WorldWideScience

Sample records for rank correlation test

  1. Correlation Test Application of Supplier’s Ranking Using TOPSIS and AHP-TOPSIS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Yuniwati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The supplier selection process can be done using multi-criteria decision making (MCDM methods in firms. There are many MCDM Methods, but firms must choose the method suitable with the firm condition. Company A has analyzed supplier’s ranking using TOPSIS method. TOPSIS method has a marjor weakness in its subjective weighting. This flaw is overcome using AHP method weighting having undergone a consistency test. In this study, the comparison of supplier’s ranking using TOPSIS and AHP-TOPSIS method used correlation test. The aim of this paper is to determine different result from two methods. Data in suppliers’ ranking is ordinal data, so this process used Spearman’s rank and Kendall’s tau b correlation. If most of the ranked scored are same, Kendall’s tau b correlation should be used. The other way, Spearman rank should be used. The result of this study is that most of the ranked scored are different, so the process used Spearman rank p-value of Spearman’s rank correlation of 0.505. It is greater than 0.05, means there is no statistically significant correlation between two methods. Furthermore, increment or decrement of supplier’s ranking in one method is not significantly related to the increment or decrement of supplier’s ranking in the second method

  2. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHER H. TIENKEN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries’ rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum’s Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI. The study investigated the existence of relationships between international test rankings from three different time periods during the last 50 years of U.S. education policy development (i.e., 1957–1982, 1983–2000, and 2001–2006 and 2006 GCI ranks. It extends previous research on the topic by investigating how GCI rankings in the top 50 percent and bottom 50 percent relate to rankings on international tests for the countries that participated in each test. The study found that the relationship between ranks on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic strength is stronger among nations with lower-performing economies. Nations with strong economies, such as the United States, demonstrate a weaker, nonsignificant relationship.

  3. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries' rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum's Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI).…

  4. Evaluation of an automatic dry eye test using MCDM methods and rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteiro-Barral, Diego; Remeseiro, Beatriz; Méndez, Rebeca; Penedo, Manuel G

    2017-04-01

    Dry eye is an increasingly common disease in modern society which affects a wide range of population and has a negative impact on their daily activities, such as working with computers or driving. It can be diagnosed through an automatic clinical test for tear film lipid layer classification based on color and texture analysis. Up to now, researchers have mainly focused on the improvement of the image analysis step. However, there is still large room for improvement on the machine learning side. This paper presents a methodology to optimize this problem by means of class binarization, feature selection, and classification. The methodology can be used as a baseline in other classification problems to provide several solutions and evaluate their performance using a set of representative metrics and decision-making methods. When several decision-making methods are used, they may offer disagreeing rankings that will be solved by conflict handling in which rankings are merged into a single one. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of the proposed methodology in this domain. Also, its general purpose allows to adapt it to other classification problems in different fields such as medicine and biology.

  5. Ranking Visualizations of Correlation Using Weber's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lane; Yang, Fumeng; Franconeri, Steven; Chang, Remco

    2014-12-01

    Despite years of research yielding systems and guidelines to aid visualization design, practitioners still face the challenge of identifying the best visualization for a given dataset and task. One promising approach to circumvent this problem is to leverage perceptual laws to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of a visualization design. Following previously established methodologies, we conduct a large scale (n=1687) crowdsourced experiment to investigate whether the perception of correlation in nine commonly used visualizations can be modeled using Weber's law. The results of this experiment contribute to our understanding of information visualization by establishing that: (1) for all tested visualizations, the precision of correlation judgment could be modeled by Weber's law, (2) correlation judgment precision showed striking variation between negatively and positively correlated data, and (3) Weber models provide a concise means to quantify, compare, and rank the perceptual precision afforded by a visualization.

  6. Generalized Reduced Rank Tests using the Singular Value Decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.; Paap, R.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson [Annals of Mathematical Statistics (1951), 22, 327-351] sensitivity to the

  7. Estimation of rank correlation for clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2017-06-30

    It is well known that the sample correlation coefficient (Rxy ) is the maximum likelihood estimator of the Pearson correlation (ρxy ) for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) bivariate normal data. However, this is not true for ophthalmologic data where X (e.g., visual acuity) and Y (e.g., visual field) are available for each eye and there is positive intraclass correlation for both X and Y in fellow eyes. In this paper, we provide a regression-based approach for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimator of ρxy for clustered data, which can be implemented using standard mixed effects model software. This method is also extended to allow for estimation of partial correlation by controlling both X and Y for a vector U_ of other covariates. In addition, these methods can be extended to allow for estimation of rank correlation for clustered data by (i) converting ranks of both X and Y to the probit scale, (ii) estimating the Pearson correlation between probit scores for X and Y, and (iii) using the relationship between Pearson and rank correlation for bivariate normally distributed data. The validity of the methods in finite-sized samples is supported by simulation studies. Finally, two examples from ophthalmology and analgesic abuse are used to illustrate the methods. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Ranking structures and Rank-Rank Correlations of Countries. The FIFA and UEFA cases

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2014-01-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures, in both cases.

  9. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  10. Correlation of Cognitive Abilities Level, Age and Ranks in Judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraček Stanislav

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to ascertain the correlation between selected cognitive abilities, age and performance of judokas according to ranking. The study group consisted of judokas in the age group 18 ± 2.4 years. The Stroop Color-Word Test - Victoria Version (VST was the instrument used to determine the level of cognitive abilities. The data obtained were measured by the Pearson Correlation (r correlation test. The results of the study show an associative relationship of indirect correlation (p < 0.01 between age and all of the three categories of the Stroop test. This is an indirect correlation, so the higher the age, the lower the time (better performance of the probands in the Stroop test. There was no statistically significant correlation between performance in the categories of the Stroop test and rankings. The outcomes show that the level of selected cognitive abilities depends on age, but the level of the selected cognitive abilities does not affect the ranking of the judokas.

  11. Cointegration rank testing under conditional heteroskedasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Giuseppe; Rahbek, Anders Christian; Taylor, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    (martingale difference) innovations. We first demonstrate that the limiting null distributions of the rank statistics coincide with those derived by previous authors who assume either independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) or (strict and covariance) stationary martingale difference innovations. We...... then propose wild bootstrap implementations of the cointegrating rank tests and demonstrate that the associated bootstrap rank statistics replicate the first-order asymptotic null distributions of the rank statistics. We show that the same is also true of the corresponding rank tests based on the i.......i.d. bootstrap of Swensen (2006, Econometrica 74, 1699-1714). The wild bootstrap, however, has the important property that, unlike the i.i.d. bootstrap, it preserves in the resampled data the pattern of heteroskedasticity present in the original shocks. Consistent with this, numerical evidence suggests that...

  12. Ranking schools on external knowledge tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašper Cankar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the use of external knowledge test results for school ranking and the implicit effect of such ranking. A question of validity is raised and a review of research literature and main known problems are presented. In many western countries publication of school results is a common practice and a similar trend can be observed in Slovenia. Experiences of other countries help to predict positive and negative aspects of such publication. Results of external knowledge tests produce very limited information about school quality—if we use other sources of information our ranking of schools can be very different. Nevertheless, external knowledge tests can yield useful information. If we want to improve quality in schools, we must allow schools to use this information themselves and improve from within. Broad public scrutiny is unnecessary and problematic—it moves the focus of school efforts from real improvement of quality to mere improvement of the school public image.

  13. Comparing survival curves using rank tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    1990-01-01

    Survival times of patients can be compared using rank tests in various experimental setups, including the two-sample case and the case of paired data. Attention is focussed on two frequently occurring complications in medical applications: censoring and tail alternatives. A review is given of the

  14. Rank range test for equality of dispersion | Odiase | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper exploits the computational simplicity of the range of a set of data to formulate a twosample scale test called the Rank Range test. The performance of the test statistic is compared with other tests of scale. The exact distribution of the Rank Range test statistic is generated empirically through the unconditional ...

  15. Population models and simulation methods: The case of the Spearman rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astivia, Oscar L Olvera; Zumbo, Bruno D

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of a population model in guiding the design and interpretation of simulation studies used to investigate the Spearman rank correlation. The Spearman rank correlation has been known for over a hundred years to applied researchers and methodologists alike and is one of the most widely used non-parametric statistics. Still, certain misconceptions can be found, either explicitly or implicitly, in the published literature because a population definition for this statistic is rarely discussed within the social and behavioural sciences. By relying on copula distribution theory, a population model is presented for the Spearman rank correlation, and its properties are explored both theoretically and in a simulation study. Through the use of the Iman-Conover algorithm (which allows the user to specify the rank correlation as a population parameter), simulation studies from previously published articles are explored, and it is found that many of the conclusions purported in them regarding the nature of the Spearman correlation would change if the data-generation mechanism better matched the simulation design. More specifically, issues such as small sample bias and lack of power of the t-test and r-to-z Fisher transformation disappear when the rank correlation is calculated from data sampled where the rank correlation is the population parameter. A proof for the consistency of the sample estimate of the rank correlation is shown as well as the flexibility of the copula model to encompass results previously published in the mathematical literature. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Co-integration Rank Testing under Conditional Heteroskedasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Guiseppe; Rahbæk, Anders; Taylor, A.M. Robert

    null distributions of the rank statistics coincide with those derived by previous authors who assume either i.i.d. or (strict and covariance) stationary martingale difference innovations. We then propose wild bootstrap implementations of the co-integrating rank tests and demonstrate that the associated...

  17. Second order analysis of two-stage rank tests for the one-sample problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a rank analogue to Stein's two-stage procedure. We analyze its behavior to second order using existing asymptotic expansions for fixed sample size rank tests and recent results on combinations of independent rank statistics.

  18. A new powerful nonparametric rank test for ordered alternative problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guogen Shan

    Full Text Available We propose a new nonparametric test for ordered alternative problem based on the rank difference between two observations from different groups. These groups are assumed to be independent from each other. The exact mean and variance of the test statistic under the null distribution are derived, and its asymptotic distribution is proven to be normal. Furthermore, an extensive power comparison between the new test and other commonly used tests shows that the new test is generally more powerful than others under various conditions, including the same type of distribution, and mixed distributions. A real example from an anti-hypertensive drug trial is provided to illustrate the application of the tests. The new test is therefore recommended for use in practice due to easy calculation and substantial power gain.

  19. Interval estimation for rank correlation coefficients based on the probit transformation with extension to measurement error correction of correlated ranked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-02-10

    The Spearman (rho(s)) and Kendall (tau) rank correlation coefficient are routinely used as measures of association between non-normally distributed random variables. However, confidence limits for rho(s) are only available under the assumption of bivariate normality and for tau under the assumption of asymptotic normality of tau. In this paper, we introduce another approach for obtaining confidence limits for rho(s) or tau based on the arcsin transformation of sample probit score correlations. This approach is shown to be applicable for an arbitrary bivariate distribution. The arcsin-based estimators for rho(s) and tau (denoted by rho(s,a), tau(a)) are shown to have asymptotic relative efficiency (ARE) of 9/pi2 compared with the usual estimators rho(s) and tau when rho(s) and tau are, respectively, 0. In some nutritional applications, the Spearman rank correlation between nutrient intake as assessed by a reference instrument versus nutrient intake as assessed by a surrogate instrument is used as a measure of validity of the surrogate instrument. However, if only a single replicate (or a few replicates) are available for the reference instrument, then the estimated Spearman rank correlation will be downwardly biased due to measurement error. In this paper, we use the probit transformation as a tool for specifying an ANOVA-type model for replicate ranked data resulting in a point and interval estimate of a measurement error corrected rank correlation. This extends previous work by Rosner and Willett for obtaining point and interval estimates of measurement error corrected Pearson correlations. 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A multivariate rank test for comparing mass size distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Lombard, F.

    2012-04-01

    Particle size analyses of a raw material are commonplace in the mineral processing industry. Knowledge of particle size distributions is crucial in planning milling operations to enable an optimum degree of liberation of valuable mineral phases, to minimize plant losses due to an excess of oversize or undersize material or to attain a size distribution that fits a contractual specification. The problem addressed in the present paper is how to test the equality of two or more underlying size distributions. A distinguishing feature of these size distributions is that they are not based on counts of individual particles. Rather, they are mass size distributions giving the fractions of the total mass of a sampled material lying in each of a number of size intervals. As such, the data are compositional in nature, using the terminology of Aitchison [1] that is, multivariate vectors the components of which add to 100%. In the literature, various versions of Hotelling\\'s T 2 have been used to compare matched pairs of such compositional data. In this paper, we propose a robust test procedure based on ranks as a competitor to Hotelling\\'s T 2. In contrast to the latter statistic, the power of the rank test is not unduly affected by the presence of outliers or of zeros among the data. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Relative Power of the Wilcoxon Test, the Friedman Test, and Repeated-Measures ANOVA on Ranks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    1993-01-01

    Comparisons of the Wilcoxon test, Friedman test, and repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) on ranks in a computer simulation show that the Friedman test performs like the sign test whereas the ANOVA performs like the Wilcoxon test. Classification of these tests in introductory statistics textbooks should be revised. (SLD)

  2. Covariate-adjusted Spearman's rank correlation with probability-scale residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Li, Chun; Wanga, Valentine; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2017-11-13

    It is desirable to adjust Spearman's rank correlation for covariates, yet existing approaches have limitations. For example, the traditionally defined partial Spearman's correlation does not have a sensible population parameter, and the conditional Spearman's correlation defined with copulas cannot be easily generalized to discrete variables. We define population parameters for both partial and conditional Spearman's correlation through concordance-discordance probabilities. The definitions are natural extensions of Spearman's rank correlation in the presence of covariates and are general for any orderable random variables. We show that they can be neatly expressed using probability-scale residuals (PSRs). This connection allows us to derive simple estimators. Our partial estimator for Spearman's correlation between X and Y adjusted for Z is the correlation of PSRs from models of X on Z and of Y on Z, which is analogous to the partial Pearson's correlation derived as the correlation of observed-minus-expected residuals. Our conditional estimator is the conditional correlation of PSRs. We describe estimation and inference, and highlight the use of semiparametric cumulative probability models, which allow preservation of the rank-based nature of Spearman's correlation. We conduct simulations to evaluate the performance of our estimators and compare them with other popular measures of association, demonstrating their robustness and efficiency. We illustrate our method in two applications, a biomarker study and a large survey. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Efficient implementation of the rank correlation merit function for 2D/3D registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figl, M; Bloch, C; Gendrin, C; Weber, C; Pawiro, S A; Hummel, J; Markelj, P; Pernus, F; Bergmann, H; Birkfellner, W, E-mail: michael.figl@meduniwien.ac.a, E-mail: christoph.bloch@meduniwien.ac.a, E-mail: wolfgang.birkfellner@meduniwien.ac.a [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University Vienna, AKH 4 L, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Laboratory of Imaging Technologies, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-10-07

    A growing number of clinical applications using 2D/3D registration have been presented recently. Usually, a digitally reconstructed radiograph is compared iteratively to an x-ray image of the known projection geometry until a match is achieved, thus providing six degrees of freedom of rigid motion which can be used for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy or computer-assisted interventions. Recently, stochastic rank correlation, a merit function based on Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, was presented as a merit function especially suitable for 2D/3D registration. The advantage of this measure is its robustness against variations in image histogram content and its wide convergence range. The considerable computational expense of computing an ordered rank list is avoided here by comparing randomly chosen subsets of the DRR and reference x-ray. In this work, we show that it is possible to omit the sorting step and to compute the rank correlation coefficient of the full image content as fast as conventional merit functions. Our evaluation of a well-calibrated cadaver phantom also confirms that rank correlation-type merit functions give the most accurate results if large differences in the histogram content for the DRR and the x-ray image are present. (note)

  4. Genetic parameters and alternatives for evaluation and ranking of Nellore young bulls in pasture performance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno de Oliveira Fragomeni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate (covariance components for weight at 550 days, average daily gain and an index with both traits, and to compare alternatives for evaluation and ranking of Nellore young bulls in pasture performance tests. The heritability estimates were 0.73, 0.31 and 0.44 for weight at 550 days, average daily gain and index, respectively. Animals were ranked according to their predicted breeding values or the phenotypic deviations in relation to the mean of the test. Although the correlations between breeding values and phenotypic deviations were high, there were differences in the number of animals selected in common when the selection criteria were the predicted breeding values or the phenotypic deviations. Mixed models are more appropriate than the least squares method and should be utilized in the evaluation of young bulls in performance tests.

  5. The Friedman Two-Way Analysis of Variance as a Test for Ranking Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Edwin E.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of bias in rankings due to the initial position of entities when presented to judges is discussed. A modification of the Friedman Two-Way Analysis of Variance to test "ranking error" is presented. (JKS)

  6. Test rank of an abelian product of a free Lie algebra and a free ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a free Lie algebra of rank ≥ 2 and be a free abelian Lie algebra of rank ≥ 2. We prove that the test rank of the abelian product F × A is . Morever we compute the test rank of the algebra F / k ( F ) ′ . Author Affiliations. Naime Ekici1 Nazar Şahin Öğüşlü1. Department of Mathematics, Çukurova University, ...

  7. Thalamo-Sensorimotor Functional Connectivity Correlates with World Ranking of Olympic, Elite, and High Performance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity studies have shown functional reorganization in participants with outstanding motor expertise. Little is known about neural plasticity associated with exceptionally long motor training or of its predictive value for motor performance excellence. The present study utilised resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI in a unique sample of world-class athletes: Olympic, elite, and internationally ranked swimmers (n=30. Their world ranking ranged from 1st to 250th: each had prepared for participation in the Olympic Games. Combining rs-fMRI graph-theoretical and seed-based functional connectivity analyses, it was discovered that the thalamus has its strongest connections with the sensorimotor network in elite swimmers with the highest world rankings (career best rank: 1–35. Strikingly, thalamo-sensorimotor functional connections were highly correlated with the swimmers’ motor performance excellence, that is, accounting for 41% of the individual variance in best world ranking. Our findings shed light on neural correlates of long-term athletic performance involving thalamo-sensorimotor functional circuits.

  8. Sparse and smooth canonical correlation analysis through rank-1 matrix approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa-El-Bey, Abdeldjalil; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2017-12-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a well-known technique used to characterize the relationship between two sets of multidimensional variables by finding linear combinations of variables with maximal correlation. Sparse CCA and smooth or regularized CCA are two widely used variants of CCA because of the improved interpretability of the former and the better performance of the later. So far, the cross-matrix product of the two sets of multidimensional variables has been widely used for the derivation of these variants. In this paper, two new algorithms for sparse CCA and smooth CCA are proposed. These algorithms differ from the existing ones in their derivation which is based on penalized rank-1 matrix approximation and the orthogonal projectors onto the space spanned by the two sets of multidimensional variables instead of the simple cross-matrix product. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms are tested on simulated experiments. On these results, it can be observed that they outperform the state of the art sparse CCA algorithms.

  9. Test rank of an abelian product of a free Lie algebra and a free ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The notions test set, test rank and test elements are interesting for groups and Lie algebras. Examples of test elements of free Lie algebras of rank two were given by Mikhalev and. Yu [10]. Other examples of test elements were considered by Mikhalev, Umirbaev and Yu. [11], Temizyurek and Ekici [13] and ...

  10. Do Quantitative Measures of Research Productivity Correlate with Academic Rank in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Dodson, Thomas B; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Calotta, Nicholas; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-08-01

    Academic promotion is linked to research productivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States. The predictor variables were categorized as demographic (gender, medical degree, research doctorate, other advanced degree) and quantitative measures of academic productivity (total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single article, I-10 index [number of publications with ≥ 10 citations], and h-index [number of publications h with ≥ h citations each]). The outcome variable was current academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or endowed professor). Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed to evaluate associations between the predictors and academic rank. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were computed to identify thresholds for academic promotion. The sample consisted of 324 academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of whom 11.7% were female, 40% had medical degrees, and 8% had research doctorates. The h-index was the most strongly correlated with academic rank (ρ = 0.62, p research activity.

  11. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  12. FIELD TEST OF THE PROPOSED REVISED HAZARD RANKING SYSTEM (HRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to revise the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) so that, to the maximum extent feasible, it accurately assesses the relative risks associated with actual or potent...

  13. Comparison of a Class of Rank-Score Tests in Two-Factor Designs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The empirical Type I error rate and power of these test statistics on the rank scores were determined using Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the robustness of the tests. The results show that there are problems of inflation in the Type I error rate using asymptotic ƒÓ2 test for all the rank score functions, especially for small ...

  14. Do Standard Bibliometric Measures Correlate with Academic Rank of Full-Time Pediatric Dentistry Faculty Members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Harlyn K; Dhar, Vineet; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between quantitative measures of research productivity and academic rank for full-time pediatric dentistry faculty members in accredited U.S. and Canadian residency programs. For each pediatric dentist in the study group, academic rank and bibliometric factors derived from publicly available databases were recorded. Academic ranks were lecturer/instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor. Bibliometric factors were mean total number of publications, mean total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single work, and h-index (a measure of the impact of publications, determined by total number of publications h that had at least h citations each). The study sample was comprised of 267 pediatric dentists: 4% were lecturers/instructors, 44% were assistant professors, 30% were associate professors, and 22% were professors. The mean number of publications for the sample was 15.4±27.8. The mean number of citations was 218.4±482.0. The mean h-index was 4.9±6.6. The h-index was strongly correlated with academic rank (r=0.60, p=0.001). For this sample, an h-index of ≥3 was identified as a threshold for promotion to associate professor, and an h-index of ≥6 was identified as a threshold for promotion to professor. The h-index was strongly correlated with the academic rank of these pediatric dental faculty members, suggesting that this index may be considered a measure for promotion, along with a faculty member's quality and quantity of research, teaching, service, and clinical activities.

  15. Sex-reversed correlation between stress levels and dominance rank in a captive non-breeder flock of crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Minami; Asaba, Akari; Miyazawa, Eri; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Group living has both benefits and costs to individuals; benefits include efficient acquisition of resources, and costs include stress from social conflicts among group members. Such social challenges result in hierarchical dominance ranking among group members as a solution to avoid escalating conflict that causes different levels of basal stress between individuals at different ranks. Stress-associated glucocorticoid (corticosterone in rodents and birds; CORT) levels are known to correlate with dominance rank in diverse taxa and to covary with various social factors, such as sex and dominance maintenance styles. Although there is much evidence for sex differences in the basal levels of CORT in various species, the correlation of sex differences in basal CORT with dominance rank is poorly understood. We investigated the correlation between CORT metabolites (CM) in the droppings and social factors, including rank and sex, in a captive non-breeder group of crows. In this group, all the single males dominated all the single females, and dominance ranks were stable among single males but relatively unstable among single females. CM levels and rank were significantly correlated in a sex-reversed fashion: males at higher rank (i.e., more dominant) had higher CM, whereas females at higher rank exhibited lower CM. This is the first evidence of sex-reversed patterns of CM-rank correlation in birds. The results suggest that different mechanisms of stress-dominance relationships operate on the sexes in non-breeder crow aggregations; in males, stress is associated with the cost of aggressive displays, whereas females experience subordination stress due to males' overt aggression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Su, Xiaoyan; Qian, Hong; Yang, Ning; Han, Wenhua

    2017-10-16

    In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (D-S theory) has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D-S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjian Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster–Shafer evidence theory (D–S theory has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D–S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) Modal Test Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Corliss, James M.; Mark, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Modal testing of the Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) was performed to obtain data to determine the accuracy of the BTA LS- DYNA model in determining the structural response. The BTA is a full-scale steel and aluminum test article that is representative of the Orion Crew Module (CM), with similar outer-mold-line geometry, mass properties, and some similar structural features, including an internal pressure vessel connected to a backshell and heatshield via longerons, Retention and Release (R&R) brackets, and an aft ring. The structural design of the Orion CM is being developed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. To obtain data to evaluate the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact landing simulations, a series of BTA water impacts was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Discrepancies between test and simulation data are attributed to three causes:(1) Test data variability and uncertainty, (2) LS-DYNA water model and fluid-structure coupling approximations; and (3) LS-DYNA structural modeling approximations. Two activities have been undertaken to assess the accuracy of the BTA LS-DYNA structural model separately from the fluid-structure coupling portion of the water landing simulations: 1) modal testing, and 2) static load testing. The results from the static load tests are documented in a separate report. For the modal test series, the following tests were performed: (1) BTA Fully-Assembled Model Test, (2) BTA Backshell Removed Modal Test, (3) Standalone Heatshield Modal Test, (4) Standalone Windward Backshell Panel Modal Test; and (5) Standalone Leeward Backshell Panel Modal Test. This report documents findings from correlation of modal test data with LS-DYNA modal analysis results. The following figures illustrate the correlation of the modal frequencies. Where multiple closely spaced modes have been identified, the points representing the upper and lower frequencies are shown connected by a dotted line.

  19. Systemic testing on Bradley-Terry model against nonlinear ranking hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shev, Aaron; Fujii, Kevin; Hsieh, Fushing; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    We take a system point of view toward constructing any power or ranking hierarchy onto a society of human or animal players. The most common hierarchy is the linear ranking, which is habitually used in nearly all real-world problems. A stronger version of linear ranking via increasing and unvarying winning potentials, known as Bradley-Terry model, is particularly popular. Only recently non-linear ranking hierarchy is discussed and developed through recognition of dominance information contents beyond direct dyadic win-and-loss. We take this development further by rigorously arguing for the necessity of accommodating system's global pattern information contents, and then introducing a systemic testing on Bradley-Terry model. Our test statistic with an ensemble based empirical distribution favorably compares with the Deviance test equipped with a Chi-squared asymptotic approximation. Several simulated and real data sets are analyzed throughout our development.

  20. Improved Likelihood Ratio Tests for Cointegration Rank in the VAR Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boswijk, H. Peter; Jansson, Michael; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We suggest improved tests for cointegration rank in the vector autoregressive (VAR) model and develop asymptotic distribution theory and local power results. The tests are (quasi-)likelihood ratio tests based on a Gaussian likelihood, but of course the asymptotic results apply more generally...

  1. On the matched pairs sign test using bivariate ranked set sampling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our numerical and theoretical results indicate that using BVRSS for the matched pairs sign test is substantially more efficient than using BVSRS. Illustration using palm trees data from sultanate of Oman is provided. Key words: Bootstrap method, bivariate ranked set sample, power of the test, P-value of the test, Pitman's ...

  2. Estimating personalized risk ranking using laboratory test and medical knowledge (UMLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Meru A; Bhaumik, Sandip; Paul, Soubhik; Bissoyi, Swarupananda; Roy, Raj; Ryu, Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Concept Graph Engine (CG-Engine) that generates patient specific personalized disease ranking based on the laboratory test data. CG-Engine uses the Unified Medical Language System database as medical knowledge base. The CG-Engine consists of two concepts namely, a concept graph and its attributes. The concept graph is a two level tree that starts at a laboratory test root node and ends at a disease node. The attributes of concept graph are: Relation types, Semantic types, Number of Sources and Symmetric Information between nodes. These attributes are used to compute the weight between laboratory tests and diseases. The personalized disease ranking is created by aggregating the weights of all the paths connecting between a particular disease and contributing abnormal laboratory tests. The clinical application of CG-Engine improves physician's throughput as it provides the snapshot view of abnormal laboratory tests as well as a personalized disease ranking.

  3. Why does Income Relate to Depressive Symptoms? Testing the Income Rank Hypothesis Longitudinally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osafo Hounkpatin, Hilda; Wood, Alex M; Brown, Gordon D A; Dunn, Graham

    This paper reports a test of the relative income rank hypothesis of depression, according to which it is the rank position of an individual's income amongst a comparison group, rather than the individual's absolute income, that will be associated with depressive symptoms. A new methodology is developed to test between psychosocial and material explanations of why income relates to well-being. This method was used to test the income rank hypothesis as applied to depressive symptoms. We used data from a cohort of 10,317 individuals living in Wisconsin who completed surveys in 1992 and 2003. The utility assumed to arise from income was represented with a constant relative risk aversion function to overcome limitations of previous work in which inadequate specification of the relationship between absolute income and well-being may have inappropriately favoured relative income specifications. We compared models in which current and future depressive symptoms were predicted from: (a) income utility alone, (b) income rank alone, (c) the transformed difference between the individual's income and the mean income of a comparison group and (d) income utility, income rank and distance from the mean jointly. Model comparison overcomes problems involving multi-collinearity amongst the predictors. A rank-only model was consistently supported. Similar results were obtained for the association between depressive symptoms and wealth and rank of wealth in a cohort of 32,900 British individuals who completed surveys in 2002 and 2008. We conclude that it is the rank of a person's income or wealth within a social comparison group, rather than income or wealth themselves or their deviations from the mean within a reference group, that is more strongly associated with depressive symptoms.

  4. Testing the maximal rank of the volatility process for continuous diffusions observed with noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fissler, Tobias; Podolskij, Mark

    frequency observations we construct a test statistic for the maximal rank of the time varying stochastic volatility process. Our methodology is based upon a combination of a matrix perturbation approach and pre-averaging. We will show the asymptotic mixed normality of the test statistic and obtain......In this paper, we present a test for the maximal rank of the volatility process in continuous diffusion models observed with noise. Such models are typically applied in mathematical finance, where latent price processes are corrupted by microstructure noise at ultra high frequencies. Using high...

  5. Comparison of a Class of Rank-Score Tests in Two-Factor Designs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Mathematics, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto ... The empirical Type I error rate and power of these test statistics on the rank scores were ... INTRODUCTION. When analyzing data from a two-factor design, usually a linear model is assumed and the hypotheses are formulated by the parameters of this ...

  6. Adaptive designs for the one-sample log-rank test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rene; Faldum, Andreas; Kwiecien, Robert

    2017-09-22

    Traditional designs in phase IIa cancer trials are single-arm designs with a binary outcome, for example, tumor response. In some settings, however, a time-to-event endpoint might appear more appropriate, particularly in the presence of loss to follow-up. Then the one-sample log-rank test might be the method of choice. It allows to compare the survival curve of the patients under treatment to a prespecified reference survival curve. The reference curve usually represents the expected survival under standard of the care. In this work, convergence of the one-sample log-rank statistic to Brownian motion is proven using Rebolledo's martingale central limit theorem while accounting for staggered entry times of the patients. On this basis, a confirmatory adaptive one-sample log-rank test is proposed where provision is made for data dependent sample size reassessment. The focus is to apply the inverse normal method. This is done in two different directions. The first strategy exploits the independent increments property of the one-sample log-rank statistic. The second strategy is based on the patient-wise separation principle. It is shown by simulation that the proposed adaptive test might help to rescue an underpowered trial and at the same time lowers the average sample number (ASN) under the null hypothesis as compared to a single-stage fixed sample design. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  7. Universality, correlations, and rankings in the Brazilian universities national admission examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberto; Lamb, Luis C.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the scores obtained by students who have taken the ENEM examination, The Brazilian High School National Examination which is used in the admission process at Brazilian universities. The average high schools scores from different disciplines are compared through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different school subjects. Even though the students' scores in the ENEM form a Gaussian due to the standardization, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that cannot be used to evaluate and compare students performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and the economic level (based on the average family income) of the students. The ENEM scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance examination from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The analysis of the performance of the same individuals in both tests shows that the two tests not only select different abilities, but also lead to the admission of different sets of individuals. Our results indicate that standardized tests might be an interesting tool to compare performance of individuals over the years, but not of institutions.

  8. A default Bayesian hypothesis test for correlations and partial correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.; Wagenmakers, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a default Bayesian hypothesis test for the presence of a correlation or a partial correlation. The test is a direct application of Bayesian techniques for variable selection in regression models. The test is easy to apply and yields practical advantages that the standard frequentist tests

  9. [Computerized ranking test in three French universities: Staff experience and students' feedback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, D; Meyer, G; Cymbalista, F; Bouaziz, J-D; Falgarone, G; Tesniere, A; Gervais, J; Cariou, A; Peffault de Latour, R; Marat, M; Moenaert, E; Guebli, T; Rodriguez, O; Lefort, A; Dreyfuss, D; Hajage, D; Ricard, J-D

    2016-03-01

    The year 2016 will be pivotal for the evaluation of French medical students with the introduction of the first computerized National Ranking Test (ECNi). The SIDES, online electronic system for medical student evaluation, was created for this purpose. All the universities have already organized faculty exams but few a joint computerized ranking test at several universities simultaneously. We report our experience on the organization of a mock ECNi by universities Paris Descartes, Paris Diderot and Paris 13. Docimological, administrative and technical working groups were created to organize this ECNi. Students in their fifth year of medical studies, who will be the first students to sit for the official ECNi in 2016, were invited to attend this mock exam that represented more than 50% of what will be proposed in 2016. A final electronic questionnaire allowed a docimological and organizational evaluation by students. An analysis of ratings and rankings and their distribution on a 1000-point scale were performed. Sixty-four percent of enrolled students (i.e., 654) attended the three half-day exams. No difference in total score and ranking between the three universities was observed. Students' feedback was extremely positive. Normalized over 1000 points, 99% of students were scored on 300 points only. Progressive clinical cases were the most discriminating test. The organization of a mock ECNi involving multiple universities was a docimological and technical success but required an important administrative, technical and teaching investment. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Statistical methods for ranking data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvo, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced undergraduate, graduate students and practitioners to statistical methods for ranking data. An important aspect of nonparametric statistics is oriented towards the use of ranking data. Rank correlation is defined through the notion of distance functions and the notion of compatibility is introduced to deal with incomplete data. Ranking data are also modeled using a variety of modern tools such as CART, MCMC, EM algorithm and factor analysis. This book deals with statistical methods used for analyzing such data and provides a novel and unifying approach for hypotheses testing. The techniques described in the book are illustrated with examples and the statistical software is provided on the authors’ website.

  11. Male ruff colour as a rank signal in a monomorphic-horned mammal: behavioural correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovari, S.; Fattorini, N.; Boesi, R.; Bocci, A.

    2015-08-01

    Coexistence of individuals within a social group is possible through the establishment of a hierarchy. Social dominance is achieved through aggressive interactions, and, in wild sheep and goats, it is related mainly to age, body size and weapon size as rank signals. Adult male Himalayan tahr are much larger than females and subadult males. They have a prominent neck ruff, ranging in colour from yellow (5.5-9.5 years old, i.e. young adults, golden males) to brown (7.5-14.5 years old, i.e. older individuals, pale and dark brown males), with golden males being the most dominant. We investigated the social behaviour of male tahr and analysed the relationships between ruff colour, courtship and agonistic behaviour patterns during the rut. Colour classes varied in their use of several behaviour patterns (male dominance: approach, stare, horning vegetation; courtship: low stretch, naso- genital contact, rush). Golden-ruffed males used more threats than darker ones. Pale brown and dark brown males addressed threats significantly more often to males of lower or their own colour classes, respectively, whereas golden ones addressed threats to all colour classes, including their own. The courtship of dominant males was characterised by the assertive rush, whereas that of subordinates did not. Ruff colour of male Himalayan tahr may have evolved as a rank signal, homologous to horn size in wild sheep and goats.

  12. Non-parametric three-way mixed ANOVA with aligned rank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Rodríguez, Juan C; Wang, X T

    2015-02-01

    Research problems that require a non-parametric analysis of multifactor designs with repeated measures arise in the behavioural sciences. There is, however, a lack of available procedures in commonly used statistical packages. In the present study, a generalization of the aligned rank test for the two-way interaction is proposed for the analysis of the typical sources of variation in a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. It can be implemented in the usual statistical packages. Its statistical properties are tested by using simulation methods with two sample sizes (n = 30 and n = 10) and three distributions (normal, exponential and double exponential). Results indicate substantial increases in power for non-normal distributions in comparison with the usual parametric tests. Similar levels of Type I error for both parametric and aligned rank ANOVA were obtained with non-normal distributions and large sample sizes. Degrees-of-freedom adjustments for Type I error control in small samples are proposed. The procedure is applied to a case study with 30 participants per group where it detects gender differences in linguistic abilities in blind children not shown previously by other methods. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Stochastic rank correlation: a robust merit function for 2D/3D registration of image data obtained at different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Stock, Markus; Figl, Michael; Gendrin, Christelle; Hummel, Johann; Dong, Shuo; Kettenbach, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Bergmann, Helmar

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the authors evaluate a merit function for 2D/3D registration called stochastic rank correlation (SRC). SRC is characterized by the fact that differences in image intensity do not influence the registration result; it therefore combines the numerical advantages of cross correlation (CC)-type merit functions with the flexibility of mutual-information-type merit functions. The basic idea is that registration is achieved on a random subset of the image, which allows for an efficient computation of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. This measure is, by nature, invariant to monotonic intensity transforms in the images under comparison, which renders it an ideal solution for intramodal images acquired at different energy levels as encountered in intrafractional kV imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. Initial evaluation was undertaken using a 2D/3D registration reference image dataset of a cadaver spine. Even with no radiometric calibration, SRC shows a significant improvement in robustness and stability compared to CC. Pattern intensity, another merit function that was evaluated for comparison, gave rather poor results due to its limited convergence range. The time required for SRC with 5% image content compares well to the other merit functions; increasing the image content does not significantly influence the algorithm accuracy. The authors conclude that SRC is a promising measure for 2D/3D registration in IGRT and image-guided therapy in general.

  14. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter egd(G), defined as the smallest integer r ≥ 1 for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of G, can be completed to a matrix in the convex hull

  15. Inflation of type I error rates by unequal variances associated with parametric, nonparametric, and Rank-Transformation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W. Zimmerman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the two-sample Student t test fails to maintain its significance level when the variances of treatment groups are unequal, and, at the same time, sample sizes are unequal. However, introductory textbooks in psychology and education often maintain that the test is robust to variance heterogeneity when sample sizes are equal. The present study discloses that, for a wide variety of non-normal distributions, especially skewed distributions, the Type I error probabilities of both the t test and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test are substantially inflated by heterogeneous variances, even when sample sizes are equal. The Type I error rate of the t test performed on ranks replacing the scores (rank-transformed data is inflated in the same way and always corresponds closely to that of the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. For many probability densities, the distortion of the significance level is far greater after transformation to ranks and, contrary to known asymptotic properties, the magnitude of the inflation is an increasing function of sample size. Although nonparametric tests of location also can be sensitive to differences in the shape of distributions apart from location, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test and rank-transformation tests apparently are influenced mainly by skewness that is accompanied by specious differences in the means of ranks.

  16. Endogenous Versus Exogenous Shocks in Complex Networks: An Empirical Test Using Book Sale Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Deschâtres, F.; Gilbert, T.; Ageon, Y.

    2004-11-01

    We study the precursory and recovery signatures accompanying shocks in complex networks, that we test on a unique database of the Amazon.com ranking of book sales. We find clear distinguishing signatures classifying two types of sales peaks. Exogenous peaks occur abruptly and are followed by a power law relaxation, while endogenous peaks occur after a progressively accelerating power law growth followed by an approximately symmetrical power law relaxation which is slower than for exogenous peaks. These results are rationalized quantitatively by a simple model of epidemic propagation of interactions with long memory within a network of acquaintances. The observed relaxation of sales implies that the sales dynamics is dominated by cascades rather than by the direct effects of news or advertisements, indicating that the social network is close to critical.

  17. Reduced Rank Mixed Effects Models for Spatially Correlated Hierarchical Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lan

    2010-03-01

    Hierarchical functional data are widely seen in complex studies where sub-units are nested within units, which in turn are nested within treatment groups. We propose a general framework of functional mixed effects model for such data: within unit and within sub-unit variations are modeled through two separate sets of principal components; the sub-unit level functions are allowed to be correlated. Penalized splines are used to model both the mean functions and the principal components functions, where roughness penalties are used to regularize the spline fit. An EM algorithm is developed to fit the model, while the specific covariance structure of the model is utilized for computational efficiency to avoid storage and inversion of large matrices. Our dimension reduction with principal components provides an effective solution to the difficult tasks of modeling the covariance kernel of a random function and modeling the correlation between functions. The proposed methodology is illustrated using simulations and an empirical data set from a colon carcinogenesis study. Supplemental materials are available online.

  18. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating e...... eigenvalues and eigenvectors. We give a number of different applications to regression and time series analysis, and show how the reduced rank regression estimator can be derived as a Gaussian maximum likelihood estimator. We briefly mention asymptotic results......The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  19. Standard test method for ranking resistance of materials to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of materials to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank pairs of materials according to their sliding wear characteristics under various conditions. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. However, the interlaboratory testing has been limited to metals. In addition, the test can be run with various lubricants, liquids, or gaseous atmospheres, as desired, to simulate service conditions. Rotational speed and load can also be varied to better correspond to service requirements. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for both the block and ring. Materials...

  20. Correlated Spatio-Temporal Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Low Rank Matrix Approximation and Optimized Node Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglin Piao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging low rank matrix approximation (LRMA method provides an energy efficient scheme for data collection in wireless sensor networks (WSNs by randomly sampling a subset of sensor nodes for data sensing. However, the existing LRMA based methods generally underutilize the spatial or temporal correlation of the sensing data, resulting in uneven energy consumption and thus shortening the network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a correlated spatio-temporal data collection method for WSNs based on LRMA. In the proposed method, both the temporal consistence and the spatial correlation of the sensing data are simultaneously integrated under a new LRMA model. Moreover, the network energy consumption issue is considered in the node sampling procedure. We use Gini index to measure both the spatial distribution of the selected nodes and the evenness of the network energy status, then formulate and resolve an optimization problem to achieve optimized node sampling. The proposed method is evaluated on both the simulated and real wireless networks and compared with state-of-the-art methods. The experimental results show the proposed method efficiently reduces the energy consumption of network and prolongs the network lifetime with high data recovery accuracy and good stability.

  1. The use of TCP based EUD to rank and compare lung radiotherapy plans: in-silico study to evaluate the correlation between TCP with physical quality indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Balosso, Jacques

    2017-06-01

    To apply the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) radiobiological model to estimate the tumor control probability (TCP) scores for treatment plans using different radiobiological parameter settings, and to evaluate the correlation between TCP and physical quality indices of the treatment plans. Ten radiotherapy treatment plans for lung cancer were generated. The dose distributions were calculated using anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA). Dose parameters and quality indices derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) for target volumes were evaluated. The predicted TCP was computed using EUD model with tissue-specific parameter (a=-10). The assumed radiobiological parameter setting for adjuvant therapy [tumor dose to control 50% of the tumor (TCD50) =36.5 Gy and γ50=0.72] and curative intent (TCD50=51.24 Gy and γ50=0.83) were used. The bootstrap method was used to estimate the 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The coefficients (ρ) from Spearman's rank test were calculated to assess the correlation between quality indices with TCP. Wilcoxon paired test was used to calculate P value. The 95% CI of TCP were 70.6-81.5 and 46.6-64.7, respectively, for adjuvant radiotherapy and curative intent. The TCP outcome showed a positive and good correlation with calculated dose to 95% of the target volume (D95%) and minimum dose (Dmin). Consistently, TCP correlate negatively with heterogeneity indices. This study confirms that more relevant and robust radiobiological parameters setting should be integrated according to cancer type. The positive correlation with quality indices gives chance to improve the clinical out-come by optimizing the treatment plans to maximize the Dmin and D95%. This attempt to increase the TCP should be carried out with the respect of dose constraints for organs at risks. However, the negative correlation with heterogeneity indices shows that the optimization of beam arrangements could be also useful. Attention should be paid to obtain an appropriate

  2. Biometric verification by cross-correlation analysis of 12-lead ECG patterns: Ranking of the most reliable peripheral and chest leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Abächerli, Roger

    Electrocardiogram (ECG)-based biometrics relies on the most stable and unique beat patterns, i.e. those with maximal intra-subject and minimal inter-subject waveform differences seen from different leads. We investigated methodology to evaluate those differences, aiming to rank the most prominent single and multi-lead ECG sets for biometric verification across a large population. A clinical standard 12-lead resting ECG database, including 460 pairs of remote recordings (distanced 1year apart) was used. Inter-subject beat waveform differences were studied by cross-correlation and amplitude relations of average PQRST (500ms) and QRS (100ms) patterns, using 8 features/lead in 12-leads. Biometric verification models based on stepwise linear discriminant classifier were trained on the first half of records. True verification rate (TVR) on the remaining test data was further reported as a common mean of the correctly verified equal subjects (true acceptance rate) and correctly rejected different subjects (true rejection rate). In single-lead ECG human identity applications, we found maximal TVR (87-89%) for the frontal plane leads (I, -aVR, II) within (0-60°) sector. Other leads were ranked: inferior (85%), lateral to septal (82-81%), with intermittent V3 drop (77.6%), suggesting anatomical landmark displacements. ECG pattern view from multi-lead sets improved TVR: chest (91.3%), limb (94.6%), 12-leads (96.3%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The connections between postural reactions, scoliosis postures and scoliosis in girls aged 12-15 years old examined using the Spearman’s Rank OrderCorrelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczyński Jacek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to analyse the Spearman's Rank Order Correlation between the postural reactions, scoliosis postures and scoliosis in girls aged 12-15 years old. Throughout the whole group of girls, positive correlations between attitude parameters in the frontal plane and the postural reactions were observed: The angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed with which eyes closed, angle of primary curvature /average speed with which eyes closed, angle of primary curvature /path length eyes closed, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X eyes closed, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/lateral speed eyes closed. Negative correlations occurred in cases: absolute value angle of secondary curvature/ mean loading point X eyes open, depth of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes open, length of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes open, angle of secondary curvature/mean loading point X eyes closed. Statistically significant correlations occurred more frequent when the Romberg’s test was held with eyes closed (CE: angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed, torso inclination angle/mean loading point X, angle of primary curvature/average speed, angle of primary curvature/path length, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/ lateral speed, angle of secondary curvature/mean loading point Y. Among the correlations with eyes closed six were positive: angle of primary curvature/anteroposterior speed, torso inclination angle/mean loading point X, angle of primary curvature/ average speed, angle of primary curvature/ path length, absolute value shoulders angle line/mean loading point X, absolute value pelvic inclination angle/lateral speed, and one was negative: angle of secondary curvature/ mean loading point Y. Among the correlations with eyes open (OE only three negative correlations occurred: absolute value angle of secondary curvature

  4. Data depth and rank-based tests for covariance and spectral density matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Chau, Joris

    2017-06-26

    In multivariate time series analysis, objects of primary interest to study cross-dependences in the time series are the autocovariance or spectral density matrices. Non-degenerate covariance and spectral density matrices are necessarily Hermitian and positive definite, and our primary goal is to develop new methods to analyze samples of such matrices. The main contribution of this paper is the generalization of the concept of statistical data depth for collections of covariance or spectral density matrices by exploiting the geometric properties of the space of Hermitian positive definite matrices as a Riemannian manifold. This allows one to naturally characterize most central or outlying matrices, but also provides a practical framework for rank-based hypothesis testing in the context of samples of covariance or spectral density matrices. First, the desired properties of a data depth function acting on the space of Hermitian positive definite matrices are presented. Second, we propose two computationally efficient pointwise and integrated data depth functions that satisfy each of these requirements. Several applications of the developed methodology are illustrated by the analysis of collections of spectral matrices in multivariate brain signal time series datasets.

  5. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-06-01

    Engagement in research and academic productivity are crucial components in the training of a neurosurgeon. This process typically begins in residency training. In this study, we analyzed individual resident productivity as it correlated to publications across all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery training programs in an attempt to identify how programs have developed and fostered a research culture and environment. We obtained a list of current neurosurgery residents in ACGME-accredited programs from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons database. An expanded PubMed and Scopus search was conducted for each resident through the present time. We tabulated all articles attributed to each resident. We then categorized the publications based on each neurosurgical subspecialty while in residency. A spreadsheet-based statistical analysis was performed. This formulated the average number of resident articles, h-indices, and most common subspecialty categories by training program. We analyzed 1352 current neurosurgery residents in 105 programs. There were a total of 10 645 publications, of which 3985 were resident first-author publications during the period of study. The most common subspecialties among all resident publications were vascular (24.9%), spine (16.9%), oncology (16.1%), pediatric (5.6%), functional (4.9%), and trauma (3.8%). The average resident published 2.9 first-author papers with average of 38.0 first-author publications by total residents at each program (range 0-241). The average h-index per resident is 2.47 ± 3.25. When comparing previously published faculty h-index program rankings against our resident h-index rankings, there is a strong correlation between the 2 datasets with a clear delineation between Top-20 productivity and that of other programs (average h-index 4.2 vs 1.7, respectively, P productivity on both the resident and faculty level (average h-index 1.6, 1.9, 3.9 for 1, 2, and

  6. correlation between cytology and thyroid function test

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Damary

    2006-10-01

    Oct 1, 2006 ... euthyroidism, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is the diagnostic test of choice in determining whether a nodule is benign or malignant. Objective: To correlate hormonal levels to FNA cytologic findings. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital ...

  7. Harassment of adults by immatures in bonobos (Pan paniscus): testing the Exploratory Aggression and Rank Improvement hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, Klaree; White, Frances

    2017-06-13

    The immatures of many primate species frequently pester adult group members with aggressive behaviors referred to as a type of harassment. Although these behaviors are characteristic of immatures as they develop from infancy through adolescence, there have been few studies that specifically address the adaptive significance of harassment. Two functional hypotheses have been generated from observations of the behavior in chimpanzees. The Exploratory Aggression hypothesis describes harassment as a mechanism used by immatures to learn about the parameters of aggression and dominance behavior and to acquire information about novel, complex, or unpredictable relationships. The Rank Improvement hypothesis describes harassment as a mechanism of dominance acquisition used by immatures to outrank adults. This study investigated harassment of adults by immatures in a group of bonobos housed at the Columbus Zoo and compared the results to the predictions outlined by the Exploratory Aggression and Rank Improvement hypotheses. Although all immature bonobos in this group harassed adults, adolescents performed the behavior more frequently than did infants or juveniles and low-ranking adults were targeted more frequently than high-ranking. Targets responded more with agonistic behaviors than with neutral behaviors and the amount of harassment an individual received was significantly correlated with the amount of agonistic responses given. Furthermore, bouts of harassment were found to continue significantly more frequently when responses were agonistic than when they were neutral. Adolescents elicited mostly agonistic responses from targets whereas infants and juveniles received mostly neutral responses. These results support predictions from each hypothesis where harassment functions both as a mechanism of social exploration and as a tool to establish dominance rank.

  8. Tensor Rank

    OpenAIRE

    Erdtman, Elias; Jönsson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    This master's thesis addresses numerical methods of computing the typical ranks of tensors over the real numbers and explores some properties of tensors over finite fields. We present three numerical methods to compute typical tensor rank. Two of these have already been published and can be used to calculate the lowest typical ranks of tensors and an approximate percentage of how many tensors have the lowest typical ranks (for some tensor formats), respectively. The third method was developed...

  9. English Language Use at the Internationalised Universities of Northern Europe: Is There a Correlation between Englishisation and World Rank?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Anna Kristina

    2014-01-01

    European universities have, since the late 1990s, undergone dramatic changes centred on internationalisation, harmonisation and competition. This paper is concerned with two specific consequences of these changes and their interrelationship: rankings and Englishisation, the latter defined as an increase in the use of English at universities of…

  10. Rank Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  11. Ranking nano-enabled hybrid media for simultaneous removal of contaminants with different chemistries: Pseudo-equilibrium sorption tests versus column tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Tomas; Garcia, Jose; Markovski, Jasmina; McKay Gifford, James; Hristovski, Kiril D; Olson, Larry W

    2017-12-15

    The underlying hypothesis of this study was that pseudo-equilibrium and column testing conditions would provide the same sorbent ranking trends although the values of sorbents' performance descriptors (e.g. sorption capacity) may vary because of different kinetics and competition effects induced by the two testing approaches. To address this hypothesis, nano-enabled hybrid media were fabricated and its removal performances were assessed for two model contaminants under multi-point batch pseudo-equilibrium and continuous-flow conditions. Calculation of simultaneous removal capacity indices (SRC) demonstrated that the more resource demanding continuous-flow tests are able to generate the same performance rankings as the ones obtained by conducing the simpler pseudo-equilibrium tests. Furthermore, continuous overlap between the 98% confidence boundaries for each SRC index trend, not only validated the hypothesis that both testing conditions provide the same ranking trends, but also pointed that SRC indices are statistically the same for each media, regardless of employed method. In scenarios where rapid screening of new media is required to obtain the best performing synthesis formulation, use of pseudo-equilibrium tests proved to be reliable. Considering that kinetics induced effects on sorption capacity must not be neglected, more resource demanding column test could be conducted only with the top performing media that exhibit the highest sorption capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ouderdom, omvang en citatiescores: rankings nader bekeken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Jules

    2017-01-01

    By comparing the Top-300 lists of four global university rankings (ARWU, THE, QS, Leiden), three hypotheses are tested: 1) position correlates with size in the ARWU more than in the THE and QS; 2) given their strong dependency on reputation scores, position will be correlated more with a

  13. Personality correlates (BAS-BIS), self-perception of social ranking, and cortical (alpha frequency band) modulation in peer-group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pagani, Silvia

    2014-06-22

    The perception and interpretation of social hierarchies are a key part of our social life. In the present research we considered the activation of cortical areas, mainly the prefrontal cortex, related to social ranking perception in conjunction with some personality components (BAS - Behavioral Activation System - and BIS - Behavioral Inhibition System). In two experiments we manipulated the perceived superior/inferior status during a competitive cognitive task. Indeed, we created an explicit and strongly reinforced social hierarchy based on incidental rating in an attentional task. Specifically, a peer group comparison was undertaken and improved (Experiment 1) or decreased (Experiment 2) performance was artificially manipulated by the experimenter. For each experiment two groups were compared, based on a BAS and BIS dichotomy. Alpha band modulation in prefrontal cortex, behavioral measures (performance: error rate, ER; response times, RTs), and self-perceived ranking were considered. Repeated measures ANOVAs and regression analyses showed in Experiment 1 a significant improved cognitive performance (decreased ER and RTs) and higher self-perceived ranking in high-BAS participants. Moreover, their prefrontal activity was increased within the left side (alpha band decreasing). Conversely, in Experiment 2 a significant decreased cognitive performance (increased ER and RTs) and lower self-perceived ranking was observed in higher-BIS participants. Their prefrontal right activity was increased in comparison with higher BAS. The regression analyses confirmed the significant predictive role of alpha band modulation with respect of subjects' performance and self-perception of social ranking, differently for BAS/BIS components. The present results suggest that social status perception is directly modulated by cortical activity and personality correlates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Validating rankings in soccer championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Parracho Sant'Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The final ranking of a championship is determined by quality attributes combined with other factors which should be filtered out of any decision on relegation or draft for upper level tournaments. Factors like referees' mistakes and difficulty of certain matches due to its accidental importance to the opponents should have their influence reduced. This work tests approaches to combine classification rules considering the imprecision of the number of points as a measure of quality and of the variables that provide reliable explanation for it. Two home-advantage variables are tested and shown to be apt to enter as explanatory variables. Independence between the criteria is checked against the hypothesis of maximal correlation. The importance of factors and of composition rules is evaluated on the basis of correlation between rank vectors, number of classes and number of clubs in tail classes. Data from five years of the Brazilian Soccer Championship are analyzed.

  15. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals.\\ud Design: Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing dura...

  16. How to Rank Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows.

  17. Coal and coke - analysis and testing. Higher rank coal. Hardgrove grindability index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-04

    The Standard specifies the method for determining the grindability index of hard coal using the Hardgrove machine. It also specifies the procedure for calibrating the test machine and for preparing the standard reference coal samples. The Standard is identical with ISO 5074:1994.

  18. Standard test method for ranking resistance of plastic materials to sliding wear using a block-on-ring configuration

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory procedure to measure the resistance of plastic materials under dry sliding conditions. The test utilizes a block-on-ring geometry to rank materials according to their sliding wear characteristics under various conditions. 1.2 The test specimens are small so that they can be molded or cut from fabricated plastic parts. The test may be run at the load, velocity, and temperature which simulate the service condition. 1.3 Wear test results are reported as specific wear rates calculated from volume loss, sliding distance, and load. Materials with superior wear resistance have lower specific wear rates. 1.4 This test method allows the use of both single- and multi-station apparatus to determine the specific wear rates. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibil...

  19. Analisis Kecenderungan Data Hujan di Jawa Timur Menggunakan Metode Mann-Kendal & Rank-Sum Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indarto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe temporal variability of rainfall data in East Java region and perform trend analysis using Mean-Kendall-Test. Is there any significant trend amongs periods? Time series data from (9 nine pluviometres around the East Java region were exploited. Daily rainfall data from: 01 January 1960 to 31 Decembre 2005 were used as main input for the analysis. Daily, Monthly and Annual data were visualised by means of Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA and then analysed using Mean-Kendall Test. Results shows that annual rainfall data from a few locations have significant negatif trend. However, Rainfall data from others locations have no significant trend amongs periods of observation.

  20. Correlation of the Health Sciences Reasoning Test with student admission variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Wendy C; Persky, Adam; Blalock, Susan J

    2013-08-12

    To assess the association between scores on the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) and pharmacy student admission variables. During the student admissions process, cognitive data, including undergraduate grade point average and Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores, were collected from matriculating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. Between 2007 and 2009, the HSRT was administered to 329 first-year PharmD students. Correlations between HSRT scores and cognitive data, previous degree, and gender were examined. After controlling for other predictors, 3 variables were significantly associated with HSRT scores: percentile rank on the reading comprehension (padmission criteria.

  1. correlation between cytology and thyroid function test

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Damary

    2006-10-01

    Oct 1, 2006 ... Results: Forty two patients had their thyroid profiles done and the results were correlated with. FNA diagnosis. Majority of patients had nodular goiter ... diagnosis of non-diagnostic sample had euthyroidism while 2.4% each with papillary carcinoma, ... of a nodule raises suspicion for cancer, only 5% are.

  2. Correlation Between Screening Mammography Interpretive Performance on a Test Set and Performance in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Ichikawa, Laura; Smith, Robert A; Buist, Diana S M; Carney, Patricia A; Geller, Berta; Monsees, Barbara; Onega, Tracy; Rosenberg, Robert; Sickles, Edward A; Yankaskas, Bonnie C; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is inconsistent about whether radiologists' interpretive performance on a screening mammography test set reflects their performance in clinical practice. This study aimed to estimate the correlation between test set and clinical performance and determine if the correlation is influenced by cancer prevalence or lesion difficulty in the test set. This institutional review board-approved study randomized 83 radiologists from six Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium registries to assess one of four test sets of 109 screening mammograms each; 48 radiologists completed a fifth test set of 110 mammograms 2 years later. Test sets differed in number of cancer cases and difficulty of lesion detection. Test set sensitivity and specificity were estimated using woman-level and breast-level recall with cancer status and expert opinion as gold standards. Clinical performance was estimated using women-level recall with cancer status as the gold standard. Spearman rank correlations between test set and clinical performance with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. For test sets with fewer cancers (N = 15) that were more difficult to detect, correlations were weak to moderate for sensitivity (woman level = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.16, 0.69; breast level = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.03, 0.61) and weak for specificity (0.24, 95% CI = 0.01, 0.45) relative to expert recall. Correlations for test sets with more cancers (N = 30) were close to 0 and not statistically significant. Correlations between screening performance on a test set and performance in clinical practice are not strong. Test set performance more accurately reflects performance in clinical practice if cancer prevalence is low and lesions are challenging to detect. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Political attitudes in adolescence and emerging adulthood: Developmental changes in mean level, polarization, rank-order stability, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekker, Roderik; Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim

    2015-06-01

    This three-wave cohort-sequential longitudinal study (N = 1302) examined the development of two core political attitudes, economic egalitarianism and ethnocentrism, among Dutch youths between age 12 and 31. Longitudinal regression analyses revealed a curvilinear mean level development for both attitudes, reflecting an increased disagreement with economic redistribution and multiculturalism around late adolescence. Furthermore, attitudes became decreasingly polarized (i.e., less extreme) and increasingly stable with age. Finally, several effects of attitudes' correlates gradually changed: The effect of educational level on ethnocentrism increased with age, whereas the effect of gender diminished. Regional effects on ethnocentrism developed as youths resided in a new area. No age-related change was found in the effect of parental SES. Overall, these findings support the idea that attitudes mature during the formative phase of adolescence and that this process slows down during emerging adulthood. Furthermore, these results support developmental explanations for the association between attitudes and their correlates. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Testing University Rankings Statistically: Why this Perhaps is not such a Good Idea after All. Some Reflections on Statistical Power, Effect Size, Random Sampling and Imaginary Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and question the use of statistical significance tests in relation to university rankings as recently suggested. We outline the assumptions behind and interpretations of statistical significance tests and relate this to examples from the recent SCImago Institutions Rankin...

  5. Diabetic Erythrocytes Test by Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A.M; Foresto, P; Darrigo, M; Rosso, O.A

    2008-01-01

    Even when a healthy individual is studied, his/her erythrocytes in capillaries continually change their shape in a synchronized erratic fashion. In this work, the problem of characterizing the cell behavior is studied from the perspective of bounded correlated random walk, based on the assumption that diffractometric data involves both deterministic and stochastic components. The photometric readings are obtained by ektacytometry over several millions of shear elongated cells, using a home-made device called Erythrodeformeter. We have only a scalar signal and no governing equations; therefore the complete behavior has to be reconstructed in an artificial phase space. To analyze dynamics we used the technique of time delay coordinates suggested by Takens, May algorithm, and Fourier transform. The results suggest that on random-walk approach the samples from healthy controls exhibit significant differences from those from diabetic patients and these could allow us to claim that we have linked mathematical nonlinear tools with clinical aspects of diabetic erythrocytes’ rheological properties. PMID:19415139

  6. Rasch analysis of three dry eye questionnaires and correlates with objective clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlinden, Colm; Gao, Rongrong; Wang, Qinmei; Zhu, Senmiao; Yang, Jing; Yu, Ayong; Bron, Anthony J; Huang, Jinhai

    2017-04-01

    To assess the psychometric properties of Chinese versions of the Ocular Comfort Index (OCI), Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) and McMonnies questionnaires. Further, to assess the correlation between questionnaire scores and objective dry eye disease (DED) clinical tests. Translated versions of the OCI, OSDI and McMonnies questionnaires were completed in a random order by 238 participants with DED. Objective clinical tests included visual acuity (VA), fluorescein tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal fluorescein staining, Schirmer I testing and meibomian gland grading. Rasch analysis was used to assess questionnaire psychometrics and spearman rank for correlations. For the OCI, the person separation was 2.31, item infit and outfit statistics ranged from 0.74-1.14 and 0.75-1.32, respectively, and targeting 1.54 logits. For the OSDI, person separation was 0.94. None of the three subscales provided valid measurements based on Rasch analysis. For the McMonnies questionnaire, person separation was 1.17, item infit and outfit statistics ranged from 0.7 to 1.21 and 0.51-3.49, respectively. There were weak correlations between questionnaire scores and clinical tests. There were weak correlations between OSDI scores and VA, fluorescein TBUT, Schirmer I testing and corneal fluorescein staining. There were weak correlations between McMonnies scores and VA, fluorescein TBUT, Schirmer I testing, and corneal fluorescein staining and meibomian gland grading. The OCI questionnaire was the only questionnaire that provided valid measurement on the basis of Rasch analysis, although slight multidimensionality was found. There were weak correlations between OCI scores and fluorescein TBUT, Schirmer I testing, and corneal fluorescein staining. Due to this paradoxical disconnect between symptoms and signs and the repeatability of tests, the use of both subjective and objective markers in the clinical management of patients or as endpoints in clinical trials would appear prudent

  7. Satisfaction with Information Centers, E-Journals and Specilized Databases and their Correlation with the Age and Academic Rank of Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Salajegheh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study intends to study the extent of utilization of information centers and e-journals as well as satisfaction rate and to correlate these with age and academic status of faculty members at medical schools in Iranian medical universities. A questionnaire was used for data collection. 700 faculty members were selected using regular random sampling. Results indicate that faculty members use e-journals more than printed journals. Satisfaction rate with databases as well as their utilization is high. Digital libraries are used heavily for document access. A combination of digital library and print library comes second, followed by using print libraries exclusively. The study further demonstrates that there is a link between variables such as age and using e-journals, age and using information centers, age and satisfaction with specialized databases. There was no correlation between academic status and e-journal usage, academic status and satisfaction with electronic databases and academic ranking with using information centers.

  8. Cytotoxic testing for food allergy: evaluation of reproducibility and correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, T E; Arkins, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cytotoxic food tests still present conflicting opinions concerning their validity. Nine atopic patients with or without a history of food allergy were studied along with 5 nonatopic patients. All tests were conducted in a double-blind fashion with 6 determinations for each of 10 food antigens. Reproducibility of the test (5/6 positive or negative) was demonstrated with wheat, milk, yeast, chocolate, and orange. In the nonatopic group, reproducible results were obtained for wheat, egg, yeast, chocolate, and chicken. Clinical correlation with 11 foods in 7 patients was demonstrated. However, there were 46 positive tests without correlation and 2 negative tests with positive histories. Therefore, there appears to be reproducibility of the tests to only 3 foods but no apparent correlation with clinical symptoms. At the present time, cytotoxic tests offer no reliable help in establishing the diagnosis of food allergy.

  9. Evaluation of Test/Analysis Correlation Methods for Crash Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Bark, Lindley W.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2001-01-01

    A project has been initiated to improve crash test and analysis correlation. The work in this paper concentrated on the test and simulation results for a fuselage section. Two drop tests of the section were conducted. The first test was designed to excite the linear structural response for comparison with finite element modal analysis results. The second test was designed to provide data for correlation with crash simulations. An MSC.Dytran model was developed to generate nonlinear transient dynamic results. Following minor modifications, the same model was executed in MSC.Nastran to generate modal analysis results. The results presented in this paper concentrate on evaluation of correlation methodologies for crash test data and finite element simulation results.

  10. Correlations among bending test methods for dental hard resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Daisuke; Miyasaka, Taira; Aoki, Harumi; Aoyagi, Yusuke; Ishida, Yoshiki

    2017-07-26

    Three types of bending tests -the 3-point bending test, 4-point bending test and biaxial flexural test- were performed to examine the correlations among the testing methods for dental hard resins (HRs). The results for 5 HRs showed that the bending strengths in descending order were: biaxial flexural strength>3-point bending strength>4-point bending strength. Regression analysis of the test methods indicated that the coefficients of determination were large for all test methods; the largest was for the combination of the 4-point bending test and biaxial flexural tests. The Weibull moduli ranged from 5.42 to 10.61, and a similar descending-order trend was found in the Weibull characteristic strength (S0) of the test methods. The biaxial flexural test method is thus a valid test of the flexural strength of dental hard resins.

  11. HIV Testing in Recent College Students: Prevalence and Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Singer, Barbara J.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; Arria, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence and correlates of HIV testing were examined in a sample of 957 unmarried recent college students in the United States. Participants were asked about HIV testing, past-six-months sexual activities, lifetime treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STI), past-year health service utilization, and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol and other…

  12. Testing group differences in brain functional connectivity: using correlations or partial correlations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R; Mueller, Bryon A; Pan, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more stable testing

  13. Electric vehicle chassis dynamometer test methods at JPL and their correlation to track tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marte, J.; Bryant, J.

    1983-01-01

    Early in its electric vehicle (EV) test program, JPL recognized that EV test procedures were too vague and too loosely defined to permit much meaningful data to be obtained from the testing. Therefore, JPL adopted more stringent test procedures and chose the chassis dynamometer rather than the track as its principal test technique. Through the years, test procedures continued to evolve towards a methodology based on chassis dynamometers which would exhibit good correlation with track testing. Based on comparative dynamometer and track test results on the ETV-1 vehicle, the test methods discussed in this report demonstrate a means by which excellent track-to-dynamometer correlation can be obtained.

  14. Correlations of Platooning Track Test and Wind Tunnel Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, Michael P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kelly, Kenneth J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering

    2018-02-02

    In this report, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed results from multiple, independent truck platooning projects to compare and contrast track test results with wind tunnel test results conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Some highlights from the report include compiled data, and results from four independent SAE J1321 full-size track test campaigns that were compared to LLNL wind tunnel testing results. All platooning scenarios tested demonstrated significant fuel savings with good correlation relative to following distances, but there are still unanswered questions and clear opportunities for system optimization. NOx emissions showed improvements from NREL tests in 2014 to Auburn tests in 2015 with respect to J1321 platooning track testing of Peloton system. NREL evaluated data from Volpe's Naturalistic Study of Truck Following Behavior, which showed minimal impact of naturalistic background platooning. We found significant correlation between multiple track studies, wind tunnel tests, and computational fluid dynamics, but also showed that there is more to learn regarding close formation and longer-distance effects. We also identified potential areas for further research and development, including development of advanced aerodynamic designs optimized for platooning, measurement of platoon system performance in traffic conditions, impact of vehicle lateral offsets on platooning performance, and characterization of the national potential for platooning based on fleet operational characteristics.

  15. Fractional cointegration rank estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating the parame......We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating...... to control for stochastic trend estimation effects from the first step. The critical values of the tests proposed depend only on the number of common trends under the null, p - r, and on the interval of the cointegration degrees b allowed, but not on the true cointegration degree b0. Hence, no additional...

  16. Generalized Correlation Coefficient Based on Log Likelihood Ratio Test Statistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hsiang-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I point out that both Joe’s and Ding’s strength statistics can only be used for testing the pair-wise independence, and I propose a novel G-square based strength statistic, called Liu’s generalized correlation coefficient, it can be used to detect and compare the strength of not only the pair-wise independence but also the mutual independence of any multivariate variables. Furthermore, I proved that only Liu’s generalized correlation coefficient is strictly increasing on its number of variables, it is more sensitive and useful than Cramer’s V coefficient, in other words, Liu generalized correlation coefficient is not only the G-square based strength statistic, but also an improved statistic for detecting and comparing the strengths of deferent associations of any two or more sets of multivariate variables, moreover, this new strength statistic can also be tested by G2.

  17. Parallel to the Situational Judgement Test: is the Educational Performance Measure fair in ranking medical students on the UK Foundation Programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sidhu H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Harmeet Singh Sidhu,1 Adil Mahmood,2 Ranjodh Sanghera,1 Jay Mandan11Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, London, UKWe readily appraised the expert opinion by Singagireson et al which explored the fairness of using the Situational Judgement Test (SJT to rank medical students as part of the UK Foundation Programme.1 Although we agree with many of the points raised, we feel it is equally important to discuss the role of the Educational Performance Measure (EPM, which has comparable weighting to the SJT in ranking medical students. Therefore, we aim to explore whether the EPM is a fair measure in determining the allocation of foundation-training jobs to newly qualified doctors.View the original paper by Singagireson et al

  18. Correlation between brine shrimp test (BST) and some bioassays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaves of Neem (Azadirachta indica A.Juss) and Wild custard-apple (Annona senegalensis Pers) were extracted using ethanol and extracts were screened for bioactivity against brine shrimp larvae. The bioactive extracts in the brine shrimp test (BST) were investigated for correlation with aphid nematode and ...

  19. Testing Dependent Correlations with Nonoverlapping Variables: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, N. Clayton; Hittner, James B.; May, Kim

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a Monte Carlo simulation of 4 test statistics or comparing dependent correlations with no variables in common. Empirical Type 1 error rates and power estimates were determined for K. Pearson and L. N. G. Filon's (1898) z, O. J. Dunn and V. A. Clark's (1969) z, J. H. Steiger's (1980) original modification of Dunn and Clark's…

  20. Correlation of histological and histometric changes in rats testes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histological and histometric changes in the testes of albino Wistar rats were correlated. Wistar rats weighing between 180-240g were randomly divided into three groups of ten rats each. One group served as control and the rats were given normal saline. The second and third groups received 2mg/kg and 4mg/kg body ...

  1. Exploration into power of homogeneity and serial correlation tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Střelec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Verification of regression models is primarily based on analysis of error terms and constitutes one of the most important steps in applied regression analysis. In cross-sectional models, the error terms are typically heteroskedastic, while in time series regressions the errors are often affected by serial correlation. Consequently, in this paper, we focus on Monte Carlo simulations applied to explore the power of several tests of homogeneity and tests for presence of autocorrelation. In the past decades, the computational power has increased significantly to allow the benefit of simulation from exact distributions, which are not defined explicitly. We will discuss 1 testing of homogeneity for a given number of components in the exponential mixture approximated by subpopulations and 2 simulation of power in several commonly used tests of autocorrelation. For the first case, we consider exact likelihood ratio test (ELR and exact likelihood ratio test against the alternative with two-component subpopulation (ELR2. In the second case, we consider the Durbin-Watson, Durbin h, Breusch-Godfrey, Box-Pierce and Ljung-Box tests of 1st order serial correlation and the runs test of randomness in two different types of linear regression models.

  2. Correlation between depth perception by three-rods test and stereoacuity by distance Randot Stereotest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Negayama, Ryo; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Hasebe, Kayoko

    2014-09-01

    The examination of depth perception with three-rods test, in addition to visual acuity testing, is required to obtain motor vehicle license to drive taxies and trucks, according to the Road Traffic Act in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine whether the results of the three-rods test would correlate with the results of static stereopsis tests, used in ophthalmic practice. This study involved 54 normal subjects, 9 women and 45 men, with ages ranging from 18 to 25 (mean, 20.8) years. All had visual acuity of 0.8 or better with or without glasses or contact lenses correction and had no strabismus at the distant (5 m) or near (0.3 m) fixation. TNO Stereotest and Titmus Stereotest were examined at 40 cm while Distance Randot Stereotest was at 3 m. At three-rods test, a central rod was moved at the speed of 50 mm/sec forward and backward automatically against two laterally located fixed rods, placed inside the illuminated box. An examinee at the distance of 2.5 m observed the rods inside the box from a small viewing window and pushed a button to stop the central rod in alignment with the fixed rods. Erred distance (mm) of the central rod from the fixed rods as a mean of 4 measurements was correlated with stereoacuity in second of arc, measured by three kinds of the stereopsis tests. The erred distance of three-rods test was positively correlated with static stereoacuity at distance measured with Distance Randot Stereotest (ρ=0.418, p=0.0023, Spearman rank correlation test) and also with the other stereopsis tests at near fixation. The stereoacuity at near fixation, measured by TNO Stereotest and Titmus Stereotest, was positively correlated with each other (ρ=0.431, p=0.0017). Three-rods test, examining depth perception, together with the response by eye-hand coordination, gave consistent results with distant static stereoacuity when measured with Distance Randot Stereotest.

  3. Clinical color vision testing and correlation with visual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiawei; Davé, Sarita B; Wang, Jiangxia; Subramanian, Prem S

    2015-09-01

    To determine if Hardy-Rand-Rittler (H-R-R) and Ishihara testing are accurate estimates of color vision in subjects with acquired visual dysfunction. Assessment of diagnostic tools. Twenty-two subjects with optic neuropathy (aged 18-65) and 18 control subjects were recruited prospectively from an outpatient clinic. Individuals with visual acuity (VA) color blindness were excluded. All subjects underwent a comprehensive eye examination including VA, color vision, and contrast sensitivity testing. Color vision was assessed using H-R-R and Ishihara plates and Farnsworth D-15 (D-15) discs. D-15 is the accepted standard for detecting and classifying color vision deficits. Contrast sensitivity was measured using Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity charts. No relationship was found between H-R-R and D-15 scores (P = .477). H-R-R score and contrast sensitivity were positively correlated (P = .003). On multivariate analysis, contrast sensitivity (β = 8.61, P color identification in patients with optic neuropathy. Both H-R-R and Ishihara testing are correlated with contrast sensitivity, and these tests may be useful clinical surrogates for contrast sensitivity testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ranking library materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper discusses ranking factors suitable for library materials and shows that ranking in general is a complex process and that ranking for library materials requires a variety of techniques. Design/methodology/approach: The relevant literature is reviewed to provide a systematic overview of suitable ranking factors. The discussion is based on an overview of ranking factors used in Web search engines. Findings: While there are a wide variety of ranking factors appl...

  5. A Lagrange Multiplier Test for Testing the Adequacy of the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catani, Paul; Teräsvirta, Timo; Yin, Meiqun

    A Lagrange multiplier test for testing the parametric structure of a constant conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (CCC-GARCH) model is proposed. The test is based on decomposing the CCC-GARCH model multiplicatively into two components, one of which...... represents the null model, whereas the other one describes the misspeci…cation. A simulation study shows that the test has good …nite sample properties. We compare the test with other tests for misspeci…cation of multivariate GARCH models. The test has high power against alternatives where the misspeci......…cation is in the GARCH parameters and is superior to other tests. The test is not greatly affected by misspeci…cation in the conditional correlations and is therefore well suited for considering misspeci…cation of GARCH equations....

  6. Correlational structure of ‘frontal’ tests and intelligence tests indicates two components with asymmetrical neurostructural correlates in old age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Nissan, Jack; Royle, Natalie A.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both general fluid intelligence (gf) and performance on some ‘frontal tests’ of cognition decline with age. Both types of ability are at least partially dependent on the integrity of the frontal lobes, which also deteriorate with age. Overlap between these two methods of assessing complex cognition in older age remains unclear. Such overlap could be investigated using inter-test correlations alone, as in previous studies, but this would be enhanced by ascertaining whether frontal test performance and gf share neurobiological variance. To this end, we examined relationships between gf and 6 frontal tests (Tower, Self-Ordered Pointing, Simon, Moral Dilemmas, Reversal Learning and Faux Pas tests) in 90 healthy males, aged ~ 73 years. We interpreted their correlational structure using principal component analysis, and in relation to MRI-derived regional frontal lobe volumes (relative to maximal healthy brain size). gf correlated significantly and positively (.24 ≤ r ≤ .53) with the majority of frontal test scores. Some frontal test scores also exhibited shared variance after controlling for gf. Principal component analysis of test scores identified units of gf-common and gf-independent variance. The former was associated with variance in the left dorsolateral (DL) and anterior cingulate (AC) regions, and the latter with variance in the right DL and AC regions. Thus, we identify two biologically-meaningful components of variance in complex cognitive performance in older age and suggest that age-related changes to DL and AC have the greatest cognitive impact. PMID:25278641

  7. Sequential hypothesis testing with spatially correlated presence-absence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Elijah; Jeske, Daniel R; Lara, Jesus R; Hoddle, Mark

    2012-06-01

    A pest management decision to initiate a control treatment depends upon an accurate estimate of mean pest density. Presence-absence sampling plans significantly reduce sampling efforts to make treatment decisions by using the proportion of infested leaves to estimate mean pest density in lieu of counting individual pests. The use of sequential hypothesis testing procedures can significantly reduce the number of samples required to make a treatment decision. Here we construct a mean-proportion relationship for Oligonychus perseae Tuttle, Baker, and Abatiello, a mite pest of avocados, from empirical data, and develop a sequential presence-absence sampling plan using Bartlett's sequential test procedure. Bartlett's test can accommodate pest population models that contain nuisance parameters that are not of primary interest. However, it requires that population measurements be independent, which may not be realistic because of spatial correlation of pest densities across trees within an orchard. We propose to mitigate the effect of spatial correlation in a sequential sampling procedure by using a tree-selection rule (i.e., maximin) that sequentially selects each newly sampled tree to be maximally spaced from all other previously sampled trees. Our proposed presence-absence sampling methodology applies Bartlett's test to a hypothesis test developed using an empirical mean-proportion relationship coupled with a spatial, statistical model of pest populations, with spatial correlation mitigated via the aforementioned tree-selection rule. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methodology over a range of parameter estimates appropriate for densities of O. perseae that would be observed in avocado orchards in California.

  8. Correlation of accelerometry with clinical balance tests in older fallers and non-fallers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Maura

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: falls are a common cause of injury and decreased functional independence in the older adult. Diagnosis and treatment of fallers require tools that accurately assess physiological parameters associated with balance. Validated clinical tools include the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG); however, the BBS tends to be subjective in nature, while the TUG quantifies an individuals functional impairment but requires further subjective evaluation for balance assessment. Other quantitative alternatives to date require expensive, sophisticated equipment. Measurement of the acceleration of centre of mass, with relatively inexpensive, lightweight, body-mounted accelerometers is a potential solution to this problem. OBJECTIVES: to determine (i) if accelerometry correlates with standard clinical tests (BBS and TUG), (ii) to characterise accelerometer responses to increasingly difficult challenges to balance and (iii) to characterise acceleration patterns between fallers and non-fallers. Study design and setting: torso accelerations were measured at the level of L3 using a tri-axial accelerometer under four conditions; standing unsupported with eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and on a mat with eyes open (MAT EO) and closed (MAT EC). Older patients (n = 21, 8 males, 13 females) with a mean age of 78 (SD +\\/- 7.6) years who attended a day hospital were recruited for this study. Patients were identified as fallers or non-fallers based on a comprehensive falls history. MEASUREMENTS: Spearman\\'s rank correlation analysis examined the relationship between acceleration root mean square (RMS) data and the BBS while Pearson\\'s correlation was used with TUG scores. Differences in accelerometer RMS between fallers and non-fallers and between test conditions were examined using t-test and non-parametric alternatives where appropriate. RESULTS: there was a stepwise increase in accelerometer RMS with increasing task complexity, and the accelerometer

  9. Differences in the neural correlates of frontal lobe tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Teruyuki; Kato, Yuka; Imai, Ayu; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kaeko; Yamada, Kei; Narumoto, Jin

    2018-01-01

    The Executive Interview (EXIT25), the executive clock-drawing task (CLOX1), and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) are used to assess executive function at the bedside. These tests assess distinct psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to examine differences in the neural correlates of the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based on magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-eight subjects (30 with Alzheimer's disease, 10 with mild cognitive impairment, and 18 healthy controls) participated in this study. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the brain regions correlated with the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB scores. Age, gender, and years of education were included as covariates. Statistical thresholds were set to uncorrected P-values of 0.001 at the voxel level and 0.05 at the cluster level. The EXIT25 score correlated inversely with the regional grey matter volume in the left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann areas 6, 9, 44, and 45). The CLOX1 score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11) and the left supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40). The FAB score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right precentral gyrus (Brodmann area 6). The left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 9) and the right lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 46) were identified as common brain regions that showed association with EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based only a voxel-level threshold. The results of this study suggest that the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB may be associated with the distinct neural correlates of the frontal cortex. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  10. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-05-01

    A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals. Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 surveyed participants to examine whether the perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration could be predicted from the ranking of each person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 2 tested whether manipulating the rank position of the tooth-brushing duration influenced participant-perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 used a longitudinal intervention method to examine whether messages relating to the rank positions of tooth-brushing durations causally influenced the self-report tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 demonstrates that perceptions of the health benefits from tooth-brushing duration are predicted by the perceptions of how that behaviour ranks in comparison to other people's behaviour. Study 2 demonstrates that the perceptions of the health benefits of tooth-brushing duration can be manipulated experimentally by changing the ranked position of a person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 experimentally demonstrates the possibility of increasing the length of time for which individuals clean their teeth by focusing on how they rank among their peers in terms of tooth-brushing duration. The effectiveness of interventions using social-ranking methods relative to those that emphasize comparisons made against group averages or normative guidelines are discussed. What is already known on this subject? Individual make judgements based on social rank information. Social rank information has been shown to influence positive health behaviours such as exercise

  11. A driving simulation task: correlations with Multiple Sleep Latency Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Fabio; Contardi, Sara; Mostacci, Barbara; Mondini, Susanna; Cirignotta, Fabio

    2004-06-30

    Sleepiness and driving is a dangerous combination that causes thousands of crashes each year resulting in injury and death. In the last few years, driving simulators have been used to study the performance decrements associated with drowsiness. We correlated performances of a driving simulation task in healthy volunteers in different alertness conditions with objective (MSLT: Multiple Sleep Latency Test) and subjective (SSS: Stanford Sleepiness Scale; VAS: Visual Analogue Scale) sleepiness measurements. The subjects were tested on two days, after a normal night of sleep and after a night of complete sleep deprivation. The study consists of four sessions of MSLT, each one followed by subjective measurements of sleepiness and by a 30 min driving simulation task with a monotonous driving scenario. The parameters that correlate most highly with MSLT are the standard deviation of lane position, the mean RT, crash frequency and exceeding the speed limit frequency. The monotonous driving simulation we adopted showed strong correlations with MSLT and subjective sleepiness scales in healthy subjects and is suitable to evaluate excessive daytime sleepiness in patients.

  12. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  13. Standard test method for ranking resistance of plastics to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test—cumulative wear method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of plastics to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank plastics according to their sliding wear characteristics against metals or other solids. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. In addition, the test can be run with different gaseous atmospheres and elevated temperatures, as desired, to simulate service conditions. 1.3 Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for the block and ring. Materials of higher wear resistance will have lower volume loss. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with it...

  14. Ranking of in vitro fermentability of 20 feedstuffs with an automated gas production technique. Resuls of a ring test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, van A.H.; Hetta, M.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.; Boever, de J.L.; Hartigh, Den H.; Rymer, C.; Oostrum, van M.; Kaathoven, van R.; Cone, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A ring test was completed to determine within laboratory repeatability, and reproducibility among laboratories, of a gas production technique for measuring fermentation kinetics of feeds in rumen fluid. Eight laboratories in different European countries received 20 feed samples. All used the same

  15. Pseudo-Gaussian and rank-based optimal tests for random individual effects in large n small T panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennala, N.; Hallin, M.; Paindaveine, D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting unobserved heterogeneity, that is, the problem of testing the absence of random individual effects in an n × T panel. We establish a local asymptotic normality property–with respect to intercept, regression coefficient, the scale parameter σ of the error, and the

  16. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d0=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d0.

  17. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d_{0}=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d_{0}.

  18. Correlation between laboratory coagulation testing and thromboelastometry is modified during management of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jean-Stéphane; Durand, Maeva; Levrat, Albrice; Lefevre, Mathilde; Rugeri, Lucia; Geay-Baillat, Marie-Odile; Inaba, Kenji; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Thromboelastometry (ROTEM, Pentapharm GmbH, Munich, Germany) is increasingly being used to make a diagnosis of coagulopathy and to guide hemostatic therapy (HT). Although ROTEM parameters and standard laboratory test (SLT) correlated well before administration of HT, it is not known if this correlation persists after hemostatic resuscitation. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a trauma registry (2011-2014) was performed. All patients having a ROTEM analysis were included. ROTEM parameters (clotting time and clot amplitude at 5 minutes) were determined after activation with tissue factor (EXTEM) or platelet inhibition with cytochalasin D (FIBTEM). Spearman rank correlation coefficient was calculated for the correlation between SLT and thromboelastometry parameters, and thresholds were determined with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for the diagnosis of an international normalized ratio (INR) greater than 1.5, fibrinogen 1.5 g/L or less, and platelet count of less than 100.10/L. Of the 358 patients included, 533 thromboelastometry results were obtained (335 at admission, 198 during care). Correlation between INR and EXTEM-clotting time was good at admission (r = 0.617) in the whole cohort but decreased in the subgroup of patients having an Injury Severity Score of less than 25 (r = 0.399) or a base excess of less than 6 mmol/L (r = 0.489). During care, correlation was impaired after the administration of fibrinogen concentrates in the whole cohort (r = 0.430), as well as in the subgroup of patients having an Injury Severity Score greater than 24 (r = 0.465). As well, for the diagnosis of increased INR, sensitivity and the area under the ROC curve decreased from 75% and 0.894 (no treatment) to 20% and 0.653 (fibrinogen concentrate). Areas under the ROC curve for the prediction of a fibrinogen or platelet decrease were not significantly altered regardless of the treatment group. A decrease in the correlation between

  19. Testing the Correlations between Corporate Giving, Performance and Company Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia-Daniela Hategan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper seeks to identify the relationship between the charitable contributions, performance, and market value of Romanian listed companies. To achieve the objective, a panel data analysis was conducted on a group of companies listed at Bucharest Stock Exchange in the period 2011 to 2016, which registered profit for the entire period. The empirical analysis points out, using a logistic regression, which financial and non-financial indicators contribute to the decisions of the companies to make the charitable contributions. It also tests the impact of those indicators and corporate giving activities like Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR activities on company value, represented by Tobin’s Q Ratio and on company performance, expressed by Return on Equity (ROE. The results show that there is a positive correlation between the charitable contributions, performance, and market value of the Romanian listed companies.

  20. Development and testing of new exchange correlation functionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgård, Keld Troen

    Catalysts are used in 90% of the world’s chemical processes to produce 60% of its chemical products, and they are thus very important to our modern society. We therefore seek to better understand current catalytic materials, so that we can find alternatives that will improve the energy efficiency...... on accurate and efficient approximations to the exchange correlation functional, yet these functional approximations have lacked a systematic way to estimate the underlying uncertainties. A Bayesian error estimation approach provides a mechanism for calculating approximative uncertainties, and so accurate......-empirical functional approximations have been made: BEEF-vdW, mBEEF, and mBEEFvdW. It is shown that these functionals are able balance the accuracy of predicting energetics of covalent and non-covalent chemistry better than any comparative functional that we have tested, and they could therefore become the functional...

  1. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  2. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  3. Ranking Fuzzy Numbers and Its Application to Products Attributes Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Lazim; Fauzee, Nor Nashrah Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is one of the widely used methods in fuzzy decision making environment. The recent ranking fuzzy numbers proposed by Wang and Li is claimed to be the improved version in ranking. However, the method was never been simplified and tested in real life application. This paper presents a four-step computation of ranking fuzzy numbers and its application in ranking attributes of selected chocolate products. The four steps algorithm was formulated to rank fuzzy numbers and followed by a tes...

  4. Correlation between Peel Test and Real Time Ultrasonic Test for Quality Diagnosis in Resistance Spot Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo F. Andreoli

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper aimed to study the correlation between Real Time Integrated Weld Analyzer measurements and peel test results. The experiment involved study of weld nuggets for different combinations of sheet thicknesses, welding time and current of mild steel samples. The intent was to assess the potential use of a real time integrated ultrasonic system in the industrial environment allowing nondestructive evaluation of 100% of the spot welds produced. The results showed high correlation between nugget penetration into the sheets and nugget size measured ultrasonically and destructively, for all evaluated parameters.

  5. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  6. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-04-17

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse structure, we assume that each multimedia object could be represented as a sparse linear combination of all other objects, and combination coefficients are regarded as a similarity measure between objects and used to regularize their ranking scores. Moreover, we propose to learn the sparse combination coefficients and the ranking scores simultaneously. A unified objective function is constructed with regard to both the combination coefficients and the ranking scores, and is optimized by an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two multimedia database retrieval data sets demonstrate the significant improvements of the propose algorithm over state-of-the-art ranking score learning algorithms.

  7. Using Response Surface Methods to Correlate the Modal Test of an Inflatable Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anju

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a practical application of response surface methods (RSM) to correlate a finite element model of a structural modal test. The test article is a quasi-cylindrical inflatable structure which primarily consists of a fabric weave, with an internal bladder and metallic bulkheads on either end. To mitigate model size, the fabric weave was simplified by representing it with shell elements. The task at hand is to represent the material behavior of the weave. The success of the model correlation is measured by comparing the four major modal frequencies of the analysis model to the four major modal frequencies of the test article. Given that only individual strap material properties were provided and material properties of the overall weave were not available, defining the material properties of the finite element model became very complex. First it was necessary to determine which material properties (modulus of elasticity in the hoop and longitudinal directions, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc.) affected the modal frequencies. Then a Latin Hypercube of the parameter space was created to form an efficiently distributed finite case set. Each case was then analyzed with the results input into RSM. In the resulting response surface it was possible to see how each material parameter affected the modal frequencies of the analysis model. If the modal frequencies of the analysis model and its corresponding parameters match the test with acceptable accuracy, it can be said that the model correlation is successful.

  8. Relationship Between the 6-minute Walk Test and Correlates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The measurements included the 6-Minute Walk Distance (6MWD) for exercise capacity and the T2D correlates including age, body mass index, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. The relationships between the parameters were determined using the Pearson's correlation coefficient at a significance level of 0.05.

  9. Maximum Waring ranks of monomials

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Erik; Plummer, Paul; Siegert, Jeremy; Teitler, Zach

    2013-01-01

    We show that monomials and sums of pairwise coprime monomials in four or more variables have Waring rank less than the generic rank, with a short list of exceptions. We asymptotically compare their ranks with the generic rank.

  10. Spelling Correlation on Handwritten vs. Multiple-Choice Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Genell

    In order to determine if multiple choice spelling tests are as effective as handwritten tests, 265 college freshmen were tested on the same spelling words by traditional oral dictation and then by five-option multiple choice questions. Results were compared to examine the efficacy of multiple choice testing. Of a possible 20 points, the mean score…

  11. Using the Correlation Function in Ultrasonic Non-destructive Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kreidl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with ultrasonic signal de-noising by means of correlation. It is commonly known that the cross-correlation function shows the statistical dependence between two signals. In ultrasonic inspection, the measured signal is taken as the first signal. The most important aspect of this method is the choice of the second signal. Various types of the second signals can be tried.

  12. Academic rankings: an approach to a Portuguese ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardino, Pedro; Marques,Rui

    2009-01-01

    The academic rankings are a controversial subject in higher education. However, despite all the criticism, academic rankings are here to stay and more and more different stakeholders use rankings to obtain information about the institutions’ performance. The two most well-known rankings, The Times and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings have different methodologies. The Times ranking is based on peer review, whereas the Shanghai ranking has only quantitative indicators and is mainly ba...

  13. Neural correlates of testing effects in vocabulary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Gesa S E; Takashima, Atsuko; Segers, Eliane; Fernández, Guillén; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-09-01

    Tests that require memory retrieval strongly improve long-term retention in comparison to continued studying. For example, once learners know the translation of a word, restudy practice, during which they see the word and its translation again, is less effective than testing practice, during which they see only the word and retrieve the translation from memory. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated the neuro-cognitive mechanisms underlying this striking testing effect. Twenty-six young adults without prior knowledge of Swahili learned the translation of 100 Swahili words and then further practiced the words in an fMRI scanner by restudying or by testing. Recall of the translations on a final memory test after one week was significantly better and faster for tested words than for restudied words. Brain regions that were more active during testing than during restudying included the left inferior frontal gyrus, ventral striatum, and midbrain areas. Increased activity in the left inferior parietal and left middle temporal areas during testing but not during restudying predicted better recall on the final memory test. Together, results suggest that testing may be more beneficial than restudying due to processes related to targeted semantic elaboration and selective strengthening of associations between retrieval cues and relevant responses, and may involve increased effortful cognitive control and modulations of memory through striatal motivation and reward circuits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlates of hepatitis B testing among Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Gloria D; Taylor, Victoria M; Tu, Shin-Ping; Yasui, Yutaka; Acorda, Elizabeth; Woodall, Erica; Yip, Mei-Po; Li, Lin; Hislop, T Gregory

    2007-12-01

    Chinese Americans are 10 times more likely to be diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than their white counterparts. About 80% of HCC's among Asian immigrants are associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We used data from in-person interviews of Chinese residents in Seattle to examine factors associated with HBV testing. The survey was completed by 206 men and 236 women (cooperation rate: 58%). Less than one-half (48%) of respondents had been tested for HBV. Factors associated (p infected with HBV than Whites; individuals can be infected with HBV for life; HBV infection can cause liver cancer; not believing that HBV can be prevented by having a positive attitude; having a family member, friend, or medical doctor recommend testing; asking for testing from a medical doctor; and not needing interpreter services. In multiple regression analyses, the following factors were independently associated with testing: believing that Chinese were more likely than Whites to get HBV (p = 0.004), having a doctor recommend testing (p test (p < 0.001) and not needing an interpreter for doctors visits (p = 0.002). Intervention programs to improve HBV testing rates in Chinese Americans should include strategies to improve knowledge about the risk of HBV and encourage effective communication with health care providers about HBV testing.

  15. The role of growth form and correlated traits in competitive ranking of six perennial ruderal plant species grown in unbalanced mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Hansjörg; Steinlein, Thomas; Ullmann, Isolde

    1998-02-01

    The competitive abilities of six perennial ruderal plants of three different growth forms were compared via yield measures using an additive diallel experimental design with unbalanced mixtures (9:3 or 3:9 plants per pot, respectively). Thus, in a given mixture species A was grown in two configurations: three individuals in centre position of the pot together with nine plants of species B in border position and vice versa. Effect competitive abilities as well as response competitive abilities of the species were significantly related to canopy height and plant biomass. The species with lower rosette growth form and smaller biomasses were weaker competitors than the species possessing elevated canopies along with higher biomasses, whereas total leaf area was not significantly correlated with competitive ability between species. Species differences in competitive ability were stronger between the plants grown in the central position than between those grown in the border position. Furthermore, interactions between species-specific traits and configuration could be observed, indicating the importance of species proportions and arrangement patterns for evaluation of competitive outcome in the field. The degree of complete transitivity of the competitive network of the six ruderal species, which was significantly higher than expected under the null model in our experimental design, also seemed to depend on species proportions in mixture. Shifts in root:shoot ratio of the centre plants when faced with competition by the border plants were in the direction of higher shoot allocation for the weak competitors with rosette growth form irrespective of the neighbour species, except for Bunias orientalis, which showed a more plastic response. The stronger competitors showed higher root allocation ( Urtica dioica) or were hardly affected at all. Consistent with the results of our experiment, the weaker competitors occur at rather frequently disturbed and therefore transient

  16. Ranking Economic History Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study ranks - for the first time - 12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We...... also compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential...

  17. Ranking economic history journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    This study ranks-for the first time-12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We also...... compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential for economic...

  18. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  19. Rotary Wing Aircraft Water Impact Test and Analyses Correlation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wittlin, Gil

    2000-01-01

    ... with a decreasing dependence on expensive scale model ditching tests. This paper describes an effort that focuses on the application of a crash modeling and simulation approach utilizing both a nonlinear finite-element code (MSC/DYTRAN(registered...

  20. Correlation of geotextile puncture test methods : research brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Geotextiles are commonly used in pavements, earth retaining structures, landfills and other geotechnical contexts. Various tests are conducted to evaluate and classify geotextiles to determine their suitability for each of these applications. The AST...

  1. Testing ecological and behavioral correlates of nest predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, J.J.; Martel, M.; Markland, H.M.; Niklison, Alina M.; Decker, Karie L.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in nest predation rates among bird species are assumed to reflect differences in risk that are specific to particular nest sites. Theoretical and empirical studies suggest that parental care behaviors can evolve in response to nest predation risk and thereby differ among ecological conditions that vary in inherent risk. However, parental care also can influence predation risk. Separating the effects of nest predation risk inherent to a nest site from the risk imposed by parental strategies is needed to understand the evolution of parental care. Here we identify correlations between risks inherent to nest sites, and risk associated with parental care behaviors, and use an artificial nest experiment to assess site-specific differences in nest predation risk across nesting guilds and between habitats that differed in nest predator abundance. We found a strong correlation between parental care behaviors and inherent differences in nest predation risk, but despite the absence of parental care at artificial nests, patterns of nest predation risk were similar for real and artificial nests both across nesting guilds and between predator treatments. Thus, we show for the first time that inherent risk of nest predation varies with nesting guild and predator abundance independent of parental care. ?? Oikos.

  2. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  3. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  4. Citation ranking versus peer evaluation of senior faculty research performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meho, Lokman I.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    indicator of research performance of senior faculty members? Citation data, book reviews, and peer ranking were compiled and examined for faculty members specializing in Kurdish studies. Analysis shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis data yield identical ranking results....... Analysis also shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis, book reviews, and peer ranking perform similarly (i.e., are highly correlated) for high-ranked and low-ranked senior scholars. Additional evaluation methods and measures that take into account the context and content......The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between citation ranking and peer evaluation in assessing senior faculty research performance. Other studies typically derive their peer evaluation data directly from referees, often in the form of ranking. This study uses two additional...

  5. PageRank as a method to rank biomedical literature by importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Elliot J; Dixon, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Optimal ranking of literature importance is vital in overcoming article overload. Existing ranking methods are typically based on raw citation counts, giving a sum of 'inbound' links with no consideration of citation importance. PageRank, an algorithm originally developed for ranking webpages at the search engine, Google, could potentially be adapted to bibliometrics to quantify the relative importance weightings of a citation network. This article seeks to validate such an approach on the freely available, PubMed Central open access subset (PMC-OAS) of biomedical literature. On-demand cloud computing infrastructure was used to extract a citation network from over 600,000 full-text PMC-OAS articles. PageRanks and citation counts were calculated for each node in this network. PageRank is highly correlated with citation count (R = 0.905, P PageRank can be trivially computed on commodity cluster hardware and is linearly correlated with citation count. Given its putative benefits in quantifying relative importance, we suggest it may enrich the citation network, thereby overcoming the existing inadequacy of citation counts alone. We thus suggest PageRank as a feasible supplement to, or replacement of, existing bibliometric ranking methods.

  6. Learning style, school environment and test anxiety as correlates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their age ranged between 12 and 19 years with mean age of 15.4 years and the standard deviation of 4.56. The participants were administered four valid and reliable instruments to assess the predictors of learning outcomes among the students (learning styles, school environment and test anxiety). Pearson's Product ...

  7. Asset ranking manager (ranking index of components)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, S.M.; Engle, A.M.; Morgan, T.A. [Applied Reliability, Maracor Software and Engineering (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Ranking Index of Components (RIC) is an Asset Reliability Manager (ARM), which itself is a Web Enabled front end where plant database information fields from several disparate databases are combined. That information is used to create a specific weighted number (Ranking Index) relating to that components health and risk to the site. The higher the number, the higher priority that any work associated with that component receives. ARM provides site Engineering, Maintenance and Work Control personnel with a composite real time - (current condition) look at the components 'risk of not working' to the plant. Information is extracted from the existing Computerized Maintenance management System (CMMS) and specific site applications and processed nightly. ARM helps to ensure that the most important work is placed into the workweeks and the non value added work is either deferred, frequency changed or deleted. This information is on the web, updated each night, and available for all employees to use. This effort assists the work management specialist when allocating limited resources to the most important work. The use of this tool has maximized resource usage, performing the most critical work with available resources. The ARM numbers are valued inputs into work scoping for the workweek managers. System and Component Engineers are using ARM to identify the components that are at 'risk of failure' and therefore should be placed into the appropriate work week schedule.

  8. Multiplex PageRank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Halu

    Full Text Available Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  9. Multiplex PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  10. Ranking of Rankings: Benchmarking Twenty-Five Higher Education Ranking Systems in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ingo; Hendel, Darwin D.; Horn, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ranking practices of 25 European higher education ranking systems (HERSs). Ranking practices were assessed with 14 quantitative measures derived from the Berlin Principles on Ranking of Higher Education Institutions (BPs). HERSs were then ranked according to their degree of congruence with the BPs.…

  11. Functional Multiplex PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Rahmede, Christoph; Arenas, Alex; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-10-01

    Recently it has been recognized that many complex social, technological and biological networks have a multilayer nature and can be described by multiplex networks. Multiplex networks are formed by a set of nodes connected by links having different connotations forming the different layers of the multiplex. Characterizing the centrality of the nodes in a multiplex network is a challenging task since the centrality of the node naturally depends on the importance associated to links of a certain type. Here we propose to assign to each node of a multiplex network a centrality called Functional Multiplex PageRank that is a function of the weights given to every different pattern of connections (multilinks) existent in the multiplex network between any two nodes. Since multilinks distinguish all the possible ways in which the links in different layers can overlap, the Functional Multiplex PageRank can describe important non-linear effects when large relevance or small relevance is assigned to multilinks with overlap. Here we apply the Functional Page Rank to the multiplex airport networks, to the neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans, and to social collaboration and citation networks between scientists. This analysis reveals important differences existing between the most central nodes of these networks, and the correlations between their so-called pattern to success.

  12. Correlates of androgens in wild male Barbary macaques: Testing the challenge hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Alan V; Maréchal, Laëtitia; Semple, Stuart; Majolo, Bonaventura; MacLarnon, Ann

    2017-10-01

    Investigating causes and consequences of variation in hormonal expression is a key focus in behavioral ecology. Many studies have explored patterns of secretion of the androgen testosterone in male vertebrates, using the challenge hypothesis (Wingfield, Hegner, Dufty, & Ball, 1990; The American Naturalist, 136(6), 829-846) as a theoretical framework. Rather than the classic association of testosterone with male sexual behavior, this hypothesis predicts that high levels of testosterone are associated with male-male reproductive competition but also inhibit paternal care. The hypothesis was originally developed for birds, and subsequently tested in other vertebrate taxa, including primates. Such studies have explored the link between testosterone and reproductive aggression as well as other measures of mating competition, or between testosterone and aspects of male behavior related to the presence of infants. Very few studies have simultaneously investigated the links between testosterone and male aggression, other aspects of mating competition and infant-related behavior. We tested predictions derived from the challenge hypothesis in wild male Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus), a species with marked breeding seasonality and high levels of male-infant affiliation, providing a powerful test of this theoretical framework. Over 11 months, 251 hr of behavioral observations and 296 fecal samples were collected from seven adult males in the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco. Fecal androgen levels rose before the onset of the mating season, during a period of rank instability, and were positively related to group mating activity across the mating season. Androgen levels were unrelated to rates of male-male aggression in any period, but higher ranked males had higher levels in both the mating season and in the period of rank instability. Lower androgen levels were associated with increased rates of male-infant grooming during the mating and unstable periods. Our results

  13. From rankings to mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Darrell G; Prescott, John E

    2013-08-01

    Since the 1980s, school ranking systems have been a topic of discussion among leaders of higher education. Various ranking systems are based on inadequate data that fail to illustrate the complex nature and special contributions of the institutions they purport to rank, including U.S. medical schools, each of which contributes uniquely to meeting national health care needs. A study by Tancredi and colleagues in this issue of Academic Medicine illustrates the limitations of rankings specific to primary care training programs. This commentary discusses, first, how each school's mission and strengths, as well as the impact it has on the community it serves, are distinct, and, second, how these schools, which are each unique, are poorly represented by overly subjective ranking methodologies. Because academic leaders need data that are more objective to guide institutional development, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has been developing tools to provide valid data that are applicable to each medical school. Specifically, the AAMC's Medical School Admissions Requirements and its Missions Management Tool each provide a comprehensive assessment of medical schools that leaders are using to drive institutional capacity building. This commentary affirms the importance of mission while challenging the leaders of medical schools, teaching hospitals, and universities to use reliable data to continually improve the quality of their training programs to improve the health of all.

  14. Value of Multiple Sleep Latency Test Periods and Clinical Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Oztura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Patients with complaints excessive daytime sleepiness were evaluated with Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT electrophysiological findings and researched narcolepsy symptoms like nightmare, hallucinations, cataplexy in this study. Material and Method: To study 26 patients were admitted retrospectively with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness at Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine Sleep Clinic in the dates December 2009- December 2010. Cases of narcolepsy symptoms (hallucinations-nightmare-cataplexy and MSLT were evaluated together. The onset of REM sleep (SOREM was counted, than SOREM (+ and SOREM (- patients’ sleep latency and narcolepsy symptoms were compared. All data were analyzed with SPSS 20.0. Results: The mean sleep latency assessed sleep latencies, gradually widening towards the end of the first sleep period, and it has been observed to be statistically significant(p:0.007. Conclusion: The mean sleep latency assessed sleep latencies, gradually widening towards the end of the first sleep period, and it has been observed to be statistically significant(p:0.007 and we thinked that it can be decreased of need to sleep during nap periods. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 712-718

  15. Test for equality of intraclass correlation coefficients under unequal family sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D J; Bhandary, M

    1998-12-01

    The likelihood ratio test, the large-sample z-test, and the large-sample z-test have been proposed to test for the equality of two intraclass correlation coefficients under unequal family sizes based on two independent multinomial samples. It has been found on the basis of simulation studies that the likelihood ratio test consistently and reliably produces results superior to those of the large-sample z-test and large-sample z-test in terms of power for various combinations of intraclass correlation coefficient values.

  16. Correlation between Picture Use in Test Format and Students' Vocabulary Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyanto

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between picture use in test format and vocabulary achievement of 41 male and female seventh graders of Santu Petrus Junior High School. Hence, in this paper, the writer presents how strong the correlation between picture use in test format and vocabulary achievement of the seventh graders, and the students'…

  17. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  18. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  19. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf

    2015-03-23

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective: The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods: We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results: There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions: ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  20. Ranking adverse drug reactions with crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-03-23

    There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  1. Ranking Fuzzy Numbers and Its Application to Products Attributes Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Lazim Abdullah; Nor Nashrah Ahmad Fauzee

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is one of the widely used methods in fuzzy decision making environment. The recent ranking fuzzy numbers proposed by Wang and Li is claimed to be the improved version in ranking. However, the method was never been simplified and tested in real life application. This paper presents a four-step computation of ranking fuzzy numbers and its application in ranking attributes of selected chocolate products.  The four steps algorithm was formulated to rank fuzzy numbers and followed by a tes...

  2. Gray matter correlates of cognitive ability tests used for vocational guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Cheuk

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual differences in cognitive abilities provide information that is valuable for vocational guidance, but there is an ongoing debate about the role of ability factors, including general intelligence (g, compared to individual tests. Neuroimaging can help identify brain parameters that may account for individual differences in both factors and tests. Here we investigate how eight tests used in vocational guidance correlate to regional gray matter. We compare brain networks identified by using scores for ability factors (general and specific to those identified by using individual tests to determine whether these relatively broad and narrow approaches yield similar results. Findings Using MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM, we correlated gray matter with independent ability factors (general intelligence, speed of reasoning, numerical, spatial, memory and individual test scores from a battery of cognitive tests completed by 40 individuals seeking vocational guidance. Patterns of gray matter correlations differed between group ability factors and individual tests. Moreover, tests within the same factor showed qualitatively different brain correlates to some degree. Conclusions The psychometric factor structure of cognitive tests can help identify brain networks related to cognitive abilities beyond a general intelligence factor (g. Correlates of individual ability tests with gray matter, however, appear to have some differences from the correlates for group factors.

  3. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. OutRank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Steinhausen, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Outlier detection is an important data mining task for consistency checks, fraud detection, etc. Binary decision making on whether or not an object is an outlier is not appropriate in many applications and moreover hard to parametrize. Thus, recently, methods for outlier ranking have been proposed...

  5. A folk-psychological ranking of personality facets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Roivainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Which personality facets should a general personality test measure? No consensus exists on the facet structure of personality, the nature of facets, or the correct method of identifying the most significant facets. However, it can be hypothesized (the lexical hypothesis that high frequency personality describing words more likely represent important personality facets and rarely used words refer to less significant aspects of personality. Participants and procedure A ranking of personality facets was performed by studying the frequency of the use of popular personality adjectives in causal clauses (because he is a kind person on the Internet and in books as attributes of the word person (kind person. Results In Study 1, the 40 most frequently used adjectives had a cumulative usage frequency equal to that of the rest of the 295 terms studied. When terms with a higher-ranking dictionary synonym or antonym were eliminated, 23 terms remained, which represent 23 different facets. In Study 2, clusters of synonymous terms were examined. Within the top 30 clusters, personality terms were used 855 times compared to 240 for the 70 lower-ranking clusters. Conclusions It is hypothesized that personality facets represented by the top-ranking terms and clusters of terms are important and impactful independent of their correlation with abstract underlying personality factors (five/six factor models. Compared to hierarchical personality models, lists of important facets probably better cover those aspects of personality that are situated between the five or six major domains.

  6. Correlates of HIV testing and receipt of test results in addiction health services in Los Angeles County

    OpenAIRE

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Guerrero, Erick G; Kong, Yinfei; Tsai, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV testing and receipt of HIV test results among individuals with substance use disorders is less than optimal. We examined rates and correlates of HIV testing and receipt of test results in one of the largest public addiction health services systems in the United States. Methods The study included 139,516 adult clients in treatment between 2006 and 2011. We used logistic regression models to examine associations between predisposing, enabling, and need factors and two dependent v...

  7. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  8. Androgen correlates of male reproductive effort in wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis): A multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Heistermann, Michael; Rahmi, Erdiansyah; Agil, Muhammad; Ahmad Fauzan, Panji; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-03-15

    The challenge hypothesis (Wingfield et al., 1990) has been broadly utilised as a conceptual framework to study male androgen correlates of reproductive challenges in mammals. These studies mainly assessed male androgen responsiveness to a general degree of challenge over extended periods of time. Short term co-variation between the socio-sexual challenging context and androgen levels remains, however, largely understudied. We thus aim at providing a multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis by investigating the inter- and intra-individual variations in faecal androgen excretion associated to 1) breeding seasonality, 2) dominance rank, 3) mate-guarding activity and 4) value of the guarded female. We studied long-tailed macaques, a species in which males engage in highly challenging monopolisation of females over discreet periods of time. This particularity allows testing specifically the predicted increase from level B to level C in the challenge hypothesis. The study was carried out during two reproductive seasons on three groups of wild long-tailed macaques. We combined behavioural observations and non-invasive measurements of faecal androgen metabolite (fAM) levels. We found that, as predicted by the challenge hypothesis, male long-tailed macaques respond not only to seasonal but also to short term reproductive challenges by adapting their androgen levels. First, males exhibited a seasonal rise in fAM levels during the mating period which may be triggered by fruit availability as shown by our phenological data. Second, males had increased androgen levels when mate-guarding females and, across mate-guarding periods, males had higher fAM levels when monopolising high-ranking parous females than when monopolising low-ranking ones. Finally, high-ranking males had higher fAM levels than low-ranking males year round. Our study confirms that, in species with a high degree of female monopolisability, androgen may be an important physiological fitness enhancing tool

  9. Improving Ranking Using Quantum Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Melucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows that ranking information units by quantum probability differs from ranking them by classical probability provided the same data used for parameter estimation. As probability of detection (also known as recall or power) and probability of false alarm (also known as fallout or size) measure the quality of ranking, we point out and show that ranking by quantum probability yields higher probability of detection than ranking by classical probability provided a given probability of ...

  10. A study of correlations between crude oil spot and futures markets: A rolling sample test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wan, Jieqiu

    2011-10-01

    In this article, we investigate the asymmetries of exceedance correlations and cross-correlations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot and futures markets. First, employing the test statistic proposed by Hong et al. [Asymmetries in stock returns: statistical tests and economic evaluation, Review of Financial Studies 20 (2007) 1547-1581], we find that the exceedance correlations were overall symmetric. However, the results from rolling windows show that some occasional events could induce the significant asymmetries of the exceedance correlations. Second, employing the test statistic proposed by Podobnik et al. [Quantifying cross-correlations using local and global detrending approaches, European Physics Journal B 71 (2009) 243-250], we find that the cross-correlations were significant even for large lagged orders. Using the detrended cross-correlation analysis proposed by Podobnik and Stanley [Detrended cross-correlation analysis: a new method for analyzing two nonstationary time series, Physics Review Letters 100 (2008) 084102], we find that the cross-correlations were weakly persistent and were stronger between spot and futures contract with larger maturity. Our results from rolling sample test also show the apparent effects of the exogenous events. Additionally, we have some relevant discussions on the obtained evidence.

  11. Functional Balance and Motor Impairment Correlations with Gait Parameters during Timed Up and Go Test across Three Attentional Loading Conditions in Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidzir Manaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether stroke survivor’s gait performance during dual-task Timed Up and Go (TUG test is correlated with the level of functional balance and motor impairment. Thirty stroke survivors (22 men, 8 women were recruited for this study. The level of functional balance (Berg Balance Scale and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer assessment lower extremity were assessed prior to the TUG test. TUG test was conducted under three attentional loading conditions (single, dual motor, and dual-cognitive. The time and number of steps were used to quantify gait parameters. The Spearmen’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between these variables. There was moderate to strong negative correlation between functional balance and gait parameters (range −0.53 to −0.73, P<0.05. There was a weak negative correlation observed between the time taken to complete the single task and motor impairment (rs=-0.43; P=0.02 dual motor task and motor impairment (rs=-0.41; P=0.02. However, there were no significant correlations between lower limb motor impairment and the number of steps in all conditions. These findings suggest that functional balance may be an influential domain of successful dual-task TUG in stroke.

  12. A study of serial ranks via random graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Haeusler, Erich; Mason, David M.; Turova, Tatyana S.

    2000-01-01

    Serial ranks have long been used as the basis for nonparametric tests of independence in time series analysis. We shall study the underlying graph structure of serial ranks. This will lead us to a basic martingale which will allow us to construct a weighted approximation to a serial rank process. To show the applicability of this approximation, we will use it to prove two very general central limit theorems for Wald-Wolfowitz-type serial rank statistics.

  13. The quadratic relationship between difficulty of intelligence test items and their correlations with working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Tomasz; Chuderski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Fluid intelligence (Gf) is a crucial cognitive ability that involves abstract reasoning in order to solve novel problems. Recent research demonstrated that Gf strongly depends on the individual effectiveness of working memory (WM). We investigated a popular claim that if the storage capacity underlay the WM-Gf correlation, then such a correlation should increase with an increasing number of items or rules (load) in a Gf-test. As often no such link is observed, on that basis the storage-capacity account is rejected, and alternative accounts of Gf (e.g., related to executive control or processing speed) are proposed. Using both analytical inference and numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the load-dependent change in correlation is primarily a function of the amount of floor/ceiling effect for particular items. Thus, the item-wise WM correlation of a Gf-test depends on its overall difficulty, and the difficulty distribution across its items. When the early test items yield huge ceiling, but the late items do not approach floor, that correlation will increase throughout the test. If the early items locate themselves between ceiling and floor, but the late items approach floor, the respective correlation will decrease. For a hallmark Gf-test, the Raven-test, whose items span from ceiling to floor, the quadratic relationship is expected, and it was shown empirically using a large sample and two types of WMC tasks. In consequence, no changes in correlation due to varying WM/Gf load, or lack of them, can yield an argument for or against any theory of WM/Gf. Moreover, as the mathematical properties of the correlation formula make it relatively immune to ceiling/floor effects for overall moderate correlations, only minor changes (if any) in the WM-Gf correlation should be expected for many psychological tests.

  14. The quadratic relationship between difficulty of intelligence test items and their correlations with working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz eSmoleń

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid intelligence (Gf is a crucial cognitive ability that involves abstract reasoning in order to solve novel problems. Recent research demonstrated that Gf strongly depends on the individual effectiveness of working memory (WM. We investigated a popular claim that if the storage capacity underlay the WM-Gf correlation, then such a correlation should increase with an increasing number of items or rules (load in a Gf test. As often no such link is observed, on that basis the storage-capacity account is rejected, and alternative accounts of Gf (e.g., related to executive control or processing speed are proposed. Using both analytical inference and numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the load-dependent change in correlation is primarily a function of the amount of floor/ceiling effect for particular items. Thus, the item-wise WM correlation of a Gf test depends on its overall difficulty, and the difficulty distribution across its items. When the early test items yield huge ceiling, but the late items do not approach floor, that correlation will increase throughout the test. If the early items locate themselves between ceiling and floor, but the late items approach floor, the respective correlation will decrease. For a hallmark Gf test, the Raven test, whose items span from ceiling to floor, the quadratic relationship is expected, and it was shown empirically using a large sample and two types of WMC tasks. In consequence, no changes in correlation due to varying WM/Gf load, or lack of them, can yield an argument for or against any theory of WM/Gf. Moreover, as the mathematical properties of the correlation formula make it relatively immune to ceiling/floor effects for overall moderate correlations, only minor changes (if any in the WM-Gf correlation should be expected for many psychological tests.

  15. An empirical test of Rogers' original and revised theory of correlates in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarcheski, A; Mahon, N E

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Rogers' original and revised theory of correlates in adolescents. The correlates were measured by Perceived Field Motion, Human Field Rhythms, Creativity, Sentience, Fast Tempo, and Waking Periods. The original theory was tested with data obtained from samples of early (n = 116), middle (n = 116), and late (n = 116) adolescents. The revised theory was tested in a fourth selectively combined sample of adolescents, aged 12 to 21 (n = 89). Data were collected in classroom settings. Although the findings did not support either theory, they did indicate that: (1) four of the six correlates studied performed as correlates when examined in three discrete phases of adolescence, as determined by chronological age, (2) the means of the individual correlates increased slightly in frequency levels developmentally, and (3) the correlates emerged at different frequency levels when examined in adolescents, aged 12 to 21.

  16. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  18. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  19. Correlation of in vitro challenge testing with consumer use testing for cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, D K; Dille, J C; Kaufman, D J

    1987-01-01

    An in vitro microbial challenge test has been developed to predict the likelihood of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. The challenge test involved inoculating product at four concentrations (30, 50, 70, and 100%) with microorganisms known to contaminate cosmetics. Elimination of these microorganisms at each concentration was followed over a 28-day period. The test was used to classify products as poorly preserved, marginally preserved, or well preserved. Consumer use testing was then used to determine whether the test predicted the risk of actual consumer contamination. Products classified by the challenge test as poorly preserved returned 46 to 90% contaminated after use. Products classified by the challenge test as well preserved returned with no contamination. Marginally preserved products returned with 0 to 21% of the used units contaminated. As a result, the challenge test described can be accurately used to predict the risk of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. PMID:3662517

  20. Correlating PMC-MMC Bonded Joint 3D FEA with Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mindy; Rodini, Benjamin; Chen, Wayne C.; Flom, Yury A.; Posey, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the correlation of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) and Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) bonded joints using three dimensional finite element analyses with materials tests is shown.

  1. Correlation of Simulation Examination to Written Test Scores for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Testing: Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne L. Strom

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS courses are evaluated using written multiple-choice tests. High-fidelity simulation is a widely used adjunct to didactic content, and has been used in many specialties as a training resource as well as an evaluative tool. There are no data to our knowledge that compare simulation examination scores with written test scores for ACLS courses. Objective: To compare and correlate a novel high-fidelity simulation-based evaluation with traditional written testing for senior medical students in an ACLS course. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study to determine the correlation between simulationbased evaluation and traditional written testing in a medical school simulation center. Students were tested on a standard acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest scenario. Our primary outcome measure was correlation of exam results for 19 volunteer fourth-year medical students after a 32-hour ACLS-based Resuscitation Boot Camp course. Our secondary outcome was comparison of simulation-based vs. written outcome scores. Results: The composite average score on the written evaluation was substantially higher (93.6% than the simulation performance score (81.3%, absolute difference 12.3%, 95% CI [10.6-14.0%], p<0.00005. We found a statistically significant moderate correlation between simulation scenario test performance and traditional written testing (Pearson r=0.48, p=0.04, validating the new evaluation method. Conclusion: Simulation-based ACLS evaluation methods correlate with traditional written testing and demonstrate resuscitation knowledge and skills. Simulation may be a more discriminating and challenging testing method, as students scored higher on written evaluation methods compared to simulation.

  2. Systematic comparison of hedonic ranking and rating methods demonstrates few practical differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Marcin; Cliff, Margaret A

    2013-08-01

    Hedonic ranking is one of the commonly used methods to evaluate consumer preferences. Some authors suggest that it is the best methodology for discriminating among products, while others recommend hedonic rating. These mixed findings suggest the statistical outcome(s) are dependent on the experimental conditions or a user's expectation of "what is" and "what is not" desirable for evaluating consumer preferences. Therefore, sensory and industry professionals may be uncertain or confused regarding the appropriate application of hedonic tests. This paper would like to put this controversy to rest, by evaluating 3 data sets (3 yogurts, 79 consumers; 6 yogurts, 109 consumers; 4 apple cultivars, 70 consumers) collected using the same consumers and by calculating nontied ranks from hedonic scores. Consumer responses were evaluated by comparing bivariate associations between the methods (nontied ranks, tied ranks, hedonic rating scores) using trellis displays, determining the number of consumers with discrepancies in their responses between the methods, and comparing mean values using conventional statistical analyses. Spearman's rank correlations (0.33-0.84) revealed significant differences between the methods for all products, whether or not means separation tests differentiated the products. The work illustrated the inherent biases associated with hedonic ranking and recommended alternate hedonic methodologies. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Global network centrality of university rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisi; Del Vecchio, Marco; Pogrebna, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    Universities and higher education institutions form an integral part of the national infrastructure and prestige. As academic research benefits increasingly from international exchange and cooperation, many universities have increased investment in improving and enabling their global connectivity. Yet, the relationship of university performance and its global physical connectedness has not been explored in detail. We conduct, to our knowledge, the first large-scale data-driven analysis into whether there is a correlation between university relative ranking performance and its global connectivity via the air transport network. The results show that local access to global hubs (as measured by air transport network betweenness) strongly and positively correlates with the ranking growth (statistical significance in different models ranges between 5% and 1% level). We also found that the local airport's aggregate flight paths (degree) and capacity (weighted degree) has no effect on university ranking, further showing that global connectivity distance is more important than the capacity of flight connections. We also examined the effect of local city economic development as a confounding variable and no effect was observed suggesting that access to global transportation hubs outweighs economic performance as a determinant of university ranking. The impact of this research is that we have determined the importance of the centrality of global connectivity and, hence, established initial evidence for further exploring potential connections between university ranking and regional investment policies on improving global connectivity.

  4. A Durbin-Watson serial correlation test for ARX processes via excited adaptive tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, Bernard; Portier, Bruno; Vazquez, Victor

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new statistical test for the residual autocorrelation in ARX adaptive tracking. The introduction of a persistent excitation in the adaptive tracking control allows us to build a bilateral statistical test based on the well-known Durbin-Watson statistic. We establish the almost sure convergence and the asymptotic normality for the Durbin-Watson statistic leading to a powerful serial correlation test. Numerical experiments illustrate the good performances of our statistical test procedure.

  5. A Durbin-Watson serial correlation test for ARX processes via excited adaptive tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Bercu, Bernard; Portier, Bruno; Vazquez, Victor

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new statistical test for the residual autocorrelation in ARX adaptive tracking. The introduction of a persistent excitation in the adaptive tracking control allows us to build a bilateral statistical test based on the well-known Durbin-Watson statistic. We establish the almost sure convergence and the asymptotic normality for the Durbin-Watson statistic leading to a powerful serial correlation test. Numerical experiments illustrate the good performances of our statistical test pr...

  6. EU Country Rankings' Sensitivity to the Choice of Welfare Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, M. Azhar

    2016-01-01

    are particularly volatile for countries in the middle of the ranking distribution, while countries with either high or low welfare generally have lower volatility. A multidimensional poverty index has the highest correlation with the latent welfare measure. It is concluded that the observed rankings do not tell......Ranking of countries with respect to some welfare measure is highly popular and takes places with high frequency. Ranking of a country can change over time given the same welfare measure is applied. Rankings can also change depending on which welfare measure is applied in a given year. To what...... extent do we see ranking changes and which existing welfare measures best captures an unobserved, yet existing, notion of welfare in society? To investigate this we apply seven welfare indicators for fifteen EU countries covering the years from 2005 until 2011. The results indicate that rankings...

  7. Fitness tests and occupational tasks of military interest: a systematic review of correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Veronique D; DeGroot, David W; Hall, Shane M; Grier, Tyson L; Deaver, Karen D; Hauret, Keith G; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-02-01

    : Physically demanding occupations (ie, military, firefighter, law enforcement) often use fitness tests for job selection or retention. Despite numerous individual studies, the relationship of these tests to job performance is not always clear. : This review examined the relationship by aggregating previously reported correlations between different fitness tests and common occupational tasks. : Search criteria were applied to PUBMED, EBSCO, EMBASE and military sources; scoring yielded 27 original studies providing 533 Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between fitness tests and 12 common physical job task categories. Fitness tests were grouped into predominant health-related fitness components and body regions: cardiorespiratory endurance (CRe); upper body, lower body and trunk muscular strength and muscular endurance (UBs, LBs, TRs, UBe, LBe, TRe) and flexibility (FLX). Meta-analyses provided pooled r's between each fitness component and task category. : The CRe tests had the strongest pooled correlations with most tasks (eight pooled r values 0.80-0.52). Next were LBs (six pooled r values >0.50) and UBe (four pooled r values >0.50). UBs and LBe correlated strongly to three tasks. TRs, TRe and FLX did not strongly correlate to tasks. : Employers can maximise the relevancy of assessing workforce health by using fitness tests with strong correlations between fitness components and job performance, especially those that are also indicators for injury risk. Potentially useful field-expedient tests include timed-runs (CRe), jump tests (LBs) and push-ups (UBe). Impacts of gender and physiological characteristics (eg, lean body mass) should be considered in future study and when implementing tests. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Can College Rankings Be Believed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Davis

    Full Text Available The article summarizes literature on college and university rankings worldwide and the strategies used by various ranking organizations, including those of government and popular media. It traces the history of national and global rankings, indicators used by ranking systems, and the effect of rankings on academic programs and their institutions. Although ranking systems employ diverse criteria and most weight certain indicators over others, there is considerable skepticism that most actually measure educational quality. At the same time, students and their families increasingly consult these evaluations when making college decisions, and sponsors of faculty research consider reputation when forming academic partnerships. While there are serious concerns regarding the validity of ranking institutions when so little data can support differences between one institution and another, college rankings appear to be here to stay.

  9. Ranking Baltic States Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, using the h-index and the total number of citations, the best 10 Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian researchers from several disciplines are ranked. The list may be formed based on the h-index and the total number of citations, given in Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish Program and Google Scholar database. Data for the first 10 researchers are presented. Google Scholar is the most complete. Therefore, to define a single indicator, h-index calculated by Google Scholar may be a good and simple one. The author chooses the Google Scholar database as it is the broadest one.

  10. Sync-rank: Robust Ranking, Constrained Ranking and Rank Aggregation via Eigenvector and SDP Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    eigenvector of the associated Laplacian matrix (i.e., the Fiedler vector) matches that of the variables. In other words, this approach (reminiscent of...S1), i.e., Dii = ∑n j=1Gi,j is the degree of node i in the measurement graph G. 3: Compute the Fiedler vector of S (eigenvector corresponding to the...smallest nonzero eigenvalue of LS). 4: Output the ranking induced by sorting the Fiedler vector of S, with the global ordering (increasing or decreasing

  11. The photometric latex test for rheumatoid factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. I. correlation with other serologic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezelić, N; Zergollern, V; Dezelić, G; Dürrigl, T; Jurak, H; Vitaus, M; Androić, S

    1978-01-01

    The photometric latex test (PLT) for the detection of rheumatoid factors (RF) has been correlated with the sensitized sheep cell test (SSC) and the latex slide test (LST). A total of 377 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 sera from control subjects were examined. When the PLT was carried out on the native sera at a lower buffer ionic strength (0.05 M), agglutination was noted in over 99% of cases, indicating interaction of complement with human immunoglobulin bound to the latex particle surface. Although thermal inactivation eliminated most of the complement agglutination, an increase in ionic strength (0.5 M) was found to be essential for measuring only RF agglutination. The serologic data were analysed statistically by computer. A highly significant correlation was found between all serologic tests and RA sera, but there was no such correlation with the control sera. The specificity of all tests was generally over 90% and did not vary significantly, but the sensitivity varied from 52.0% to 71.1%, confirming that about one-third of all RA patients are seronegative. The tests were analysed for their total diagnostic capability. The PLT with native sera at higher ionic strenght proved to be the most sensitive, but with thermally inactivated sera it had a better diagnostic capacity. The SSC test appeared to be less sensitive and of lower diagnostic validity. Rapid LST tests were clearly inferior to PLT tests. The PLT can be used as a reliable and straightforward serologic method of diagnosis in RA, especially when carried out at a higher ionic strength and with thermally inactivated sera. It should be given preference over other serologic tests for RF and could well become standard practice in rheumatologic serology as a substitute for the SSC test.

  12. Sample Size Calculation for Estimating or Testing a Nonzero Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, K.; Xia, Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The problems of hypothesis testing and interval estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient of a multivariate normal distribution are considered. It is shown that available one-sided tests are uniformly most powerful, and the one-sided confidence intervals are uniformly most accurate. An exact method of calculating sample size to…

  13. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector beam test results from quartz and acrylic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Sugaya, Y; Yoshimura, Y; Kanda, S; Olsen, S; Ueno, K; Varner, G S; Bergfeld, T; Bialek, J J; Lorenc, J; Palmer, M; Rudnick, G; Selen, M; Auran, T; Boyer, V; Honscheid, K; Tamura, N; Yoshimura, K; Lü, C; Marlow, D R; Mindas, C R; Prebys, E J; Asai, M; Kimura, A; Hayashi, S

    1995-01-01

    Several prototypes of a Cherenkov Correlated Timing (CCT) Detector have been tested at the KEK-PS test beam line. We describe the results for Cherenkov light yields and timing characteristics from quartz and acrylic bar prototypes. A Cherenkov angle resolution is found to be 15 mrad at a propagation distance of 100 cm with a 2 cm thick quartz bar prototype.

  14. Correlation among High School Senior Students' Test Anxiety, Academic Performance and Points of University Entrance Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Hakan; Alci, Bulent; Aydin, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Test anxiety seems like a benign problem to some people, but it can be potentially serious when it leads to high levels of distress and academic failure. The aim of this study is to define the correlation among high school senior students' test anxiety, academic performance (GPA) and points of university entrance exam (UEE). The study group of…

  15. Beyond Correlations: Usefulness of High School GPA and Test Scores in Making College Admissions Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that high school GPA is better than admission test scores in predicting first-year college GPA, although test scores have incremental predictive validity. The usefulness of a selection variable in making admission decisions depends in part on its predictive validity, but also on institutions' selectivity and…

  16. Rankings from Fuzzy Pairwise Comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.; Noppen, J.A.R.; Mohammadian, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new method for deriving rankings from fuzzy pairwise comparisons. It is based on the observation that quantification of the uncertainty of the pairwise comparisons should be used to obtain a better crisp ranking, instead of a fuzzified version of the ranking obtained from crisp pairwise

  17. PageRank (II): Mathematics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maths/stats

    INTRODUCTION. PageRank is Google's system for ranking web pages. A page with a higher PageRank is deemed more important and is more likely to be listed above a ... Felix U. Ogban, Department of Mathematics/Statistics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, University of ..... probability, 2004, 41, (3): 721-734.

  18. University Rankings and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  19. RRCRank: a fusion method using rank strategy for residue-residue contact prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoyang; Dong, Qiwen; Lu, Ruqian

    2017-09-02

    In structural biology area, protein residue-residue contacts play a crucial role in protein structure prediction. Some researchers have found that the predicted residue-residue contacts could effectively constrain the conformational search space, which is significant for de novo protein structure prediction. In the last few decades, related researchers have developed various methods to predict residue-residue contacts, especially, significant performance has been achieved by using fusion methods in recent years. In this work, a novel fusion method based on rank strategy has been proposed to predict contacts. Unlike the traditional regression or classification strategies, the contact prediction task is regarded as a ranking task. First, two kinds of features are extracted from correlated mutations methods and ensemble machine-learning classifiers, and then the proposed method uses the learning-to-rank algorithm to predict contact probability of each residue pair. First, we perform two benchmark tests for the proposed fusion method (RRCRank) on CASP11 dataset and CASP12 dataset respectively. The test results show that the RRCRank method outperforms other well-developed methods, especially for medium and short range contacts. Second, in order to verify the superiority of ranking strategy, we predict contacts by using the traditional regression and classification strategies based on the same features as ranking strategy. Compared with these two traditional strategies, the proposed ranking strategy shows better performance for three contact types, in particular for long range contacts. Third, the proposed RRCRank has been compared with several state-of-the-art methods in CASP11 and CASP12. The results show that the RRCRank could achieve comparable prediction precisions and is better than three methods in most assessment metrics. The learning-to-rank algorithm is introduced to develop a novel rank-based method for the residue-residue contact prediction of proteins, which

  20. Sequential rank agreement methods for comparison of ranked lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jensen, Andreas Kryger

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...... are illustrated using gene rankings, and using data from two Danish ovarian cancer studies where we assess the within and between agreement of different statistical classification methods.......The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...

  1. Stimulus and correlation matching measurement technique in computer based characterization testing

    OpenAIRE

    Dorman, A M

    2012-01-01

    Constructive theory of characterization test is considered. The theory is applicable to a nano devices characterization: current-voltage, Auger current dependence. Generally small response of device under test on an applied stimulus is masked by an unknown deterministic background and a random noise. Characterization test in this signal corruption scenario should be based on correlation measurement technique of device response on applied optimal stimulus with optimal reference signal. Co-synt...

  2. Camera: a competitive gene set test accounting for inter-gene correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Smyth, Gordon K.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive gene set tests are commonly used in molecular pathway analysis to test for enrichment of a particular gene annotation category amongst the differential expression results from a microarray experiment. Existing gene set tests that rely on gene permutation are shown here to be extremely sensitive to inter-gene correlation. Several data sets are analyzed to show that inter-gene correlation is non-ignorable even for experiments on homogeneous cell populations using genetically identical model organisms. A new gene set test procedure (CAMERA) is proposed based on the idea of estimating the inter-gene correlation from the data, and using it to adjust the gene set test statistic. An efficient procedure is developed for estimating the inter-gene correlation and characterizing its precision. CAMERA is shown to control the type I error rate correctly regardless of inter-gene correlations, yet retains excellent power for detecting genuine differential expression. Analysis of breast cancer data shows that CAMERA recovers known relationships between tumor subtypes in very convincing terms. CAMERA can be used to analyze specified sets or as a pathway analysis tool using a database of molecular signatures. PMID:22638577

  3. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  4. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN THE FIBRINOGEN’S VALUES AND THE GODAL TEST AT PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Alina Duma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study is to present the correlations between the fibrinogen’s values and the Godal test on a lot of 57 patients admitted in the Municipal Clinical Hospital of Timişoara for haematological disorders. We found that low values of fibrinogen correlate to a negative FMT in 82% of cases, while the high values of fibrinogen are accompanied by a positive FMT in 90.9% of the cases studied.

  5. The quadratic relationship between difficulty of intelligence test items and their correlations with working memory

    OpenAIRE

    Smolen, Tomasz; Chuderski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Fluid intelligence (Gf) is a crucial cognitive ability that involves abstract reasoning in order to solve novel problems. Recent research demonstrated that Gf strongly depends on the individual effectiveness of working memory (WM). We investigated a popular claim that if the storage capacity underlay the WM-Gf correlation, then such a correlation should increase with an increasing number of items or rules (load) in a Gf test. As often no such link is observed, on that basis the storage-capaci...

  6. Sample size for estimation of the Pearson correlation coefficient in cherry tomato tests

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Giacomini Sari; Alessandro Dal’Col Lúcio; Cinthya Souza Santana; Dionatan Ketzer Krysczun; André Luís Tischler; Lucas Drebes

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the required sample size for estimation of the Pearson coefficient of correlation between cherry tomato variables. Two uniformity tests were set up in a protected environment in the spring/summer of 2014. The observed variables in each plant were mean fruit length, mean fruit width, mean fruit weight, number of bunches, number of fruits per bunch, number of fruits, and total weight of fruits, with calculation of the Pearson correlation matrix b...

  7. Empirical ranking of a wide range of WC-Co grades in terms of their abrasion resistance measured by the ASTM standard B 611-85 test

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    O'Quigley, DGF

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available tests The abrasion testing for all the grades was car- ried out in accordance with the ASTM Standard B 61 l-85 for the abrasion testing of cemented carbides. The abrasion tester consists of a wheel of diameter 169 mm and width 13 mm. The wheel... variation may be linked to the uncertainty in the grain L 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Cobalt content (wt%) Fig. 1. Summary of the measured carbide grain size and the cobalt content of the WC-Co grades tested. The grades are divided into four sets...

  8. Development of a discriminative biphasic in vitro dissolution test and correlation with in vivo pharmacokinetic studies for differently formulated racecadotril granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jia; Staufenbiel, Sven; Hao, Shilei; Wang, Bochu; Dashevskiy, Andriy; Bodmeier, Roland

    2017-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to discriminate the release behavior from three differently formulated racecadotril (BCS II) granules and to establish an in vitro-in vivo correlation. Three granule formulations of the lipophilic drug were prepared with equivalent composition but prepared with different manufacturing processes (dry granulation, wet granulation with or without binder). In vitro release of the three granules was investigated using a biphasic dissolution system (phosphate buffer pH6.8 and octanol) and compared to the conventional single phase USP II dissolution test performed under sink and non-sink conditions. In vivo studies with each granule formulation were performed in rats. Interestingly, the granule formulations exhibited pronouncedly different behavior in the different dissolution systems depending on different wetting and dissolution conditions. Single phase USP II dissolution tests lacked discrimination. In contrast, remarkable discrimination between the granule formulations was observed in the octanol phase of biphasic dissolution system with a rank order of release from granules prepared by wet granulation with binder>wet granulation without binder>dry granulation. This release order correlated well with the wettability of these granules. An excellent correlation was also established between in vitro release in the octanol phase of the biphasic test and in vivo data (R(2)=0.999). Compared to conventional dissolution methods, the biphasic method provides great potential to discriminate between only minor formulation and process changes within the same dosage form for poorly soluble drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic Correlations of Testes Size with Semen Traits and the Productive Traits of Young Boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacyno, E; Kawęcka, M; Pietruszka, A; Sosnowska, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship of young boar testes size with semen traits and with productive traits. The dimensions (length, width and volume) of each testis and semen traits (semen volume, percentage of sperm with progressive motility, sperm concentration, total number of sperm in semen, percentage of sperm with normal acrosome, percentage of sperm with major and minor morphological defects, osmotic resistance test value and activity of aspartate aminotransferase in seminal plasma) were determined on 120 young boars aged 6 months. At 180 day of age, the boars backfat thickness and leanness (by ultrasonic apparatus) and body weight were also measured. The average daily gain was determined in the period from 70 to 180 days of age of the boars. The results showed that the sperm concentration, total number of sperm in semen and percentage of progressive motile sperm were a significantly positively correlated with width and volume of the left (p ≤ 0.01) and right testis (p ≤ 0.05) and with total volume of both testes (p ≤ 0.01). But the highest values of correlation coefficients were found between the width of the left testis and sperm concentration, total number of sperm in semen and percentage of progressive motile sperm. A correlations of dimensions (length and width) and volume of testes with other semen traits were very low and statistically non-significant. The volume of testes (left and right testis and total testes) was significantly positively correlated with body weight at 180 days of age and daily gain (p ≤ 0.01), but lower correlation coefficient was between left testis and daily gain (p ≤ 0.05), whereas correlations were low and non-significant with leanness and backfat thickness. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Correlating the EMC analysis and testing methods for space systems in MIL-STD-1541A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Reinaldo J.

    A study was conducted to improve the correlation between the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) analysis models stated in MIL-STD-1541A and the suggested testing methods used for space systems. The test and analysis methods outlined in MIL-STD-1541A are described, and a comparative assessment of testing and analysis techniques as they relate to several EMC areas is presented. Suggestions on present analysis and test methods are introduced to harmonize and bring the analysis and testing tools in MIL-STD-1541A into closer agreement. It is suggested that test procedures in MIL-STD-1541A must be improved by providing alternatives to the present use of shielded enclosures as the primary site for such tests. In addition, the alternate use of anechoic chambers and open field test sites must be considered.

  11. On the correlation between minimum thickness and central deflection during small punch test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Present paper deals with a detailed study on the correlation between minimum thickness (t/t0) and central deflection (δ/t0). Such data are obtained during the deformation of a small punch test of miniaturized specimen. Finite element studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of various parameters which are expected to influence this correlation. The parameters under consideration are material hardening, material yield stress, coefficient of friction and initial thickness of the specimen. It is shown that the correlation remains unaffected with respect to change in material parameters. Similarly, the coefficient of friction beyond 0.2 also does not affect the correlation. However, change in thickness has significant effect on the correlation. A modification has been suggested in the existing correlation to consider the influence of thickness change. The modified correlation is then used to calculate fracture toughness using the experimental results quoted in the literature. It is shown that the modified correlation improves the fracture toughness prediction considerably.

  12. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  13. On the Kendall Correlation Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we first discuss the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. In continuous case, we define the Kendall rank correlation coefficient in terms of the concomitants of order statistics, find the expected value of the Kendall rank correlation coefficient and show that the later is free of n. We also prove that in continuous case the Kendall correlation coefficient converges in probability to its expected value. We then propose to consider the expected value of the Kendall rank ...

  14. Lack of Correlation between Severity of Clinical Symptoms, Skin Test Reactivity, and Radioallergosorbent Test Results in Venom-Allergic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Rj

    2006-06-15

    To retrospectively examine the relation between skin test reactivity, venom-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody levels, and severity of clinical reaction in patients with insect venom allergy. Thirty-six patients (including 15 females) who presented with a history of allergic reactions to insect stings were assessed. The mean age at the time of the reactions was 33.4 +/- 15.1 years (range, 4-76 years), and patients were evaluated 43.6 +/- 90 months (range, 1-300 months) after the reactions. Clinical reactions were scored according to severity, from 1 (cutaneous manifestations only) to 3 (anaphylaxis with shock). These scores were compared to scores for skin test reactivity (0 to 5, indicating the log increase in sensitivity from 1 mug/mL to 0.0001 mug/mL) and radioallergosorbent test (RAST) levels (0 to 4, indicating venom-specific IgE levels, from undetectable to >17.5 kilounits of antigen per litre [kUA/L]). No correlation was found between skin test reactivity (Spearman's coefficient = 0.15, p = .377) or RAST level (Spearman's coefficient = 0.32, p = .061) and the severity of reaction. Skin test and RAST scores both differed significantly from clinical severity (p test reactivity and RAST score (p = .042). There was no correlation between skin test reactivity and time since reaction (Spearman's coefficient = 0.18, p = .294) nor between RAST and time since reaction (r = 0.1353, p = .438). Elimination of patients tested more than 12 months after their reaction still produced no correlation between skin test reactivity (p = .681) or RAST score (p = .183) and the severity of the clinical reaction. In venom-allergic patients (in contrast to reported findings in cases of inhalant IgE-mediated allergy), there appears to be no significant correlation between the degree of skin test reactivity or levels of venom-specific IgE (determined by RAST) and the severity of the clinical reaction.

  15. The Times Higher Education Supplement and Quacquarelli Symonds (THES - QS) World University Rankings: New Developments in Ranking Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowter, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents key new developments in the THES - QS World University Rankings in 2007, related to enhancements to the "Peer Review", "Data Collection" and "Statistical Aggregation" utilised in this ranking as well as discussing the decision to utilise Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) figures for personnel statistics. Indicator correlation is also…

  16. Parallel walk test: its correlation with balance and motor functions in people with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S; Chan, Lynn H; Chan, Cindy S; Lai, Stephanie H; Wu, Winnie W; Tse, Mimi M; Fong, Shirley S

    2015-05-01

    To investigate (1) the intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability of the times and scores generated in the parallel walk test (PWT); (2) their correlations with impairments and activity limitations of individuals with stroke; and (3) the cutoff times that best discriminate individuals with stroke from healthy elderly subjects. Cross sectional study. University-based rehabilitation center. Participants (N=72) comprised individuals with stroke (n=37) and healthy individuals (n=35). Not applicable. The PWT was administered along with the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment of the Lower Extremities (FMA-LE), handheld dynamometer measurements of ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscle strength, the 5-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), a limits of stability (LOS) test, the 10-m walk test (10-MWT), and the timed Up and Go (TUG) test. PWT times and scores showed good to excellent intrarater, interrater, and test-retest reliability in individuals with stroke. PWT times using paths of 3 different widths significantly correlated with FMA-LE scores, 5-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test times, BBS scores, some LOS test results, 10-MWT gait speed, and TUG test times. PWT times of 6.30 to 7.48 seconds, depending on the path width, were shown reliably to discriminate individuals with stroke from healthy individuals. The PWT is a reliable, easy-to-administer clinical tool for assessing dynamic walking balance in individuals with chronic stroke. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The shear behaviour of pine wood in the Arcan test with the digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malyszko Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arcan shear test is used together with the digital image correlation to study the shear stress-strain relationship for pine wood in the symmetry plane LR. The relationship of shearing perpendicular to the grain direction is shown by the straight line below the proportional limit and the nonlinear curve beyond it describing hardening up to the ultimate limit. Subsequent failure modes are shown during the load increase. Additionally, some results of the off-axis tension tests, as well as the uniaxial tension tests, with the mechanical and electric resistance strain gauges are presented to determine and compare the shear modulus from both methods of testing.

  18. Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Mikko; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The ranking of scientific journals is important because of the signal it sends to scientists about what is considered most vital for scientific progress. Existing ranking systems focus on measuring the influence of a scientific paper (citations)—these rankings do not reward journals for publishing innovative work that builds on new ideas. We propose an alternative ranking based on the proclivity of journals to publish papers that build on new ideas, and we implement this ranking via a text-based analysis of all published biomedical papers dating back to 1946. In addition, we compare our neophilia ranking to citation-based (impact factor) rankings; this comparison shows that the two ranking approaches are distinct. Prior theoretical work suggests an active role for our neophilia index in science policy. Absent an explicit incentive to pursue novel science, scientists underinvest in innovative work because of a coordination problem: for work on a new idea to flourish, many scientists must decide to adopt it in their work. Rankings that are based purely on influence thus do not provide sufficient incentives for publishing innovative work. By contrast, adoption of the neophilia index as part of journal-ranking procedures by funding agencies and university administrators would provide an explicit incentive for journals to publish innovative work and thus help solve the coordination problem by increasing scientists' incentives to pursue innovative work. PMID:28713181

  19. The responsiveness and correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motor Status Scale, and the Action Research Arm Test in chronic stroke with upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xi-Jun; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Responsiveness of clinical assessments is an important element in the report of clinical effectiveness after rehabilitation. The correlation could reflect the validity of assessments as an indication of clinical performance before and after interventions. This study investigated the correlation and responsiveness of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Motor Status Scale (MSS), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), which are used frequently in effectiveness studies of robotic upper-extremity training in stroke rehabilitation. Twenty-seven chronic stroke patients were recruited for a 20-session upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training program. This was a rater-blinded randomized controlled trial. All participants were evaluated with FMA, MSS, ARAT, MAS, and Functional Independent Measure before and after robotic training. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied for the analysis of correlation. The standardized response mean (SRM) and Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) were used to analyze responsiveness. Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a significantly high correlation (ρ=0.91-0.96) among FMA, MSS, and ARAT and a fair-to-moderate correlation (ρ=0.40-0.62) between MAS and the other assessments. FMA, MSS, and MAS on the wrist showed higher responsiveness (SRM=0.85-0.98, GRI=1.59-3.62), whereas ARAT showed relatively less responsiveness (SRM=0.22, GRI=0.81). The results showed that FMA or MSS would be the best choice for evaluating the functional improvement in stroke studies on robotic upper-extremity training with high responsiveness and good correlation with ARAT. MAS could be used separately to evaluate the spasticity changes after intervention in terms of high responsiveness.

  20. Lack of Correlation between Severity of Clinical Symptoms, Skin Test Reactivity, and Radioallergosorbent Test Results in Venom-Allergic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington RJ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To retrospectively examine the relation between skin test reactivity, venom-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE antibody levels, and severity of clinical reaction in patients with insect venom allergy. Method Thirty-six patients (including 15 females who presented with a history of allergic reactions to insect stings were assessed. The mean age at the time of the reactions was 33.4 ± 15.1 years (range, 4-76 years, and patients were evaluated 43.6 ± 90 months (range, 1-300 months after the reactions. Clinical reactions were scored according to severity, from 1 (cutaneous manifestations only to 3 (anaphylaxis with shock. These scores were compared to scores for skin test reactivity (0 to 5, indicating the log increase in sensitivity from 1 μg/mL to 0.0001 μg/mL and radioallergosorbent test (RAST levels (0 to 4, indicating venom-specific IgE levels, from undetectable to >17.5 kilounits of antigen per litre [kUA/L]. Results No correlation was found between skin test reactivity (Spearman's coefficient = 0.15, p = .377 or RAST level (Spearman's coefficient = 0.32, p = .061 and the severity of reaction. Skin test and RAST scores both differed significantly from clinical severity (p p = .042. There was no correlation between skin test reactivity and time since reaction (Spearman's coefficient = 0.18, p = .294 nor between RAST and time since reaction (r = 0.1353, p = .438. Elimination of patients tested more than 12 months after their reaction still produced no correlation between skin test reactivity (p = .681 or RAST score (p = .183 and the severity of the clinical reaction. Conclusion In venom-allergic patients (in contrast to reported findings in cases of inhalant IgE-mediated allergy, there appears to be no significant correlation between the degree of skin test reactivity or levels of venom-specific IgE (determined by RAST and the severity of the clinical reaction.

  1. Correlation between strength properties in standard test specimens and molded phenolic parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, P S; Thomason, R H

    1946-01-01

    This report describes an investigation of the tensile, flexural, and impact properties of 10 selected types of phenolic molding materials. The materials were studied to see in what ways and to what extent their properties satisfy some assumptions on which the theory of strength of materials is based: namely, (a) isotropy, (b) linear stress-strain relationship for small strains, and (c) homogeneity. The effect of changing the dimensions of tensile and flexural specimens and the span-depth ratio in flexural tests were studied. The strengths of molded boxes and flexural specimens cut from the boxes were compared with results of tests on standard test specimens molded from the respective materials. The nonuniformity of a material, which is indicated by the coefficient of variation, affects the results of tests made with specimens of different sizes and tests with different methods of loading. The strength values were found to depend on the relationship between size and shape of the molded specimen and size and shape of the fillers. The most significant variations observed within a diversified group of materials were found to depend on the orientation of fibrous fillers. Of secondary importance was the dependence of the variability of test results on the pieces of filler incorporated into the molding powder as well as on the size of the piece. Static breaking strength tests on boxes molded from six representative phenolic materials correlated well with falling-ball impact tests on specimens cut from molded flat sheets. Good correlation was obtained with Izod impact tests on standard test specimens prepared from the molding materials. The static breaking strengths of the boxes do not correlate with the results of tensile or flexural tests on standard specimens.

  2. Correlation of Standard and Cone Penetration Tests: Case Study from Tekirdag (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feda Aral, I.; Gunes, Ekrem

    2017-10-01

    In geotechnical engineering, the Standard Penetration Test (SPT-N value) is often used as an in-situ test. The Cone Penetration Test (CPT) is based on design and cone resistance (qc) and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, there is also a need for a SPT-CPT correlation association that can be used in the basic design. In this study, the values of the SPT-CPT tests applied to the ground were compared and tried to generate a certain statistical data. SPT and CPT experiments were performed side by side to determine the soil properties. Formulas have been developed using various statistical methods and correlation coefficients have been established between the data obtained for “high-medium-low plastic clay” and “sand and sandy clayey soils”. The obtained data were compared with the studies in the literature.

  3. Correlation between thromboelastography and traditional coagulation test parameters in hospitalized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubanick JV

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jean V Rubanick, Medora B Pashmakova, Micah A Bishop, James W Barr Department of Veterinary Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA Abstract: A hospital-based, prospective cross-sectional study was used to compare kaolin-activated thromboelastography (TEG parameters with traditional coagulation tests in 29 hospitalized dogs. Cases were included if the attending clinician requested coagulation testing. Blood was obtained from each dog and coagulation (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, antithrombin activity, d-dimer concentration, and fibrinogen concentration and TEG analyses were performed. Hematocrit (Hct was also measured. Traditional coagulation results were evaluated for correlation with those from kaolin-activated TEG. Spearman’s correlation was used to calculate correlation coefficients. Fibrinogen was positively correlated with maximum amplitude (Pearson r=0.72, P<0.001 and global clot strength (Pearson r=0.72, P<0.001. There was no correlation between any of the remaining coagulation variables, TEG parameters, or Hct. Results of kaolin-activated TEG and traditional coagulation tests are not interchangeable means of monitoring coagulation derangements in this intensive care unit patient population. Determination of a true outcome measure is necessary to establish TEG’s clinical relevance to veterinary medicine. Keywords: TEG, thromboelastography, coagulation, hemostasis

  4. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Geoffroy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs or small insertion/deletions (indels. High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians.Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients.Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/.

  5. A goodness-of-fit test for occupancy models with correlated within-season revisits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wilson; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupancy modeling is important for exploring species distribution patterns and for conservation monitoring. Within this framework, explicit attention is given to species detection probabilities estimated from replicate surveys to sample units. A central assumption is that replicate surveys are independent Bernoulli trials, but this assumption becomes untenable when ecologists serially deploy remote cameras and acoustic recording devices over days and weeks to survey rare and elusive animals. Proposed solutions involve modifying the detection-level component of the model (e.g., first-order Markov covariate). Evaluating whether a model sufficiently accounts for correlation is imperative, but clear guidance for practitioners is lacking. Currently, an omnibus goodnessof- fit test using a chi-square discrepancy measure on unique detection histories is available for occupancy models (MacKenzie and Bailey, Journal of Agricultural, Biological, and Environmental Statistics, 9, 2004, 300; hereafter, MacKenzie– Bailey test). We propose a join count summary measure adapted from spatial statistics to directly assess correlation after fitting a model. We motivate our work with a dataset of multinight bat call recordings from a pilot study for the North American Bat Monitoring Program. We found in simulations that our join count test was more reliable than the MacKenzie–Bailey test for detecting inadequacy of a model that assumed independence, particularly when serial correlation was low to moderate. A model that included a Markov-structured detection-level covariate produced unbiased occupancy estimates except in the presence of strong serial correlation and a revisit design consisting only of temporal replicates. When applied to two common bat species, our approach illustrates that sophisticated models do not guarantee adequate fit to real data, underscoring the importance of model assessment. Our join count test provides a widely applicable goodness-of-fit test and

  6. Application of High Speed Digital Image Correlation in Rocket Engine Hot Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Schmidt, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Hot fire testing of rocket engine components and rocket engine systems is a critical aspect of the development process to understand performance, reliability and system interactions. Ground testing provides the opportunity for highly instrumented development testing to validate analytical model predictions and determine necessary design changes and process improvements. To properly obtain discrete measurements for model validation, instrumentation must survive in the highly dynamic and extreme temperature application of hot fire testing. Digital Image Correlation has been investigated and being evaluated as a technique to augment traditional instrumentation during component and engine testing providing further data for additional performance improvements and cost savings. The feasibility of digital image correlation techniques were demonstrated in subscale and full scale hotfire testing. This incorporated a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The development process, setup and calibrations, data collection, hotfire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  7. Correlates of sexually transmissible infection testing among a sample of at-risk young Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Caitlin H; Vella, Alyce M; Hellard, Margaret E; Lim, Megan S C

    2017-07-01

    Annual chlamydia testing is recommended for all sexually active Australians aged 15-29 years; however, the testing rate is below recommended levels. Three surveys at a Melbourne music festival were conducted over 2012-14 to identify correlates of sexually transmissible infection (STI) testing among young people at risk of STIs. In total, 3588 participants were recruited; 72% reported having sex in the past year. Based on sexual behaviours, 38% of sexually active participants were classified as at risk of contracting STIs. In the past year, at-risk participants had significantly higher odds of reporting a STI test (37%) than participants classified as not at risk (24%) (OR=1.9; CI=1.6-2.3). Among at-risk participants, correlates of STI testing in the past year included being aged 20-24 years, visiting a GP, higher knowledge levels, earlier sexual debut and reporting more than five lifetime partners. Testing rates in our sample did not meet levels required to reduce chlamydia prevalence. However, the testing rate was higher in at-risk participants than participants who were not at risk. Future programs aiming to increase chlamydia testing should improve knowledge and promote the importance of testing after risk exposure, particularly among 16- to 19-year-olds.

  8. Does an emotional intelligence test correlate with traditional measures used to determine medical school admission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, John J; Moineau, Geneviève; Puddester, Derek; Wood, Timothy J; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2011-10-01

    As medical school admission committees are giving increased consideration to noncognitive measures, this study sought to determine how emotional intelligence (EI) scores relate to other traditional measures used in the admissions process. EI was measured using an ability-based test (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT) in two consecutive cohorts of medical school applicants (2006 and 2007) qualifying for the admission interview. Pearson correlations between EI scores and traditional measures (i.e., weighted grade point average [wGPA], autobiographical sketch scores, and interview scores) were calculated. Of 659 applicants, 68% participated. MSCEIT scores did not correlate with traditional measures (r = -0.06 to 0.09, P > .05), with the exception of a small correlation with wGPA in the 2007 cohort (r = -0.13, P school admission measures suggests that EI evaluates a construct fundamentally different from traits captured in our admission process.

  9. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  10. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  11. Testing Different Types of Genotype-Environment Correlation: An Extended Children-of Twins Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusyte, Jurgita; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; D'Onofrio, Brian M.; Reiss, David; Spotts, Erica L.; Ganiban, Jody; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an extended children-of-twins model, which allowed the authors to test the direction of the association between parenting and child adjustment. Three mechanisms were examined: direct phenotypic influence of parenting on child behavior (controlling for both parental and child genotype), passive genotype-environment correlation,…

  12. A Test and Reformulation of Reference Group and Role Correlates of Premarital Sexual Permissiveness Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Roger W.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Propositions concerned with reference group and role correlates of Ira Reiss' premarital sexual permissiveness theory were tested. Reiss' basic propositions are only partially supported. Closeness to mother's sexual standards is considerably more predictive of self-permissiveness than was obvious in Reiss' theory. Closeness to friends' and peers'…

  13. Experimental Aeroelastic Models Design and Wind Tunnel Testing for Correlation with New Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several examples of experimental model designs, wind tunnel tests and correlation with new theory are presented in this paper. The goal is not only to evaluate a new theory, new computational method or new aeroelastic phonomenon, but also to provide new insights into nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, flutter, limit cycle oscillation (LCO and gust response.

  14. The Correlation among EFL Learners' Test Anxiety, Foreign Language Anxiety and Language Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakici, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the correlation among test anxiety (TA), foreign language anxiety (FLA) and language achievement of university preparatory students learning English as a foreign language. The sample of the research consisted of 301 (211 females, 90 males) attending a one-year EFL preparatory school at Ondokuz Mayis…

  15. RANK/RANK-L/OPG in Patients with Bone Metastases Treated with Anticancer Agents and Zoledronic Acid: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercatali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with solid cancer frequently develop bone metastases (BM. Zoledronic acid (Zometa®, ZA, routinely used to treat patients with BM, acts on osteoclasts and also has antitumor properties. We aimed to assess the effect of ZA over time in novel bone turnover markers (RANK/receptor activator of nuclear factor-k B ligand (RANK-L/ Osteoprotegerin (OPG and to correlate these with serum N-terminal telopeptide (NTX. The study prospectively evaluated levels of RANK, RANK-L and OPG transcripts by real-time PCR and NTX expression by ELISA in the peripheral blood of 49 consecutive patients with advanced breast, lung or prostate cancer. All patients received the standard ZA schedule and were monitored for 12 months. Median baseline values of RANK, RANK-L and OPG were 78.28 (range 7.34–620.64, 319.06 (21.42–1884.41 and 1.52 (0.10–58.02, respectively. At 12 months, the median RANK-L value had decreased by 22% with respect to the baseline, whereas median OPG levels had increased by about 96%. Consequently, the RANK-L/OPG ratio decreased by 56% from the baseline. Median serum NTX levels decreased over the 12-month period, reaching statistical significance (p < 0.0001. Our results would seem to indicate that ZA modulates RANK, RANK-L and OPG expression, thus decreasing osteoclast activity.

  16. A statistical approach towards the derivation of predictive gene sets for potency ranking of chemicals in the mouse embryonic stem cell test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, Sjors H W; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Tonk, Elisa C M; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2014-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is applied as a model system for detection of embryotoxicants. The application of transcriptomics allows a more detailed effect assessment compared to the morphological endpoint. Genes involved in cell differentiation, modulated by chemical exposures, may be useful

  17. Linear Subspace Ranking Hashing for Cross-Modal Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Qi, Guo-Jun; Ye, Jun; Hua, Kien A

    2017-09-01

    Hashing has attracted a great deal of research in recent years due to its effectiveness for the retrieval and indexing of large-scale high-dimensional multimedia data. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking-based hashing framework that maps data from different modalities into a common Hamming space where the cross-modal similarity can be measured using Hamming distance. Unlike existing cross-modal hashing algorithms where the learned hash functions are binary space partitioning functions, such as the sign and threshold function, the proposed hashing scheme takes advantage of a new class of hash functions closely related to rank correlation measures which are known to be scale-invariant, numerically stable, and highly nonlinear. Specifically, we jointly learn two groups of linear subspaces, one for each modality, so that features' ranking orders in different linear subspaces maximally preserve the cross-modal similarities. We show that the ranking-based hash function has a natural probabilistic approximation which transforms the original highly discontinuous optimization problem into one that can be efficiently solved using simple gradient descent algorithms. The proposed hashing framework is also flexible in the sense that the optimization procedures are not tied up to any specific form of loss function, which is typical for existing cross-modal hashing methods, but rather we can flexibly accommodate different loss functions with minimal changes to the learning steps. We demonstrate through extensive experiments on four widely-used real-world multimodal datasets that the proposed cross-modal hashing method can achieve competitive performance against several state-of-the-arts with only moderate training and testing time.

  18. A methodology for use of digital image correlation for hot mix asphalt testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Estefany

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a relatively new technology which aids in the measurement of material properties without the need for installation of sensors. DIC is a noncontact measuring technique that requires the specimen to be marked with a random speckled pattern and to be photographed during the test. The photographs are then post-processed based on the location of the pattern throughout the test. DIC can aid in calculating properties that would otherwise be too difficult even with other measuring instruments. The objective of this thesis is to discuss the methodology and validate the use of DIC in different hot mix asphalt (HMA) tests, such as, the Overlay Tester (OT) Test, Indirect Tensile (IDT) Test, and the Semicircular Bending (SCB) Test. The DIC system provides displacements and strains in any visible surface. The properly calibrated 2-D or 3-D DIC data can be used to understand the complex stress and strain distributions and the modes of the initiation and propagation of cracks. The use of this observational method will lead to further understanding of the complex boundary conditions of the different test, and therefore, allowing it to be implemented in the analysis of other materials. The use of digital image correlation will bring insight and knowledge onto what is happening during a test.

  19. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  20. Does learning performance in horses relate to fearfulness, baseline stress hormone, and social rank?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Ahrendt, Line Peerstrup; Lintrup, Randi

    2012-01-01

    The ability of horses to learn and remember new tasks is fundamentally important for their use by humans. Fearfulness may, however, interfere with learning, because stimuli in the environment can overshadow signals from the rider or handler. In addition, prolonged high levels of stress hormones can...... affect neurons within the hippocampus; a brain region central to learning and memory. In a series of experiments, we aimed to investigate the link between performance in two learning tests, the baseline level of stress hormones, measured as faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM), fearfulness, and social rank...... = 0.04), i.e. high rank corresponded to low FCM concentrations, whereas neither rank nor FCM correlated with fearfulness or learning performance. We conclude that performance under stressful conditions is affected by activation of the sympathetic nervous system during training and related...

  1. A cross-benchmark comparison of 87 learning to rank methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tax, Niek; Bockting, Sander; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2015-01-01

    Learning to rank is an increasingly important scientific field that comprises the use of machine learning for the ranking task. New learning to rank methods are generally evaluated on benchmark test collections. However, comparison of learning to rank methods based on evaluation results is hindered

  2. Regression Estimator Using Double Ranked Set Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani M. Samawi

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a regression estimator based on the double ranked set sample (DRSS scheme, introduced by Al-Saleh and Al-Kadiri (2000, is investigated when the mean of the auxiliary variable X is unknown. Our primary analysis and simulation indicates that using the DRSS regression estimator for estimating the population mean substantially increases relative efficiency compared to using regression estimator based on simple random sampling (SRS or ranked set sampling (RSS (Yu and Lam, 1997 regression estimator.  Moreover, the regression estimator using DRSS is also more efficient than the naïve estimators of the population mean using SRS, RSS (when the correlation coefficient is at least 0.4 and DRSS for high correlation coefficient (at least 0.91. The theory is illustrated using a real data set of trees.

  3. Social class rank, essentialism, and punitive judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael W; Keltner, Dacher

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that perceptions of social class rank influence a variety of social cognitive tendencies, from patterns of causal attribution to moral judgment. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that upper-class rank individuals would be more likely to endorse essentialist lay theories of social class categories (i.e., that social class is founded in genetically based, biological differences) than would lower-class rank individuals and that these beliefs would decrease support for restorative justice--which seeks to rehabilitate offenders, rather than punish unlawful action. Across studies, higher social class rank was associated with increased essentialism of social class categories (Studies 1, 2, and 4) and decreased support for restorative justice (Study 4). Moreover, manipulated essentialist beliefs decreased preferences for restorative justice (Study 3), and the association between social class rank and class-based essentialist theories was explained by the tendency to endorse beliefs in a just world (Study 2). Implications for how class-based essentialist beliefs potentially constrain social opportunity and mobility are discussed.

  4. Correlation test to assess low-level processing of high-density oligonucleotide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Jonas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently a number of competing techniques for low-level processing of oligonucleotide array data. The choice of technique has a profound effect on subsequent statistical analyses, but there is no method to assess whether a particular technique is appropriate for a specific data set, without reference to external data. Results We analyzed coregulation between genes in order to detect insufficient normalization between arrays, where coregulation is measured in terms of statistical correlation. In a large collection of genes, a random pair of genes should have on average zero correlation, hence allowing a correlation test. For all data sets that we evaluated, and the three most commonly used low-level processing procedures including MAS5, RMA and MBEI, the housekeeping-gene normalization failed the test. For a real clinical data set, RMA and MBEI showed significant correlation for absent genes. We also found that a second round of normalization on the probe set level improved normalization significantly throughout. Conclusion Previous evaluation of low-level processing in the literature has been limited to artificial spike-in and mixture data sets. In the absence of a known gold-standard, the correlation criterion allows us to assess the appropriateness of low-level processing of a specific data set and the success of normalization for subsets of genes.

  5. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  6. Sample size for estimation of the Pearson correlation coefficient in cherry tomato tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Giacomini Sari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the required sample size for estimation of the Pearson coefficient of correlation between cherry tomato variables. Two uniformity tests were set up in a protected environment in the spring/summer of 2014. The observed variables in each plant were mean fruit length, mean fruit width, mean fruit weight, number of bunches, number of fruits per bunch, number of fruits, and total weight of fruits, with calculation of the Pearson correlation matrix between them. Sixty eight sample sizes were planned for one greenhouse and 48 for another, with the initial sample size of 10 plants, and the others were obtained by adding five plants. For each planned sample size, 3000 estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient were obtained through bootstrap re-samplings with replacement. The sample size for each correlation coefficient was determined when the 95% confidence interval amplitude value was less than or equal to 0.4. Obtaining estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient with high precision is difficult for parameters with a weak linear relation. Accordingly, a larger sample size is necessary to estimate them. Linear relations involving variables dealing with size and number of fruits per plant have less precision. To estimate the coefficient of correlation between productivity variables of cherry tomato, with a confidence interval of 95% equal to 0.4, it is necessary to sample 275 plants in a 250m² greenhouse, and 200 plants in a 200m² greenhouse.

  7. Sex-Dependent Individual Differences and the Correlational Relationship Between Proprioceptive and Verbal Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liutsko Liudmila

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between proprioceptive and verbal tests on personality in both sexes separately due to existing proprioceptive differences in fine motor behavior between men and women in our previous studies [1, 2, 3]. Material and methods. 114 middle-aged participants from Belarus completed verbal tests (personality: Eysenck's EPQ, Big Five in Hromov's Russian adaptation, and Rosenberg's Self-esteem together with Proprioceptive Diagnostics of Temperament and Character (by Tous. Complementary information, such as tests of time perception, was collected and used in correlative and ANOVA analyses with the use of SPSS v.19. Results. The relationship between proprioceptive variables in personality and individual differences, time perception and the results of verbal tests were determined for each sex subgroup and discussed. ANOVA results reflected the corresponding differences and similarities between men and women in the variables of each test. Time perception was found to be significantly correlated to all five dimensions of the Big Five Test in both sexes, and both had a significant relationship to the same variables of the DP-TC test. Conclusions. Time perception can be used as an indirect indicator of personality. Existing individual and personality differences should be taken into account in coaching and education to obtain more effective results.

  8. Kriging for Simulation Metamodeling: Experimental Design, Reduced Rank Kriging, and Omni-Rank Kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Michael Robert

    This dissertation improves an analyst's use of simulation by offering improvements in the utilization of kriging metamodels. There are three main contributions. First an analysis is performed of what comprises good experimental designs for practical (non-toy) problems when using a kriging metamodel. Second is an explanation and demonstration of how reduced rank decompositions can improve the performance of kriging, now referred to as reduced rank kriging. Third is the development of an extension of reduced rank kriging which solves an open question regarding the usage of reduced rank kriging in practice. This extension is called omni-rank kriging. Finally these results are demonstrated on two case studies. The first contribution focuses on experimental design. Sequential designs are generally known to be more efficient than "one shot" designs. However, sequential designs require some sort of pilot design from which the sequential stage can be based. We seek to find good initial designs for these pilot studies, as well as designs which will be effective if there is no following sequential stage. We test a wide variety of designs over a small set of test-bed problems. Our findings indicate that analysts should take advantage of any prior information they have about their problem's shape and/or their goals in metamodeling. In the event of a total lack of information we find that Latin hypercube designs are robust default choices. Our work is most distinguished by its attention to the higher levels of dimensionality. The second contribution introduces and explains an alternative method for kriging when there is noise in the data, which we call reduced rank kriging. Reduced rank kriging is based on using a reduced rank decomposition which artificially smoothes the kriging weights similar to a nugget effect. Our primary focus will be showing how the reduced rank decomposition propagates through kriging empirically. In addition, we show further evidence for our

  9. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  10. Y balance test has no correlation with the Stability Index of the Biodex Balance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Monteiro, Isabel Oliveira; Marizeiro, Débora Fortes; Maia, Laísa Braga; de Paula Lima, Pedro Olavo

    2017-02-01

    A cross-sectional study design. The Stability Index of the Biodex Balance System (SI-BBS) and Y Balance Test (YBT) has been used in studies assessing postural stability but no studies have verified the association of the YBT with the SI-BBS. To analyze the association of the Y Balance Test (YBT) with the Stability Index of the Biodex Balance System (SI-BBS) to evaluate postural stability. Forty participants who engaged in recreational physical activities, 12 of whom had a history of injury to the lower limbs. Was used the SI-BBS and the anterior, posterolateral, posteromedial, and composite measures of the YBT. The order of execution of the tests and of the lower limbs evaluated was randomized and blind tested by two evaluators. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to check the strength of the relationship between the distances achieved on the YBT and the SI-BBS. The YBT showed excellent reliability in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. However, the YBT showed no statistically significant correlation with any variables in the SI-BBS, indicating poor validity between YBT and SI-BBS assessments of postural stability in people with and without history of lower limb injuries. The results of this study showed the YBT is not correlated with the SI-BBS as an assessment of postural stability. This finding has implications for researchers and clinicians using YBT results as the only measure of postural stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  12. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  13. Econophysics of a ranked demand and supply resource allocation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priel, Avner; Tamir, Boaz

    2018-01-01

    We present a two sided resource allocation problem, between demands and supplies, where both parties are ranked. For example, in Big Data problems where a set of different computational tasks is divided between a set of computers each with its own resources, or between employees and employers where both parties are ranked, the employees by their fitness and the employers by their package benefits. The allocation process can be viewed as a repeated game where in each iteration the strategy is decided by a meta-rule, based on the ranks of both parties and the results of the previous games. We show the existence of a phase transition between an absorbing state, where all demands are satisfied, and an active one where part of the demands are always left unsatisfied. The phase transition is governed by the ratio between supplies and demand. In a job allocation problem we find positive correlation between the rank of the workers and the rank of the factories; higher rank workers are usually allocated to higher ranked factories. These all suggest global emergent properties stemming from local variables. To demonstrate the global versus local relations, we introduce a local inertial force that increases the rank of employees in proportion to their persistence time in the same factory. We show that such a local force induces non trivial global effects, mostly to benefit the lower ranked employees.

  14. Test-Analysis Correlation of a Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a Commuter-Category Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite element model of an ATR42-300 commuter-class aircraft was developed and a crash simulation was executed. Analytical predictions were correlated with data obtained from a 30-feet per second (9.14-meters per second) vertical drop test of the aircraft. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of the aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with seats, dummies, luggage, and other ballast. The wings were filled with 8,700 lb. (3,946 kilograms) of water to represent the fuel. The finite element model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry. The seats, dummies, luggage, simulated engines and fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. The model was executed in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element code for performing explicit transient dynamic simulations. Analytical predictions of structural deformation and selected time-history responses were correlated with experimental data from the drop test to validate the simulation.

  15. PageRank tracker: from ranking to tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Fu, Keren; Loza, Artur; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Video object tracking is widely used in many real-world applications, and it has been extensively studied for over two decades. However, tracking robustness is still an issue in most existing methods, due to the difficulties with adaptation to environmental or target changes. In order to improve adaptability, this paper formulates the tracking process as a ranking problem, and the PageRank algorithm, which is a well-known webpage ranking algorithm used by Google, is applied. Labeled and unlabeled samples in tracking application are analogous to query webpages and the webpages to be ranked, respectively. Therefore, determining the target is equivalent to finding the unlabeled sample that is the most associated with existing labeled set. We modify the conventional PageRank algorithm in three aspects for tracking application, including graph construction, PageRank vector acquisition and target filtering. Our simulations with the use of various challenging public-domain video sequences reveal that the proposed PageRank tracker outperforms mean-shift tracker, co-tracker, semiboosting and beyond semiboosting trackers in terms of accuracy, robustness and stability.

  16. Using incomplete citation data for MEDLINE results ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovic, Jorge R; Bernstam, Elmer V

    2005-01-01

    Information overload is a significant problem for modern medicine. Searching MEDLINE for common topics often retrieves more relevant documents than users can review. Therefore, we must identify documents that are not only relevant, but also important. Our system ranks articles using citation counts and the PageRank algorithm, incorporating data from the Science Citation Index. However, citation data is usually incomplete. Therefore, we explore the relationship between the quantity of citation information available to the system and the quality of the result ranking. Specifically, we test the ability of citation count and PageRank to identify "important articles" as defined by experts from large result sets with decreasing citation information. We found that PageRank performs better than simple citation counts, but both algorithms are surprisingly robust to information loss. We conclude that even an incomplete citation database is likely to be effective for importance ranking.

  17. Correlation between plasma endothelin-1 levels and severity of septic liver failure quantified by maximal liver function capacity (LiMAx test. A prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus F Kaffarnik

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between the degree of liver dysfunction, quantified by maximal liver function capacity (LiMAx test and endothelin-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in septic surgical patients.28 septic patients (8 female, 20 male, age range 35-80y were prospectively investigated on a surgical intensive care unit. Liver function, defined by LiMAx test, and measurements of plasma levels of endothelin-1, TNF-α and IL-6 were carried out within the first 24 hours after onset of septic symptoms, followed by day 2, 5 and 10. Patients were divided into 2 groups (group A: LiMAx ≥100 μg/kg/h, moderate liver dysfunction; group B: LiMAx <100 μg/kg/h, severe liver dysfunction for analysis and investigated regarding the correlation between endothelin-1 and the severity of liver failure, quantified by LiMAx test.Group B showed significant higher results for endothelin-1 than patients in group A (P = 0.01, d5; 0.02, d10. For TNF-α, group B revealed higher results than group A, with a significant difference on day 10 (P = 0.005. IL-6 showed a non-significant trend to higher results in group B. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient revealed a significant correlation between LiMAx and endothelin-1 (-0.434; P <0.001, TNF-α (-0.515; P <0.001 and IL-6 (-0.590; P <0.001.Sepsis-related hepatic dysfunction is associated with elevated plasma levels of endothelin-1, TNF-α and IL-6. Low LiMAx results combined with increased endothelin-1 and TNF-α and a favourable correlation between LiMAx and cytokine values support the findings of a crucial role of Endothelin-1 and TNF-α in development of septic liver failure.

  18. Statistical correlation analysis for comparing vibration data from test and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, T. G.; Strang, R. F.; Purves, L. R.; Hershfeld, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A theory was developed to compare vibration modes obtained by NASTRAN analysis with those obtained experimentally. Because many more analytical modes can be obtained than experimental modes, the analytical set was treated as expansion functions for putting both sources in comparative form. The dimensional symmetry was developed for three general cases: nonsymmetric whole model compared with a nonsymmetric whole structural test, symmetric analytical portion compared with a symmetric experimental portion, and analytical symmetric portion with a whole experimental test. The theory was coded and a statistical correlation program was installed as a utility. The theory is established with small classical structures.

  19. Correlations for the Stroop Color and Word Test with measures of reading and language achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverett, J Patrick; Lassiter, Kerry S; Buchanan, Gray M

    2002-04-01

    The present investigation examined the relationships for scores on the Stroop Color and Word Test with measures of reading and language achievement within an adult population. The Stroop Color and Word Test, Nelson-Denny Reading Test, Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised, and Wide Range Achievement Test-3 were administered to 99 men ranging in age from 18 to 27 years. Pearson product-moment correlations indicated that the Stroop Word task was positively associated with scores on the WRAT-3 Spelling task, the Woodcock-Johnson Basic and Broad Reading tasks, and the Nelson-Denny Rcading Rate and Comprehension tasks. These and other significant relationships were discussed in terms of possible implications regarding the assessment of reading achievement.

  20. Correlation Between Capillary and Venous Blood Glucose in the Lactose Tolerance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Jiménez, José Luis; Fernández Suárez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The lactose tolerance test is a classic method for the study of lactose malabsorption. However, the methodology used has not been standardized, and this leads to differences in results. The aim of this report was to analyze whether capillary blood glucose measurement is in agreement with venous blood glucose when performing lactose tolerance test. This is a prospective study of consecutive patients with suspected lactose malabsorption who had lactose tolerance test performed in venous and capillary blood simultaneously, using a load of 50 g lactose. Agreement was measured using the concordance correlation coefficient of Lin (95 % CI) and Bland-Altman plots. The degree of agreement was measured using the Kappa index. A value of p index of 0.59 (p lactose tolerance test in different studies for lactose malabsorption is incorrect, making it necessary to specify the analysis method.

  1. A Correlative Defect Analyzer Combining Glide Test with Atomic Force Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizhong He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel instrument combining a glide tester with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM for hard disk drive (HDD media defect test and analysis. The sample stays on the same test spindle during both glide test and AFM imaging without losing the relevant coordinates. This enables an in situ evaluation with the high-resolution AFM of the defects detected by the glide test. The ability for the immediate follow-on AFM analysis solves the problem of relocating the defects quickly and accurately in the current workflow. The tool is furnished with other functions such as scribing, optical imaging, and head burnishing. Typical data generated from the tool are shown at the end of the paper. It is further demonstrated that novel experiments can be carried out on the platform by taking advantage of the correlative capabilities of the tool.

  2. A probit latent class model with general correlation structures for evaluating accuracy of diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huiping; Craig, Bruce A

    2009-12-01

    Traditional latent class modeling has been widely applied to assess the accuracy of dichotomous diagnostic tests. These models, however, assume that the tests are independent conditional on the true disease status, which is rarely valid in practice. Alternative models using probit analysis have been proposed to incorporate dependence among tests, but these models consider restricted correlation structures. In this article, we propose a probit latent class model that allows a general correlation structure. When combined with some helpful diagnostics, this model provides a more flexible framework from which to evaluate the correlation structure and model fit. Our model encompasses several other PLC models but uses a parameter-expanded Monte Carlo EM algorithm to obtain the maximum-likelihood estimates. The parameter-expanded EM algorithm was designed to accelerate the convergence rate of the EM algorithm by expanding the complete-data model to include a larger set of parameters and it ensures a simple solution in fitting the PLC model. We demonstrate our estimation and model selection methods using a simulation study and two published medical studies.

  3. Anaerobic contribution during maximal anaerobic running test: correlation with maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, A; Redkva, P; Loures, J; Kalva Filho, C; Franco, V; Kaminagakura, E; Papoti, M

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to measure energy system contributions in maximal anaerobic running test (MART); and (ii) to verify any correlation between MART and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Eleven members of the armed forces were recruited for this study. Participants performed MART and MAOD, both accomplished on a treadmill. MART consisted of intermittent exercise, 20 s effort with 100 s recovery, after each spell of effort exercise. Energy system contributions by MART were also determined by excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, lactate response, and oxygen uptake measurements. MAOD was determined by five submaximal intensities and one supramaximal intensity exercises corresponding to 120% at maximal oxygen uptake intensity. Energy system contributions were 65.4±1.1% to aerobic; 29.5±1.1% to anaerobic a-lactic; and 5.1±0.5% to anaerobic lactic system throughout the whole test, while only during effort periods the anaerobic contribution corresponded to 73.5±1.0%. Maximal power found in MART corresponded to 111.25±1.33 mL/kg/min but did not significantly correlate with MAOD (4.69±0.30 L and 70.85±4.73 mL/kg). We concluded that the anaerobic a-lactic system is the main energy system in MART efforts and this test did not significantly correlate to MAOD. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Development of empirical correlation of peak friction angle with surface roughness of discontinuities using tilt test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serasa, Ailie Sofyiana; Lai, Goh Thian; Rafek, Abdul Ghani; Simon, Norbert; Hussein, Azimah; Ern, Lee Khai; Surip, Noraini; Mohamed, Tuan Rusli

    2016-11-01

    The significant influence of surface roughness of discontinuity surfaces is a quantity that is fundamental to the understanding of shear strength of geological discontinuities. This is due to reason that the shear strength of geological discontinuities greatly influenced the mechanical behavior of a rock mass especially in stability evaluation of tunnel, foundation, and natural slopes. In evaluating the stability of these structures, the study of peak friction angle (Φpeak) of rough discontinuity surfaces has become more prominent seeing that the shear strength is a pivotal factor causing failures. The measurement of peak friction angle however, requires an extensive series of laboratory tests which are both time and cost demanding. With that in mind, this publication presents an approach in the form of an experimentally determined polynomial equation to estimate peak friction angle of limestone discontinuity surfaces by measuring the Joint Roughness Coefficient (JRC) values from tilt tests, and applying the fore mentioned empirical correlation. A total of 1967 tilt tests and JRC measurements were conducted in the laboratory to determine the peak friction angles of rough limestone discontinuity surfaces. A polynomial equation of ɸpeak = -0.0635JRC2 + 3.95JRC + 25.2 that exhibited 0.99 coefficient of determination (R2) were obtained from the correlation of JRC and peak friction angles. The proposed correlation offers a practical method for estimation of peak friction angles of rough discontinuity surfaces of limestone from measurement of JRC in the field.

  5. The Distribution of the Sum of Signed Ranks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We describe the calculation of the distribution of the sum of signed ranks and develop an exact recursive algorithm for the distribution as well as an approximation of the distribution using the normal. The results have applications to the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

  6. CORRELATION OF LOW BACK PAIN WITH BODY MASS INDEX, FUNCTIONAL REACH TEST AMONG FEMALE NURSING PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shameela .T .V

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among health care workers the highest level of work related back injuries are more affected in nurses. There were many studies done to assess low back pain by using different tools. So this study aimed to identify the prevalence low back pain disability among female nursing professionals and the association between BMI, functional reach test and low back pain, so that a better tool can be used during the clinical examination for the betterment of the patient. The objective of the study is to identify the prevalence of low back pain disability, the association of Low Back Pain(LBP with BMI and functional reach test among female nursing professionals. Methods: A total of 256 subjects were assessed for disability due to back pain using OswestryLBP Disability Questionnaire and the prevalence of disability was determined. The sit and reach test, forward reach test and their BMI were calculated for those who had a disability score of 20 and above (n=87. Results: Data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation.The study result showed a significant correlation (p=0.03 of sit and reach test with low back pain disability scores. There was a negative correlationseen among BMI and LBP disability score forward reach test and LBP disability score, and BMI and no low back pain disability score. Conclusion: The prevalence of LBP disability among nursing professionals was 33.9%. This study suggest that sit and reach test can be used as an indicator of low back pain. Whereas BMI and forward reach test do not indicate low back pain.

  7. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Siart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology however is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C and testosterone (T levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were 1 warrant officers (High Rank, HR and 2 enlisted men (Low Rank, LR. One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment.We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military

  8. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siart, Benjamin; Pflüger, Lena S; Wallner, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology, however, is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C) and testosterone (T) levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were (1) warrant officers (high rank, HR) and (2) enlisted men (low rank, LR). One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment. We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in the LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military rank

  9. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  10. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Costello, J.F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  11. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  12. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Weibing; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A

    2011-01-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the human society. By clicking the web pages of Forbes, you may find all kinds of rankings, such as world's most powerful people, world's richest people, top-paid tennis stars, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind, sports ranking systems in which players' scores and prize money are calculated based on their performances in attending various tournaments. A typical example is tennis. It is found that the distributions of both scores and prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports fields. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player will top the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simul...

  13. Image Registration based on Low Rank Matrix: Rank-Regularized SSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Aboozar; Fatemizadeh, Emad

    2017-08-25

    Similarity measure is a main core of image registration algorithms. Spatially varying intensity distortion is an important challenge which affects the performance of similarity measures. Correlation among pixels is the main characteristic of this distortion. Similarity measures such as sum-of-squareddifferences (SSD) and mutual information (MI) ignore this correlation; Hence, perfect registration cannot be achieved in the presence of this distortion. In this paper, we model this correlation with the aid of the low rank matrix theory. Based on this model, we compensate this distortion analytically and introduce Rank-Regularized SSD (RRSSD). This new similarity measure is a modified SSD based on singular values of difference image in mono-modal imaging. In fact, image registration and distortion correction are performed simultaneously in the proposed model. Based on our experiments, the RRSSD similarity measure achieves clinically acceptable registration results, and outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures such as the well-known method of residual complexity.

  14. Correlation between liver function tests and metabolic syndrome in hepatitis-free elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Sheng Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to investigate the relationship between liver function tests (LFTs and metabolic syndrome (MetS as several studies have shown positive correlations between some of the LFTs, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT, and MetS but have not fully explored the same in the elderly. Owing to the progress in public health, the aging of the general population becomes a major issue. Design: We enrolled subjects aged over 60 years who underwent routine health checkups in a Health Screening Center after excluding subjects with a history of hepatitis B or C infection, excessive alcohol consumption, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, acute hepatitis, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, or receiving medications for these diseases. Finally, 9,282 participants were eligible for analysis. Statistical Analysis: All data were tested for normal distribution with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and for homogeneity of variances with the Levene′s test. A t-test was used to evaluate the differences between the two groups. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to observe correlations between different parameters. Receiver operating characteristic curves of each LFT were used to predict MetS. Areas under curves and 95% confidence interval were also estimated and compared. Results: With the exception of aspartate aminotransferase and α-fetal protein, the results of LFTs, including total and direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, ALT, and γ-GT, were altered in the group with MetS. Furthermore, the levels of γ-GT in men and ALP in women were independently associated with all MetS components and had the highest areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Conclusion: Abnormal LFTs are highly correlated with MetS in the hepatitis-free elderly, with levels of γ-GT in men and ALP in women being the most important factors. LFTs may represent an auxiliary tool for the

  15. Pulmonary function tests correlated with thoracic volumes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledonio, Charles Gerald T; Rosenstein, Benjamin E; Johnston, Charles E; Regelmann, Warren E; Nuckley, David J; Polly, David W

    2017-01-01

    Scoliosis deformity has been linked with deleterious changes in the thoracic cavity that affect pulmonary function. The causal relationship between spinal deformity and pulmonary function has yet to be fully defined. It has been hypothesized that deformity correction improves pulmonary function by restoring both respiratory muscle efficiency and increasing the space available to the lungs. This research aims to correlate pulmonary function and thoracic volume before and after scoliosis correction. Retrospective correlational analysis between thoracic volume modeling from plain x-rays and pulmonary function tests was conducted. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients enrolled in a multicenter database were sorted by pre-operative Total Lung Capacities (TLC) % predicted values from their Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT). Ten patients with the best and ten patients with the worst TLC values were included. Modeled thoracic volume and TLC values were compared before and 2 years after surgery. Scoliosis correction resulted in an increase in the thoracic volume for patients with the worst initial TLCs (11.7%) and those with the best initial TLCs (12.5%). The adolescents with the most severe pulmonary restriction prior to surgery strongly correlated with post-operative change in total lung capacity and thoracic volume (r2  = 0.839; p Scoliosis correction in adolescents was found to increase thoracic volume and is strongly correlated with improved TLC in cases with severe restrictive pulmonary function, but no correlation was found in cases with normal pulmonary function. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:175-182, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bronchial asthma: correlation of quantitative CT and the pulmonary function test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun; Jin, Gong Yong; Jeon, Su Bin; Han, Young Min [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in the evaluation asthma patients and to correlate its use with the pulmonary function test (PFT). Thirty asthmatic patients and thirty normal volunteers were prospectively evaluated by the use of HRCT and the PFT. By using 16 slice MDCT, HRCT was performed from the apex to the base of both lungs at the end inspiration and end expiration periods in all patients and images were reconstructed to a thickness of 1 mm (window level: -750 HU, window width: 1,500 HU). We analyzed each image for the whole lung using the Pulmo CT program. PFTs including FVC and FEV1 were performed one week prior and one week after the completion of a HRCT. The Difference of QCT (the mean lung density and subrange ratio) between volunteers and asthmatic patients was analyzed by using the Student's t-test. Spearman's correlation test was used to determine the association between PFT and QCT. The mean lung density (MLD) and subrange ratio were lower in asthmatic patients than in volunteers for and expiration and no difference was seen between asthmatic patients and volunteers for end inspiration. FVC and FEV1 were lower in asthmatic patients than in volunteers. A decrease in FVC and FEV1 correlated with changes in the MLD and subrange ratio for end expiration. QCT such as MLD and the subrange ratio using HRCT can be used to indirectly assess the pulmonary function of the asthma patient. The PFT seems to correlate better with the MLD and subrange ratio for expiratory QCT of the asthma patient than with inspiratory QCT.

  17. Phylogenetically nested comparisons for testing correlates of species richness: a simulation study of continuous variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Nick J B; Agapow, Paul-Michael; Harvey, Paul H; Purvis, Andy

    2003-01-01

    Explaining the uneven distribution of species among lineages is one of the oldest questions in evolution. Proposed correlations between biological traits and species diversity are routinely tested by making comparisons between phylogenetic sister clades. Several recent studies have used nested sister-clade comparisons to test hypotheses linking continuously varying traits, such as body size, with diversity. Evaluating the findings of these studies is complicated because they differ in the index of species richness difference used, the way in which trait differences were treated, and the statistical tests employed. In this paper, we use simulations to compare the performance of four species richness indices, two choices about the branch lengths used to estimate trait values for internal nodes and two statistical tests under a range of models of clade growth and character evolution. All four indices returned appropriate Type I error rates when the assumptions of the method were met and when branch lengths were set proportional to time. Only two of the indices were robust to the different evolutionary models and to different choices of branch lengths and statistical tests. These robust indices had comparable power under one nonnull scenario. Regression through the origin was consistently more powerful than the t-test, and the choice of branch lengths exerts a strong effect on both the validity and power. In the light of our simulations, we re-evaluate the findings of those who have previously used nested comparisons in the context of species richness. We provide a set of simple guidelines to maximize the performance of phylogenetically nested comparisons in tests of putative correlates of species richness.

  18. Comparison of the neural correlates of retrieval success in tests of cued recall and recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kayoko; Vilberg, Kaia L; Rugg, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    The neural correlates of successful retrieval on tests of word stem recall and recognition memory were compared. In the recall test, subjects viewed word stems, half of which were associated with studied items and half with unstudied items, and for each stem attempted to recall a corresponding study word. In the recognition test, old/new judgments were made on old and new words. The neural correlates of successful retrieval were identified by contrasting activity elicited by correctly endorsed test items. Old > new effects common to the two tasks were found in medial and lateral parietal and right entorhinal cortex. Common new > old effects were identified in medial and left frontal cortex, and left anterior intra-parietal sulcus. Greater old > new effects were evident for cued recall in inferior parietal regions abutting those demonstrating common effects, whereas larger new > old effects were found for recall in left frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate. New > old effects were also found for the recall task in right lateral anterior prefrontal cortex, where they were accompanied by old > new effects during recognition. It is concluded that successful recall and recognition are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of recollection-sensitive parietal regions, and that the greater activation in these regions during recall reflects the greater dependence of that task on recollection. Larger new > old effects during recall are interpreted as reflections of the greater opportunity for iterative retrieval attempts when retrieval cues are partial rather than copy cues. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Change of liver echogenicity in chronic renal failure: Correlation with serologic test and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Kim, Jeong Kon [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Hoon [Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To correlate serologic test and pathologic findings with change of hepatic parenchymal echogenicity on ultrasound (US) in patients with chronic renal failure. From January 1995 to April 2000, among eight hundred eighty four patients with kidney transplantation due to chronic renal failure, sixty seven patients who underwent US-guided liver biopsy were selected. Change of liver echogenicity on US was analyzed, and this change was compared with serologic test and pathologic findings. Among sixty seven patients, pathologic findings of thirty four patients with the normal liver echogenicity on US revealed normal in 15 patients (44%), viral hepatitis in 18 (53%), and liver cirrhosis in one patient (3%). Meanwhile, twenty seven patients with chronic liver disease on US were pathologically confirmed as normal in 13 patients (48%), viral hepatitis in 11 (40%), liver cirrhosis in four patients (11%); six patients with cirrhotic change on US, liver cirrhosis in four patients (67%) and viral hepatitis on two patients (33%). Serologic test of thirty four patients with the normal liver echogenicity on US showed positive HBs Ag in 17 patients (50%), positive anti-HCV Ab in 11 (32%), positive in both HBs Ag and anti-HCV Ab in one (3%), and normal result in five patients (15%). In patients with chronic renal failure, it is nor enough to determine the presence of liver disease only based on change of echogenicity on US. A careful correlation with serologic test and, if needed, pathologic confirmation are recommended for the accurate preoperative evaluation of the liver.

  20. Comparison of the neural correlates of retrieval success in tests of cued recall and recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kayoko; Vilberg, Kaia L.; Rugg, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of successful retrieval on tests of word stem recall and recognition memory were compared. In the recall test, subjects viewed word stems, half of which were associated with studied items and half with unstudied items, and for each stem attempted to recall a corresponding study word. In the recognition test, old/new judgments were made on old and new words. The neural correlates of successful retrieval were identified by contrasting activity elicited by correctly endorsed test items. Old > new effects common to the two tasks were found in medial and lateral parietal, and right entorhinal cortex. Common new > old effects were identified in medial and left frontal cortex, and left anterior intra-parietal sulcus. Greater old > new effects were evident for cued recall in inferior parietal regions abutting those demonstrating common effects, whereas larger new > old effects were found for recall in left frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate. New > old effects were also found for the recall task in right lateral anterior prefrontal cortex, where they were accompanied by old > new effects during recognition. It is concluded that successful recall and recognition are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of recollection-sensitive parietal regions, and that the greater activation in these regions during recall reflects the greater dependence of that task on recollection. Larger new > old effects during recall are interpreted as reflections of the greater opportunity for iterative retrieval attempts when retrieval cues are partial rather than copy cues. PMID:21455941

  1. Fitness Field Tests' Correlation With Game Performance in U-19-Category Basketball Referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabli, Mohamed Ali; Abdelkrim, Nidhal Ben; Jabri, Imed; Batikh, Tahar; Castagna, Carlo; Chamari, Karim

    2016-11-01

    To examine the relation between game performance, physiological responses, and field-test results in Tunisian basketball referees. Computerized time-motion analysis, heart rate (HR), and blood lactate concentration [La - ] were measured in 15 referees during 8 competitive games (under-19-y-old Tunisian league). Referees also performed a repeated-sprint test (RSA), Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 1 (YYIRTL1), agility T-test, and 30-m sprint with 10-m lap time. Computerized video analysis determined the time spent in 5 locomotor activities (standing, walking, jogging, running, and sprint), then grouped in high-, moderate-, and low-intensity activities (HIAs, MIAs, and LIAs, respectively). YYIRTL1 performance correlated with (1) total distance covered during the 4th quarter (r = .52, P = .04) and (2) distance covered in LIA during all game periods (P basketball referees and (2) referees' RSA correlates with the amount of HIA performed during the 2nd half, which represents the ability to keep up with play.

  2. Psycho-social Correlates of Condom Use and HIV Testing among MSM Refugees in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Johnny; Egan, James E; Friedman, Mackey R; Stall, Ron

    2016-12-01

    MSM refugees have to deal with personal challenges and social/structural adversaries based on their refugee status on top of their sexual identity. To better customize interventions beside this population, we explored psycho-social and structural correlates of condom use and HIV testing in Lebanon by surveying and testing 150 participants. 67 % self-identified as gay. 84.6 % reported any unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with men in the prior 3 months. Those who engaged in UAI, were lest comfortable with a doctor, didn't know where to get free HIV testing, experienced discrimination based on their refugee status and spent more time with their refugee peers, were less inclined to have seen a doctor in the past 12 month or knew where to get free HIV testing. Ever having been HIV tested was associated with being comfortable with medical doctors, knowing where to get HIV testing and spending time with other peer refugees. HIV prevention and testing promotion efforts targeting MSM refugees need to account for structural barriers, while fighting discrimination is crucial for a healthy sexual identity development.

  3. Correlations between the simulated military tasks performance and physical fitness tests at high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Borba Neves

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the Correlations between the Simulated Military Tasks Performance and Physical Fitness Tests at high altitude. This research is part of a project to modernize the physical fitness test of the Colombian Army. Data collection was performed at the 13th Battalion of Instruction and Training, located 30km south of Bogota D.C., with a temperature range from 1ºC to 23ºC during the study period, and at 3100m above sea level. The sample was composed by 60 volunteers from three different platoons. The volunteers start the data collection protocol after 2 weeks of acclimation at this altitude. The main results were the identification of a high positive correlation between the 3 Assault wall in succession and the Simulated Military Tasks performance (r = 0.764, p<0.001, and a moderate negative correlation between pull-ups and the Simulated Military Tasks performance (r = -0.535, p<0.001. It can be recommended the use of the 20-consecutive overtaking of the 3 Assault wall in succession as a good way to estimate the performance in operational tasks which involve: assault walls, network of wires, military Climbing Nets, Tarzan jump among others, at high altitude.

  4. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons and EDU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a more traditional thermal control system. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement and/or short transport distances. Tests were performed on coupons and an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at NASA s Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit test results.

  5. PageRank of integers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, K. M.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is approximately inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows us to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers.

  6. Testing the correlation of fragmented pollen records of the middle and late Pleistocene temperate stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuneš, Petr; Odgaard, Bent Vad

    Quaternary temperate stages have long been described based on changing pollen abundances of various tree taxa in lacustrine sediments. Later, attempts have been made to assign such biostratigraphic units to distinct marine isotope stages (MIS). Existing continuous chronosequences from Southern...... records depends on site-to-site correlations. This comparison has often been performed on a visual basis, lacking clearly defined protocols and statements of underlying assumptions. Here I test the correlation of well and poorly known pollen records of the middle- and late-Pleistocene temperate stages...... records. Ordination compares main trends in pollen stratigraphies of all pollen sequences. It finds very similar patterns between Eemian records and Cromerian stage II. Although different methods show sometimes inconsistent results, they can certainly contribute to the discussion of the age of poorly...

  7. Trachomatous Scar Ranking: A Novel Outcome for Trachoma Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Angela; Ryner, Alexander M; Tadesse, Zerihun; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Callahan, Kelly; Fry, Dionna M; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-06-01

    AbstractWe evaluated a new trachoma scarring ranking system with potential use in clinical research. The upper right tarsal conjunctivas of 427 individuals from Ethiopian villages with hyperendemic trachoma were photographed. An expert grader first assigned a scar grade to each photograph using the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. Then, all photographs were ranked from least (rank = 1) to most scarring (rank = 427). Photographic grading found 79 (18.5%) conjunctivae without scarring (C0), 191 (44.7%) with minimal scarring (C1), 105 (24.6%) with moderate scarring (C2), and 52 (12.2%) with severe scarring (C3). The ranking method demonstrated good internal validity, exhibiting a monotonic increase in the median rank across the levels of the 1981 WHO grading system. Intrarater repeatability was better for the ranking method (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74-0.94). Exhibiting better internal and external validity, this ranking method may be useful for evaluating the difference in scarring between groups of individuals.

  8. Correlation between Histological Status of the Pulp and Its Response to Sensibility Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mandana; Khayat, Akbar; Zamaheni, Sara; Shojaeian, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of sensibility tests by correlating it with histologic pulp condition. Assessment of clinical signs and symptoms were performed on 65 permanent teeth that were scheduled to be extracted for periodontal, prosthodontic or orthodontic reasons. The normal pulp and reversible pulpitis were considered as treatable tooth conditions while irreversible pulpitis and necrosis were considered as untreatable conditions. The teeth were then extracted and sectioned for histological analysis of dental pulp. Histologic status and classification corresponded to the treatable or untreatable pulp condition. Comparisons between histological treatable and untreatable pulp condition were performed with chi-square analysis for sensibility test responses. The positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy to detect untreatable from treatable pulp condition were calculated for each test. A significant difference was detected in the normal and a sharp lingered response to heat and cold tests. There was significant difference in the negative response to EPT between histological groups. The kappa agreement coefficient between clinical and histological diagnosis of pulp condition was about 0.843 (Ppulpitis with a higher probability (NPV=63%-67% -54%, PPV=83%-91% -95% for heat, cold and EPT, respectively). Sensibility test results were more likely to diagnose pulpal disease or untreatable pulp conditions. However, to increase the diagnostic accuracy patient history, clinical signs and symptoms and also radiographic findings in conjunction with sensibility tests must be used. The result of this small study demonstrated a good agreement between clinical and histological pulp diagnosis.

  9. Correlation between a psychometric test and biochemical indices of hepatic encephalopathy in alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganaro, M; Zardi, E M; Ceccanti, M; Spada, S; Attilia, M L; Pancheri, P; Biondi, M; Paga, G

    2000-01-01

    In alcohol abusers an alteration of responses to psychometric tests has been reported, even when clinical symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are absent. Our research was intended to individualize a simple psychometric test, easy enough to be performed also at the patient's home, able to reveal an impending encephalopathy and, consequently, to facilitate earlier treatment. Twenty-six consecutive male alcoholics were engaged and, after informed consent, the following schedule was applied: administration of a psychometric test, followed by a drawing of blood for the determination of many blood parameters. After 15 days of treatment to detoxicate patients, psychometric tests and blood examinations were repeated. The results confirmed that common blood examinations are not useful to monitor brain damage in chronic alcoholism, that a psychometric test is able to demonstrate a therapeutic improvement and that a positive and significant correlation has been observed between BBCA/AAA ratio and WAIS Score. These preliminary results suggest that it is possible to suspect dangerous biochemical changes by means of a simple psychometric test.

  10. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  11. Effect of harmonic rank on the streaming of complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sara Miay Kim; Dau, Torsten; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the rank of the harmonics on sequential stream segregation of complex tones was investigated for normal-hearing participants with no musical training. It was hypothesized that stream segregation would be greater for tones with high pitch salience, as assessed by fundamental frequency....... There was a significant trend for less stream segregation with increasing harmonic rank. The amount of stream segregation was inversely correlated with the f0 difference limens, consistent with the hypothesis....

  12. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  13. Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in transonic wind-tunnel/flight-test correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    The capability for calculating transonic flows for realistic configurations and conditions is discussed. Various phenomena which were modeled are shown to have the same order of magnitude on the influence of predicted results. It is concluded that CFD can make the following contributions to the task of correlating wind tunnel and flight test data: some effects of geometry differences and aeroelastic distortion can be predicted; tunnel wall effects can be assessed and corrected for; and the effects of model support systems and free stream nonuniformities can be modeled.

  14. Pitfalls and important issues in testing reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients in orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jaebong; Chung, Chin Youb; Ahn, Soyeon; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Hui Jong; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-06-01

    Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) provide a statistical means of testing the reliability. However, their interpretation is not well documented in the orthopedic field. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of ICCs in the orthopedic literature and to demonstrate pitfalls regarding their use. First, orthopedic articles that used ICCs were retrieved from the Pubmed database, and journal demography, ICC models and concurrent statistics used were evaluated. Second, reliability test was performed on three common physical examinations in cerebral palsy, namely, the Thomas test, the Staheli test, and popliteal angle measurement. Thirty patients were assessed by three orthopedic surgeons to explore the statistical methods testing reliability. Third, the factors affecting the ICC values were examined by simulating the data sets based on the physical examination data where the ranges, slopes, and interobserver variability were modified. Of the 92 orthopedic articles identified, 58 articles (63%) did not clarify the ICC model used, and only 5 articles (5%) described all models, types, and measures. In reliability testing, although the popliteal angle showed a larger mean absolute difference than the Thomas test and the Staheli test, the ICC of popliteal angle was higher, which was believed to be contrary to the context of measurement. In addition, the ICC values were affected by the model, type, and measures used. In simulated data sets, the ICC showed higher values when the range of data sets were larger, the slopes of the data sets were parallel, and the interobserver variability was smaller. Care should be taken when interpreting the absolute ICC values, i.e., a higher ICC does not necessarily mean less variability because the ICC values can also be affected by various factors. The authors recommend that researchers clarify ICC models used and ICC values are interpreted in the context of measurement.

  15. Correlation between hypoosmotic swelling test and breeding soundness evaluation of adult Nelore bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Miranda Neto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the relationship between physical and morphological semen features with the hypoosmotic swelling (HOS test in raw semen of adult Nelore bulls classified as sound and unsound for breeding. Two hundred and six Nelore bulls aging from 3-10 years old were subjected to breeding soundness examination. After physical and morphological semen examination, HOS test was done. After the breeding soundness examination, 94.2% of the bulls were classified as sound for breeding. There was no difference between the average scrotal circumference of bulls classified as sound and unsound for breeding (P>0.05, but there was difference between all semen physical and morphological aspects of bulls classified as sound and unsound for breeding (P>0.05, but there was no difference in the mean percentage of reactive spermatozoa to HOS test results both for sound (38.4±17.9 and unsound animals (39.5±16.4; P>0.05, with no Pearson correlation between the HOS test and variables. According to these results HOS test can not be used alone to predict the reproductive potential of adult Nelore bulls.

  16. Pendulum test measure correlates with gait parameters in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfian, M; Mirbagheri, M M; Kharazi, M R; Dadashi, F; Nourian, R; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, A

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) usually suffer from different impairments including gait impairment and spasticity. Spastic hypertonia is a defining feature of spasticity and manifests as a mechanical abnormality. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between spastic hypertonia and gait impairments in spastic children with CP, addressing an important controversial issue. Spastic hypertonia was quantified using the pendulum test. The gait impairments were evaluated using the motion capture system in a gait laboratory. Our results showed significant correlations among gait parameters; i.e. walking speed, step length, and the pendulum test measures. This indicates that neuromuscular abnormalities are associated with spasticity and may contribute to gait impairments. The clinical implication is that the impaired gait in children with CP may be improved with the treatment of neuromuscular abnormalities.

  17. Correlations between tests of aging in Hiroshima subjects: an attempt to define physiologic age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, J.W.; Hashizume, Asaji; Jablon, Seymour

    1964-12-01

    Nine physiologic functions which change with age were measured in 437 subjects during their regular visits to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission clinic in Hiroshima, Japan. This pilot study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of collecting such data in a population sample physiologic age score. Tests conducted consisted of: skin elasticity, systolic blood pressure, vital capacity, hand grip strength, light extinction time, vibrometer, visual activity, audiometry, and serum cholesterol. The study demonstrated that adequate sample data could be obtained, and that statistical treatment could construct a physiologic age for individual subjects. However, the tests were of limited value below age 40, and the validation of the concept of physiologic age requires eventual correlation with mortality. Since the ABCC program includes a highly accurate mortality survey, it is hoped that data on physiologic aging can be collected and eventually related to mortality. 11 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Correlation analysis between pulmonary function test parameters and CT image parameters of emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Pei; Li, Chia-Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Yu, Wen-Kuang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, diagnosis and severity classification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are usually based on the pulmonary function tests (PFTs). To reduce the need of PFT for the diagnosis of COPD, this paper proposes a correlation model between the lung CT images and the crucial index of the PFT, FEV1/FVC, a severity index of COPD distinguishing a normal subject from a COPD patient. A new lung CT image index, Mirage Index (MI), has been developed to describe the severity of COPD primarily with emphysema disease. Unlike conventional Pixel Index (PI) which takes into account all voxels with HU values less than -950, the proposed approach modeled these voxels by different sizes of bullae balls and defines MI as a weighted sum of the percentages of the bullae balls of different size classes and locations in a lung. For evaluation of the efficacy of the proposed model, 45 emphysema subjects of different severity were involved in this study. In comparison with the conventional index, PI, the correlation between MI and FEV1/FVC is -0.75+/-0.08, which substantially outperforms the correlation between PI and FEV1/FVC, i.e., -0.63+/-0.11. Moreover, we have shown that the emphysematous lesion areas constituted by small bullae balls are basically irrelevant to FEV1/FVC. The statistical analysis and special case study results show that MI can offer better assessment in different analyses.

  19. Test and Analysis Correlation for a Y-Joint Specimen for a Composite Cryotank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brian H.; Sleight, David W.; Grenoble, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The Composite Cryotank Technology Demonstration (CCTD) project under NASA's Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) developed space technologies using advanced composite materials. Under CCTD, NASA funded the Boeing Company to design and test a number of element-level joint specimens as a precursor to a 2.4-m diameter composite cryotank. Preliminary analyses indicated that the y-joint in the cryotank had low margins of safety; hence the y-joint was considered to be a critical design region. The y-joint design includes a softening strip wedge to reduce localized shear stresses at the skirt/dome interface. In this paper, NASA-developed analytical models will be correlated with the experimental results of a series of positive-peel y-joint specimens from Boeing tests. Initial analytical models over-predicted the experimental strain gage readings in the far-field region by approximately 10%. The over-prediction was attributed to uncertainty in the elastic properties of the laminate and a mismatch between the thermal expansion of the strain gages and the laminate. The elastic properties of the analytical model were adjusted to account for the strain gage differences. The experimental strain gages also indicated a large non-linear effect in the softening strip region that was not predicted by the analytical model. This non-linear effect was attributed to delamination initiating in the softening strip region at below 20% of the failure load for the specimen. Because the specimen was contained in a thermally insulated box during cryogenic testing to failure, delamination initiation and progression was not visualized during the test. Several possible failure initiation locations were investigated, and a most likely failure scenario was determined that correlated well with the experimental data. The most likely failure scenario corresponded to damage initiating in the softening strip and delamination extending to the grips at final failure.

  20. Skin Test Reactivity to Indoor Allergens Correlates with Asthma Severity in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshak Emad A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increased emphasis on the role of indoor allergens in asthma. Objective To examine the spectrum of skin test reactivity (sensitization to indoor allergens and its correlation with asthma severity in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods Asthmatic patients referred to the allergy clinic at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH in Jeddah were studied. Measures of clinical severity were adopted from national and international asthma guidelines. The degree of sensitization was assessed by the wheal size (positive ≥ 3 mm from standard skin-prick tests for the following common indoor inhalant allergens: house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus [Dp] and Dermatophagoides farinae [Df], cat, and cockroach. Results Skin test results from 113 of 151 (74.8% asthmatic patients were positive for one or more allergens. The patients' ages ranged between 9 and 63 years (mean, 30 ± 13 years, and females constituted 65.5%. The predominant asthma severity level was moderate persistent (55.8%, followed by mild persistent (33.6%. The prevalences of sensitization to indoor allergens were as follows: Dp, 87% (3-25 mm [mean, 7 mm]; Df, 84% (3-20 mm [mean, 7 mm]; cat, 44% (3-15 mm [mean, 6 mm]; and cockroach, 33% (3-12 mm [mean, 4 mm]. Higher asthma severity levels were significantly correlated with the number of allergens with positive sensitization (R = 0.3, p Dp [degrees of freedom {df} = 16, p Df [df = 17, p df = 10, p df = 8, p Conclusions Immunoglobulin E-mediated skin test reactivity to indoor allergens, particularly to house dust mites, was common in asthmatic patients from Jeddah at KAUH. Increased sensitization was associated with higher levels of asthma severity, which is compatible with the literature. This emphasizes the importance of identifying sensitization to relevant indoor allergens in the clinical evaluation of asthmatic persons.

  1. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a correlative study of noninvasive arterial health testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Erin M; Mankad, Rekha; Crowson, Cynthia S; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Mulvagh, Sharon L; Matteson, Eric L; Kvrgic, Zoran; Davis, John M

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between noninvasive measures of arterial health and both estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk and measures of disease activity over time in established rheumatoid arthritis. Fifty rheumatoid arthritis patients underwent noninvasive arterial health testing (brachial artery reactivity, aortic augmentation index [AIx], pulse wave velocity, carotid artery intima-media thickness, and carotid artery plaque presence) and assessment of clinical disease activity (tender or swollen joint counts, Clinical Disease Activity Index [CDAI], and Health Assessment Questionnaire II [HAQ-II]). Clinical measures during 3 years before the study visit were averaged. Arterial health testing was compared with the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) Pooled Cohort Equation. Spearman methods identified correlations between disease activity measures, cardiac biomarkers, and arterial health parameters. Among the patients (mean age, 57.5 years), disease activity was moderate (mean [SD] CDAI, 16.9 [15.3]). At the study visit, corrected aortic augmentation index correlated with CDAI (r = 0.37, P = .009) and HAQ-II (r = 0.33, P = .02). AIx correlated with time-averaged tender joint count (r = 0.37, P = .008), CDAI (r = 0.36, P = .01), HAQ-II (r = 0.36, P = .01), swollen joint count (r = 0.36, P = .10), patient global assessment (r = 0.33, P = .02), physician global assessment (r = 0.35, P = .01), and pain score (r = 0.38, P = .007). The AHA/ACC low-risk group (risk) had highest prevalence of carotid plaques. Arterial health testing may identify increased risk of cardiovascular disease compared with risk obtained through AHA/ACC Pooled Cohort Equation. Measures of arterial stiffness correlate with the burden of disease activity over time.

  2. University Ranking Systems; Criteria and Critiques

    OpenAIRE

    Saka, Yavuz; YAMAN, Süleyman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore international university ranking systems. As a compilation study this paper provides specific criteria that each ranking system uses and main critiques regarding these ranking systems. Since there are many ranking systems in this area of research, this study focused on only most cited and referred ranking systems. As there is no consensus in terms of the criteria that these systems use, this paper has no intention of identifying the best ranking system ...

  3. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance.

  4. Correlation between Different Patterns of Hypo-Osmotic Swelling and Sperm Functional Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Bassiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sperm membrane integrity is not only important as a barrier between intraandextra-cellular spaces, but also it can be considered as a sign of DNA integrity. Hypoosmoticswelling test reflects membrane integrity and has been used to evaluate spermquality. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI in adjunct with hypo-osmotic swellingtest (HOST has been used for treatment of males with asthenozoospermia. Therefore,this study aims to evaluate correlation of different pattern of HOST with sperm parameters,protamine deficiency and apoptosis.Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, sixteen semen samples were randomlycollected from infertile normozospermic men. Semen samples were divided intotwo portions as follows: one portion was assessed for sperm parameters according toWorldHealth Organization (WHO-2010, while the other portion, after applying HOSTprocedure, was used for assessment of sperm morphology, protamine deficiency and lateor early apoptosis. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package forthe Social Studies (SPSS 11.5.Results: Our results showed that, the lowest odds ratio (OR of abnormal sperm headmorphology and abnormal acrosome was in d-sperm as compared to a-pattern or nonviablespermatozoa (p=0.00, p=0.01. In addition, a significant correlation was observedbetween d-sperm with sperm concentration and percentage of DNA damage (p=0.03and p=0.04, respectively. A significant correlation was observed between percentageof sperm motility and DNA fragmentation (r=-0.56; p=0.01. Furthermore, significantcorrelations were observed between percentages of early apoptotic sperm with protaminedeficiency and sperm concentration (p=0.009 and p=0.01, respectively.Conclusion: Significant correlations exist between d-pattern and sperm DNA integrity.Semen samples with low sperm concentration have low percentage of d-sperm which aremature and intact sperms.

  5. Correlations between pulmonary function and childhood asthma control test results in 5-11-year-old children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Sheng; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Han; Tsao, Lon-Yen; Chiu, Han-Yao; Tseng, Yu-Ching; Lin, Liang-Mei

    2014-06-01

    We examined correlations between the two asthma assessment tools, pulmonary function tests, and Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) scores, in 5-11-year-old children with asthma to determine if the C-ACT scores could predict pulmonary function test results. A total of 172 children with asthma aged 5-11 years completed C-ACT questionnaires and underwent pulmonary function testing. Correlations between these test results were examined. Patients were also placed into two groups, C-ACT scores ≤19 and >19, to determine if patients with scores >19 had better pulmonary function test results. Weak correlations were found between pulmonary function test results and childhood asthma control test scores in 5-11-year-old children with asthma, with or without the use of an asthma controller. These correlations included: 0.061 for FEV1 [confidence interval (CI): -0.022-0.049] and 0.074 for MMEF (CI: -0.013-0.037). The proportions of children with C-ACT test scores ≤19 group and those with scores >19 group were not significantly different. Correlations between C-ACT scores and pulmonary function test results were poor for children aged 5-11 years with asthma. FEV1, FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, MMEF, and PEFR were not significantly correlated with C-ACT scores. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Preliminary test of the LFA rapid evaluation of activity in lupus (LFA-REAL): an efficient outcome measure correlates with validated instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanase, Anca; Li, Xiaoqing; Pong, Avery; Shum, Katrina; Kamp, Stan; Carthen, Fredonna; Aberle, Teresa; Hanrahan, Leslie; Daly, Paola; Giles, Jon; Merrill, Joan T

    2015-01-01

    Current disease activity measures for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are difficult to score or interpret and problematic for use in clinical practice. Lupus Foundation of America (LFA)-Rapid Evaluation of Activity in Lupus (REAL) is a pilot application composed of anchored visual analogue scores (0-100 mm each) for each organ affected by lupus. This study evaluated the use of LFA-REAL in capturing SLE disease activity. In a preliminary test of LFA-REAL, this simplified, organ-based system was compared with the most widely used outcome measures in clinical trials, the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 Index (BILAG), the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment (SELENA) SLEDAI Physician's Global Assessment (SS-PGA). The level of agreement was analysed using Spearman rank correlations. 91 patients with SLE with mild to severe disease activity were evaluated, their median SLEDAI score was 4.0 (range 0-28) and BILAG score 8.0 (0-32). The median SS-PGA was 38 mm (4-92) versus the total REAL 50 mm (0-268), which expands in range by additive organ scores. Thirty-three patients had moderate to severe disease activity (≥1.5 on SS-PGA landmarks). The median SS-PGA score of this group was 66 mm (50-92) versus median REAL score of 100 mm (59-268), confirming ability to detect a wider distribution of scores at higher disease activity. Total REAL correlated with SLEDAI, BILAG and SS-PGA (correlation coefficient=0.816, 0.933 and 0.903, respectively; pexercise, there were strong correlations between LFA-REAL and validated lupus disease activity indices. Further development may be valuable for consistent scoring in clinical trials, grading optimal assessment of change in disease activity and reliable monitoring of patients in practice.

  7. Rey Visual Design Learning Test performance correlates with white matter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begré, Stefan; Kiefer, Claus; von Känel, Roland; Frommer, Angela; Federspiel, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Studies exploring relation of visual memory to white matter are extensively lacking. The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT) is an elementary motion, colour and word independent visual memory test. It avoids a significant contribution from as many additional higher order visual brain functions as possible to visual performance, such as three-dimensional, colour, motion or word-dependent brain operations. Based on previous results, we hypothesised that test performance would be related with white matter of dorsal hippocampal commissure, corpus callosum, posterior cingulate, superior longitudinal fascicle and internal capsule. In 14 healthy subjects, we measured intervoxel coherence (IC) by diffusion tensor imaging as an indication of connectivity and visual memory performance measured by the RVDLT. IC considers the orientation of the adjacent voxels and has a better signal-to-noise ratio than the commonly used fractional anisotropy index. Using voxelwise linear regression analyses of the IC values, we found a significant and direct relationship between 11 clusters and visual memory test performance. The fact that memory performance correlated with white matter structure in left and right dorsal hippocampal commissure, left and right posterior cingulate, right callosal splenium, left and right superior longitudinal fascicle, right medial orbitofrontal region, left anterior cingulate, and left and right anterior limb of internal capsule emphasises our hypothesis. Our observations in healthy subjects suggest that individual differences in brain function related to the performance of a task of higher cognitive demands might partially be associated with structural variation of white matter regions.

  8. Experimental characterization of an adaptive aileron: lab tests and FE correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Gianluca; Dimino, Ignazio; Amoroso, Francesco; Pecora, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    Like any other technology, morphing has to demonstrate system level performance benefits prior to implementation onto a real aircraft. The current status of morphing structures research efforts (as the ones, sponsored by the European Union) involves the design of several subsystems which have to be individually tested in order to consolidate their general performance in view of the final integration into a flyable device. This requires a fundamental understanding of the interaction between aerodynamic, structure and control systems. Important worldwide research collaborations were born in order to exchange acquired experience and better investigate innovative technologies devoted to morphing structures. The "Adaptive Aileron" project represents a joint cooperation between Canadian and Italian research centers and leading industries. In this framework, an overview of the design, manufacturing and testing of a variable camber aileron for a regional aircraft is presented. The key enabling technology for the presented morphing aileron is the actuation structural system, integrating a suitable motor and a load-bearing architecture. The paper describes the lab test campaign of the developed device. The implementation of a distributed actuation system fulfills the actual tendency of the aeronautical research to move toward the use of electrical power to supply non-propulsive systems. The aileron design features are validated by targeted experimental tests, demonstrating both its adaptive capability and robustness under operative loads and its dynamic behavior for further aeroelastic analyses. The experimental results show a satisfactory correlation with the numerical expectations thus validating the followed design approach.

  9. Sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Nadine V; Cailleaud, Kevin; Bassères, Anne; Liess, Matthias; Beketov, Mikhail A

    2017-11-01

    Hydrocarbons have an utmost economical importance but may also cause substantial ecological impacts due to accidents or inadequate transportation and use. Currently, freshwater biomonitoring methods lack an indicator that can unequivocally reflect the impacts caused by hydrocarbons while being independent from effects of other stressors. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitivity ranking for freshwater invertebrates towards hydrocarbon contaminants, which can be used in hydrocarbon-specific bioindicators. We employed the Relative Sensitivity method and developed the sensitivity ranking S hydrocarbons based on literature ecotoxicological data supplemented with rapid and mesocosm test results. A first validation of the sensitivity ranking based on an earlier field study has been conducted and revealed the S hydrocarbons ranking to be promising for application in sensitivity based indicators. Thus, the first results indicate that the ranking can serve as the core component of future hydrocarbon-specific and sensitivity trait based bioindicators.

  10. Beyond Zipf's Law: The Lavalette Rank Function and its Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanelli, Oscar; Yang, Yaning; Cocho, Germinal; Li, Wentian

    2016-01-01

    Although Zipf's law is widespread in natural and social data, one often encounters situations where one or both ends of the ranked data deviate from the power-law function. Previously we proposed the Beta rank function to improve the fitting of data which does not follow a perfect Zipf's law. Here we show that when the two parameters in the Beta rank function have the same value, the Lavalette rank function, the probability density function can be derived analytically. We also show both computationally and analytically that Lavalette distribution is approximately equal, though not identical, to the lognormal distribution. We illustrate the utility of Lavalette rank function in several datasets. We also address three analysis issues on the statistical testing of Lavalette fitting function, comparison between Zipf's law and lognormal distribution through Lavalette function, and comparison between lognormal distribution and Lavalette distribution.

  11. Ranking agility factors affecting hospitals in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdi Talarposht

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Agility is an effective response to the changing and unpredictable environment and using these changes as opportunities for organizational improvement. Objective: The aim of the present study was to rank the factors affecting agile supply chain of hospitals of Iran. Methods: This applied study was conducted by cross sectional-descriptive method at some point of 2015 for one year. The research population included managers, administrators, faculty members and experts were selected hospitals. A total of 260 people were selected as sample from the health centers. The construct validity of the questionnaire was approved by confirmatory factor analysis test and its reliability was approved by Cronbach's alpha (α=0.97. All data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Chi-square and Friedman tests. Findings: The development of staff skills, the use of information technology, the integration of processes, appropriate planning, and customer satisfaction and product quality had a significant impact on the agility of public hospitals of Iran (P<0.001. New product introductions had earned the highest ranking and the development of staff skills earned the lowest ranking. Conclusion: The new product introduction, market responsiveness and sensitivity, reduce costs, and the integration of organizational processes, ratings better to have acquired agility hospitals in Iran. Therefore, planners and officials of hospitals have to, through the promotion quality and variety of services customer-oriented, providing a basis for investing in the hospital and etc to apply for agility supply chain public hospitals of Iran.

  12. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-02-02

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  13. SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST FOR FUNGI: CLINICAL AND LABORATORIAL CORRELATIONS IN MEDICAL MYCOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ALASTRUEY-IZQUIERDO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYDuring recent decades, antifungal susceptibility testing has become standardized and nowadays has the same role of the antibacterial susceptibility testing in microbiology laboratories. American and European standards have been developed, as well as equivalent commercial systems which are more appropriate for clinical laboratories. The detection of resistant strains by means of these systems has allowed the study and understanding of the molecular basis and the mechanisms of resistance of fungal species to antifungal agents. In addition, many studies on the correlation of in vitro results with the outcome of patients have been performed, reaching the conclusion that infections caused by resistant strains have worse outcome than those caused by susceptible fungal isolates. These studies have allowed the development of interpretative breakpoints for Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., the most frequent agents of fungal infections in the world. In summary, antifungal susceptibility tests have become essential tools to guide the treatment of fungal diseases, to know the local and global disease epidemiology, and to identify resistance to antifungals.

  14. Life satisfaction and its correlates among college students in China: a test of social reference theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Sibo; Lester, David; Zhou, Chengchao

    2014-08-01

    To study life satisfaction and to test the role of social reference in determining the degree of life satisfaction, we examined a large sample of undergraduate students in China for the correlates of campus life satisfaction. A questionnaire survey was administered at a university and the final sample consisted of 439 respondents aged between 17 and 24 years, from all over the country, and studying different subjects. It was found that freshman students tended to score higher on their life satisfaction than students in other grades and the college students' life satisfaction was positively related to female gender, self-esteem, social support, and the liberal attitudes on female gender roles, but negatively correlated with depression and suicidal ideation. Contrary to common beliefs, students from an urban area or from better-off families were not necessarily more satisfied with current life than those students coming from the countryside or low income families. The findings were accounted for by the social reference theory and in this case college students' campus life satisfaction is basically affected by their pre-college life quality as a reference. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Automatic airway analysis on multidetector computed tomography in cystic fibrosis: correlation with pulmonary function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielpütz, Mark O; Eichinger, Monika; Weinheimer, Oliver; Ley, Sebastian; Mall, Marcus A; Wiebel, Matthias; Bischoff, Arved; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Heußel, Claus P; Puderbach, Michael

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the fully automatic quantification of airway dimensions on chest multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airflow indices including predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) were used to study the impact on regional lung function. MDCT data of patients with CF (14 children and 23 adults) and of control patients (11 children and 22 adults) were used to compute total diameter (TD), lumen area (LA), and wall thickness (WT) using dedicated software. Pulmonary function testing including FEV1% was performed in parallel and correlated with MDCT parameters in a generation-based analysis. TD was largely increased in CF patients (third-generation to fourth-generation airways in children, first to ninth in adults; Pchildren, first to eleventh in adults; P<0.05). In adult CF patients significant negative correlations for TD, LA, and WT with FEV1% were found for intermediate airways (fifth to seventh generation; r=-0.7 to -0.9) but not in pediatric CF patients and controls. Automatic airway analysis succeeded in quantifying specific pathologies such as airway dilatation and wall thickening in CF patients at different ages. Moreover, our results indicate a shift in main airflow resistance to intermediate airways in cases of chronic CF. The objective computational parameters TD, LA, and WT should be considered for assessment and follow-up of CF airway disease.

  16. Quantification of sweat gland volume and innervation in neuropathy: Correlation with thermoregulatory sweat testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loavenbruck, Adam; Wendelschaefer-Crabbe, Gwen; Sandroni, Paola; Kennedy, William R

    2014-10-01

    No study has correlated thermoregulatory sweat testing (TST) with histopathologic study of sweat glands (SGs) and SG nerve fibers (SGNFs). We studied 10 neuropathy patients in whom anhidrosis was found by TST and 10 matched controls. Skin biopsies were taken from both anhidrotic and sweating skin and immunohistochemical staining was done for nerves and basement membrane. For each biopsy, total tissue volume, total SG volume, and total SGNF length were measured. SGNF length per biopsy volume, SG volume per biopsy volume (SG%), and SGNF length per SG volume were calculated. SGNF length per biopsy volume was reduced in anhidrotic site biopsies of patients compared with controls. SG% was decreased and SGNF length per SG volume increased in patients compared with controls. The results suggest a concomitant loss of SG volume and SGNF length in neuropathy, with greater loss of SGNFs in anhidrotic skin, possibly exceeding collateral reinnervation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Layer Correlation Technique for ATLAS Calorimetry Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Carli, T; Spanò, F; Speckmayer, P

    2008-01-01

    A method for calibrating the response of a segmented calorimeter to hadrons is developed. The ansatz is that information on longitudinal shower fluctuations gained from a principal component analysis of the layer energy depositions can improve energy resolution by correcting for hadronic invisible energy and dead material losses: projections along the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix are used as input for the calibration. The technique is used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the ATLAS calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. Simulated Monte Carlo events are used to derive corrections for invisible energy lost in nuclear reactions and in dead material in front and in between the calorimeters. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the resolution is improved by about 20%.

  18. The presence of chaos in rainfall by using 0-1 test and correlation dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapini, Muhamad Luqman; Adam, Nor Syahira; Ibrahim, Nursyahirah; Rosmen, Nursyaziella; Yusof, Norliza Muhamad

    2017-11-01

    Rainfall could be favorable for human being. It gives composure to living thing and maintains the balance of the surrounding ecosystem from floods, droughts, and erosion. However, if it involves a large amount of rain, it will cause a great natural disaster. For this reason, projection of rainfall is required as to take precautionary and effective measure can be taken. In case that chaos presence in the data, a model adapting nonlinear dynamic can be used thus an accurate forecasts can be attained. In this research, chaos in rainfall will be dig up by using Correlation Dimension and 0 - 1 Test. In addition, Single Exponential Smoothing will be used to reduce the noise and make the result more accurate. As a result, chaos is presence in the rainfall data.

  19. The correlation between pedestrian injury severity in real-life crashes and Euro NCAP pedestrian test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandroth, Johan; Rizzi, Matteo; Sternlund, Simon; Lie, Anders; Tingvall, Claes

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the correlation between Euro NCAP pedestrian rating scores and injury outcome in real-life car-to-pedestrian crashes, with special focus on long-term disability. Another aim was to determine whether brake assist (BA) systems affect the injury outcome in real-life car-to-pedestrian crashes and to estimate the combined effects in injury reduction of a high Euro NCAP ranking score and BA. In the current study, the Euro NCAP pedestrian scoring was compared with the real-life outcome in pedestrian crashes that occurred in Sweden during 2003 to 2010. The real-life crash data were obtained from the data acquisition system Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA), which combines police records and hospital admission data. The medical data consisted of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnoses and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scoring. In all, approximately 500 pedestrians submitted to hospital were included in the study. Each car model was coded according to Euro NCAP pedestrian scores. In addition, the presence or absence of BA was coded for each car involved. Cars were grouped according to their scoring. Injury outcomes were analyzed with AIS and, at the victim level, with permanent medical impairment. This was done by translating the injury scores for each individual to the risk of serious consequences (RSC) at 1, 5, and 10 percent risk of disability level. This indicates the total risk of a medical disability for each victim, given the severity and location of injuries. The mean RSC (mRSC) was then calculated for each car group and t-tests were conducted to falsify the null hypothesis at p ≤ .05 that the mRSC within the groups was equal. The results showed a significant reduction of injury severity for cars with better pedestrian scoring, although cars with a high score could not be studied due to lack of cases. The reduction in RSC for medium-performing cars in comparison with low-performing cars

  20. Rank distributions: Frequency vs. magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Carlos; Robledo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We examine the relationship between two different types of ranked data, frequencies and magnitudes. We consider data that can be sorted out either way, through numbers of occurrences or size of the measures, as it is the case, say, of moon craters, earthquakes, billionaires, etc. We indicate that these two types of distributions are functional inverses of each other, and specify this link, first in terms of the assumed parent probability distribution that generates the data samples, and then in terms of an analog (deterministic) nonlinear iterated map that reproduces them. For the particular case of hyperbolic decay with rank the distributions are identical, that is, the classical Zipf plot, a pure power law. But their difference is largest when one displays logarithmic decay and its counterpart shows the inverse exponential decay, as it is the case of Benford law, or viceversa. For all intermediate decay rates generic differences appear not only between the power-law exponents for the midway rank decline but also for small and large rank. We extend the theoretical framework to include thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical concepts, such as entropies and configuration.

  1. Rankings Methodology Hurts Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In the 1980s, when the "U.S. News & World Report" rankings of colleges were based solely on reputation, the nation's public universities were well represented at the top. However, as soon as the magazine began including its "measures of excellence," statistics intended to define quality, public universities nearly disappeared from the top. As the…

  2. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  3. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Andrea; Koenderink, Jan; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of "pictorial depth" in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of "depth" is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The pictorial space for this study was evoked by a capriccio (imaginary landscape) by Francesco Guardi (1712-1793). In such a drawing pictorial space is suggested by the artist through a small set of conventional depth cues. As a result typical Western observers tend to agree largely in their visual awareness when looking at such art. We rank depths for locations that are not on a single surface and far apart in pictorial space. We find that observers resolve about 40 distinct depth layers and agree largely in this. From a previous experiment we have metrical data for the same observers. The rank correlations between the results are high. Perhaps surprisingly, we find no correlation between the number of distinct depth layers and the total metrical depth range. Thus, the relation between subjective magnitude and discrimination threshold fails to hold for pictorial depth.

  4. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  5. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World…

  7. Correlations Between Pulmonary Function and Childhood Asthma Control Test Results in 5–11-year-old Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Sheng Lee

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Correlations between C-ACT scores and pulmonary function test results were poor for children aged 5–11 years with asthma. FEV1, FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, MMEF, and PEFR were not significantly correlated with C-ACT scores.

  8. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  9. Associations of Power at V̇O2peak and Anaerobic Threshold with Rank in British High Performance Junior Surfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow Matthew John

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of this study was to determine the relationships of peak oxygen uptake ( V̇O2peak, power at V̇O2peak and power at the anaerobic threshold (AT with national ranking in a sample of British high performance junior surfers. Methods. Eighteen male surfers (aged 15.4 ± 1.4 years from the British Junior Surfing team were tested for V̇O2peak and AT using an adapted kayak ergometer; national ranking was used to indicate performance level. The AT was identified as the point at which V̇E/V̇O2 started to rise without a concomitant increase in V̇E/V̇CO2. Spearman’s rank (rs and partial correlations (rp controlling for age were used to identify the relationships between the physiological variables and national ranking. Results. Mean V̇O2peak was 3.1 ± 0.5 l · min-1 (47.7 ± 7.2 ml · kg-1 · min-1 and mean AT occurred at 48.1 ± 12.2 W. There were significant correlations between national ranking and power at V̇O2peak (rs = -0.549, p = 0.028, power at AT (rs = -0.646, p = 0.009, and age (rs = -0.579, p = 0.012. Significant partial correlations were established controlling for age between national ranking and power at V̇O2peak (rp = -0.839, p = 0.000 and power at AT (rp = -0.541, p < 0.046. Conclusions. The power outputs associated with V̇O2peak and AT were significantly related to surfer ranking in this sample. However, due to the low coefficient of determination associated with the AT/ranking relationship, AT does not discriminate well between the ranking of surfers. These findings support the inclusion of power at V̇O2peak in assessment batteries for junior competitive surfers.

  10. Correlation of FEM/BEM Vibroacoustic Prediction to System-Level Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G.; Ngan, I.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses are employed for deriving spacecraft random vibration environments and supporting the design of low aerial density structures. They offer deterministic predictions which are very accurate at low-frequency and meaningful across all the spectrum of interest for vibroacoustic response.An assessment of the standard procedure of FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses was carried out by correlation to measurements from system-level tests of several spacecraft. This allowed a quantification of the typical errors committed, and concluded on the adequacy of applying the standard factor of safety +4dB to the predictions. It was observed that a major source of error is the lack of representativeness of the models of the spacecraft, which adds to the diffuse field idealization made on the acoustic environment inside the fairing and the test chambers. In particular, it was observed a clear impact from a lack of detail of the damping of the structure, and an often crude lumped representation of units and equipment as well as tanks and fixations.

  11. The correlation between GnRH stimulation testing and obstetric ultrasonographic parameters in precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binay, Cigdem; Simsek, Enver; Bal, Cengiz

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine reliable cut-off levels of basal gonadotropin and to assess the correlation of obstetric ultrasound parameters with the GnRH stimulation test. The GnRH stimulation test was performed in a cohort of young female patients who presented at our hospital for the evaluation of early signs of puberty. Using receiver operating curves (ROCs), the sensitivity and specificity of basal luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), basal and stimulated LH/FSH ratio, oestradiol levels and ultrasonographic parameters were evaluated at each level, and the area under curve (AUC) was measured. One hundred female children were assessed. We found that LH levels, peak LH/FSH ratio, fundal/cervical ratio, uterus length, and ovarian volume were reliable predictors of central precocious puberty (CPP). Cut-off levels of basal LH and the peak LH/FSH ratio had high specificity in our cohort. In addition, obstetric ultrasound parameters represent reliable predictors for the diagnosis of CPP.

  12. Weighted Discriminative Dictionary Learning based on Low-rank Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heyou; Zheng, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Low-rank representation has been widely used in the field of pattern classification, especially when both training and testing images are corrupted with large noise. Dictionary plays an important role in low-rank representation. With respect to the semantic dictionary, the optimal representation matrix should be block-diagonal. However, traditional low-rank representation based dictionary learning methods cannot effectively exploit the discriminative information between data and dictionary. To address this problem, this paper proposed weighted discriminative dictionary learning based on low-rank representation, where a weighted representation regularization term is constructed. The regularization associates label information of both training samples and dictionary atoms, and encourages to generate a discriminative representation with class-wise block-diagonal structure, which can further improve the classification performance where both training and testing images are corrupted with large noise. Experimental results demonstrate advantages of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Bootstrap determination of the cointegration rank in heteroskedastic VAR models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Guiseppe; Rahbæk, Anders; Taylor, A.M. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper Cavaliere et al. (2012) develop bootstrap implementations of the (pseudo-) likelihood ratio (PLR) co-integration rank test and associated sequential rank determination procedure of Johansen (1996). The bootstrap samples are constructed using the restricted parameter estimates...... show that the bootstrap PLR tests are asymptotically correctly sized and, moreover, that the probability that the associated bootstrap sequential procedures select a rank smaller than the true rank converges to zero. This result is shown to hold for both the i.i.d. and wild bootstrap variants under...... conditional heteroskedasticity but only for the latter under unconditional heteroskedasticity. Monte Carlo evidence is reported which suggests that the bootstrap approach of Cavaliere et al. (2012) significantly improves upon the finite sample performance of corresponding procedures based on either...

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV Infection and HIV Testing Among Transgender Women in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Wang, Ying; Jones, Nicolette; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Harker, Sheldon; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Transgender women are overrepresented in the Caribbean HIV epidemic. The study objective was to examine correlates of HIV infection and HIV testing among transgender women in Jamaica. We implemented a cross-sectional survey with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with HIV testing and HIV infection. Among 137 transgender women [mean age 24.0; standard deviation (SD) 5.5], three-quarters (n = 103, 75.7%) had received an HIV test. Of these, one-quarter (n = 26, 25.2%) were HIV positive. In multivariable analyses, HIV testing was associated with: perceived HIV risk [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.42, confidence interval (CI) 1.36-4.28], depression (AOR 1.34, CI 1.01-1.77), forced sex (AOR 3.83, CI 1.42-10.35), physical abuse (AOR 4.11, CI 1.44-11.72), perceived transgender stigma (AOR 1.23, 1.06-1.42), having a healthcare provider (AOR 5.89, CI 1.46-23.77), and lower HIV-related stigma (AOR 0.96, CI 0.92-0.99), incarceration (AOR 0.28, CI 0.10-0.78), and drug use (AOR 0.74, CI 0.58-0.95). HIV infection was associated with the following: homelessness (AOR 5.94, CI 1.27-27.74), perceived HIV risk (AOR 1.67, CI 1.02-2.72), depression (AOR 1.39, CI 1.06-1.82), STI history (AOR 56.79, CI 5.12-630.33), perceived (AOR 1.26, CI 1.06-1.51) and enacted (AOR 1.16, CI 1.04-1.29) transgender stigma, forced sex (AOR 4.14, CI 1.49-11.51), physical abuse (AOR 3.75, CI 1.39-10.12), and lower self-rated health (AOR 0.55, CI 0.30-0.98) and social support (AOR 0.79, CI 0.64-0.97). Transgender women in Jamaica experience high HIV infection rates and suboptimal HIV testing. Combination HIV prevention approaches should address transgender women's social and structural vulnerabilities.

  15. Structural neurobiological correlates of Mayer-Salovery-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test performance in early course schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtalik, Jessica A; Eack, Shaun M; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2013-01-10

    The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) is a key measure of social cognition in schizophrenia that has good psychometric properties and is recommended by the MATRICS committee. As a way to further investigate the validity of the MSCEIT, this study sought to examine the neurobiological correlates of MSCEIT performance in patients with early course schizophrenia. A total of 51 patients diagnosed with early course, stabilized schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder completed structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and the MSCEIT. Investigation of the associations between MSCEIT performance and gray matter morphology was examined by conducting voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses across hypothesized social-cognitive regions of interest using automated anatomical labeling in Statistical Parametric Mapping Software, version 5 (SPM5). All VBM analyses utilized general linear models examining gray matter density partitioned images, adjusting for demographic and illness-related confounds. VBM results were then followed up with confirmatory volumetric analyses. Patients with poorer overall and Facilitating, Understanding, and Managing Emotions subscale performances on the MSCEIT showed significantly reduced gray matter density in the left parahippocampal gyrus. Additionally, attenuated performance on the Facilitating and Managing Emotions subscales was significantly associated with reduced right posterior cingulate gray matter density. All associations observed between MSCEIT performance and gray matter density were supported with confirmatory gray matter volumetric analyses, with the exception of the association between the right posterior cingulate and the facilitation of emotions. These findings provide additional evidence for the MSCEIT as a valid social-cognitive measure by elucidating its correlates with neurobiological structures commonly implicated in emotion processing. These findings provide additional biological evidence

  16. Test anxiety in medical school is unrelated to academic performance but correlates with an effort/reward imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Henry; Kropp, Peter; Kirschstein, Timo; Rücker, Gernot; Müller-Hilke, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    During their early years at medical school, students repeatedly criticize their workload, time constraints and test associated stress. At the same time, depressiveness and anxiety among first and second year medical students are on the rise. We therefore hypothesized that test anxiety may be related to depressiveness and considered cognitive and academic performances as confounders for the former and psychosocial distress for the latter. A whole class of 200 second year students was invited to participate in the study. Anxiety as a trait, depressiveness, crystallized intelligence, verbal fluency and psychosocial distress were assessed using validated tests and questionnaires. Acute state anxiety and sympathetic stress parameters were measured in real life situations immediately before an oral and a written exam and paired tests were used to compare the individual anxieties at the various time points. Previous academic performances were self-reported, the results of the impending exams were monitored. Finally, correlations were performed to test for interrelatedness between academic performances and the various personal, cognitive and psychosocial factors. Acute test anxiety did not correlate with depressiveness nor did it correlate with previous nor impending academic performances nor any of the expected confounders on academic performance. However both, depressiveness and test anxiety strongly correlated with the perceived imbalance between efforts spent and rewards received. Moreover, anxiety as a trait not only correlated with acute state anxiety before an exam but was also significantly correlated to the feeling of over-commitment. Depressiveness during the early years of medical school seems unrelated to test anxiety and academic performance. Instead, it strongly correlated with the psychosocial distress emanating from attending medical school and points at a perceived imbalance between efforts spent and rewards received.

  17. Test anxiety in medical school is unrelated to academic performance but correlates with an effort/reward imbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hahn

    Full Text Available During their early years at medical school, students repeatedly criticize their workload, time constraints and test associated stress. At the same time, depressiveness and anxiety among first and second year medical students are on the rise. We therefore hypothesized that test anxiety may be related to depressiveness and considered cognitive and academic performances as confounders for the former and psychosocial distress for the latter.A whole class of 200 second year students was invited to participate in the study. Anxiety as a trait, depressiveness, crystallized intelligence, verbal fluency and psychosocial distress were assessed using validated tests and questionnaires. Acute state anxiety and sympathetic stress parameters were measured in real life situations immediately before an oral and a written exam and paired tests were used to compare the individual anxieties at the various time points. Previous academic performances were self-reported, the results of the impending exams were monitored. Finally, correlations were performed to test for interrelatedness between academic performances and the various personal, cognitive and psychosocial factors.Acute test anxiety did not correlate with depressiveness nor did it correlate with previous nor impending academic performances nor any of the expected confounders on academic performance. However both, depressiveness and test anxiety strongly correlated with the perceived imbalance between efforts spent and rewards received. Moreover, anxiety as a trait not only correlated with acute state anxiety before an exam but was also significantly correlated to the feeling of over-commitment.Depressiveness during the early years of medical school seems unrelated to test anxiety and academic performance. Instead, it strongly correlated with the psychosocial distress emanating from attending medical school and points at a perceived imbalance between efforts spent and rewards received.

  18. Correlations among upper and lower tear menisci, noninvasive tear break-up time, and the Schirmer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Palakuru, Jayachandra R; Aquavella, James V

    2008-05-01

    To determine the relationships among tear meniscus parameters, noninvasive tear break-up time (NITBUT), and the Schirmer test. Experimental study. Thirty-six subjects were tested on one randomly selected eye. Real-time corneal optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to image the upper and lower tear menisci during normal and delayed blinking followed by measurement of NITBUT and the Schirmer test. Digital images of the eye were taken for measuring the lid lengths to estimate tear volume in the menisci. Compared with normal blinking, significant increases of tear menisci occurred during delayed blinking (post hoc, P < .01). NITBUT was weakly but significantly correlated with the height (r = 0.36; P = .03) and area (r = 0.37; P = .03) of the lower tear meniscus during normal blinks. NITBUT was also correlated with the lower tear meniscus volume (r = 0.45; P < .05) and total tear meniscus volume (r = 0.43; P < .05) during normal blinking. The Schirmer test was not significantly related to any parameters of the tear menisci, volumes, or NITBUT; however, it was negatively correlated with the age of the subjects (r = -0.47; P = .004). The age was negatively correlated with the upper tear meniscus (r ranged from 0.36 to 0.37 for the radius, height, and area, P < .05) measured during delayed blinking. NITBUT appears correlated with the lower tear meniscus during normal blinking, and the Schirmer test appears not correlated with the noninvasively measured tear meniscus.

  19. Testing in a Random Effects Panel Data Model with Spatially Correlated Error Components and Spatially Lagged Dependent Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming He

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a random effects panel data model with both spatially correlated error components and spatially lagged dependent variables. We focus on diagnostic testing procedures and derive Lagrange multiplier (LM test statistics for a variety of hypotheses within this model. We first construct the joint LM test for both the individual random effects and the two spatial effects (spatial error correlation and spatial lag dependence. We then provide LM tests for the individual random effects and for the two spatial effects separately. In addition, in order to guard against local model misspecification, we derive locally adjusted (robust LM tests based on the Bera and Yoon principle (Bera and Yoon, 1993. We conduct a small Monte Carlo simulation to show the good finite sample performances of these LM test statistics and revisit the cigarette demand example in Baltagi and Levin (1992 to illustrate our testing procedures.

  20. Minkowski metrics in creating universal ranking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Ameljańczyk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a general procedure for creating the rankings of a set of objects, while the relation of preference based on any ranking function. The analysis was possible to use the ranking functions began by showing the fundamental drawbacks of commonly used functions in the form of a weighted sum. As a special case of the ranking procedure in the space of a relation, the procedure based on the notion of an ideal element and generalized Minkowski distance from the element was proposed. This procedure, presented as universal ranking algorithm, eliminates most of the disadvantages of ranking functions in the form of a weighted sum.[b]Keywords[/b]: ranking functions, preference relation, ranking clusters, categories, ideal point, universal ranking algorithm

  1. Combined Reduced-Rank Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Torokhti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose and justify a new approach to constructing optimal nonlinear transforms of random vectors. We show that the proposed transform improves such characteristics of {rank-reduced} transforms as compression ratio, accuracy of decompression and reduces required computational work. The proposed transform ${mathcal T}_p$ is presented in the form of a sum with $p$ terms where each term is interpreted as a particular rank-reduced transform. Moreover, terms in ${mathcal T}_p$ are represented as a combination of three operations ${mathcal F}_k$, ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ with $k=1,ldots,p$. The prime idea is to determine ${mathcal F}_k$ separately, for each $k=1,ldots,p$, from an associated rank-constrained minimization problem similar to that used in the Karhunen--Lo`{e}ve transform. The operations ${mathcal Q}_k$ and ${oldsymbol{varphi}}_k$ are auxiliary for f/inding ${mathcal F}_k$. The contribution of each term in ${mathcal T}_p$ improves the entire transform performance. A corresponding unconstrained nonlinear optimal transform is also considered. Such a transform is important in its own right because it is treated as an optimal filter without signal compression. A rigorous analysis of errors associated with the proposed transforms is given.

  2. Ranking Support Vector Machine with Kernel Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Rongchun; Dou, Yong; Liang, Zhengfa; Lv, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Learning to rank algorithm has become important in recent years due to its successful application in information retrieval, recommender system, and computational biology, and so forth. Ranking support vector machine (RankSVM) is one of the state-of-art ranking models and has been favorably used. Nonlinear RankSVM (RankSVM with nonlinear kernels) can give higher accuracy than linear RankSVM (RankSVM with a linear kernel) for complex nonlinear ranking problem. However, the learning methods for nonlinear RankSVM are still time-consuming because of the calculation of kernel matrix. In this paper, we propose a fast ranking algorithm based on kernel approximation to avoid computing the kernel matrix. We explore two types of kernel approximation methods, namely, the Nyström method and random Fourier features. Primal truncated Newton method is used to optimize the pairwise L2-loss (squared Hinge-loss) objective function of the ranking model after the nonlinear kernel approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method gets a much faster training speed than kernel RankSVM and achieves comparable or better performance over state-of-the-art ranking algorithms.

  3. America's Best Graduate Schools, 1997. Exclusive Rankings: The Latest Word on Admissions, Entrance Tests, and Job Prospects, Plus a Directory of Law, Business, Medical, Osteopathic Medical, and Engineering Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfin, Mel, Ed.

    This career planning guide to graduate school education in the United States ranks graduate study programs and offers prospective students guidance. In articles about schools, students, life on campus, fields of study, and job prospects the guide tries to present a comprehensive view of what the best graduate schools today offer their students.…

  4. The Publication Ranking Score for pediatric urology: quantifying thought leadership within the subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jessica C; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Nelson, Caleb P; Kokorowski, Paul J; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Kutikov, Alexander; Routh, Jonathan C

    2013-12-01

    Clinical care parameters are frequently assessed by national ranking systems. However, these rankings do little to comment on institutions' academic contributions. The Publication Ranking Score (PRS) was developed to allow for objective comparisons of scientific thought-leadership at various pediatric urology institutions. Faculty lists were compiled for each of the US News & World Report (USNWR) top-50 pediatric urology hospitals. A list of all faculty publications (2006-2011) was then compiled, after adjusting for journal impact factor, and summed to derive a Publication Ranking Score (PRS). PRS rankings were then compared to the USNWR pediatric urology top-50 hospital list. A total of 1811 publications were indexed. PRS rankings resulted in a mean change in rank of 12 positions, compared to USNWR ranks. Of the top-10 USNWR hospitals, only 4 were ranked in the top-10 by the PRS. There was little correlation between the USNWR and PRS ranks for either top-10 (r = 0.42, p = 0.23) or top-50 (r = 0.48, p = 0.0004) hospitals. PRS institutional ranking differs significantly from the USNWR top-50 hospital list in pediatric urology. While not a replacement, we believe the PRS to be a useful adjunct to the USNWR rankings of pediatric urology hospitals. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An imaging diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis: CT and MR findings and correlation with ELISA antibody test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hong Dae; Cho, Seung Yull; Kong, Yoon; Kang, Hyung Keun; Kim, Myung Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    To evaluate the CT and MR findings of cerebral paragonimiasis(PW) and to assess the diagnostic value of the specific antibody test by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) for PW, 55 CT scans and 13 MR images of 57 patients with cerebral PW were reviewed retrospectively, and correlated with the serum/ CSF antibody levels. We divided the patients into three groups, early active (n=21), chronic(n=32), and combined stage(n=4), on the basis of CT/MR findings. In the groups of early active stage the most common and characteristic finding was multiple, conglomerated, ring-like enhancing lesion in the unilateral cerebral hemisphere, which was seen in 52% on CT and 44% on MR. Other non-specific findings included a solitary ring-like or irregular enhancing lesions, ill-defined low density lesions without enhancement, localized hemorrhage with or without enhancing lesions. In the group of chronic stage, there were multiple calcifications of various shapes, most commonly 1-2 cm sized round shape, and associated encephalomalacia. MR was superior to CT in detecting hemorrhage and in characterizing the central contents of ring-shaped calcifications, while it was inferior to CT in identifying small calcifications. Antibody levels of serum and CSF were positive in 86% and 82% in early active group, and in 48% and 31% in chronic stage,retrospectively.The positive rate was significantly different between the two groups (P=0.001). CT/MR findings were characteristic in only approximately half the cases in early active cerebral PW which can be cured by Praziquantel therapy. Therefore, antibody test by ELISA is recommended as a complementary tool, particularly in patients with non-specific imaging findings.

  6. Potential Functional Embedding Theory at the Correlated Wave Function Level. 2. Error Sources and Performance Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-14

    Quantum mechanical embedding theories partition a complex system into multiple spatial regions that can use different electronic structure methods within each, to optimize trade-offs between accuracy and cost. The present work incorporates accurate but expensive correlated wave function (CW) methods for a subsystem containing the phenomenon or feature of greatest interest, while self-consistently capturing quantum effects of the surroundings using fast but less accurate density functional theory (DFT) approximations. We recently proposed two embedding methods [for a review, see: Acc. Chem. Res. 2014 , 47 , 2768 ]: density functional embedding theory (DFET) and potential functional embedding theory (PFET). DFET provides a fast but non-self-consistent density-based embedding scheme, whereas PFET offers a more rigorous theoretical framework to perform fully self-consistent, variational CW/DFT calculations [as defined in part 1, CW/DFT means subsystem 1(2) is treated with CW(DFT) methods]. When originally presented, PFET was only tested at the DFT/DFT level of theory as a proof of principle within a planewave (PW) basis. Part 1 of this two-part series demonstrated that PFET can be made to work well with mixed Gaussian type orbital (GTO)/PW bases, as long as optimized GTO bases and consistent electron-ion potentials are employed throughout. Here in part 2 we conduct the first PFET calculations at the CW/DFT level and compare them to DFET and full CW benchmarks. We test the performance of PFET at the CW/DFT level for a variety of types of interactions (hydrogen bonding, metallic, and ionic). By introducing an intermediate CW/DFT embedding scheme denoted DFET/PFET, we show how PFET remedies different types of errors in DFET, serving as a more robust type of embedding theory.

  7. Preliminary Correlation Map of Geomorphic Surfaces in North-Central Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-08-01

    This correlation map (scale = 1:12,000) presents the results of a mapping initiative that was part of the comprehensive site characterization required to operate the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in northern Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Eight primary map units are recognized for Quaternary surfaces: remnants of six alluvial fan or terrace surfaces, one unit that includes colluvial aprons associated with hill slopes, and one unit for anthropogenically disturbed surfaces. This surficial geology map provides fundamental data on natural processes for reconstruction of the Quaternary history of northern Frenchman Flat, which in turn will aid in the understanding of the natural processes that act to develop the landscape, and the time-frames involved in landscape development. The mapping was conducted using color and color-infrared aerial photographs and field verification of map unit composition and boundaries. Criteria for defining the map unit composition of geomorphic surface units are based on relative geomorphic position, landform morphology, and degree of preservation of surface morphology. The bedrock units identified on this map were derived from previous published mapping efforts and are included for completeness.

  8. Correlation of levels of obstruction in COPD with lactate and six-minute walk test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Brasil Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbid-mortality world wide, leading not only to pulmonary damage but also to multisystemic impairment, with repercussions on skeletal muscles and the ability to undertake effort, as measured in the six-minute walk test (6-MWT. Aims: To correlate the level of obstruction in COPD with lactate concentration and heart rate (HR at rest, and distance walked. To correlate distance walked with blood gas analysis and correlate desaturation in 6-MWT with post 6-MWT lactate concentration and heart rate. Methods: COPD patients underwent spirometry, blood gas analysis and 6-MWT to evaluate distance walked, heart rate, capillary lactate (CL concentration pre– and post 6MWT, and desaturation with 6-MWT. Results: 91 patients with all levels of obstruction were evaluated. HR and CL increased significantly post 6-MWT. The decrease in peripheral saturation of haemoglobin to oxygen observed with 6-MWT was also significant. The distance walked was shorter the greater the obstruction. The correlation analysis was significantly positive between FEV1 and distance walked, negative between FEV1 and HR at rest and negative between distance walked and PaCO2, and not significant for the other variables. Conclusions: Increased obstruction in COPD and higher PaCO2 values contribute to a reduction in distance walked in 6-MWT. The level of obstruction in COPD leads to a haemodynamic impairment with increased HR at rest of these patients. Resumo: Contextualização: A doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC, importante causa de morbimortalidade em todo mundo, leva não só ao comprometimento pulmonar, mas também a alterações sistémicas, com repercussões sobre músculos esqueléticos e a capacidade de realizar esforços, mensurável pelo teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6’. Objectivos: correlacionar obstrução da DPOC com lactato de repouso, frequ

  9. Risk of false decision on conformity of a multicomponent material when test results of the components' content are correlated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuselman, Ilya; Pennecchi, Francesca R; da Silva, Ricardo J N B; Hibbert, D Brynn

    2017-11-01

    The probability of a false decision on conformity of a multicomponent material due to measurement uncertainty is discussed when test results are correlated. Specification limits of the components' content of such a material generate a multivariate specification interval/domain. When true values of components' content and corresponding test results are modelled by multivariate distributions (e.g. by multivariate normal distributions), a total global risk of a false decision on the material conformity can be evaluated based on calculation of integrals of their joint probability density function. No transformation of the raw data is required for that. A total specific risk can be evaluated as the joint posterior cumulative function of true values of a specific batch or lot lying outside the multivariate specification domain, when the vector of test results, obtained for the lot, is inside this domain. It was shown, using a case study of four components under control in a drug, that the correlation influence on the risk value is not easily predictable. To assess this influence, the evaluated total risk values were compared with those calculated for independent test results and also with those assuming much stronger correlation than that observed. While the observed statistically significant correlation did not lead to a visible difference in the total risk values in comparison to the independent test results, the stronger correlation among the variables caused either the total risk decreasing or its increasing, depending on the actual values of the test results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Money and happiness: rank of income, not income, affects life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Christopher J; Brown, Gordon D A; Moore, Simon C

    2010-04-01

    Does money buy happiness, or does happiness come indirectly from the higher rank in society that money brings? We tested a rank-income hypothesis, according to which people gain utility from the ranked position of their income within a comparison group. The rank hypothesis contrasts with traditional reference-income hypotheses, which suggest that utility from income depends on comparison to a social reference-group norm. We found that the ranked position of an individual's income predicts general life satisfaction, whereas absolute income and reference income have no effect. Furthermore, individuals weight upward comparisons more heavily than downward comparisons. According to the rank hypothesis, income and utility are not directly linked: Increasing an individual's income will increase his or her utility only if ranked position also increases and will necessarily reduce the utility of others who will lose rank.

  11. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  12. An ensemble rank learning approach for gene prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Po-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Several different computational approaches have been developed to solve the gene prioritization problem. We intend to use the ensemble boosting learning techniques to combine variant computational approaches for gene prioritization in order to improve the overall performance. In particular we add a heuristic weighting function to the Rankboost algorithm according to: 1) the absolute ranks generated by the adopted methods for a certain gene, and 2) the ranking relationship between all gene-pairs from each prioritization result. We select 13 known prostate cancer genes in OMIM database as training set and protein coding gene data in HGNC database as test set. We adopt the leave-one-out strategy for the ensemble rank boosting learning. The experimental results show that our ensemble learning approach outperforms the four gene-prioritization methods in ToppGene suite in the ranking results of the 13 known genes in terms of mean average precision, ROC and AUC measures.

  13. Behavioral and Psychosocial Correlates of HIV Testing Among Male Clients of Female Sex Workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Patterson, Thomas L; Chavarin, Claudia V; Semple, Shirley J; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Pitpitan, Eileen V

    2017-08-01

    We use data collected from a sample of 400 male clients of female sex workers (FSW) to examine their HIV testing behavior. We present frequencies of HIV testing and used bivariate and multivariable analyses to assess its socio-demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial correlates. We found that the majority (55 %) of male clients of FSW in Tijuana, Mexico had never had an HIV test and the prevalence of HIV testing within the past year was low (9 %). In multivariable analyses, significant correlates of having ever tested for HIV were higher age, higher HIV knowledge score, lower sexual compulsiveness score, lower misogynistic attitudes score, having a condom break during sex with a FSW, and higher frequency of sex with a FSW while she was high. Our findings represent an important starting point for developing effective interventions to address the need to promote HIV testing among this population.

  14. [Correlation between ICIQ-UI-SF score and personality testing results over a urinary incontinent population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, L; De Mol, J; Mélot, C; Falez, F

    2016-03-01

    We found out the personality pattern of an incontinent population and proceeded to a correlation between the personality inventory and the ICIQ-UI-SF (International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence Short Form) to demonstrate reliability and sincerity of the answers and to establish that a personality disturbance may impact the physiopathology of micturition. We performed an observational prospective study. It included patient's answers to a computed questionnaire combining a double ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaire and the 71 questions of the Minimult questionnaire. Forty-seven patients were asked to participate. Over 37 patients included, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney non parametric test confirmed agreement of the two ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaires with P=0.1792. Twenty-three patients were validated to the Minimult inventory with F scalevalidity scale using ROC analysis. We observed an AUC of 0.559 with sensitivity 78.6% and specificity 43.5%. No L score was above 70 demonstrating absence of lie. No personality disturbance was found in 9 cases. We observed six cases with a high hypochondric value, five with a high depressive value, and four with a high hysteric value. This neurotic triad was found in two cases. We noticed five cases with psychopathic deviance relative to antisocial behaviour while values of paranoia and hypomania were high in one case without any association of these personality aspects, which demonstrated absence of behavioural problem. Psychotic profile associating schizophrenia, paranoia, depression and hypomania was not found. We outlined in half of the valid population a significant high psycho-asthenic pattern. We conclude that a correlation between the personality inventory and the ICIQ-UI-SF is feasible. The comparative study demonstrate reliability of answers. Sincerity is established by the Minimult L scale. We confirm and precise literature information over clinical personality pattern of this population and observe relevant

  15. [Correlation between complaints of stress urinary incontinence and the one-hour pad test in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria Thereza; Micussi, Barbosa Cabral; Soares, Elvira Maria Mafaldo; Lemos, Telma Maria Araújo Moura; Brito, Tereza Neuma de Souza; Silva, João Batista da; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira

    2011-02-01

    to correlate complaints of stress urinary incontinence and the results of a one-hour pad test in pre- and postmenopausal women. cross-sectional study conducted on 60 postmenopausal volunteers divided into two groups: one consisting of 34 women with involuntary loss of urine due to stress incontinence and the other consisting of 26 women without involuntary loss of urine. A control group of 15 premenopausal women with normal menstrual cycles and no urinary complaints was also used. All women underwent clinical and laboratory analysis as well as the one-hour pad test. Patients were considered to be incontinent when sanitary pad weight post-test was more than 1 g. Data were submitted to descriptive statistics, parametric ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey test and Pearson's correlation. all postmenopausal women presented with stress urinary incontinence during the pad test, both those with urinary loss (4 g) and with no previous loss (3.5 g). A strong correlation was observed between urinary loss and time since menopause (r=0.8; ppad test (0.4 g). the results of the one-hour pad test showed that all postmenopausal women exhibited stress urinary incontinence, including those without urine loss on effort. Urine loss was correlated with time since menopause and body mass index.

  16. Reliability of dynamic sitting balance tests and their correlations with functional mobility for wheelchair users with chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring the dynamic sitting balance of wheelchair users with spinal cord injury. The balance tests were performed in nine patients with chronic spinal cord injury (average of 17.2 years postinjury between levels C6 and L1, while they were sitting in their wheelchairs and on a standardized stool (unsupported sitting, twice, 7 days apart. Limits of stability (LOS and sequential weight shifting (SWS were designed in this study. The balance tests measured participants' volitional weight shifting in multiple directions within their base of support. Their mobility scores on the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III were correlated with the balance test results. The LOS results showed moderate to excellent test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.673 to 0.990 for both the wheelchair and the unsupported sitting. The SWS results showed moderate to excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.688 to 0.952. The LOS results correlated significantly with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility scores only in case of unsupported sitting, but the SWS test results showed significant correlations in both sitting conditions. To sum up, the sitting LOS and SWS tests are reliable and valid tools for assessing the dynamic sitting balance control of patients with spinal cord injury.

  17. Motif discovery in ranked lists of sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tataru, Paula; Madsen, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    . These features make Regmex well suited for a range of biological sequence analysis problems related to motif discovery, exemplified by microRNA seed enrichment, but also including enrichment problems involving complex motifs and combinations of motifs. We demonstrate a number of usage scenarios that take......Motif analysis has long been an important method to characterize biological functionality and the current growth of sequencing-based genomics experiments further extends its potential. These diverse experiments often generate sequence lists ranked by some functional property. There is therefore...... a growing need for motif analysis methods that can exploit this coupled data structure and be tailored for specific biological questions. Here, we present an exploratory motif analysis tool, Regmex (REGular expression Motif EXplorer), which offers several methods to evaluate the correlation of motifs...

  18. Correlation of finite element free vibration predictions using random vibration test data. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element analysis is regularly used during the engineering cycle of mechanical systems to predict the response to static, thermal, and dynamic loads. The finite element model (FEM) used to represent the system is often correlated with physical test results to determine the validity of analytical results provided. Results from dynamic testing provide one means for performing this correlation. One of the most common methods of measuring accuracy is by classical modal testing, whereby vibratory mode shapes are compared to mode shapes provided by finite element analysis. The degree of correlation between the test and analytical mode shapes can be shown mathematically using the cross orthogonality check. A great deal of time and effort can be exhausted in generating the set of test acquired mode shapes needed for the cross orthogonality check. In most situations response data from vibration tests are digitally processed to generate the mode shapes from a combination of modal parameters, forcing functions, and recorded response data. An alternate method is proposed in which the same correlation of analytical and test acquired mode shapes can be achieved without conducting the modal survey. Instead a procedure is detailed in which a minimum of test information, specifically the acceleration response data from a random vibration test, is used to generate a set of equivalent local accelerations to be applied to the reduced analytical model at discrete points corresponding to the test measurement locations. The static solution of the analytical model then produces a set of deformations that once normalized can be used to represent the test acquired mode shapes in the cross orthogonality relation. The method proposed has been shown to provide accurate results for both a simple analytical model as well as a complex space flight structure.

  19. Synthesis of descriptive sensory attributes and hedonic rankings of dried persimmon (Diospyros kakisp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milczarek, Rebecca R; Woods, Rachelle D; LaFond, Sean I; Breksa, Andrew P; Preece, John E; Smith, Jenny L; Sedej, Ivana; Olsen, Carl W; Vilches, Ana M

    2018-01-01

    This work aimed to characterize the sensory attributes of hot air-dried persimmon ( Diospyros kaki ) chips, correlate these attributes with consumer hedonic information, and, by doing so, present recommendations for cultivars that are most suitable for hot-air drying. A trained sensory panel evaluated dried persimmon samples (representing 40 cultivars) for flavor, taste/aftertaste, and texture. In addition, in each of two tests conducted in different years, more than 100 consumers provided hedonic evaluations of 21 unique samples in a ranking task with a balanced incomplete block design. A partial least squares regression model correlating the mean hedonic ranking to the trained panel data was developed using the data from the first consumer panel. The predictions from the model were correlated with the second panel to verify the model. It was found that including taste, aftertaste, and texture data (but not specific flavor attribute data) produced a predictive model (Spearman's ρ=0.83). This indicates that flavor is likely secondary to taste and texture in dried persimmon chips. Using the validated predictive model, 6 of the 40 persimmon cultivars tested are recommended for a dried chip product; these cultivars are 'Fuyu', 'Lycopersicon', 'Maekawa Jiro', 'Nishimura Wase', 'Tishihtzu', and 'Yotsumizo'.

  20. World Class Education Ranking: Is It Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan; Muse, Ivan

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of why Asian students rank high on international assessment tests in science and mathematics reveals that Asian schools stress rote memorization and test taking to the extent that children don't have the opportunity to be children. The U.S. educational system's encouragement of critical thinking and nonacademic activities contributes…

  1. Correlation between neuropsychological tests and hypoperfusion in MCI patients: anatomical labeling using xjView and Talairach Daemon software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Jin; Park, Kyung Won; Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do-Young

    2012-10-01

    Statistical analysis of brain perfusion SPECT images has shown mild to severe abnormalities, consistent with cortical dysfunctions in the brain. Recently, functional brain imaging such as fMRI, PET and SPECT is increasingly used for diagnosis of MCI. In this study, we calculate the correlation with perfusion of brain SPECT and neuropsychological test scores of patients by SPM analysis to evaluate the relationship with cerebral hypoperfusion and cognitive dysfunction in MCI patients. Anatomical labeling was performed automatically using the Talairach Daemon (TD) and xjView. Ninety-three patients (mean age 67.2 ± 7.42 years; 59 women and 34 men) with MCI were selected and examined by the comprehensive neuropsychological test. Tc-99m-HMPAO brain SPECT images were acquired on the patients using a two-head gamma camera. We analyzed the brain image of MCI patients by SPM8 software, and observed the anatomical correlated region, between the neuropsychological tests and cerebral hypoperfusion. The SPM8 tool provided correlation between neuropsychological score and brain perfusion by simple regression method. The neuropsychological test included attention, language function, visuospatial function, memory, frontal executive function, depression score and general cognitive function. Percentage of voxels with correlated area to the whole brain was calculated and the values by Rey complex figure test (CFT) copy score, MMSE score, Seoul verbal learning test (SVLT) immediate recall score and Rey CFT delayed recall score were 15.3, 12.33, 10.59 and 8.45 %, respectively. Rey CFT copy score was correlated with perfusion in the left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21), right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45), right lingual gyrus, left lingual gyrus (BA 18), right postcentral gyrus (BA 40), right cingulate gyrus (BA 31) and left thalamus (pulvinar) with p SVLT immediate recall score was correlated with left superior temporal gyrus and Rey CFT delayed recall score was correlated with left

  2. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  3. Methodology, Meaning and Usefulness of Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross

    2008-01-01

    University rankings are having a profound effect on both higher education systems and individual universities. In this paper we outline these effects, discuss the desirable characteristics of a good ranking methodology and document existing practice, with an emphasis on the two main international rankings (Shanghai Jiao Tong and THES-QS). We take…

  4. A computer-aided diagnosis system of nuclear cataract via ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Huiqi; Chan, Kap Luk; Lim, Joo Hwee; Liu, Jiang; Wong, Tien Yin

    2009-01-01

    A novel computer-aided diagnosis system of nuclear cataract via ranking is firstly proposed in this paper. The grade of nuclear cataract in a slit-lamp image is predicted based on its neighboring labeled images in a ranked images list, which is achieved using an optimal ranking function. A new ranking evaluation measure is proposed for learning the optimal ranking function via direct optimization. Our system has been tested by a large dataset composed of 1000 slit-lamp images from 1000 different cases. Both experimental results and comparison with several state-of-the-art methods indicate the superiority of our system.

  5. Correlates of HIV/STD testing and willingness to test among rural-to-urban migrants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; McGuire, James

    2010-08-01

    This study investigates socio-demographic, behavioral, psychological, and structural factors associated with self-reported HIV/STD testing and willingness to test among 1,938 Chinese migrants. Overall, 6% and 14% of participants had ever been tested for HIV and STD, respectively. The results of multivariate analyses indicate that working at entertainment sectors, engaging in commercial sex, and utilization of health care were positively associated with both HIV and STD testing. Younger age, selling blood, perceived peer sexual risk involvement, and satisfaction with life were associated with HIV testing only. Female gender, early sexual debut, multiple sexual partners, and perceived vulnerability to HIV/STD were associated with STD testing only. Male gender, having premarital sex, perceived higher severity of and vulnerability to HIV/STD, and utilization of health care were associated with willingness to be tested for both HIV and STD. Interventions designed to raise the perception of vulnerability to HIV/STD and to improve access to and utilization of health care may be effective in encouraging more HIV testing in this vulnerable population.

  6. Issue Management Risk Ranking Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novack, Steven David; Marshall, Frances Mc Clellan; Stromberg, Howard Merion; Grant, Gary Michael

    1999-06-01

    Thousands of safety issues have been collected on-line at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as part of the Issue Management Plan. However, there has been no established approach to prioritize collected and future issues. The authors developed a methodology, based on hazards assessment, to identify and risk rank over 5000 safety issues collected at INEEL. This approach required that it was easily applied and understandable for site adaptation and commensurate with the Integrated Safety Plan. High-risk issues were investigated and mitigative/preventive measures were suggested and ranked based on a cost-benefit scheme to provide risk-informed safety measures. This methodology was consistent with other integrated safety management goals and tasks providing a site-wide risk informed decision tool to reduce hazardous conditions and focus resources on high-risk safety issues. As part of the issue management plan, this methodology was incorporated at the issue collection level and training was provided to management to better familiarize decision-makers with concepts of safety and risk. This prioritization methodology and issue dissemination procedure will be discussed. Results of issue prioritization and training efforts will be summarized. Difficulties and advantages of the process will be reported. Development and incorporation of this process into INEELs lessons learned reporting and the site-wide integrated safety management program will be shown with an emphasis on establishing self reliance and ownership of safety issues.

  7. Numerical development of a new correlation between biaxial fracture strain and material fracture toughness for small punch test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dutta, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2017-04-01

    The miniaturized specimens are used to determine mechanical properties of the materials, such as yield stress, ultimate stress, fracture toughness etc. Use of such specimens is essential whenever limited quantity of material is available for testing, such as aged/irradiated materials. The miniaturized small punch test (SPT) is a technique which is widely used to determine change in mechanical properties of the materials. Various empirical correlations are proposed in the literature to determine the value of fracture toughness (JIC) using this technique. bi-axial fracture strain is determined using SPT tests. This parameter is then used to determine JIC using available empirical correlations. The correlations between JIC and biaxial fracture strain quoted in the literature are based on experimental data acquired for large number of materials. There are number of such correlations available in the literature, which are generally not in agreement with each other. In the present work, an attempt has been made to determine the correlation between biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and crack initiation toughness (Ji) numerically. About one hundred materials are digitally generated by varying yield stress, ultimate stress, hardening coefficient and Gurson parameters. Such set of each material is then used to analyze a SPT specimen and a standard TPB specimen. Analysis of SPT specimen generated biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and analysis of TPB specimen generated value of Ji. A graph is then plotted between these two parameters for all the digitally generated materials. The best fit straight line determines the correlation. It has been also observed that it is possible to have variation in Ji for the same value of biaxial fracture strain (εqf) within a limit. Such variation in the value of Ji has been also ascertained using the graph. Experimental SPT data acquired earlier for three materials were then used to get Ji by using newly developed correlation. A reasonable

  8. Aggregate Interview Method of ranking orthopedic applicants predicts future performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Jacqueline; VanHeest, Ann; Tatman, Penny; Gioe, Terence

    2013-07-01

    This article evaluates and describes a process of ranking orthopedic applicants using what the authors term the Aggregate Interview Method. The authors hypothesized that higher-ranking applicants using this method at their institution would perform better than those ranked lower using multiple measures of resident performance. A retrospective review of 115 orthopedic residents was performed at the authors' institution. Residents were grouped into 3 categories by matching rank numbers: 1-5, 6-14, and 15 or higher. Each rank group was compared with resident performance as measured by faculty evaluations, the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), and American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) test results. Residents ranked 1-5 scored significantly better on patient care, behavior, and overall competence by faculty evaluation (Porthopedic resident candidates who scored highly on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident core competencies as measured by faculty evaluations, performed above the national average on the OITE, and passed the ABOS part 1 examination at rates exceeding the national average. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Learning to rank figures within a biomedical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. This ever-increasing sheer volume has made it difficult for scientists to effectively and accurately access figures of their interest, the process of which is crucial for validating research facts and for formulating or testing novel research hypotheses. Current figure search applications can't fully meet this challenge as the "bag of figures" assumption doesn't take into account the relationship among figures. In our previous study, hundreds of biomedical researchers have annotated articles in which they serve as corresponding authors. They ranked each figure in their paper based on a figure's importance at their discretion, referred to as "figure ranking". Using this collection of annotated data, we investigated computational approaches to automatically rank figures. We exploited and extended the state-of-the-art listwise learning-to-rank algorithms and developed a new supervised-learning model BioFigRank. The cross-validation results show that BioFigRank yielded the best performance compared with other state-of-the-art computational models, and the greedy feature selection can further boost the ranking performance significantly. Furthermore, we carry out the evaluation by comparing BioFigRank with three-level competitive domain-specific human experts: (1) First Author, (2) Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article but who works in the same field of the corresponding author of the article, and (3) Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article and who may or may not work in the same field of the corresponding author of an article. Our results show that BioFigRank outperforms Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert and performs as well as Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert. Although BioFigRank underperforms First Author, since most biomedical researchers are either in- or out

  10. Learning to rank figures within a biomedical article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifan Liu

    Full Text Available Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. This ever-increasing sheer volume has made it difficult for scientists to effectively and accurately access figures of their interest, the process of which is crucial for validating research facts and for formulating or testing novel research hypotheses. Current figure search applications can't fully meet this challenge as the "bag of figures" assumption doesn't take into account the relationship among figures. In our previous study, hundreds of biomedical researchers have annotated articles in which they serve as corresponding authors. They ranked each figure in their paper based on a figure's importance at their discretion, referred to as "figure ranking". Using this collection of annotated data, we investigated computational approaches to automatically rank figures. We exploited and extended the state-of-the-art listwise learning-to-rank algorithms and developed a new supervised-learning model BioFigRank. The cross-validation results show that BioFigRank yielded the best performance compared with other state-of-the-art computational models, and the greedy feature selection can further boost the ranking performance significantly. Furthermore, we carry out the evaluation by comparing BioFigRank with three-level competitive domain-specific human experts: (1 First Author, (2 Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article but who works in the same field of the corresponding author of the article, and (3 Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article and who may or may not work in the same field of the corresponding author of an article. Our results show that BioFigRank outperforms Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert and performs as well as Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert. Although BioFigRank underperforms First Author, since most biomedical researchers are either in- or

  11. Full-scale locomotive dynamic crash testing and correlations : locomotive consist colliding with steel coil truck at grade crossing (test 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the test results and finite element correlations of a full-scale dynamic collision between a locomotive and a highway truck loaded with two heavy steel coils. The locomotive consist was moving at 58 miles per hour before it struc...

  12. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  13. Ranking serials in oceanography: An analysis based on the Indian contributions and their citations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.; Maheswarappa, B.S.

    negative correlation with a marginal difference of -0.214 is observed between these two rank lists. This difference is attributed to studies from different geographical areas in these two rank sets. Bradford graphs for all datasets, but one, showed typical...

  14. Investigating the Correlation Between Pharmacy Student Performance on the Health Science Reasoning Test and a Critical Thinking Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nornoo, Adwoa O; Jackson, Jonathan; Axtell, Samantha

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To determine whether there is a correlation between pharmacy students' scores on the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT) and their grade on a package insert assignment designed to assess critical thinking. Methods. The HSRT was administered to first-year pharmacy students during a critical-thinking course in the spring semester. In the same semester, a required package insert assignment was completed in a pharmacokinetics course. To determine whether there was a relationship between HSRT scores and grades on the assignment, a Spearman's rho correlation test was performed. Results. A very weak but significant positive correlation was found between students' grades on the assignment and their overall HSRT score (r=0.19, p thinking skills in pharmacy students.

  15. The Franck Test for Gender Identity: Correlation with Occupation and Long-Term Stability of Score in Normal Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Roland

    1985-01-01

    A correlation was found between high (independent) occupational positions and masculine scores on the Franck Drawing Completion Test (FDCT). Acceptable individual long-term stability was also evident. The FDCT appears to be useful in assessing gender identity. (Author/ABB)

  16. Bond strength tests of dental adhesive systems and their correlation with clinical results - A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Rousson, Valentin; Mahn, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the variability of bond strength test results of adhesive systems (AS) and to correlate the results with clinical parameters of clinical studies investigating cervical restorations. Regarding the clinical studies, the internal database which had previously been used for a meta-analysis on cervical restorations was updated with clinical studies published between 2008 and 2012 by searching the PubMed and SCOPUS databases. PubMed and the International Association for Dental Research abstracts online were searched for laboratory studies on microtensile, macrotensile and macroshear bond strength tests. The inclusion criteria were (1) dentin, (2) testing of at least four adhesive systems, (3) same diameter of composite and (4) 24h of water storage prior to testing. The clinical outcome variables were retention loss, marginal discoloration, detectable margins, and a clinical index comprising the three parameters by weighing them. Linear mixed models which included a random study effect were calculated for both, the laboratory and the clinical studies. The variability was assessed by calculating a ratio of variances, dividing the variance among the estimated bonding effects obtained in the linear mixed models by the sum of all variance components estimated in these models. Thirty-two laboratory studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria comprising 183 experiments. Of those, 86 used the microtensile test evaluating 22 adhesive systems (AS). Twenty-seven used the macrotensile test with 17 AS, and 70 used the macroshear test with 24 AS. For 28 AS the results from clinical studies were available. Microtensile and macrotensile (Spearman rho=0.66, p=0.007) were moderately correlated and also microtensile and macroshear (Spearman rho=0.51, p=0.03) but not macroshear and macrotensile (Spearman rho=0.34, p=0.22). The effect of the adhesive system was significant for microtensile and macroshear (p clinical trials, about 49% of the variability of retained restorations could

  17. Relationship between Particle Size Distribution of Low-Rank Pulverized Coal and Power Plant Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajive Ganguli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of particle size distribution (PSD of pulverized, low rank high volatile content Alaska coal on combustion related power plant performance was studied in a series of field scale tests. Performance was gauged through efficiency (ratio of megawatt generated to energy consumed as coal, emissions (SO2, NOx, CO, and carbon content of ash (fly ash and bottom ash. The study revealed that the tested coal could be burned at a grind as coarse as 50% passing 76 microns, with no deleterious impact on power generation and emissions. The PSD’s tested in this study were in the range of 41 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. There was negligible correlation between PSD and the followings factors: efficiency, SO2, NOx, and CO. Additionally, two tests where stack mercury (Hg data was collected, did not demonstrate any real difference in Hg emissions with PSD. The results from the field tests positively impacts pulverized coal power plants that burn low rank high volatile content coals (such as Powder River Basin coal. These plants can potentially reduce in-plant load by grinding the coal less (without impacting plant performance on emissions and efficiency and thereby, increasing their marketability.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Steering for Testing Nonclassical Correlations in Quantum Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shin-Liang; Lambert, Neill; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2017-06-16

    We introduce the concept of spatio-temporal steering (STS), which reduces, in special cases, to Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering and the recently-introduced temporal steering. We describe two measures of this effect referred to as the STS weight and robustness. We suggest that these STS measures enable a new way to assess nonclassical correlations in an open quantum network, such as quantum transport through nano-structures or excitation transfer in a complex biological system. As one of our examples, we apply STS to check nonclassical correlations among sites in a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson model.

  19. Genetic correlations among milk yield, morphology, performance test traits and somatic cells in dual-purpose Rendena breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, C; Guzzo, N; Mazza, S; Mantovani, R

    2017-10-17

    Selection in native local breeds needs great carefulness due to the small population size and the risk of inbreeding. Furthermore, most breeds are dual-purpose, and milk and beef attitudes are antagonistic. For preservation purposes functional traits need to be considered. Focusing on the small local Rendena cattle, this study aimed to analyse the genetic correlations among milk, beef and udder health traits and the response to selection predicted under different scenarios. The study considered milk, fat and protein yields (MY), factor scores for udder volume (UV), conformation (UC) and muscularity obtained from type traits scored on primiparous cows, and performance test traits (PT) measured on young bulls at test station: average daily gain, in vivo SEUROP fleshiness, in vivo dressing percentage. Somatic cell score (SCS) was considered as a functional trait, with a possibility of restricting its genetic gain to zero. The study considered 281 497 MY test-day data collected on 16 974 cows, and data from linear type evaluation on 11 992 primiparous cows for factor scores. The PT data were recorded on 1428 young bulls, and SCS obtained from cell counts at milk recording. Bi-trait restricted maximum likelihood animal model analyses were performed to assess genetic parameters. Heritability varied from 0.157 (fat) to 0.442 (dressing percentage). Udder volume and MY resulted positively genetically correlated (average correlation 0.427), whereas the low-negative genetic correlation between MY and UC (-0.141) suggested a negative impact of milk gain on udder form. Beef traits of factor muscularity and PT showed medium-high favourable genetic correlations (from 0.357 to 0.984), excluding a null correlation between daily gain and muscularity. The genetic correlation MY v. muscularity was unfavourable (-0.328 on average), whereas null correlations were found in MY v. PT, apart from fat v. dressing percentage (-0.151). Somatic cell score showed low unfavourable correlations

  20. Correlating off-axis tension tests to shear modulus of wood-based panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond P. Saliklis; Robert H. Falk

    2000-01-01

    The weakness of existing relationships correlating off-axis modulus of elasticity E q to shear modulus G 12 for wood composite panels is demonstrated through presentation of extensive experimental data. A new relationship is proposed that performs better than existing equations found in the literature. This relationship can be manipulated to calculate the shear modulus...

  1. (e, 3e) Test on e–e correlations in helium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (TS1) process in which the incident particle ejects one target electron which then interacts with and ejects the second one and (iii) another two-step (TS2) process in which the in- cident particle interacts successively with the target electrons and ejects them one by one. A proper accounting of e–e correlation in the final state ...

  2. Polarization correlations of S-1(0) proton pairs as tests of hidden-variable theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polachic, C; Rangacharyulu, C; van den Berg, AM; Hamieh, S; Harakeh, MN; Hunyadi, M; de Huu, MA; Wortche, HJ; Heyse, J; Baumer, C; Frekers, D; Brooke, JA; Busch, P

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of nuclear physics experiments designed to overcome the loopholes of observer-dependent reality and satisfying the counterfactuality condition. In a first approach, we have measured polarization correlations of S-1(0) proton pairs produced in C-12(d, He-2) and

  3. Subclinical Eating Disorders in Adolescent Women: A Test of the Continuity Hypothesis and Its Psychological Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L.; Omori, Mika

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the severity of disturbed eating and its psychological correlates in college freshman women. Reports that 9% fell into the problem bulimic or dieter at-risk categories, 23% were classified as intensive dieters, 17% as casual dieters, and over half were non-dieters. Depression, dysfunctional thinking, and disturbed eating attitudes…

  4. An Investigation on Formaldehyde Emission Characteristics of Wood Building Materials in Chinese Standard Tests: Product Emission Levels, Measurement Uncertainties, and Data Correlations between Various Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Cao, Yang; Wang, Dandan; Hou, Guojun; Shen, Zaihua; Zhang, Shuangbao

    2015-01-01

    As a large producer and consumer of wood building materials, China suffers product formaldehyde emissions (PFE) but lacks systematic investigations and basic data on Chinese standard emission tests (CST), so this paper presented a first effort on this issue. The PFE of fiberboards, particleboards, blockboards, floorings, and parquets manufactured in Beijing region were characterized by the perforator extraction method (PE), 9–11 L and 40 L desiccator methods (D9, D40), and environmental chamber method (EC) of the Chinese national standard GB 18580; based on statistics of PFE data, measurement uncertainties in CST were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method; moreover, PFE data correlations between tests were established. Results showed: (1) Different tests may give slightly different evaluations on product quality. In PE and D9 tests, blockboards and parquets reached E1 grade for PFE, which can be directly used in indoor environment; but in D40 and EC tests, floorings and parquets achieved E1. (2) In multiple tests, PFE data characterized by PE, D9, and D40 complied with Gaussian distributions, while those characterized by EC followed log-normal distributions. Uncertainties in CST were overall low, with uncertainties for 20 material-method combinations all below 7.5%, and the average uncertainty for each method under 3.5%, thus being acceptable in engineering application. A more complicated material structure and a larger test scale caused higher uncertainties. (3) Conventional linear models applied to correlating PFE values between PE, D9, and EC, with R2 all over 0.840, while novel logarithmic (exponential) models can work better for correlations involving D40, with R2 all beyond 0.901. This research preliminarily demonstrated the effectiveness of CST, where results for D40 presented greater similarities to EC—the currently most reliable test for PFE, thus highlighting the potential of Chinese D40 as a more practical approach in production control and risk

  5. Correlations among ocular surface temperature difference value, the tear meniscus height, Schirmer's test and fluorescein tear film break up time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tai Yuan; Ho, Wei Ting; Lu, Chien Yi; Chang, Shu Wen; Chiang, Huihua Kenny

    2015-04-01

    To report the use of a thermographer for measuring ocular surface temperature, and to evaluate the correlation among the obtained temperature difference values (TDVs) and dry eye parameters (tear meniscus height (TMH); Schirmer's test results; fluorescent tear breakup time (FTBUT)). Forty-three participants (age 40.2±14.7 years; range 21-67 years) from Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taiwan were recruited for the study. The surface temperature was measured at the centre of the ocular surface for 4 s after blinking. TDV was defined as the change in corneal surface temperature relative to that of the preceding eye opening, where TDV01, TDV02, TDV03, and TDV04 represent the values obtained 1, 2, 3, and 4 s after blinking, respectively. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) was employed to measure the lower TMH. Schirmer's test with topical anaesthetic was conducted to measure the basal tear secretion. The FTBUT was recorded using a digital camera. TDV measurement exhibited high reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.91). TDV03 exhibited the highest significance and strongest positive correlation with the TMH (r=0.52, p=0.0003) and Schirmer's test value (r=0.39, p=0.008), whereas the TDV03-FTBUT correlation was non-significant. Age correlated negatively and significantly with the TDV (r= -0.35, p=0.021), TMH (r= -0.33, p=0.031), and Schirmer's test value (r= -0.31, p=0.044). TDV03 remained significantly correlated with the TMH and Schirmer's test value after adjustment for age. The thermographer was effective in capturing temperature changes in the ocular surface. The temperature difference 3 s after blinking appears to be correlated with lower TMH and Schirmer test values. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Rey Visual Design Learning Test performance correlates with white matter structure

    OpenAIRE

    Begré, Stefan; Kiefer, Claus; von Känel, Roland; Frommer, Angela; Federspiel, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Studies exploring relation of visual memory to white matter are extensively lacking. The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT) is an elementary motion, colour and word independent visual memory test. It avoids a significant contribution from as many additional higher order visual brain functions as possible to visual performance, such as three-dimensional, colour, motion or word-dependent brain operations. Based on previous results, we hypothesised that test performance would be ...

  7. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of $7\\times10^{−21}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of $2.5\\times 10^{−18}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of $4\\times 10^{11}$ digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  8. Assessment of aerobic fitness and its correlates in Omani adolescents using the 20-metre shuttle run test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Barwani, Sulayma; Al Abri, Mohammed; Al Hashmi, Khamis; Al Shukeiry, Masoud; Tahlilkar, Khurram; Al Zuheibi, Thuraya; Al Rawas, Omar; Hassan, Mohammed O

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess aerobic fitness in male and female adolescents using the multistage 20-metre shuttle run test and correlate it with selected fitness variables. Method: The subjects comprised 83 girls and 64 boys aged 15–16 years, randomly selected from two segregated government schools in Muscat. After the pupils filled in a short questionnaire on their personal leisure time activities of the preceding week, their heights and weights were measured. Aerobic fitness was assessed by estimating each pupil’s minimal oxygen uptake levels (VO2max) using the multistage 20-metre shuttle running test (20-MST). Results: Boys spent more time than girls on leisure physical activities, television, computer and video games and the Internet. The estimated VO2max in both boys and girls showed high correlation with their weekly physical activities. The time spent on television and computer negatively correlated with VO2max in girls but not in boys. Girls had higher body mass index (BMI) and less VO2max compared to boys; BMI showed a negative correlation with VO2max in girls but not in boys. Conclusion: Aerobic fitness in this sample was higher in boys than in girls and was strongly influenced by weekly physical activities in both genders. The 20-MST has proved a simple and inexpensive field test for aerobic fitness that could be implemented on a wide scale. PMID:24019712

  9. Assessment of aerobic fitness and its correlates in Omani adolescents using the 20-metre shuttle run test: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Barwani, S; Al Abri, M; Al Hashmi, K; Al Shukeiry, M; Tahlilkar, K; Al Zuheibi, T; Al Rawas, O; Hassan, M O

    2001-10-01

    To assess aerobic fitness in male and female adolescents using the multistage 20-metre shuttle run test and correlate it with selected fitness variables. The subjects comprised 83 girls and 64 boys aged 15-16 years, randomly selected from two segregated government schools in Muscat. After the pupils filled in a short questionnaire on their personal leisure time activities of the preceding week, their heights and weights were measured. Aerobic fitness was assessed by estimating each pupil's minimal oxygen uptake levels (VO2max) using the multistage 20-metre shuttle running test (20-MST). Boys spent more time than girls on leisure physical activities, television, computer and video games and the Internet. The estimated VO2max in both boys and girls showed high correlation with their weekly physical activities. The time spent on television and computer negatively correlated with VO2max in girls but not in boys. Girls had higher body mass index (BMI) and less VO2max compared to boys; BMI showed a negative correlation with VO2max in girls but not in boys. Aerobic fitness in this sample was higher in boys than in girls and was strongly influenced by weekly physical activities in both genders. The 20-MST has proved a simple and inexpensive field test for aerobic fitness that could be implemented on a wide scale.

  10. Use of diagnostic self-tests on body materials among Internet users in the Netherlands: prevalence and correlates of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norg Roelf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A range of self-tests on body materials has become available to the general public, but the extent of their use has hardly been studied. This study examined how many people use diagnostic self-tests on body materials such as blood or urine, as well as the type of tests that are used, and factors associated with their use. Methods Cross-sectional survey. Participants were recruited from an existing Dutch Internet panel of 12,529 persons, and information was collected by means of a structured Internet-based questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess correlates of self-test use. Results Response to the survey was 63%. Sixteen percent of the respondents said they had ever used at least one self-test, with a mean of 2.1 tests per self-tester. The most frequently reported self-tests were those for diabetes and cholesterol. Self-testers generally reported lower health status and had a higher BMI than non-testers. On the other hand, they were more likely to engage in health-related behaviour such as the use of dietary supplements and homeopathic medicine. Conclusion Self-testing proved to be relatively prevalent among Dutch Internet users. We therefore think that it is essential to develop appropriate information for consumers, health care providers and policymakers, about the pros and cons of self-testing and specific self-tests. More test-specific research is needed.

  11. Potential Influences of Residencies' Health Risk Policies on Their Rankings by Ohio Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Albert F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 341 fourth-year Ohio medical students investigated attitudes regarding residencies' policies on drug screening, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, and smoke-free workplaces. Substantial subsets indicated they would rank lower, or not at all, programs requiring preresidency drug screening or HIV testing but would rank schools…

  12. Exact p-values for pairwise comparison of Friedman rank sums, with application to comparing classifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisinga, R.N.; Heskes, T.M.; Pelzer, B.J.; Grotenhuis, H.F. te

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Friedman rank sum test is a widely-used nonparametric method in computational biology. In addition to examining the overall null hypothesis of no significant difference among any of the rank sums, it is typically of interest to conduct pairwise comparison tests. Current approaches to

  13. Prevalence and correlates of physical fitness testing in U.S. schools--2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R; Fulton, Janet E; Brener, Nancy D; Kohl, Harold W

    2008-06-01

    Because of the perceived lack of youth physical fitness and/or concerns for increased obesity, physical education teachers are interested in youth fitness and physical activity levels. Statewide mandates are being developed that require school-based teachers to complete physical fitness testing. Data from the nationally representative School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000 were analyzed to investigate the prevalence of fitness testing and the professional characteristics of fitness test users. Data were collected with teachers of either randomly selected classes in elementary schools and randomly selected required physical education courses in middle/junior high and senior high schools (N = 1,564). The prevalence of fitness test use is 65% across all school levels. Variables associated with physical fitness test usage were professionally oriented. Results showed that teachers in secondary schools (odds ratio [OR] = 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = I.18-4.27), those with degrees in physical education/kinesiology-related disciplines (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.11-3.63), and those who had completed staff development on physical fitness testing (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.86-5.60) were more likely than respondents without these characteristics to engage in physical fitness testing. Results changed little when separate analyses were conducted for classes/courses in districts requiring versus not requiring fitness testing. Financial variables, including fitness-oriented facilities available, metropolitan location, and discretionary expenditures per student, were not associated with fitness test use. Results provided national prevalence of school-based physical fitness testing use in the U. S. and conveyed information about those who currently use physical fitness tests.

  14. Fibre reinforced concrete in flexure and single fibre pull-out test: a correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M.; Ciancio, D.; Dight, P.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to assess whether a single fibre pull-out test can be related to the behaviour of multiple fibres in fibre reinforced concrete under bending condition. A simple model based on the stress block theory is described and compared with experimental results on three point bending tests with aligned fibres.

  15. Correlation of applied kinesiology muscle testing findings with serum immunoglobulin levels for food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Leisman, G

    1998-12-01

    The pilot study attempted to determine whether subjective muscle testing employed by Applied Kinesiology practitioners, prospectively determine those individuals with specific hyperallergenic responses. Seventeen subjects were found positive on Applied Kinesiology (A.K.) muscle testing screening procedures indicating food hypersensitivity (allergy) reactions. Each subject showed muscle weakening (inhibition) reactions to oral provocative testing of one or two foods for a total of 21 positive food reactions. Tests for a hypersensitivity reaction of the serum were performed using both a radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) and immune complex test for IgE and IgG against all 21 of the foods that tested positive with A.K. muscle screening procedures. These serum tests confirmed 19 of the 21 food allergies (90.5%) suspected based on the applied kinesiology screening procedures. This pilot study offers a basis to examine further a means by which to predict the clinical utility of a given substance for a given patient, based on the patterns of neuromuscular response elicited from the patient, representing a conceptual expansion of the standard neurological examination process.

  16. Gray Matter Correlates of Fluid, Crystallized, and Spatial Intelligence: Testing the P-FIT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Roberto; Haier, Richard J.; Head, Kevin; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Shih, Pei Chun; Jung, Rex E.

    2009-01-01

    The parieto-frontal integration theory (P-FIT) nominates several areas distributed throughout the brain as relevant for intelligence. This theory was derived from previously published studies using a variety of both imaging methods and tests of cognitive ability. Here we test this theory in a new sample of young healthy adults (N = 100) using a…

  17. Is Conscientiousness negatively correlated with intelligence test and inspection time performance

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Kirsty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain if high C developed as a compensation mechanism to make up for a lack of intelligence: our hypothesis was that C would negatively correlate with intelligence tests’ scores and IT accuracy scores. C was measured along with the other Big 5 factors via a 100 item personality questionnaire: there were 10 items for each factor, except C which had 10 items measuring each of its 6 subfacets, hence 100 items. Intelligence was measured via Rave...

  18. High-resolution computed tomography in silicosis: correlation with chest radiography and pulmonary function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jose [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Pedro Ernesto Univ. Hospital. Dept. of Respiratory Function]. E-mail: phel.lop@uol.com.br; Mogami, Roberto; Capone, Domenico; Jansen, Jose Manoel [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences; Tessarollo, Bernardo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Image; Melo, Pedro Lopes de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. of Biology

    2008-05-15

    Objective: To correlate tomographic findings with pulmonary function findings, as well as to compare chest X-ray findings with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, in patients with silicosis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 non-smoking patients without a history of tuberculosis. Chest X-ray findings were classified according to the International Labour Organization recommendations. Using a semiquantitative system, the following HRCT findings were measured: the full extent of pulmonary involvement; parenchymal opacities; and emphysema. Spirometry and forced oscillation were performed. Pulmonary volumes were evaluated using the helium dilution method, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was assessed. Results: Of the 44 patients studied, 41 were male. The mean age was 48.4 years. There were 4 patients who were classified as category 0 based on X-ray findings and as category 1 based on HRCT findings. Using HRCT scans, we identified progressive massive fibrosis in 33 patients, compared with only 23 patients when X-rays were used. Opacity score was found to correlate most closely with airflow, DLCO and compliance. Emphysema score correlated inversely with volume, DLCO and airflow. In this sample of patients presenting a predominance of large opacities (75% of the individuals), the deterioration of pulmonary function was associated with the extent of structural changes. Conclusions: In the early detection of silicosis and the identification of progressive massive fibrosis, HRCT scans are superior to X-rays. (author)

  19. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 2: Functional Performance Tests Correlate With Return-to-Sport Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Timothy M; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2017-02-01

    Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. To investigate prospectively the relationship between functional performance test results at 24 weeks postoperative and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity score) at 12 and 24 months, respectively, after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (doubled semitendinosus/gracilis [2ST/2GR]) ACL reconstructions. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft; mean age, 27.9 years; body mass index [BMI], 24.9 kg/m(2)) were assessed preoperatively and at staged intervals postoperatively up to 24 weeks for isokinetic testing of quadriceps and hamstring average power per repetition at 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s, a battery of hop tests, peak vertical ground-reaction force (vGRF), and time to peak vGRF (in seconds) during a step- and jump-down task onto a force platform and peak speed (m/s) using a global positioning system (GPS unit) during a running task. A cohort of 32 healthy matched participants (mean age, 26.31 years; BMI, 25.7 kg/m(2)) were also tested to act as reference. Pearson correlation was calculated to assess correlation of each performance measure at 24 weeks postoperative with activity outcomes (Tegner score) at 12 and 24 months. The strongest correlation between physical performance tests and return-to-sport outcomes was observed with peak speed during running. Large correlations were also observed for hamstring isokinetic power and hop test for distance. Moderate correlations were observed for timed hop, peak vGRF during a jump-down task, and quadriceps isokinetic power. No statistical correlations were observed for time to peak vGRF during a step-down and jump-down task as well as peak vGRF during a step-down task. When the performance

  20. Rank Modulation for Translocation Error Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Farnoud, Farzad; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2012-01-01

    We consider rank modulation codes for flash memories that allow for handling arbitrary charge drop errors. Unlike classical rank modulation codes used for correcting errors that manifest themselves as swaps of two adjacently ranked elements, the proposed \\emph{translocation rank codes} account for more general forms of errors that arise in storage systems. Translocations represent a natural extension of the notion of adjacent transpositions and as such may be analyzed using related concepts in combinatorics and rank modulation coding. Our results include tight bounds on the capacity of translocation rank codes, construction techniques for asymptotically good codes, as well as simple decoding methods for one class of structured codes. As part of our exposition, we also highlight the close connections between the new code family and permutations with short common subsequences, deletion and insertion error-correcting codes for permutations and permutation arrays.

  1. Dynamics of Ranking Processes in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumm, Nicholas; Ghoshal, Gourab; Forró, Zalán; Schich, Maximilian; Bianconi, Ginestra; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-09-01

    The world is addicted to ranking: everything, from the reputation of scientists, journals, and universities to purchasing decisions is driven by measured or perceived differences between them. Here, we analyze empirical data capturing real time ranking in a number of systems, helping to identify the universal characteristics of ranking dynamics. We develop a continuum theory that not only predicts the stability of the ranking process, but shows that a noise-induced phase transition is at the heart of the observed differences in ranking regimes. The key parameters of the continuum theory can be explicitly measured from data, allowing us to predict and experimentally document the existence of three phases that govern ranking stability.

  2. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error.

  3. Early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlates with hepatic cytochrome P4503A activity in liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Olsen, A K; Stentoft, K

    2001-01-01

    , but the method has never been directly validated. The aim of the study was to investigate whether an early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlated with the hepatic CYP3A protein level and catalytic activity in liver transplant recipients. METHODS: In 18 liver transplant recipients, the erythromycin...... breath test was performed within 2 hours after transplantation. A graft biopsy was obtained during surgery and analyzed for the CYP3A protein level by Western blotting and for CYP3A activity with erythromycin demethylation and testosterone 6beta- hydroxylation assays. RESULTS: The erythromycin breath......). CONCLUSION: Our data support the erythromycin breath test as a specific in vivo assay of CYP3A activity in humans. The test is applicable in liver transplant recipients in the early postoperative phase. Future studies should evaluate the clinical usefulness of an early postoperative erythromycin breath test...

  4. Rankings, Standards, and Competition: Task vs. Scale Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Stephen M.; Tor, Avishalom

    2007-01-01

    Research showing how upward social comparison breeds competitive behavior has so far conflated local comparisons in "task" performance (e.g. a test score) with comparisons on a more general "scale" (i.e. an underlying skill). Using a ranking methodology (Garcia, Tor, & Gonzalez, 2006) to separate task and scale comparisons, Studies 1-2 reveal that…

  5. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Callahan, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical radioisotope power system (RPS) launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources were designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  6. Ranking in Swiss system chess team tournaments

    OpenAIRE

    Csató, László

    2015-01-01

    The paper uses paired comparison-based scoring procedures for ranking the participants of a Swiss system chess team tournament. We present the main challenges of ranking in Swiss system, the features of individual and team competitions as well as the failures of official lexicographical orders. The tournament is represented as a ranking problem, our model is discussed with respect to the properties of the score, generalized row sum and least squares methods. The proposed procedure is illustra...

  7. A universal rank-size law

    CERN Document Server

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    A mere hyperbolic law, like the Zipf's law power function, is often inadequate to describe rank-size relationships. An alternative theoretical distribution is proposed based on theoretical physics arguments starting from the Yule-Simon distribution. A modeling is proposed leading to a universal form. A theoretical suggestion for the "best (or optimal) distribution", is provided through an entropy argument. The ranking of areas through the number of cities in various countries and some sport competition ranking serves for the present illustrations.

  8. Histological-cytological reports correlation and reliability of papanicolau test for the detection of malignant changes in the cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitković L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of cervical cancer in Serbia is among the highest in Europe and is 23.8 in 100.000. Papanicolaou test, colposcopy and pathohistology report are the basic method of secondary prevention of cervical cancer. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between histological-cytological findings and reliability of the Papanicolaou test in detection of cervical lesions. We analyzed cervical smears (Papanicolaou test in 3868 women. Among them 190 women had suspect finding and because of that they were underwent to cervical biopsy. We detected premalignant or malignant changes of the cervix in 77 women. LSIL was found at 43 (22.6%, HSIL at 25 (13.2% and carcinoma planocellulare at 9 (4.7% women. There is a statistically significant positive correlation (Spearman=0.829; p<0,001 between histological and cytological findings of the respondents. Most estimates of diagnostic performance of Papanicolaou test in discrimination of LSIL, HSIL and carcinoma planocellulare in accordance with cervicitis are for cytological findings of ASCH (PA IIIa (Sp=90.6% and Sn=100% for carcinoma planocellulare; Sn = 96% for HSIL and Sn=86% for LSIL. In discrimination HSIL from LSIL the best discrimination is achieved by finding LSIL (PAIIIb Papanicolaou test (Sn=72.0%, Sp=67.4%, and in discrimination carcinoma planocellulare from LSIL best discrimination is achieved by finding HSIL (PA IIIb/IV Papanicolaou test (Sn=77.8%, Sp=97.7%. Based on our results we can conclude that there is a positive correlation between histological-cytological findings and that the Papanicolaou test more reliable in detecting severe premalignant lesions. Cytological diagnosis of ASCH (PAIIIa and LSIL (PAIIIb can reliably indicate the presence of premalignant cervical lesions in women, and patients with these findings must be more controlled and treated.

  9. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  10. Ranking documents with a thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, R; Bicknell, E

    1989-09-01

    This article reports on exploratory experiments in evaluating and improving a thesaurus through studying its effect on retrieval. A formula called DISTANCE was developed to measure the conceptual distance between queries and documents encoded as sets of thesaurus terms. DISTANCE references MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and assesses the degree of match between a MeSH-encoded query and document. The performance of DISTANCE on MeSH is compared to the performance of people in the assessment of conceptual distance between queries and documents, and is found to simulate with surprising accuracy the human performance. The power of the computer simulation stems both from the tendency of people to rely heavily on broader-than (BT) relations in making decisions about conceptual distance and from the thousands of accurate BT relations in MeSH. One source for discrepancy between the algorithms' measurement of closeness between query and document and people's measurement of closeness between query and document is occasional inconsistency in the BT relations. Our experiments with adding non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT non-BT relations to MeSH showed how these non-BT relations could improve document ranking, if DISTANCE were also appropriately revised to treat these relations differently from BT relations.

  11. Enhancing Invenio Digital Library With An External Relevance Ranking Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Glauner, Patrick Oliver

    Invenio is a comprehensive web-based free digital library software suite originally developed at CERN. In order to improve its information retrieval and word similarity ranking capabilities, the goal of this thesis is to enhance Invenio by bridging it with modern external information retrieval systems. In the first part a comparison of various information retrieval systems such as Solr and Xapian is made. In the second part a system-independent bridge for word similarity ranking is designed and implemented. Subsequently, Solr and Xapian are integrated in Invenio via adapters to the bridge. In the third part scalability tests are performed. Finally, a future outlook is briefly discussed.

  12. Adaptive Game Level Creation through Rank-based Interactive Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Martínez, Héctor Pérez; Togelius, Julian

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces Rank-based Interactive Evolution (RIE) which is an alternative to interactive evolution driven by computational models of user preferences to generate personalized content. In RIE, the computational models are adapted to the preferences of users which, in turn, are used...... as fitness functions for the optimization of the generated content. The preference models are built via ranking-based preference learning, while the content is generated via evolutionary search. The proposed method is evaluated on the creation of strategy game maps, and its performance is tested using...

  13. Website visibility the theory and practice of improving rankings

    CERN Document Server

    Weideman, Melius

    2009-01-01

    The quest to achieve high website rankings in search engine results is a prominent subject for both academics and website owners/coders. Website Visibility marries academic research results to the world of the information practitioner and contains a focused look at the elements which contribute to website visibility, providing support for the application of each element with relevant research. A series of real-world case studies with tested examples of research on website visibility elements and their effect on rankings are reviewed.Written by a well-respected academic and practitioner in the

  14. Structural MRI-based detection of Alzheimer's disease using feature ranking and classification error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Iman; Demirel, Hasan; Farokhian, Farnaz; Yang, Chunlan; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on feature ranking for detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data. The proposed CAD system is composed of four systematic stages. First, global and local differences in the gray matter (GM) of AD patients compared to the GM of healthy controls (HCs) are analyzed using a voxel-based morphometry technique. The aim is to identify significant local differences in the volume of GM as volumes of interests (VOIs). Second, the voxel intensity values of the VOIs are extracted as raw features. Third, the raw features are ranked using a seven-feature ranking method, namely, statistical dependency (SD), mutual information (MI), information gain (IG), Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC), t-test score (TS), Fisher's criterion (FC), and the Gini index (GI). The features with higher scores are more discriminative. To determine the number of top features, the estimated classification error based on training set made up of the AD and HC groups is calculated, with the vector size that minimized this error selected as the top discriminative feature. Fourth, the classification is performed using a support vector machine (SVM). In addition, a data fusion approach among feature ranking methods is introduced to improve the classification performance. The proposed method is evaluated using a data-set from ADNI (130 AD and 130 HC) with 10-fold cross-validation. The classification accuracy of the proposed automatic system for the diagnosis of AD is up to 92.48% using the sMRI data. An automatic CAD system for the classification of AD based on feature-ranking method and classification errors is proposed. In this regard, seven-feature ranking methods (i.e., SD, MI, IG, PCC, TS, FC, and GI) are evaluated. The optimal size of top discriminative features is determined by the classification error estimation in the training phase. The experimental results indicate that

  15. Correlation between stated and measured concentrations of acrylate and methacrylate allergens in patch-test preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Anthony Teik-Jin; Bruze, Magnus; Zimerson, Erik; Sörensen, Osten; Goh, Chee-Leok; Koh, David Soo-Quee; Isaksson, Marléne

    2011-01-01

    Contact allergy to acrylates and methacrylates is not uncommon. The allergy is confirmed by patch-testing patients with commercial patch-test preparations. To investigate acrylate and methacrylate allergens used for patch testing in nine different dermatology departments from Europe, America, Asia, and Australia. The acrylate and methacrylate (methyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol diacrylate) allergen samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography to measure the allergen content. Variation in measured versus stated concentrations was seen in these samples. The ratio of measured to stated concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 1.1. Only 22 (63%) of 35 samples were within the arbitrary acceptable limits of 80 to 120% of the stated concentrations. The results may have implications for individual diagnosis and prevention and when test results from various centers are compared.

  16. Safety of railroad passenger vehicle dynamics : OMNISIM simulation and test correlations for passenger rail cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the work is to validate the safety assessment methodology previously developed for passenger rail vehicle dynamics, which requires the application of simulation tools as well as testing of vehicles under different track scenarios. This...

  17. Communities in Large Networks: Identification and Ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study the problem of identifying and ranking the members of a community in a very large network with link analysis only, given a set of representatives of the community. We define the concept of a community justified by a formal analysis of a simple model of the evolution of a directed graph. ...... and its immediate surroundings. The members are ranked with a “local” variant of the PageRank algorithm. Results are reported from successful experiments on identifying and ranking Danish Computer Science sites and Danish Chess pages using only a few representatives....

  18. Citation graph based ranking in Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Marian, Ludmila; Rajman, Martin; Vesely, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Invenio is the web-based integrated digital library system developed at CERN. Within this framework, we present four types of ranking models based on the citation graph that complement the simple approach based on citation counts: time-dependent citation counts, a relevancy ranking which extends the PageRank model, a time-dependent ranking which combines the freshness of citations with PageRank and a ranking that takes into consideration the external citations. We present our analysis and results obtained on two main data sets: Inspire and CERN Document Server. Our main contributions are: (i) a study of the currently available ranking methods based on the citation graph; (ii) the development of new ranking methods that correct some of the identified limitations of the current methods such as treating all citations of equal importance, not taking time into account or considering the citation graph complete; (iii) a detailed study of the key parameters for these ranking methods. (The original publication is ava...

  19. Correlation between the immunological condition and the results of immunoenzymatic tests in diagnosing infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaro, Giorgio; Donato, Michela; Princi, Tanja; Parco, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    A symptom-based diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis is not sufficiently accurate, since some clinical symptoms of infectious mononucleosis are also detected in other virally induced diseases. Moreover, not all patients suffering from infectious mononucleosis show circulating atypical lymphocytes, which are considered characteristic of this disease. Therefore, when this disorder is suspected, serum analyses are carried out to detect the presence of certain immunoglobulins associated with infectious mononucleosis in the patient's blood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and the specificity of a rapid test detecting heterophil antibodies in diagnosing infectious mononucleosis in a paediatric population. We considered 163 paediatric patients with suspected infectious mononucleosis and we tested their serums to detect heterophil antibodies (using an inexpensive and rapid test) and specific immunoglobulins directed against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (these assays are known to be characterized by high sensitivity and specificity, but are more expensive and time-consuming). By comparing the results of the rapid test with those of the other assays, we found that the sensitivity of the first test was 61.8%, whereas its specificity was sufficiently high (about 90%). We show that, in paediatric patients, the detection of heterophil antibodies is not a very sensitive test, therefore the determination of immunoglobulins against specific antigens of EBV is recommended.

  20. Correlates of HIV testing among South African women with high sexual and substance-use risk behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luseno, Winnie K; Wechsberg, Wendee M

    2009-02-01

    Despite its importance in raising awareness of HIV risk behaviour and in linking HIV-positive individuals to care and treatment, research findings indicate that the HIV antibody testing rate in the general South African population remains relatively low, although knowledge of HIV testing services is high. The identification of important correlates of testing behaviour can be used to improve HIV testing campaigns by refining messages that target individuals at highest risk for infection. This study uses data from an ongoing prevention intervention study in Pretoria, South Africa to identify factors that may have a greater influence on facilitating or hindering HIV testing among South African women who face a high risk for infection. The data for this study (n=425) are derived from the baseline interviews and HIV test results collected between June 2004 and January 2007. HIV testing for this study was significantly associated with education level, alcohol and cannabis use, sex trading, number of STI symptoms, physical abuse and number of visits to a clinic for medical treatment. Results suggest that more focused efforts need to be made to provide HIV testing to women who report substance use behaviour, experience violence and report high-risk sexual behaviour. Interventions also need to address denial of HIV infection and fear to test for HIV.

  1. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth [Department of Behavioural Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Hollis, Sally [Medical Statistics Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Yates, David W. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  2. Static Ranking of Scholarly Papers using Article-Level Eigenfactor (ALEF)

    OpenAIRE

    Wesley-Smith, Ian; Bergstrom, Carl T.; West, Jevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Microsoft Research hosted the 2016 WSDM Cup Challenge based on the Microsoft Academic Graph. The goal was to provide static rankings for the articles that make up the graph, with the rankings to be evaluated against those of human judges. While the Microsoft Academic Graph provided metadata about many aspects of each scholarly document, we focused more narrowly on citation data and used this contest as an opportunity to test the Article Level Eigenfactor (ALEF), a novel citation-based ranking...

  3. Testing the aerobic model for the evolution of endothermy: implications of using present correlations to infer past evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespolo, Roberto F; Roff, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of endothermy is one of the most puzzling events in vertebrate evolution, for which several hypotheses have been proposed. The most accepted model is the aerobic model, which assumes the existence of a genetic correlation between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and maximum aerobic capacity (whose standard measure is maximum metabolic rate, MMR). This model posits that directional selection acted on maximum aerobic capacity and resting metabolic rate increased as a correlated response, in turn increasing body temperature. To test this hypothesis we implemented a simple two-trait quantitative genetic model in which RMR and MMR are initially independent of each other and subject to stabilizing selection to two separate optima. We show mutations that arise that affect both traits can lead to the evolution of a genetic correlation between the traits without any significant shifting of the two trait means. Thus, the presence of a genetic correlation between RMR and MMR in living animals provides no support in and of itself for the past elevation of metabolic rate via selection on aerobic capacity. This result calls into question the testability of the hypothesis that RMR increased as a correlated response to directional selection on MMR, in turn increasing body temperature, using quantitative genetics. Given the difficulty in studying ancient physiological processes, we suggest that approaches such as this model are a valuable alternative for analyzing possible mechanisms of endothermy evolution.

  4. A test of the species-people correlation for stream macro-invertebrates in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautasso, Marco; Fontaneto, Diego

    2008-12-01

    Many recent studies have shown that over large scales there are positive correlations between plant and vertebrate species richness and human population presence. It is unknown whether this pattern applies also to Ephemeroptera (mayflies), Plecoptera (stoneflies), and Trichoptera (caddisflies) (EPT), which are common bio-indicators of the naturalness of streams. Most local studies report higher species richness of these macro-invertebrates where human influences on water quality are lower. Using a newly collated taxonomic data set, we studied whether the species richness of EPT is related to human population size in European countries. Analyses controlled for country area, plant species richness, and mean annual temperature and precipitation. We found a significant increase in the number of EPT species with increasing human population size, plant species richness, and decreasing temperature. Our analysis confirmed the scale dependence of the human population-biodiversity correlation. Although stream macro-invertebrates are traditionally used as indicators of pristine ecosystems over local to regional scales, over broad scales more populated regions have more EPT species than less populated ones. This finding underlines the importance of scale in ecology and implies that there is a challenge also for the broadscale conservation of EPT diversity.

  5. Lack of correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and autologous serum skin test in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başkan, Emel Bülbül; Türker, Tugba; Gülten, Macit; Tunali, Sükran

    2005-12-01

    There are controversial reports about the direct role of Helicobacterpylori infection in chronic idiopathic urticaria. The indirect role of H. pylori infection in the induction of pathogenetic antibodies is not fully elucidated either. This study aims to reveal the association of H. pylori infection with autologous serum skin test positivity in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) patients. A total of 47 patients (35 women, 12 men, age range 17-65 years) diagnosed as CIU were included in the study. Autologous serum skin test was performed on all patients. The patients were examined with a commercially available ELISA test for H. pylori-specific antibodies. Gastroscopy with mucosal biopsy and rapid urease tests were proposed to verify the presence of H. pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 33 of the 47 patients (70%). No significant relation was found between the autologous serum skin test positivity and the serological and histopathological presence of H. pylori infection. The results of our study suggest that chronic H. pylori infection does not appear to have a role in the induction of autoantibodies in CIU.

  6. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and

  7. Correlation between standard Charpy and sub-size Charpy test results of selected steels in upper shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopík, P.; Džugan, J.; Bucki, T.; Rzepa, S.; Rund, M.; Procházka, R.

    2017-02-01

    Absorbed energy obtained from impact Charpy tests is one of the most important values in many applications, for example in residual lifetime assessment of components in service. Minimal absorbed energy is often the value crucial for extending components service life, e.g. turbines, boilers and steam lines. Using a portable electric discharge sampling equipment (EDSE), it is possible to sample experimental material non-destructively and subsequently produce mini-Charpy specimens. This paper presents a new approach in correlation from sub-size to standard Charpy test results.

  8. Testing for the Gaussian nature of cosmological density perturbations through the three-point temperature correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the crucial aspects of density perturbations that are produced by the standard inflation scenario is that they are Gaussian where seeds produced by topological defects tend to be non-Gaussian. The three-point correlation function of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) provides a sensitive test of this aspect of the primordial density field. In this paper, this function is calculated in the general context of various allowed non-Gaussian models. It is shown that the Cosmic Background Explorer and the forthcoming South Pole and balloon CBR anisotropy data may be able to provide a crucial test of the Gaussian nature of the perturbations.

  9. Systematic differences in signal emitting and receiving revealed by PageRank analysis of a human protein interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Donglei; Lee, Connie F; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A) What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B) Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C) Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D) Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell.

  10. Systematic differences in signal emitting and receiving revealed by PageRank analysis of a human protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglei Du

    Full Text Available Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell.

  11. Systematic Differences in Signal Emitting and Receiving Revealed by PageRank Analysis of a Human Protein Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Most protein PageRank studies do not use signal flow direction information in protein interactions because this information was not readily available in large protein databases until recently. Therefore, four questions have yet to be answered: A) What is the general difference between signal emitting and receiving in a protein interactome? B) Which proteins are among the top ranked in directional ranking? C) Are high ranked proteins more evolutionarily conserved than low ranked ones? D) Do proteins with similar ranking tend to have similar subcellular locations? In this study, we address these questions using the forward, reverse, and non-directional PageRank approaches to rank an information-directional network of human proteins and study their evolutionary conservation. The forward ranking gives credit to information receivers, reverse ranking to information emitters, and non-directional ranking mainly to the number of interactions. The protein lists generated by the forward and non-directional rankings are highly correlated, but those by the reverse and non-directional rankings are not. The results suggest that the signal emitting/receiving system is characterized by key-emittings and relatively even receivings in the human protein interactome. Signaling pathway proteins are frequent in top ranked ones. Eight proteins are both informational top emitters and top receivers. Top ranked proteins, except a few species-related novel-function ones, are evolutionarily well conserved. Protein-subunit ranking position reflects subunit function. These results demonstrate the usefulness of different PageRank approaches in characterizing protein networks and provide insights to protein interaction in the cell. PMID:23028653

  12. Finite-Element Vibration Analysis and Modal Testing of Graphite Epoxy Tubes and Correlation Between the Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Pappa, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Structural materials in the form of graphite epoxy composites with embedded rubber layers are being used to reduce vibrations in rocket motor tubes. Four filament-wound, graphite epoxy tubes were studied to evaluate the effects of the rubber layer on the modal parameters (natural vibration frequencies, damping, and mode shapes). Tube 1 contained six alternating layers of 30-degree helical wraps and 90-degree hoop wraps. Tube 2 was identical to tube 1 with the addition of an embedded 0.030-inch-thick rubber layer. Tubes 3 and 4 were identical to tubes 1 and 2, respectively, with the addition of a Textron Kelpoxy elastomer. This report compares experimental modal parameters obtained by impact testing with analytical modal parameters obtained by NASTRAN finite-element analysis. Four test modes of tube 1 and five test modes of tube 3 correlate highly with corresponding analytical predictions. Unsatisfactory correlation of test and analysis results occurred for tubes 2 and 4 and these comparisons are not shown. Work is underway to improve the analytical models of these tubes. Test results clearly show that the embedded rubber layers significantly increase structural modal damping as well as decrease natural vibration frequencies.

  13. Parametric Roll Resonance Detection using Phase Correlation and Log-likelihood Testing Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    started. After having determined statistical properties of the signals at hand, a detector based on the generalised log-likelihood ratio test (GLRT) is designed to look for variation in signal power. The ability of the detector to trigger alarms when parametric roll is going to onset is evaluated on two...

  14. Psychological Correlates of School Bullying Victimization: Academic Self-Concept, Learning Motivation and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims at detecting the association between students' bullying victimization at school and some psychological dimensions, referred to academic self-concept (for both Mathematics and Reading), learning motivation (intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, commitment to study) and test anxiety. A questionnaire including these measures was…

  15. A Correlational Study: Code of Ethics in Testing and EFL Instructors' Professional Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hamid; Kafi, Zahra; Saeedan, Azaam

    2018-01-01

    The present study has aimed at delving the code of ethics in testing in English language institutions to see how far adhering to these ethical codes will result in EFL teachers' professional behavior. Therefore, 300 EFL instructors teaching at English language schools in Khorasan Razavi Province, Zabansara Language School, as well as Khorasan…

  16. Social and Behavioural Correlates of HIV Testing Among Australian Gay and Bisexual Men in Regular Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Evelyn; Murphy, Dean; Mao, Limin; de Wit, John; Prestage, Garrett; Zablotska, Iryna; Holt, Martin

    In this study we sought to identify the social and behavioural characteristics of Australian gay and bisexual men who had and had not tested for HIV during their current relationship. The results were based on 2012 and 2013 data collected from ongoing cross-sectional and community-based surveys held

  17. Lumped Parameter Modeling for Rapid Vibration Response Prototyping and Test Correlation for Electronic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Present preliminary work using lumped parameter models to approximate dynamic response of electronic units to random vibration; Derive a general N-DOF model for application to electronic units; Illustrate parametric influence of model parameters; Implication of coupled dynamics for unit/board design; Demonstrate use of model to infer printed wiring board (PWB) dynamics from external chassis test measurement.

  18. Neural correlates of four broad temperament dimensions: testing predictions for a novel construct of personality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy L Brown

    Full Text Available Four suites of behavioral traits have been associated with four broad neural systems: the 1 dopamine and related norepinephrine system; 2 serotonin; 3 testosterone; 4 and estrogen and oxytocin system. A 56-item questionnaire, the Fisher Temperament Inventory (FTI, was developed to define four temperament dimensions associated with these behavioral traits and neural systems. The questionnaire has been used to suggest romantic partner compatibility. The dimensions were named: Curious/Energetic; Cautious/Social Norm Compliant; Analytical/Tough-minded; and Prosocial/Empathetic. For the present study, the FTI was administered to participants in two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that elicited feelings of love and attachment, near-universal human experiences. Scores for the Curious/Energetic dimension co-varied with activation in a region of the substantia nigra, consistent with the prediction that this dimension reflects activity in the dopamine system. Scores for the Cautious/Social Norm Compliant dimension correlated with activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in regions associated with social norm compliance, a trait linked with the serotonin system. Scores on the Analytical/Tough-minded scale co-varied with activity in regions of the occipital and parietal cortices associated with visual acuity and mathematical thinking, traits linked with testosterone. Also, testosterone contributes to brain architecture in these areas. Scores on the Prosocial/Empathetic scale correlated with activity in regions of the inferior frontal gyrus, anterior insula and fusiform gyrus. These are regions associated with mirror neurons or empathy, a trait linked with the estrogen/oxytocin system, and where estrogen contributes to brain architecture. These findings, replicated across two studies, suggest that the FTI measures influences of four broad neural systems, and that these temperament dimensions and neural systems could constitute

  19. Ranked Conservation Opportunity Areas for Region 7 (ECO_RES.RANKED_OAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The RANKED_OAS are all the Conservation Opportunity Areas identified by MoRAP that have subsequently been ranked by patch size, landform representation, and the...

  20. Buckling Test Results and Preliminary Test and Analysis Correlation from the 8-Foot-Diameter Orthogrid-Stiffened Cylinder Test Article TA02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Thornburgh, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    Results from the testing of cylinder test article SBKF-P2-CYL-TA02 (referred to herein as TA02) are presented. TA02 is an 8-foot-diameter (96-inches), 78.0-inch-long, aluminum-lithium (Al-Li), orthogrid-stiffened cylindrical shell similar to those used in current state-of-the-art launch-vehicle structures and was designed to exhibit global buckling when subjected to combined compression and bending loads. The testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), February 3-6, 2009, in support of the Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Project (SBKF). The test was used to verify the performance of a newly constructed buckling test facility at MSFC and to verify the test article design and analysis approach used by the SBKF researchers.

  1. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-10-17

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  2. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  3. Entity Ranking using Wikipedia as a Pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kaptein; P. Serdyukov; A.P. de Vries (Arjen); J. Kamps

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about

  4. Entity ranking using Wikipedia as a pivot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Serdyukov, P.; de Vries, A.; Kamps, J.; Huang, X.J.; Jones, G.; Koudas, N.; Wu, X.; Collins-Thompson, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the task of Entity Ranking on the Web. Searchers looking for entities are arguably better served by presenting a ranked list of entities directly, rather than a list of web pages with relevant but also potentially redundant information about these entities. Since

  5. Biplots in Reduced-Rank Regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, ter C.J.F.; Looman, C.W.N.

    1994-01-01

    Regression problems with a number of related response variables are typically analyzed by separate multiple regressions. This paper shows how these regressions can be visualized jointly in a biplot based on reduced-rank regression. Reduced-rank regression combines multiple regression and principal

  6. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  7. Using centrality to rank web snippets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; de Rijke, M.; Peters, C.; Jijkoun, V.; Mandl, T.; Müller, H.; Oard, D.W.; Peñas, A.; Petras, V.; Santos, D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe our participation in the WebCLEF 2007 task, targeted at snippet retrieval from web data. Our system ranks snippets based on a simple similarity-based centrality, inspired by the web page ranking algorithms. We experimented with retrieval units (sentences and paragraphs) and with the

  8. Generating and ranking of Dyck words

    CERN Document Server

    Kasa, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    A new algorithm to generate all Dyck words is presented, which is used in ranking and unranking Dyck words. We emphasize the importance of using Dyck words in encoding objects related to Catalan numbers. As a consequence of formulas used in the ranking algorithm we can obtain a recursive formula for the nth Catalan number.

  9. Correlation between urodynamic tests, history and clinical findings in treatment of women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Ramos Borges

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urodynamic test in diagnosis of urinary incontinence, comparing detailed data of history and physical examination, and some easy-to-apply clinical tests. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out by reviewing the medical charts of 55 patients with complaint of loss of urine, seen at the Urogynecology Service of Women’s Health Outpatient Clinic of Hospital Universitário de Jundiaí, between October 2006 and March 2007. The patients answered a specific questionnaire involving the epidemiological and physical examination variables considered in this study. They were submitted to physical examination and urodynamic tests. Results: The complaint of loss of urine upon exertion, either isolated or associated with urge incontinence, was confirmed by urodynamic tests in most women, and only 4 of 49 symptomatic women had negative results. The clinical sign was present in 35 patients (63.6%, and 46 patients (83.6% had the exertion component in the urodynamic test. The exertion component was observed in 10 (18% out of 15 patients without symptoms (30%. The positive and negative predictive values of the clinical sign for diagnosis of any type of urinary incontinence in this studied group were 97.1 and 26.7%, respectively. As for the clinical complaint of urinary loss upon exertion, the positive and negative predictive values for any type of urinary incontinence were 92 and 40%, respectively. For the clinical complaint of urge incontinence, the positive and negative predictive values of 92.5 and 23.1%, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that the urodynamic evaluation is an important instrument to evaluate the severity of incontinence, although it was not necessary to diagnose loss of urine. The finding of urinary loss during physical examination had low sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of the type of loss of urine. Urodynamic tests had better performance in

  10. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, E.; Abdallah, J. M.; Addy, T. N.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahmad, A.; Akesson, T. P. A.; Aleksa, M.; Alexa, C.; Anderson, K.; Andreazza, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Arabidze, G.; Arik, E.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Baker, O. K.; Banfi, D.; Baron, S.; Barr, A. J.; Beccherle, R.; Beck, H. P.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Benchekroun, D.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benslama, K.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Bernabeu, J.; Bertelsen, H.; Binet, S.; Biscarat, C.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Bosman, M.; Bourdarios, C.; Broklova, Z.; Burckhart Chromek, D.; Bychkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Calvet, D.; Canneri, M.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Caprini, M.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Carvalho, J.; Cascella, M.; Castillo, M. V.; Catinaccio, A.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cetin, S. A.; Chen, H.; Cherkaoui, R.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chouridou, S.; Ciobotaru, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, B.; Cobal, M.; Cogneras, E.; Conde Muino, P.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Corso Radu, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Cwetanski, P.; Da Silva, D.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Davidek, T.; De, K.; Defay, P. O.; Dekhissi, B.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dotti, A.; Drake, G.; Drasal, Z.; Dressnandt, N.; Driouchi, C.; Drohan, J.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egorov, K.; Eifert, T. F.; Einsweiler, K.; El Kacimi, M.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Etienvre, A. I.; Fabich, A.; Facius, K.; Fakhr-Edine, A. I.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farthouat, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayard, L.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fenyuk, A.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira, B. C.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Filippini, G.; Flick, T.; Fournier, D.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Fullana, E.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B. J.; Gameiro, S.; Gan, K. K.; Garcia, R.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giokaris, N.; Glonti, G.; Goettfert, T.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez, M. D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Goujdami, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grenier, P.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grishkevich, Y.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gruwe, M.; Guicheney, C.; Gupta, A.; Haeberli, C.; Haertel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hance, M.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Harvey, A., Jr.; Hawkings, R. J.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Henriques Correia, A.; Henss, T.; Hervas, L.; Higon, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hoffman, J.; Hostachy, J. Y.; Hruska, I.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurwitz, M.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jansen, E.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Johansson, P. D. C.; Jon-And, K.; Joos, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Karyukhin, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kayumov, F.; Kazarov, A.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kerschen, N.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khramov, E.; Khristachev, A.; Khubua, J.; Kittelmann, T. H.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Kolos, S.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopikov, S.; Korolkov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Krüger, K.; Kramarenko, V.; Kudin, L. G.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Lacasta, C.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Lanni, F.; Laplace, S.; Lari, T.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lechowski, M.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lehmann, G.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lester, C. G.; Liang, Z.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Louchard, L.; Lourerio, K. F.; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Ma, H.; Mackeprang, R.; Maio, A.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mandelli, L.; Maneira, J.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manousakis, A.; Mapelli, L.; Marques, C.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, F.; Mathes, M.; Mazzanti, M.; McFarlane, K. W.; McPherson, R.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mehlhase, S.; Meirosu, C.; Meng, Z.; Meroni, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mikulec, B.; Milstead, D.; Minashvili, I.; Mindur, B.; Mitsou, V. A.; Moed, S.; Monnier, E.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Morozov, S. V.; Mosidze, M.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. W. J.; Munar, A.; Myagkov, A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nikitine, I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, S.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paolone, V.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passmored, S. M.; Pater, J.; Patrichev, S.; Peez, M.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Pina, J.; Pinto, B.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poppleton, A.; Poveda, J.; Pralavorio, P.; Pribyl, L.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Puigdengoles, C.; Puzo, P.; RØhne, O.; Ragusa, F.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Rembser, C.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Reznicek, P.; Ridel, M.; Risso, P.; Riu, I.; Robinson, D.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Ruiz, A.; Rusakovich, N.; Rust, D.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryjov, V.; Salto, O.; Salvachua, B.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sauvage, G.; Says, L. P.; Schaefer, M.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schlager, G.; Schlereth, J.; Schmitt, C.; Schultes, J.; Schwemling, P.; Schwindling, J.; Seixas, J. M.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Serin, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalanda, N.; Shaw, C.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Silva, J.; Simion, S.; Simonyan, M.; Sloper, J. E.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnova, L.; Solans, C.; Solodkov, A.; Solovianov, O.; Soloviev, I.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Stancu, S.; Stanek, R.; Starchenko, E.; Straessner, A.; Suchkov, S. I.; Suk, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Tas, P.; Tayalati, Y.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teuscher, R.; Thioye, M.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Tremblet, L.; Troncon, C.; Tsiareshka, P.; Tyndel, M.; Karagoez Unel, M.; Unal, G.; Unel, G.; Usai, G.; Van Berg, R.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls, J. A.; Vandelli, W.; Vannucci, F.; Vartapetian, A.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vernocchi, F.; Vetter-Cole, Y.; Vichou, I.; Vinogradov, V.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; de Vivie, J. B.; Volpi, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wang, C.; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Wells, P. S.; Werner, P.; Wheeler, S.; Wiessmann, M.; Wilkens, H.; Williams, H. H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Yasu, Y.; Zaitsev, A.; Zenin, A.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhou, N.

    2011-06-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  11. University ranking methodologies. An interview with Ben Sowter about the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Baccini; Antono Banfi; Giuseppe De Nicolao; Paola Galimberti

    2015-01-01

    University rankings represent a controversial issue in the debate about higher education policy. One of the best known university ranking is the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings (QS), published annually since 2004 by Quacquarelli Symonds ltd, a company founded in 1990 and headquartered in London. QS provides a ranking based on a score calculated by weighting six different indicators. The 2015 edition, published in October 2015, introduced major methodological innovations and, as...

  12. Correlation of smoke development in room tests with cone calorimeter data for wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Ondrej. Grexa

    2000-01-01

    A direct proportionality has been found between the smoke extinction area (SEA) for smoke of room linings and the SEA as measured in the cone calorimeter (ISO5660). The room test scenario (ISO9705) considered was the propane ignition burner at the corner with a 100/300 kW program and the specimen lined on the walls only. The mixing of smoke from propane and lining...

  13. Patch testing with dermatophagoides and its correlation with chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Chetna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic eczema is commonly encountered in the Indian set up. So also is atopic dermatitis. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides are implicated in various diseases like atopic dermatitis, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. It has also been proven that patch testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP is important for detection of contact sensitization in chronic dermatitis. Aims: To study clinical characteristics of DP mix positive patients with regards to chronic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dermatology outpatients presenting to the department of Skin and STD of Kasturba Medical College (KMC, with clinically diagnosed atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema were chosen for the study. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were well demarked. Eighty six randomly selected patients of dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with standard series and DP mix. Results: Of the 86, 50 (58% showed positive reaction to DP mix. Among these positive patients, chronic dermatitis was seen in 42 (84% with involvement of exposed parts in 37 (74%. Atopic dermatitis was seen in 19 patients (38% from DP positive group whereas it was observed in 4 patients (17% from the other group. Conclusion: Dermatophagoides mix positivity was statistically significant in chronic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Patch testing is an important tool to detect delayed type allergy to house dust mite.

  14. Development of draw-bending testing method using digital image correlation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Chiharu; Hakoyama, Tomoyuki; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Fukiharu, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    A novel draw-bending testing method using a non-contact optical 3D deformation measuring system (ARAMIS®, GOM) was developed to investigate the deformation process of draw-bending. Furthermore, the accuracy of the fracture prediction based on a fracture criterion using the concept of forming limit stress was also investigated. The experimental apparatus is capable of applying draw-bending to a sheet specimen with a forming speed of 100 mm/s, which is comparable to those in real press forming operations. Specimens undergo bending-unbending under tension when passing over the die profile radius. The test materials is a 590MPa high-strength steel sheet. In order to evaluate the effect of the stress variation in the width direction of a specimen on the accuracy of the calculated draw-bending fracture stress σDB, the strain components on the upper surface of the specimen were measured using the ARAMIS® software. High-speed CMOS cameras were used to take synchronized images. The development of the strain field on the surface of the specimen was succssesfully measured. The σDB was calculated from the draw-bending force and the strain components at the moment immediately before fracture, and compared with the forming limit stress σPT measured for monotonic plane strain tension. It is concluded that the forming limit stress criterion is effective as a fracture criterion for the draw-bending of the test material.

  15. Universal emergence of PageRank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, K M; Georgeot, B; Shepelyansky, D L, E-mail: frahm@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr, E-mail: georgeot@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr, E-mail: dima@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique du CNRS, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2011-11-18

    The PageRank algorithm enables us to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter {alpha} Element-Of ]0, 1[. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of the PageRank vector at its emergence when {alpha} {yields} 1. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For {alpha} {yields} 1, PageRank converges to a universal power-law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at {alpha} {yields} 1 is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix, which are extremely close to unity, leading to large relaxation times as, for example, in spin glasses. (paper)

  16. Comparing classical and quantum PageRanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, T.; Tang, J. W.; Rodriguez, J.; Small, M.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Following recent developments in quantum PageRanking, we present a comparative analysis of discrete-time and continuous-time quantum-walk-based PageRank algorithms. Relative to classical PageRank and to different extents, the quantum measures better highlight secondary hubs and resolve ranking degeneracy among peripheral nodes for all networks we studied in this paper. For the discrete-time case, we investigated the periodic nature of the walker's probability distribution for a wide range of networks and found that the dominant period does not grow with the size of these networks. Based on this observation, we introduce a new quantum measure using the maximum probabilities of the associated walker during the first couple of periods. This is particularly important, since it leads to a quantum PageRanking scheme that is scalable with respect to network size.

  17. Reliability of journal impact factor rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Darren C

    2007-01-01

    Background Journal impact factors and their ranks are used widely by journals, researchers, and research assessment exercises. Methods Based on citations to journals in research and experimental medicine in 2005, Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty associated with these journal performance indicators. Results Intervals representing plausible ranges of values for journal impact factor ranks indicated that most journals cannot be ranked with great precision. Only the top and bottom few journals could place any confidence in their rank position. Intervals were wider and overlapping for most journals. Conclusion Decisions placed on journal impact factors are potentially misleading where the uncertainty associated with the measure is ignored. This article proposes that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of journal impact factors and their ranks, and specifically that a measure of uncertainty should be routinely presented alongside the point estimate. PMID:18005435

  18. Reliability of journal impact factor rankings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Darren C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Journal impact factors and their ranks are used widely by journals, researchers, and research assessment exercises. Methods Based on citations to journals in research and experimental medicine in 2005, Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty associated with these journal performance indicators. Results Intervals representing plausible ranges of values for journal impact factor ranks indicated that most journals cannot be ranked with great precision. Only the top and bottom few journals could place any confidence in their rank position. Intervals were wider and overlapping for most journals. Conclusion Decisions placed on journal impact factors are potentially misleading where the uncertainty associated with the measure is ignored. This article proposes that caution should be exercised in the interpretation of journal impact factors and their ranks, and specifically that a measure of uncertainty should be routinely presented alongside the point estimate.

  19. Trends and correlates of HIV testing during pregnancy in racially/ethnically diverse insured population, 1997-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jean M; Liu, In-Lu A; Towner, William J

    2009-09-01

    To describe the trends in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing during pregnancy from 1997 through 2006, and the demographic, clinical, and health system correlates of being tested in a diverse insured population. Health plan members who had one or more births at > or = 20 weeks gestation from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2006 in Kaiser Permanente Southern California hospitals were included in this retrospective analysis. Data were obtained from the infants' birth certificate, and administrative and laboratory databases. Multiple log binomial regression analyses were used to generate adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each characteristic. Of the 240,575 women with 302,246 pregnancies, the proportion tested for HIV during pregnancy increased from 77.6% in 1997 to 91.0% in 2006 (P (trend) /=30, having more than a high school education, and residing in census blocks with the highest income tertile. Additionally, women were less likely to be tested after their first birth, if enrolling in prenatal care in the third trimester, or if they had a gap in insurance during their pregnancy. Of the 53,566 women with two sequential pregnancies, 78.5% were tested during both pregnancies. In an insured racially/ethnically patient population, the testing rate exceeded 90% in 2006. Achieving and sustaining these high testing levels has public health implications.

  20. A tilting approach to ranking influence

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-12-01

    We suggest a new approach, which is applicable for general statistics computed from random samples of univariate or vector-valued or functional data, to assessing the influence that individual data have on the value of a statistic, and to ranking the data in terms of that influence. Our method is based on, first, perturbing the value of the statistic by ‘tilting’, or reweighting, each data value, where the total amount of tilt is constrained to be the least possible, subject to achieving a given small perturbation of the statistic, and, then, taking the ranking of the influence of data values to be that which corresponds to ranking the changes in data weights. It is shown, both theoretically and numerically, that this ranking does not depend on the size of the perturbation, provided that the perturbation is sufficiently small. That simple result leads directly to an elegant geometric interpretation of the ranks; they are the ranks of the lengths of projections of the weights onto a ‘line’ determined by the first empirical principal component function in a generalized measure of covariance. To illustrate the generality of the method we introduce and explore it in the case of functional data, where (for example) it leads to generalized boxplots. The method has the advantage of providing an interpretable ranking that depends on the statistic under consideration. For example, the ranking of data, in terms of their influence on the value of a statistic, is different for a measure of location and for a measure of scale. This is as it should be; a ranking of data in terms of their influence should depend on the manner in which the data are used. Additionally, the ranking recognizes, rather than ignores, sign, and in particular can identify left- and right-hand ‘tails’ of the distribution of a random function or vector.

  1. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  2. The neural correlates of problem states: testing FMRI predictions of a computational model of multitasking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer P Borst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been shown that people can only maintain one problem state, or intermediate mental representation, at a time. When more than one problem state is required, for example in multitasking, performance decreases considerably. This effect has been explained in terms of a problem state bottleneck. METHODOLOGY: In the current study we use the complimentary methodologies of computational cognitive modeling and neuroimaging to investigate the neural correlates of this problem state bottleneck. In particular, an existing computational cognitive model was used to generate a priori fMRI predictions for a multitasking experiment in which the problem state bottleneck plays a major role. Hemodynamic responses were predicted for five brain regions, corresponding to five cognitive resources in the model. Most importantly, we predicted the intraparietal sulcus to show a strong effect of the problem state manipulations. CONCLUSIONS: Some of the predictions were confirmed by a subsequent fMRI experiment, while others were not matched by the data. The experiment supported the hypothesis that the problem state bottleneck is a plausible cause of the interference in the experiment and that it could be located in the intraparietal sulcus.

  3. Contextual effects on the perceived health benefits of exercise: the exercise rank hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, John; Wood, Alex M; Vlaev, Ivo; Taylor, Michael J; Brown, Gordon D A

    2012-12-01

    Many accounts of social influences on exercise participation describe how people compare their behaviors to those of others. We develop and test a novel hypothesis, the exercise rank hypothesis, of how this comparison can occur. The exercise rank hypothesis, derived from evolutionary theory and the decision by sampling model of judgment, suggests that individuals' perceptions of the health benefits of exercise are influenced by how individuals believe the amount of exercise ranks in comparison with other people's amounts of exercise. Study 1 demonstrated that individuals' perceptions of the health benefits of their own current exercise amounts were as predicted by the exercise rank hypothesis. Study 2 demonstrated that the perceptions of the health benefits of an amount of exercise can be manipulated by experimentally changing the ranked position of the amount within a comparison context. The discussion focuses on how social norm-based interventions could benefit from using rank information.

  4. A failure to reject: Testing the correlation between large igneous provinces and deep mantle structures with EDF statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-03-01

    Absolute reconstructions of large igneous provinces (LIPs) for the past 300 Ma reveal a remarkable spatial pattern suggesting that almost all LIPs have erupted over the margins of the two large-scale structures in the Earth's lower mantle commonly referred to as the Large Low Shear-wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs). This correlation suggests that mantle plumes that have triggered LIP eruptions rose from the margins of LLSVPs, implying long-term stability of these structures and suggesting that they may be chemically distinct from the bulk of the mantle. Yet, some researchers consider the LLSVPs to be purely thermal upwellings, arguing that the observed distribution of LIPs can be explained by plumes randomly forming over the entire areas of LLSVPs. Here we examine the correlation between the LIPs and LLSVPs using nonparametric statistical tests, updated plate reconstructions, and a large number of alternative definitions of LLSVPs based on seismic tomography. We show that probability models assuming plume sources originating at the margins of LLSVPs adequately explain the observed distribution of reconstructed LIPs. In contrast, we find strong evidence against the models seeking to link LIPs with plumes randomly forming over the entire LLSVP areas. However, the hypothesis proposing that the correlation can be explained by plumes randomly forming over a larger area of slower-than-average shear wave velocities in the lowermost mantle cannot be ruled out formally. Our analysis suggests that there is no statistically sound reason for questioning the hypothesis that the LIPs correlate with the margins of LLSVP globally.

  5. Comparative tests of the species-genetic diversity correlation at neutral and nonneutral loci in four species of stream insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kozo; Monaghan, Michael T

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental question linking population genetics and community ecology is how adaptive processes (e.g., natural selection) and neutral processes (e.g., drift-migration equilibrium) underpin the species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC). Here, we combine genome scans and outlier loci detection with community analysis to separately test for neutral and nonneutral SGDCs in four species of stream insect. We sampled 60 localities in Japan and examined the relationships among population AFLP band richness (Br), taxon richness of the total community (S) and of the trophic guild (Str ), and 15 habitat parameters that could potentially drive adaptation and influence richness. Neutral Br was positively correlated with S only in the dominant species of these communities, suggesting Br may be constrained when intraspecific competition is pronounced. Nonneutral Br was correlated with Str in a species restricted to high elevations where habitat heterogeneity was highest. Community distance and genetic distance (β-SGDC) was correlated in two of the four species at both neutral and nonneutral loci. Distance-based redundancy analysis found geographic isolation and elevation to drive divergence of both communities and populations. This suggests that both neutral and adaptive divergence occurred through the shared influences of geographic isolation and local adaptation at the two levels of diversity. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. [Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A detection using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its correlation with coagulase and thermonuclease tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, María José; Arias, María Laura; del Mar Gamboa, María

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium, widely distributed on nature and associated to general infection and food borne outbreaks. The relationship between this bacterium and food borne outbreaks has been done, historically, using several tests, including coagulase, thermonuclease and actually, PCR for the genes codifying for the enterotoxin responsible of clinical symptoms. The objective of this work is to detect enterotoxin A codifying gene through PCR in a group of S. aureus strains isolated from food samples, and also to correlate the presence of this gene with the production of coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes. A total of 69 staphylococcal strains were analyzed, 58 obtained from non pasteurized milk samples from the Estación Experimental Alfredo Volio Mata and 11 from the Food and Water Microbiology Laboratory collection, Universidad de Costa Rica. Coagulase, thermonuclease and enterotoxin A were analyzed in all the strains, and a statistical correlation was performed in order to verify possible associations. Results show that there is no correlation between the three variables, nevertheless, all coagulase positive strains were thermonuclease positive, and all enterotoxin positive strains were coagulase and thermonuclease positive, but not inversely. These results show that the use of presumptive or indirect tests for establishing entorotoxigenity of S. aureus strains is not truthful, more sensible and specific analysis, as PCR, shall be performed.

  7. Expiratory CT in cigarette smokers: correlation between areas of decreased lung attenuation, pulmonary function tests and smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verschakelen, J.A.; Scheinbaum, K.; Bogaert, J.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Demedts, M.; Lacquet, L.L. [Department of Pneumology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between cigarette-smoke-related bronchial disease and air trapping as assessed by expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans. Thirty healthy subjects (11 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers for > 2 years, 12 current smokers; age range 35-55 years) with a smoking history between 0 and 28.5 pack-years underwent pulmonary function tests (PFT) and HRCT in inspiration and expiration in supine and prone position. The extent of air trapping was scored in ventral and dorsal aspects of the upper, middle and lower lung portions. In 24 subjects (7 non-smokers, 7 ex-smokers, 10 current smokers) areas of focal air trapping were found, and were present significantly more often in dependent lung portions (p < 0.05) compared with non-dependent portions. No significant differences were found between apical and basal lung zones. Scores of focal air trapping were not significantly different between smokers and ex-smokers, but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in non-smokers and showed a significant (p < 0.0005) correlation with pack-years. The degree of air trapping was also associated with several lung function tests, especially RV, DLCO, FRC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC. Air trapping is seen in smokers with normal PFT and correlates with the severity of the smoking history, independently of current smoking status. (orig.) (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 59 refs.

  8. Can human resources induce sustainability in business?: Modeling, testing and correlating HR index and company's business results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubović Jovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper the authors analyze the impact of the composite human resource index on sustainable growth in a specific business sector in a transition country. Sustainability of country's economy is growingly relying on the knowledge economy which has been implemented in strategies of sustainable development throughout Europe. The knowledge economy is mostly based on human resources and the way they are organized and managed in the companies actively operating in competitive markets. In order to confirm importance of the human resources (HR index, results were tested by means of modeling, measuring and correlating the HR index with business results at micro level. The tests were conducted on the data from the survey in Serbian meat processing industry. The results were then compared with the results from the survey conducted in a financial industry. Moreover, a model was made that could be applicable in all countries that do not have available official statistic data on the level of investments in human resources. The focus was on determining the correlation direction, and hence creating a research model applicable in all business sectors. It has been found that a significant one-way correlation exists between business performance and increased HR index. In that way it has been confirmed that in Serbian economy that has recorded global decrease during transition, certain business sectors, and especially companies with high levels of investments in improving its HR index record above average and sustainable growth.

  9. Energy system contribution in a maximal incremental test: correlations with pacing and overall performance in a 10-km running trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Damasceno

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the association between the contribution of energy systems during an incremental exercise test (IET, pacing, and performance during a 10-km running time trial. Thirteen male recreational runners completed an incremental exercise test on a treadmill to determine the respiratory compensation point (RCP, maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max, peak treadmill speed (PTS, and energy systems contribution; and a 10-km running time trial (T10-km to determine endurance performance. The fractions of the aerobic (WAER and glycolytic (WGLYCOL contributions were calculated for each stage based on the oxygen uptake and the oxygen energy equivalents derived by blood lactate accumulation, respectively. Total metabolic demand (WTOTAL was the sum of these two energy systems. Endurance performance during the T10-km was moderately correlated with RCP, V˙O2maxand PTS (P<@0.05, and moderate-to-highly correlated with WAER, WGLYCOL, and WTOTAL (P<0.05. In addition, WAER, WGLYCOL, and WTOTAL were also significantly correlated with running speed in the middle (P<0.01 and final (P<0.01 sections of the T10-km. These findings suggest that the assessment of energy contribution during IET is potentially useful as an alternative variable in the evaluation of endurance runners, especially because of its relationship with specific parts of a long-distance race.

  10. Low-Rank Affinity Based Local-Driven Multilabel Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel low-rank affinity based local-driven algorithm to robustly propagate the multilabels from training images to test images. A graph is constructed over the segmented local image regions. The labels for vertices from the training data are derived based on the context among different training images, and the derived vertex labels are propagated to the unlabeled vertices via the graph. The multitask low-rank affinity, which jointly seeks the sparsity-consistent low-rank affinities from multiple feature matrices, is applied to compute the edge weights between graph vertices. The inference process of multitask low-rank affinity is formulated as a constrained nuclear norm and ℓ2,1-norm minimization problem. The optimization is conducted efficiently with the augmented Lagrange multiplier method. Based on the learned local patch labels we can predict the multilabels for the test images. Experiments on multilabel image annotation demonstrate the encouraging results from the proposed framework.

  11. Damage law identification of a quasi brittle ceramic from a b ending test using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meille S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quasi brittle ceramics show a non linear mechanical behaviour resulting most of the time in a dissymetry between their tensile and compressive stress-strain laws. The characterization of their fracture strengths might be biased if elastic linear formulae are used to analyze classical tests like bending tests. Based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC, a methodology is proposed to characterize materials with dissymmetric behaviours. Applying specific DIC decomposition functions for bending, compressive and tensile tests, a stress-strain model and its damage law are identified for aluminium titanate, a damageable micro cracked ceramic. This identification method using DIC can obviously be applied to other quasi brittle materials.

  12. Trajectory measurements and correlations in the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Renier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 commissioning group aims to demonstrate the feasibility of the beam delivery system of the next linear colliders (ILC and CLIC as well as to define and to test the tuning methods. As the design vertical beam sizes of the linear colliders are about few nanometers, the stability of the trajectory as well as the control of the aberrations are very critical. ATF2 commissioning started in December 2008, and thanks to submicron resolution beam position monitors (BPMs, it has been possible to measure the beam position fluctuation along the final focus of ATF2 during the 2009 runs. The optics was not the nominal one yet, with a lower focusing to make the tuning easier. In this paper, a method to measure the noise of each BPM every pulse, in a model-independent way, will be presented. A method to reconstruct the trajectory’s fluctuations is developed which uses the previously determined BPM resolution. As this reconstruction provides a measurement of the beam energy fluctuations, it was also possible to measure the horizontal and vertical dispersion function at each BPMs parasitically. The spatial and angular dispersions can be fitted from these measurements with uncertainties comparable with usual measurements.

  13. Predictive value of a positive exercise stress testing and correlations with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitu, O; Roca, M; Leon, Maria Magdalena; Mitu, F

    2014-01-01

    Electrocardiogram exercise stress test (EST) is a widespread technique in assessment of coronary artery disease, stratifying cardiovascular risk and prognosis. Evaluation of the impact of cardiovascular risk factors upon the results of EST. The 2-year retrospective study included 294 patients referred to an EST. All patients were assessed according to: presence of typical angina chest pain at admission, medical history of angina or myocardial infarction, resting electrocardiogram, global ejection fraction at echocardiographic exam and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We compared the results between two groups: positive and negative EST. The patients were age- and sex-matched. 160 patients (54.42%) had a positive EST. Positive EST was associated with typical angina chest pain at admission (88.12% vs. 76.11%, p = 0.008), coronary artery disease history (61.87% vs. 41.04%, p = 0.0003), resting ECG abnormalities (49.37% vs. 36.56%, p = 0.026), arterial hypertension (85.62% vs. 74.62%, p = 0.019). Ejection fraction was higher in the negative EST group (63.34 +/- 8.57% vs. 61.18 +/- 11.34%, p = 0.035). Type 2 diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, dyslipidemia and inflammatory syndrome did not significantly influence the results of the EST. Typical angina, medical history of coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension, and reduced ejection fraction are strong predictors for a positive exercise stress test.

  14. Olfactory impairment is correlated with confabulation in alcoholism: towards a multimodal testing of orbitofrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Maurage

    Full Text Available Olfactory abilities are now a flourishing field in psychiatry research. As the orbitofrontal cortex appears to be simultaneously implicated in odour processing and executive impairments, it has been proposed that olfaction could constitute a cognitive marker of psychiatric states. While this assumption appears promising, very few studies have been conducted on this topic among psychopathological populations. The present study thus aimed at exploring the links between olfaction and executive functions. These links were evaluated using two tasks of comparable difficulty, one known to rely on orbitofrontal cortex processing (i.e., a confabulation task, and one not associated with this area (i.e., Stop-Signal task.Twenty recently detoxified alcoholic individuals and twenty paired controls took part in an experiment evaluating olfactory abilities and executive functioning (i.e., Stop-Signal task and confabulation task. Comorbidities and potential biasing variables were also controlled for. Alcoholic individuals exhibited impaired performance for high-level olfactory processing and significant confabulation problems as compared to controls (but no deficit in Stop-Signal task, even when the influence of comorbidities was taken into account. Most importantly, olfactory abilities and confabulation rates were significantly correlated in both groups.Alcoholism jointly leads to olfactory and memory source impairments, and these two categories of deficits are associated. These results strongly support the proposition that olfactory and confabulation measures both index orbitofrontal functioning, and suggest that olfaction could become a reliable cognitive marker in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it underlines the need to take into account these olfactory and source memory impairments in a clinical context.

  15. Evaluation of the VDA 238-100 Tight Radius Bending Test using Digital Image Correlation Strain Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, K.; Omer, K.; Butcher, C.; George, R.; Dykeman, J.

    2017-09-01

    The VDA238-100 standard for tight radius bending (v-bending) of sheet materials has received widespread acceptance with automotive suppliers and material producers to characterize local formability. However, the test fixture and tooling in the v-bend test standard is not amenable to direct strain measurement and the operator cannot terminate the test at the onset of crack initiation as the outer bend surface is not visible. Consequently, fracture is identified using a load threshold and the bend angle estimated from an analytical formula based upon the punch displacement and tooling geometry. Bend angles are not directly transferable and must be interpreted relative to the sheet thickness and bend radius unlike a strain measurement. By obtaining an in-situ strain measurement on the surface using digital image correlation (DIC), the plane strain fracture limit can be accurately identified at the onset of cracking and remove ambiguity in translating the bend angles to practical forming operations and simulations. A novel inverted VDA test frame was developed to incorporate DIC strain measurement during the bend test and a variety of advanced high strength sheet materials were evaluated. It was observed that the VDA bend test creates a homogeneous strain state of plane strain across the width of the sample along with a proportional strain path to fracture without necking that is ideal for fracture characterization. A correlation is developed to relate the bend angle with the major strain for the materials considered and accounts for the sheet thickness and bend radius. A comparison of the bend angle obtained using the formula in the VDA standard based on the punch displacement was in very good agreement with manual measurements and an algorithm to measure the bend angle using DIC analysis was developed.

  16. Bootstrap Sequential Determination of the Co-integration Rank in VAR Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Giuseppe; Rahbek, Anders; Taylor, A. M. Robert

    Determining the co-integrating rank of a system of variables has become a fundamental aspect of applied research in macroeconomics and finance. It is wellknown that standard asymptotic likelihood ratio tests for co-integration rank of Johansen (1996) can be unreliable in small samples...... with empirical rejection frequencies often very much in excess of the nominal level. As a consequence, bootstrap versions of these tests have been developed. To be useful, however, sequential procedures for determining the co-integrating rank based on these bootstrap tests need to be consistent, in the sense...... that the probability of selecting a rank smaller than (equal to) the true co-integrating rank will converge to zero (one minus the marginal significance level), as the sample size diverges, for general I(1) processes. No such likelihood-based procedure is currently known to be available. In this paper we fill this gap...

  17. Bootstrap Sequential Determination of the Co-integration Rank in VAR Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guiseppe, Cavaliere; Rahbæk, Anders; Taylor, A.M. Robert

    Determining the co-integrating rank of a system of variables has become a fundamental aspect of applied research in macroeconomics and finance. It is wellknown that standard asymptotic likelihood ratio tests for co-integration rank of Johansen (1996) can be unreliable in small samples...... that the probability of selecting a rank smaller than (equal to) the true co-integrating rank will converge to zero (one minus the marginal significance level), as the sample size diverges, for general I(1) processes. No such likelihood-based procedure is currently known to be available. In this paper we fill this gap...... with empirical rejection frequencies often very much in excess of the nominal level. As a consequence, bootstrap versions of these tests have been developed. To be useful, however, sequential procedures for determining the co-integrating rank based on these bootstrap tests need to be consistent, in the sense...

  18. A practical ranking system to compare toxicity of anti-fouling paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Breitholtz, Magnus; Eklund, Britta

    2006-12-01

    The toxicity of a number of new anti-fouling paints, claimed to function by physical means and not by leakage of toxic substances, have been tested on two common organisms in the Baltic Sea, i.e., the red macro alga Ceramium tenuicorne and the copepod Nitocra spinipes. In order to compare the toxicity between the paints a ranking system was developed based on the EC(50)- and LC(50)-values. The results showed a wide span in toxicity with the most toxic paints ranked 160 times more toxic than the ones ranked least toxic. Also, TBT, irgarol and diuron, which have been used as active ingredients in traditional anti-fouling paints, were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the two test organisms. The results showed that the test organisms were equally sensitive to the substances as similar organisms in earlier studies. In conclusion, the ranking system presented in this study permits ranking and comparison of total toxicity of complex mixtures.

  19. The effect of uncertainties in distance-based ranking methods for multi-criteria decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaini, Nor I.; Utyuzhnikov, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Data in the multi-criteria decision making are often imprecise and changeable. Therefore, it is important to carry out sensitivity analysis test for the multi-criteria decision making problem. The paper aims to present a sensitivity analysis for some ranking techniques based on the distance measures in multi-criteria decision making. Two types of uncertainties are considered for the sensitivity analysis test. The first uncertainty is related to the input data, while the second uncertainty is towards the Decision Maker preferences (weights). The ranking techniques considered in this study are TOPSIS, the relative distance and trade-off ranking methods. TOPSIS and the relative distance method measure a distance from an alternative to the ideal and antiideal solutions. In turn, the trade-off ranking calculates a distance of an alternative to the extreme solutions and other alternatives. Several test cases are considered to study the performance of each ranking technique in both types of uncertainties.

  20. A method for generating permutation distribution of ranks in a k ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sample experiment is presented. This provides a methodology for constructing exact test of significance of a rank statistic. The proposed method is linked to the partition of integers and in a combinatorial sense the distribution of the ranks is ...

  1. Ranking Accounting Authors and Departments in Accounting Education: Different Methodologies--Significantly Different Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Richard A.; Zamojcin, Kimberly A.; Delande, Taylor L.

    2016-01-01

    This research tests whether Holderness Jr., D. K., Myers, N., Summers, S. L., & Wood, D. A. [(2014). "Accounting education research: Ranking institutions and individual scholars." "Issues in Accounting Education," 29(1), 87-115] accounting-education rankings are sensitive to a change in the set of journals used. It provides…

  2. Correlative methods for dual-species quantum tests of the weak equivalence principle

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B; Chichet, L; Battelier, B; Gominet, P -A; Bertoldi, A; Bouyer, P; Landragin, A

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interferometers utilizing non-identical elements intrinsically have different sensitivities, and the analysis tools available until now are insufficient for accurately estimating the atomic phase difference under many experimental conditions. In this work, we describe and demonstrate two new methods for extracting the differential phase between dual-species atom interferometers for precise tests of the weak equivalence principle. The first method is a generalized Bayesian analysis, which uses knowledge of the system noise to estimate the differential phase based on a statistical model. The second method utilizes a mechanical accelerometer to reconstruct single-sensor interference fringes based on measurements of the vibration-induced phase. An improved ellipse-fitting algorithm is also implemented as a third method for comparison. These analysis tools are investigated using both numerical simulations and experimental data from simultaneous $^{87}$Rb and $^{39}$K interferometers, and both new techn...

  3. A Layer Correlation Technique for Pion Energy Calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, Karl-Johan

    2009-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed. It is based on a principal component analysis of the calorimeter layer energy deposits, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the ATLAS calorimeters were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20 and 180 GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by about 20% compared to the electromagnetic scale.

  4. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance in a state-wide test of math achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Eric D; Cutting, Laurie E; Price, Gavin R

    2017-03-03

    The development of math skills is a critical component of early education and a strong indicator of later school and economic success. Recent research utilizing population-normed, standardized measures of math achievement suggest that structural and functional integrity of parietal regions, especially the intraparietal sulcus, are closely related to the development of math skills. However, it is unknown how these findings relate to in-school math learning. The present study is the first to address this issue by investigating the relationship between regional differences in grey matter (GM) volume and performance in grade-level mathematics as measured by a state-wide, school-based test of math achievement (TCAP math) in children from 3rd to 8th grade. Results show that increased GM volume in the bilateral hippocampal formation and the right inferior frontal gyrus, regions associated with learning and memory, is associated with higher TCAP math scores. Secondary analyses revealed that GM volume in the left angular gyrus had a stronger relationship to TCAP math in grades 3-4 than in grades 5-8 while the relationship between GM volume in the left inferior frontal gyrus and TCAP math was stronger for grades 5-8. These results suggest that the neuroanatomical architecture related to in-school math achievement differs from that related to math achievement measured by standardized tests, and that the most related neural structures differ as a function of grade level. We suggest, therefore, that the use of school-relevant outcome measures is critical if neuroscience is to bridge the gap to education. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Correlation between Positive Rate and Number of Biopsy Samples on Urease Test in Childhood Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    To identify the correlation between the number of gastric biopsy samples and the positive rate, we compared the results of urease test using one and three biopsy samples from each 255 children who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. The children were divided into three age groups: 0-4, 5-9, and 10-15 yr. The gastric endoscopic biopsies were subjected to the urease test. That is, one and three gastric antral biopsy samples were collected from the same child. The results of urease test were classified into three grades: Grade 0 (no change), 1 (6-24 hr), 2 (1-6 hr), and 3 (<1 hr). The positive rate of urease test was increased by the age with no respect to the number of gastric biopsy samples (one biopsy P = 0.001, three biopsy P < 0.001). The positive rate of the urease test was higher on three biopsy samples as compared with one biopsy sample (P < 0.001). The difference between one and three biopsy samples was higher in the children aged 0-9 yr. Our results indicate that the urease test might be a more accurate diagnostic modality when it is performed on three or more biopsy samples in children. PMID:24431913

  6. University ranking methodologies. An interview with Ben Sowter about the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Baccini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available University rankings represent a controversial issue in the debate about higher education policy. One of the best known university ranking is the Quacquarelli Symonds World University Rankings (QS, published annually since 2004 by Quacquarelli Symonds ltd, a company founded in 1990 and headquartered in London. QS provides a ranking based on a score calculated by weighting six different indicators. The 2015 edition, published in October 2015, introduced major methodological innovations and, as a consequence, many universities worldwide underwent major changes of their scores and ranks. Ben Sowter, head of division of intelligence unit of Quacquarelli Symonds, responds to 15 questions about the new QS methodology.

  7. On a common generalization of Shelah's 2-rank, dp-rank, and o-minimal dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Guingona, Vincent; Hill, Cameron Donnay

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we build a dimension theory related to Shelah's 2-rank, dp-rank, and o-minimal dimension. We call this dimension op-dimension. We exhibit the notion of the n-multi-order property, generalizing the order property, and use this to create op-rank, which generalizes 2-rank. From this we build op-dimension. We show that op-dimension bounds dp-rank, that op-dimension is sub-additive, and op-dimension generalizes o-minimal dimension in o-minimal theories.

  8. Academic rankings: an approach to rank portuguese universities Rankings académicos: un abordaje para clasificar las universidades portuguesas Rankings acadêmicos: uma abordagem ao ranking das universidades portuguesas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Bernardino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The academic rankings are a controversial subject in higher education. However, despite all the criticism, academic rankings are here to stay and more and more different stakeholders use rankings to obtain information about the institutions' performance. The two most well-known rankings, The Times and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings have different methodologies. The Times ranking is based on peer review, whereas the Shanghai ranking has only quantitative indicators and is mainly based on research outputs. In Germany, the CHE ranking uses a different methodology from the traditional rankings, allowing the users to choose criteria and weights. The Portuguese higher education institutions are performing below their European peers, and the Government believes that an academic ranking could improve both performance and competitiveness between institutions. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the advantages and problems of academic rankings and provide guidance to a new Portuguese ranking.Los rankings académicos son un tema muy contradictorio en la enseñanza superior. Todavía, además de todas las críticas los rankings están para quedarse entre nosotros. Y cada vez más, diferentes stakeholders utilizan los rankings para obtener información sobre el desempeño de las instituciones. Dos de los rankings más conocidos, el The Times y el ranking de la universidad de Shangai Jiao Tong tienen métodos distintos. El The Times se basa en la opinión de expertos mientras el ranking de la universidad de Shangai presenta solamente indicadores cuantitativos y mayoritariamente basados en los resultados de actividades de investigación. En Alemania el ranking CHE usa un método distinto permitiendo al utilizador elegir los criterios y su importancia. Las instituciones de enseñanza superior portuguesas tienen un desempeño abajo de las europeas y el gobierno cree que un ranking académico podría contribuir para mejorar su desempeño y

  9. Testing the correlated response hypothesis for the evolution and maintenance of male mating preferences in Drosophila serrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, T P; Rundle, H D; Chenoweth, S F

    2014-10-01

    Mate preferences are abundant throughout the animal kingdom with female preferences receiving the most empirical and theoretical attention. Although recent work has acknowledged the existence of male mate preferences, whether they have evolved and are maintained as a direct result of selection on males or indirectly as a genetically correlated response to selection for female choice remains an open question. Using the native Australian species Drosophila serrata in which mutual mate choice occurs for a suite of contact pheromones (cuticular hydrocarbons or CHCs), we empirically test key predictions of the correlated response hypothesis. First, within the context of a quantitative genetic breeding design, we estimated the degree to which the trait values favoured by male and female choice are similar both phenotypically and genetically. The direction of sexual selection on male and female CHCs differed statistically, and the trait combinations that maximized male and female mating success were not genetically correlated, suggesting that male and female preferences target genetically different signals. Second, despite detecting significant genetic variance in female preferences, we found no evidence for genetic variance in male preferences and, as a consequence, no detectable correlation between male and female mating preferences. Combined, these findings are inconsistent with the idea that male mate choice in D. serrata is simply a correlated response to female choice. Our results suggest that male and female preferences are genetically distinct traits in this species and may therefore have arisen via different evolutionary processes. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. High-resolution CT findings of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex pulmonary disease: correlation with pulmonary function test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong Woon; Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ji Young; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kwon, O Jung

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to analyze the high-resolution CT findings of the nodular bronchiectatic form of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) pulmonary disease and to correlate the extent of high-resolution CT findings with pulmonary function test (PFT) results. From January 2005 through December 2005, we identified 47 patients (mean age, 58 +/- 13 years; age range, 24-72 years; male-female ratio, 11:36) with the nodular bronchiectatic form of MAC pulmonary disease who underwent both high-resolution CT and PFTs. High-resolution CT findings were reviewed retrospectively in terms of the presence and extent of bronchiectasis, cellular or inflammatory bronchiolitis (centrilobular small nodules and tree-in-bud signs), cavity, nodule, and other findings. The extent of the abnormalities seen on high-resolution CT was scored by modifying the cystic fibrosis scoring system proposed by Helbich and coworkers. The scores were correlated with PFT results using Spearman's correlation coefficient. On high-resolution CT, the three most frequently observed patterns of parenchymal abnormalities were, in decreasing order of frequency, cellular bronchiolitis (n = 47, 100%), bronchiectasis (n = 46, 98%), and consolidation (n = 27, 57%). The total CT score showed a significant correlation with the residual volume-total lung capacity (RV/TLC) ratio (r = 0.572, p forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) value (r = -0.426, p = 0.003), forced vital capacity (FVC) value (r = -0.360, p = 0.013), peak expiratory flow value (r = -0.352, p = 0.015), and peak expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75%)) (r = -0.289, p = 0.049). CT scoring of pulmonary abnormalities correlates with measures of functional impairment in patients with MAC pulmonary disease.

  11. Analysis/test correlation using VAWT-SDS on a step-relaxation test for the rotating Sandia 34 m test bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argueello, J.G.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.; Veers, P.S.

    1993-11-01

    The combined analysis/test effort described in this paper compares predictions with measured data from a step-relaxation test in the absence of significant wind-driven aerodynamic loading. The process described here is intended to illustrate a method for validation of time domain codes for structural analysis of wind turbine structures. Preliminary analyses were performed to investigate the transient dynamic response that the rotating Sandia 34 m Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) would undergo when one of the two blades was excited by step-relaxation. The calculations served two purposes. The first was for pretest planning to evaluate the relative importance of the various forces that would be acting on the structure during the test and to determine if the applied force in the step-relaxation would be sufficient to produce an excitation that was distinguishable from that produced by the aerodynamic loads. The second was to provide predictions that could subsequently be compared to the data from the test. The test was carried out specifically to help in the validation of the time-domain structural dynamics code, VAWT-SDS, which predicts the dynamic response of VAWTs subject to transient events. Post-test comparisons with the data were performed and showed a qualitative agreement between pretest predictions and measured response. However, they also showed that there was significantly more damping in the measurements than included in the predictions. Efforts to resolve this difference, including post-test analyses, were undertaken and are reported herein. The overall effort described in this paper represents a major step in the process of arriving at a validated structural dynamics code.

  12. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Neural correlates of derived relational responding on tests of stimulus equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cataldo Michael F

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An essential component of cognition and language involves the formation of new conditional relations between stimuli based upon prior experiences. Results of investigations on transitive inference (TI highlight a prominent role for the medial temporal lobe in maintaining associative relations among sequentially arranged stimuli (A > B > C > D > E. In this investigation, medial temporal lobe activity was assessed while subjects completed "Stimulus Equivalence" (SE tests that required deriving conditional relations among stimuli within a class (A ≡ B ≡ C. Methods Stimuli consisted of six consonant-vowel-consonant triads divided into two classes (A1, B1, C1; A2, B2, C2. A simultaneous matching-to-sample task and differential reinforcement were employed during pretraining to establish the conditional relations A1:B1 and B1:C1 in class 1 and A2:B2 and B2:C2 in class 2. During functional neuroimaging, recombined stimulus pairs were presented and subjects judged (yes/no whether stimuli were related. SE tests involved presenting three different types of within-class pairs: Symmetrical (B1 A1; C1 B1; B2 A2; C2 B2, and Transitive (A1 C1; A2 C2 and Equivalence (C1 A1; C2 A2 relations separated by a nodal stimulus. Cross-class 'Foils' consisting of unrelated stimuli (e.g., A1 C2 were also presented. Results Relative to cross-class Foils, Transitive and Equivalence relations requiring inferential judgments elicited bilateral activation in the anterior hippocampus while Symmetrical relations elicited activation in the parahippocampus. Relative to each derived relation, Foils generally elicited bilateral activation in the parahippocampus, as well as in frontal and parietal lobe regions. Conclusion Activation observed in the hippocampus to nodal-dependent derived conditional relations (Transitive and Equivalence relations highlights its involvement in maintaining relational structure and flexible memory expression among stimuli within a

  14. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  15. High-resolution CT in patients with chronic airflow obstruction: correlation with clinical diagnosis and pulmonary function test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ki Taek; Kang, Eun Young; Rhee, Ji Yong; Kim, Jin Hyung; Choi, Jung Ah; Cho, Jae Yoen; Oh, Yu Whan; Suh, Won Hyuck [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To determine the utility of HRCT in the diagnosis of chronic airflow obstruction and to correlate the morphologic abnormalities revealed by this modality with functional impairment in patients with chronic airflow obstruction. This study involved 80 patients with chronic airflow obstruction who underwent HRCT and a pulmonary function test. Final clinical diagnosis in these patients was determined by a chest physician on the basis of clinical features, bronchoscopy, pulmonary function test, and HRCT. In order to diagnose and determine the extent of areas of decreased attenuation revealed by HRCT (the CT score), the findings of HRCT were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Clinical and HRCT diagnoses were then compared, and the rate of agreement between them was calculated. The relationship between the extent of areas of decreased attenuation revealed by HRCT and by FEV1/FVC was evaluated using Correl's account and Student's unpaired t-test. The agreement rate between clinical and HRCT diagnoses was 77.5% (62/80). The rates for bronchiectasis (88.9%, 24/27), emphysema (93.9%, 31/33), and bronchiolitis obliterans (100%, 6/6) were considerably higher than those for chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. The correlation rate between CT score and FEV1/FVC was significant in bronchiectasis (p less than 0.05; r: -0.76) and bronchiolitis obliterans (p less than 0.01; r: -0.66), but not in cases involving emphysema, bronchial asthma, or chronic bronchitis (p greater than 0.05). HRCT is valuable in the diagnosis and prediction of physiologic impairment in patients with bronchiectasis and bronchiolitis obliterans, but has limited value in those with emphysema, chronic bronchitis or asthma. (author)

  16. The 5-HT4 receptor levels in hippocampus correlates inversely with memory test performance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Mette Ewers; Fisher, Patrick; Holst, Klaus; Madsen, Karine; Jensen, Christian Gaden; Marner, Lisbeth; Lehel, Szabols; Baaré, William; Knudsen, Gitte; Hasselbalch, Steen

    2013-11-01

    The cerebral serotonin (5-HT) system is involved in cognitive functions such as memory and learning and animal studies have repeatedly shown that stimulation of the 5-HT type 4 receptor (5-HT4 R) facilitates memory and learning and further that the 5-HT4 R modulates cellular memory processes in hippocampus. However, any associations between memory functions and the expression of the 5-HT4 R in the human hippocampus have not been investigated. Using positron emission tomography with the tracer [(11) C]SB207145 and Reys Auditory Verbal Learning Test we aimed to examine the individual variation of the 5-HT4R binding in hippocampus in relation to memory acquisition and consolidation in healthy young volunteers. We found significant, negative associations between the immediate recall scores and left and right hippocampal BPND , (p = 0.009 and p = 0.010 respectively) and between the right hippocampal BPND and delayed recall (p = 0.014). These findings provide evidence that the 5-HT4 R is associated with memory functions in the human hippocampus and potentially pharmacological stimulation of the receptor may improve episodic memory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Event-related potential correlates of serial-position effects during an elaborative memory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Jacqueline A; Barry, Robert J; Johnstone, Stuart S

    2002-10-01

    Twenty undergraduate students participated in an elaborative learning test to evaluate the relationship between electrical brain activity and subsequently recalled and not-recalled words. Data collected from the midline (Fz, Cz, Pz) and lateral scalp sites (F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4) were analysed. The difference between event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by subsequently recalled and not-recalled words, the ERP memory effect, was evaluated for each portion (primacy, plateau and recency) of the serial-position curve (SPC). We compared peak amplitudes for the P1, N1, P2, N400, P3 and frontal positive slow wave (FPSW) components. The electrophysiological data support the hypothesis that different mechanisms underlie primacy and recency effects during free recall paradigms. There was no support for the hypothesis that an association arises between memory and the FPSW when subjects utilise elaborative learning strategies. The P2 component predicted subsequent recall at the primacy portion of the SPC, and P1 predicted recall at the primacy and plateau portions of the curve. The findings suggest that the early positive components of the ERP (i.e. P1 and P2) are useful indices of the differential stimulus processing during elaborative learning which predicts later recall. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Entropic Movement Complexity Reflects Subjective Creativity Rankings of Visualized Hand Motion Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhen; Braun, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate 55 novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated 10 times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity. PMID:26733896

  19. Entropic movement complexity reflects subjective creativity rankings of visualized hand motion trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen ePeng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study we have shown that human motion trajectories can be characterized by translating continuous trajectories into symbol sequences with well-defined complexity measures. Here we test the hypothesis that the motion complexity individuals generate in their movements might be correlated to the degree of creativity assigned by a human observer to the visualized motion trajectories. We asked participants to generate fifty-five novel hand movement patterns in virtual reality, where each pattern had to be repeated ten times in a row to ensure reproducibility. This allowed us to estimate a probability distribution over trajectories for each pattern. We assessed motion complexity not only by the previously proposed complexity measures on symbolic sequences, but we also propose two novel complexity measures that can be directly applied to the distributions over trajectories based on the frameworks of Gaussian Processes and Probabilistic Movement Primitives. In contrast to previous studies, these new methods allow computing complexities of individual motion patterns from very few sample trajectories. We compared the different complexity measures to how a group of independent jurors rank ordered the recorded motion trajectories according to their personal creativity judgment. We found three entropic complexity measures that correlate significantly with human creativity judgment and discuss differences between the measures. We also test whether these complexity measures correlate with individual creativity in divergent thinking tasks, but do not find any consistent correlation. Our results suggest that entropic complexity measures of hand motion may reveal domain-specific individual differences in kinesthetic creativity.

  20. Evaluation of treatment effects by ranking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halekoh, U; Kristensen, K

    2008-01-01

    In crop experiments measurements are often made by a judge evaluating the crops' conditions after treatment. In the present paper an analysis is proposed for experiments where plots of crops treated differently are mutually ranked. In the experimental layout the crops are treated on consecutive...... plots usually placed side by side in one or more rows. In the proposed method a judge ranks several neighbouring plots, say three, by ranking them from best to worst. For the next observation the judge moves on by no more than two plots, such that up to two plots will be re-evaluated again...