning predominates learning in the outside world. In the present study a higher-order conditioning task was designed in which brain responses of smokers and non-smokers were conditioned by pairing smoking-related and neutral stimuli (CS1smoke and CS1neutral) with two geometrical figures (CS2smoke and CS2neutral). ERPs were recorded to all CSs. Data showed that the geometrical figure that was paired with smoking stimuli elicited significantly larger P2 and P3 waves than the geometrical figure that was paired with neutral stimuli. During the first half of the experiment this effect was only present in smokers whereas non-smokers displayed no significant differences between both stimuli, indicating that neutral cues paired with motivationally relevant smoking-related stimuli gain more motivational significance even though they were never paired directly with smoking. These conclusions are underscored by self-reported evidence of enhanced second-order conditioning in smokers. It can be concluded that smokers show associative learning for higher-order smoking-related stimuli. The present study directly shows the contribution of higher-order conditioning to smoking addiction and is the first to reveal its electrophysiological correlates. Although results are preliminary, they may help in understanding the etiology of smoking addiction and its persistence.

  5. Ranking library materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper discusses ranking factors suitable for library materials and shows that ranking in general is a complex process and that ranking for library materials requires a variety of techniques. Design/methodology/approach: The relevant literature is reviewed to provide a systematic overview of suitable ranking factors. The discussion is based on an overview of ranking factors used in Web search engines. Findings: While there are a wide variety of ranking factors appl...

  6. Relating Out-of-Time-Order Correlations to Entanglement via Multiple-Quantum Coherences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärttner, Martin; Hauke, Philipp; Rey, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-time-order correlations (OTOCs) characterize the scrambling, or delocalization, of quantum information over all the degrees of freedom of a system and thus have been proposed as a proxy for chaos in quantum systems. Recent experimental progress in measuring OTOCs calls for a more thorough understanding of how these quantities characterize complex quantum systems, most importantly in terms of the buildup of entanglement. Although a connection between OTOCs and entanglement entropy has been derived, the latter only quantifies entanglement in pure systems and is hard to access experimentally. In this work, we formally demonstrate that the multiple-quantum coherence spectra, a specific family of OTOCs well known in NMR, can be used as an entanglement witness and as a direct probe of multiparticle entanglement. Our results open a path to experimentally testing the fascinating idea that entanglement is the underlying glue that links thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum gravity.

  7. Correlation between Local Structure Order and Spatial Heterogeneity in a Metallic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Hirata, Akihiko; Liu, Pan; Song, Shuangxi; Tian, Yuan; Han, Jiuhui; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2017-11-01

    Although nanoscale spatial heterogeneity of metallic glasses has been demonstrated by extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, the nature of spatial heterogeneity remains poorly known owing to the absence of a structural depiction of the inhomogeneity from experimental insight. Here we report the experimental characterization of the spatial heterogeneity of a metallic glass by utilizing state-of-the-art angstrom-beam electron diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The subnanoscale electron diffraction reveals that the nanoscale spatial heterogeneity and corresponding density fluctuation have a close correlation with the local structure variation from icosahedronlike to tetragonal crystal-like order. The structural insights of spatial heterogeneity have important implications in understanding the properties and dynamics of metallic glasses.

  8. PageRank tracker: from ranking to tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Fu, Keren; Loza, Artur; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Video object tracking is widely used in many real-world applications, and it has been extensively studied for over two decades. However, tracking robustness is still an issue in most existing methods, due to the difficulties with adaptation to environmental or target changes. In order to improve adaptability, this paper formulates the tracking process as a ranking problem, and the PageRank algorithm, which is a well-known webpage ranking algorithm used by Google, is applied. Labeled and unlabeled samples in tracking application are analogous to query webpages and the webpages to be ranked, respectively. Therefore, determining the target is equivalent to finding the unlabeled sample that is the most associated with existing labeled set. We modify the conventional PageRank algorithm in three aspects for tracking application, including graph construction, PageRank vector acquisition and target filtering. Our simulations with the use of various challenging public-domain video sequences reveal that the proposed PageRank tracker outperforms mean-shift tracker, co-tracker, semiboosting and beyond semiboosting trackers in terms of accuracy, robustness and stability.

  9. Sync-rank: Robust Ranking, Constrained Ranking and Rank Aggregation via Eigenvector and SDP Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    eigenvector of the associated Laplacian matrix (i.e., the Fiedler vector) matches that of the variables. In other words, this approach (reminiscent of...S1), i.e., Dii = ∑n j=1Gi,j is the degree of node i in the measurement graph G. 3: Compute the Fiedler vector of S (eigenvector corresponding to the...smallest nonzero eigenvalue of LS). 4: Output the ranking induced by sorting the Fiedler vector of S, with the global ordering (increasing or decreasing

  10. Neural correlates of audiovisual temporal processing--comparison of temporal order and simultaneity judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, M

    2015-08-06

    Multisensory integration is one of the essential features of perception. Though the processing of spatial information is an important clue to understand its mechanisms, a complete knowledge cannot be achieved without taking into account the processing of temporal information. Simultaneity judgments (SJs) and temporal order judgments (TOJs) are the two most widely used procedures for explicit estimation of temporal relations between sensory stimuli. Behavioral studies suggest that both tasks recruit different sets of cognitive operations. On the other hand, empirical evidence related to their neuronal underpinnings is still scarce, especially with regard to multisensory stimulation. The aim of the current fMRI study was to explore neural correlates of both tasks using paradigm with audiovisual stimuli. Fifteen subjects performed TOJ and SJ tasks grouped in 18-second blocks. Subjects were asked to estimate onset synchrony or temporal order of onsets of non-semantic auditory and visual stimuli. Common areas of activation elicited by both tasks were found in the bilateral fronto-parietal network, including regions whose activity can be also observed in tasks involving spatial selective attention. This can be regarded as an evidence for the hypothesis that tasks involving selection based on temporal information engage the similar regions as the attentional tasks based on spatial information. The direct contrast between the SJ task and the TOJ task did not reveal any regions showing stronger activity for SJ task than in TOJ task. The reverse contrast revealed a number of left hemisphere regions which were more active during the TOJ task than the SJ task. They were found in the prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobules (superior and inferior) and in the occipito-temporal regions. These results suggest that the TOJ task requires recruitment of additional cognitive operations in comparison to SJ task. They are probably associated with forming representations of stimuli as

  11. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  12. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Weibing; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the human society. By clicking the web pages of Forbes, you may find all kinds of rankings, such as world's most powerful people, world's richest people, top-paid tennis stars, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind, sports ranking systems in which players' scores and prize money are calculated based on their performances in attending various tournaments. A typical example is tennis. It is found that the distributions of both scores and prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports fields. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player will top the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simul...

  13. PageRank of integers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, K. M.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is approximately inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows us to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers.

  14. Monte Carlo explicitly correlated second-order many-body perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cole M; Doran, Alexander E; Zhang, Jinmei; Valeev, Edward F; Hirata, So

    2016-10-21

    A stochastic algorithm is proposed and implemented that computes a basis-set-incompleteness (F12) correction to an ab initio second-order many-body perturbation energy as a short sum of 6- to 15-dimensional integrals of Gaussian-type orbitals, an explicit function of the electron-electron distance (geminal), and its associated excitation amplitudes held fixed at the values suggested by Ten-no. The integrals are directly evaluated (without a resolution-of-the-identity approximation or an auxiliary basis set) by the Metropolis Monte Carlo method. Applications of this method to 17 molecular correlation energies and 12 gas-phase reaction energies reveal that both the nonvariational and variational formulas for the correction give reliable correlation energies (98% or higher) and reaction energies (within 2 kJ mol(-1) with a smaller statistical uncertainty) near the complete-basis-set limits by using just the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The nonvariational formula is found to be 2-10 times less expensive to evaluate than the variational one, though the latter yields energies that are bounded from below and is, therefore, slightly but systematically more accurate for energy differences. Being capable of using virtually any geminal form, the method confirms the best overall performance of the Slater-type geminal among 6 forms satisfying the same cusp conditions. Not having to precompute lower-dimensional integrals analytically, to store them on disk, or to transform them in a nonscalable dense-matrix-multiplication algorithm, the method scales favorably with both system size and computer size; the cost increases only as O(n(4)) with the number of orbitals (n), and its parallel efficiency reaches 99.9% of the ideal case on going from 16 to 4096 computer processors.

  15. A model for a correlated random walk based on the ordered extension of pseudopodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J M Van Haastert

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the absence of external cues is well described by a correlated random walk. Most single cells move by extending protrusions called pseudopodia. To deduce how cells walk, we have analyzed the formation of pseudopodia by Dictyostelium cells. We have observed that the formation of pseudopodia is highly ordered with two types of pseudopodia: First, de novo formation of pseudopodia at random positions on the cell body, and therefore in random directions. Second, pseudopod splitting near the tip of the current pseudopod in alternating right/left directions, leading to a persistent zig-zag trajectory. Here we analyzed the probability frequency distributions of the angles between pseudopodia and used this information to design a stochastic model for cell movement. Monte Carlo simulations show that the critical elements are the ratio of persistent splitting pseudopodia relative to random de novo pseudopodia, the Left/Right alternation, the angle between pseudopodia and the variance of this angle. Experiments confirm predictions of the model, showing reduced persistence in mutants that are defective in pseudopod splitting and in mutants with an irregular cell surface.

  16. A QSAR/QSTR study on the human health impact of the rocket fuel 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine and its transformation products Multicriteria hazard ranking based on partial order methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Lars; Kenessov, Bulat N; Batyrbekova, Svetlana Ye

    2009-05-01

    The possible impact of the rocket fuel 1,1-dimethyl hydrazine (heptyl) (1) and its transformation products on human health has been studied using (Quantitative) Structure Activity/Toxicity ((Q)SAR/(Q)STR) modelling, including both ADME models and models for acute toxicity, organ specific adverse haematological effects, the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems, the kidneys, the liver and the lungs, as well as a model predicting the biological activity of the compounds. It was predicted that all compounds studied are readily bioavailable through oral intake and that significant amounts of the compounds will be freely available in the systemic circulation. In general, the compounds are not predicted to be acutely toxic apart from hydrogen cyanide, whereas several compounds are predicted to cause adverse organ specific human health effects. Further, several compounds are predicted to exhibit high probabilities for potential carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity and/or embryotoxicity. The compounds were ranked based on their predicted human health impact using partial order ranking methodologies that highlight which compounds on a cumulative basis should receive the major attention, i.e., N-nitroso dimethyl amine, 1,1,4,4-tetramethyl tetrazene, trimethyl, trimethyl hydrazine, acetaldehyde dimethyl hydrazone, 1, 1-formyl 2,2-dimethyl hydrazine and formaldehyde dimethyl hydrazone, respectively. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d0=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d0.

  18. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d_{0}=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d_{0}.

  19. Generalized Reduced Rank Tests using the Singular Value Decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.; Paap, R.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson [Annals of Mathematical Statistics (1951), 22, 327-351] sensitivity to the

  20. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  1. On a common generalization of Shelah's 2-rank, dp-rank, and o-minimal dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Guingona, Vincent; Hill, Cameron Donnay

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we build a dimension theory related to Shelah's 2-rank, dp-rank, and o-minimal dimension. We call this dimension op-dimension. We exhibit the notion of the n-multi-order property, generalizing the order property, and use this to create op-rank, which generalizes 2-rank. From this we build op-dimension. We show that op-dimension bounds dp-rank, that op-dimension is sub-additive, and op-dimension generalizes o-minimal dimension in o-minimal theories.

  2. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  3. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-04-17

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse structure, we assume that each multimedia object could be represented as a sparse linear combination of all other objects, and combination coefficients are regarded as a similarity measure between objects and used to regularize their ranking scores. Moreover, we propose to learn the sparse combination coefficients and the ranking scores simultaneously. A unified objective function is constructed with regard to both the combination coefficients and the ranking scores, and is optimized by an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two multimedia database retrieval data sets demonstrate the significant improvements of the propose algorithm over state-of-the-art ranking score learning algorithms.

  4. Ranking in Swiss system chess team tournaments

    OpenAIRE

    Csató, László

    2015-01-01

    The paper uses paired comparison-based scoring procedures for ranking the participants of a Swiss system chess team tournament. We present the main challenges of ranking in Swiss system, the features of individual and team competitions as well as the failures of official lexicographical orders. The tournament is represented as a ranking problem, our model is discussed with respect to the properties of the score, generalized row sum and least squares methods. The proposed procedure is illustra...

  5. Superconductivity, spin and charge order, and quantum criticality in correlated electron materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu J.-H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe recent experiments performed in our laboratory that address spin or charge ordered phases in novel rare earth and actinide based materials and phenomena that emerge when these ordered phases are suppressed toward 0 K by varying an external control parameter such as chemical composition, pressure, or magnetic field. Specific examples discussed include magnetic order, heavy fermion behavior, and unconventional quantum criticality in noncentrosymmetric M2T12P7 compounds (M = rare earth, actinide; T = Co, Fe and the interplay of superconductivity and charge density waves in rare earth tritelluride compounds RTe3 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy.

  6. Nonexponential decay of velocity correlations in surface diffusion: The role of interactions and ordering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Hjelt, T.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study the diffusive dynamics of adparticles in two model systems with strong interactions by considering the decay of the single-particle velocity correlation function phi (t). In accordance with previous studies, we find phi (t) to decay nonexponentially and follow a power-law phi (t)similar ...

  7. Diurnal fluctuation of higher order ocular aberrations: correlation with intraocular pressure and corneal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierdel, Peter; Krinke, Hans-Eberhard; Pollack, Katharina; Spoerl, Eberhard

    2004-01-01

    Optimal wavefront-guided refractive corneal laser surgery requires sufficiently exact data of optical higher order aberrations. We investigated whether these aberrations had a systematic during-the-day variation, studied the range of variation, and changes in intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness. In 22 eyes of 22 young volunteers the optical aberrations of higher order were measured by means of a Tscherning-type ocular aberrometer three times during one day (7 AM, 12 noon, 4 PM). In addition, in 12 of these eyes the intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness were measured. The intraocular wavefront aberration was computed using Zernike polynomials up to the sixth order, and Zernike coefficients of third and fourth order were analyzed. Only the coefficient Z 2/4 (C13) showed a significant increase during the day by a mean 0.016 microm. A significant regression could be detected between changes of coefficients Z3/3, Z-2/4, Z0/4, Z4/4, and changes of intraocular pressure or central corneal thickness during the day. Due to the small values, the measured during-the-day changes of higher order aberrations had no direct practical consequences for the aberrometry-guided corneal laser surgery. Alterations of some Zernike coefficients during the day may be explained by the biomechanical behavior of the cornea.

  8. Validating rankings in soccer championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Parracho Sant'Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The final ranking of a championship is determined by quality attributes combined with other factors which should be filtered out of any decision on relegation or draft for upper level tournaments. Factors like referees' mistakes and difficulty of certain matches due to its accidental importance to the opponents should have their influence reduced. This work tests approaches to combine classification rules considering the imprecision of the number of points as a measure of quality and of the variables that provide reliable explanation for it. Two home-advantage variables are tested and shown to be apt to enter as explanatory variables. Independence between the criteria is checked against the hypothesis of maximal correlation. The importance of factors and of composition rules is evaluated on the basis of correlation between rank vectors, number of classes and number of clubs in tail classes. Data from five years of the Brazilian Soccer Championship are analyzed.

  9. Maximum Waring ranks of monomials

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Erik; Plummer, Paul; Siegert, Jeremy; Teitler, Zach

    2013-01-01

    We show that monomials and sums of pairwise coprime monomials in four or more variables have Waring rank less than the generic rank, with a short list of exceptions. We asymptotically compare their ranks with the generic rank.

  10. Symmetries and Topological Order: Realizations and Signals in Correlated Strong Spin-Orbit Coupled Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ping

    Spin-orbit coupling exists in materials in general. However, it entangles the spin and orbital degrees of freedom and complicates the model. Thus, theorists usually neglect the effects induced by spin-orbit coupling first and consider spin-orbit coupling as perturbation next. The non-perturbative effects brought up by spin-orbit coupling are thus often less studied or overlooked. On the other hand, the majority in the study of interacting topological order focusing on the general structure of theories and made significant advances by leaving material details behind. It is thus important to find possible microscopic models that could realize the new phases in laboratories and benefits from the progress of theories to make experimental predictions. In this thesis, we study the physical effects due to strong spin-orbit coupling from the perspective of searching new quantum orders and the non-trivial responses. (i) The first project, we propose the nontrivial dipolar-octupolar(DO) doublets on the pyrochlore lattice. By studying the most general symmetry allowed model at the localized and the itinerant limit for DO doublets, we found two 3D symmetry enriched topological orders and topological insulator correspondingly. (ii) In the second project, we analyze the 2D model descending from the localized limit of DO doublets on pyrochlore. The discrete onsite symmetry and space group symmetry could lead to a symmetry-enriched topological order with symmetry fractionalization pattern that cannot emerge from a spin model with continuous spin rotational symmetry. The non-trivial symmetry fractionalization pattern contributes to the striking numerical signal that can help identifying the topological order. (iii) In the third project, we develop a theory to understand the high-energy Raman signal in Sr2IrO4.

  11. Ordered patterns of cell shape and orientational correlation during spontaneous cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke T Maeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. METHODOLOGY: We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion. We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli.

  12. Competing orders in strongly correlated systems. Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Laura

    2016-11-04

    In this work we address the collective phenomena appearing in interacting fermion systems due to the competition of distinct orders at the example of Dirac materials and iron-based superconductors. On the one hand we determine leading ordering tendencies in an unbiased way, when Fermi liquid instabilities are expected simultaneously in the particle-particle and particle-hole channel. In this context we analyze the impact of electron-phonon interactions on the many-body instabilities of electrons on the honeycomb lattice. Furthermore we investigate the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism and orbital order in five-pocket iron-based superconductors including the full orbital composition of low-energy excitations. On the other hand we study how the close proximity of different phases affects the structure of the phase diagram and the nature of transitions, as well as the corresponding quantum multicritical behavior. To this end we consider the semimetal-insulator transitions to an antiferromagnetic and a staggered-density state of low-energy Dirac fermions. To account for the decisive role of interactions and the various degrees of freedom in these models, modern renormalization group techniques are applied.

  13. Academic rankings: an approach to a Portuguese ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardino, Pedro; Marques,Rui

    2009-01-01

    The academic rankings are a controversial subject in higher education. However, despite all the criticism, academic rankings are here to stay and more and more different stakeholders use rankings to obtain information about the institutions’ performance. The two most well-known rankings, The Times and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings have different methodologies. The Times ranking is based on peer review, whereas the Shanghai ranking has only quantitative indicators and is mainly ba...

  14. Spiral magnetic order, non-uniform states and electron correlations in the conducting transition metal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshev, P. A.; Timirgazin, M. A.; Arzhnikov, A. K.; Antipin, T. V.; Irkhin, V. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    The ground-state magnetic phase diagram is calculated within the Hubbard and s-d exchange (Kondo) models for square and simple cubic lattices vs. band filling and interaction parameter. The difference of the results owing to the presence of localized moments in the latter model is discussed. We employ a generalized Hartree-Fock approximation (HFA) to treat commensurate ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AFM), and incommensurate (spiral) magnetic phases. The electron correlations are taken into account within the Hubbard model by using the Kotliar-Ruckenstein slave boson approximation (SBA). The main advantage of this approach is a correct qualitative description of the paramagnetic phase: its energy becomes considerably lower as compared with HFA, and the gain in the energy of magnetic phases is substantially reduced.

  15. Pairwise and higher-order correlations among drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 subtype B protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Alexandre V

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reaction of HIV protease to inhibitor therapy is characterized by the emergence of complex mutational patterns which confer drug resistance. The response of HIV protease to drugs often involves both primary mutations that directly inhibit the action of the drug, and a host of accessory resistance mutations that may occur far from the active site but may contribute to restoring the fitness or stability of the enzyme. Here we develop a probabilistic approach based on connected information that allows us to study residue, pair level and higher-order correlations within the same framework. Results We apply our methodology to a database of approximately 13,000 sequences which have been annotated by the treatment history of the patients from which the samples were obtained. We show that including pair interactions is essential for agreement with the mutational data, since neglect of these interactions results in order-of-magnitude errors in the probabilities of the simultaneous occurence of many mutations. The magnitude of these pair correlations changes dramatically between sequences obtained from patients that were or were not exposed to drugs. Higher-order effects make a contribution of as much as 10% for residues taken three at a time, but increase to more than twice that for 10 to 15-residue groups. The sequence data is insufficient to determine the higher-order effects for larger groups. We find that higher-order interactions have a significant effect on the predicted frequencies of sequences with large numbers of mutations. While relatively rare, such sequences are more prevalent after multi-drug therapy. The relative importance of these higher-order interactions increases with the number of drugs the patient had been exposed to. Conclusion Correlations are critical for the understanding of mutation patterns in HIV protease. Pair interactions have substantial qualitative effects, while higher-order interactions are

  16. The role of growth form and correlated traits in competitive ranking of six perennial ruderal plant species grown in unbalanced mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Hansjörg; Steinlein, Thomas; Ullmann, Isolde

    1998-02-01

    The competitive abilities of six perennial ruderal plants of three different growth forms were compared via yield measures using an additive diallel experimental design with unbalanced mixtures (9:3 or 3:9 plants per pot, respectively). Thus, in a given mixture species A was grown in two configurations: three individuals in centre position of the pot together with nine plants of species B in border position and vice versa. Effect competitive abilities as well as response competitive abilities of the species were significantly related to canopy height and plant biomass. The species with lower rosette growth form and smaller biomasses were weaker competitors than the species possessing elevated canopies along with higher biomasses, whereas total leaf area was not significantly correlated with competitive ability between species. Species differences in competitive ability were stronger between the plants grown in the central position than between those grown in the border position. Furthermore, interactions between species-specific traits and configuration could be observed, indicating the importance of species proportions and arrangement patterns for evaluation of competitive outcome in the field. The degree of complete transitivity of the competitive network of the six ruderal species, which was significantly higher than expected under the null model in our experimental design, also seemed to depend on species proportions in mixture. Shifts in root:shoot ratio of the centre plants when faced with competition by the border plants were in the direction of higher shoot allocation for the weak competitors with rosette growth form irrespective of the neighbour species, except for Bunias orientalis, which showed a more plastic response. The stronger competitors showed higher root allocation ( Urtica dioica) or were hardly affected at all. Consistent with the results of our experiment, the weaker competitors occur at rather frequently disturbed and therefore transient

  17. Computerized implementation of higher-order electron-correlation methods and their linear-scaling divide-and-conquer extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Hirata, So; Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2017-11-05

    We have implemented a linear-scaling divide-and-conquer (DC)-based higher-order coupled-cluster (CC) and Møller-Plesset perturbation theories (MPPT) as well as their combinations automatically by means of the tensor contraction engine, which is a computerized symbolic algebra system. The DC-based energy expressions of the standard CC and MPPT methods and the CC methods augmented with a perturbation correction were proposed for up to high excitation orders [e.g., CCSDTQ, MP4, and CCSD(2)TQ ]. The numerical assessment for hydrogen halide chains, polyene chains, and first coordination sphere (C1) model of photoactive yellow protein has revealed that the DC-based correlation methods provide reliable correlation energies with significantly less computational cost than that of the conventional implementations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  19. Genome-wide and Ordered-Subset linkage analyses provide support for autism loci on 17q and 19p with evidence of phenotypic and interlocus genetic correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folstein Susan E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a neurobehavioral spectrum of phenotypes characterized by deficits in the development of language and social relationships and patterns of repetitive, rigid and compulsive behaviors. Twin and family studies point to a significant genetic etiology, and several groups have performed genomic linkage screens to identify susceptibility loci. Methods We performed a genome-wide linkage screen in 158 combined Tufts, Vanderbilt and AGRE (Autism Genetics Research Exchange multiplex autism families using parametric and nonparametric methods with a categorical autism diagnosis to identify loci of main effect. Hypothesizing interdependence of genetic risk factors prompted us to perform exploratory studies applying the Ordered-Subset Analysis (OSA approach using LOD scores as the trait covariate for ranking families. We employed OSA to test for interlocus correlations between loci with LOD scores ≥1.5, and empirically determined significance of linkage in optimal OSA subsets using permutation testing. Exploring phenotypic correlates as the basis for linkage increases involved comparison of mean scores for quantitative trait-based subsets of autism between optimal subsets and the remaining families. Results A genome-wide screen for autism loci identified the best evidence for linkage to 17q11.2 and 19p13, with maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD scores of 2.9 and 2.6, respectively. Suggestive linkage (LOD scores ≥1.5 at other loci included 3p, 6q, 7q, 12p, and 16p. OSA revealed positive correlations of linkage between the 19p locus and 17q, between 19p and 6q, and between 7q and 5p. While potential phenotypic correlates for these findings were not identified for the chromosome 7/5 combination, differences indicating more rapid achievement of "developmental milestones" was apparent in the chromosome 19 OSA-defined subsets for 17q and 6q. OSA was used to test the hypothesis that 19p linkage involved more rapid achievement of

  20. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  1. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  2. Citation ranking versus peer evaluation of senior faculty research performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meho, Lokman I.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    indicator of research performance of senior faculty members? Citation data, book reviews, and peer ranking were compiled and examined for faculty members specializing in Kurdish studies. Analysis shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis data yield identical ranking results....... Analysis also shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis, book reviews, and peer ranking perform similarly (i.e., are highly correlated) for high-ranked and low-ranked senior scholars. Additional evaluation methods and measures that take into account the context and content......The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between citation ranking and peer evaluation in assessing senior faculty research performance. Other studies typically derive their peer evaluation data directly from referees, often in the form of ranking. This study uses two additional...

  3. PageRank as a method to rank biomedical literature by importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Elliot J; Dixon, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Optimal ranking of literature importance is vital in overcoming article overload. Existing ranking methods are typically based on raw citation counts, giving a sum of 'inbound' links with no consideration of citation importance. PageRank, an algorithm originally developed for ranking webpages at the search engine, Google, could potentially be adapted to bibliometrics to quantify the relative importance weightings of a citation network. This article seeks to validate such an approach on the freely available, PubMed Central open access subset (PMC-OAS) of biomedical literature. On-demand cloud computing infrastructure was used to extract a citation network from over 600,000 full-text PMC-OAS articles. PageRanks and citation counts were calculated for each node in this network. PageRank is highly correlated with citation count (R = 0.905, P PageRank can be trivially computed on commodity cluster hardware and is linearly correlated with citation count. Given its putative benefits in quantifying relative importance, we suggest it may enrich the citation network, thereby overcoming the existing inadequacy of citation counts alone. We thus suggest PageRank as a feasible supplement to, or replacement of, existing bibliometric ranking methods.

  4. Cointegration rank testing under conditional heteroskedasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Giuseppe; Rahbek, Anders Christian; Taylor, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    (martingale difference) innovations. We first demonstrate that the limiting null distributions of the rank statistics coincide with those derived by previous authors who assume either independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) or (strict and covariance) stationary martingale difference innovations. We...... then propose wild bootstrap implementations of the cointegrating rank tests and demonstrate that the associated bootstrap rank statistics replicate the first-order asymptotic null distributions of the rank statistics. We show that the same is also true of the corresponding rank tests based on the i.......i.d. bootstrap of Swensen (2006, Econometrica 74, 1699-1714). The wild bootstrap, however, has the important property that, unlike the i.i.d. bootstrap, it preserves in the resampled data the pattern of heteroskedasticity present in the original shocks. Consistent with this, numerical evidence suggests that...

  5. Asset ranking manager (ranking index of components)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, S.M.; Engle, A.M.; Morgan, T.A. [Applied Reliability, Maracor Software and Engineering (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Ranking Index of Components (RIC) is an Asset Reliability Manager (ARM), which itself is a Web Enabled front end where plant database information fields from several disparate databases are combined. That information is used to create a specific weighted number (Ranking Index) relating to that components health and risk to the site. The higher the number, the higher priority that any work associated with that component receives. ARM provides site Engineering, Maintenance and Work Control personnel with a composite real time - (current condition) look at the components 'risk of not working' to the plant. Information is extracted from the existing Computerized Maintenance management System (CMMS) and specific site applications and processed nightly. ARM helps to ensure that the most important work is placed into the workweeks and the non value added work is either deferred, frequency changed or deleted. This information is on the web, updated each night, and available for all employees to use. This effort assists the work management specialist when allocating limited resources to the most important work. The use of this tool has maximized resource usage, performing the most critical work with available resources. The ARM numbers are valued inputs into work scoping for the workweek managers. System and Component Engineers are using ARM to identify the components that are at 'risk of failure' and therefore should be placed into the appropriate work week schedule.

  6. Systematic analysis of compositional order of proteins reveals new characteristics of biological functions and a universal correlate of macroevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erez Persi

    Full Text Available We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between 'regularity', 'periodicity' and 'vocabulary', to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic 'innovation' at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces.

  7. Systematic Analysis of Compositional Order of Proteins Reveals New Characteristics of Biological Functions and a Universal Correlate of Macroevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persi, Erez; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO) based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs) that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between ‘regularity’, ‘periodicity’ and ‘vocabulary’, to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT) in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic ‘innovation’ at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces. PMID:24278003

  8. Systematic analysis of compositional order of proteins reveals new characteristics of biological functions and a universal correlate of macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persi, Erez; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO) based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs) that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between 'regularity', 'periodicity' and 'vocabulary', to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT) in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic 'innovation' at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces.

  9. Ouderdom, omvang en citatiescores: rankings nader bekeken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Jules

    2017-01-01

    By comparing the Top-300 lists of four global university rankings (ARWU, THE, QS, Leiden), three hypotheses are tested: 1) position correlates with size in the ARWU more than in the THE and QS; 2) given their strong dependency on reputation scores, position will be correlated more with a

  10. Multiplex PageRank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Halu

    Full Text Available Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  11. Multiplex PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  12. Ranking of Rankings: Benchmarking Twenty-Five Higher Education Ranking Systems in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ingo; Hendel, Darwin D.; Horn, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ranking practices of 25 European higher education ranking systems (HERSs). Ranking practices were assessed with 14 quantitative measures derived from the Berlin Principles on Ranking of Higher Education Institutions (BPs). HERSs were then ranked according to their degree of congruence with the BPs.…

  13. Functional Multiplex PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Rahmede, Christoph; Arenas, Alex; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-10-01

    Recently it has been recognized that many complex social, technological and biological networks have a multilayer nature and can be described by multiplex networks. Multiplex networks are formed by a set of nodes connected by links having different connotations forming the different layers of the multiplex. Characterizing the centrality of the nodes in a multiplex network is a challenging task since the centrality of the node naturally depends on the importance associated to links of a certain type. Here we propose to assign to each node of a multiplex network a centrality called Functional Multiplex PageRank that is a function of the weights given to every different pattern of connections (multilinks) existent in the multiplex network between any two nodes. Since multilinks distinguish all the possible ways in which the links in different layers can overlap, the Functional Multiplex PageRank can describe important non-linear effects when large relevance or small relevance is assigned to multilinks with overlap. Here we apply the Functional Page Rank to the multiplex airport networks, to the neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans, and to social collaboration and citation networks between scientists. This analysis reveals important differences existing between the most central nodes of these networks, and the correlations between their so-called pattern to success.

  14. From rankings to mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Darrell G; Prescott, John E

    2013-08-01

    Since the 1980s, school ranking systems have been a topic of discussion among leaders of higher education. Various ranking systems are based on inadequate data that fail to illustrate the complex nature and special contributions of the institutions they purport to rank, including U.S. medical schools, each of which contributes uniquely to meeting national health care needs. A study by Tancredi and colleagues in this issue of Academic Medicine illustrates the limitations of rankings specific to primary care training programs. This commentary discusses, first, how each school's mission and strengths, as well as the impact it has on the community it serves, are distinct, and, second, how these schools, which are each unique, are poorly represented by overly subjective ranking methodologies. Because academic leaders need data that are more objective to guide institutional development, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has been developing tools to provide valid data that are applicable to each medical school. Specifically, the AAMC's Medical School Admissions Requirements and its Missions Management Tool each provide a comprehensive assessment of medical schools that leaders are using to drive institutional capacity building. This commentary affirms the importance of mission while challenging the leaders of medical schools, teaching hospitals, and universities to use reliable data to continually improve the quality of their training programs to improve the health of all.

  15. A Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow indices in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang, E-mail: guoqiang.yu@uky.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Conventional semi-infinite analytical solutions of correlation diffusion equation may lead to errors when calculating blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements in tissues with irregular geometries. Very recently, we created an algorithm integrating a Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in homogenous tissues with arbitrary geometries for extraction of BFI (i.e., αD{sub B}). The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of the Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting BFI in heterogeneous tissues with arbitrary geometries. The previous linear algorithm was modified to extract BFIs in different types of tissues simultaneously through utilizing DCS data at multiple source-detector separations. We compared the proposed linear algorithm with the semi-infinite homogenous solution in a computer model of adult head with heterogeneous tissue layers of scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain. To test the capability of the linear algorithm for extracting relative changes of cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in deep brain, we assigned ten levels of αD{sub B} in the brain layer with a step decrement of 10% while maintaining αD{sub B} values constant in other layers. Simulation results demonstrate the accuracy (errors < 3%) of high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm in extracting BFIs in different tissue layers and rCBF in deep brain. By contrast, the semi-infinite homogenous solution resulted in substantial errors in rCBF (34.5% ≤ errors ≤ 60.2%) and BFIs in different layers. The Nth-order linear model simplifies data analysis, thus allowing for online data processing and displaying. Future study will test this linear algorithm in heterogeneous tissues with different levels of blood flow variations and noises.

  16. Thermostability of Well-Ordered HIV Spikes Correlates with the Elicitation of Autologous Tier 2 Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Feng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the context of HIV vaccine design and development, HIV-1 spike mimetics displaying a range of stabilities were evaluated to determine whether more stable, well-ordered trimers would more efficiently elicit neutralizing antibodies. To begin, in vitro analysis of trimers derived from the cysteine-stabilized SOSIP platform or the uncleaved, covalently linked NFL platform were evaluated. These native-like trimers, derived from HIV subtypes A, B, and C, displayed a range of thermostabilities, and were "stress-tested" at varying temperatures as a prelude to in vivo immunogenicity. Analysis was performed both in the absence and in the presence of two different adjuvants. Since partial trimer degradation was detected at 37°C before or after formulation with adjuvant, we sought to remedy such an undesirable outcome. Cross-linking (fixing of the well-ordered trimers with glutaraldehyde increased overall thermostability, maintenance of well-ordered trimer integrity without or with adjuvant, and increased resistance to solid phase-associated trimer unfolding. Immunization of unfixed and fixed well-ordered trimers into animals revealed that the elicited tier 2 autologous neutralizing activity correlated with overall trimer thermostability, or melting temperature (Tm. Glutaraldehyde fixation also led to higher tier 2 autologous neutralization titers. These results link retention of trimer quaternary packing with elicitation of tier 2 autologous neutralizing activity, providing important insights for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  17. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  18. Explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory in a Divide-Expand-Consolidate (DEC) context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang Min; Hättig, Christof; Reine, Simen; Valeev, Edward; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Kristensen, Kasper

    2016-05-01

    We present the DEC-RIMP2-F12 method where we have augmented the Divide Expand-Consolidate resolution-of-the-identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory method (DEC-RIMP2) [P. Baudin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 054102 (2016)] with an explicitly correlated (F12) correction. The new method is linear-scaling, massively parallel, and it corrects for the basis set incompleteness error in an efficient manner. In addition, we observe that the F12 contribution decreases the domain error of the DEC-RIMP2 correlation energy by roughly an order of magnitude. An important feature of the DEC scheme is the inherent error control defined by a single parameter, and this feature is also retained for the DEC-RIMP2-F12 method. In this paper we present the working equations for the DEC-RIMP2-F12 method and proof of concept numerical results for a set of test molecules.

  19. Anharmonic correlated Debye model high-order expanded interatomic effective potential and Debye-Waller factors of bcc crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hung, Nguyen, E-mail: hungnv@vnu.edu.vn [Department of Physics, Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hue, Trinh Thi [Department of Physics, Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khoa, Ha Dang [School of Engineering Physics, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vuong, Dinh Quoc [Quang Ninh Education & Training Department, Nguyen Van Cu, Ha Long, Quang Ninh (Viet Nam)

    2016-12-15

    High-order expanded interatomic effective potential and Debye-Waller factors (DWFs) for local vibrational amplitudes in X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) of bcc crystals have been studied based on the anharmonic correlated Debye model. DWFs are presented in terms of cumulant expansion up to the fourth order and the many-body effects are taken into account in the present one-dimensional model based on the first shell near neighbor contribution approach used in the derivations of the anharmonic effective potential and XAFS cumulants where Morse potential is assumed to describe the single-pair atomic interaction. Analytical expressions for the dispersion relation, correlated Debye frequency and temperature and four first temperature-dependent XAFS cumulants have been derived based on the many-body perturbation approach. Thermodynamic properties and anharmonic effects in XAFS of bcc crystals described by the obtained cumulants have been in detail discussed. The advantage and efficiency of the present theory are illustrated by good agreement of the numerical results for Mo, Fe and W with experiment.

  20. Determination of Equilibrium Constant and Relative Brightness in FRET-FCS by Including the Third-Order Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingyi; He, Shanshan; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2017-12-21

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) encodes the information on the equilibrium constant (K), the relative fluorescence brightness of fluorophore (Q), and the forward and backward reaction rate constants (k+ and k-) on a physical or chemical relaxation. However, it has been a long-standing problem to completely resolve the FCS data to get the thermodynamic and kinetic information. Recently, we have solved the problem for fluorescence autocorrelation spectroscopy (FACS). Here, we extend the method to fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), which appears when FCS is coupled with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Among 12 total second-order and third-order pre-exponential factors in a relaxation process probed by the FRET-FCS technique, 3 are independent. We presented and discussed 3 sets of explicit solutions to use these pre-exponential factors to calculate K and Q. Together with the relaxation time, the acquired K will allow people to obtain k+ and k-, so that the goal of deciphering the FRET-FCS data will be fully reached. The theory is verified by extensive computer simulations and tested experimentally on a system of oligonucleotide hybridization.

  1. Local explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with pair natural orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättig, Christof; Tew, David P.; Helmich, Benjamin

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for computing explicitly correlated second- and third-order Møller-Plesset energies near the basis set limit for large molecules with a cost that scales formally as N^4 with system size N. This is achieved through a hybrid approach where locality is exploited first through orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) and subsequently through pair natural orbitals (PNOs) and integrals are approximated using density fitting. Our method combines the low orbital transformation costs of the OSVs with the compactness of the PNO representation of the doubles amplitude vector. The N^4 scaling does not rely upon the a priori definition of domains, enforced truncation of pair lists, or even screening and the energies converge smoothly to the canonical values with decreasing occupation number thresholds, used in the selection of the PNO basis. For MP2.5 intermolecular interaction energies, we find that 99% of benchmark basis set limit correlation energy contributions are recovered using an aug-cc-pVTZ basis and that on average only 50 PNOs are required to correlate the significant orbital pairs.

  2. Orbital-dependent second-order scaled-opposite-spin correlation functionals in the optimized effective potential method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Ireneusz, E-mail: ig@fizyka.umk.pl; Śmiga, Szymon; Buksztel, Adam [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Fabiano, Eduardo [National Nanotechnology Laboratory, Istituto Nanoscienze–CNR, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Teale, Andrew M. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Sala, Fabio Della [National Nanotechnology Laboratory, Istituto Nanoscienze–CNR, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies @UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Barsanti, 73010 Arnesano (LE) (Italy)

    2014-07-14

    The performance of correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) functionals based on the spin-resolved second-order correlation energy is analysed. The relative importance of singly- and doubly- excited contributions as well as the effect of scaling the same- and opposite- spin components is investigated in detail comparing OEP results with Kohn–Sham (KS) quantities determined via an inversion procedure using accurate ab initio electronic densities. Special attention is dedicated in particular to the recently proposed scaled-opposite–spin OEP functional [I. Grabowski, E. Fabiano, and F. Della Sala, Phys. Rev. B 87, 075103 (2013)] which is the most advantageous from a computational point of view. We find that for high accuracy, a careful, system dependent, selection of the scaling coefficient is required. We analyse several size-extensive approaches for this selection. Finally, we find that a composite approach, named OEP2-SOSh, based on a post-SCF rescaling of the correlation energy can yield high accuracy for many properties, being comparable with the most accurate OEP procedures previously reported in the literature but at substantially reduced computational effort.

  3. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. OutRank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Steinhausen, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Outlier detection is an important data mining task for consistency checks, fraud detection, etc. Binary decision making on whether or not an object is an outlier is not appropriate in many applications and moreover hard to parametrize. Thus, recently, methods for outlier ranking have been proposed...

  5. A novel 2nd-order shape function based digital image correlation method for large deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruixiang; Jiang, Hao; Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Weikang

    2017-03-01

    Compared with the traditional forward compositional matching strategy, the inverse compositional matching strategy has almost the same accuracy, but has an obviously higher efficiency than the former in digital image correlation (DIC) algorithms. Based on the inverse compositional matching strategy and the auxiliary displacement functions, a more accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton (IC-GN2) algorithm with a new second-order shape operator is proposed for nonuniform and large deformation measurements. A theoretical deduction showed that the new proposed second-order shape operator is invertible and can steadily attain second-order precision. The result of the numerical simulation showed that the matching accuracy of the new IC-GN2 algorithm is the same as that of the forward compositional Gauss-Newton (FC-GN2) algorithm and is relatively better than in IC-GN2 algorithm. Finally, a rubber tension experiment with a large deformation of 27% was performed to validate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Improving Ranking Using Quantum Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Melucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows that ranking information units by quantum probability differs from ranking them by classical probability provided the same data used for parameter estimation. As probability of detection (also known as recall or power) and probability of false alarm (also known as fallout or size) measure the quality of ranking, we point out and show that ranking by quantum probability yields higher probability of detection than ranking by classical probability provided a given probability of ...

  7. Fuzzy Ordering Theory and Its Use in Filter Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barner Kenneth E

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The rank ordering of samples is widely used in robust nonlinear signal processing. Recent advances in nonlinear filtering algorithms have focused on combining spatial and rank (SR order information into the filtering process to allow spatial correlations to be exploited while retaining the robust characteristics of strict rank order methods. Further generalization can be achieved by replacing the crisp, or binary, SR information utilized by most methods with more general fuzzy SR information. Indeed, by exploiting fuzzy methodologies real valued SR orderings can be defined that not only relate the spatial and rank orderings of samples, but also includes information on sample spread. This paper utilizes this approach to define fuzzy ranking and fuzzy order statistics. Properties of these concepts are discussed and several previously defined filters are generalized by including fuzzy concepts. Specifically, the fuzzy median, fuzzy rank conditioned rank selection, and fuzzy weighted median filters are defined. Optimization of the parameters for these filters are discussed. Simulation results are presented to show the advantages of these fuzzy filters over their crisp counterparts.

  8. Assessing texture measures with respect to their sensitivity to scale-dependent higher order correlations in medical images using surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räth, Christoph; Müller, Dirk; Sidorenko, Irina; Monetti, Roberto; Bauer, Jan

    2010-03-01

    The quantitative characterization of images showing tissue probes being visualized by e.g. CT or MR is of great interest in many fields of medical image analysis. A proper quantification of the information content in such images can be realized by calculating well-suited texture measures, which are able to capture the main characteristics of the image structures under study. Using test images showing the complex trabecular structure of the inner bone of a healthy and osteoporotic patient we propose and apply a novel statistical framework, with which one can systematically assess the sensitivity of texture measures to scale-dependent higher order correlations (HOCs). To this end, so-called surrogate images are generated, in which the linear properties are exactly preserved, while parts of the higher order correlations (if present) are wiped out in a scale dependent manner. This is achieved by dedicated Fourier phase shuffling techniques. We compare three commonly used classes of texture measures, namely spherical Mexican hat wavelets (SMHW), Minkowski functionals (MF) and scaling indices (SIM). While the SMHW were sensitive to HOCs on small scales (Significance S=19-23), the MF and SIM could detect the HOCs very well for the larger scales (S = 39 (MF) and S = 29 (SIM)). Thus the three classes of texture measures are complimentary with respect to their ability to detect scaledependent HOCs. The MF and SIM are, however, slightly preferable, because they are more sensitive to HOCs on length scales, which the important structural elements, i.e. the trabeculae, are considered to have.

  9. Communication: the description of strong correlation within self-consistent Green's function second-order perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordan J; Zgid, Dominika

    2014-06-28

    We report an implementation of self-consistent Green's function many-body theory within a second-order approximation (GF2) for application with molecular systems. This is done by iterative solution of the Dyson equation expressed in matrix form in an atomic orbital basis, where the Green's function and self-energy are built on the imaginary frequency and imaginary time domain, respectively, and fast Fourier transform is used to efficiently transform these quantities as needed. We apply this method to several archetypical examples of strong correlation, such as a H32 finite lattice that displays a highly multireference electronic ground state even at equilibrium lattice spacing. In all cases, GF2 gives a physically meaningful description of the metal to insulator transition in these systems, without resorting to spin-symmetry breaking. Our results show that self-consistent Green's function many-body theory offers a viable route to describing strong correlations while remaining within a computationally tractable single-particle formalism.

  10. A Modification on the Hesitant Fuzzy Set Lexicographical Ranking Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel hesitant fuzzy set (HFS ranking technique based on the idea of lexicographical ordering is proposed and an example is presented to demonstrate that the proposed ranking method is invariant with multiple occurrences of any element of a hesitant fuzzy element (HFE. In this paper, we show by examples that the HFS lexicographical ordering method is sometimes invalid, and a modified ranking method is presented. In comparison with the HFS lexicographical ordering method, the modified ranking method is more reasonable in more general cases.

  11. Fractional cointegration rank estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating the parame......We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating...... to control for stochastic trend estimation effects from the first step. The critical values of the tests proposed depend only on the number of common trends under the null, p - r, and on the interval of the cointegration degrees b allowed, but not on the true cointegration degree b0. Hence, no additional...

  12. Personality Correlates of Midlife Cardiometabolic Risk: The Explanatory Role of Higher-Order Factors of the Five-Factor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah S; Wright, Aidan G C; Cheong, JeeWon; Miller, Karissa G; Muldoon, Matthew F; Flory, Janine D; Gianaros, Peter J; Marsland, Anna L; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-12-01

    Varying associations are reported between Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality traits and cardiovascular disease risk. Here, we further examine dispositional correlates of cardiometabolic risk within a hierarchical model of personality that proposes higher-order traits of Stability (shared variance of Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, inverse Neuroticism) and Plasticity (Extraversion, Openness), and we test hypothesized mediation via biological and behavioral factors. In an observational study of 856 community volunteers aged 30-54 years (46% male, 86% Caucasian), latent variable FFM traits (using multiple-informant reports) and aggregated cardiometabolic risk (indicators: insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, blood pressure, adiposity) were estimated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The cardiometabolic factor was regressed on each personality factor or higher-order trait. Cross-sectional indirect effects via systemic inflammation, cardiac autonomic control, and physical activity were tested. CFA models confirmed the Stability "meta-trait," but not Plasticity. Lower Stability was associated with heightened cardiometabolic risk. This association was accounted for by inflammation, autonomic function, and physical activity. Among FFM traits, only Openness was associated with risk over and above Stability, and, unlike Stability, this relationship was unexplained by the intervening variables. A Stability meta-trait covaries with midlife cardiometabolic risk, and this association is accounted for by three candidate biological and behavioral factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Research of Subgraph Estimation Page Rank Algorithm for Web Page Rank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Lan-yin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional PageRank algorithm can not efficiently perform large data Webpage scheduling problem. This paper proposes an accelerated algorithm named topK-Rank,which is based on PageRank on the MapReduce platform. It can find top k nodes efficiently for a given graph without sacrificing accuracy. In order to identify top k nodes,topK-Rank algorithm prunes unnecessary nodes and edges in each iteration to dynamically construct subgraphs,and iteratively estimates lower/upper bounds of PageRank scores through subgraphs. Theoretical analysis shows that this method guarantees result exactness. Experiments show that topK-Rank algorithm can find k nodes much faster than the existing approaches.

  14. A Hybrid Distance-Based Ideal-Seeking Consensus Ranking Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tavana, Madjid; LoPinto, Frank; Smither, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Ordinal consensus ranking problems have received much attention in the management science literature. A problem arises in situations where a group of k decision makers (DMs) is asked to rank order n alternatives. The question is how to combine the DM rankings into one consensus ranking. Several different approaches have been suggested to aggregate DM responses into a compromise or consensus ranking; however, the similarity of consensus rankings generated by the differe...

  15. Global network centrality of university rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisi; Del Vecchio, Marco; Pogrebna, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    Universities and higher education institutions form an integral part of the national infrastructure and prestige. As academic research benefits increasingly from international exchange and cooperation, many universities have increased investment in improving and enabling their global connectivity. Yet, the relationship of university performance and its global physical connectedness has not been explored in detail. We conduct, to our knowledge, the first large-scale data-driven analysis into whether there is a correlation between university relative ranking performance and its global connectivity via the air transport network. The results show that local access to global hubs (as measured by air transport network betweenness) strongly and positively correlates with the ranking growth (statistical significance in different models ranges between 5% and 1% level). We also found that the local airport's aggregate flight paths (degree) and capacity (weighted degree) has no effect on university ranking, further showing that global connectivity distance is more important than the capacity of flight connections. We also examined the effect of local city economic development as a confounding variable and no effect was observed suggesting that access to global transportation hubs outweighs economic performance as a determinant of university ranking. The impact of this research is that we have determined the importance of the centrality of global connectivity and, hence, established initial evidence for further exploring potential connections between university ranking and regional investment policies on improving global connectivity.

  16. Comparing the rankings obtained from two biodiversity indices: the Fair Proportion Index and the Shapley Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, Kristina; Fischer, Mareike

    2017-10-07

    The Shapley Value and the Fair Proportion Index of phylogenetic trees have been frequently discussed as prioritization tools in conservation biology. Both indices rank species according to their contribution to total phylogenetic diversity, allowing for a simple conservation criterion. While both indices have their specific advantages and drawbacks, it has recently been shown that both values are closely related. However, as different authors use different definitions of the Shapley Value, the specific degree of relatedness depends on the specific version of the Shapley Value - it ranges from a high correlation index to equality of the indices. In this note, we first give an overview of the different indices. Then we turn our attention to the mere ranking order provided by either of the indices. We compare the rankings obtained from different versions of the Shapley Value for a phylogenetic tree of European amphibians and illustrate their differences. We then undertake further analyses on simulated data and show that even though the chance of two rankings being exactly identical (when obtained from different versions of the Shapley Value) decreases with an increasing number of taxa, the distance between the two rankings converges to zero, i.e., the rankings are becoming more and more alike. Moreover, we introduce our freely available software package FairShapley, which was implemented in Perl and with which all calculations have been performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. EU Country Rankings' Sensitivity to the Choice of Welfare Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, M. Azhar

    2016-01-01

    are particularly volatile for countries in the middle of the ranking distribution, while countries with either high or low welfare generally have lower volatility. A multidimensional poverty index has the highest correlation with the latent welfare measure. It is concluded that the observed rankings do not tell......Ranking of countries with respect to some welfare measure is highly popular and takes places with high frequency. Ranking of a country can change over time given the same welfare measure is applied. Rankings can also change depending on which welfare measure is applied in a given year. To what...... extent do we see ranking changes and which existing welfare measures best captures an unobserved, yet existing, notion of welfare in society? To investigate this we apply seven welfare indicators for fifteen EU countries covering the years from 2005 until 2011. The results indicate that rankings...

  18. Stochastic Self-Consistent Second-Order Green's Function Method for Correlation Energies of Large Electronic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Roi; Zgid, Dominika

    2017-11-14

    The second-order Matsubara Green's function method (GF2) is a robust temperature-dependent quantum chemistry approach, extending beyond the random-phase approximation. However, until now the scope of GF2 applications was quite limited as they require computer resources that rise steeply with system size. In each step of the self-consistent GF2 calculation there are two parts: estimating of the self-energy from the previous step's Green's function and updating the Green's function from the self-energy. The first part formally scales as the fifth power of the system size, while the second has a much gentler cubic scaling. Here, we develop a stochastic approach to GF2 (sGF2), which reduces the fifth power scaling of the first step to merely quadratic, leaving the overall sGF2 scaling as cubic. We apply the method to linear hydrogen chains with up to 1000 electrons, showing that the approach is numerically stable, efficient, and accurate. The stochastic errors are very small, on the order of 0.1% or less of the correlation energy for large systems, with only a moderate computational effort. The first iteration of GF2 is an MP2 calculation that is done in linear scaling; hence we obtain an extremely fast stochastic MP2 (sMP2) method as a byproduct. While here we consider finite systems with large band gaps where at low temperatures effects are negligible, the sGF2 formalism is temperature dependent and general and can be applied to finite or periodic systems with small gaps at finite temperatures.

  19. Systematic studies of correlations between different order flow harmonics in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adamova, Dagmar; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Al-turany, Mohammad; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Antonio; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dukhishyam, Mallick; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Gonzalez Hernandez, Emma; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kreis, Lukas; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Toledo Matuoka, Paula Fernanda; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Nag, Dipanjan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schaefer, Brennan; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silaeva, Svetlana; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Rojas Torres, Solangel; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2018-02-13

    The correlations between event-by-event fluctuations of anisotropic flow harmonic amplitudes have been measured in Pb--Pb collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The results are reported in terms of multiparticle correlation observables dubbed Symmetric Cumulants. These observables are robust against biases originating from nonflow effects. The centrality dependence of correlations between the higher order harmonics (the quadrangular $v_4$ and pentagonal $v_5$ flow) and the lower order harmonics (the elliptic $v_2$ and triangular $v_3$ flow) is presented. The transverse momentum dependence of correlations between $v_3$ and $v_2$ and between $v_4$ and $v_2$ is also reported. The results are compared to calculations from viscous hydrodynamics and A Multi-Phase Transport ({AMPT}) model calculations. The comparisons to viscous hydrodynamic models demonstrate that the different order harmonic correlations respond differently to the initial conditi...

  20. Can College Rankings Be Believed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Davis

    Full Text Available The article summarizes literature on college and university rankings worldwide and the strategies used by various ranking organizations, including those of government and popular media. It traces the history of national and global rankings, indicators used by ranking systems, and the effect of rankings on academic programs and their institutions. Although ranking systems employ diverse criteria and most weight certain indicators over others, there is considerable skepticism that most actually measure educational quality. At the same time, students and their families increasingly consult these evaluations when making college decisions, and sponsors of faculty research consider reputation when forming academic partnerships. While there are serious concerns regarding the validity of ranking institutions when so little data can support differences between one institution and another, college rankings appear to be here to stay.

  1. Ranking Baltic States Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, using the h-index and the total number of citations, the best 10 Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian researchers from several disciplines are ranked. The list may be formed based on the h-index and the total number of citations, given in Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish Program and Google Scholar database. Data for the first 10 researchers are presented. Google Scholar is the most complete. Therefore, to define a single indicator, h-index calculated by Google Scholar may be a good and simple one. The author chooses the Google Scholar database as it is the broadest one.

  2. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals.\\ud Design: Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing dura...

  3. Rankings from Fuzzy Pairwise Comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.; Noppen, J.A.R.; Mohammadian, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new method for deriving rankings from fuzzy pairwise comparisons. It is based on the observation that quantification of the uncertainty of the pairwise comparisons should be used to obtain a better crisp ranking, instead of a fuzzified version of the ranking obtained from crisp pairwise

  4. PageRank (II): Mathematics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maths/stats

    INTRODUCTION. PageRank is Google's system for ranking web pages. A page with a higher PageRank is deemed more important and is more likely to be listed above a ... Felix U. Ogban, Department of Mathematics/Statistics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, University of ..... probability, 2004, 41, (3): 721-734.

  5. University Rankings and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  6. Sequential rank agreement methods for comparison of ranked lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jensen, Andreas Kryger

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...... are illustrated using gene rankings, and using data from two Danish ovarian cancer studies where we assess the within and between agreement of different statistical classification methods.......The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...

  7. Ranking health between countries in international comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons and ranking of summary measures of population health sometimes give rise to inconsistent and diverging conclusions. In order to minimise confusion, international comparative studies ought to be based on well-harmonised data with common standards of definitions...

  8. RRCRank: a fusion method using rank strategy for residue-residue contact prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoyang; Dong, Qiwen; Lu, Ruqian

    2017-09-02

    In structural biology area, protein residue-residue contacts play a crucial role in protein structure prediction. Some researchers have found that the predicted residue-residue contacts could effectively constrain the conformational search space, which is significant for de novo protein structure prediction. In the last few decades, related researchers have developed various methods to predict residue-residue contacts, especially, significant performance has been achieved by using fusion methods in recent years. In this work, a novel fusion method based on rank strategy has been proposed to predict contacts. Unlike the traditional regression or classification strategies, the contact prediction task is regarded as a ranking task. First, two kinds of features are extracted from correlated mutations methods and ensemble machine-learning classifiers, and then the proposed method uses the learning-to-rank algorithm to predict contact probability of each residue pair. First, we perform two benchmark tests for the proposed fusion method (RRCRank) on CASP11 dataset and CASP12 dataset respectively. The test results show that the RRCRank method outperforms other well-developed methods, especially for medium and short range contacts. Second, in order to verify the superiority of ranking strategy, we predict contacts by using the traditional regression and classification strategies based on the same features as ranking strategy. Compared with these two traditional strategies, the proposed ranking strategy shows better performance for three contact types, in particular for long range contacts. Third, the proposed RRCRank has been compared with several state-of-the-art methods in CASP11 and CASP12. The results show that the RRCRank could achieve comparable prediction precisions and is better than three methods in most assessment metrics. The learning-to-rank algorithm is introduced to develop a novel rank-based method for the residue-residue contact prediction of proteins, which

  9. Molecular origin of aging of pure Se glass: Growth of inter-chain structural correlations, network compaction, and partial ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S.; Chen, P.; Boolchand, P.

    2017-06-01

    Glass transition width W of pure Se narrows from 7.1(3) °C to 1.5(2) °C and the non-reversing enthalpy of relaxation (Δ Hnr) at Tg increases from 0.23(5) cal/g to 0.90(5) cal/g upon room temperature aging for 4 months in the dark as examined in modulated differential scanning colorimetry (MDSC) at low scan rates. In Raman scattering, such aging leads the A1 mode of Sen-chains (near 250 cm-1) to narrow by 26% and its scattering strength to decrease as the strength of modes of correlated chains (near 235 cm-1) and of Se8 rings (near 264 cm-1) systematically grows. These calorimetric and Raman scattering results are consistent with the "molecular" chains of Sen, predominant in the fresh glass, reconstructing with each other to compact and partially order the network. Consequences of the aging induced reconstruction of the long super-flexible and uncorrelated Sen-chains are also manifested upon alloying up to 4 mol. % of Ge as revealed by a qualitative narrowing (by 25%) of the Raman vibrational mode of the corner-sharing GeSe4 tetrahedra and a blue-shift of the said mode by nearly 1 cm-1 in 194 cm-1. But, at higher Ge content (x > 6%), as the length of Sen chain-segments across Ge cross-links decreases qualitatively (⟨n ⟩ 10% to acquire values observed earlier as alloying concentration approaches 20% and networks become spontaneously rigid.

  10. Ranking agricultural, environmental and natural resource economics journals: A note

    OpenAIRE

    Halkos, George; Tzeremes, Nickolaos

    2012-01-01

    This paper by applying Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) ranks for the first time Economics journals in the field of Agricultural, Environmental and Natural Resource. Specifically, by using one composite input and one composite output the paper ranks 32 journals. In addition for the first time three different quality ranking reports have been incorporated to the DEA modelling problem in order to classify the journals into four categories (‘A’ to ‘D’). The results reveal that the journals with t...

  11. Linear Subspace Ranking Hashing for Cross-Modal Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Qi, Guo-Jun; Ye, Jun; Hua, Kien A

    2017-09-01

    Hashing has attracted a great deal of research in recent years due to its effectiveness for the retrieval and indexing of large-scale high-dimensional multimedia data. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking-based hashing framework that maps data from different modalities into a common Hamming space where the cross-modal similarity can be measured using Hamming distance. Unlike existing cross-modal hashing algorithms where the learned hash functions are binary space partitioning functions, such as the sign and threshold function, the proposed hashing scheme takes advantage of a new class of hash functions closely related to rank correlation measures which are known to be scale-invariant, numerically stable, and highly nonlinear. Specifically, we jointly learn two groups of linear subspaces, one for each modality, so that features' ranking orders in different linear subspaces maximally preserve the cross-modal similarities. We show that the ranking-based hash function has a natural probabilistic approximation which transforms the original highly discontinuous optimization problem into one that can be efficiently solved using simple gradient descent algorithms. The proposed hashing framework is also flexible in the sense that the optimization procedures are not tied up to any specific form of loss function, which is typical for existing cross-modal hashing methods, but rather we can flexibly accommodate different loss functions with minimal changes to the learning steps. We demonstrate through extensive experiments on four widely-used real-world multimodal datasets that the proposed cross-modal hashing method can achieve competitive performance against several state-of-the-arts with only moderate training and testing time.

  12. Resolution of ranking hierarchies in directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Paolo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2018-01-01

    Identifying hierarchies and rankings of nodes in directed graphs is fundamental in many applications such as social network analysis, biology, economics, and finance. A recently proposed method identifies the hierarchy by finding the ordered partition of nodes which minimises a score function, termed agony. This function penalises the links violating the hierarchy in a way depending on the strength of the violation. To investigate the resolution of ranking hierarchies we introduce an ensemble of random graphs, the Ranked Stochastic Block Model. We find that agony may fail to identify hierarchies when the structure is not strong enough and the size of the classes is small with respect to the whole network. We analytically characterise the resolution threshold and we show that an iterated version of agony can partly overcome this resolution limit. PMID:29394278

  13. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations...... of paired strands) of a given protein. We show that the beta-topology corresponding to the native structure is, with high probability, among the top-ranked. Since full enumeration is very time-consuming, we also suggest a method to deal with proteins with many beta-strands. The results reported...... in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. The top-ranked beta-topologies can be used to find initial conformations from which conformational searches can be started. They can also be used to filter decoys by removing those with poorly...

  14. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  15. The Times Higher Education Supplement and Quacquarelli Symonds (THES - QS) World University Rankings: New Developments in Ranking Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowter, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents key new developments in the THES - QS World University Rankings in 2007, related to enhancements to the "Peer Review", "Data Collection" and "Statistical Aggregation" utilised in this ranking as well as discussing the decision to utilise Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) figures for personnel statistics. Indicator correlation is also…

  16. On the ranking of chemicals based on their PBT characteristics: comparison of different ranking methodologies using selected POPs as an illustrative example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Zhakupbekova, Arai; Amutova, Farida; Carlsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the environmental behavior of chemicals is a fundamental part of the risk assessment process. The present paper discusses various methods of ranking of a series of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) according to the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) characteristics. Traditionally ranking has been done as an absolute (total) ranking applying various multicriteria data analysis methods like simple additive ranking (SAR) or various utility functions (UFs) based rankings. An attractive alternative to these ranking methodologies appears to be partial order ranking (POR). The present paper compares different ranking methods like SAR, UF and POR. Significant discrepancies between the rankings are noted and it is concluded that partial order ranking, as a method without any pre-assumptions concerning possible relation between the single parameters, appears as the most attractive ranking methodology. In addition to the initial ranking partial order methodology offers a wide variety of analytical tools to elucidate the interplay between the objects to be ranked and the ranking parameters. In the present study is included an analysis of the relative importance of the single P, B and T parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Mikko; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The ranking of scientific journals is important because of the signal it sends to scientists about what is considered most vital for scientific progress. Existing ranking systems focus on measuring the influence of a scientific paper (citations)—these rankings do not reward journals for publishing innovative work that builds on new ideas. We propose an alternative ranking based on the proclivity of journals to publish papers that build on new ideas, and we implement this ranking via a text-based analysis of all published biomedical papers dating back to 1946. In addition, we compare our neophilia ranking to citation-based (impact factor) rankings; this comparison shows that the two ranking approaches are distinct. Prior theoretical work suggests an active role for our neophilia index in science policy. Absent an explicit incentive to pursue novel science, scientists underinvest in innovative work because of a coordination problem: for work on a new idea to flourish, many scientists must decide to adopt it in their work. Rankings that are based purely on influence thus do not provide sufficient incentives for publishing innovative work. By contrast, adoption of the neophilia index as part of journal-ranking procedures by funding agencies and university administrators would provide an explicit incentive for journals to publish innovative work and thus help solve the coordination problem by increasing scientists' incentives to pursue innovative work. PMID:28713181

  18. An Integrated Multicriteria Decision-Making Approach for Evaluating Nuclear Fuel Cycle Systems for Long-term Sustainability on the Basis of an Equilibrium Model: Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution, Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation, and Multiattribute Utility Theory Combined with Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saerom Yoon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus on the issues surrounding spent nuclear fuel and lifetime extension of old nuclear power plants continues to grow nowadays. A transparent decision-making process to identify the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle (NFC is considered to be the key task in the current situation. Through this study, an attempt is made to develop an equilibrium model for the NFC to calculate the material flows based on 1 TWh of electricity production, and to perform integrated multicriteria decision-making method analyses via the analytic hierarchy process technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution, preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation, and multiattribute utility theory methods. This comparative study is aimed at screening and ranking the three selected NFC options against five aspects: sustainability, environmental friendliness, economics, proliferation resistance, and technical feasibility. The selected fuel cycle options include pressurized water reactor (PWR once-through cycle, PWR mixed oxide cycle, or pyroprocessing sodium-cooled fast reactor cycle. A sensitivity analysis was performed to prove the robustness of the results and explore the influence of criteria on the obtained ranking. As a result of the comparative analysis, the pyroprocessing sodium-cooled fast reactor cycle is determined to be the most competitive option among the NFC scenarios.

  19. An integrated multicriteria decision-making approach for evaluating nuclear fuel cycle systems for long-term sustainability on the basis of an equilibrium model: Technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution, preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation, and multiattribute utility theory combined with analytic hierarchy process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sae Rom [Dept of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology (KUST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Yeol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulju (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Wonil [Nonproliferation System Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The focus on the issues surrounding spent nuclear fuel and lifetime extension of old nuclear power plants continues to grow nowadays. A transparent decision-making process to identify the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) is considered to be the key task in the current situation. Through this study, an attempt is made to develop an equilibrium model for the NFC to calculate the material flows based on 1 TWh of electricity production, and to perform integrated multicriteria decision-making method analyses via the analytic hierarchy process technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution, preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation, and multiattribute utility theory methods. This comparative study is aimed at screening and ranking the three selected NFC options against five aspects: sustainability, environmental friendliness, economics, proliferation resistance, and technical feasibility. The selected fuel cycle options include pressurized water reactor (PWR) once-through cycle, PWR mixed oxide cycle, or pyroprocessing sodium-cooled fast reactor cycle. A sensitivity analysis was performed to prove the robustness of the results and explore the influence of criteria on the obtained ranking. As a result of the comparative analysis, the pyroprocessing sodium-cooled fast reactor cycle is determined to be the most competitive option among the NFC scenarios.

  20. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  1. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  2. Information Theoretic Bounds for Low-Rank Matrix Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Vishwanath, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the low-rank matrix completion problem from an information theoretic perspective. The completion problem is rephrased as a communication problem of an (uncoded) low-rank matrix source over an erasure channel. The paper then uses achievability and converse arguments to present order-wise optimal bounds for the completion problem.

  3. RANK/RANK-L/OPG in Patients with Bone Metastases Treated with Anticancer Agents and Zoledronic Acid: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercatali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with solid cancer frequently develop bone metastases (BM. Zoledronic acid (Zometa®, ZA, routinely used to treat patients with BM, acts on osteoclasts and also has antitumor properties. We aimed to assess the effect of ZA over time in novel bone turnover markers (RANK/receptor activator of nuclear factor-k B ligand (RANK-L/ Osteoprotegerin (OPG and to correlate these with serum N-terminal telopeptide (NTX. The study prospectively evaluated levels of RANK, RANK-L and OPG transcripts by real-time PCR and NTX expression by ELISA in the peripheral blood of 49 consecutive patients with advanced breast, lung or prostate cancer. All patients received the standard ZA schedule and were monitored for 12 months. Median baseline values of RANK, RANK-L and OPG were 78.28 (range 7.34–620.64, 319.06 (21.42–1884.41 and 1.52 (0.10–58.02, respectively. At 12 months, the median RANK-L value had decreased by 22% with respect to the baseline, whereas median OPG levels had increased by about 96%. Consequently, the RANK-L/OPG ratio decreased by 56% from the baseline. Median serum NTX levels decreased over the 12-month period, reaching statistical significance (p < 0.0001. Our results would seem to indicate that ZA modulates RANK, RANK-L and OPG expression, thus decreasing osteoclast activity.

  4. Regression Estimator Using Double Ranked Set Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani M. Samawi

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a regression estimator based on the double ranked set sample (DRSS scheme, introduced by Al-Saleh and Al-Kadiri (2000, is investigated when the mean of the auxiliary variable X is unknown. Our primary analysis and simulation indicates that using the DRSS regression estimator for estimating the population mean substantially increases relative efficiency compared to using regression estimator based on simple random sampling (SRS or ranked set sampling (RSS (Yu and Lam, 1997 regression estimator.  Moreover, the regression estimator using DRSS is also more efficient than the naïve estimators of the population mean using SRS, RSS (when the correlation coefficient is at least 0.4 and DRSS for high correlation coefficient (at least 0.91. The theory is illustrated using a real data set of trees.

  5. Tile Low Rank Cholesky Factorization for Climate/Weather Modeling Applications on Manycore Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Akbudak, Kadir

    2017-05-11

    Covariance matrices are ubiquitous in computational science and engineering. In particular, large covariance matrices arise from multivariate spatial data sets, for instance, in climate/weather modeling applications to improve prediction using statistical methods and spatial data. One of the most time-consuming computational steps consists in calculating the Cholesky factorization of the symmetric, positive-definite covariance matrix problem. The structure of such covariance matrices is also often data-sparse, in other words, effectively of low rank, though formally dense. While not typically globally of low rank, covariance matrices in which correlation decays with distance are nearly always hierarchically of low rank. While symmetry and positive definiteness should be, and nearly always are, exploited for performance purposes, exploiting low rank character in this context is very recent, and will be a key to solving these challenging problems at large-scale dimensions. The authors design a new and flexible tile row rank Cholesky factorization and propose a high performance implementation using OpenMP task-based programming model on various leading-edge manycore architectures. Performance comparisons and memory footprint saving on up to 200K×200K covariance matrix size show a gain of more than an order of magnitude for both metrics, against state-of-the-art open-source and vendor optimized numerical libraries, while preserving the numerical accuracy fidelity of the original model. This research represents an important milestone in enabling large-scale simulations for covariance-based scientific applications.

  6. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  7. Correlated calculations of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using second-order polarization propagator approximations: SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Thomas; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    1998-01-01

    We present correlated calculations of the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of HD, HF, H2O, CH4, C2H2, BH, AlH, CO and N2 at the level of the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) and the second-order polarization propagator approximation with coupled-cluster sing......We present correlated calculations of the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants of HD, HF, H2O, CH4, C2H2, BH, AlH, CO and N2 at the level of the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) and the second-order polarization propagator approximation with coupled...

  8. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  9. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  10. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Siart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology however is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C and testosterone (T levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were 1 warrant officers (High Rank, HR and 2 enlisted men (Low Rank, LR. One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment.We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military

  11. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siart, Benjamin; Pflüger, Lena S; Wallner, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology, however, is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C) and testosterone (T) levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were (1) warrant officers (high rank, HR) and (2) enlisted men (low rank, LR). One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment. We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in the LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military rank

  12. Econophysics of a ranked demand and supply resource allocation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priel, Avner; Tamir, Boaz

    2018-01-01

    We present a two sided resource allocation problem, between demands and supplies, where both parties are ranked. For example, in Big Data problems where a set of different computational tasks is divided between a set of computers each with its own resources, or between employees and employers where both parties are ranked, the employees by their fitness and the employers by their package benefits. The allocation process can be viewed as a repeated game where in each iteration the strategy is decided by a meta-rule, based on the ranks of both parties and the results of the previous games. We show the existence of a phase transition between an absorbing state, where all demands are satisfied, and an active one where part of the demands are always left unsatisfied. The phase transition is governed by the ratio between supplies and demand. In a job allocation problem we find positive correlation between the rank of the workers and the rank of the factories; higher rank workers are usually allocated to higher ranked factories. These all suggest global emergent properties stemming from local variables. To demonstrate the global versus local relations, we introduce a local inertial force that increases the rank of employees in proportion to their persistence time in the same factory. We show that such a local force induces non trivial global effects, mostly to benefit the lower ranked employees.

  13. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Rebolini, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of four small molecules: N2, CO2, H2CO, and C2H4. The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  14. Image Registration based on Low Rank Matrix: Rank-Regularized SSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Aboozar; Fatemizadeh, Emad

    2017-08-25

    Similarity measure is a main core of image registration algorithms. Spatially varying intensity distortion is an important challenge which affects the performance of similarity measures. Correlation among pixels is the main characteristic of this distortion. Similarity measures such as sum-of-squareddifferences (SSD) and mutual information (MI) ignore this correlation; Hence, perfect registration cannot be achieved in the presence of this distortion. In this paper, we model this correlation with the aid of the low rank matrix theory. Based on this model, we compensate this distortion analytically and introduce Rank-Regularized SSD (RRSSD). This new similarity measure is a modified SSD based on singular values of difference image in mono-modal imaging. In fact, image registration and distortion correction are performed simultaneously in the proposed model. Based on our experiments, the RRSSD similarity measure achieves clinically acceptable registration results, and outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures such as the well-known method of residual complexity.

  15. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK. Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH and the corneal resistance factor (CRF with the corneal HOAs of the anterior, posterior, and total cornea were assessed preoperatively and three months postoperatively. Multivariate linear regression was applied to determine the correlations. Results. The preoperative CRF was significantly correlated with the induced 3rd–6th-order HOAs and spherical aberration of the anterior surface and the total cornea after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgeries (P<0.05, postoperatively. The CRF was significantly correlated with the induced vertical coma of the anterior and posterior surfaces and the total cornea after SMILE surgery (P<0.05. There was a significant correlation between the CRF and the induced posterior corneal horizontal coma after FS-LASIK surgery (P=0.013. Conclusions. The corneal biomechanics affect the surgically induced corneal HOAs after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgery, which may be meaningful for screening the patients preoperatively and optimizing the visual qualities postoperatively.

  16. Enhanced Electrical Conductivity of Molecularly p-Doped Poly(3-hexylthiophene) through Understanding the Correlation with Solid-State Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hynynen, Jonna

    2017-10-11

    Molecular p-doping of the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) is a widely studied model system. Underlying structure–property relationships are poorly understood because processing and doping are often carried out simultaneously. Here, we exploit doping from the vapor phase, which allows us to disentangle the influence of processing and doping. Through this approach, we are able to establish how the electrical conductivity varies with regard to a series of predefined structural parameters. We demonstrate that improving the degree of solid-state order, which we control through the choice of processing solvent and regioregularity, strongly increases the electrical conductivity. As a result, we achieve a value of up to 12.7 S cm–1 for P3HT:F4TCNQ. We determine the F4TCNQ anion concentration and find that the number of (bound + mobile) charge carriers of about 10–4 mol cm–3 is not influenced by the degree of solid-state order. Thus, the observed increase in electrical conductivity by almost 2 orders of magnitude can be attributed to an increase in charge-carrier mobility to more than 10–1 cm2 V–1 s–1. Surprisingly, in contrast to charge transport in undoped P3HT, we find that the molecular weight of the polymer does not strongly influence the electrical conductivity, which highlights the need for studies that elucidate structure–property relationships of strongly doped conjugated polymers.

  17. Node seniority ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Fioriti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in graph theory suggest that is possible to identify the oldest nodes of a network using only the graph topology. Here we report on applications to heterogeneous real world networks. To this end, and in order to gain new insights, we propose the theoretical framework of the Estrada communicability. We apply it to two technological networks (an underground, the diffusion of a software worm in a LAN) and to a third network representing a cholera outbreak. In spite of errors introduced in the adjacency matrix of their graphs, the identification of the oldest nodes is feasible, within a small margin of error, and extremely simple. Utilizations include the search of the initial disease-spreader (patient zero problem), rumors in social networks, malware in computer networks, triggering events in blackouts, oldest urban sites recognition.

  18. Trachomatous Scar Ranking: A Novel Outcome for Trachoma Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Angela; Ryner, Alexander M; Tadesse, Zerihun; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Callahan, Kelly; Fry, Dionna M; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-06-01

    AbstractWe evaluated a new trachoma scarring ranking system with potential use in clinical research. The upper right tarsal conjunctivas of 427 individuals from Ethiopian villages with hyperendemic trachoma were photographed. An expert grader first assigned a scar grade to each photograph using the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. Then, all photographs were ranked from least (rank = 1) to most scarring (rank = 427). Photographic grading found 79 (18.5%) conjunctivae without scarring (C0), 191 (44.7%) with minimal scarring (C1), 105 (24.6%) with moderate scarring (C2), and 52 (12.2%) with severe scarring (C3). The ranking method demonstrated good internal validity, exhibiting a monotonic increase in the median rank across the levels of the 1981 WHO grading system. Intrarater repeatability was better for the ranking method (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74-0.94). Exhibiting better internal and external validity, this ranking method may be useful for evaluating the difference in scarring between groups of individuals.

  19. Rankings Scientists, Journals and Countries using h-Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indexes in scientometrics are based on citations. However, in contrast to the journal impact factor, which gives only the ranking of the scientific journals, ordered by impact factor, indexes in scientometrics are suitable for ranking of scientists, scientific journals and countries. In this paper the h-index, h5-index, the World ranking the top of 25 Highly Cited Researchers (h > 100 and the ranking of 25 scientists in Hungarian Institutions according to their Google Scholar Citations public profiles are considered. These indexes (h5-index are applied for making of the list of top 20 publications (journals and proceedings in the field of Robotics. The World ranking is done of the best 50 countries according to h-index in year 2014. Data are obtained from the portal Scimago.

  20. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  1. Toward Chemical Accuracy in ab Initio Thermochemistry and Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Compounds: Assessing Core-Valence Correlation, Second-Order Spin-Orbit Coupling, and Higher Order Effects in Lanthanide Diatomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonik, Victor G; Smirnov, Alexander N

    2017-11-14

    The higher order (HO) correlation beyond the coupled-cluster single double (triple) CCSD(T) level of theory, second-order spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and core-valence (CV) correlation effects on bond length, re, vibrational frequency, ωe, and dissociation energy, De, are studied for a set of 17 lanthanide containing diatomics, including lanthanum, europium, ytterbium, and lutetium oxides and halides. Convergence in the magnitudes of the SOC, CV, and HO corrections with respect to basis set size is examined using a sequence of double, triple, and quadruple-ζ basis sets, with the complete basis set (CBS) limit estimates provided in most cases. The CV effects on De, re, and ωe are calculated to amount up to 1.3 kcal·mol(-1), 0.008 Å, and 5 cm(-1), respectively. A detailed analysis of the origin of the CV effect with a particular accounting for various subvalence shells reveals that, generally, the Ln 4d correlation makes a major contribution, although in some instances the lower-lying 4sp shells contribute largely and even more substantially than 4d. The second-order SOC effect evaluated via two-component and four-component relativistic techniques proves to be non-negligible, especially for heavier species, e.g., LaI, in which it is as large as 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) in De, 0.002 Å in re, and 1.3 cm(-1) in ωe. Higher order correlation effects assessed through the CCSDT(Q) level are mostly less than 0.8 kcal·mol(-1), 0.004 Å, and 5 cm(-1); however, in species with prominence of nondynamical correlation, e.g., EuO, YbF, and LuO, the HO correction can amount to 1.2-1.6 kcal·mol(-1), 0.005-0.008 Å, and 8-30 cm(-1) in De, re, and ωe, respectively. In general, the [CCSD(T)+CV]/CBS + SOC + HO composite results are in good agreement with the available experimental data, exhibiting a mean absolute deviation of 1.8 kcal·mol(-1) in De, 0.0023 Å in re, and 3.5 cm(-1) in ωe. A significant experimental outlier, the bond length in YbI, is revealed, implying the need for re

  2. Effect of harmonic rank on the streaming of complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sara Miay Kim; Dau, Torsten; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the rank of the harmonics on sequential stream segregation of complex tones was investigated for normal-hearing participants with no musical training. It was hypothesized that stream segregation would be greater for tones with high pitch salience, as assessed by fundamental frequency....... There was a significant trend for less stream segregation with increasing harmonic rank. The amount of stream segregation was inversely correlated with the f0 difference limens, consistent with the hypothesis....

  3. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  4. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjing Wu; Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs) after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK). Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) with the corneal HOAs of the anterio...

  5. On the measure of electron correlation and entanglement in quantum chemistry based on the cumulant of the second-order reduced density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, D. R.; Bochicchio, R. C.; Lain, L.; Torre, A.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we propose a functional of the many-body cumulant of the second-order reduced density matrix within the spin-free formalism of quantum chemistry which quantifies the idea of electron correlation and allows one to detect spin entanglement. Its properties are rigorously stated and discussed for spin-adapted pure states. Numerical determinations are performed for both equilibrium conformations and dissociation processes in molecular systems.

  6. Mutual-probability prediction and higher-order correlation effects among acoustic, light and electromagnetic waves in a video display terminal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Ikuta, Akira

    2005-08-01

    A probabilistic signal processing method, with which is possible to get some methodological suggestion to the measurement method of correlative and/or accumulative effects in the compound environment of sound, light and electromagnetic (EM) waves is discussed. In order to extract various types of latent interrelation characteristics among wave environmental factors leaked from an actually operating video display terminal (VDT), an extended regression system model, hierarchically reflecting not only linear correlation information but also nonlinear correlation information, is first introduced, especially from a viewpoint of 'relationism-first'. Then, through estimating each regression parameter of this model, some original evaluation methods for predicting a whole probability distribution form, from one another, are proposed. Finally, the effectiveness of the methods is experimentally confirmed, by applying them to the actual observed data leaked by a VDT with some television games. To cite this article: M. Ohta et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  7. Fixed versus dynamic co-occurrence windows in TextRank term weights for information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Wei; Cheng, Qikai; Lioma, Christina

    2012-01-01

    this, and considers dynamically adjusted windows of term co-occurrence that follow the document structure on a sentence- and paragraph-level. The resulting TextRank term weights are used in a ranking function that re-ranks 1000 initially returned search results in order to improve the precision...

  8. Decomposition of the Google PageRank and Optimal Linking Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avrachenkov, Konstatin; Litvak, Nelli

    We provide the analysis of the Google PageRank from the perspective of the Markov Chain Theory. First we study the Google PageRank for a Web that can be decomposed into several connected components which do not have any links to each other. We show that in order to determine the Google PageRank for

  9. Neural correlates of the empathic perceptual processing of realistic social interaction scenarios displayed from a first-order perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, T; Achtziger, A; Roth, G; Strüber, D

    2014-10-02

    The neural processing of impulsive behavior is a central topic in various clinical and non-clinical contexts. To investigate neural and behavioral correlates of the empathic processing of complex social scenarios, especially considering ecological validity of the experimental procedure, we developed and investigated a video stimulus inventory. It includes realistic neutral, social-positive, and reactive-aggressive action scenarios. Short video-clips showing these social scenarios from a first-person perspective triggering different emotional states were presented to a non-clinical sample of 20 young adult male participants during fMRI measurements. Both affective interaction conditions (social-positive and reactive-aggressive) were contrasted against a neutral baseline condition and against each other. Behavioral evaluation data largely confirmed the validity of the emotion-inducing stimulus material. Reactive-aggressive and social-positive interaction scenarios produced widely overlapping fMRI activation patterns in hetero-modal association cortices, but also in subcortical regions, such as the peri-aqueductal gray. Reactive-aggressive compared to social-positive scenarios yielded a more anterior distribution of activations in pre-motor and inferior frontal brain regions associated to motor-preparation and inhibitory control processing as well as in the insula associated to pain- and/or aversion-processing. We argue that there are both principally common neural networks recruited for the processing of reactive-aggressive and social-positive scenarios, but also exclusive network parts in particular involved depending on individual socialization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Subcompartmentalisation of proteins in the rhoptries correlates with ordered events of erythrocyte invasion by the blood stage malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Zuccala

    Full Text Available Host cell infection by apicomplexan parasites plays an essential role in lifecycle progression for these obligate intracellular pathogens. For most species, including the etiological agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis, infection requires active host-cell invasion dependent on formation of a tight junction - the organising interface between parasite and host cell during entry. Formation of this structure is not, however, shared across all Apicomplexa or indeed all parasite lifecycle stages. Here, using an in silico integrative genomic search and endogenous gene-tagging strategy, we sought to characterise proteins that function specifically during junction-dependent invasion, a class of proteins we term invasins to distinguish them from adhesins that function in species specific host-cell recognition. High-definition imaging of tagged Plasmodium falciparum invasins localised proteins to multiple cellular compartments of the blood stage merozoite. This includes several that localise to distinct subcompartments within the rhoptries. While originating from the same organelle, however, each has very different dynamics during invasion. Apical Sushi Protein and Rhoptry Neck protein 2 release early, following the junction, whilst a novel rhoptry protein PFF0645c releases only after invasion is complete. This supports the idea that organisation of proteins within a secretory organelle determines the order and destination of protein secretion and provides a localisation-based classification strategy for predicting invasin function during apicomplexan parasite invasion.

  11. University Ranking Systems; Criteria and Critiques

    OpenAIRE

    Saka, Yavuz; YAMAN, Süleyman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore international university ranking systems. As a compilation study this paper provides specific criteria that each ranking system uses and main critiques regarding these ranking systems. Since there are many ranking systems in this area of research, this study focused on only most cited and referred ranking systems. As there is no consensus in terms of the criteria that these systems use, this paper has no intention of identifying the best ranking system ...

  12. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-05-01

    A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals. Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 surveyed participants to examine whether the perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration could be predicted from the ranking of each person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 2 tested whether manipulating the rank position of the tooth-brushing duration influenced participant-perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 used a longitudinal intervention method to examine whether messages relating to the rank positions of tooth-brushing durations causally influenced the self-report tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 demonstrates that perceptions of the health benefits from tooth-brushing duration are predicted by the perceptions of how that behaviour ranks in comparison to other people's behaviour. Study 2 demonstrates that the perceptions of the health benefits of tooth-brushing duration can be manipulated experimentally by changing the ranked position of a person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 experimentally demonstrates the possibility of increasing the length of time for which individuals clean their teeth by focusing on how they rank among their peers in terms of tooth-brushing duration. The effectiveness of interventions using social-ranking methods relative to those that emphasize comparisons made against group averages or normative guidelines are discussed. What is already known on this subject? Individual make judgements based on social rank information. Social rank information has been shown to influence positive health behaviours such as exercise

  13. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-02-02

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  14. Correlation Between Lower And Higher Order Sensory Functions And Fine And Gross Motor Function In Dominant And Non-Dominant Hand Of Patients With Choronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandehgary Najafabadi Mahbubeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To investigate the correlation between lower and higher order sensory functions and manual dexterity as well as Identify factors affecting upper extremity motor function(UEMF in subjects with chronic stroke. Methods: In this correlational study, seventy chronic stroke subjects (48 male and 22 female by mean age of 56.94 (±12.92 years and mean time after stroke of 3.01 (±2.64 years were selected by simple nonprobability method. Lower order sensory function (i.e., light touch threshold, higher order sensory functions (i.e., tactile acuity, weight and texture discrimination, haptic performance and wrist proprioception were measured by Weinstein enhanced sensory test, two point discrimination, wrist position sense test, hand active sensation test and haptic object test, respectively. The gross and fine manual dexterity were measured by Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT, Box and Block Test(BBT and Purdue Pegboard (PPB test. The step by step regression model was used to investigate the sensory determinants of motor function. Results: A weak to high significant correlation (r =0.25 to 0.80 was found between sensory predictors and motor outcomes. The regression models explained 19.8%, 30.3% and 52.3% of variancein motor function measures of the PPB, BBT and WMFT, respectively. The tactile threshold (p<0.001 was the most relevant predictor in all stepwise models for all motor outcomes in dominant or non-dominant hand , followed by tactile acuity, haptic performance and wrist proprioception (p< 0.05. The weight and texture discrimination was not included in any outcome models.  Conclusion: The results of present study showed that tactile threshold as lowr order sensory function is the most relevant predictor for UEMF in stroke. The results reinforce that rehabilitation interventions focused on tactile threshold may be best able to impact UEMF in stroke subjects.

  15. Mucus can change the permeation rank order of drug candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagesaether, Ellen; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the effect of mucus on the permeability of newly developed structurally related free fatty acid receptor 1-agonists TUG-488, TUG-499 and TUG-424, which were compared to the more hydrophilic ketoprofen and the more hydrophobic testosterone as reference drugs...

  16. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  17. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjing; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs) after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK). Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) with the corneal HOAs of the anterior, posterior, and total cornea were assessed preoperatively and three months postoperatively. Multivariate linear regression was applied to determine the correlations. Results. The preoperative CRF was significantly correlated with the induced 3rd-6th-order HOAs and spherical aberration of the anterior surface and the total cornea after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgeries (P cornea after SMILE surgery (P biomechanics affect the surgically induced corneal HOAs after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgery, which may be meaningful for screening the patients preoperatively and optimizing the visual qualities postoperatively.

  18. The Correlation Analysis between Corneal Biomechanical Properties and the Surgically Induced Corneal High-Order Aberrations after Small Incision Lenticule Extraction and Femtosecond Laser In Situ Keratomileusis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the correlation between corneal biomechanics and the surgically induced corneal high-order aberrations (HOAs) after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK). Methods. A total of 150 right myopic eyes that underwent SMILE or FS-LASIK surgery were included in this retrospective study, 75 eyes in each group. The corneal hysteresis (CH) and the corneal resistance factor (CRF) with the corneal HOAs of the anterior, posterior, and total cornea were assessed preoperatively and three months postoperatively. Multivariate linear regression was applied to determine the correlations. Results. The preoperative CRF was significantly correlated with the induced 3rd–6th-order HOAs and spherical aberration of the anterior surface and the total cornea after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgeries (P corneal horizontal coma after FS-LASIK surgery (P = 0.013). Conclusions. The corneal biomechanics affect the surgically induced corneal HOAs after SMILE and FS-LASIK surgery, which may be meaningful for screening the patients preoperatively and optimizing the visual qualities postoperatively. PMID:26483975

  19. Correlation Effects and Hidden Spin-Orbit Entangled Electronic Order in Parent and Electron-Doped Iridates Sr2 IrO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sen; Jiang, Kun; Chen, Hua; Wang, Ziqiang

    2017-10-01

    Analogs of the high-Tc cuprates have been long sought after in transition metal oxides. Because of the strong spin-orbit coupling, the 5 d perovskite iridates Sr2 IrO4 exhibit a low-energy electronic structure remarkably similar to the cuprates. Whether a superconducting state exists as in the cuprates requires understanding the correlated spin-orbit entangled electronic states. Recent experiments discovered hidden order in the parent and electron-doped iridates, some with striking analogies to the cuprates, including Fermi surface pockets, Fermi arcs, and pseudogap. Here, we study the correlation and disorder effects in a five-orbital model derived from the band theory. We find that the experimental observations are consistent with a d -wave spin-orbit density wave order that breaks the symmetry of a joint twofold spin-orbital rotation followed by a lattice translation. There is a Berry phase and a plaquette spin flux due to spin procession as electrons hop between Ir atoms, akin to the intersite spin-orbit coupling in quantum spin Hall insulators. The associated staggered circulating Jeff=1 /2 spin current can be probed by advanced techniques of spin-current detection in spintronics. This electronic order can emerge spontaneously from the intersite Coulomb interactions between the spatially extended iridium 5 d orbitals, turning the metallic state into an electron-doped quasi-2D Dirac semimetal with important implications on the possible superconducting state suggested by recent experiments.

  20. Correlation Effects and Hidden Spin-Orbit Entangled Electronic Order in Parent and Electron-Doped Iridates Sr_{2}IrO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analogs of the high-T_{c} cuprates have been long sought after in transition metal oxides. Because of the strong spin-orbit coupling, the 5d perovskite iridates Sr_{2}IrO_{4} exhibit a low-energy electronic structure remarkably similar to the cuprates. Whether a superconducting state exists as in the cuprates requires understanding the correlated spin-orbit entangled electronic states. Recent experiments discovered hidden order in the parent and electron-doped iridates, some with striking analogies to the cuprates, including Fermi surface pockets, Fermi arcs, and pseudogap. Here, we study the correlation and disorder effects in a five-orbital model derived from the band theory. We find that the experimental observations are consistent with a d-wave spin-orbit density wave order that breaks the symmetry of a joint twofold spin-orbital rotation followed by a lattice translation. There is a Berry phase and a plaquette spin flux due to spin procession as electrons hop between Ir atoms, akin to the intersite spin-orbit coupling in quantum spin Hall insulators. The associated staggered circulating J_{eff}=1/2 spin current can be probed by advanced techniques of spin-current detection in spintronics. This electronic order can emerge spontaneously from the intersite Coulomb interactions between the spatially extended iridium 5d orbitals, turning the metallic state into an electron-doped quasi-2D Dirac semimetal with important implications on the possible superconducting state suggested by recent experiments.

  1. Rank distributions: Frequency vs. magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Carlos; Robledo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We examine the relationship between two different types of ranked data, frequencies and magnitudes. We consider data that can be sorted out either way, through numbers of occurrences or size of the measures, as it is the case, say, of moon craters, earthquakes, billionaires, etc. We indicate that these two types of distributions are functional inverses of each other, and specify this link, first in terms of the assumed parent probability distribution that generates the data samples, and then in terms of an analog (deterministic) nonlinear iterated map that reproduces them. For the particular case of hyperbolic decay with rank the distributions are identical, that is, the classical Zipf plot, a pure power law. But their difference is largest when one displays logarithmic decay and its counterpart shows the inverse exponential decay, as it is the case of Benford law, or viceversa. For all intermediate decay rates generic differences appear not only between the power-law exponents for the midway rank decline but also for small and large rank. We extend the theoretical framework to include thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical concepts, such as entropies and configuration.

  2. Rankings Methodology Hurts Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In the 1980s, when the "U.S. News & World Report" rankings of colleges were based solely on reputation, the nation's public universities were well represented at the top. However, as soon as the magazine began including its "measures of excellence," statistics intended to define quality, public universities nearly disappeared from the top. As the…

  3. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  4. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  5. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World…

  7. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  8. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  9. An ensemble rank learning approach for gene prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Several different computational approaches have been developed to solve the gene prioritization problem. We intend to use the ensemble boosting learning techniques to combine variant computational approaches for gene prioritization in order to improve the overall performance. In particular we add a heuristic weighting function to the Rankboost algorithm according to: 1) the absolute ranks generated by the adopted methods for a certain gene, and 2) the ranking relationship between all gene-pairs from each prioritization result. We select 13 known prostate cancer genes in OMIM database as training set and protein coding gene data in HGNC database as test set. We adopt the leave-one-out strategy for the ensemble rank boosting learning. The experimental results show that our ensemble learning approach outperforms the four gene-prioritization methods in ToppGene suite in the ranking results of the 13 known genes in terms of mean average precision, ROC and AUC measures.

  10. Toward optimal feature selection using ranking methods and classification algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Jasmina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented a comparison between several feature ranking methods used on two real datasets. We considered six ranking methods that can be divided into two broad categories: statistical and entropy-based. Four supervised learning algorithms are adopted to build models, namely, IB1, Naive Bayes, C4.5 decision tree and the RBF network. We showed that the selection of ranking methods could be important for classification accuracy. In our experiments, ranking methods with different supervised learning algorithms give quite different results for balanced accuracy. Our cases confirm that, in order to be sure that a subset of features giving the highest accuracy has been selected, the use of many different indices is recommended.

  11. Ranking industries using a hybrid of DEA-TOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mehdiabadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ranking industry normally helps find hot sectors and attract potential investors to invest in appropriate plans. Ranking various industries is also a multiple criteria decision making problem. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to rank different industries using the art of data envelopment analysis (DEA. The inputs of our proposed DEA model include capital, employment and importance coefficient and outputs are exports, ecological effects and added value. In addition, exports, value added and environmental investment are used as outputs of DEA method. Since the results of DEA may consider more than one efficient unit, so we implement Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS technique to rank efficient units. In our case study, there were 15 different sectors from various industries and the implementation of DEA technique recommends 8 efficient units. The implementation of TOPSIS among these efficient units has suggested that Chemical industry could be considered as the most attracting industry for investment.

  12. What Predicts Performance? A Multicenter Study Examining the Association Between Resident Performance, Rank List Position, and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jonathan G; Schneberk, Todd; Zobrist, Marissa; Hern, H Gene; Jordan, Jamie; Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Menchine, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Each application cycle, emergency medicine (EM) residency programs attempt to predict which applicants will be most successful in residency and rank them accordingly on their program's Rank Order List (ROL). Determine if ROL position, participation in a medical student rotation at their respective program, or United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 rank within a class is predictive of residency performance. All full-time EM faculty at Los Angeles County + University of Southern California (LAC + USC), Harbor-UCLA (Harbor), Alameda Health System-Highland (Highland), and the University of California-Irvine (UCI) ranked each resident in the classes of 2013 and 2014 at time of graduation. From these anonymous surveys, a graduation ROL was created, and using Spearman's rho, was compared with the program's adjusted ROL, USMLE Step 1 rank, and whether the resident participated in a medical student rotation. A total of 93 residents were evaluated. Graduation ROL position did not correlate with adjusted ROL position (Rho = 0.14, p = 0.19) or USMLE Step 1 rank (Rho = 0.15, p = 0.14). Interestingly, among the subgroup of residents who rotated as medical students, adjusted ROL position demonstrated significant correlation with final ranking on graduation ROL (Rho = 0.31, p = 0.03). USMLE Step 1 score rank and adjusted ROL position did not predict resident performance at time of graduation. However, adjusted ROL position was predictive of future residency success in the subgroup of residents who had completed a sub-internship at their respective programs. These findings should guide the future selection of EM residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ranking the dermatology programs based on measurements of academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jashin J; Ramirez, Claudia C; Alonso, Carol A; Berman, Brian; Tyring, Stephen K

    2007-07-13

    The only dermatology rankings in the past were based on National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and journal citations. To determine the highest ranking academic dermatology programs based on 5 outcome measures and on an overall ranking scale. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to rank the dermatology programs on 4 of the following outcome measures of academic achievement and with an overall ranking. We collected extensive 2001 to 2004 data ranging from total publications to grant funding on 107 U.S. dermatology programs and their full-time faculty. Data from part-time and volunteer faculty were not used. Publications in 2001 to 2004; NIH funding in 2004; Dermatology Foundation grants in 2001 to 2004; faculty lectures in 2004 delivered at national conferences; number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of the top 3 U.S. dermatology journals and the top 4 subspecialty journals We used the 5 outcome measures to tabulate the highest ranking programs in each category. Using a weighted ranking system, we also tabulated the overall top 30 dermatology programs based on these 5 outcome measures. We were not able to determine the total amount of NIH funding in dollars of the dermatology divisions. The impact factors of the journal in which these publications appeared was not factored into our calculations. Since faculty members may collaborate on the same publication, some publications may have been double-counted. In descending order, the 5 highest ranked academic programs are the University of Pennsylvania; University of California, San Francisco; Yale-New Haven Medical Center; New York University; and University of Michigan. This ranking system may allow residents and faculty to improve the academic achievements at their respective programs.

  14. Correlation between centrality metrics and their application to the opinion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Li, Q.; Van Mieghem, P.F.A.; Stanley, H.E.; Wang, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, a number of centrality metrics describing network properties of nodes have been proposed to rank the importance of nodes. In order to understand the correlations between centrality metrics and to approximate a high-complexity centrality metric by a strongly correlated

  15. Student Practices, Learning, and Attitudes When Using Computerized Ranking Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M.; Prather, E. E.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    Ranking Tasks are a novel type of conceptual exercise based on a technique called rule assessment. Ranking Tasks present students with a series of four to eight icons that describe slightly different variations of a basic physical situation. Students are then asked to identify the order, or ranking, of the various situations based on some physical outcome or result. The structure of Ranking Tasks makes it difficult for students to rely strictly on memorized answers and mechanical substitution of formulae. In addition, by changing the presentation of the different scenarios (e.g., photographs, line diagrams, graphs, tables, etc.) we find that Ranking Tasks require students to develop mental schema that are more flexible and robust. Ranking tasks may be implemented on the computer which requires students to order the icons through drag-and-drop. Computer implementation allows the incorporation of background material, grading with feedback, and providing additional similar versions of the task through randomization so that students can build expertise through practice. This poster will summarize the results of a study of student usage of computerized ranking tasks. We will investigate 1) student practices (How do they make use of these tools?), 2) knowledge and skill building (Do student scores improve with iteration and are there diminishing returns?), and 3) student attitudes toward using computerized Ranking Tasks (Do they like using them?). This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  16. Minkowski metrics in creating universal ranking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ameljańczyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a general procedure for creating the rankings of a set of objects, while the relation of preference based on any ranking function. The analysis was possible to use the ranking functions began by showing the fundamental drawbacks of commonly used functions in the form of a weighted sum. As a special case of the ranking procedure in the space of a relation, the procedure based on the notion of an ideal element and generalized Minkowski distance from the element was proposed. This procedure, presented as universal ranking algorithm, eliminates most of the disadvantages of ranking functions in the form of a weighted sum.[b]Keywords[/b]: ranking functions, preference relation, ranking clusters, categories, ideal point, universal ranking algorithm

  17. Combined Reduced-Rank Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Torokhti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose and justify a new approach to constructing optimal nonlinear transforms of random vectors. We show that the proposed transform improves such characteristics of {rank-reduced} transforms as compression ratio, accuracy of decompression and reduces required computational work. The proposed transform ${mathcal T}_p$ is presented in the form of a sum with $p$ terms where each term is interpreted as a particular rank-reduced transform. Moreover, terms in ${mathcal T}_p$ are represented as a combination of three operations ${mathcal F}_k$, ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ with $k=1,ldots,p$. The prime idea is to determine ${mathcal F}_k$ separately, for each $k=1,ldots,p$, from an associated rank-constrained minimization problem similar to that used in the Karhunen--Lo`{e}ve transform. The operations ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ are auxiliary for f/inding ${mathcal F}_k$. The contribution of each term in ${mathcal T}_p$ improves the entire transform performance. A corresponding unconstrained nonlinear optimal transform is also considered. Such a transform is important in its own right because it is treated as an optimal filter without signal compression. A rigorous analysis of errors associated with the proposed transforms is given.

  18. Ranking Performance Measures in Multi-Task Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Sabac, Florin; Tian, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for ranking performance evaluation systems in multi-task agency models (using both optimal and linear contracts) in terms of a second-order stochastic dominance (SSD) condition on the likelihood ratios. The SSD condition can be replaced by a variance-covariance mat......We derive sufficient conditions for ranking performance evaluation systems in multi-task agency models (using both optimal and linear contracts) in terms of a second-order stochastic dominance (SSD) condition on the likelihood ratios. The SSD condition can be replaced by a variance...

  19. Ranking Support Vector Machine with Kernel Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Rongchun; Dou, Yong; Liang, Zhengfa; Lv, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Learning to rank algorithm has become important in recent years due to its successful application in information retrieval, recommender system, and computational biology, and so forth. Ranking support vector machine (RankSVM) is one of the state-of-art ranking models and has been favorably used. Nonlinear RankSVM (RankSVM with nonlinear kernels) can give higher accuracy than linear RankSVM (RankSVM with a linear kernel) for complex nonlinear ranking problem. However, the learning methods for nonlinear RankSVM are still time-consuming because of the calculation of kernel matrix. In this paper, we propose a fast ranking algorithm based on kernel approximation to avoid computing the kernel matrix. We explore two types of kernel approximation methods, namely, the Nyström method and random Fourier features. Primal truncated Newton method is used to optimize the pairwise L2-loss (squared Hinge-loss) objective function of the ranking model after the nonlinear kernel approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method gets a much faster training speed than kernel RankSVM and achieves comparable or better performance over state-of-the-art ranking algorithms.

  20. Correlation analysis of symmetry breaking in the surface nanostructure ordering: case study of the ventral scale of the snake Morelia viridis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A.; Filippov, A.; Gorb, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the majority of inorganic or artificial materials, there is no ideal long-range ordering of structures on the surface in biological systems. Local symmetry of the ordering on biological surfaces is also often broken. In the present paper, the particular symmetry violation was analyzed for dimple-like nano-pattern on the belly scales of the skin of the pythonid snake Morelia viridis using correlation analysis and statistics of the distances between individual nanostructures. The results of the analysis performed on M. viridis were compared with a well-studied nano-nipple pattern on the eye of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta, used as a reference. The analysis revealed non-random, but very specific symmetry violation. In the case of the moth eye, the nano-nipple arrangement forms a set of domains, while in the case of the snake skin, the nano-dimples arrangement resembles an ordering of particles (molecules) in amorphous (glass) state. The function of the nano-dimples arrangement may be to provide both friction and strength isotropy of the skin. A simple model is suggested, which provides the results almost perfectly coinciding with the experimental ones. Possible mechanisms of the appearance of the above nano-formations are discussed.

  1. Self-Organized Lattices of Nonlinear Optochemical Waves in Photopolymerizable Fluids: The Spontaneous Emergence of 3- D Order in a Weakly Correlated System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Matthew R; Hudson, Alexander D; Saravanamuttu, Kalaichelvi

    2018-02-09

    Many of the extraordinary three-dimensional architectures that pattern our physical world emerge from complex nonlinear systems or dynamic populations whose individual constituents are only weakly correlated to each other. Shoals of fish, murmuration behaviours in birds, congestion patterns in traffic and even networks of social conventions are examples of spontaneous pattern formation, which cannot be predicted from the properties of individual elements alone. Pattern formation at a different scale has been observed or predicted in weakly correlated systems including superconductors, atomic gases near Bose Einstein condensation and incoherent optical fields. Understanding pattern formation in nonlinear weakly-correlated systems, which are often unified through mathematical expression, could pave intelligent self-organizing pathways to functional materials, architectures and computing technologies. However, it is experimentally difficult to directly visualize the nonlinear dynamics of pattern formation in most populations - especially in three dimensions. Here, we describe the collective behaviour of large populations of nonlinear optochemical waves, which are poorly correlated in both space and time. The optochemical waves - microscopic filaments of white light entrapped within polymer channels - originate from the modulation instability of incandescent light travelling in photopolymerizable fluids. By tracing the three-dimensional distribution of optical intensity in the nascent polymerizing system, we find that populations of randomly distributed, optochemical waves synergistically and collectively shift in space to form highly ordered lattices of specific symmetries. These, to our knowledge, are the first three-dimensionally periodic structures to emerge from any known system of weakly-correlated waves. Their spontaneous formation in an incoherent and effectively chaotic field is counterintuitive but the apparent contradiction of known behaviours of light

  2. The Publication Ranking Score for pediatric urology: quantifying thought leadership within the subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jessica C; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Nelson, Caleb P; Kokorowski, Paul J; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Kutikov, Alexander; Routh, Jonathan C

    2013-12-01

    Clinical care parameters are frequently assessed by national ranking systems. However, these rankings do little to comment on institutions' academic contributions. The Publication Ranking Score (PRS) was developed to allow for objective comparisons of scientific thought-leadership at various pediatric urology institutions. Faculty lists were compiled for each of the US News & World Report (USNWR) top-50 pediatric urology hospitals. A list of all faculty publications (2006-2011) was then compiled, after adjusting for journal impact factor, and summed to derive a Publication Ranking Score (PRS). PRS rankings were then compared to the USNWR pediatric urology top-50 hospital list. A total of 1811 publications were indexed. PRS rankings resulted in a mean change in rank of 12 positions, compared to USNWR ranks. Of the top-10 USNWR hospitals, only 4 were ranked in the top-10 by the PRS. There was little correlation between the USNWR and PRS ranks for either top-10 (r = 0.42, p = 0.23) or top-50 (r = 0.48, p = 0.0004) hospitals. PRS institutional ranking differs significantly from the USNWR top-50 hospital list in pediatric urology. While not a replacement, we believe the PRS to be a useful adjunct to the USNWR rankings of pediatric urology hospitals. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A modified anomaly detection method for capsule endoscopy images using non-linear color conversion and Higher-order Local Auto-Correlation (HLAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Erzhong; Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a patient-friendly endoscopy broadly utilized in gastrointestinal examination. However, the efficacy of diagnosis is restricted by the large quantity of images. This paper presents a modified anomaly detection method, by which both known and unknown anomalies in capsule endoscopy images of small intestine are expected to be detected. To achieve this goal, this paper introduces feature extraction using a non-linear color conversion and Higher-order Local Auto Correlation (HLAC) Features, and makes use of image partition and subspace method for anomaly detection. Experiments are implemented among several major anomalies with combinations of proposed techniques. As the result, the proposed method achieved 91.7% and 100% detection accuracy for swelling and bleeding respectively, so that the effectiveness of proposed method is demonstrated.

  4. UNIVERSITY RANKING IMPROVING TOOLS IN MODERN INFORMATION EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bilous

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ranking criteria of national and international levels are the instruments of university ranking increasing. Ratings provide a balanced measure of quality in higher educational institutions. Determining the level of university research influences the position of the university in various rankings. We can separate the main aggregates that are considered when ranking international higher education institutions. The results of university ranking allows the identification of its strengths and weaknesses in order to develop strategies for success and excellence based on the achievements of other universities at the regional, national and international levels. In article, we can see strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of Kherson State University (SWOT-analysis. The main goals of Kherson State University are self-promotion in the media space, raising the prestige of KSU and integration with the world science community, development of an effective technological corridor: «School - University – Labor» market, increasing the number of students, improving the ranking of academic staff in scientometric databases, and gaining international recognition.

  5. Standing orders for influenza and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination: Correlates identified in a national survey of U.S. Primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Steven M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standing orders programs (SOPs allow non-physician medical staff to assess eligibility and administer vaccines without a specific physician's order. SOPs increase vaccination rates but are underutilized. Method In 2009, correlates of SOPs use for influenza vaccine and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPV were assessed in a nationally representative, stratified random sample of U.S. physicians (n = 880 in family and internal medicine who provided office immunization. The response rate was 67%. Physicians reporting no SOPs, only influenza SOPs, and joint influenza and PPV SOPs were compared using multinomial and logistic regression models to examine individual and practice-level correlates. Results 23% reported using SOPs consistently for both influenza vaccine and PPV, and 20% for influenza vaccination only, with the remainder not using SOPs. Practice-level factors that distinguished practices with joint influenza-PPV SOPs included perceived practice openness to change, strong practice teamwork, access to an electronic medical record, presence of an immunization champion in the practice, and access to nurse/physician assistant staff as opposed to medical assistants alone. Discussion Physicians in practices with SOPs for both vaccines reported greater awareness of ACIP recommendations and/or Medicare regulations and were more likely to agree that SOPs are an effective way to boost vaccination coverage. However, implementation of both influenza and PPV SOPs was also associated with a variety of practice-level factors, including teamwork, the presence of an immunization champion, and greater availability of clinical assistants with advanced training. Conclusions Practice-level factors are critical for the adoption of more complex SOPs, such as joint SOPs for influenza and PPV.

  6. Clustered Low-Rank Tensor Format: Introduction and Application to Fast Construction of Hartree-Fock Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cannada A; Calvin, Justus A; Valeev, Edward F

    2016-12-13

    We describe the clustered low-rank (CLR) framework for block-sparse and block-low-rank tensor representation and computation. The CLR framework exploits the tensor structure revealed by basis clustering; computational savings arise from low-rank compression of tensor blocks and performing block arithmetic in the low-rank form whenever beneficial. The precision is rigorously controlled by two parameters, avoiding ad-hoc heuristics, such as domains: one controls the CLR block rank truncation, and the other controls screening of small contributions in arithmetic operations on CLR tensors to propagate sparsity through expressions. As these parameters approach zero, the CLR representation and arithmetic become exact. As a pilot application, we considered the use of the CLR format for the order-2 and order-3 tensors in the context of the density fitting (DF) evaluation of the Hartree-Fock (exact) exchange (DF-K). Even for small systems and realistic basis sets, CLR-DF-K becomes more efficient than the standard DF-K approach, and it has significantly reduced asymptotic storage and computational complexities relative to the standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] DF-K figures. CLR-DF-K is also significantly more efficient-all while negligibly affecting molecular energies and properties-than the conventional (non-DF) [Formula: see text] exchange algorithm for applications to medium-sized systems (on the order of 100 atoms) with diffuse Gaussian basis sets, a necessity for applications to negatively charged species, molecular properties, and high-accuracy correlated wave functions.

  7. Motif discovery in ranked lists of sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tataru, Paula; Madsen, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    . These features make Regmex well suited for a range of biological sequence analysis problems related to motif discovery, exemplified by microRNA seed enrichment, but also including enrichment problems involving complex motifs and combinations of motifs. We demonstrate a number of usage scenarios that take......Motif analysis has long been an important method to characterize biological functionality and the current growth of sequencing-based genomics experiments further extends its potential. These diverse experiments often generate sequence lists ranked by some functional property. There is therefore...... a growing need for motif analysis methods that can exploit this coupled data structure and be tailored for specific biological questions. Here, we present an exploratory motif analysis tool, Regmex (REGular expression Motif EXplorer), which offers several methods to evaluate the correlation of motifs...

  8. Oxygen ordering in the high-T$_c$ superconductor HgBa$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{6+\\delta}$ as revealed by perturbed angular correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonca, Tania Melo; Haas, Heinz; Odier, Philippe; Tavares, Pedro; Silva, Manuel Ribeiro; Lopes, Armandina; Pereira, Andre; Goncalves, Joao Nuno; Amaral, Joao; Darie, Celine; Araujo, Joao Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Lattice sites and collective ordering of oxygen atoms in HgBa$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{6+\\delta}$ were studied using the perturbed angular correlation (PAC) technique at ISOLDE/CERN. The electric field gradients (EFG) at $^{199m}$Hg nuclei have been measured as functions of oxygen doping on the Hg planes, above and below T$_c$. In comparison with the results obtained for oxygen and fluorine doping in Hg-1201, the analysis shows a different oxygen ordering exhibited by Hg-1212. Moreover, for all studied cases, the experimental results show that at a local scale there is non-uniform oxygen distribution. A series of ab initio EFG calculations allowed to infer that at low concentrations, regions without oxygen coexist with regions where O$_{2\\delta}$ dumbbell molecules are located at the center of the Hg mesh. On the other side, at high concentrations, O$_{2\\delta}$ dumbbell molecules coexist with single O$_\\delta$ atoms occupying the center of the Hg mesh. The present results suggest that oxygen sits on the Hg planes in t...

  9. Podium: Ranking Data Using Mixed-Initiative Visual Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Emily; Das, Subhajit; Chawla, Ravish; Kalidindi, Bharath; Brown, Eli T; Endert, Alex

    2017-08-29

    People often rank and order data points as a vital part of making decisions. Multi-attribute ranking systems are a common tool used to make these data-driven decisions. Such systems often take the form of a table-based visualization in which users assign weights to the attributes representing the quantifiable importance of each attribute to a decision, which the system then uses to compute a ranking of the data. However, these systems assume that users are able to quantify their conceptual understanding of how important particular attributes are to a decision. This is not always easy or even possible for users to do. Rather, people often have a more holistic understanding of the data. They form opinions that data point A is better than data point B but do not necessarily know which attributes are important. To address these challenges, we present a visual analytic application to help people rank multi-variate data points. We developed a prototype system, Podium, that allows users to drag rows in the table to rank order data points based on their perception of the relative value of the data. Podium then infers a weighting model using Ranking SVM that satisfies the user's data preferences as closely as possible. Whereas past systems help users understand the relationships between data points based on changes to attribute weights, our approach helps users to understand the attributes that might inform their understanding of the data. We present two usage scenarios to describe some of the potential uses of our proposed technique: (1) understanding which attributes contribute to a user's subjective preferences for data, and (2) deconstructing attributes of importance for existing rankings.Our proposed approach makes powerful machine learning techniques more usable to those who may not have expertise in these areas.

  10. Concordance-based Kendall's Correlation for Computationally-Light vs. Computationally-Heavy Centrality Metrics: Lower Bound for Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We identify three different levels of correlation (pair-wise relative ordering, network-wide ranking and linear regression that could be assessed between a computationally-light centrality metric and a computationally-heavy centrality metric for real-world networks. The Kendall's concordance-based correlation measure could be used to quantitatively assess how well we could consider the relative ordering of two vertices vi and vj with respect to a computationally-light centrality metric as the relative ordering of the same two vertices with respect to a computationally-heavy centrality metric. We hypothesize that the pair-wise relative ordering (concordance-based assessment of the correlation between centrality metrics is the most strictest of all the three levels of correlation and claim that the Kendall's concordance-based correlation coefficient will be lower than the correlation coefficient observed with the more relaxed levels of correlation measures (linear regression-based Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient and the network wide ranking-based Spearman's correlation coefficient. We validate our hypothesis by evaluating the three correlation coefficients between two sets of centrality metrics: the computationally-light degree and local clustering coefficient complement-based degree centrality metrics and the computationally-heavy eigenvector centrality, betweenness centrality and closeness centrality metrics for a diverse collection of 50 real-world networks.

  11. Selection of suitable e-learning approach using TOPSIS technique with best ranked criteria weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Husam Jasim; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Shaharanee, Izwan Nizal Mohd

    2017-11-01

    This paper compares the performances of four rank-based weighting assessment techniques, Rank Sum (RS), Rank Reciprocal (RR), Rank Exponent (RE), and Rank Order Centroid (ROC) on five identified e-learning criteria to select the best weights method. A total of 35 experts in a public university in Malaysia were asked to rank the criteria and to evaluate five e-learning approaches which include blended learning, flipped classroom, ICT supported face to face learning, synchronous learning, and asynchronous learning. The best ranked criteria weights are defined as weights that have the least total absolute differences with the geometric mean of all weights, were then used to select the most suitable e-learning approach by using TOPSIS method. The results show that RR weights are the best, while flipped classroom approach implementation is the most suitable approach. This paper has developed a decision framework to aid decision makers (DMs) in choosing the most suitable weighting method for solving MCDM problems.

  12. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  13. Methodology, Meaning and Usefulness of Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross

    2008-01-01

    University rankings are having a profound effect on both higher education systems and individual universities. In this paper we outline these effects, discuss the desirable characteristics of a good ranking methodology and document existing practice, with an emphasis on the two main international rankings (Shanghai Jiao Tong and THES-QS). We take…

  14. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  15. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  16. Systematic Weighting and Ranking: Cutting the Gordian Knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles H.; McKim, Geoffrey W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes SWEAR (Systematic Weighting and Ranking), a powers-of-two algorithm that can be used for searching the World Wide Web or any large database that automatically creates discrete, well-defined result sets and displays them in decreasing order of likely relevance. Also discusses fuzzy sets. (Author/LRW)

  17. Metric Distance Ranking Technique for Fuzzy Critical Path Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, fuzzy critical path analysis of a project network is carried out. Metric distance ranking technique is used to order fuzzy numbers during the forward and backward pass computations to obtain the earliest start, earliest finish, latest start and latest finish times of the project's activities. A numerical example is ...

  18. Ranking Performance Measures in Multi-Task Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Sabac, Florin; Tian, Joyce

    We derive sufficient conditions for ranking performance evaluation systems in multi-task agency models using both optimal and linear contracts in terms of a second-order stochastic dominance (SSD) condition on the likelihood ratios. The SSD condition can be replaced by a variance-covariance matrix...

  19. A Hybrid Distance-Based Ideal-Seeking Consensus Ranking Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madjid Tavana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ordinal consensus ranking problems have received much attention in the management science literature. A problem arises in situations where a group of k decision makers (DMs is asked to rank order n alternatives. The question is how to combine the DM rankings into one consensus ranking. Several different approaches have been suggested to aggregate DM responses into a compromise or consensus ranking; however, the similarity of consensus rankings generated by the different algorithms is largely unknown. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid distance-based ideal-seeking consensus ranking model (DCM. The proposed hybrid model combines parts of the two commonly used consensus ranking techniques of Beck and Lin (1983 and Cook and Kress (1985 into an intuitive and computationally simple model. We illustrate our method and then run a Monte Carlo simulation across a range of k and n to compare the similarity of the consensus rankings generated by our method with the best-known method of Borda and Kendall (Kendall 1962 and the two methods proposed by Beck and Lin (1983 and Cook and Kress (1985. DCM and Beck and Lin's method yielded the most similar consensus rankings, whereas the Cook-Kress method and the Borda-Kendall method yielded the least similar consensus rankings.

  20. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  1. Enhancing Invenio Digital Library With An External Relevance Ranking Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Glauner, Patrick Oliver

    Invenio is a comprehensive web-based free digital library software suite originally developed at CERN. In order to improve its information retrieval and word similarity ranking capabilities, the goal of this thesis is to enhance Invenio by bridging it with modern external information retrieval systems. In the first part a comparison of various information retrieval systems such as Solr and Xapian is made. In the second part a system-independent bridge for word similarity ranking is designed and implemented. Subsequently, Solr and Xapian are integrated in Invenio via adapters to the bridge. In the third part scalability tests are performed. Finally, a future outlook is briefly discussed.

  2. Ranking serials in oceanography: An analysis based on the Indian contributions and their citations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.; Maheswarappa, B.S.

    negative correlation with a marginal difference of -0.214 is observed between these two rank lists. This difference is attributed to studies from different geographical areas in these two rank sets. Bradford graphs for all datasets, but one, showed typical...

  3. Speckle noise reduction for optical coherence tomography images via non-local weighted group low-rank representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chang; Cao, Lijuan; Chen, Jiajia; Zheng, Xiao

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a non-local weighted group low-rank representation (WGLRR) model is proposed for speckle noise reduction in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. It is based on the observation that the similarity between patches within the noise-free OCT image leads to a high correlation between them, which means that the data matrix grouped by these similar patches is low-rank. Thus, the low-rank representation (LRR) is used to recover the noise-free group data matrix. In order to maintain the fidelity of the recovered image, the corrupted probability of each pixel is integrated into the LRR model as a weight to regularize the error term. Considering that each single patch might belong to several groups, and multiple estimates of this patch can be obtained, different estimates of each patch is aggregated to obtain its denoised result. The aggregating weights are exploited depending on the rank of each group data matrix, which can assign higher weights to those better estimates. Both qualitative and quantitative experimental results on real OCT images show the superior performance of the WGLRR model compared with other state-of-the-art speckle removal techniques.

  4. Microseismic Event Grouping Based on PageRank Linkage at the Newberry Volcano Geothermal Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A. C.; Myers, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Newberry Volcano DOE FORGE site in Central Oregon has been stimulated two times using high-pressure fluid injection to study the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology. Several hundred microseismic events were generated during the first stimulation in the fall of 2012. Initial locations of this microseismicity do not show well defined subsurface structure in part because event location uncertainties are large (Foulger and Julian, 2013). We focus on this stimulation to explore the spatial and temporal development of microseismicity, which is key to understanding how subsurface stimulation modifies stress, fractures rock, and increases permeability. We use PageRank, Google's initial search algorithm, to determine connectivity within the events (Aguiar and Beroza, 2014) and assess signal-correlation topology for the micro-earthquakes. We then use this information to create signal families and compare these to the spatial and temporal proximity of associated earthquakes. We relocate events within families (identified by PageRank linkage) using the Bayesloc approach (Myers et al., 2007). Preliminary relocations show tight spatial clustering of event families as well as evidence of events relocating to a different cluster than originally reported. We also find that signal similarity (linkage) at several stations, not just one or two, is needed in order to determine that events are in close proximity to one another. We show that indirect linkage of signals using PageRank is a reliable way to increase the number of events that are confidently determined to be similar to one another, which may lead to efficient and effective grouping of earthquakes with similar physical characteristics, such as focal mechanisms and stress drop. Our ultimate goal is to determine whether changes in the state of stress and/or changes in the generation of subsurface fracture networks can be detected using PageRank topology as well as aid in the event relocation to obtain more accurate

  5. THE USE OF RANKING SAMPLING METHOD WITHIN MARKETING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CODRUŢA DURA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing and statistical literature available to practitioners provides a wide range of sampling methods that can be implemented in the context of marketing research. Ranking sampling method is based on taking apart the general population into several strata, namely into several subdivisions which are relatively homogenous regarding a certain characteristic. In fact, the sample will be composed by selecting, from each stratum, a certain number of components (which can be proportional or non-proportional to the size of the stratum until the pre-established volume of the sample is reached. Using ranking sampling within marketing research requires the determination of some relevant statistical indicators - average, dispersion, sampling error etc. To that end, the paper contains a case study which illustrates the actual approach used in order to apply the ranking sample method within a marketing research made by a company which provides Internet connection services, on a particular category of customers – small and medium enterprises.

  6. Sparse Contextual Activation for Efficient Visual Re-Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Song; Bai, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an extremely efficient algorithm for visual re-ranking. By considering the original pairwise distance in the contextual space, we develop a feature vector called sparse contextual activation (SCA) that encodes the local distribution of an image. Hence, re-ranking task can be simply accomplished by vector comparison under the generalized Jaccard metric, which has its theoretical meaning in the fuzzy set theory. In order to improve the time efficiency of re-ranking procedure, inverted index is successfully introduced to speed up the computation of generalized Jaccard metric. As a result, the average time cost of re-ranking for a certain query can be controlled within 1 ms. Furthermore, inspired by query expansion, we also develop an additional method called local consistency enhancement on the proposed SCA to improve the retrieval performance in an unsupervised manner. On the other hand, the retrieval performance using a single feature may not be satisfactory enough, which inspires us to fuse multiple complementary features for accurate retrieval. Based on SCA, a robust feature fusion algorithm is exploited that also preserves the characteristic of high time efficiency. We assess our proposed method in various visual re-ranking tasks. Experimental results on Princeton shape benchmark (3D object), WM-SRHEC07 (3D competition), YAEL data set B (face), MPEG-7 data set (shape), and Ukbench data set (image) manifest the effectiveness and efficiency of SCA.

  7. Fast Estimation of Approximate Matrix Ranks Using Spectral Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaru, Shashanka; Saad, Yousef; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2017-05-01

    Many machine learning and data-related applications require the knowledge of approximate ranks of large data matrices at hand. This letter presents two computationally inexpensive techniques to estimate the approximate ranks of such matrices. These techniques exploit approximate spectral densities, popular in physics, which are probability density distributions that measure the likelihood of finding eigenvalues of the matrix at a given point on the real line. Integrating the spectral density over an interval gives the eigenvalue count of the matrix in that interval. Therefore, the rank can be approximated by integrating the spectral density over a carefully selected interval. Two different approaches are discussed to estimate the approximate rank, one based on Chebyshev polynomials and the other based on the Lanczos algorithm. In order to obtain the appropriate interval, it is necessary to locate a gap between the eigenvalues that correspond to noise and the relevant eigenvalues that contribute to the matrix rank. A method for locating this gap and selecting the interval of integration is proposed based on the plot of the spectral density. Numerical experiments illustrate the performance of these techniques on matrices from typical applications.

  8. Rank Modulation for Translocation Error Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Farnoud, Farzad; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2012-01-01

    We consider rank modulation codes for flash memories that allow for handling arbitrary charge drop errors. Unlike classical rank modulation codes used for correcting errors that manifest themselves as swaps of two adjacently ranked elements, the proposed \\emph{translocation rank codes} account for more general forms of errors that arise in storage systems. Translocations represent a natural extension of the notion of adjacent transpositions and as such may be analyzed using related concepts in combinatorics and rank modulation coding. Our results include tight bounds on the capacity of translocation rank codes, construction techniques for asymptotically good codes, as well as simple decoding methods for one class of structured codes. As part of our exposition, we also highlight the close connections between the new code family and permutations with short common subsequences, deletion and insertion error-correcting codes for permutations and permutation arrays.

  9. Dynamics of Ranking Processes in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumm, Nicholas; Ghoshal, Gourab; Forró, Zalán; Schich, Maximilian; Bianconi, Ginestra; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-09-01

    The world is addicted to ranking: everything, from the reputation of scientists, journals, and universities to purchasing decisions is driven by measured or perceived differences between them. Here, we analyze empirical data capturing real time ranking in a number of systems, helping to identify the universal characteristics of ranking dynamics. We develop a continuum theory that not only predicts the stability of the ranking process, but shows that a noise-induced phase transition is at the heart of the observed differences in ranking regimes. The key parameters of the continuum theory can be explicitly measured from data, allowing us to predict and experimentally document the existence of three phases that govern ranking stability.

  10. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error.

  11. Nurturing Quality of Higher Education through National Ranking: A Potential Empowerment Model for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, Dyah; Idrus, Nirwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the recently introduced National Higher Education ranking system in Indonesia in order to evaluate its potential as a sustainable model to improve the quality of higher education in the country. It is a scaffold towards an established world-universities ranking system that may prove formidable for a developing country. This…

  12. A universal rank-size law

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    A mere hyperbolic law, like the Zipf's law power function, is often inadequate to describe rank-size relationships. An alternative theoretical distribution is proposed based on theoretical physics arguments starting from the Yule-Simon distribution. A modeling is proposed leading to a universal form. A theoretical suggestion for the "best (or optimal) distribution", is provided through an entropy argument. The ranking of areas through the number of cities in various countries and some sport competition ranking serves for the present illustrations.

  13. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  14. Ranking documents with a thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, R; Bicknell, E

    1989-09-01

    This article reports on exploratory experiments in evaluating and improving a thesaurus through studying its effect on retrieval. A formula called DISTANCE was developed to measure the conceptual distance between queries and documents encoded as sets of thesaurus terms. DISTANCE references MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and assesses the degree of match between a MeSH-encoded query and document. The performance of DISTANCE on MeSH is compared to the performance of people in the assessment of conceptual distance between queries and documents, and is found to simulate with surprising accuracy the human performance. The power of the computer simulation stems both from the tendency of people to rely heavily on broader-than (BT) relations in making decisions about conceptual distance and from the thousands of accurate BT relations in MeSH. One source for discrepancy between the algorithms' measurement of closeness between query and document and people's measurement of closeness between query and document is occasional inconsistency in the BT relations. Our experiments with adding non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT relations could improve document ranking, if DISTANCE were also appropriately revised to treat these relations differently from BT relations.

  15. Communities in Large Networks: Identification and Ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study the problem of identifying and ranking the members of a community in a very large network with link analysis only, given a set of representatives of the community. We define the concept of a community justified by a formal analysis of a simple model of the evolution of a directed graph. ...... and its immediate surroundings. The members are ranked with a “local” variant of the PageRank algorithm. Results are reported from successful experiments on identifying and ranking Danish Computer Science sites and Danish Chess pages using only a few representatives....

  16. Citation graph based ranking in Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Marian, Ludmila; Rajman, Martin; Vesely, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Invenio is the web-based integrated digital library system developed at CERN. Within this framework, we present four types of ranking models based on the citation graph that complement the simple approach based on citation counts: time-dependent citation counts, a relevancy ranking which extends the PageRank model, a time-dependent ranking which combines the freshness of citations with PageRank and a ranking that takes into consideration the external citations. We present our analysis and results obtained on two main data sets: Inspire and CERN Document Server. Our main contributions are: (i) a study of the currently available ranking methods based on the citation graph; (ii) the development of new ranking methods that correct some of the identified limitations of the current methods such as treating all citations of equal importance, not taking time into account or considering the citation graph complete; (iii) a detailed study of the key parameters for these ranking methods. (The original publication is ava...

  17. Zipf rank approach and cross-country convergence of incomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jia; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Urošević, Branko; Stanley, H. Eugene; Podobnik, Boris

    2011-05-01

    We employ a concept popular in physics —the Zipf rank approach— in order to estimate the number of years that EU members would need in order to achieve "convergence" of their per capita incomes. Assuming that trends in the past twenty years continue to hold in the future, we find that after t≈30 years both developing and developed EU countries indexed by i will have comparable values of their per capita gross domestic product {\\cal G}_{i,t} . Besides the traditional Zipf rank approach we also propose a weighted Zipf rank method. In contrast to the EU block, on the world level the Zipf rank approach shows that, between 1960 and 2009, cross-country income differences increased over time. For a brief period during the 2007-2008 global economic crisis, at world level the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of richer countries declined more rapidly than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of poorer countries, in contrast to EU where the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developing EU countries declined faster than the {\\cal G}_{i,t} of developed EU countries, indicating that the recession interrupted the convergence between EU members. We propose a simple model of GDP evolution that accounts for the scaling we observe in the data.

  18. Systematic differences in signal emitting and receiving revealed by PageRank analysis of a human protein interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Donglei; Lee, Connie F; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A) What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B) Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C) Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D) Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell.

  19. Systematic differences in signal emitting and receiving revealed by PageRank analysis of a human protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglei Du

    Full Text Available Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell.

  20. Systematic Differences in Signal Emitting and Receiving Revealed by PageRank Analysis of a Human Protein Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A) What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B) Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C) Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D) Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell. PMID:23028653

  1. Ranking Technology Forecasting Journals by Using Data Envelopment Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Petković

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to present the ranking of the journals in the field of technology forecasting (TF through the application of the Data Envelopment Analysis - DEA. Over the past four decades, we have witnessed a rapid development in the field of technology forecasting. This development, both in theory and in practice, has been fuelled by the increase in complexity, even greater competition, and rapid changes in the business environment. Back in the past, little attention was paid to the importance and conceptual development in the field of TF, which caused numerous overlaps of the forms of TF development and its influence. The changes that have resulted in the emergence of information technology and modern manufacturing technology have actually increased the need for application of technology forecasting, as well as for explosive growth in scientific and engineering literature worldwide. The paper shows the ranking of 39 journals in the field of TF over the period from 1999 to 2011 through the application of the Data Envelopment Analysis, as well as through analyzing trend changes in publishing professional publications in the field of technology forecasting. Also pointed out are the shortcomings ofprevious methods of ranking journals by using impact factors, as one of the most important indicators of the quality of journals, as well as the possibilities of applying indicators obtained by using other methodologies. The results of such method of ranking should point out to publishing trends to the researchers engaged in this field, and direct them to journals in which they could present the results of their research. The aim of this research is to show that more than one criterion must be taken in order to create the rank of a journal from a specific area. In this way we get a more realistic ranking of leading journals from the observed area, since other necessary elements that contribute to the importance of a journal for a relevant

  2. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  3. Ranked Conservation Opportunity Areas for Region 7 (ECO_RES.RANKED_OAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The RANKED_OAS are all the Conservation Opportunity Areas identified by MoRAP that have subsequently been ranked by patch size, landform representation, and the...

  4. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-10-17

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  5. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  6. Entity Ranking using Wikipedia as a Pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kaptein; P. Serdyukov; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); J. Kamps

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about

  7. Entity ranking using Wikipedia as a pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Serdyukov, P.; de Vries, A.; Kamps, J.; Huang, X.J.; Jones, G.; Koudas, N.; Wu, X.; Collins-Thompson, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about these entities. Since

  8. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal

  9. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  10. Using centrality to rank web snippets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; de Rijke, M.; Peters, C.; Jijkoun, V.; Mandl, T.; Müller, H.; Oard, D.W.; Peñas, A.; Petras, V.; Santos, D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our participation in the WebCLEF 2007 task, targeted at snippet retrieval from web data. Our system ranks snippets based on a simple similarity-based centrality, inspired by the web page ranking algorithms. We experimented with retrieval units (sentences and paragraphs) and with the

  11. Generating and ranking of Dyck words

    CERN Document Server

    Kasa, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    A new algorithm to generate all Dyck words is presented, which is used in ranking and unranking Dyck words. We emphasize the importance of using Dyck words in encoding objects related to Catalan numbers. As a consequence of formulas used in the ranking algorithm we can obtain a recursive formula for the nth Catalan number.

  12. A folk-psychological ranking of personality facets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Roivainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Which personality facets should a general personality test measure? No consensus exists on the facet structure of personality, the nature of facets, or the correct method of identifying the most significant facets. However, it can be hypothesized (the lexical hypothesis that high frequency personality describing words more likely represent important personality facets and rarely used words refer to less significant aspects of personality. Participants and procedure A ranking of personality facets was performed by studying the frequency of the use of popular personality adjectives in causal clauses (because he is a kind person on the Internet and in books as attributes of the word person (kind person. Results In Study 1, the 40 most frequently used adjectives had a cumulative usage frequency equal to that of the rest of the 295 terms studied. When terms with a higher-ranking dictionary synonym or antonym were eliminated, 23 terms remained, which represent 23 different facets. In Study 2, clusters of synonymous terms were examined. Within the top 30 clusters, personality terms were used 855 times compared to 240 for the 70 lower-ranking clusters. Conclusions It is hypothesized that personality facets represented by the top-ranking terms and clusters of terms are important and impactful independent of their correlation with abstract underlying personality factors (five/six factor models. Compared to hierarchical personality models, lists of important facets probably better cover those aspects of personality that are situated between the five or six major domains.

  13. University ranking methodologies. An interview with Ben Sowter about the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Baccini; Antono Banfi; Giuseppe De Nicolao; Paola Galimberti

    2015-01-01

    University rankings represent a controversial issue in the debate about higher education policy. One of the best known university ranking is the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings (QS), published annually since 2004 by Quacquarelli Symonds ltd, a company founded in 1990 and headquartered in London. QS provides a ranking based on a score calculated by weighting six different indicators. The 2015 edition, published in October 2015, introduced major methodological innovations and, as...

  14. Universal emergence of PageRank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, K M; Georgeot, B; Shepelyansky, D L, E-mail: frahm@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr, E-mail: georgeot@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr, E-mail: dima@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique du CNRS, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2011-11-18

    The PageRank algorithm enables us to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter {alpha} Element-Of ]0, 1[. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of the PageRank vector at its emergence when {alpha} {yields} 1. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For {alpha} {yields} 1, PageRank converges to a universal power-law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at {alpha} {yields} 1 is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix, which are extremely close to unity, leading to large relaxation times as, for example, in spin glasses. (paper)

  15. Comparing classical and quantum PageRanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, T.; Tang, J. W.; Rodriguez, J.; Small, M.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Following recent developments in quantum PageRanking, we present a comparative analysis of discrete-time and continuous-time quantum-walk-based PageRank algorithms. Relative to classical PageRank and to different extents, the quantum measures better highlight secondary hubs and resolve ranking degeneracy among peripheral nodes for all networks we studied in this paper. For the discrete-time case, we investigated the periodic nature of the walker's probability distribution for a wide range of networks and found that the dominant period does not grow with the size of these networks. Based on this observation, we introduce a new quantum measure using the maximum probabilities of the associated walker during the first couple of periods. This is particularly important, since it leads to a quantum PageRanking scheme that is scalable with respect to network size.

  16. Reliability of journal impact factor rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Darren C

    2007-01-01

    Background Journal impact factors and their ranks are used widely by journals, researchers, and research assessment exercises. Methods Based on citations to journals in research and experimental medicine in 2005, Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty associated with these journal performance indicators. Results Intervals representing plausible ranges of values for journal impact factor ranks indicated that most journals cannot be ranked with great precision. Only the top and bottom few journals could place any confidence in their rank position. Intervals were wider and overlapping for most journals. Conclusion Decisions placed on journal impact factors are potentially misleading where the uncertainty associated with the measure is ignored. This article proposes that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of journal impact factors and their ranks, and specifically that a measure of uncertainty should be routinely presented alongside the point estimate. PMID:18005435

  17. Reliability of journal impact factor rankings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Darren C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Journal impact factors and their ranks are used widely by journals, researchers, and research assessment exercises. Methods Based on citations to journals in research and experimental medicine in 2005, Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty associated with these journal performance indicators. Results Intervals representing plausible ranges of values for journal impact factor ranks indicated that most journals cannot be ranked with great precision. Only the top and bottom few journals could place any confidence in their rank position. Intervals were wider and overlapping for most journals. Conclusion Decisions placed on journal impact factors are potentially misleading where the uncertainty associated with the measure is ignored. This article proposes that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of journal impact factors and their ranks, and specifically that a measure of uncertainty should be routinely presented alongside the point estimate.

  18. A tilting approach to ranking influence

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-12-01

    We suggest a new approach, which is applicable for general statistics computed from random samples of univariate or vector-valued or functional data, to assessing the influence that individual data have on the value of a statistic, and to ranking the data in terms of that influence. Our method is based on, first, perturbing the value of the statistic by ‘tilting’, or reweighting, each data value, where the total amount of tilt is constrained to be the least possible, subject to achieving a given small perturbation of the statistic, and, then, taking the ranking of the influence of data values to be that which corresponds to ranking the changes in data weights. It is shown, both theoretically and numerically, that this ranking does not depend on the size of the perturbation, provided that the perturbation is sufficiently small. That simple result leads directly to an elegant geometric interpretation of the ranks; they are the ranks of the lengths of projections of the weights onto a ‘line’ determined by the first empirical principal component function in a generalized measure of covariance. To illustrate the generality of the method we introduce and explore it in the case of functional data, where (for example) it leads to generalized boxplots. The method has the advantage of providing an interpretable ranking that depends on the statistic under consideration. For example, the ranking of data, in terms of their influence on the value of a statistic, is different for a measure of location and for a measure of scale. This is as it should be; a ranking of data in terms of their influence should depend on the manner in which the data are used. Additionally, the ranking recognizes, rather than ignores, sign, and in particular can identify left- and right-hand ‘tails’ of the distribution of a random function or vector.

  19. Ranking the European armed forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeres, R.J.M.; Bogers, M.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of collectiveness aimed for in European defence policy raises issues such as burden sharing and relative performance measurement of the European Armed Forces (EAF). This paper compares EAF performance rates on three dimensions: input, throughput and output. In order to express

  20. Multirelational Social Recommendations via Multigraph Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Mingsong; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Zhang, Jinlong

    2017-12-01

    Recommender systems aim to identify relevant items for particular users in large-scale online applications. The historical rating data of users is a valuable input resource for many recommendation models such as collaborative filtering (CF), but these models are known to suffer from the rating sparsity problem when the users or items under consideration have insufficient rating records. With the continued growth of online social networks, the increased user-to-user relationships are reported to be helpful and can alleviate the CF rating sparsity problem. Although researchers have developed a range of social network-based recommender systems, there is no unified model to handle multirelational social networks. To address this challenge, this paper represents different user relationships in a multigraph and develops a multigraph ranking model to identify and recommend the nearest neighbors of particular users in high-order environments. We conduct empirical experiments on two real-world datasets: 1) Epinions and 2) Last.fm, and the comprehensive comparison with other approaches demonstrates that our model improves recommendation performance in terms of both recommendation coverage and accuracy, especially when the rating data are sparse.

  1. Evolution of three-dimensional correlations during the photoinduced melting of antiferromagnetic order in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Först, M.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Turner, J. J.; Schlotter, W.; Trigo, M.; Krupin, O.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Moore, R.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Wilkins, S. B.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.; Hill, J. P.

    2012-08-01

    Using time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction, we measure the evolution of the full three-dimensional scattering volume of the antiferromagnetic superlattice reflection in the single-layer manganite La0.5Sr1.5MnO4on femtosecond time scales following photoexcitation. We find that the in-plane correlations are unchanged as a metastable state is entered, however there are subtle changes in the c-axis correlations. We observe a transient shift of the scattering ellipsoid along (00L) at very short times, and at longer time scales the short-range c-axis correlations are more robust than they are in equilibrium. Such results are not obtainable with any other techniques and hint at previously unresolved processes in the dynamics of photomelting in strongly correlated systems.

  2. PREFERENCE BASED TERM WEIGHTING FOR ARABIC FIQH DOCUMENT RANKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah Fahmi Hayati Holle

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In document retrieval, besides the suitability of query with search results, there is also a subjective user assessment that is expected to be a deciding factor in document ranking. This preference aspect is referred at the fiqh document searching. People tend to prefer on certain fiqh methodology without rejecting other fiqh methodologies. It is necessary to investigate preference factor in addition to the relevance factor in the document ranking. Therefore, this research proposed a method of term weighting based on preference to rank documents according to user preference. The proposed method is also combined with term weighting based on documents index and books index so it sees relevance and preference aspect. The proposed method is Inverse Preference Frequency with α value (IPFα. In this method, we calculate preference value by IPF term weighting. Then, the preference values of terms that is equal with the query are multiplied by α. IPFα combined with the existing weighting methods become TF.IDF.IBF.IPFα. Experiment of the proposed method uses dataset of several Arabic fiqh documents. Evaluation uses recall, precision, and f-measure calculations. Proposed term weighting method is obtained to rank the document in the right order according to user preference. It is shown from the result with recall value reach 75%, precision 100%, and f-measure 85.7% respectively.

  3. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Alexander M; Succi, Sauro

    2011-01-01

    Recent "science of science" research shows common regularities in the publication patterns of scientific papers across time and discipline. Here we analyze the complete publication careers of 300 scientists and find remarkable regularity in the functional form of the rank-citation profile c_{i}(r) for each scientist i =1...300. We find that the rank-ordered citation distribution c_{i}(r) can be approximated by a discrete generalized beta distribution (DGBD) over the entire range of ranks r, which allows for the characterization and comparison of c_{i}(r) using a common framework. The functional form of the DGBD has two scaling exponents, beta_i and gamma_i, which determine the scaling behavior of c_{i}(r) for both small and large rank r. The crossover between two scaling regimes suggests a complex reinforcement or positive-feedback relation between the impact of a scientist's most famous papers and the impact of his/her other papers. Moreover, since two scientists with equivalent Hirsch h-index values may hav...

  4. Rapidity-Rank Structure of $p\\overline{p}$ Pairs in Hadronic $Z^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, Piet; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidity-rank structure of \\ppb pairs is used to analyze the mechanism of baryon production in hadronic \\zz decay. The relative occurrence of the rapidity-ordered configuration \\pmpb, where $M$ is a meson, and that of \\ppb adjacent pairs is compared. The data are found to be consistent with predictions from a mechanism producing adjacent-rank \\ppb pairs, without requiring `string-ordered' \\pmpb configurations. An upper limit of 15\\% at 90\\% confidence is determined for the \\pmpb contribution.

  5. University ranking methodologies. An interview with Ben Sowter about the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Baccini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available University rankings represent a controversial issue in the debate about higher education policy. One of the best known university ranking is the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings (QS, published annually since 2004 by Quacquarelli Symonds ltd, a company founded in 1990 and headquartered in London. QS provides a ranking based on a score calculated by weighting six different indicators. The 2015 edition, published in October 2015, introduced major methodological innovations and, as a consequence, many universities worldwide underwent major changes of their scores and ranks. Ben Sowter, head of division of intelligence unit of Quacquarelli Symonds, responds to 15 questions about the new QS methodology.

  6. One-dimensional color order system for dental shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W J; Groh, C L; Boenke, K M

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-arrange the master Bioform shade guide into a long-range one-dimensional color system based upon color difference. Although most shade guides may show local order when arranged according to hue, long-range order has not been established. However, shade guide arrangement according to a logical color order would be an advantage to the user. The first step in determining the color order was to measure the color of the shade guide teeth. A methodology was developed for measuring the color by use of a reflectance spectrophotometer. The precision of measurement was determined to be equal to CIE L*a*b* delta E of 0.5. Spectra were obtained and converted into CIE L*a*b* and Munsell notation. The measured colors of the Bioform shades ranged from a Munsell hue of 0.9 Y to 3.5 Y; a value of 6.6 to 7.8; and a chroma of 1.9 to 4.1. The teeth were then arranged visually from light to dark. The correlation coefficient between the visual ranking and color difference was 0.95. There was an inverse correlation between visual ranking and Munsell value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.90. Therefore, the sequence according to color difference provided the better agreement with visual perception.

  7. Academic rankings: an approach to rank portuguese universities Rankings académicos: un abordaje para clasificar las universidades portuguesas Rankings acadêmicos: uma abordagem ao ranking das universidades portuguesas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Bernardino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The academic rankings are a controversial subject in higher education. However, despite all the criticism, academic rankings are here to stay and more and more different stakeholders use rankings to obtain information about the institutions' performance. The two most well-known rankings, The Times and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings have different methodologies. The Times ranking is based on peer review, whereas the Shanghai ranking has only quantitative indicators and is mainly based on research outputs. In Germany, the CHE ranking uses a different methodology from the traditional rankings, allowing the users to choose criteria and weights. The Portuguese higher education institutions are performing below their European peers, and the Government believes that an academic ranking could improve both performance and competitiveness between institutions. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the advantages and problems of academic rankings and provide guidance to a new Portuguese ranking.Los rankings académicos son un tema muy contradictorio en la enseñanza superior. Todavía, además de todas las críticas los rankings están para quedarse entre nosotros. Y cada vez más, diferentes stakeholders utilizan los rankings para obtener información sobre el desempeño de las instituciones. Dos de los rankings más conocidos, el The Times y el ranking de la universidad de Shangai Jiao Tong tienen métodos distintos. El The Times se basa en la opinión de expertos mientras el ranking de la universidad de Shangai presenta solamente indicadores cuantitativos y mayoritariamente basados en los resultados de actividades de investigación. En Alemania el ranking CHE usa un método distinto permitiendo al utilizador elegir los criterios y su importancia. Las instituciones de enseñanza superior portuguesas tienen un desempeño abajo de las europeas y el gobierno cree que un ranking académico podría contribuir para mejorar su desempeño y

  8. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  10. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Evaluation of treatment effects by ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halekoh, U; Kristensen, K

    2008-01-01

    In crop experiments measurements are often made by a judge evaluating the crops' conditions after treatment. In the present paper an analysis is proposed for experiments where plots of crops treated differently are mutually ranked. In the experimental layout the crops are treated on consecutive...... plots usually placed side by side in one or more rows. In the proposed method a judge ranks several neighbouring plots, say three, by ranking them from best to worst. For the next observation the judge moves on by no more than two plots, such that up to two plots will be re-evaluated again...

  12. Nowcasting Mobile Games Ranking Using Web Search Query Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones A. Sekhavat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Internet has become embedded into the purchasing decision of consumers. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the Internet behavior of users correlates with their actual behavior in computer games market. Rather than proposing the most accurate model for computer game sales, we aim to investigate to what extent web search query data can be exploited to nowcast (contraction of “now” and “forecasting” referring to techniques used to make short-term forecasts (predict the present status of the ranking of mobile games in the world. Google search query data is used for this purpose, since this data can provide a real-time view on the topics of interest. Various statistical techniques are used to show the effectiveness of using web search query data to nowcast mobile games ranking.

  13. Entropic Movement Complexity Reflects Subjective Creativity Rankings of Visualized Hand Motion Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen; Braun, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate 55 novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated 10 times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity. PMID:26733896

  14. Entropic movement complexity reflects subjective creativity rankings of visualized hand motion trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen ePeng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate fifty-five novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated ten times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity.

  15. Topological Rankings in Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard; Træholt, Chresten

    2015-01-01

    In the theory of communication the central problem is to study how agents exchange information. This problem may be studied using the theory of connected spaces in topology, since a communication network can be modelled as a topological space such that agents can communicate if and only...... if they belong to the same path connected component of that space. In order to study combinatorial properties of such a communication network, notions from algebraic topology are applied. This makes it possible to determine the shape of a network by concrete invariants, e.g. the number of connected components...

  16. Block models and personalized PageRank

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kloumann, Isabel M; Ugander, Johan; Kleinberg, Jon

    2017-01-01

    ...? We start from the observation that the most widely used techniques for this problem, personalized PageRank and heat kernel methods, operate in the space of "landing probabilities" of a random walk...

  17. Who's bigger? where historical figures really rank

    CERN Document Server

    Skiena, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Is Hitler bigger than Napoleon? Washington bigger than Lincoln? Picasso bigger than Einstein? Quantitative analysts are rapidly finding homes in social and cultural domains, from finance to politics. What about history? In this fascinating book, Steve Skiena and Charles Ward bring quantitative analysis to bear on ranking and comparing historical reputations. They evaluate each person by aggregating the traces of millions of opinions, just as Google ranks webpages. The book includes a technical discussion for readers interested in the details of the methods, but no mathematical or computational background is necessary to understand the rankings or conclusions. Along the way, the authors present the rankings of more than one thousand of history's most significant people in science, politics, entertainment, and all areas of human endeavor. Anyone interested in history or biography can see where their favorite figures place in the grand scheme of things.

  18. Ranking Forestry Investments With Parametric Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Murphy

    1976-01-01

    Parametric linear programming is introduced as a technique for ranking forestry investments under multiple constraints; it combines the advantages of simple tanking and linear programming as capital budgeting tools.

  19. Superfund Hazard Ranking System Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hazard Ranking System (HRS) training course is a four and ½ day, intermediate-level course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft, and review preliminary assessments (PAs), site inspections (SIs), and HRS documentation records/packag

  20. A cognitive model for aggregating people's rankings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Michael D; Steyvers, Mark; Miller, Brent

    2014-01-01

    .... Applications of the model to 23 data sets, dealing with general knowledge and prediction tasks, show that the model performs well in producing an aggregate ranking that is often close to the ground...

  1. Measuring 3D magnetic correlations during the photo-induced melting of electronic order in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkins S. B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measures the dynamics of antiferromagnetic correlations by reconstructing the reciprocal-space scattering volume for the magnetic Bragg peak. Modifications in the scattering line shape along the three principal reciprocal lattice directions are measured.

  2. Measuring 3D magnetic correlations during the photo-induced melting of electronic order in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Först, M.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Turner, J. J.; Schlotter, W.; Trigo, M.; Krupin, O.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. D.; Moore, R.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Wilkins, S. B.; Zeng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Cavalleri, A.; Hill, J. P.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction measures the dynamics of antiferromagnetic correlations by reconstructing the reciprocal-space scattering volume for the magnetic Bragg peak. Modifications in the scattering line shape along the three principal reciprocal lattice directions are measured.

  3. Block models and personalized PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloumann, Isabel M; Ugander, Johan; Kleinberg, Jon

    2017-01-03

    Methods for ranking the importance of nodes in a network have a rich history in machine learning and across domains that analyze structured data. Recent work has evaluated these methods through the "seed set expansion problem": given a subset [Formula: see text] of nodes from a community of interest in an underlying graph, can we reliably identify the rest of the community? We start from the observation that the most widely used techniques for this problem, personalized PageRank and heat kernel methods, operate in the space of "landing probabilities" of a random walk rooted at the seed set, ranking nodes according to weighted sums of landing probabilities of different length walks. Both schemes, however, lack an a priori relationship to the seed set objective. In this work, we develop a principled framework for evaluating ranking methods by studying seed set expansion applied to the stochastic block model. We derive the optimal gradient for separating the landing probabilities of two classes in a stochastic block model and find, surprisingly, that under reasonable assumptions the gradient is asymptotically equivalent to personalized PageRank for a specific choice of the PageRank parameter [Formula: see text] that depends on the block model parameters. This connection provides a formal motivation for the success of personalized PageRank in seed set expansion and node ranking generally. We use this connection to propose more advanced techniques incorporating higher moments of landing probabilities; our advanced methods exhibit greatly improved performance, despite being simple linear classification rules, and are even competitive with belief propagation.

  4. Rank rigidity for CAT(0) cube complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Caprace, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sageev, Michah

    2010-01-01

    We prove that any group acting essentially without a fixed point at infinity on an irreducible finite-dimensional CAT(0) cube complex contains a rank one isometry. This implies that the Rank Rigidity Conjecture holds for CAT(0) cube complexes. We derive a number of other consequences for CAT(0) cube complexes, including a purely geometric proof of the Tits Alternative, an existence result for regular elements in (possibly non-uniform) lattices acting on cube complexes, and a characterization ...

  5. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS RANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Григорян, Анна Сергеевна; Тигран Георгиевич ГРИГОРЯН; Квасневский, Евгений Анатольевич

    2013-01-01

    The ranking nuclear power plants safety improvement projects is the most important task for ensuring the efficiency of NPP project management office work. Total amount of projects in NPP portfolio may reach more than 400. Features of the nuclear power plants safety improvement projects ranking in NPP portfolio determine the choice of the decision verbal analysis as a method of decision-making, as it allows to quickly compare the number of alternatives that are not available at the time of con...

  6. Ranking Music Data by Relevance and Importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruxanda, Maria Magdalena; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing availability of audio files on the Web, it is relevant to augment search engines with advanced audio search functionality. In this context, the ranking of the retrieved music is an important issue. This paper proposes a music ranking method capable of flexibly fusing...... the relevance and importance of music. The proposed method may support users with diverse needs when searching for music....

  7. Poisson statistics of PageRank probabilities of Twitter and Wikipedia networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2014-04-01

    We use the methods of quantum chaos and Random Matrix Theory for analysis of statistical fluctuations of PageRank probabilities in directed networks. In this approach the effective energy levels are given by a logarithm of PageRank probability at a given node. After the standard energy level unfolding procedure we establish that the nearest spacing distribution of PageRank probabilities is described by the Poisson law typical for integrable quantum systems. Our studies are done for the Twitter network and three networks of Wikipedia editions in English, French and German. We argue that due to absence of level repulsion the PageRank order of nearby nodes can be easily interchanged. The obtained Poisson law implies that the nearby PageRank probabilities fluctuate as random independent variables.

  8. A practical ranking system to compare toxicity of anti-fouling paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Breitholtz, Magnus; Eklund, Britta

    2006-12-01

    The toxicity of a number of new anti-fouling paints, claimed to function by physical means and not by leakage of toxic substances, have been tested on two common organisms in the Baltic Sea, i.e., the red macro alga Ceramium tenuicorne and the copepod Nitocra spinipes. In order to compare the toxicity between the paints a ranking system was developed based on the EC(50)- and LC(50)-values. The results showed a wide span in toxicity with the most toxic paints ranked 160 times more toxic than the ones ranked least toxic. Also, TBT, irgarol and diuron, which have been used as active ingredients in traditional anti-fouling paints, were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the two test organisms. The results showed that the test organisms were equally sensitive to the substances as similar organisms in earlier studies. In conclusion, the ranking system presented in this study permits ranking and comparison of total toxicity of complex mixtures.

  9. Image Inpainting Algorithm Based on Low-Rank Approximation and Texture Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing image inpainting algorithm based on low-rank matrix approximation cannot be suitable for complex, large-scale, damaged texture image. An inpainting algorithm based on low-rank approximation and texture direction is proposed in the paper. At first, we decompose the image using low-rank approximation method. Then the area to be repaired is interpolated by level set algorithm, and we can reconstruct a new image by the boundary values of level set. In order to obtain a better restoration effect, we make iteration for low-rank decomposition and level set interpolation. Taking into account the impact of texture direction, we segment the texture and make low-rank decomposition at texture direction. Experimental results show that the new algorithm is suitable for texture recovery and maintaining the overall consistency of the structure, which can be used to repair large-scale damaged image.

  10. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  11. Hierarchical Rank Aggregation with Applications to Nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Trina; Telesca, Donatello; Rallo, Robert; George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2013-06-01

    The development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays in the field of nanotoxicology provide new opportunities for the hazard assessment and ranking of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). It is often necessary to rank lists of materials based on multiple risk assessment parameters, often aggregated across several measures of toxicity and possibly spanning an array of experimental platforms. Bayesian models coupled with the optimization of loss functions have been shown to provide an effective framework for conducting inference on ranks. In this article we present various loss-function-based ranking approaches for comparing ENM within experiments and toxicity parameters. Additionally, we propose a framework for the aggregation of ranks across different sources of evidence while allowing for differential weighting of this evidence based on its reliability and importance in risk ranking. We apply these methods to high throughput toxicity data on two human cell-lines, exposed to eight different nanomaterials, and measured in relation to four cytotoxicity outcomes. This article has supplementary material online.

  12. Ranking Water Transparency of Dutch Stock-Listed Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa H. Linneman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing world population, changing consumption patterns and climate change are affecting water demands, water scarcity and water quality worldwide, while at present, few companies are incorporating good water stewardship. In order to create awareness on this issue and provide an incentive for companies to improve the water performance in their operations and supply chain, a method for ranking companies based on their water transparency has been developed. The method consists of a checklist that can be completed on the basis of information from annual reports, sustainability reports and websites of companies. This is the first time a ranking of companies regarding water transparency has been carried out. Results show that there are large differences in transparency between and within sectors and that companies are reporting more about their operations than their supply chain.

  13. ARWU vs. Alternative ARWU Ranking: What are the Consequences for Lower Ranked Universities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Maričić

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ARWU ranking has been a source of academic debate since its development in 2003, but the same does not account for the Alternative ARWU ranking. Namely, the Alternative ARWU ranking attempts to reduce the influence of the prestigious indicators Alumni and Award which are based on the number of received Nobel Prizes and Fields Medals by alumni or university staff. However, the consequences of the reduction of the two indicators have not been scrutinized in detail. Therefore, we propose a statistical approach to the comparison of the two rankings and an in-depth analysis of the Alternative ARWU groups. The obtained results, which are based on the official data, can provide new insights into the nature of the Alternative ARWU ranking. The presented approach might initiate further research on the Alternative ARWU ranking and on the impact of university ranking’s list length. JEL Classification: C10, C38, I23

  14. Relationship Between the Brazilian Soccer Confederation Rankings and the Economical-Financial Indicators of Soccer Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleston Alexandre dos Santos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian soccer teams are required to present good results inside and outside the field. The main demand is about winning titles, to present continuous and increasing profits, and, consequently, to reach economic-financial stability. The present study aims at analyzing the relationship between the ranking formed by the Brazilian Soccer Confederation (CBF and the economic-financial indicators of the Brazilian soccer teams. The sample consisted of 36 Brazilian soccer teams that belong to the series A, B and C. Such teams are linked to CBF and published their financial statements of 2014. For data analysis, we used multi-criteria decision making method VIKOR that was applied along with Kendall rank correlation. Results revealed that the majority of Brazilian soccer teams have insufficient economical liquidity; they cannot bear their own expenses; they dependent of third-party resources; and they present negative profitability. Results also showed, through VIKOR technique, that the soccer teams studied occupy different positions in CBF ranking and in the economical-financial indicators, except for Botafogo club. Kendall rank correlation revealed no correlation and no significance between the rankings. Findings seem to support the idea that there is no relationship between CBF rankings and the economical-financial indicators of Brazilian soccer teams.

  15. Efficient Top-k Search for PageRank

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nakatsuji, Makoto; Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Mishima, Takeshi; Onizuka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

      In AI communities, many applications utilize PageRank. To obtain high PageRank score nodes, the original approach iteratively computes the PageRank score of each node until convergence from the whole graph...

  16. Is There a Gap between Students' Preference and University Presidents' Concern over College Ranking Indicators?: A Case Study of "College Navigator in Taiwan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Angela Yung-Chi; Morse, Robert; Shao, Yueh-jen E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to help students make well-informed choices, reliable college ranking systems with comparable information about higher education institutions worldwide have been welcomed by many students. Because traditional college rankings had many methodological problems, a new type of user-based ranking, called "personalized college…

  17. RANK/RANK-Ligand/OPG: Ein neuer Therapieansatz in der Osteoporosebehandlung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preisinger E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Erforschung der Kopplungsmechanismen zur Osteoklastogenese, Knochenresorption und Remodellierung eröffnete neue mögliche Therapieansätze in der Behandlung der Osteoporose. Eine Schlüsselrolle beim Knochenabbau spielt der RANK- ("receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF- κB"- Ligand (RANKL. Durch die Bindung von RANKL an den Rezeptor RANK wird die Knochenresorption eingeleitet. OPG (Osteoprotegerin sowie der für den klinischen Gebrauch entwickelte humane monoklonale Antikörper (IgG2 Denosumab blockieren die Bindung von RANK-Ligand an RANK und verhindern den Knochenabbau.

  18. Seasonal change in body fat of the Hyrax Procavia capensis (Pallas, 1766 using a body fat ranking index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.J. Fourie

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the body fat content of the hyrax Procavia capensis were used as an indicator of physiological condition. Body fat rankings for the different sexes showed seasonal variations related to physiologically stressful periods (rutting, gestation and lactation. The subjective body fat rankings were correlated significantly with total body fat.

  19. Are Fit Indices Biased in Favor of Bi-Factor Models in Cognitive Ability Research?: A Comparison of Fit in Correlated Factors, Higher-Order, and Bi-Factor Models via Monte Carlo Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant B. Morgan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-factor confirmatory factor models have been influential in research on cognitive abilities because they often better fit the data than correlated factors and higher-order models. They also instantiate a perspective that differs from that offered by other models. Motivated by previous work that hypothesized an inherent statistical bias of fit indices favoring the bi-factor model, we compared the fit of correlated factors, higher-order, and bi-factor models via Monte Carlo methods. When data were sampled from a true bi-factor structure, each of the approximate fit indices was more likely than not to identify the bi-factor solution as the best fitting. When samples were selected from a true multiple correlated factors structure, approximate fit indices were more likely overall to identify the correlated factors solution as the best fitting. In contrast, when samples were generated from a true higher-order structure, approximate fit indices tended to identify the bi-factor solution as best fitting. There was extensive overlap of fit values across the models regardless of true structure. Although one model may fit a given dataset best relative to the other models, each of the models tended to fit the data well in absolute terms. Given this variability, models must also be judged on substantive and conceptual grounds.

  20. Ranking Fuzzy Numbers and Its Application to Products Attributes Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Lazim; Fauzee, Nor Nashrah Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is one of the widely used methods in fuzzy decision making environment. The recent ranking fuzzy numbers proposed by Wang and Li is claimed to be the improved version in ranking. However, the method was never been simplified and tested in real life application. This paper presents a four-step computation of ranking fuzzy numbers and its application in ranking attributes of selected chocolate products. The four steps algorithm was formulated to rank fuzzy numbers and followed by a tes...

  1. A proof that the maximal rank for plane quartics is seven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro De Paris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the time of writing, the general problem of finding the maximal Waring rank for homogeneous polynomials of fixed degree and number of variables (or, equivalently, the maximal symmetric rank for symmetric tensors of fixed order and in fixed dimension is still unsolved. To our knowledge, the answer for ternary quartics is not widely known and can only be found among the results of a master's thesis by Johannes Kleppe at the University of Oslo (1999. In the present work we give a (direct proof that the maximal rank for plane quartics is seven, following the elementary geometric idea of splitting power sum decompositions along three suitable lines.

  2. Social class rank, essentialism, and punitive judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael W; Keltner, Dacher

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that perceptions of social class rank influence a variety of social cognitive tendencies, from patterns of causal attribution to moral judgment. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that upper-class rank individuals would be more likely to endorse essentialist lay theories of social class categories (i.e., that social class is founded in genetically based, biological differences) than would lower-class rank individuals and that these beliefs would decrease support for restorative justice--which seeks to rehabilitate offenders, rather than punish unlawful action. Across studies, higher social class rank was associated with increased essentialism of social class categories (Studies 1, 2, and 4) and decreased support for restorative justice (Study 4). Moreover, manipulated essentialist beliefs decreased preferences for restorative justice (Study 3), and the association between social class rank and class-based essentialist theories was explained by the tendency to endorse beliefs in a just world (Study 2). Implications for how class-based essentialist beliefs potentially constrain social opportunity and mobility are discussed.

  3. A network-based dynamical ranking system

    CERN Document Server

    Motegi, Shun

    2012-01-01

    Ranking players or teams in sports is of practical interests. From the viewpoint of networks, a ranking system is equivalent a centrality measure for sports networks, whereby a directed link represents the result of a single game. Previously proposed network-based ranking systems are derived from static networks, i.e., aggregation of the results of games over time. However, the score (i.e., strength) of a player, for example, depends on time. Defeating a renowned player in the peak performance is intuitively more rewarding than defeating the same player in other periods. To account for this factor, we propose a dynamic variant of such a network-based ranking system and apply it to professional men's tennis data. Our ranking system, also interpreted as a centrality measure for directed temporal networks, has two parameters. One parameter represents the exponential decay rate of the past score, and the other parameter controls the effect of indirect wins on the score. We derive a set of linear online update equ...

  4. A Cognitive Model for Aggregating People's Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael D.; Steyvers, Mark; Miller, Brent

    2014-01-01

    We develop a cognitive modeling approach, motivated by classic theories of knowledge representation and judgment from psychology, for combining people's rankings of items. The model makes simple assumptions about how individual differences in knowledge lead to observed ranking data in behavioral tasks. We implement the cognitive model as a Bayesian graphical model, and use computational sampling to infer an aggregate ranking and measures of the individual expertise. Applications of the model to 23 data sets, dealing with general knowledge and prediction tasks, show that the model performs well in producing an aggregate ranking that is often close to the ground truth and, as in the “wisdom of the crowd” effect, usually performs better than most of individuals. We also present some evidence that the model outperforms the traditional statistical Borda count method, and that the model is able to infer people's relative expertise surprisingly well without knowing the ground truth. We discuss the advantages of the cognitive modeling approach to combining ranking data, and in wisdom of the crowd research generally, as well as highlighting a number of potential directions for future model development. PMID:24816733

  5. Semilattices of finitely generated ideals of exchange rings with finite stable rank

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrung, F

    2004-01-01

    We find a distributive (v, 0, 1)-semilattice S of size $ aleph\\_1$ that is not isomorphic to the maximal semilattice quotient of any Riesz monoid endowed with an order-unit of finite stable rank. We thus obtain solutions to various open problems in ring theory and in lattice theory. In particular: - There is no exchange ring (thus, no von Neumann regular ring and no C*-algebra of real rank zero) with finite stable rank whose semilattice of finitely generated, idempotent-generated two-sided ideals is isomorphic to S. - There is no locally finite, modular lattice whose semilattice of finitely generated congruences is isomorphic to S. These results are established by constructing an infinitary statement, denoted here by URPsr, that holds in the maximal semilattice quotient of every Riesz monoid endowed with an order-unit of finite stable rank, but not in the semilattice S.

  6. A Review of Outcomes of Seven World University Ranking Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahmood Khosrowjerdi; Neda Zeraatkar

    2012-01-01

    There are many national and international ranking systems rank the universities and higher education institutions of the world, nationally or internationally, based on the same or different criteria...

  7. Characterizing Microseismicity at the Newberry Volcano Geothermal Site using PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A. C.; Myers, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Newberry Volcano, within the Deschutes National Forest in Oregon, has been designated as a candidate site for the Department of Energy's Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) program. This site was stimulated using high-pressure fluid injection during the fall of 2012, which generated several hundred microseismic events. Exploring the spatial and temporal development of microseismicity is key to understanding how subsurface stimulation modifies stress, fractures rock, and increases permeability. We analyze Newberry seismicity using both surface and borehole seismometers from the AltaRock and LLNL seismic networks. For our analysis we adapt PageRank, Google's initial search algorithm, to evaluate microseismicity during the 2012 stimulation. PageRank is a measure of connectivity, where higher ranking represents highly connected windows. In seismic applications connectivity is measured by the cross correlation of 2 time windows recorded on a common seismic station and channel. Aguiar and Beroza (2014) used PageRank based on cross correlation to detect low-frequency earthquakes, which are highly repetitive but difficult to detect. We expand on this application by using PageRank to define signal-correlation topology for micro-earthquakes, including the identification of signals that are connected to the largest number of other signals. We then use this information to create signal families and compare PageRank families to the spatial and temporal proximity of associated earthquakes. Studying signal PageRank will potentially allow us to efficiently group earthquakes with similar physical characteristics, such as focal mechanisms and stress drop. Our ultimate goal is to determine whether changes in the state of stress and/or changes in the generation of subsurface fracture networks can be detected using PageRank topology. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  8. Sexual arousal by higher- and lower-ranking partner: manifestation of a mating strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozifkova, Eva; Konvicka, Martin

    2009-12-01

    High hierarchical status is associated with increased reproduction success in mammals. However the subordinate males are not totally eliminated from reproduction due to mate choice and alternative male strategies. Thus; the sexual arousal by higher-ranking or lower-ranking partner in humans may represent a proximate mechanism for realizing a reproductive strategy. To evaluate possible connection between mating strategy and sexual arousal by lower-ranking and higher-ranking partner. Markers of possible reproductive success (the number and gender of relatives and self-reported attractiveness) were evaluated by questionnaire-based study on students (110 men and 195 women, aged 19 to 29, mean age 22.5 +/- 2.10SD). The correlation between markers of reproductive success and the sexual arousal by lower- and higher-ranking partner. Arousal by lower-ranking partner correlated positively with proportion of males in relatives (Spearman's r, males: 0.219*; females: 0.161*) and with self-reported attractiveness (males: r = 0.223*); arousal by higher-ranking partner correlated positively with self-attractiveness (females: r = 0.191*). We found markers of reproductive success despite of reduced number of offspring in nowadays population. The sexual arousal by lower- and/or higher-ranking partner appears to be a manifestation of a successful reproductive strategy, e.g. behavior connected to natural human behavior. Moreover, the sexual arousal by overemphasized hierarchy (e.g. dominant-slave play) considered to be a part of sadomasochistic sex (or so called BDSM) may represent an over emphasised manifestation of this reproductive strategy. *P < 0.05.

  9. CONSORT item adherence in top ranked anaesthesiology journals in 2011: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münter, Nils H; Stevanovic, Ana; Rossaint, Rolf; Stoppe, Christian; Sanders, Robert D; Coburn, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for measuring the efficacy of any medical intervention. The present study assesses the implementation of the CONSORT statement in the top 11 anaesthesiology journals in 2011. We designed this study in order to determine how well authors in the top 11 ranked anaesthesiology journals follow the CONSORT statement's criteria. A retrospective cross-sectional data analysis. The study was performed at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital. Journals included Pain, Anesthesiology, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, European Journal of Pain, Anesthesia and Analgesia, Anaesthesia, Minerva Anestesiologica, Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology and the European Journal of Anaesthesiology. All articles in the online table of contents from the top 11 anaesthesiology journals according to the ISI Web of Knowledge were screened for RCTs published in 2011. The RCTs were assessed using the CONSORT checklist. We also analysed the correlation between the number of citations and the adherence to CONSORT items. We evaluated 319 RCTs and found that, more than ten years after the publication of the CONSORT statement, the RCTs satisfied a median of 60.0% of the CONSORT criteria. Only 72.1% of the articles presented clearly defined primary and secondary outcome parameters. The number of citations is only weakly associated with the fulfilment of the CONSORT statement (r = 0.023). Adherence to the CONSORT criteria remains low in top-ranked anaesthesiology journals. We found only a very weak correlation between the number of citations and fulfilment of the requirements of the CONSORT statement.

  10. Ethical principles of the American Psychological Association: an argument for philosophical and practical ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Malloy, David Cruise

    1999-01-01

    Unlike the American Psychological Association (APA), the Canadian Psychological Association has adopted a code of ethics in which principles are organized in order of importance. The validity of this hierarchical organization has received some empirical and theoretical support. We conducted a theoretical analysis that revealed conceptual justification for a ranking of the 6 principles in the APA code. Such a ranking could assist psychologists in making more informed and consistent moral choices when confronted with ethical dilemmas that involve conflicts among principles.

  11. Advances in ranking and selection, multiple comparisons, and reliability methodology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, N; Nagaraja, HN

    2007-01-01

    S. Panchapakesan has made significant contributions to ranking and selection and has published in many other areas of statistics, including order statistics, reliability theory, stochastic inequalities, and inference. Written in his honor, the twenty invited articles in this volume reflect recent advances in these areas and form a tribute to Panchapakesan's influence and impact on these areas. Thematically organized, the chapters cover a broad range of topics from: Inference; Ranking and Selection; Multiple Comparisons and Tests; Agreement Assessment; Reliability; and Biostatistics. Featuring

  12. Ranking schools on external knowledge tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašper Cankar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the use of external knowledge test results for school ranking and the implicit effect of such ranking. A question of validity is raised and a review of research literature and main known problems are presented. In many western countries publication of school results is a common practice and a similar trend can be observed in Slovenia. Experiences of other countries help to predict positive and negative aspects of such publication. Results of external knowledge tests produce very limited information about school quality—if we use other sources of information our ranking of schools can be very different. Nevertheless, external knowledge tests can yield useful information. If we want to improve quality in schools, we must allow schools to use this information themselves and improve from within. Broad public scrutiny is unnecessary and problematic—it moves the focus of school efforts from real improvement of quality to mere improvement of the school public image.

  13. Low Rank Approximation Algorithms, Implementation, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Markovsky, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Matrix low-rank approximation is intimately related to data modelling; a problem that arises frequently in many different fields. Low Rank Approximation: Algorithms, Implementation, Applications is a comprehensive exposition of the theory, algorithms, and applications of structured low-rank approximation. Local optimization methods and effective suboptimal convex relaxations for Toeplitz, Hankel, and Sylvester structured problems are presented. A major part of the text is devoted to application of the theory. Applications described include: system and control theory: approximate realization, model reduction, output error, and errors-in-variables identification; signal processing: harmonic retrieval, sum-of-damped exponentials, finite impulse response modeling, and array processing; machine learning: multidimensional scaling and recommender system; computer vision: algebraic curve fitting and fundamental matrix estimation; bioinformatics for microarray data analysis; chemometrics for multivariate calibration; ...

  14. Adaptive distributional extensions to DFR ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Casper; Simonsen, Jakob Grue; Järvelin, Kalervo

    2016-01-01

    Divergence From Randomness (DFR) ranking models assume that informative terms are distributed in a corpus differently than non-informative terms. Different statistical models (e.g. Poisson, geometric) are used to model the distribution of non-informative terms, producing different DFR models....... An informative term is then detected by measuring the divergence of its distribution from the distribution of non-informative terms. However, there is little empirical evidence that the distributions of non-informative terms used in DFR actually fit current datasets. Practically this risks providing a poor...... separation between informative and non-informative terms, thus compromising the discriminative power of the ranking model. We present a novel extension to DFR, which first detects the best-fitting distribution of non-informative terms in a collection, and then adapts the ranking computation to this best...

  15. A Simulation Integrated Investment Project Ranking and Selection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur YALCINKAYA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises are confronted with several project alternatives that they assume to gain revenue in the future, but their own economical resources are limited to carry out all alternatives. Therefore, a decision process arises to prioritize and select among alternatives according to the predetermined goals and criteria to reach the maximum utilization. On the other hand, in project evaluation, the values of project parameters are often assumed to be known with complete certainty. However, project parameters normally change during a life cycle of the project, and it is necessary to consider uncertainty and risk phenomena while evaluating projects. Simulation-based project evaluation approaches enable to make more reliable investment decision since they permit to include future uncertainty and risk in analysis process. In this article, a novel simulation-based optimal decision approach is proposed for evaluating and comparing investment projects under uncertain and/or risky environments. The phases of the proposed approach are; (a developing the effectiveness measure formulation of a project, (b identifying and checking all controllable project parameters that affect the measure, (c developing simulation model for the measure, and (d performing the project ranking and selection procedures in order to rank and select the projects. Three ranking and selection procedures, previously used for comparing performances of the different production/service systems, are embedded in the proposed approach.

  16. Constrained low-rank gamut completion for robust illumination estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianshen; Yuan, Jiazheng; Liu, Hongzhe

    2017-02-01

    Illumination estimation is an important component of color constancy and automatic white balancing. According to recent survey and evaluation work, the supervised methods with a learning phase are competitive for illumination estimation. However, the robustness and performance of any supervised algorithm suffer from an incomplete gamut in training image sets because of limited reflectance surfaces in a scene. In order to address this problem, we present a constrained low-rank gamut completion algorithm, which can replenish gamut from limited surfaces in an image, for robust illumination estimation. In the proposed algorithm, we first discuss why the gamut completion is actually a low-rank matrix completion problem. Then a constrained low-rank matrix completion framework is proposed by adding illumination similarities among the training images as an additional constraint. An optimization algorithm is also given out by extending the augmented Lagrange multipliers. Finally, the completed gamut based on the proposed algorithm is fed into the support vector regression (SVR)-based illumination estimation method to evaluate the effect of gamut completion. The experimental results on both synthetic and real-world image sets show that the proposed gamut completion model not only can effectively improve the performance of the original SVR method but is also robust to the surface insufficiency in training samples.

  17. Sign rank versus Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, N.; Moran, Sh; Yehudayoff, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work studies the maximum possible sign rank of sign (N × N)-matrices with a given Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension d. For d=1, this maximum is three. For d=2, this maximum is \\widetilde{\\Theta}(N1/2). For d >2, similar but slightly less accurate statements hold. The lower bounds improve on previous ones by Ben-David et al., and the upper bounds are novel. The lower bounds are obtained by probabilistic constructions, using a theorem of Warren in real algebraic topology. The upper bounds are obtained using a result of Welzl about spanning trees with low stabbing number, and using the moment curve. The upper bound technique is also used to: (i) provide estimates on the number of classes of a given Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension, and the number of maximum classes of a given Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension--answering a question of Frankl from 1989, and (ii) design an efficient algorithm that provides an O(N/log(N)) multiplicative approximation for the sign rank. We also observe a general connection between sign rank and spectral gaps which is based on Forster's argument. Consider the adjacency (N × N)-matrix of a Δ-regular graph with a second eigenvalue of absolute value λ and Δ ≤ N/2. We show that the sign rank of the signed version of this matrix is at least Δ/λ. We use this connection to prove the existence of a maximum class C\\subseteq\\{+/- 1\\}^N with Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension 2 and sign rank \\widetilde{\\Theta}(N1/2). This answers a question of Ben-David et al. regarding the sign rank of large Vapnik-Chervonenkis classes. We also describe limitations of this approach, in the spirit of the Alon-Boppana theorem. We further describe connections to communication complexity, geometry, learning theory, and combinatorics. Bibliography: 69 titles.

  18. Pulling Rank: A Plan to Help Students with College Choice in an Age of Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Lloyd

    2008-01-01

    Colleges and universities are "ranksteering"--driving under the influence of popular college rankings systems like "U.S. News and World Report's" Best Colleges. This article examines the criticisms of college rankings and describes how a group of education leaders is honing a plan to end the tyranny of the ratings game and better help students and…

  19. When sparse coding meets ranking: a joint framework for learning sparse codes and ranking scores

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2017-06-28

    Sparse coding, which represents a data point as a sparse reconstruction code with regard to a dictionary, has been a popular data representation method. Meanwhile, in database retrieval problems, learning the ranking scores from data points plays an important role. Up to now, these two problems have always been considered separately, assuming that data coding and ranking are two independent and irrelevant problems. However, is there any internal relationship between sparse coding and ranking score learning? If yes, how to explore and make use of this internal relationship? In this paper, we try to answer these questions by developing the first joint sparse coding and ranking score learning algorithm. To explore the local distribution in the sparse code space, and also to bridge coding and ranking problems, we assume that in the neighborhood of each data point, the ranking scores can be approximated from the corresponding sparse codes by a local linear function. By considering the local approximation error of ranking scores, the reconstruction error and sparsity of sparse coding, and the query information provided by the user, we construct a unified objective function for learning of sparse codes, the dictionary and ranking scores. We further develop an iterative algorithm to solve this optimization problem.

  20. Ranking Entities in Networks via Lefschetz Duality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard; Poulsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    In the theory of communication it is essential that agents are able to exchange information. This fact is closely related to the study of connected spaces in topology. A communication network may be modelled as a topological space such that agents can communicate if and only if they belong...... then be ranked according to how essential their positions are in the network by considering the effect of their respective absences. Defining a ranking of a network which takes the individual position of each entity into account has the purpose of assigning different roles to the entities, e.g. agents...

  1. Compressed Sensing with Rank Deficient Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Johansen, Daniel Højrup; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    In compressed sensing it is generally assumed that the dictionary matrix constitutes a (possibly overcomplete) basis of the signal space. In this paper we consider dictionaries that do not span the signal space, i.e. rank deficient dictionaries. We show that in this case the signal-to-noise ratio...... (SNR) in the compressed samples can be increased by selecting the rows of the measurement matrix from the column space of the dictionary. As an example application of compressed sensing with a rank deficient dictionary, we present a case study of compressed sensing applied to the Coarse Acquisition (C...

  2. RANK rewires energy homeostasis in lung cancer cells and drives primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shuan; Sigl, Verena; Wimmer, Reiner Alois; Novatchkova, Maria; Jais, Alexander; Wagner, Gabriel; Handschuh, Stephan; Uribesalgo, Iris; Hagelkruys, Astrid; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Tortola, Luigi; Nitsch, Roberto; Cronin, Shane J; Orthofer, Michael; Branstetter, Daniel; Canon, Jude; Rossi, John; D'Arcangelo, Manolo; Botling, Johan; Micke, Patrick; Fleur, Linnea La; Edlund, Karolina; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon; Lendl, Thomas; Popper, Helmut; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Kenner, Lukas; Hirsch, Fred R; Dougall, William; Penninger, Josef M

    2017-10-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Besides smoking, epidemiological studies have linked female sex hormones to lung cancer in women; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB (RANK), the key regulator of osteoclastogenesis, is frequently expressed in primary lung tumors, an active RANK pathway correlates with decreased survival, and pharmacologic RANK inhibition reduces tumor growth in patient-derived lung cancer xenografts. Clonal genetic inactivation of KRasG12D in mouse lung epithelial cells markedly impairs the progression of KRasG12D -driven lung cancer, resulting in a significant survival advantage. Mechanistically, RANK rewires energy homeostasis in human and murine lung cancer cells and promotes expansion of lung cancer stem-like cells, which is blocked by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Our data also indicate survival differences in KRasG12D -driven lung cancer between male and female mice, and we show that female sex hormones can promote lung cancer progression via the RANK pathway. These data uncover a direct role for RANK in lung cancer and may explain why female sex hormones accelerate lung cancer development. Inhibition of RANK using the approved drug denosumab may be a therapeutic drug candidate for primary lung cancer. © 2017 Rao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. GeneRank: using search engine technology for the analysis of microarray experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie L; Breitling, Rainer; Higham, Desmond J; Gilbert, David R

    2005-09-21

    Interpretation of simple microarray experiments is usually based on the fold-change of gene expression between a reference and a "treated" sample where the treatment can be of many types from drug exposure to genetic variation. Interpretation of the results usually combines lists of differentially expressed genes with previous knowledge about their biological function. Here we evaluate a method--based on the PageRank algorithm employed by the popular search engine Google--that tries to automate some of this procedure to generate prioritized gene lists by exploiting biological background information. GeneRank is an intuitive modification of PageRank that maintains many of its mathematical properties. It combines gene expression information with a network structure derived from gene annotations (gene ontologies) or expression profile correlations. Using both simulated and real data we find that the algorithm offers an improved ranking of genes compared to pure expression change rankings. Our modification of the PageRank algorithm provides an alternative method of evaluating microarray experimental results which combines prior knowledge about the underlying network. GeneRank offers an improvement compared to assessing the importance of a gene based on its experimentally observed fold-change alone and may be used as a basis for further analytical developments.

  4. GeneRank: Using search engine technology for the analysis of microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitling Rainer

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of simple microarray experiments is usually based on the fold-change of gene expression between a reference and a "treated" sample where the treatment can be of many types from drug exposure to genetic variation. Interpretation of the results usually combines lists of differentially expressed genes with previous knowledge about their biological function. Here we evaluate a method – based on the PageRank algorithm employed by the popular search engine Google – that tries to automate some of this procedure to generate prioritized gene lists by exploiting biological background information. Results GeneRank is an intuitive modification of PageRank that maintains many of its mathematical properties. It combines gene expression information with a network structure derived from gene annotations (gene ontologies or expression profile correlations. Using both simulated and real data we find that the algorithm offers an improved ranking of genes compared to pure expression change rankings. Conclusion Our modification of the PageRank algorithm provides an alternative method of evaluating microarray experimental results which combines prior knowledge about the underlying network. GeneRank offers an improvement compared to assessing the importance of a gene based on its experimentally observed fold-change alone and may be used as a basis for further analytical developments.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Stool Microbiota in HIV-Infected Subjects by Panbacterial and Order-Level 16S Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Quantification and Correlations with Immune Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Collin L.; Ma, Zhong-Min; Mann, Surinder K.; Li, Chin-Shang; Wu, Jian; Knight, Thomas H.; Yotter, Tammy; Hayes, Timothy L.; Maniar, Archana H.; Troia-Cancio, Paolo V.; Overman, Heather A; Torok, Natalie J.; Albanese, Anthony; Rutledge, John C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Pollard, Richard B.; Asmuth, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between gut microbial community composition at the higher-taxonomic order-level and local and systemic immunologic abnormalities in HIV disease may provide insight into how bacterial translocation impacts HIV disease. Methods Antiretroviral (ART)-naive HIV patients underwent upper endoscopy before and nine months after starting ART. Duodenal tissue was paraffin-embedded for immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) and digested for FACS for T-cell subsets and immune activation (CD38+/HLA-DR+) enumeration. Stool samples were provided from patients and controls for comparison. Metagenomic microbial DNA was extracted from feces for optimized 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) real-time qPCR assays designed to quantify panbacterial loads and the relative abundances of proinflammatory Enterobacteriales order, and the dominant Bacteroidales and Clostridiales orders. Results Samples from 10 HIV-subjects prior to initiating, and from 6 subjects receiving, ART were available for analysis. There was a trend for a greater proportion of Enterobacteriales in HIV-positive subjects compared to controls (p=0.099). There were significant negative correlations between total bacterial load and duodenal CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell activation levels (r= −0.74, p= 0.004 and r= −0.67, p=0.013, respectively). The proportions of Enterobacteriales and Bacteroidales were significantly correlated with duodenal CD4+ T-cell depletion and peripheral CD8+ T-cell activation, respectively. Conclusions These data represent the first report of quantitative molecular and cellular correlations between total/universal and order-level gut bacterial populations and GALT levels of immune activation in HIV-infected subjects. The correlations between lower overall 16S rDNA levels and tissue immune activation suggest that the gut microbiome may contribute to immune activation and influence HIV progression. PMID:21436711

  6. Exploring the Associations between Social Rank and External Shame with Experiences of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Irons, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Low social rank and external shame have been found to be significantly associated with anxiety and depression. However, their relevance to experiences of psychosis has rarely been explored. This study aims to examine the relationship of social rank and external shame to personal recovery, depression and positive symptoms in psychosis. A cross sectional correlational design was adopted to examine the relationship between all variables. Fifty-two service users, aged between 18 to 65 years, with experiences of psychosis were recruited for the study. Participants were administered outcome measures examining social rank, external shame, positive symptoms of psychosis, depression and personal recovery. Multiple regression analyses were conducted on the data. Significant correlations were found between all variables. Low social rank was significantly associated with lower reported personal recovery, and higher levels of external shame and depression symptomology. The relationship between external shame and positive symptoms of psychosis and personal recovery was found to be mediated by participants' level of depression. Findings suggest that social rank and external shame are relevant to those who experience psychosis. Therapeutic approaches may need to focus on perceptions of social rank and external shame in working with experiences of psychosis.

  7. SOUTH AFRICAN ARMY RANKS AND INSIGNIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    major, cap- tain, lieutenant;. Other Ranks : Warrant officer, staff sergeant, sergeant, corporal, lance-cor- poral, private.' We apparently had no need for second lieuten- ants at that time, and they were introduced only .... Army warrant officers can also hold the cmmon serv- ice posts of Sergeant-Major of Special Forces.

  8. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  9. Biomechanics Scholar Citations across Academic Ranks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudson Duane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: citations to the publications of a scholar have been used as a measure of the quality or influence of their research record. A world-wide descriptive study of the citations to the publications of biomechanics scholars of various academic ranks was conducted.

  10. Ranking Workplace Competencies: Student and Graduate Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsbury, Elizabeth; Hodges, Dave; Burchell, Noel; Lay, Mark

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand business students and graduates made similar rankings of the five most important workplace competencies: computer literacy, customer service orientation, teamwork and cooperation, self-confidence, and willingness to learn. Graduates placed greater importance on most of the 24 competencies, resulting in a statistically significant…

  11. Subject Gateway Sites and Search Engine Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Discusses subject gateway sites and commercial search engines for the Web and presents an explanation of Google's PageRank algorithm. The principle question addressed is the conditions under which a gateway site will increase the likelihood that a target page is found in search engines. (LRW)

  12. Ranking related entities: components and analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, M.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Related entity finding is the task of returning a ranked list of homepages of relevant entities of a specified type that need to engage in a given relationship with a given source entity. We propose a framework for addressing this task and perform a detailed analysis of four core components;

  13. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

    1991-07-16

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

  14. An evaluation and critique of current rankings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federkeil, Gero; Westerheijden, Donald F.; van Vught, Franciscus A.; Ziegele, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This chapter raises the question of whether university league tables deliver relevant information to one of their key target groups – students. It examines the inherent biases and weaknesses in the methodologies of the major rankings and argues that the concentration on a single indicator of

  15. World University Ranking Methodologies: Stability and Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Brian; Parsons, Christine

    2008-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in the number of national university league tables over the last 25 years. By contrast, "World University Rankings" are a more recent development and have received little serious academic scrutiny in peer-reviewed publications. Few researchers have evaluated the sources of data and the statistical…

  16. Alternative Class Ranks Using Z-Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip H.; Van Niel, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Grades at US colleges and universities have increased precipitously over the last 50 years, suggesting that their signalling power has become attenuated. Moreover, average grades have risen disproportionately in some departments, implying that weak students in departments with high grades may obtain better class ranks than strong students in…

  17. Statistical inference of Minimum Rank Factor Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, A; Ten Berge, JMF

    For any given number of factors, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis yields optimal communalities for an observed covariance matrix in the sense that the unexplained common variance with that number of factors is minimized, subject to the constraint that both the diagonal matrix of unique variances and the

  18. City Life: Rankings (Livability) versus Perceptions (Satisfaction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between the popular Mercer city ranking (livability) and survey data (satisfactions). Livability aims to capture "objective" quality of life such as infrastructure. Survey items capture "subjective" quality of life such as satisfaction with city. The relationship between objective measures of quality of life and…

  19. Matrices with high completely positive semidefinite rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, David; Gribling, Sander; Laurent, Monique

    2017-01-01

    A real symmetric matrix M is completely positive semidefinite if it admits a Gram representation by (Hermitian) positive semidefinite matrices of any size d. The smallest such d is called the (complex) completely positive semidefinite rank of M , and it is an open question whether there exists an

  20. Comparing survival curves using rank tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    1990-01-01

    Survival times of patients can be compared using rank tests in various experimental setups, including the two-sample case and the case of paired data. Attention is focussed on two frequently occurring complications in medical applications: censoring and tail alternatives. A review is given of the

  1. Smooth rank one perturbations of selfadjoint operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassi, Seppo; Snoo, H.S.V. de; Willemsma, A.D.I.

    Let A be a selfadjoint operator in a Hilbert space aleph with inner product [.,.]. The rank one perturbations of A have the form A+tau [.,omega]omega, tau epsilon R, for some element omega epsilon aleph. In this paper we consider smooth perturbations, i.e. we consider omega epsilon dom \\A\\(k/2) for

  2. Primate Innovation: Sex, Age and Social Rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reader, S.M.; Laland, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of an exhaustive survey of primate behavior collated from the published literature revealed significant variation in rates of innovation among individuals of different sex, age and social rank. We searched approximately 1,000 articles in four primatology journals, together with other

  3. An algorithm for ranking assignments using reoptimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of ranking assignments according to cost in the classical linear assignment problem. An algorithm partitioning the set of possible assignments, as suggested by Murty, is presented where, for each partition, the optimal assignment is calculated using a new reoptimization...... technique. Computational results for the new algorithm are presented...

  4. Returns to Tenure: Time or Rank?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian

    -specific investment, efficiency-wages or adverse-selection models. However, rent extracting arguments as suggested by the theory of internal labor markets, indicate that the relative position of the worker in the seniority hierarchy of the firm, her 'seniority rank', may also explain part of the observed returns...

  5. Probabilistic relation between In-Degree and PageRank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; Volkovich, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel stochastic model that explains the relation between power laws of In-Degree and PageRank. PageRank is a popularity measure designed by Google to rank Web pages. We model the relation between PageRank and In-Degree through a stochastic equation, which is inspired by the

  6. The effect of new links on Google PageRank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avrachenkov, Konstatin; Litvak, Nelli

    2004-01-01

    PageRank is one of the principle criteria according to which Google ranks Web pages. PageRank can be interpreted as a frequency of visiting a Web page by a random surfer and thus it reflects the popularity of a Web page. We study the effect of newly created links on Google PageRank. We discuss to

  7. World University Rankings: Take with a Large Pinch of Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Soh Kay

    2011-01-01

    Equating the unequal is misleading, and this happens consistently in comparing rankings from different university ranking systems, as the NUT saga shows. This article illustrates the problem by analyzing the 2011 rankings of the top 100 universities in the AWUR, QSWUR and THEWUR ranking results. It also discusses the reasons why the rankings…

  8. Some upper and lower bounds on PSD-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. J. Lee (Troy); Z. Wei (Zhaohui); R. M. de Wolf (Ronald)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPositive semidefinite rank (PSD-rank) is a relatively new quantity with applications to combinatorial optimization and communication complexity. We first study several basic properties of PSD-rank, and then develop new techniques for showing lower bounds on the PSD-rank. All of these

  9. Some upper and lower bounds on PSD-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, T.; Wei, Z.; de Wolf, R.

    Positive semidefinite rank (PSD-rank) is a relatively new complexity measure on matrices, with applications to combinatorial optimization and communication complexity. We first study several basic properties of PSD-rank, and then develop new techniques for showing lower bounds on the PSD-rank. All

  10. 0.1 Trend analysis of δ18O composition of precipitation in Germany: Combining Mann-Kendall trend test and ARIMA models to correct for higher order serial correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Julian; Pan Chun, Kwok; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamics of stable oxygen (18O) and hydrogen (2H) isotopes in precipitation can be used as proxies for changing hydro-meteorological and regional and global climate patterns. While spatial patterns and distributions gained much attention in recent years the temporal trends in stable isotope time series are rarely investigated and our understanding of them is still limited. These might be a result of a lack of proper trend detection tools and effort for exploring trend processes. Here we make use of an extensive data set of stable isotope in German precipitation. In this study we investigate temporal trends of δ18O in precipitation at 17 observation station in Germany between 1978 and 2009. For that we test different approaches for proper trend detection, accounting for first and higher order serial correlation. We test if significant trends in the isotope time series based on different models can be observed. We apply the Mann-Kendall trend tests on the isotope series, using general multiplicative seasonal autoregressive integrate moving average (ARIMA) models which account for first and higher order serial correlations. With the approach we can also account for the effects of temperature, precipitation amount on the trend. Further we investigate the role of geographic parameters on isotope trends. To benchmark our proposed approach, the ARIMA results are compared to a trend-free prewhiting (TFPW) procedure, the state of the art method for removing the first order autocorrelation in environmental trend studies. Moreover, we explore whether higher order serial correlations in isotope series affects our trend results. The results show that three out of the 17 stations have significant changes when higher order autocorrelation are adjusted, and four stations show a significant trend when temperature and precipitation effects are considered. Significant trends in the isotope time series are generally observed at low elevation stations (≤315 m a

  11. Biology of RANK, RANKL, and osteoprotegerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Brendan F; Xing, Lianping

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)/RANK/osteoprotegerin (OPG) system and its role in the regulation of bone resorption exemplifies how both serendipity and a logic-based approach can identify factors that regulate cell function. Before this discovery in the mid to late 1990s, it had long been recognized that osteoclast formation was regulated by factors expressed by osteoblast/stromal cells, but it had not been anticipated that members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of ligands and receptors would be involved or that the factors involved would have extensive functions beyond bone remodeling. RANKL/RANK signaling regulates the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts from their precursors as well as their activation and survival in normal bone remodeling and in a variety of pathologic conditions. OPG protects the skeleton from excessive bone resorption by binding to RANKL and preventing it from binding to its receptor, RANK. Thus, RANKL/OPG ratio is an important determinant of bone mass and skeletal integrity. Genetic studies in mice indicate that RANKL/RANK signaling is also required for lymph node formation and mammary gland lactational hyperplasia, and that OPG also protects arteries from medial calcification. Thus, these tumor necrosis factor superfamily members have important functions outside bone. Although our understanding of the mechanisms whereby they regulate osteoclast formation has advanced rapidly during the past 10 years, many questions remain about their roles in health and disease. Here we review our current understanding of the role of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system in bone and other tissues. PMID:17634140

  12. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Geoffroy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs or small insertion/deletions (indels. High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians.Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients.Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/.

  13. Ranked Conservation Opportunity Areas for Region 7 (ECO_RES.RANKED_OAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RANKED_OAS are all the Conservation Opportunity Areas identified by MoRAP that have subsequently been ranked by patch size, landform representation, and the targeted land cover class (highest rank for conservation management = 1 [LFRANK_NOR]). The OAs designate areas with potential for forest or grassland conservation because they are areas of natural or semi-natural land cover that are at least 75 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. The OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER roads files.

  14. UNIVERSITY RANKINGS BY COST OF LIVING ADJUSTED FACULTY COMPENSATION

    OpenAIRE

    Terrance Jalbert; Mercedes Jalbert; Karla Hayashi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we rank 574 universities based on compensation paid to their faculty. The analysis examines universities both on a raw basis and on a cost of living adjusted basis. Rankings based on salary data and benefit data are presented. In addition rankings based on total compensation are presented. Separate rankings are provided for universities offering different degrees. The results indicate that rankings of universities based on raw and cost of living adjusted data are markedly differ...

  15. Computer simulation of CaSiO3 glass under compression: correlation between Si-Si pair radial distribution function and intermediate range order structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Mai Thi; Thuy Duong, Tran; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Van Hong, Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    The structural organization of CaSiO3 glass at 600 K and under pressure of 0-100 GPa is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). Results show that the atomic structure of CaSiO3 comprises SiO n and CaO m units considered as basic structural polyhedra. At low pressure, most of the basic structural polyhedra are SiO4, CaO5, CaO6 and CaO7. At high pressure most of the basic structural polyhedra are SiO5, SiO6 and CaO9, CaO10 and CaO11. The distribution of basic structural polyhedra is not uniform resulting in formation of Ca-rich and Si-rich regions. The distribution of SiO4, SiO5 and SiO6 polyhedra is also not uniform, but it tends to form SiO4-, SiO5-, and SiO6-clusters. For the Si-O network, under compression there is a gradual transition from the tetrahedral network (SiO4) to the octahedral network (SiO6) via SiO5 polyhedra. The SiO5-clusters are the same as immediate-phase in the transformation process. The size and shape of SiO4 tetrahedra change strongly under compression. While the size of SiO5 and SiO6 has also changed significantly, but the shape is almost unchanged under compression. The SiO n polyhedra can connect to each other via one common oxygen ion (corner-sharing bond), two common oxygen ions (edge-sharing bond) or three common oxygen ions (face-sharing bond). The Si-Si bond length in corner-sharing bonds is much longer than the ones in edge-sharing and face-sharing bonds. The change of intermediate range order (IRO) structure under compression relating to edge- and face-sharing bonds amongst SiO n at high pressure is the origin of the first peak splitting of the radial distribution functions of Si-Si pair. Under compression, the number of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) decreases. This makes the Si-O network more polymerized. At low pressure, most of the Ca2+ ions incorporate into the Si-O network via NBOs. At high pressure, the amount of NBO decreases, Ca2+ ions mainly incorporate into the Si-O network via bridging oxygen (BO) that

  16. Ranking of bank branches with undesirable and fuzzy data: A DEA-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Kordrostami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Banks are one of the most important financial sectors in order to the economic development of each country. Certainly, efficiency scores and ranks of banks are significant and effective aspects towards future planning. Sometimes the performance of banks must be measured in the presence of undesirable and vague factors. For these reasons in the current paper a procedure based on data envelopment analysis (DEA is introduced for evaluating the efficiency and complete ranking of decision making units (DMUs where undesirable and fuzzy measures exist. To illustrate, in the presence of undesirable and fuzzy measures, DMUs are evaluated by using a fuzzy expected value approach and DMUs with similar efficiency scores are ranked by using constraints and the Maximal Balance Index based on the optimal shadow prices. Afterwards, the efficiency scores of 25 branches of an Iranian commercial bank are evaluated using the proposed method. Also, a complete ranking of bank branches is presented to discriminate branches.

  17. Global cities rankings. A research agenda or a neoliberal urban planning tool?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cándida Gago García

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a theoretical reflection about the methodology and meaning given to the global city rankings. There is a very large academic production about the role that some cities have in global territorial processes, which has been related to the concept of global city. Many recent contributions from the mass media, advertising and consulting services must be considered also in the analysis. All of them have included new indicators in order to show the main role that cultural services have acquired in the urban economy. Also the city rankings are being used as a tool in neoliberal policies. These policies stress the position that cities have in the rankings, which are used in practices of city-branding and to justify the neoliberal decisions that are being taken. In fact, we think that rankings are used inappropriately and that it is necessary a deep and new reflection about them.

  18. Ranking of microRNA target prediction scores by Pareto front analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sudhakar; Albrecht, Andreas A

    2010-12-01

    Over the past ten years, a variety of microRNA target prediction methods has been developed, and many of the methods are constantly improved and adapted to recent insights into miRNA-mRNA interactions. In a typical scenario, different methods return different rankings of putative targets, even if the ranking is reduced to selected mRNAs that are related to a specific disease or cell type. For the experimental validation it is then difficult to decide in which order to process the predicted miRNA-mRNA bindings, since each validation is a laborious task and therefore only a limited number of mRNAs can be analysed. We propose a new ranking scheme that combines ranked predictions from several methods and - unlike standard thresholding methods - utilises the concept of Pareto fronts as defined in multi-objective optimisation. In the present study, we attempt a proof of concept by applying the new ranking scheme to hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-125b, and hsa-miR-373 and prediction scores supplied by PITA and RNAhybrid. The scores are interpreted as a two-objective optimisation problem, and the elements of the Pareto front are ranked by the STarMir score with a subsequent re-calculation of the Pareto front after removal of the top-ranked mRNA from the basic set of prediction scores. The method is evaluated on validated targets of the three miRNA, and the ranking is compared to scores from DIANA-microT and TargetScan. We observed that the new ranking method performs well and consistent, and the first validated targets are elements of Pareto fronts at a relatively early stage of the recurrent procedure, which encourages further research towards a higher-dimensional analysis of Pareto fronts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PageRank for low frequency earthquake detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A. C.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed Hi-Net seismic waveform data during the April 2006 tremor episode in the Nankai Trough in SW Japan using the autocorrelation approach of Brown et al. (2008), which detects low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) based on pair-wise waveform matching. We have generalized this to exploit the fact that waveforms may repeat multiple times, on more than just a pair-wise basis. We are working towards developing a sound statistical basis for event detection, but that is complicated by two factors. First, the statistical behavior of the autocorrelations varies between stations. Analyzing one station at a time assures that the detection threshold will only depend on the station being analyzed. Second, the positive detections do not satisfy "closure." That is, if window A correlates with window B, and window B correlates with window C, then window A and window C do not necessarily correlate with one another. We want to evaluate whether or not a linked set of windows are correlated due to chance. To do this, we map our problem on to one that has previously been solved for web search, and apply Google's PageRank algorithm. PageRank is the probability of a 'random surfer' to visit a particular web page; it assigns a ranking for a webpage based on the amount of links associated with that page. For windows of seismic data instead of webpages, the windows with high probabilities suggest likely LFE signals. Once identified, we stack the matched windows to improve the snr and use these stacks as template signals to find other LFEs within continuous data. We compare the results among stations and declare a detection if they are found in a statistically significant number of stations, based on multinomial statistics. We compare our detections using the single-station method to detections found by Shelly et al. (2007) for the April 2006 tremor sequence in Shikoku, Japan. We find strong similarity between the results, as well as many new detections that were not found using

  20. OPG/RANKL/RANK cytokine system in renal osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Avberšek-Lužnik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal osteodystrophy is one of the most common complications affecting patients with endstage renal disease treated with hemodialysis (HD. The action of calciotropic hormones in renal osteodystrophy is regulated by the OPG/RANKL/RANK system. Its function is modulated by interleukines, calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH.The aim of our study was to confirm that this system is involved in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy and supports the mechanism of PTH action on bone.Methods: 106 HD patients (mean age 60 years and 50 healthy volunteers (mean age 64 years were enrolled in the study. In serum samples of patients and controls we determined concentrations of OPG, RANKL, tartarat resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b, serum Cterminal telopeptide cross-links of type I collagen (CTx, bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP, osteocalcin (OC and parathyroid hormone (PTH. We compared serum measurements of HD patients and controls and assessed the correlation of OPG and RANKL with bone markers. The most frequent OPG promotor gene polymorphisms were also determined. SPSS 12.1 for Windows was used for statistical analysis.Results: Median OPG concentrations were approximately three times higher in HD patients (0.804 µg/l than in healthy volunteers (0.272 µg/l. Mean serum RANKL concentrations were 1.66- fold higher in HD patients (1.36 pmol/l than in controls (0.82 pmol/l. Serum RANKL levels significantly differed between patients with and without calcitriol therapy (p = 0.001. After dividing HD patients into tertiles according to PTH, we observed significantly higher OPG values in the lower and RANKL in the upper tertile (p < 0.001. OPG did not correlate with bone resorption markers. Only weak correlation of bone formation markers with osteocalcin was noted. In contrast to OPG, RANKL correlated well with PTH, OC and CTX. OPG promoter gene polymorphisms (149 T → C, 163 A → G, 950 T → C do not influence OPG expression and

  1. Ranking Schools' Academic Performance Using a Fuzzy VIKOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Suhaina; Aziz Jemain, Abdul

    2015-06-01

    Determination rank is structuring alternatives in order of priority. It is based on the criteria determined for each alternative involved. Evaluation criteria are performed and then a composite index composed of each alternative for the purpose of arranging in order of preference alternatives. This practice is known as multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). There are several common approaches to MCDM, one of the practice is known as VIKOR (Multi-criteria Optimization and Compromise Solution). The objective of this study is to develop a rational method for school ranking based on linguistic information of a criterion. The school represents an alternative, while the results for a number of subjects as the criterion. The results of the examination for a course, is given according to the student percentage of each grade. Five grades of excellence, honours, average, pass and fail is used to indicate a level of achievement in linguistics. Linguistic variables are transformed to fuzzy numbers to form a composite index of school performance. Results showed that fuzzy set theory can solve the limitations of using MCDM when there is uncertainty problems exist in the data.

  2. RELIABLE COGNITIVE DIMENSIONAL DOCUMENT RANKING BY WEIGHTED STANDARD CAUCHY DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Florence Vijila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Categorization of cognitively uniform and consistent documents such as University question papers are in demand by e-learners. Literature indicates that Standard Cauchy distribution and the derived values are extensively used for checking uniformity and consistency of documents. The paper attempts to apply this technique for categorizing question papers according to four selective cognitive dimensions. For this purpose cognitive dimensional keyword sets of these four categories (also termed as portrayal concepts are assumed and an automatic procedure is developed to quantify these dimensions in question papers. The categorization is relatively accurate when checked with manual methods. Hence simple and well established term frequency / inverse document frequency ‘tf/ IDF’ technique is considered for automating the categorization process. After the documents categorization, standard Cauchy formula is applied to rank order the documents that have the least differences among Cauchy value, (according to Cauchy theorem so as obtain consistent and uniform documents in an order or ranked. For the purpose of experiments and social survey, seven question papers (documents have been designed with various consistencies. To validate this proposed technique social survey is administered on selective samples of e-learners of Tamil Nadu, India. Results are encouraging and conclusions drawn out of the experiments will be useful to researchers of concept mining and categorizing documents according to concepts. Findings have also contributed utility value to e-learning system designers.

  3. Context Sensitive Article Ranking with Citation Context Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Doslu, Metin

    2015-01-01

    It is hard to detect important articles in a specific context. Information retrieval techniques based on full text search can be inaccurate to identify main topics and they are not able to provide an indication about the importance of the article. Generating a citation network is a good way to find most popular articles but this approach is not context aware. The text around a citation mark is generally a good summary of the referred article. So citation context analysis presents an opportunity to use the wisdom of crowd for detecting important articles in a context sensitive way. In this work, we analyze citation contexts to rank articles properly for a given topic. The model proposed uses citation contexts in order to create a directed and weighted citation network based on the target topic. We create a directed and weighted edge between two articles if citation context contains terms related with the target topic. Then we apply common ranking algorithms in order to find important articles in this newly cre...

  4. Kriging for Simulation Metamodeling: Experimental Design, Reduced Rank Kriging, and Omni-Rank Kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Michael Robert

    This dissertation improves an analyst's use of simulation by offering improvements in the utilization of kriging metamodels. There are three main contributions. First an analysis is performed of what comprises good experimental designs for practical (non-toy) problems when using a kriging metamodel. Second is an explanation and demonstration of how reduced rank decompositions can improve the performance of kriging, now referred to as reduced rank kriging. Third is the development of an extension of reduced rank kriging which solves an open question regarding the usage of reduced rank kriging in practice. This extension is called omni-rank kriging. Finally these results are demonstrated on two case studies. The first contribution focuses on experimental design. Sequential designs are generally known to be more efficient than "one shot" designs. However, sequential designs require some sort of pilot design from which the sequential stage can be based. We seek to find good initial designs for these pilot studies, as well as designs which will be effective if there is no following sequential stage. We test a wide variety of designs over a small set of test-bed problems. Our findings indicate that analysts should take advantage of any prior information they have about their problem's shape and/or their goals in metamodeling. In the event of a total lack of information we find that Latin hypercube designs are robust default choices. Our work is most distinguished by its attention to the higher levels of dimensionality. The second contribution introduces and explains an alternative method for kriging when there is noise in the data, which we call reduced rank kriging. Reduced rank kriging is based on using a reduced rank decomposition which artificially smoothes the kriging weights similar to a nugget effect. Our primary focus will be showing how the reduced rank decomposition propagates through kriging empirically. In addition, we show further evidence for our

  5. Social Bookmarking Induced Active Page Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsubasa; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Keita

    Social bookmarking services have recently made it possible for us to register and share our own bookmarks on the web and are attracting attention. The services let us get structured data: (URL, Username, Timestamp, Tag Set). And these data represent user interest in web pages. The number of bookmarks is a barometer of web page value. Some web pages have many bookmarks, but most of those bookmarks may have been posted far in the past. Therefore, even if a web page has many bookmarks, their value is not guaranteed. If most of the bookmarks are very old, the page may be obsolete. In this paper, by focusing on the timestamp sequence of social bookmarkings on web pages, we model their activation levels representing current values. Further, we improve our previously proposed ranking method for web search by introducing the activation level concept. Finally, through experiments, we show effectiveness of the proposed ranking method.

  6. Low-rank quadratic semidefinite programming

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2013-04-01

    Low rank matrix approximation is an attractive model in large scale machine learning problems, because it can not only reduce the memory and runtime complexity, but also provide a natural way to regularize parameters while preserving learning accuracy. In this paper, we address a special class of nonconvex quadratic matrix optimization problems, which require a low rank positive semidefinite solution. Despite their non-convexity, we exploit the structure of these problems to derive an efficient solver that converges to their local optima. Furthermore, we show that the proposed solution is capable of dramatically enhancing the efficiency and scalability of a variety of concrete problems, which are of significant interest to the machine learning community. These problems include the Top-k Eigenvalue problem, Distance learning and Kernel learning. Extensive experiments on UCI benchmarks have shown the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method. © 2012.

  7. Classification of rank 2 cluster varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, Travis

    We classify rank 2 cluster varieties (those whose corresponding skew-form has rank 2) according to the deformation type of a generic fiber U of their X-spaces, as defined by Fock and Goncharov. Our approach is based on the work of Gross, Hacking, and Keel for cluster varieties and log Calabi......-Yau surfaces. We find, for example, that U is "positive" (i.e., nearly affine) and either finite-type or non-acyclic (in the cluster sense) if and only if the monodromy of the tropicalization of U is one of Kodaira's matrices for the monodromy of an ellpitic fibration. In the positive cases, we also describe...... the action of the cluster modular group on the tropicalization of U....

  8. Deep Impact: Unintended consequences of journal rank

    CERN Document Server

    Brembs, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Much has been said about the increasing bureaucracy in science, stifling innovation, hampering the creativity of researchers and incentivizing misconduct, even outright fraud. Many anecdotes have been recounted, observations described and conclusions drawn about the negative impact of impact assessment on scientists and science. However, few of these accounts have drawn their conclusions from data, and those that have typically relied on a few studies. In this review, we present the most recent and pertinent data on the consequences that our current scholarly communication system has had on various measures of scientific quality (such as utility/citations, methodological soundness, expert ratings and retractions). These data confirm previous suspicions: using journal rank as an assessment tool is bad scientific practice. Moreover, the data lead us to argue that any journal rank (not only the currently-favored Impact Factor) would have this negative impact. Therefore, we suggest that abandoning journals altoge...

  9. Probabilistic Low-Rank Multitask Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yu; Shao, Ming; Li, Kang; Fu, Yun

    2017-01-04

    In this paper, we consider the problem of learning multiple related tasks simultaneously with the goal of improving the generalization performance of individual tasks. The key challenge is to effectively exploit the shared information across multiple tasks as well as preserve the discriminative information for each individual task. To address this, we propose a novel probabilistic model for multitask learning (MTL) that can automatically balance between low-rank and sparsity constraints. The former assumes a low-rank structure of the underlying predictive hypothesis space to explicitly capture the relationship of different tasks and the latter learns the incoherent sparse patterns private to each task. We derive and perform inference via variational Bayesian methods. Experimental results on both regression and classification tasks on real-world applications demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in dealing with the MTL problems.

  10. Ranking agility factors affecting hospitals in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abdi Talarposht; GH. Mahmodi; MA. Jahani

    2017-01-01

    Background: Agility is an effective response to the changing and unpredictable environment and using these changes as opportunities for organizational improvement. Objective: The aim of the present study was to rank the factors affecting agile supply chain of hospitals of Iran. Methods: This applied study was conducted by cross sectional-descriptive method at some point of 2015 for one year. The research population included managers, administrators, faculty members and experts were sele...

  11. Ranking images based on aesthetic qualities.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Aarushi

    2015-01-01

    The qualitative assessment of image content and aesthetic impression is affected by various image attributes and relations between the attributes. Modelling of such assessments in the form of objective rankings and learning image representations based on them is not a straightforward problem. The criteria can be varied with different levels of complexity for various applications. A highly-complex problem could involve a large number of interrelated attributes and features alongside varied rul...

  12. Homological characterisation of Lambda-ranks

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Susan

    1999-01-01

    If G is a pro-p, p-adic, Lie group and if $\\Lambda(G)$ denotes the Iwasawa algebra of G then we present a formula for determining the $\\Lambda(G)$-rank of a finitely generated $\\Lambda(G)$-module. This is given in terms of the G homology groups of the module. We explore some consequences of this for the structure of $\\Lambda(G)$-modules.

  13. Higher-rank fields and currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelfond, O.A. [Institute of System Research of Russian Academy of Sciences,Nakhimovsky prospect 36-1, 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); I.E.Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky prospect 53, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, M.A. [I.E.Tamm Department of Theoretical Physics, Lebedev Physical Institute,Leninsky prospect 53, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-13

    Sp(2M) invariant field equations in the space M{sub M} with symmetric matrix coordinates are classified. Analogous results are obtained for Minkowski-like subspaces of M{sub M} which include usual 4d Minkowski space as a particular case. The constructed equations are associated with the tensor products of the Fock (singleton) representation of Sp(2M) of any rank r. The infinite set of higher-spin conserved currents multilinear in rank-one fields in M{sub M} is found. The associated conserved charges are supported by (rM−((r(r−1))/2))-dimensional differential forms in M{sub M}, that are closed by virtue of the rank-2r field equations. The cohomology groups H{sup p}(σ{sub −}{sup r}) with all p and r, which determine the form of appropriate gauge fields and their field equations, are found both for M{sub M} and for its Minkowski-like subspace.

  14. Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Job Rank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Moradi, Mahboubeh

    2018-01-01

    The occupation of the people can influence the development of metabolic syndrome. To determine the association between metabolic syndrome and its determinants with the job rank in workers of a large car factory in Iran. 3989 male workers at a large car manufacturing company were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and anthropometric data of the participants, including age, height, weight, and abdominal circumference were measured. Blood samples were taken to measure lipid profile and blood glucose level. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in each participant based on ATPIII 2001 criteria. The workers were categorized based on their job rank into 3 groups of (1) office workers, (2) workers with physical exertion, and (3) workers with chemical exposure. The study characteristics, particularly the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its determinants were compared among the study groups. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in our study was 7.7% (95% CI 6.9 to 8.5). HDL levels were significantly lower in those who had chemical exposure (p=0.045). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in those who had mechanical exertion (p=0.026). The frequency of metabolic syndrome in the office workers, workers with physical exertion, and workers with chemical exposure was 7.3%, 7.9%, and 7.8%, respectively (p=0.836). Seemingly, there is no association between metabolic syndrome and job rank.

  15. [Ranke and modern surgery in Groningen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Hans Rudolph Ranke (1849-1887) studied medicine in Halle, located in the eastern part of Germany, where he also trained as a surgeon under Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), during which time he became familiar with the new antiseptic technique that had been introduced by Joseph Lister (1827-1912). In 1878 he was appointed head of the department of surgery in Groningen, the Netherlands, where his predecessor had been chronically indisposed and developments were flagging. Within a few months, Ranke had introduced disinfection by using carbolic acid both before and during operations. For the disinfection of wound dressings, he replaced carbolic acid with thymol as this was less pungent and foul-smelling. The rate of postoperative infections dropped to a minimum despite the inadequate housing and living conditions of the patients with infectious diseases. In 1887, at the age of 37, Ranke died after a brief illness - possibly glomerulonephritis - only eight years after he had assumed office. A street in the city of Groningen near its present-day University Medical Centre has been named after him.

  16. Ranking agility factors affecting hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdi Talarposht

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Agility is an effective response to the changing and unpredictable environment and using these changes as opportunities for organizational improvement. Objective: The aim of the present study was to rank the factors affecting agile supply chain of hospitals of Iran. Methods: This applied study was conducted by cross sectional-descriptive method at some point of 2015 for one year. The research population included managers, administrators, faculty members and experts were selected hospitals. A total of 260 people were selected as sample from the health centers. The construct validity of the questionnaire was approved by confirmatory factor analysis test and its reliability was approved by Cronbach's alpha (α=0.97. All data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Chi-square and Friedman tests. Findings: The development of staff skills, the use of information technology, the integration of processes, appropriate planning, and customer satisfaction and product quality had a significant impact on the agility of public hospitals of Iran (P<0.001. New product introductions had earned the highest ranking and the development of staff skills earned the lowest ranking. Conclusion: The new product introduction, market responsiveness and sensitivity, reduce costs, and the integration of organizational processes, ratings better to have acquired agility hospitals in Iran. Therefore, planners and officials of hospitals have to, through the promotion quality and variety of services customer-oriented, providing a basis for investing in the hospital and etc to apply for agility supply chain public hospitals of Iran.

  17. Systematic comparison of hedonic ranking and rating methods demonstrates few practical differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Marcin; Cliff, Margaret A

    2013-08-01

    Hedonic ranking is one of the commonly used methods to evaluate consumer preferences. Some authors suggest that it is the best methodology for discriminating among products, while others recommend hedonic rating. These mixed findings suggest the statistical outcome(s) are dependent on the experimental conditions or a user's expectation of "what is" and "what is not" desirable for evaluating consumer preferences. Therefore, sensory and industry professionals may be uncertain or confused regarding the appropriate application of hedonic tests. This paper would like to put this controversy to rest, by evaluating 3 data sets (3 yogurts, 79 consumers; 6 yogurts, 109 consumers; 4 apple cultivars, 70 consumers) collected using the same consumers and by calculating nontied ranks from hedonic scores. Consumer responses were evaluated by comparing bivariate associations between the methods (nontied ranks, tied ranks, hedonic rating scores) using trellis displays, determining the number of consumers with discrepancies in their responses between the methods, and comparing mean values using conventional statistical analyses. Spearman's rank correlations (0.33-0.84) revealed significant differences between the methods for all products, whether or not means separation tests differentiated the products. The work illustrated the inherent biases associated with hedonic ranking and recommended alternate hedonic methodologies. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Genesis and rank distribution of Upper Carboniferous coal basins in the Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colmenero, Juan Ramon; Barba, Pedro; Llorens, Teresa [Department of Geology, Salamanca University, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC). Ap. Co, 73. 33080-Oviedo (Spain); Fernandez-Suarez, Javier [Department of Petrology and Geochemistry, Complutense University, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2008-11-03

    The Cantabrian Mountains located in the NW of the Iberian Peninsula constitute the most important coal-mining district of Spain. Anthracitic and bituminous coals (high and medium rank coals) have been mined in the area since the end of the nineteenth century and they currently account for about 70% of the total coal resources of the country. The region forms part of the Cantabrian and West Asturian-Leonese Zones of the Iberian Variscan Fold Belt and is strongly deformed by a set of imbricate thrusts, coeval folds and high-angle faults. Coal-bearing successions are Westphalian and Stephanian (Pennsylvanian) in age and are exposed in numerous coalfields of variable size arranged roughly parallel to the tectonic structures. Coal rank varies from medium-rank bituminous D coals (Rr {>=} 0.5%) to high-rank anthracites A coals (Rr < 6.0%). The regional rank distribution can be correlated with the increase in the thermal effect observed from Westphalian to the Stephanian coals, and from the Cantabrian Zone to the West Asturian-Leonese Zone. These rank variations are related to the thermal processes caused by the emplacement of some major faults, and granitoids and mafic rocks in upper crustal levels and the subsequent development of the regional methamorphic contact aureoles. (author)

  19. Patch-Based Image Inpainting via Two-Stage Low Rank Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yin, Yilong; Zhang, Caiming

    2017-05-09

    To recover the corrupted pixels, traditional inpainting methods based on low-rank priors generally need to solve a convex optimization problem by an iterative singular value shrinkage algorithm. In this paper, we propose a simple method for image inpainting using low rank approximation, which avoids the time-consuming iterative shrinkage. Specifically, if similar patches of a corrupted image are identified and reshaped as vectors, then a patch matrix can be constructed by collecting these similar patch-vectors. Due to its columns being highly linearly correlated, this patch matrix is low-rank. Instead of using an iterative singular value shrinkage scheme, the proposed method utilizes low rank approximation with truncated singular values to derive a closed-form estimate for each patch matrix. Depending upon an observation that there exists a distinct gap in the singular spectrum of patch matrix, the rank of each patch matrix is empirically determined by a heuristic procedure. Inspired by the inpainting algorithms with component decomposition, a two-stage low rank approximation (TSLRA) scheme is designed to recover image structures and refine texture details of corrupted images. Experimental results on various inpainting tasks demonstrate that the proposed method is comparable and even superior to some state-of-the-art inpainting algorithms.

  20. Extension of latin hypercube samples with correlated variables.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hora, Stephen Curtis (University of Hawaii at Hilo, HI); Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD. (.; .)

    2006-11-01

    A procedure for extending the size of a Latin hypercube sample (LHS) with rank correlated variables is described and illustrated. The extension procedure starts with an LHS of size m and associated rank correlation matrix C and constructs a new LHS of size 2m that contains the elements of the original LHS and has a rank correlation matrix that is close to the original rank correlation matrix C. The procedure is intended for use in conjunction with uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of computationally demanding models in which it is important to make efficient use of a necessarily limited number of model evaluations.

  1. Ranking Fuzzy Numbers and Its Application to Products Attributes Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Lazim Abdullah; Nor Nashrah Ahmad Fauzee

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is one of the widely used methods in fuzzy decision making environment. The recent ranking fuzzy numbers proposed by Wang and Li is claimed to be the improved version in ranking. However, the method was never been simplified and tested in real life application. This paper presents a four-step computation of ranking fuzzy numbers and its application in ranking attributes of selected chocolate products.  The four steps algorithm was formulated to rank fuzzy numbers and followed by a tes...

  2. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  3. Validation of SmartRank: A likelihood ratio software for searching national DNA databases with complex DNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Corina C G; van de Merwe, Linda; de Jong, Jeroen; Vanvooren, Vanessa; Kempenaers, Morgane; Kees van der Beek, C P; Barni, Filippo; Reyes, Eusebio López; Moulin, Léa; Pene, Laurent; Haned, Hinda; Sijen, Titia

    2017-07-01

    Searching a national DNA database with complex and incomplete profiles usually yields very large numbers of possible matches that can present many candidate suspects to be further investigated by the forensic scientist and/or police. Current practice in most forensic laboratories consists of ordering these 'hits' based on the number of matching alleles with the searched profile. Thus, candidate profiles that share the same number of matching alleles are not differentiated and due to the lack of other ranking criteria for the candidate list it may be difficult to discern a true match from the false positives or notice that all candidates are in fact false positives. SmartRank was developed to put forward only relevant candidates and rank them accordingly. The SmartRank software computes a likelihood ratio (LR) for the searched profile and each profile in the DNA database and ranks database entries above a defined LR threshold according to the calculated LR. In this study, we examined for mixed DNA profiles of variable complexity whether the true donors are retrieved, what the number of false positives above an LR threshold is and the ranking position of the true donors. Using 343 mixed DNA profiles over 750 SmartRank searches were performed. In addition, the performance of SmartRank and CODIS were compared regarding DNA database searches and SmartRank was found complementary to CODIS. We also describe the applicable domain of SmartRank and provide guidelines. The SmartRank software is open-source and freely available. Using the best practice guidelines, SmartRank enables obtaining investigative leads in criminal cases lacking a suspect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Domain Generalization and Adaptation using Low Rank Exemplar SVMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Dong; Dai, Dengxin; Van Gool, Luc

    2017-05-16

    Domain adaptation between diverse source and target domains is a challenging research problem, especially in the real-world visual recognition tasks where the images and videos consist of significant variations in viewpoints, illuminations, qualities, etc. In this paper, we propose a new approach for domain generalization and domain adaptation based on exemplar SVMs. Specifically, we decompose the source domain into many subdomains, each of which contains only one positive training sample and all negative samples. Each subdomain is relatively less diverse, and is expected to have a simpler distribution. By training one exemplar SVM for each subdomain, we obtain a set of exemplar SVMs. To further exploit the inherent structure of source domain, we introduce a nuclear-norm based regularizer into the objective function in order to enforce the exemplar SVMs to produce a low-rank output on training samples. In the prediction process, the confident exemplar SVM classifiers are selected and reweigted according to the distribution mismatch between each subdomain and the test sample in the target domain. We formulate our approach based on the logistic regression and least square SVM algorithms, which are referred to as low rank exemplar SVMs (LRE-SVMs) and low rank exemplar least square SVMs (LRE-LSSVMs), respectively. A fast algorithm is also developed for accelerating the training of LRE-LSSVMs. We further extend Domain Adaptation Machine (DAM) to learn an optimal target classifier for domain adaptation, and show that our approach can also be applied to domain adaptation with evolving target domain, where the target data distribution is gradually changing. The comprehensive experiments for object recognition and action recognition demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach for domain generalization and domain adaptation with fixed and evolving target domains.

  5. Ranking of delay factors in construction projects after Egyptian revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Fayek Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time is one of the major considerations throughout project management life cycle and can be regarded as one of the most important parameters of a project and the driving force of project success. Time delay is a very frequent phenomenon and is almost associated with nearly all constructing projects. However, little effort has been made to curtail the phenomenon, this research work attempts to identify, investigate, and rank factors perceived to affect delays in the Egyptian construction projects with respect to their relative importance so as to proffer possible ways of coping with this phenomenon. To achieve this objective, researcher invited practitioners and experts, comprising a statistically representative sample to participate in a structured questionnaire survey. Brain storming was taken into consideration, through which a number of delay factors were identified in construction projects. Totally, ninety-nine (99 factors were short-listed to be made part of the questionnaire survey and were identified and categorized into nine (9 major categories. The survey was conducted with experts and representatives from private, public, and local general construction firms. The data were analyzed using Relative Importance Index (RII, ranking and simple percentages. Ranking of factors and categories was demonstrated according to their importance level on delay, especially after 25/1/2011 (Egyptian revolution. According to the case study results, the most contributing factors and categories (those need attention to delays were discussed, and some recommendations were made in order to minimize and control delays in construction projects. Also, this paper can serve as a guide for all construction parties with effective management in construction projects to achieve a competitive level of quality and a time effective project.

  6. Correlating melting and collapse of charge ordering with magnetic transitions in La{sub 0.5-x}Pr{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, M., E-mail: mnadeemsb@gmail.com [EMMG, Physics Division, Directorate of Science, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, M. Javid; Farhan, M. Arshad [EMMG, Physics Division, Directorate of Science, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, Ejaz; Khan, M. Nasir [CDL, Physics Division, Directorate of Science, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Concept of normalized magnetization is introduced to explain relative magnetic transitions. • Coexistence of two magnetic modes is correlated with the magnetic transitions and MIT. • Field induced melting and collapse of charge ordered antiferromagnetic (CO-AFM) state into ferromagnetic (FM) state is conferred. - Abstract: The magnetic properties of polycrystalline La{sub 0.5-x}Pr{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} material are investigated at different temperatures. The existence of magnetically diverse phases associated with various relaxation modes and their modulation with temperature and doping is analyzed. La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} exhibited field induced melting and collapse of charge ordered antiferromagnetic (CO-AFM) phase into ferromagnetic (FM) state. This phenomenon results in lowering of Neel’s temperature (T{sub N}) along with changes in the slope of magnetic moment with temperature. Using normalized M(T) curves, the variation and interplay of charge ordered temperature (T{sub CO}), Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and T{sub N} is conferred. The coexistence of two magnetic modes is explained as major ingredient for the magnetic transitions as well as metal to insulator transition (MIT); where melting and collapse of charge ordering is conversed as basic feature in these Praseodymium (Pr) doped La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} materials.

  7. Low-rank spectral expansions of two electron excitations for the acceleration of quantum chemistry calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Mazziotti, David A

    2012-12-28

    Treatment of two-electron excitations is a fundamental but computationally expensive part of ab initio calculations of many-electron correlation. In this paper we develop a low-rank spectral expansion of two-electron excitations for accelerated electronic-structure calculations. The spectral expansion differs from previous approaches by relying upon both (i) a sum of three expansions to increase the rank reduction of the tensor and (ii) a factorization of the tensor into geminal (rank-two) tensors rather than orbital (rank-one) tensors. We combine three spectral expansions from the three distinct forms of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM), (i) the two-particle (2)D, (ii) the two-hole (2)Q, and the (iii) particle-hole (2)G matrices, to produce a single spectral expansion with significantly accelerated convergence. While the resulting expansion is applicable to any quantum-chemistry calculation with two-particle excitation amplitudes, it is employed here in the parametric 2-RDM method [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253002 (2008)]. The low-rank parametric 2-RDM method scales quartically with the basis-set size, but like its full-rank version it can capture multi-reference correlation effects that are difficult to treat efficiently by traditional single-reference wavefunction methods. Applications are made to computing potential energy curves of HF and triplet OH(+), equilibrium bond distances and frequencies, the HCN-HNC isomerization, and the energies of hydrocarbon chains. Computed 2-RDMs nearly satisfy necessary N-representability conditions. The low-rank spectral expansion has the potential to expand the applicability of the parametric 2-RDM method as well as other ab initio methods to large-scale molecular systems that are often only treatable by mean-field or density functional theories.

  8. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: Model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance.

  9. Thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether: A model of ether linkages in low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Malcolm, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, an area of interest and frustration for coal chemists has been the direct liquefaction of low rank coal. Although low rank coals are more reactive than bituminous coals, they are more difficult to liquefy and offer lower liquefaction yields under conditions optimized for bituminous coals. Solomon, Serio, and co-workers have shown that: in the pyrolysis and liquefaction of low rank coals, a low temperature cross-linking reaction associated with oxygen functional groups occurs before tar evolution. A variety of pretreatments (demineralization, alkylation, and ion-exchange) have been shown to reduce these retrogressive reactions and increase tar yields, but the actual chemical reactions responsible for these processes have not been defined. In order to gain insight into the thermochemical reactions leading to cross-linking in low rank coal, we have undertaken a study of the pyrolysis of oxygen containing coal model compounds. Solid state NMR studies suggest that the alkyl aryl ether linkage may be present in modest amounts in low rank coal. Therefore, in this paper, we will investigate the thermolysis of phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) as a model of 0-aryl ether linkages found in low rank coal, lignites, and lignin, an evolutionary precursor of coal. Our results have uncovered a new reaction channel that can account for 25% of the products formed. The impact of reaction conditions, including restricted mass transport, on this new reaction pathway and the role of oxygen functional groups in cross-linking reactions will be investigated.

  10. Ranking U-Sapiens 2010-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Roberto Peña-Barrera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Los principales objetivos de esta investigación son los siguientes: (1 que la comunidad científica nacional e internacional y la sociedad en general co-nozcan los resultados del Ranking U-Sapiens Colombia 2010_2, el cual clasifica a cada institución de educación superior colombiana según puntaje, posición y cuartil; (2 destacar los movimientos más importantes al comparar los resultados del ranking 2010_1 con los del 2010_2; (3 publicar las respuestas de algunos actores de la academia nacional con respecto a la dinámica de la investigación en el país; (4 reconocer algunas instituciones, medios de comunicación e investigadores que se han interesado a modo de reflexión, referenciación o citación por esta investigación; y (5 dar a conocer el «Sello Ranking U-Sapiens Colombia» para las IES clasificadas. El alcance de este estudio en cuanto a actores abordó todas y cada una de las IES nacionales (aunque solo algunas lograran entrar al ranking y en cuanto a tiempo, un periodo referido al primer semestre de 2010 con respecto a: (1 los resultados 2010-1 de revistas indexadas en Publindex, (2 los programas de maestrías y doctorados activos durante 2010-1 según el Ministerio de Educación Nacional, y (3 los resultados de grupos de investigación clasificados para 2010 según Colciencias. El método empleado para esta investigación es el mismo que para el ranking 2010_1, salvo por una especificación aún más detallada en uno de los pasos del modelo (las variables α, β, γ; es completamente cuantitativo y los datos de las variables que fundamentan sus resultados provienen de Colciencias y el Ministerio de Educación Nacional; y en esta ocasión se darán a conocer los resultados por variable para 2010_1 y 2010_2. Los resultados más relevantes son estos: (1 entraron 8 IES al ranking y salieron 3; (2 las 3 primeras IES son públicas; (3 en total hay 6 instituciones universitarias en el ranking; (4 7 de las 10 primeras IES son

  11. The Logistics Potential of Ukraine in the International Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchkova Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the ranking of countries by the LPI index, identifying causes of the low positioning of Ukraine and ways to restructure its logistics system. It has been proved that, by the level of development of the logistics industry, Ukraine’s position in the world standings every year worsens. Over the past four years the country has lost 19 positions and in 2016 has moved into the 80 place among the 160 countries. On the basis of analysis of the components of LPI was determined that the worst indicator among all evaluated characteristics Ukraine had demonstrated as to customs handling of cargo (116th place, the best – as to timeliness of delivery of goods to destinations (54th place, relatively well – as to logistics coverage and cargo tracking – 61st place. In order to restructure the logistics system of Ukraine and improve its position in the world ranking the priorities are: intensification of developing innovative technology; further integration into the world community, studying and introduction of international experience; construction of logistics centers and developing infrastructure throughout the country; education of highly qualified personnel through the development of institutions of higher education and business programs of advanced training.

  12. System for ranking relative threats of U.S. volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    A methodology to systematically rank volcanic threat was developed as the basis for prioritizing volcanoes for long-term hazards evaluations, monitoring, and mitigation activities. A ranking of 169 volcanoes in the United States and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (U.S. volcanoes) is presented based on scores assigned for various hazard and exposure factors. Fifteen factors define the hazard: Volcano type, maximum known eruptive explosivity, magnitude of recent explosivity within the past 500 and 5,000 years, average eruption-recurrence interval, presence or potential for a suite of hazardous phenomena (pyroclastic flows, lahars, lava flows, tsunami, flank collapse, hydrothermal explosion, primary lahar), and deformation, seismic, or degassing unrest. Nine factors define exposure: a measure of ground-based human population in hazard zones, past fatalities and evacuations, a measure of airport exposure, a measure of human population on aircraft, the presence of power, transportation, and developed infrastructure, and whether or not the volcano forms a significant part of a populated island. The hazard score and exposure score for each volcano are multiplied to give its overall threat score. Once scored, the ordered list of volcanoes is divided into five overall threat categories from very high to very low. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Low-Rank Linear Dynamical Systems for Motor Imagery EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuanqi; Liu, Shaobo

    2016-01-01

    The common spatial pattern (CSP) and other spatiospectral feature extraction methods have become the most effective and successful approaches to solve the problem of motor imagery electroencephalography (MI-EEG) pattern recognition from multichannel neural activity in recent years. However, these methods need a lot of preprocessing and postprocessing such as filtering, demean, and spatiospectral feature fusion, which influence the classification accuracy easily. In this paper, we utilize linear dynamical systems (LDSs) for EEG signals feature extraction and classification. LDSs model has lots of advantages such as simultaneous spatial and temporal feature matrix generation, free of preprocessing or postprocessing, and low cost. Furthermore, a low-rank matrix decomposition approach is introduced to get rid of noise and resting state component in order to improve the robustness of the system. Then, we propose a low-rank LDSs algorithm to decompose feature subspace of LDSs on finite Grassmannian and obtain a better performance. Extensive experiments are carried out on public dataset from “BCI Competition III Dataset IVa” and “BCI Competition IV Database 2a.” The results show that our proposed three methods yield higher accuracies compared with prevailing approaches such as CSP and CSSP. PMID:28096809

  14. Low-Rank Linear Dynamical Systems for Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The common spatial pattern (CSP and other spatiospectral feature extraction methods have become the most effective and successful approaches to solve the problem of motor imagery electroencephalography (MI-EEG pattern recognition from multichannel neural activity in recent years. However, these methods need a lot of preprocessing and postprocessing such as filtering, demean, and spatiospectral feature fusion, which influence the classification accuracy easily. In this paper, we utilize linear dynamical systems (LDSs for EEG signals feature extraction and classification. LDSs model has lots of advantages such as simultaneous spatial and temporal feature matrix generation, free of preprocessing or postprocessing, and low cost. Furthermore, a low-rank matrix decomposition approach is introduced to get rid of noise and resting state component in order to improve the robustness of the system. Then, we propose a low-rank LDSs algorithm to decompose feature subspace of LDSs on finite Grassmannian and obtain a better performance. Extensive experiments are carried out on public dataset from “BCI Competition III Dataset IVa” and “BCI Competition IV Database 2a.” The results show that our proposed three methods yield higher accuracies compared with prevailing approaches such as CSP and CSSP.

  15. Low-Rank Kalman Filtering in Subsurface Contaminant Transport Models

    KAUST Repository

    El Gharamti, Mohamad

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the geology and the hydrology of the subsurface is important to model the fluid flow and the behavior of the contaminant. It is essential to have an accurate knowledge of the movement of the contaminants in the porous media in order to track them and later extract them from the aquifer. A two-dimensional flow model is studied and then applied on a linear contaminant transport model in the same porous medium. Because of possible different sources of uncertainties, the deterministic model by itself cannot give exact estimations for the future contaminant state. Incorporating observations in the model can guide it to the true state. This is usually done using the Kalman filter (KF) when the system is linear and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) when the system is nonlinear. To overcome the high computational cost required by the KF, we use the singular evolutive Kalman filter (SEKF) and the singular evolutive extended Kalman filter (SEEKF) approximations of the KF operating with low-rank covariance matrices. The SEKF can be implemented on large dimensional contaminant problems while the usage of the KF is not possible. Experimental results show that with perfect and imperfect models, the low rank filters can provide as much accurate estimates as the full KF but at much less computational cost. Localization can help the filter analysis as long as there are enough neighborhood data to the point being analyzed. Estimating the permeabilities of the aquifer is successfully tackled using both the EKF and the SEEKF.

  16. CONSORT item reporting quality in the top ten ranked journals of critical care medicine in 2011: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Ana; Schmitz, Sabine; Rossaint, Rolf; Schürholz, Tobias; Coburn, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Reporting randomised controlled trials is a key element in order to disseminate research findings. The CONSORT statement was introduced to improve the reporting quality. We assessed the adherence to the CONSORT statement of randomised controlled trials published 2011 in the top ten ranked journals of critical care medicine (ISI Web of Knowledge 2011, Thomson Reuters, London UK). Design. We performed a retrospective cross sectional data analysis. Setting. This study was executed at the University Hospital of RWTH, Aachen. Participants. We selected the following top ten listed journals according to ISI Web of Knowledge (Thomson Reuters, London, UK) critical care medicine ranking in the year 2011: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Intensive Care Medicine, CHEST, Critical Care, Journal of Neurotrauma, Resuscitation, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Shock and Minerva Anestesiologica. Main outcome measures. We screened the online table of contents of each included journal, to identify the randomised controlled trials. The adherence to the items of the CONSORT Checklist in each trial was evaluated. Additionally we correlated the citation frequency of the articles and the impact factor of the respective journal with the amount of reported items per trial. We analysed 119 randomised controlled trials and found, 15 years after the implementation of the CONSORT statement, that a median of 61,1% of the checklist-items were reported. Only 55.5% of the articles were identified as randomised trials in their titles. The citation frequency of the trials correlated significantly (rs = 0,433; p<0,001 and r = 0,331; p<0,001) to the CONSORT statement adherence. The impact factor showed also a significant correlation to the CONSORT adherence (r = 0,386; p<0,001). The reporting quality of randomised controlled trials in the field of critical care medicine remains poor and needs considerable improvement.

  17. On the Nonnegative Rank of Euclidean Distance Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Matthew M; Chu, Moody T

    2010-09-01

    The Euclidean distance matrix for n distinct points in ℝ r is generically of rank r + 2. It is shown in this paper via a geometric argument that its nonnegative rank for the case r = 1 is generically n.

  18. Global Low-Rank Image Restoration With Gaussian Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Jiao, Licheng; Liu, Fang; Wang, Shuang

    2017-06-27

    Low-rank restoration has recently attracted a lot of attention in the research of computer vision. Empirical studies show that exploring the low-rank property of the patch groups can lead to superior restoration performance, however, there is limited achievement on the global low-rank restoration because the rank minimization at image level is too strong for the natural images which seldom match the low-rank condition. In this paper, we describe a flexible global low-rank restoration model which introduces the local statistical properties into the rank minimization. The proposed model can effectively recover the latent global low-rank structure via nuclear norm, as well as the fine details via Gaussian mixture model. An alternating scheme is developed to estimate the Gaussian parameters and the restored image, and it shows excellent convergence and stability. Besides, experiments on image and video sequence datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed method in image inpainting problems.

  19. Algebraic and computational aspects of real tensor ranks

    CERN Document Server

    Sakata, Toshio; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive summaries of theoretical (algebraic) and computational aspects of tensor ranks, maximal ranks, and typical ranks, over the real number field. Although tensor ranks have been often argued in the complex number field, it should be emphasized that this book treats real tensor ranks, which have direct applications in statistics. The book provides several interesting ideas, including determinant polynomials, determinantal ideals, absolutely nonsingular tensors, absolutely full column rank tensors, and their connection to bilinear maps and Hurwitz-Radon numbers. In addition to reviews of methods to determine real tensor ranks in details, global theories such as the Jacobian method are also reviewed in details. The book includes as well an accessible and comprehensive introduction of mathematical backgrounds, with basics of positive polynomials and calculations by using the Groebner basis. Furthermore, this book provides insights into numerical methods of finding tensor ranks through...

  20. Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xingyu; Guo, Xianglin; Liu, Guangcan; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-17

    While current block diagonal constrained subspace clustering methods are performed explicitly on the original data space, in practice it is often more desirable to embed the block diagonal prior into the reproducing kernel Hilbert feature space by kernelization techniques, as the underlying data structure in reality is usually nonlinear. However, it is still unknown how to carry out the embedding and kernelization in the models with block diagonal constraints. In this work, we shall take a step in this direction. First, we establish a novel model termed Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation (IBDLR), by incorporating the implicit feature representation and block diagonal prior into the prevalent Low-Rank Representation (LRR) method. Second, mostly important, we show that the model in IBDLR could be kernelized by making use of a smoothed dual representation and the specifics of a proximal gradient based optimization algorithm. Finally, we provide some theoretical analyses for the convergence of our optimization algorithm. Comprehensive experiments on synthetic and realworld datasets demonstrate the superiorities of our IBDLR over state-of-the-art methods.While current block diagonal constrained subspace clustering methods are performed explicitly on the original data space, in practice it is often more desirable to embed the block diagonal prior into the reproducing kernel Hilbert feature space by kernelization techniques, as the underlying data structure in reality is usually nonlinear. However, it is still unknown how to carry out the embedding and kernelization in the models with block diagonal constraints. In this work, we shall take a step in this direction. First, we establish a novel model termed Implicit Block Diagonal Low-Rank Representation (IBDLR), by incorporating the implicit feature representation and block diagonal prior into the prevalent Low-Rank Representation (LRR) method. Second, mostly important, we show that the model in IBDLR could be