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Sample records for rank correlation coefficients

  1. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures

    OpenAIRE

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship b...

  2. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  3. Detecting genuine multipartite correlations in terms of the rank of coefficient matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Fan Heng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method to detect genuine quantum correlation for arbitrary quantum states in terms of the rank of coefficient matrices associated with the pure state. We then derive a necessary and sufficient condition for a quantum state to possess genuine correlation, namely that all corresponding coefficient matrices have rank larger than 1. We demonstrate an approach to decompose the genuine quantum correlated state with high rank coefficient matrix into the form of product states with no genuine quantum correlation for a pure state. (paper)

  4. Asymptotic properties of Pearson's rank-variate correlation coefficient under contaminated Gaussian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rubao; Xu, Weichao; Zhang, Yun; Ye, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness properties of Pearson's rank-variate correlation coefficient (PRVCC) in scenarios where one channel is corrupted by impulsive noise and the other is impulsive noise-free. As shown in our previous work, these scenarios that frequently encountered in radar and/or sonar, can be well emulated by a particular bivariate contaminated Gaussian model (CGM). Under this CGM, we establish the asymptotic closed forms of the expectation and variance of PRVCC by means of the well known Delta method. To gain a deeper understanding, we also compare PRVCC with two other classical correlation coefficients, i.e., Spearman's rho (SR) and Kendall's tau (KT), in terms of the root mean squared error (RMSE). Monte Carlo simulations not only verify our theoretical findings, but also reveal the advantage of PRVCC by an example of estimating the time delay in the particular impulsive noise environment.

  5. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjian Shi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster–Shafer evidence theory (D–S theory has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D–S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Research on the Fusion of Dependent Evidence Based on Rank Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Su, Xiaoyan; Qian, Hong; Yang, Ning; Han, Wenhua

    2017-10-16

    In order to meet the higher accuracy and system reliability requirements, the information fusion for multi-sensor systems is an increasing concern. Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (D-S theory) has been investigated for many applications in multi-sensor information fusion due to its flexibility in uncertainty modeling. However, classical evidence theory assumes that the evidence is independent of each other, which is often unrealistic. Ignoring the relationship between the evidence may lead to unreasonable fusion results, and even lead to wrong decisions. This assumption severely prevents D-S evidence theory from practical application and further development. In this paper, an innovative evidence fusion model to deal with dependent evidence based on rank correlation coefficient is proposed. The model first uses rank correlation coefficient to measure the dependence degree between different evidence. Then, total discount coefficient is obtained based on the dependence degree, which also considers the impact of the reliability of evidence. Finally, the discount evidence fusion model is presented. An example is illustrated to show the use and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. On the Kendall Correlation Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we first discuss the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. In continuous case, we define the Kendall rank correlation coefficient in terms of the concomitants of order statistics, find the expected value of the Kendall rank correlation coefficient and show that the later is free of n. We also prove that in continuous case the Kendall correlation coefficient converges in probability to its expected value. We then propose to consider the expected value of the Kendall rank ...

  8. Alternatives to Pearson's and Spearman's Correlation Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2008-01-01

    This article presents several alternatives to Pearson's correlation coefficient and many examples. In the samples where the rank in a discrete variable counts more than the variable values, the mixtures that we propose of Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients give better results.

  9. Estimation of rank correlation for clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2017-06-30

    It is well known that the sample correlation coefficient (R xy ) is the maximum likelihood estimator of the Pearson correlation (ρ xy ) for independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) bivariate normal data. However, this is not true for ophthalmologic data where X (e.g., visual acuity) and Y (e.g., visual field) are available for each eye and there is positive intraclass correlation for both X and Y in fellow eyes. In this paper, we provide a regression-based approach for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimator of ρ xy for clustered data, which can be implemented using standard mixed effects model software. This method is also extended to allow for estimation of partial correlation by controlling both X and Y for a vector U_ of other covariates. In addition, these methods can be extended to allow for estimation of rank correlation for clustered data by (i) converting ranks of both X and Y to the probit scale, (ii) estimating the Pearson correlation between probit scores for X and Y, and (iii) using the relationship between Pearson and rank correlation for bivariate normally distributed data. The validity of the methods in finite-sized samples is supported by simulation studies. Finally, two examples from ophthalmology and analgesic abuse are used to illustrate the methods. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Correlation Coefficients: Appropriate Use and Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Patrick; Boer, Christa; Schwarte, Lothar A

    2018-05-01

    Correlation in the broadest sense is a measure of an association between variables. In correlated data, the change in the magnitude of 1 variable is associated with a change in the magnitude of another variable, either in the same (positive correlation) or in the opposite (negative correlation) direction. Most often, the term correlation is used in the context of a linear relationship between 2 continuous variables and expressed as Pearson product-moment correlation. The Pearson correlation coefficient is typically used for jointly normally distributed data (data that follow a bivariate normal distribution). For nonnormally distributed continuous data, for ordinal data, or for data with relevant outliers, a Spearman rank correlation can be used as a measure of a monotonic association. Both correlation coefficients are scaled such that they range from -1 to +1, where 0 indicates that there is no linear or monotonic association, and the relationship gets stronger and ultimately approaches a straight line (Pearson correlation) or a constantly increasing or decreasing curve (Spearman correlation) as the coefficient approaches an absolute value of 1. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals can be used to address the statistical significance of the results and to estimate the strength of the relationship in the population from which the data were sampled. The aim of this tutorial is to guide researchers and clinicians in the appropriate use and interpretation of correlation coefficients.

  11. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  12. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients

  13. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  14. Rank reduction of correlation matrices by majorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pietersz (Raoul); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a novel method is developed for the problem of finding a low-rank correlation matrix nearest to a given correlation matrix. The method is based on majorization and therefore it is globally convergent. The method is computationally efficient, is straightforward to implement,

  15. Efficient Rank Reduction of Correlation Matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Grubisic (Igor); R. Pietersz (Raoul)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractGeometric optimisation algorithms are developed that efficiently find the nearest low-rank correlation matrix. We show, in numerical tests, that our methods compare favourably to the existing methods in the literature. The connection with the Lagrange multiplier method is established,

  16. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  17. Correlation coefficients in neutron β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.

    1978-01-01

    The various angular and polarisation coefficients in neutron decay are the principal sources of information on the β-interaction. Measurements of the electron-neutrino angular correlation coefficient (a), the neutron-spin-electron-momentum correlation coefficient (A), the neutron-spin-neutrino-momentum correlation coefficient (B), and the triple correlation coefficient D and time-reversal invariance are reviewed and the results discussed. (U.K.)

  18. General correlation and partial correlation analysis in finding interactions: with Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation as correlation measures

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang; Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Between-taxon interactions can be detected by calculating the sampling data of taxon sample type. In present study, Spearman rank correlation and proportion correlation are chosen as the general correlation measures, and their partial correlations are calculated and compared. The results show that for Spearman rank correlation measure, in all predicted candidate direct interactions by partial correlation, about 16.77% (x, 0-45.4%) of them are not successfully detected by Spearman rank correla...

  19. Wavelet Correlation Coefficient of 'strongly correlated' financial time series

    OpenAIRE

    Razdan, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use wavelet concepts to show that correlation coefficient between two financial data's is not constant but varies with scale from high correlation value to strongly anti-correlation value This studies is important because correlation coefficient is used to quantify degree of independence between two variables. In econophysics correlation coefficient forms important input to evolve hierarchial tree and minimum spanning tree of financial data.

  20. Estimation of the simple correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2010-11-01

    This article investigates some unfamiliar properties of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient for the estimation of simple correlation coefficient. Although Pearson's r is biased, except for limited situations, and the minimum variance unbiased estimator has been proposed in the literature, researchers routinely employ the sample correlation coefficient in their practical applications, because of its simplicity and popularity. In order to support such practice, this study examines the mean squared errors of r and several prominent formulas. The results reveal specific situations in which the sample correlation coefficient performs better than the unbiased and nearly unbiased estimators, facilitating recommendation of r as an effect size index for the strength of linear association between two variables. In addition, related issues of estimating the squared simple correlation coefficient are also considered.

  1. An inequality between the weighted average and the rowwise correlation coefficient for proximity matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, WP

    De Vries (1993) discusses Pearson's product-moment correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, and Kendall's rank-correlation coefficient for assessing the association between the rows of two proximity matrices. For each of these he introduces a weighted average variant and a rowwise variant. In this

  2. AN INEQUALITY BETWEEN THE WEIGHTED AVERAGE AND THE ROWWISE CORRELATION-COEFFICIENT FOR PROXIMITY MATRICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRIJNEN, WP

    De Vries (1993) discusses Pearson's product-moment correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, and Kendall's rank-correlation coefficient for assessing the association between the rows of two proximity matrices. For each of these he introduces a weighted average variant and a rowwise variant. In this

  3. A new proposal for Lagrangian correlation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinsoy, N.; Tugrul, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The statistical description of dispersion in turbulent flow was first considered by Taylor (Proc. London Math. Soc. 20 (1921) 196) and the statistical properties of the field were determined by Lagrangian correlation coefficient R L (τ). Frenkiel (Adv. Appl. Mech. 3 (1953) 61) has proposed several simple forms for R L (τ). Some workers have investigated for a proper form of the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. In this work, a new proposal for the Lagrangian correlation coefficient is proposed and discussed. It can be written in general form with the one of the Frenkiel's (Adv. Appl. Mech. 3 (1953) 61) Lagrangian correlation coefficient. There is very satisfactory agreement between the new correlation and the experiment

  4. Temporal correlation coefficient for directed networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with network theory focused mainly on the static aggregation of edges over specific time window lengths. Thus, most of the dynamic information gets lost. To assess the quality of such a static aggregation the temporal correlation coefficient can be calculated. It measures the overall possibility for an edge to persist between two consecutive snapshots. Up to now, this measure is only defined for undirected networks. Therefore, we introduce the adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient to directed networks. This new methodology enables the distinction between ingoing and outgoing edges. Besides a small example network presenting the single calculation steps, we also calculated the proposed measurements for a real pig trade network to emphasize the importance of considering the edge direction. The farm types at the beginning of the pork supply chain showed clearly higher values for the outgoing temporal correlation coefficient compared to the farm types at the end of the pork supply chain. These farm types showed higher values for the ingoing temporal correlation coefficient. The temporal correlation coefficient is a valuable tool to understand the structural dynamics of these systems, as it assesses the consistency of the edge configuration. The adaption of this measure for directed networks may help to preserve meaningful additional information about the investigated network that might get lost if the edge directions are ignored.

  5. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  6. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  7. Analytic posteriors for Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Alexander; Marsman, Maarten; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2018-02-01

    Pearson's correlation is one of the most common measures of linear dependence. Recently, Bernardo (11th International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology, 2015) introduced a flexible class of priors to study this measure in a Bayesian setting. For this large class of priors, we show that the (marginal) posterior for Pearson's correlation coefficient and all of the posterior moments are analytic. Our results are available in the open-source software package JASP.

  8. Analytic posteriors for Pearson's correlation coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, A.; Marsman, M.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2018-01-01

    Pearson's correlation is one of the most common measures of linear dependence. Recently, Bernardo (11th International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology, 2015) introduced a flexible class of priors to study this measure in a Bayesian setting. For this large class of priors, we show that the (marginal) posterior for Pearson's correlation coefficient and all of the posterior moments are analytic. Our results are available in the open‐source software package JASP.

  9. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  10. Ranking Decision Making Units with Stochastic Data by Using Coefficient of Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfi, F.; Nematollahi, N.; Behzadi, M.H.; Mirbolouki, M.

    2010-01-01

    Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is a non-parametric technique which is based on mathematical programming for evaluating the efficiency of a set of Decision Making Units (DMUs). Throughout applications, managers encounter with stochastic data and the necessity of having a method that is able to evaluate efficiency and rank efficient units has been under consideration. In this paper considering the concept of coefficient of variation among efficient DMUs, two ranking methods has been proposed. ...

  11. Forecast Correlation Coefficient Matrix of Stock Returns in Portfolio Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    In Modern Portfolio Theory, the correlation coefficients decide the risk of a set of stocks in the portfolio. So, to understand the correlation coefficients between returns of stocks, is a challenge but is very important for the portfolio management. Usually, the stocks with small correlation coefficients or even negative correlation coefficients are preferred. One can calculate the correlation coefficients of stock returns based on the historical stock data. However, in order to control the ...

  12. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  13. Comparison of values of Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation coefficient on the same sets of data

    OpenAIRE

    Hauke, Jan; Kossowski, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient is a nonparametric (distribution-free) rank statistic proposed by Charles Spearman as a measure of the strength of an association between two variables. It is a measure of a monotone association that is used when the distribution of data makes Pearson’s correlation coefficient undesirable or misleading. Spearman’s coefficient is not a measure of the linear relationship between two variables, as some “statisticians” declare. It assesses how well an arbit...

  14. Correlation of Cognitive Abilities Level, Age and Ranks in Judo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraček Stanislav

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to ascertain the correlation between selected cognitive abilities, age and performance of judokas according to ranking. The study group consisted of judokas in the age group 18 ± 2.4 years. The Stroop Color-Word Test - Victoria Version (VST was the instrument used to determine the level of cognitive abilities. The data obtained were measured by the Pearson Correlation (r correlation test. The results of the study show an associative relationship of indirect correlation (p < 0.01 between age and all of the three categories of the Stroop test. This is an indirect correlation, so the higher the age, the lower the time (better performance of the probands in the Stroop test. There was no statistically significant correlation between performance in the categories of the Stroop test and rankings. The outcomes show that the level of selected cognitive abilities depends on age, but the level of the selected cognitive abilities does not affect the ranking of the judokas.

  15. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wen-Kai; Yao Xu-Ri; Liu Xue-Feng; Li Long-Zhen; Zhai Guang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. (paper)

  16. Object detection by correlation coefficients using azimuthally averaged reference projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, William V

    2004-11-01

    A method of computing correlation coefficients for object detection that takes advantage of using azimuthally averaged reference projections is described and compared with two alternative methods-computing a cross-correlation function or a local correlation coefficient versus the azimuthally averaged reference projections. Two examples of an application from structural biology involving the detection of projection views of biological macromolecules in electron micrographs are discussed. It is found that a novel approach to computing a local correlation coefficient versus azimuthally averaged reference projections, using a rotational correlation coefficient, outperforms using a cross-correlation function and a local correlation coefficient in object detection from simulated images with a range of levels of simulated additive noise. The three approaches perform similarly in detecting macromolecular views in electron microscope images of a globular macrolecular complex (the ribosome). The rotational correlation coefficient outperforms the other methods in detection of keyhole limpet hemocyanin macromolecular views in electron micrographs.

  17. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  18. Feature Genes Selection Using Supervised Locally Linear Embedding and Correlation Coefficient for Microarray Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiucheng; Mu, Huiyu; Wang, Yun; Huang, Fangzhou

    2018-01-01

    The selection of feature genes with high recognition ability from the gene expression profiles has gained great significance in biology. However, most of the existing methods have a high time complexity and poor classification performance. Motivated by this, an effective feature selection method, called supervised locally linear embedding and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (SLLE-SC 2 ), is proposed which is based on the concept of locally linear embedding and correlation coefficient algorithms. Supervised locally linear embedding takes into account class label information and improves the classification performance. Furthermore, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient is used to remove the coexpression genes. The experiment results obtained on four public tumor microarray datasets illustrate that our method is valid and feasible.

  19. Modified Regression Correlation Coefficient for Poisson Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaengthong, Nattacha; Domthong, Uthumporn

    2017-09-01

    This study gives attention to indicators in predictive power of the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) which are widely used; however, often having some restrictions. We are interested in regression correlation coefficient for a Poisson regression model. This is a measure of predictive power, and defined by the relationship between the dependent variable (Y) and the expected value of the dependent variable given the independent variables [E(Y|X)] for the Poisson regression model. The dependent variable is distributed as Poisson. The purpose of this research was modifying regression correlation coefficient for Poisson regression model. We also compare the proposed modified regression correlation coefficient with the traditional regression correlation coefficient in the case of two or more independent variables, and having multicollinearity in independent variables. The result shows that the proposed regression correlation coefficient is better than the traditional regression correlation coefficient based on Bias and the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE).

  20. Analytic posteriors for Pearson's correlation coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ly, A.; Marsman, M.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2018-01-01

    Pearson's correlation is one of the most common measures of linear dependence. Recently, Bernardo (11th International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology, 2015) introduced a flexible class of priors to study this measure in a Bayesian setting. For this large class of priors, we show that the

  1. A Note on the Correlated Random Coefficient Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    In this note we derive the bias of the OLS estimator for a correlated random coefficient model with one random coefficient, but which is correlated with a binary variable. We provide set-identification to the parameters of interest of the model. We also show how to reduce the bias of the estimator...

  2. Testing the Difference of Correlated Agreement Coefficients for Statistical Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwet, Kilem L.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of testing the difference between two correlated agreement coefficients for statistical significance. A number of authors have proposed methods for testing the difference between two correlated kappa coefficients, which require either the use of resampling methods or the use of advanced statistical modeling…

  3. Accounting for Missing Correlation Coefficients in Fixed-Effects MASEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne; Cheung, Mike W-L

    2018-01-01

    Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) is increasingly applied to advance theories by synthesizing existing findings. MASEM essentially consists of two stages. In Stage 1, a pooled correlation matrix is estimated based on the reported correlation coefficients in the individual studies. In Stage 2, a structural model (such as a path model) is fitted to explain the pooled correlations. Frequently, the individual studies do not provide all the correlation coefficients between the research variables. In this study, we modify the currently optimal MASEM-method to deal with missing correlation coefficients, and compare its performance with existing methods. This study is the first to evaluate the performance of fixed-effects MASEM methods under different levels of missing correlation coefficients. We found that the often used univariate methods performed very poorly, while the multivariate methods performed well overall.

  4. Diabetic Erythrocytes Test by Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A.M; Foresto, P; Darrigo, M; Rosso, O.A

    2008-01-01

    Even when a healthy individual is studied, his/her erythrocytes in capillaries continually change their shape in a synchronized erratic fashion. In this work, the problem of characterizing the cell behavior is studied from the perspective of bounded correlated random walk, based on the assumption that diffractometric data involves both deterministic and stochastic components. The photometric readings are obtained by ektacytometry over several millions of shear elongated cells, using a home-made device called Erythrodeformeter. We have only a scalar signal and no governing equations; therefore the complete behavior has to be reconstructed in an artificial phase space. To analyze dynamics we used the technique of time delay coordinates suggested by Takens, May algorithm, and Fourier transform. The results suggest that on random-walk approach the samples from healthy controls exhibit significant differences from those from diabetic patients and these could allow us to claim that we have linked mathematical nonlinear tools with clinical aspects of diabetic erythrocytes’ rheological properties. PMID:19415139

  5. Pearson's correlation coefficient in the theory of networks: A comment

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin

    2018-01-01

    In statistics, the Pearson correlation coefficient $r_{x,y}$ determines the degree of linear correlation between two variables and it is known that $-1 \\le r_{x,y} \\le 1$. In the theory of networks, a curious expression proposed in [PRL {\\bf 89} 208701 (2002)] for degree-degree correlation coefficient $r_{j_i,k_i}, i\\in [1,M]$ has been in use. We realize that the suggested form is the conventional Pearson's coefficient for $\\{(j_i,k_i), (k_i,j_i)\\}$ for $2M$ data points and hence it is rightl...

  6. Eliciting conditional and unconditional rank correlations from conditional probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, O.; Kurowicka, D.; Roelen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Causes of uncertainties may be interrelated and may introduce dependencies. Ignoring these dependencies may lead to large errors. A number of graphical models in probability theory such as dependence trees, vines and (continuous) Bayesian belief nets [Cooke RM. Markov and entropy properties of tree and vine-dependent variables. In: Proceedings of the ASA section on Bayesian statistical science, 1997; Kurowicka D, Cooke RM. Distribution-free continuous Bayesian belief nets. In: Proceedings of mathematical methods in reliability conference, 2004; Bedford TJ, Cooke RM. Vines-a new graphical model for dependent random variables. Ann Stat 2002; 30(4):1031-68; Kurowicka D, Cooke RM. Uncertainty analysis with high dimensional dependence modelling. New York: Wiley; 2006; Hanea AM, et al. Hybrid methods for quantifying and analyzing Bayesian belief nets. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ENBIS5 conference, 2005; Shachter RD, Kenley CR. Gaussian influence diagrams. Manage Sci 1998; 35(5) .] have been developed to capture dependencies between random variables. The input for these models are various marginal distributions and dependence information, usually in the form of conditional rank correlations. Often expert elicitation is required. This paper focuses on dependence representation, and dependence elicitation. The techniques presented are illustrated with an application from aviation safety

  7. [Electroencephalogram Feature Selection Based on Correlation Coefficient Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinzhi; Tang, Xiaofang

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of classification with small amount of motor imagery training data on the development of brain-computer interface (BCD systems, we proposed an analyzing method to automatically select the characteristic parameters based on correlation coefficient analysis. Throughout the five sample data of dataset IV a from 2005 BCI Competition, we utilized short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and correlation coefficient calculation to reduce the number of primitive electroencephalogram dimension, then introduced feature extraction based on common spatial pattern (CSP) and classified by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Simulation results showed that the average rate of classification accuracy could be improved by using correlation coefficient feature selection method than those without using this algorithm. Comparing with support vector machine (SVM) optimization features algorithm, the correlation coefficient analysis can lead better selection parameters to improve the accuracy of classification.

  8. Dynamics analysis of SIR epidemic model with correlation coefficients and clustering coefficient in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juping; Yang, Chan; Jin, Zhen; Li, Jia

    2018-07-14

    In this paper, the correlation coefficients between nodes in states are used as dynamic variables, and we construct SIR epidemic dynamic models with correlation coefficients by using the pair approximation method in static networks and dynamic networks, respectively. Considering the clustering coefficient of the network, we analytically investigate the existence and the local asymptotic stability of each equilibrium of these models and derive threshold values for the prevalence of diseases. Additionally, we obtain two equivalent epidemic thresholds in dynamic networks, which are compared with the results of the mean field equations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Limits of the memory coefficient in measuring correlated bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Hiraoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    Temporal inhomogeneities in event sequences of natural and social phenomena have been characterized in terms of interevent times and correlations between interevent times. The inhomogeneities of interevent times have been extensively studied, while the correlations between interevent times, often called correlated bursts, are far from being fully understood. For measuring the correlated bursts, two relevant approaches were suggested, i.e., memory coefficient and burst size distribution. Here a burst size denotes the number of events in a bursty train detected for a given time window. Empirical analyses have revealed that the larger memory coefficient tends to be associated with the heavier tail of the burst size distribution. In particular, empirical findings in human activities appear inconsistent, such that the memory coefficient is close to 0, while burst size distributions follow a power law. In order to comprehend these observations, by assuming the conditional independence between consecutive interevent times, we derive the analytical form of the memory coefficient as a function of parameters describing interevent time and burst size distributions. Our analytical result can explain the general tendency of the larger memory coefficient being associated with the heavier tail of burst size distribution. We also find that the apparently inconsistent observations in human activities are compatible with each other, indicating that the memory coefficient has limits to measure the correlated bursts.

  10. Statistical Study of Turbulence: Spectral Functions and Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkiel, Francois N.

    1958-01-01

    In reading the publications on turbulence of different authors, one often runs the risk of confusing the various correlation coefficients and turbulence spectra. We have made a point of defining, by appropriate concepts, the differences which exist between these functions. Besides, we introduce in the symbols a few new characteristics of turbulence. In the first chapter, we study some relations between the correlation coefficients and the different turbulence spectra. Certain relations are given by means of demonstrations which could be called intuitive rather than mathematical. In this way we demonstrate that the correlation coefficients between the simultaneous turbulent velocities at two points are identical, whether studied in Lagrange's or in Euler's systems. We then consider new spectra of turbulence, obtained by study of the simultaneous velocities along a straight line of given direction. We determine some relations between these spectra and the correlation coefficients. Examining the relation between the spectrum of the turbulence measured at a fixed point and the longitudinal-correlation curve given by G. I. Taylor, we find that this equation is exact only when the coefficient is very small.

  11. Distributing Correlation Coefficients of Linear Structure-Activity/Property Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure-activity/property relationships are mathematical relationships linking chemical structure and activity/property in a quantitative manner. These in silico approaches are frequently used to reduce animal testing and risk-assessment, as well as to increase time- and cost-effectiveness in characterization and identification of active compounds. The aim of our study was to investigate the pattern of correlation coefficients distribution associated to simple linear relationships linking the compounds structure with their activities. A set of the most common ordnance compounds found at naval facilities with a limited data set with a range of toxicities on aquatic ecosystem and a set of seven properties was studied. Statistically significant models were selected and investigated. The probability density function of the correlation coefficients was investigated using a series of possible continuous distribution laws. Almost 48% of the correlation coefficients proved fit Beta distribution, 40% fit Generalized Pareto distribution, and 12% fit Pert distribution.

  12. A study of metrics of distance and correlation between ranked lists for compositionality detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Hansen, Niels Dalum

    2017-01-01

    affects the measurement of semantic similarity. We propose a new compositionality detection method that represents phrases as ranked lists of term weights. Our method approximates the semantic similarity between two ranked list representations using a range of well-known distance and correlation metrics...... of compositionality using any of the distance and correlation metrics considered....

  13. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  14. A comparison of two indices for the intraclass correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the behavior of two indices for measuring the intraclass correlation in the one-way random effects model: the prevailing ICC(1) (Fisher, 1938) and the corrected eta-squared (Bliese & Halverson, 1998). These two procedures differ both in their methods of estimating the variance components that define the intraclass correlation coefficient and in their performance of bias and mean squared error in the estimation of the intraclass correlation coefficient. In contrast with the natural unbiased principle used to construct ICC(1), in the present study it was analytically shown that the corrected eta-squared estimator is identical to the maximum likelihood estimator and the pairwise estimator under equal group sizes. Moreover, the empirical results obtained from the present Monte Carlo simulation study across various group structures revealed the mutual dominance relationship between their truncated versions for negative values. The corrected eta-squared estimator performs better than the ICC(1) estimator when the underlying population intraclass correlation coefficient is small. Conversely, ICC(1) has a clear advantage over the corrected eta-squared for medium and large magnitudes of population intraclass correlation coefficient. The conceptual description and numerical investigation provide guidelines to help researchers choose between the two indices for more accurate reliability analysis in multilevel research.

  15. A new correlation for two-phase critical discharge coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Chun, Moon Hyun

    1989-01-01

    A new simple correlation for subcooled and two-phase critical flow discharge coefficient has been developed by stepwise regression technique. The new discharge coefficient has three independent variables and they are length to hydraulic diameter ratio, degree of subcooling, and stagnation temperature. The new discharge coefficient is applied as a multiplier to homogeneous equilibrium model and Abauf's single phase critical mass flux calculation equation. This method has been tested for its accuracy by comparing with experimental data. Results of the comparison show that the agreement between the predictions with new correlation and the experimental data is good for pipes and nozzles with vertical upward flow for subcooled upstream condition and nozzles with horizontal configuration for two-phase upstream condition

  16. Variability, correlation and path coefficient analysis of seedling traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Indirect selection is a useful means for improving yield in cotton crop. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic variability, broad sense heritability, genetic advance and correlation among the six seedling traits and their direct and indirect effects on cotton yield by using path coefficient ...

  17. Variability, correlation and path coefficient analysis of seedling traits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indirect selection is a useful means for improving yield in cotton crop. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic variability, broad sense heritability, genetic advance and correlation among the six seedling traits and their direct and indirect effects on cotton yield by using path coefficient analysis.

  18. On the misinterpretation of the correlation coefficient in pharmaceutical sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnergaard, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    The correlation coefficient is often used and more often misused as a universal parameter expressing the quality in linear regression analysis. The popularity of this dimensionless quantity is evident as it is easy to communicate and considered to be unproblematic to comprehend. However, illustra...

  19. Time correlation functions and transport coefficients in a dilute superfluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, T.R.; Dorfman, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Time correlation functions for the transport coefficients in the linear Landau-Khalatnikov equations are derived on the basis of a formal theory. These Green--Kubo expressions are then explicitly evaluated for a dilute superfluid and the resulting transport coefficiencts are shown to be identical to those obtained previously by using a distribution function method

  20. Correlation Revelation: The Search for Meaning in Pearson's Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Craig

    2016-01-01

    When the author was first charged with getting a group of students to understand the correlation coefficient, he did not anticipate the topic would challenge his own understanding, let alone cause him to eventually question the very nature of mathematics itself. On the surface, the idea seemed straightforward, one that millions of students across…

  1. Modeling Concordance Correlation Coefficient for Longitudinal Study Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Tang, Wan; Yu, Qin; Tu, X. M.

    2010-01-01

    Measures of agreement are used in a wide range of behavioral, biomedical, psychosocial, and health-care related research to assess reliability of diagnostic test, psychometric properties of instrument, fidelity of psychosocial intervention, and accuracy of proxy outcome. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a popular measure of…

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A correlation to the heat transfer coefficient in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribatski, Gherhardt; Jabardo, Jose M. Saiz

    1999-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer is a complex phenomenon, making the development of a correlation for the heat transfer coefficient rather cumbersome due to the number of physical parameters involved in it. Some authors have followed a pragmatic approach to the problem by correlating the heat transfer coefficient in terms of reduced primitive properties. Two of the most knowledgeable authors who have followed this approach are Gorenflo and Cooper. Comparisons have been performed among results from the correlations proposed by these researchers and experimental results obtained elsewhere for refrigerants R-11, R-113 and R-114. These comparisons have shown that Cooper's correlation is best fitted for halocarbon refrigerants. The correlation proposed by Gorenflo ads the difficulty of including a numerical factor specific for each fluid. Leiner modified Gorenflo's correlation to determine the numerical factor as a function of known physical parameters of the fluid. In present study, the form of this function has been investigated for halocarbon refrigerants. The obtained correlation is written in terms of the following parameters: reduced pressure, eccentric and compressibility factors at the critical state, and a dimensionless specific heat of the vapor phase. The correlation compares well with experimental results. (author)

  4. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Hisahiro [Chiba University, Department of Frontier Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Kazama, Toshiki [Chiba University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  5. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Kazama, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  6. Generalization of Clustering Coefficients to Signed Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Giulio; Perugini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The recent interest in network analysis applications in personality psychology and psychopathology has put forward new methodological challenges. Personality and psychopathology networks are typically based on correlation matrices and therefore include both positive and negative edge signs. However, some applications of network analysis disregard negative edges, such as computing clustering coefficients. In this contribution, we illustrate the importance of the distinction between positive and negative edges in networks based on correlation matrices. The clustering coefficient is generalized to signed correlation networks: three new indices are introduced that take edge signs into account, each derived from an existing and widely used formula. The performances of the new indices are illustrated and compared with the performances of the unsigned indices, both on a signed simulated network and on a signed network based on actual personality psychology data. The results show that the new indices are more resistant to sample variations in correlation networks and therefore have higher convergence compared with the unsigned indices both in simulated networks and with real data. PMID:24586367

  7. Identifying and ranking influential spreaders in complex networks by combining a local-degree sum and the clustering coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengtian; Zhang, Ruisheng; Hu, Rongjing; Yang, Fan; Yao, Yabing; Yuan, Yongna

    2018-03-01

    Identifying influential spreaders is a crucial problem that can help authorities to control the spreading process in complex networks. Based on the classical degree centrality (DC), several improved measures have been presented. However, these measures cannot rank spreaders accurately. In this paper, we first calculate the sum of the degrees of the nearest neighbors of a given node, and based on the calculated sum, a novel centrality named clustered local-degree (CLD) is proposed, which combines the sum and the clustering coefficients of nodes to rank spreaders. By assuming that the spreading process in networks follows the susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) model, we perform extensive simulations on a series of real networks to compare the performances between the CLD centrality and other six measures. The results show that the CLD centrality has a competitive performance in distinguishing the spreading ability of nodes, and exposes the best performance to identify influential spreaders accurately.

  8. Correlation of Cadmium Distribution Coefficients to Soil Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Rootzen, Helle; Borggaard, Ole K.

    2003-01-01

    on whole soil samples have shown that pH is the main parameter controlling the distribution. To identify further the components that are important for Cd binding in soil we measured Cd distribution coefficients (K-d) at two fixed pH values and at low Cd loadings for 49 soils sampled in Denmark. The Kd...... values for Cd ranged from 5 to 3000 L kg(-1). The soils were described pedologically and characterized in detail (22 parameters) including determination of contents of the various minerals in the clay fraction. Correlating parameters were grouped and step-wise regression analysis revealed...... interlayered clay minerals [HIM], chlorite, quartz, microcline, plagioclase) were significant in explaining the Cd distribution coefficient....

  9. Population models and simulation methods: The case of the Spearman rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astivia, Oscar L Olvera; Zumbo, Bruno D

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of a population model in guiding the design and interpretation of simulation studies used to investigate the Spearman rank correlation. The Spearman rank correlation has been known for over a hundred years to applied researchers and methodologists alike and is one of the most widely used non-parametric statistics. Still, certain misconceptions can be found, either explicitly or implicitly, in the published literature because a population definition for this statistic is rarely discussed within the social and behavioural sciences. By relying on copula distribution theory, a population model is presented for the Spearman rank correlation, and its properties are explored both theoretically and in a simulation study. Through the use of the Iman-Conover algorithm (which allows the user to specify the rank correlation as a population parameter), simulation studies from previously published articles are explored, and it is found that many of the conclusions purported in them regarding the nature of the Spearman correlation would change if the data-generation mechanism better matched the simulation design. More specifically, issues such as small sample bias and lack of power of the t-test and r-to-z Fisher transformation disappear when the rank correlation is calculated from data sampled where the rank correlation is the population parameter. A proof for the consistency of the sample estimate of the rank correlation is shown as well as the flexibility of the copula model to encompass results previously published in the mathematical literature. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Random matrix theory analysis of cross-correlations in the US stock market: Evidence from Pearson’s correlation coefficient and detrended cross-correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang-Jin; Xie, Chi; Chen, Shou; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Yang, Ming-Yan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we first build two empirical cross-correlation matrices in the US stock market by two different methods, namely the Pearson’s correlation coefficient and the detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then, combining the two matrices with the method of random matrix theory (RMT), we mainly investigate the statistical properties of cross-correlations in the US stock market. We choose the daily closing prices of 462 constituent stocks of S&P 500 index as the research objects and select the sample data from January 3, 2005 to August 31, 2012. In the empirical analysis, we examine the statistical properties of cross-correlation coefficients, the distribution of eigenvalues, the distribution of eigenvector components, and the inverse participation ratio. From the two methods, we find some new results of the cross-correlations in the US stock market in our study, which are different from the conclusions reached by previous studies. The empirical cross-correlation matrices constructed by the DCCA coefficient show several interesting properties at different time scales in the US stock market, which are useful to the risk management and optimal portfolio selection, especially to the diversity of the asset portfolio. It will be an interesting and meaningful work to find the theoretical eigenvalue distribution of a completely random matrix R for the DCCA coefficient because it does not obey the Marčenko-Pastur distribution.

  11. A short note on jackknifing the concordance correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2014-02-10

    Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a very popular scaled index of agreement used in applied statistics. To obtain a confidence interval (CI) for the estimate of CCC, jackknifing was proposed and shown to perform well in simulation as well as in applications. However, a theoretical proof of the validity of the jackknife CI for the CCC has not been presented yet. In this note, we establish a sufficient condition for using the jackknife method to construct the CI for the CCC. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Correlation coefficient based supervised locally linear embedding for pulmonary nodule recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Panpan; Xia, Kewen; Yu, Hengyong

    2016-11-01

    Dimensionality reduction techniques are developed to suppress the negative effects of high dimensional feature space of lung CT images on classification performance in computer aided detection (CAD) systems for pulmonary nodule detection. An improved supervised locally linear embedding (SLLE) algorithm is proposed based on the concept of correlation coefficient. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient is introduced to adjust the distance metric in the SLLE algorithm to ensure that more suitable neighborhood points could be identified, and thus to enhance the discriminating power of embedded data. The proposed Spearman's rank correlation coefficient based SLLE (SC(2)SLLE) is implemented and validated in our pilot CAD system using a clinical dataset collected from the publicly available lung image database consortium and image database resource initiative (LICD-IDRI). Particularly, a representative CAD system for solitary pulmonary nodule detection is designed and implemented. After a sequential medical image processing steps, 64 nodules and 140 non-nodules are extracted, and 34 representative features are calculated. The SC(2)SLLE, as well as SLLE and LLE algorithm, are applied to reduce the dimensionality. Several quantitative measurements are also used to evaluate and compare the performances. Using a 5-fold cross-validation methodology, the proposed algorithm achieves 87.65% accuracy, 79.23% sensitivity, 91.43% specificity, and 8.57% false positive rate, on average. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the original locally linear embedding and SLLE coupled with the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Based on the preliminary results from a limited number of nodules in our dataset, this study demonstrates the great potential to improve the performance of a CAD system for nodule detection using the proposed SC(2)SLLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overcoming multicollinearity in multiple regression using correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainodin, H. J.; Yap, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    Multicollinearity happens when there are high correlations among independent variables. In this case, it would be difficult to distinguish between the contributions of these independent variables to that of the dependent variable as they may compete to explain much of the similar variance. Besides, the problem of multicollinearity also violates the assumption of multiple regression: that there is no collinearity among the possible independent variables. Thus, an alternative approach is introduced in overcoming the multicollinearity problem in achieving a well represented model eventually. This approach is accomplished by removing the multicollinearity source variables on the basis of the correlation coefficient values based on full correlation matrix. Using the full correlation matrix can facilitate the implementation of Excel function in removing the multicollinearity source variables. It is found that this procedure is easier and time-saving especially when dealing with greater number of independent variables in a model and a large number of all possible models. Hence, in this paper detailed insight of the procedure is shown, compared and implemented.

  14. Covariate-adjusted Spearman's rank correlation with probability-scale residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Li, Chun; Wanga, Valentine; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2018-06-01

    It is desirable to adjust Spearman's rank correlation for covariates, yet existing approaches have limitations. For example, the traditionally defined partial Spearman's correlation does not have a sensible population parameter, and the conditional Spearman's correlation defined with copulas cannot be easily generalized to discrete variables. We define population parameters for both partial and conditional Spearman's correlation through concordance-discordance probabilities. The definitions are natural extensions of Spearman's rank correlation in the presence of covariates and are general for any orderable random variables. We show that they can be neatly expressed using probability-scale residuals (PSRs). This connection allows us to derive simple estimators. Our partial estimator for Spearman's correlation between X and Y adjusted for Z is the correlation of PSRs from models of X on Z and of Y on Z, which is analogous to the partial Pearson's correlation derived as the correlation of observed-minus-expected residuals. Our conditional estimator is the conditional correlation of PSRs. We describe estimation and inference, and highlight the use of semiparametric cumulative probability models, which allow preservation of the rank-based nature of Spearman's correlation. We conduct simulations to evaluate the performance of our estimators and compare them with other popular measures of association, demonstrating their robustness and efficiency. We illustrate our method in two applications, a biomarker study and a large survey. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  15. Canonical correlation analysis of professional stress,social support,and professional burnout among low-rank army officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-yun LI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study investigates the influence of professional stress and social support on professional burnout among low-rank army officers.Methods The professional stress,social support,and professional burnout scales among low-rank army officers were used as test tools.Moreover,the officers of established units(battalion,company,and platoon were chosen as test subjects.Out of the 260 scales sent,226 effective scales were received.The descriptive statistic and canonical correlation analysis models were used to analyze the influence of each variable.Results The scores of low-rank army officers in the professional stress,social support,and professional burnout scales were more than average,except on two factors,namely,interpersonal support and de-individualization.The canonical analysis identified three groups of canonical correlation factors,of which two were up to a significant level(P < 0.001.After further eliminating the social support variable,the canonical correlation analysis of professional stress and burnout showed that the canonical correlation coefficients P corresponding to 1 and 2 were 0.62 and 0.36,respectively,and were up to a very significant level(P < 0.001.Conclusion The low-rank army officers experience higher professional stress and burnout levels,showing a lower sense of accomplishment,emotional exhaustion,and more serious depersonalization.However,social support can reduce the onset and seriousness of professional burnout among these officers by lessening pressure factors,such as career development,work features,salary conditions,and other personal factors.

  16. A robust bayesian estimate of the concordance correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A need for assessment of agreement arises in many situations including statistical biomarker qualification or assay or method validation. Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is one of the most popular scaled indices reported in evaluation of agreement. Robust methods for CCC estimation currently present an important statistical challenge. Here, we propose a novel Bayesian method of robust estimation of CCC based on multivariate Student's t-distribution and compare it with its alternatives. Furthermore, we extend the method to practically relevant settings, enabling incorporation of confounding covariates and replications. The superiority of the new approach is demonstrated using simulation as well as real datasets from biomarker application in electroencephalography (EEG). This biomarker is relevant in neuroscience for development of treatments for insomnia.

  17. A comparison of confidence interval methods for the concordance correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient with small number of raters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Svetnik, Vladimir; Coimbra, Alexandre; Baumgartner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with fixed raters or, equivalently, the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for continuous outcomes is a widely accepted aggregate index of agreement in settings with small number of raters. Quantifying the precision of the CCC by constructing its confidence interval (CI) is important in early drug development applications, in particular in qualification of biomarker platforms. In recent years, there have been several new methods proposed for construction of CIs for the CCC, but their comprehensive comparison has not been attempted. The methods consisted of the delta method and jackknifing with and without Fisher's Z-transformation, respectively, and Bayesian methods with vague priors. In this study, we carried out a simulation study, with data simulated from multivariate normal as well as heavier tailed distribution (t-distribution with 5 degrees of freedom), to compare the state-of-the-art methods for assigning CI to the CCC. When the data are normally distributed, the jackknifing with Fisher's Z-transformation (JZ) tended to provide superior coverage and the difference between it and the closest competitor, the Bayesian method with the Jeffreys prior was in general minimal. For the nonnormal data, the jackknife methods, especially the JZ method, provided the coverage probabilities closest to the nominal in contrast to the others which yielded overly liberal coverage. Approaches based upon the delta method and Bayesian method with conjugate prior generally provided slightly narrower intervals and larger lower bounds than others, though this was offset by their poor coverage. Finally, we illustrated the utility of the CIs for the CCC in an example of a wake after sleep onset (WASO) biomarker, which is frequently used in clinical sleep studies of drugs for treatment of insomnia.

  18. Thalamo-Sensorimotor Functional Connectivity Correlates with World Ranking of Olympic, Elite, and High Performance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zirui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity studies have shown functional reorganization in participants with outstanding motor expertise. Little is known about neural plasticity associated with exceptionally long motor training or of its predictive value for motor performance excellence. The present study utilised resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI in a unique sample of world-class athletes: Olympic, elite, and internationally ranked swimmers (n=30. Their world ranking ranged from 1st to 250th: each had prepared for participation in the Olympic Games. Combining rs-fMRI graph-theoretical and seed-based functional connectivity analyses, it was discovered that the thalamus has its strongest connections with the sensorimotor network in elite swimmers with the highest world rankings (career best rank: 1–35. Strikingly, thalamo-sensorimotor functional connections were highly correlated with the swimmers’ motor performance excellence, that is, accounting for 41% of the individual variance in best world ranking. Our findings shed light on neural correlates of long-term athletic performance involving thalamo-sensorimotor functional circuits.

  19. Do Quantitative Measures of Research Productivity Correlate with Academic Rank in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Dodson, Thomas B; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Calotta, Nicholas; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-08-01

    Academic promotion is linked to research productivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States. The predictor variables were categorized as demographic (gender, medical degree, research doctorate, other advanced degree) and quantitative measures of academic productivity (total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single article, I-10 index [number of publications with ≥ 10 citations], and h-index [number of publications h with ≥ h citations each]). The outcome variable was current academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or endowed professor). Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed to evaluate associations between the predictors and academic rank. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were computed to identify thresholds for academic promotion. The sample consisted of 324 academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of whom 11.7% were female, 40% had medical degrees, and 8% had research doctorates. The h-index was the most strongly correlated with academic rank (ρ = 0.62, p research activity.

  20. Are Quantitative Measures of Academic Productivity Correlated with Academic Rank in Plastic Surgery? A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Miller, Devin; O'Brien-Coon, Devin; Zins, James E; Serletti, Joseph M; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Manson, Paul N; Gordon, Chad R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among full-time academic plastic surgeons. Bibliometric indices were computed for all full-time academic plastic surgeons in the United States. The primary study variable was academic rank. Bibliometric predictors included the Hirsch index, I-10 index, number of publications, number of citations, and highest number of citations for a single publication. Descriptive, bivariate, and correlation analyses were computed. Multiple comparisons testing was used to calculate adjusted associations for subgroups. For all analyses, a value of p productivity. Although academic promotion is the result of success in multiple different areas, bibliometric measures may be useful adjuncts for assessment of research productivity.

  1. Improvement of a new rotation function for molecular replacement by designing new scoring functions and dynamic correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Ding, Wei

    2010-10-01

    A previously published new rotation function has been improved by using a dynamic correlation coefficient as well as two new scoring functions of relative entropy and mean-square-residues to make the rotation function more robust and independent of a specific set of weights for scoring and ranking. The previously described new rotation function calculates the rotation function of molecular replacement by matching the search model directly with the Patterson vector map. The signal-to-noise ratio for the correct match was increased by averaging all the matching peaks. Several matching scores were employed to evaluate the goodness of matching. These matching scores were then combined into a single total score by optimizing a set of weights using the linear regression method. It was found that there exists an optimal set of weights that can be applied to the global rotation search and the correct solution can be ranked in the top 100 or less. However, this set of optimal weights in general is dependent on the search models and the crystal structures with different space groups and cell parameters. In this work, we try to solve this problem by designing a dynamic correlation coefficient. It is shown that the dynamic correlation coefficient works for a variety of space groups and cell parameters in the global search of rotation function. We also introduce two new matching scores: relative entropy and mean-square-residues. Last but not least, we discussed a valid method for the optimization of the adjustable parameters for matching vectors.

  2. Do Standard Bibliometric Measures Correlate with Academic Rank of Full-Time Pediatric Dentistry Faculty Members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Harlyn K; Dhar, Vineet; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between quantitative measures of research productivity and academic rank for full-time pediatric dentistry faculty members in accredited U.S. and Canadian residency programs. For each pediatric dentist in the study group, academic rank and bibliometric factors derived from publicly available databases were recorded. Academic ranks were lecturer/instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor. Bibliometric factors were mean total number of publications, mean total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single work, and h-index (a measure of the impact of publications, determined by total number of publications h that had at least h citations each). The study sample was comprised of 267 pediatric dentists: 4% were lecturers/instructors, 44% were assistant professors, 30% were associate professors, and 22% were professors. The mean number of publications for the sample was 15.4±27.8. The mean number of citations was 218.4±482.0. The mean h-index was 4.9±6.6. The h-index was strongly correlated with academic rank (r=0.60, p=0.001). For this sample, an h-index of ≥3 was identified as a threshold for promotion to associate professor, and an h-index of ≥6 was identified as a threshold for promotion to professor. The h-index was strongly correlated with the academic rank of these pediatric dental faculty members, suggesting that this index may be considered a measure for promotion, along with a faculty member's quality and quantity of research, teaching, service, and clinical activities.

  3. The design and content of orthodontic practise websites in the UK is suboptimal and does not correlate with search ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Annika; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated standards of ethical advertising; design and content; and information quality associated with UK dental practice websites offering orthodontic treatment. The World Wide Web was searched from a UK-based computer using the Google search engine combined with the term 'orthodontic braces'. The first 100 UK-based dental practice websites were pooled and saved following duplicate removal. Websites were evaluated for compliance with current General Dental Council ethical advertising guidelines; accessibility, usability, and reliability using the LIDA instrument (a validated outcome tool for healthcare website design and content evaluation); and quality of information using the DISCERN toolkit (a validated method of quality assessment for online written patient information). Nine per cent of websites demonstrated full compliance with current guidelines on ethical advertising. Mean total LIDA score was 110/144 (76%) [range: 51-135; 35-94%]. Eleven websites reached a gold standard of 90% or more for total LIDA score. Mean total DISCERN score was 48/75 (64%) [range: 19-73; 25-97%]. Five websites achieved a total DISCERN score above 90%. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients demonstrated no significant correlations between LIDA (0.1669; P = 0.4252, confidence interval [CI]: -0.2560 to 0.5362) or DISCERN (0.3572; P = 0.0796, CI: -0.0565 to 0.663) score and ranking amongst the 25 highest ranked websites. Most UK websites offering orthodontic services are not fully compliant with national guidelines relating to ethical advertising. Validated measures of website design (LIDA) and information quality (DISCERN) showed wide variation amongst sites. No correlation existed between ranking amongst the highest 25 sites and either of these measures. This investigation was limited to a subsample of UK-only websites; and whilst not representative of European-wide sites, it does suggest that in the UK at least website quality can be improved. © The Author 2014

  4. Video deraining and desnowing using temporal correlation and low-rank matrix completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hwan; Sim, Jae-Young; Kim, Chang-Su

    2015-09-01

    A novel algorithm to remove rain or snow streaks from a video sequence using temporal correlation and low-rank matrix completion is proposed in this paper. Based on the observation that rain streaks are too small and move too fast to affect the optical flow estimation between consecutive frames, we obtain an initial rain map by subtracting temporally warped frames from a current frame. Then, we decompose the initial rain map into basis vectors based on the sparse representation, and classify those basis vectors into rain streak ones and outliers with a support vector machine. We then refine the rain map by excluding the outliers. Finally, we remove the detected rain streaks by employing a low-rank matrix completion technique. Furthermore, we extend the proposed algorithm to stereo video deraining. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm detects and removes rain or snow streaks efficiently, outperforming conventional algorithms.

  5. Correlation of heat transfer coefficient in quenching process using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davare, Sandeep Kedarnath; Balachandran, G.; Singh, R. K. P.

    2018-04-01

    During the heat treatment by quenching in a liquid medium the convective heat transfer coefficient plays a crucial role in the extraction of heat. The heat extraction ultimately influences the cooling rate and hence the hardness and mechanical properties. A Finite Element analysis of quenching a simple flat copper sample with different orientation of sample and with different quenchant temperatures were carried out to check and verify the results obtained from the experiments. The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) was calculated from temperature history in a simple flat copper disc sample experimentally. This HTC data was further used as input to simulation software and the cooling curves were back calculated. The results obtained from software and using experimentation shows nearly consistent values.

  6. Genome-scale cluster analysis of replicated microarrays using shrinkage correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchao; Chang, Chunqi; Salmi, Mari L; Hung, Yeung Sam; Loraine, Ann; Roux, Stanley J

    2008-06-18

    Currently, clustering with some form of correlation coefficient as the gene similarity metric has become a popular method for profiling genomic data. The Pearson correlation coefficient and the standard deviation (SD)-weighted correlation coefficient are the two most widely-used correlations as the similarity metrics in clustering microarray data. However, these two correlations are not optimal for analyzing replicated microarray data generated by most laboratories. An effective correlation coefficient is needed to provide statistically sufficient analysis of replicated microarray data. In this study, we describe a novel correlation coefficient, shrinkage correlation coefficient (SCC), that fully exploits the similarity between the replicated microarray experimental samples. The methodology considers both the number of replicates and the variance within each experimental group in clustering expression data, and provides a robust statistical estimation of the error of replicated microarray data. The value of SCC is revealed by its comparison with two other correlation coefficients that are currently the most widely-used (Pearson correlation coefficient and SD-weighted correlation coefficient) using statistical measures on both synthetic expression data as well as real gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two leading clustering methods, hierarchical and k-means clustering were applied for the comparison. The comparison indicated that using SCC achieves better clustering performance. Applying SCC-based hierarchical clustering to the replicated microarray data obtained from germinating spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, we discovered two clusters of genes with shared expression patterns during spore germination. Functional analysis suggested that some of the genetic mechanisms that control germination in such diverse plant lineages as mosses and angiosperms are also conserved among ferns. This study shows that SCC is an alternative to the Pearson

  7. Statistical electron correlation coefficients for the five lowest states of the heliumlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakkar, A.J.; Smith, V.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical correlation coefficients were introduced by Kutzelnigg, Del Re, and Berthier to provide overall measures of the difference between the electron pair density and the product of one-electron densities in atoms and molecules. Some properties of these coefficients are discussed, and it is shown that an angular correlation coefficient is experimentally accessible. Radial and angular correlation coefficients are computed from highly accurate wave functions for the 1 1 S, 2 3 S, 2 1 S, 2 3 P, and 2 1 P states of the heliumlike ions from He through Mg 10+ . It is found that positive angular correlation coefficients occur in the 2 1 P state of the two-electron positive ions but not in neutral helium. Moreover, the angular correlation coefficients for the 2 1 S and 2 3 S states of the positively charged two-electron ions show that a previously proposed reformulation of Hund's rule is incorrect

  8. SEPHIS and the distribution coefficients correlation in the IMPUREX system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andaur Iturrieta, Claudio

    1997-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels by the IMPUREX process consists in uranium selective extraction, originally in aqueous nitric solution, by action of the tributyl phosphate (TBP) present in an organic phase that circulates at countercurrent of the aqueous one. In the study of such process, it is necessary to use the correlations that allows to predict the concentrations of the solutes in the equilibrium, both in the aqueous phase and in the organic one, given as data the ruling operation conditions (temperature, TBP concentration and acidity). A correlation of this kind is the Groenier-Rainey-Watson, which is forming part of the code of the SEPHIS simulation program. In the present work it is analyzed the behavior of this correlation contrasting the predicted values with experimental ones

  9. Sex-reversed correlation between stress levels and dominance rank in a captive non-breeder flock of crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Minami; Asaba, Akari; Miyazawa, Eri; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Group living has both benefits and costs to individuals; benefits include efficient acquisition of resources, and costs include stress from social conflicts among group members. Such social challenges result in hierarchical dominance ranking among group members as a solution to avoid escalating conflict that causes different levels of basal stress between individuals at different ranks. Stress-associated glucocorticoid (corticosterone in rodents and birds; CORT) levels are known to correlate with dominance rank in diverse taxa and to covary with various social factors, such as sex and dominance maintenance styles. Although there is much evidence for sex differences in the basal levels of CORT in various species, the correlation of sex differences in basal CORT with dominance rank is poorly understood. We investigated the correlation between CORT metabolites (CM) in the droppings and social factors, including rank and sex, in a captive non-breeder group of crows. In this group, all the single males dominated all the single females, and dominance ranks were stable among single males but relatively unstable among single females. CM levels and rank were significantly correlated in a sex-reversed fashion: males at higher rank (i.e., more dominant) had higher CM, whereas females at higher rank exhibited lower CM. This is the first evidence of sex-reversed patterns of CM-rank correlation in birds. The results suggest that different mechanisms of stress-dominance relationships operate on the sexes in non-breeder crow aggregations; in males, stress is associated with the cost of aggressive displays, whereas females experience subordination stress due to males' overt aggression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient tracking of the cross-correlation coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, R.M.; Irwan, R.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    2002-01-01

    In many (audio) processing algorithms, involving manipulation of discrete-time signals, the performance can vary strongly over the repertoire that is used. This may be the case when the signals from the various channels are allowed to be strongly positively or negatively correlated. We propose and

  11. 147 - 154 Genetic Variability, Heritability and Correlation Coefficient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    twelve upland rice genotypes during 2013 main cropping season. ... spikelet per panicle, number of filled grains per panicle and biomass yield had a positive and significant correlation ... fertilizers were applied at the rate of 100 kg per hectare. ..... ultimate effect for selecting superior varieties (Ali et al., .... (Brassica napus L.).

  12. Multi criteria decision making using correlation coefficient under rough neutrosophic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapati Pramanik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we define correlation coefficient measure between any two rough neutrosophic sets. We also prove some of its basic properties.. We develop a new multiple attribute group decision making method based on the proposed correlation coefficient measure.

  13. Multi criteria decision making using correlation coefficient under rough neutrosophic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Pramanik, Surapati; Roy, Rumi; Roy, Tapan Kumar; Smarandache, Florentin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we define correlation coefficient measure between any two rough neutrosophic sets. We also prove some of its basic properties. We develop a new multiple attribute group decision making method based on the proposed correlation coefficient measure. An illustrative example of medical diagnosis is solved to demonstrate the applicability and effecriveness of the proposed method.

  14. Correlation Coefficients of Probabilistic Hesitant Fuzzy Elements and Their Applications to Evaluation of the Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-xing Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Correlation coefficient is one of the broadly use indexes in multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM processes. However, some important issues related to correlation coefficient utilization within probabilistic hesitant fuzzy environments remain to be addressed. The purpose of this study is introduced a MCDM method based on correlation coefficients utilize probabilistic hesitant fuzzy information. First, the covariance and correlation coefficient between two PHFEs is introduced, the properties of the proposed covariance and correlation coefficient are discussed. In addition, the northwest corner rule to obtain the expected mean related to the multiply of two PHFEs is introduced. Second, the weighted correlation coefficient is proposed to make the proposed MCDM method more applicable. And the properties of the proposed weighted correlation coefficient are also discussed. Finally, an illustrative example is demonstrated the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed method. An illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the correlation coefficient propose in this paper lies in the interval [−1, 1], which not only consider the strength of relationship between the PHFEs but also whether the PHFEs are positively or negatively related. The advantage of this method is it can avoid the inconsistency of the decision-making result due to the loss of information.

  15. The Robustness of Designs for Trials with Nested Data against Incorrect Initial Intracluster Correlation Coefficient Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendijk, Elly J. H.; Moerbeek, Mirjam; Maas, Cora J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the case of trials with nested data, the optimal allocation of units depends on the budget, the costs, and the intracluster correlation coefficient. In general, the intracluster correlation coefficient is unknown in advance and an initial guess has to be made based on published values or subject matter knowledge. This initial estimate is likely…

  16. Correlation coefficient measurement of the mode-locked laser tones using four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthur, Aravind P; Panapakkam, Vivek; Vujicic, Vidak; Merghem, Kamel; Lelarge, Francois; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Barry, Liam P

    2016-06-01

    We use four-wave mixing to measure the correlation coefficient of comb tones in a quantum-dash mode-locked laser under passive and active locked regimes. We study the uncertainty in the measurement of the correlation coefficient of the proposed method.

  17. The robustness of designs for trials with nested data against incorrect initial intracluster correlation coefficient estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korendijk, E.J.H.; Moerbeek, M.; Maas, C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the case of trials with nested data, the optimal allocation of units depends on the budget, the costs, and the intracluster correlation coefficient. In general, the intracluster correlation coefficient is unknown in advance and an initial guess has to be made based on published values or

  18. Attenuation of the Squared Canonical Correlation Coefficient under Varying Estimates of Score Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Celia M.

    2010-01-01

    Research pertaining to the distortion of the squared canonical correlation coefficient has traditionally been limited to the effects of sampling error and associated correction formulas. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of attenuation of the squared canonical correlation coefficient under varying conditions of score reliability.…

  19. Pearson's chi-square test and rank correlation inferences for clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Joanna H; Fay, Michael P

    2017-09-01

    Pearson's chi-square test has been widely used in testing for association between two categorical responses. Spearman rank correlation and Kendall's tau are often used for measuring and testing association between two continuous or ordered categorical responses. However, the established statistical properties of these tests are only valid when each pair of responses are independent, where each sampling unit has only one pair of responses. When each sampling unit consists of a cluster of paired responses, the assumption of independent pairs is violated. In this article, we apply the within-cluster resampling technique to U-statistics to form new tests and rank-based correlation estimators for possibly tied clustered data. We develop large sample properties of the new proposed tests and estimators and evaluate their performance by simulations. The proposed methods are applied to a data set collected from a PET/CT imaging study for illustration. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Empirical correlations for axial dispersion coefficient and Peclet number in fixed-bed columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Seyed Omid; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-03-24

    In this work, a new correlation for the axial dispersion coefficient was obtained using experimental data in the literature for axial dispersion in fixed-bed columns packed with particles. The Chung and Wen correlation, the De Ligny correlation are two popular empirical correlations. However, the former lacks the molecular diffusion term and the latter does not consider bed voidage. The new axial dispersion coefficient correlation in this work was based on additional experimental data in the literature by considering both molecular diffusion and bed voidage. It is more comprehensive and accurate. The Peclet number correlation from the new axial dispersion coefficient correlation on the average leads to 12% lower Peclet number values compared to the values from the Chung and Wen correlation, and in many cases much smaller than those from the De Ligny correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring correlations between non-stationary series with DCCA coefficient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 402, č. 1 (2014), s. 291-298 ISSN 0378-4371 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-11402P Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : power-law cross-correlations * long - term memory * econophysics Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.732, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/kristoufek-0433533.pdf

  2. Improvement of a new rotation function for molecular replacement by designing new scoring functions and dynamic correlation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Jiang; Wei, Ding

    2010-01-01

    A previously published new rotation function has been improved by using a dynamic correlation coefficient as well as two new scoring functions of relative entropy and mean-square-residues to make the rotation function more robust and independent of a specific set of weights for scoring and ranking. The previously described new rotation function calculates the rotation function of molecular replacement by matching the search model directly with the Patterson vector map. The signal-to-noise ratio for the correct match was increased by averaging all the matching peaks. Several matching scores were employed to evaluate the goodness of matching. These matching scores were then combined into a single total score by optimizing a set of weights using the linear regression method. It was found that there exists an optimal set of weights that can be applied to the global rotation search and the correct solution can be ranked in the top 100 or less. However, this set of optimal weights in general is dependent on the search models and the crystal structures with different space groups and cell parameters. In this work, we try to solve this problem by designing a dynamic correlation coefficient. It is shown that the dynamic correlation coefficient works for a variety of space groups and cell parameters in the global search of rotation function. We also introduce two new matching scores: relative entropy and mean-square-residues. Last but not least, we discussed a valid method for the optimization of the adjustable parameters for matching vectors. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  3. ppcor: An R Package for a Fast Calculation to Semi-partial Correlation Coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho

    2015-11-01

    Lack of a general matrix formula hampers implementation of the semi-partial correlation, also known as part correlation, to the higher-order coefficient. This is because the higher-order semi-partial correlation calculation using a recursive formula requires an enormous number of recursive calculations to obtain the correlation coefficients. To resolve this difficulty, we derive a general matrix formula of the semi-partial correlation for fast computation. The semi-partial correlations are then implemented on an R package ppcor along with the partial correlation. Owing to the general matrix formulas, users can readily calculate the coefficients of both partial and semi-partial correlations without computational burden. The package ppcor further provides users with the level of the statistical significance with its test statistic.

  4. Diagnosing cysts with correlation coefficient images from 2-dimensional freehand elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booi, Rebecca C; Carson, Paul L; O'Donnell, Matthew; Richards, Michael S; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2007-09-01

    We compared the diagnostic potential of using correlation coefficient images versus elastograms from 2-dimensional (2D) freehand elastography to characterize breast cysts. In this preliminary study, which was approved by the Institutional Review Board and compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, we imaged 4 consecutive human subjects (4 cysts, 1 biopsy-verified benign breast parenchyma) with freehand 2D elastography. Data were processed offline with conventional 2D phase-sensitive speckle-tracking algorithms. The correlation coefficient in the cyst and surrounding tissue was calculated, and appearances of the cysts in the correlation coefficient images and elastograms were compared. The correlation coefficient in the cysts was considerably lower (14%-37%) than in the surrounding tissue because of the lack of sufficient speckle in the cysts, as well as the prominence of random noise, reverberations, and clutter, which decorrelated quickly. Thus, the cysts were visible in all correlation coefficient images. In contrast, the elastograms associated with these cysts each had different elastographic patterns. The solid mass in this study did not have the same high decorrelation rate as the cysts, having a correlation coefficient only 2.1% lower than that of surrounding tissue. Correlation coefficient images may produce a more direct, reliable, and consistent method for characterizing cysts than elastograms.

  5. An Improved Rank Correlation Effect Size Statistic for Single-Case Designs: Baseline Corrected Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    Measuring treatment effects when an individual's pretreatment performance is improving poses a challenge for single-case experimental designs. It may be difficult to determine whether improvement is due to the treatment or due to the preexisting baseline trend. Tau- U is a popular single-case effect size statistic that purports to control for baseline trend. However, despite its strengths, Tau- U has substantial limitations: Its values are inflated and not bound between -1 and +1, it cannot be visually graphed, and its relatively weak method of trend control leads to unacceptable levels of Type I error wherein ineffective treatments appear effective. An improved effect size statistic based on rank correlation and robust regression, Baseline Corrected Tau, is proposed and field-tested with both published and simulated single-case time series. A web-based calculator for Baseline Corrected Tau is also introduced for use by single-case investigators.

  6. Comparing two K-category assignments by a K-category correlation coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Predicted assignments of biological sequences are often evaluated by Matthews correlation coefficient. However, Matthews correlation coefficient applies only to cases where the assignments belong to two categories, and cases with more than two categories are often artificially forced into two...... categories by considering what belongs and what does not belong to one of the categories, leading to the loss of information. Here, an extended correlation coefficient that applies to K-categories is proposed, and this measure is shown to be highly applicable for evaluating prediction of RNA secondary...

  7. Statistics corner: A guide to appropriate use of correlation coefficient in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaka, M M

    2012-09-01

    Correlation is a statistical method used to assess a possible linear association between two continuous variables. It is simple both to calculate and to interpret. However, misuse of correlation is so common among researchers that some statisticians have wished that the method had never been devised at all. The aim of this article is to provide a guide to appropriate use of correlation in medical research and to highlight some misuse. Examples of the applications of the correlation coefficient have been provided using data from statistical simulations as well as real data. Rule of thumb for interpreting size of a correlation coefficient has been provided.

  8. Correlation factor, velocity autocorrelation function and frequency-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijeren, H. van; Kehr, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    The correlation factor, defined as the ratio between the tracer diffusion coefficient in lattice gases and the diffusion coefficient for a corresponding uncorrelated random walk, is known to assume a very simple form under certain conditions. A simple derivation of this is given with the aid of

  9. Detecting PM2.5's Correlations between Neighboring Cities Using a Time-Lagged Cross-Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Yuming

    2017-08-31

    In order to investigate the time-dependent cross-correlations of fine particulate (PM2.5) series among neighboring cities in Northern China, in this paper, we propose a new cross-correlation coefficient, the time-lagged q-L dependent height crosscorrelation coefficient (denoted by p q (τ, L)), which incorporates the time-lag factor and the fluctuation amplitude information into the analogous height cross-correlation analysis coefficient. Numerical tests are performed to illustrate that the newly proposed coefficient ρ q (τ, L) can be used to detect cross-correlations between two series with time lags and to identify different range of fluctuations at which two series possess cross-correlations. Applying the new coefficient to analyze the time-dependent cross-correlations of PM2.5 series between Beijing and the three neighboring cities of Tianjin, Zhangjiakou, and Baoding, we find that time lags between the PM2.5 series with larger fluctuations are longer than those between PM2.5 series withsmaller fluctuations. Our analysis also shows that cross-correlations between the PM2.5 series of two neighboring cities are significant and the time lags between two PM2.5 series of neighboring cities are significantly non-zero. These findings providenew scientific support on the view that air pollution in neighboring cities can affect one another not simultaneously but with a time lag.

  10. Determining Sample Size for Accurate Estimation of the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algina, James; Olejnik, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Discusses determining sample size for estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient and presents regression equations that permit determination of the sample size for estimating this parameter for up to 20 predictor variables. (SLD)

  11. Correlation Coefficients of Extended Hesitant Fuzzy Sets and Their Applications to Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Lu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extended hesitant fuzzy sets (EHFSs, which allow the membership degree of an element to a set represented by several possible value-groups, can be considered as a powerful tool to express uncertain information in the process of group decision making. Therefore, we derive some correlation coefficients between EHFSs, which contain two cases, the correlation coefficients taking into account the length of extended hesitant fuzzy elements (EHFEs and the correlation coefficients without taking into account the length of EHFEs, as a new extension of existing correlation coefficients for hesitant fuzzy sets (HFSs and apply them to decision making under extended hesitant fuzzy environments. A real-world example based on the energy policy problem is employed to illustrate the actual need for dealing with the difference of evaluation information provided by different experts without information loss in decision making processes.

  12. Observations of copolar correlation coefficient through a bright band at vertical incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrnic, D. S.; Raghavan, R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of polarimetric measurements at vertical incidence. In particular, the correlation coefficients between linear copolar components are examined, and measurements obtained with the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL)'s and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s polarimetric radars are presented. The data are from two well-defined bright bands. A sharp decrease of the correlation coefficient, confined to a height interval of a few hundred meters, marks the bottom of the bright band.

  13. Sparse and smooth canonical correlation analysis through rank-1 matrix approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa-El-Bey, Abdeldjalil; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2017-12-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a well-known technique used to characterize the relationship between two sets of multidimensional variables by finding linear combinations of variables with maximal correlation. Sparse CCA and smooth or regularized CCA are two widely used variants of CCA because of the improved interpretability of the former and the better performance of the later. So far, the cross-matrix product of the two sets of multidimensional variables has been widely used for the derivation of these variants. In this paper, two new algorithms for sparse CCA and smooth CCA are proposed. These algorithms differ from the existing ones in their derivation which is based on penalized rank-1 matrix approximation and the orthogonal projectors onto the space spanned by the two sets of multidimensional variables instead of the simple cross-matrix product. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms are tested on simulated experiments. On these results, it can be observed that they outperform the state of the art sparse CCA algorithms.

  14. Correlation Between Minimum Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADCmin) and Tumor Cellularity: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Wienke, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on measure of water diffusion that can provide information about tissue microstructure, especially about cell count. Increase of cell density induces restriction of water diffusion and decreases apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). ADC can be divided into three sub-parameters: ADC minimum or ADC min , mean ADC or ADC mean and ADC maximum or ADC max Some studies have suggested that ADC min shows stronger correlations with cell count in comparison to other ADC fractions and may be used as a parameter for estimation of tumor cellularity. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to summarize correlation coefficients between ADC min and cellularity in different tumors based on large patient data. For this analysis, MEDLINE database was screened for associations between ADC and cell count in different tumors up to September 2016. For this work, only data regarding ADC min were included. Overall, 12 publications with 317 patients were identified. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to analyze associations between ADC min and cellularity. The reported Pearson correlation coefficients in some publications were converted into Spearman correlation coefficients. The pooled correlation coefficient for all included studies was ρ=-0.59 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.72 to -0.45), heterogeneity Tau 2 =0.04 (pcorrelated moderately with tumor cellularity. The calculated correlation coefficient is not stronger in comparison to the reported coefficient for ADC mean and, therefore, ADC min does not represent a better means to reflect cellularity. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Quantifying the range of cross-correlated fluctuations using a q- L dependent AHXA coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Yuming

    2018-03-01

    Recently, based on analogous height cross-correlation analysis (AHXA), a cross-correlation coefficient ρ×(L) has been proposed to quantify the levels of cross-correlation on different temporal scales for bivariate series. A limitation of this coefficient is that it cannot capture the full information of cross-correlations on amplitude of fluctuations. In fact, it only detects the cross-correlation at a specific order fluctuation, which might neglect some important information inherited from other order fluctuations. To overcome this disadvantage, in this work, based on the scaling of the qth order covariance and time delay L, we define a two-parameter dependent cross-correlation coefficient ρq(L) to detect and quantify the range and level of cross-correlations. This new version of ρq(L) coefficient leads to the formation of a ρq(L) surface, which not only is able to quantify the level of cross-correlations, but also allows us to identify the range of fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two given signals. Applications to the classical ARFIMA models and the binomial multifractal series illustrate the feasibility of this new coefficient ρq(L) . In addition, a statistical test is proposed to quantify the existence of cross-correlations between two given series. Applying our method to the real life empirical data from the 1999-2000 California electricity market, we find that the California power crisis in 2000 destroys the cross-correlation between the price and the load series but does not affect the correlation of the load series during and before the crisis.

  16. Wavelet based correlation coefficient of time series of Saudi Meteorological Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Siddiqi, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, wavelet concepts are used to study a correlation between pairs of time series of meteorological parameters such as pressure, temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind speed. The study utilized the daily average values of meteorological parameters of nine meteorological stations of Saudi Arabia located at different strategic locations. The data used in this study cover a period of 16 years between 1990 and 2005. Besides obtaining wavelet spectra, we also computed the wavelet correlation coefficients between two same parameters from two different locations and show that strong correlation or strong anti-correlation depends on scale. The cross-correlation coefficients of meteorological parameters between two stations were also calculated using statistical function. For coastal to costal pair of stations, pressure time series was found to be strongly correlated. In general, the temperature data were found to be strongly correlated for all pairs of stations and the rainfall data the least.

  17. Sample size for estimation of the Pearson correlation coefficient in cherry tomato tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Giacomini Sari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the required sample size for estimation of the Pearson coefficient of correlation between cherry tomato variables. Two uniformity tests were set up in a protected environment in the spring/summer of 2014. The observed variables in each plant were mean fruit length, mean fruit width, mean fruit weight, number of bunches, number of fruits per bunch, number of fruits, and total weight of fruits, with calculation of the Pearson correlation matrix between them. Sixty eight sample sizes were planned for one greenhouse and 48 for another, with the initial sample size of 10 plants, and the others were obtained by adding five plants. For each planned sample size, 3000 estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient were obtained through bootstrap re-samplings with replacement. The sample size for each correlation coefficient was determined when the 95% confidence interval amplitude value was less than or equal to 0.4. Obtaining estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient with high precision is difficult for parameters with a weak linear relation. Accordingly, a larger sample size is necessary to estimate them. Linear relations involving variables dealing with size and number of fruits per plant have less precision. To estimate the coefficient of correlation between productivity variables of cherry tomato, with a confidence interval of 95% equal to 0.4, it is necessary to sample 275 plants in a 250m² greenhouse, and 200 plants in a 200m² greenhouse.

  18. Correlation Coefficient Control For A Frequency Reconfigurable Dual-Band Compact MIMO Antenna Destined For LTE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatomirescu, Alexandru; Buskgaard, Emil Feldborg; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    . The MIMO performance is investigated in two different channel models through efficiency, branch power imbalance and envelope correlation. The proposed antennas have acceptable levels of isolation between them, even in the low-bands, while having a good efficiency. Furthermore, the correlation coefficient...

  19. Reducing Bias and Error in the Correlation Coefficient Due to Nonnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Hittner, James B.

    2015-01-01

    It is more common for educational and psychological data to be nonnormal than to be approximately normal. This tendency may lead to bias and error in point estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient. In a series of Monte Carlo simulations, the Pearson correlation was examined under conditions of normal and nonnormal data, and it was compared…

  20. Statistical electron angular correlation coefficients for atoms within the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical electron angular correlation coefficients tau = 2 2 He through 14 Si, within the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham density-functional formalism. These are computed with use of the spectral sum rules obtained from the pseudoexcitation spectrum employing the recent formulation of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham theory due to Bartolotti. Various approximations to the exchange-correlation energy functional are used and for first-row atoms, a comparison is made with the highly accurate correlation coefficients recently obtained by Thakkar. The present tau values show closer agreement with those of Thakkar with increasing number of electrons

  1. Relationships among the slopes of lines derived from various data analysis techniques and the associated correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for fitting a straight line to a collection of data points is given. The relationships between the slopes and correlation coefficients, and between the corresponding standard deviations and correlation coefficient are given.

  2. QSPR modeling of octanol/water partition coefficient of antineoplastic agents by balance of correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Raska, Ivan; Benfenati, Emilio

    2010-04-01

    Three different splits into the subtraining set (n = 22), the set of calibration (n = 21), and the test set (n = 12) of 55 antineoplastic agents have been examined. By the correlation balance of SMILES-based optimal descriptors quite satisfactory models for the octanol/water partition coefficient have been obtained on all three splits. The correlation balance is the optimization of a one-variable model with a target function that provides both the maximal values of the correlation coefficient for the subtraining and calibration set and the minimum of the difference between the above-mentioned correlation coefficients. Thus, the calibration set is a preliminary test set. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlations and fluctuations in reflection coefficients for coherent wave propagation in disordered scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Feng, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relation between the reflection coefficients and the Green's function for a coherent wave propagation in a disordered elastic-scattering medium is derived. The sum rule of the reflection and transmission coefficients corresponding to probability conservation is shown rigorously for an arbitrary scattering potential. The correlation function of the reflection coefficients is then calculated by using a Feynman-diagrammatic approach in the weak-localized multiple-scattering regime (L much-gt l much-gt λ). The result is in agreement with recent experiments on the so-called ''memory effect'' in reflection coefficients. A more general condition under which the memory effect can occur is derived. Differences between the the correlation functions for reflection and that for transmission are discussed

  4. New external convective heat transfer coefficient correlations for isolated low-rise buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmel, M. G.; Mendes, N. [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR/CCET, Thermal Systems Laboratory, LST, Curitiba (Brazil); Abadie, M. O. [Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, PUCPR/CCET, Thermal Systems Laboratory, LST, Curitiba (Brazil); Laboratoire d' Etude des Phenomenes de Transfert Appliques au batiment (LEPTAB), University of La Rochelle, La Rochelle (France)

    2007-07-01

    Building energy analyses are very sensitive to external convective heat transfer coefficients so that some researchers have conducted sensitivity calculations and proved that depending on the choice of those coefficients, energy demands estimation values can vary from 20% to 40%. In this context, computational fluid dynamics calculations have been performed to predict convective heat transfer coefficients at the external surfaces of a simple shape low-rise building. Effects of wind velocity and orientation have been analyzed considering four surface-to-air temperature differences. Results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient value strongly depends on the wind velocity, that the wind direction has a notable effect for vertical walls and for roofs and that the surface-to-air temperature difference has a negligible effect for wind velocity higher than 2 m/s. External convective heat transfer coefficient correlations are provided as a function of the wind free stream velocity and wind-to-surface angle. (author)

  5. The use of photon correlation spectroscopy method for determining diffusion coefficient in brine and herring flesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumanova M.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The process fish salting has been studied by the method of photon correlation spectroscopy; the distribution of salt concentration in the solution and herring flesh with skin has been found, diffusion coefficients and salt concentrations used for creating a mathematical model of the salting technology have been worked out; the possibility of determination by this method the coefficient of dynamic viscosity of solutions and different media (minced meat etc. has been considered

  6. Apparent diffusion coefficient ratio correlates significantly with prostate cancer gleason score at final pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Løgager, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient measurements (ADCtumor and ADCratio ) and the Gleason score from radical prostatectomy specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with clinically localized prostate cancer scheduled for radical prostatectomy...... correlated with the Gleason score from the prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS: The association between ADC measurements and Gleason score showed a significant negative correlation (P ... ) and 0.90 (ADCratio ) when discriminating Gleason score ≤7(3+4) from Gleason score ≥7(4+3). CONCLUSION: ADC measurements showed a significant correlation with tumor Gleason score at final pathology. The ADCratio demonstrated the best correlation compared to the ADCtumor value and radically improved...

  7. [Correlation of molecular weight and nanofiltration mass transfer coefficient of phenolic acid composition from Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cun-Yu; Wu, Xin; Gu, Jia-Mei; Li, Hong-Yang; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Based on the molecular sieving and solution-diffusion effect in nanofiltration separation, the correlation between initial concentration and mass transfer coefficient of three typical phenolic acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza was fitted to analyze the relationship among mass transfer coefficient, molecular weight and concentration. The experiment showed a linear relationship between operation pressure and membrane flux. Meanwhile, the membrane flux was gradually decayed with the increase of solute concentration. On the basis of the molecular sieving and solution-diffusion effect, the mass transfer coefficient and initial concentration of three phenolic acids showed a power function relationship, and the regression coefficients were all greater than 0.9. The mass transfer coefficient and molecular weight of three phenolic acids were negatively correlated with each other, and the order from high to low is protocatechualdehyde >rosmarinic acid> salvianolic acid B. The separation mechanism of nanofiltration for phenolic acids was further clarified through the analysis of the correlation of molecular weight and nanofiltration mass transfer coefficient. The findings provide references for nanofiltration separation, especially for traditional Chinese medicine with phenolic acids. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Correlation Between Posttraumatic Growth and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Based on Pearson Correlation Coefficient: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An-Nuo; Wang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hui-Ping; Gong, Juan; Liu, Xiao-Hong

    2017-05-01

    The literature on posttraumatic growth (PTG) is burgeoning, with the inconsistencies in the literature of the relationship between PTG and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms becoming a focal point of attention. Thus, this meta-analysis aims to explore the relationship between PTG and PTSD symptoms through the Pearson correlation coefficient. A systematic search of the literature from January 1996 to November 2015 was completed. We retrieved reports on 63 studies that involved 26,951 patients. The weighted correlation coefficient revealed an effect size of 0.22 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.18 to 0.25. Meta-analysis provides evidence that PTG may be positively correlated with PTSD symptoms and that this correlation may be modified by age, trauma type, and time since trauma. Accordingly, people with high levels of PTG should not be ignored, but rather, they should continue to receive help to alleviate their PTSD symptoms.

  9. Quantized correlation coefficient for measuring reproducibility of ChIP-chip data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda Mitzi I

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip is used to study protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications on a genome-scale. To ensure data quality, these experiments are usually performed in replicates, and a correlation coefficient between replicates is used often to assess reproducibility. However, the correlation coefficient can be misleading because it is affected not only by the reproducibility of the signal but also by the amount of binding signal present in the data. Results We develop the Quantized correlation coefficient (QCC that is much less dependent on the amount of signal. This involves discretization of data into set of quantiles (quantization, a merging procedure to group the background probes, and recalculation of the Pearson correlation coefficient. This procedure reduces the influence of the background noise on the statistic, which then properly focuses more on the reproducibility of the signal. The performance of this procedure is tested in both simulated and real ChIP-chip data. For replicates with different levels of enrichment over background and coverage, we find that QCC reflects reproducibility more accurately and is more robust than the standard Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients. The quantization and the merging procedure can also suggest a proper quantile threshold for separating signal from background for further analysis. Conclusions To measure reproducibility of ChIP-chip data correctly, a correlation coefficient that is robust to the amount of signal present should be used. QCC is one such measure. The QCC statistic can also be applied in a variety of other contexts for measuring reproducibility, including analysis of array CGH data for DNA copy number and gene expression data.

  10. Quantized correlation coefficient for measuring reproducibility of ChIP-chip data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouyong; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Park, Peter J

    2010-07-27

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip) is used to study protein-DNA interactions and histone modifications on a genome-scale. To ensure data quality, these experiments are usually performed in replicates, and a correlation coefficient between replicates is used often to assess reproducibility. However, the correlation coefficient can be misleading because it is affected not only by the reproducibility of the signal but also by the amount of binding signal present in the data. We develop the Quantized correlation coefficient (QCC) that is much less dependent on the amount of signal. This involves discretization of data into set of quantiles (quantization), a merging procedure to group the background probes, and recalculation of the Pearson correlation coefficient. This procedure reduces the influence of the background noise on the statistic, which then properly focuses more on the reproducibility of the signal. The performance of this procedure is tested in both simulated and real ChIP-chip data. For replicates with different levels of enrichment over background and coverage, we find that QCC reflects reproducibility more accurately and is more robust than the standard Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients. The quantization and the merging procedure can also suggest a proper quantile threshold for separating signal from background for further analysis. To measure reproducibility of ChIP-chip data correctly, a correlation coefficient that is robust to the amount of signal present should be used. QCC is one such measure. The QCC statistic can also be applied in a variety of other contexts for measuring reproducibility, including analysis of array CGH data for DNA copy number and gene expression data.

  11. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPHER H. TIENKEN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries’ rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum’s Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI. The study investigated the existence of relationships between international test rankings from three different time periods during the last 50 years of U.S. education policy development (i.e., 1957–1982, 1983–2000, and 2001–2006 and 2006 GCI ranks. It extends previous research on the topic by investigating how GCI rankings in the top 50 percent and bottom 50 percent relate to rankings on international tests for the countries that participated in each test. The study found that the relationship between ranks on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic strength is stronger among nations with lower-performing economies. Nations with strong economies, such as the United States, demonstrate a weaker, nonsignificant relationship.

  12. Estimating a graphical intra-class correlation coefficient (GICC) using multivariate probit-linear mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chen; Chen, Shaojie; Sair, Haris I; Airan, Raag; Caffo, Brian S

    2015-09-01

    Data reproducibility is a critical issue in all scientific experiments. In this manuscript, the problem of quantifying the reproducibility of graphical measurements is considered. The image intra-class correlation coefficient (I2C2) is generalized and the graphical intra-class correlation coefficient (GICC) is proposed for such purpose. The concept for GICC is based on multivariate probit-linear mixed effect models. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo EM (mcm-cEM) algorithm is used for estimating the GICC. Simulation results with varied settings are demonstrated and our method is applied to the KIRBY21 test-retest dataset.

  13. Choosing the best index for the average score intraclass correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2016-09-01

    The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)(2) index from a one-way random effects model is widely used to describe the reliability of mean ratings in behavioral, educational, and psychological research. Despite its apparent utility, the essential property of ICC(2) as a point estimator of the average score intraclass correlation coefficient is seldom mentioned. This article considers several potential measures and compares their performance with ICC(2). Analytical derivations and numerical examinations are presented to assess the bias and mean square error of the alternative estimators. The results suggest that more advantageous indices can be recommended over ICC(2) for their theoretical implication and computational ease.

  14. Colocalization analysis in fluorescence micrographs: verification of a more accurate calculation of pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Andrew L; Macleod, Alasdair; Noppen, Samuel; Sanderson, Jeremy; Guérin, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    One of the most routine uses of fluorescence microscopy is colocalization, i.e., the demonstration of a relationship between pairs of biological molecules. Frequently this is presented simplistically by the use of overlays of red and green images, with areas of yellow indicating colocalization of the molecules. Colocalization data are rarely quantified and can be misleading. Our results from both synthetic and biological datasets demonstrate that the generation of Pearson's correlation coefficient between pairs of images can overestimate positive correlation and fail to demonstrate negative correlation. We have demonstrated that the calculation of a thresholded Pearson's correlation coefficient using only intensity values over a determined threshold in both channels produces numerical values that more accurately describe both synthetic datasets and biological examples. Its use will bring clarity and accuracy to colocalization studies using fluorescent microscopy.

  15. Osmotic coefficients of alcoholic mixtures containing BMpyrDCA: Experimental determination and correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, N.; Domínguez, Á.; Macedo, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Osmotic coefficients of alcohols with BMpyrDCA ionic liquid are determined. • Experimental data were correlated with Extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. • Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. • The results have been interpreted in terms of interactions. - Abstract: The vapour pressure osmometry technique (VPO) has been used to obtain the osmotic coefficients of the binary mixtures of the primary and secondary alcohols 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol and 1-pentanol with the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, BMpyrDCA. From these coefficients, the corresponding activity coefficients and vapour pressures of the mixtures have been also determined. The results have been discussed in terms of solute–solvent and ion–ion interactions and have been compared with those taken from literature in order to analyse the influence of the anion or cation constituting the ionic liquid. For the treatment of the experimental data, the Extended Pitzer model of Archer and the MNRTL model have been applied, obtaining standard deviations from the experimental osmotic coefficients lower than 0.015 and 0.065, respectively. From the parameters obtained with the Extended Pitzer model or Archer, the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures have been calculated

  16. Closed-Form Representations of the Density Function and Integer Moments of the Sample Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge B. Provost

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a simplified representation of the exact density function of R, the sample correlation coefficient. The odd and even moments of R are also obtained in closed forms. Being expressed in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions, the resulting representations are readily computable. Some numerical examples corroborate the validity of the results derived herein.

  17. The relation between Pearson’s correlation coefficient r and Salton’s cosine measure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egghe, L.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between Pearson's correlation coefficient and Salton's cosine measure is revealed based on the different possible values of the division of the L1-norm and the L2-norm of a vector. These different values yield a sheaf of increasingly straight lines which together form a cloud of points,

  18. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients in Hierarchical Designs: Evaluation Using Latent Variable Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Tenko

    2011-01-01

    Interval estimation of intraclass correlation coefficients in hierarchical designs is discussed within a latent variable modeling framework. A method accomplishing this aim is outlined, which is applicable in two-level studies where participants (or generally lower-order units) are clustered within higher-order units. The procedure can also be…

  19. Speed Estimation in Geared Wind Turbines Using the Maximum Correlation Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Marhadi, Kun S.; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    to overcome the above mentioned issues. The high speed stage shaft angular velocity is calculated based on the maximum correlation coefficient between the 1 st gear mesh frequency of the last gearbox stage and a pure sinus tone of known frequency and phase. The proposed algorithm utilizes vibration signals...

  20. A simple approximation to the bivariate normal distribution with large correlation coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The bivariate normal distribution function is approximated with emphasis on situations where the correlation coefficient is large. The high accuracy of the approximation is illustrated by numerical examples. Moreover, exact upper and lower bounds are presented as well as asymptotic results on the

  1. Sample Size Calculation for Estimating or Testing a Nonzero Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, K.; Xia, Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The problems of hypothesis testing and interval estimation of the squared multiple correlation coefficient of a multivariate normal distribution are considered. It is shown that available one-sided tests are uniformly most powerful, and the one-sided confidence intervals are uniformly most accurate. An exact method of calculating sample size to…

  2. Using beta coefficients to impute missing correlations in meta-analysis research: Reasons for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Philip L; Le, Huy; Oh, In-Sue; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Bobko, Philip

    2018-06-01

    Meta-analysis has become a well-accepted method for synthesizing empirical research about a given phenomenon. Many meta-analyses focus on synthesizing correlations across primary studies, but some primary studies do not report correlations. Peterson and Brown (2005) suggested that researchers could use standardized regression weights (i.e., beta coefficients) to impute missing correlations. Indeed, their beta estimation procedures (BEPs) have been used in meta-analyses in a wide variety of fields. In this study, the authors evaluated the accuracy of BEPs in meta-analysis. We first examined how use of BEPs might affect results from a published meta-analysis. We then developed a series of Monte Carlo simulations that systematically compared the use of existing correlations (that were not missing) to data sets that incorporated BEPs (that impute missing correlations from corresponding beta coefficients). These simulations estimated ρ̄ (mean population correlation) and SDρ (true standard deviation) across a variety of meta-analytic conditions. Results from both the existing meta-analysis and the Monte Carlo simulations revealed that BEPs were associated with potentially large biases when estimating ρ̄ and even larger biases when estimating SDρ. Using only existing correlations often substantially outperformed use of BEPs and virtually never performed worse than BEPs. Overall, the authors urge a return to the standard practice of using only existing correlations in meta-analysis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Rankings of International Achievement Test Performance and Economic Strength: Correlation or Conjecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    Examining a popular political notion, this article presents results from a series of Spearman Rho calculations conducted to investigate relationships between countries' rankings on international tests of mathematics and science and future economic competitiveness as measured by the 2006 World Economic Forum's Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI).…

  4. Evaluation of icing drag coefficient correlations applied to iced propeller performance prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas L.; Shaw, R. J.; Korkan, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of three empirical icing drag coefficient correlations is accomplished through application to a set of propeller icing data. The various correlations represent the best means currently available for relating drag rise to various flight and atmospheric conditions for both fixed-wing and rotating airfoils, and the work presented here ilustrates and evaluates one such application of the latter case. The origins of each of the correlations are discussed, and their apparent capabilities and limitations are summarized. These correlations have been made to be an integral part of a computer code, ICEPERF, which has been designed to calculate iced propeller performance. Comparison with experimental propeller icing data shows generally good agreement, with the quality of the predicted results seen to be directly related to the radial icing extent of each case. The code's capability to properly predict thrust coefficient, power coefficient, and propeller efficiency is shown to be strongly dependent on the choice of correlation selected, as well as upon proper specificatioon of radial icing extent.

  5. Spatially varying cross-correlation coefficients in the presence of nugget effects

    KAUST Repository

    Kleiber, William; Genton, Marc G.

    2012-01-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for the cross-correlation coefficient of a multivariate spatial process to vary with location when the spatial model is augmented with nugget effects. The derived class is valid for any choice of covariance functions, and yields substantial flexibility between multiple processes. The key is to identify the cross-correlation coefficient matrix with a contraction matrix, which can be either diagonal, implying a parsimonious formulation, or a fully general contraction matrix, yielding greater flexibility but added model complexity. We illustrate the approach with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature dataset in Colorado, allowing the two variables to be positively correlated at low elevations and nearly independent at high elevations, while still yielding a positive definite covariance matrix. © 2012 Biometrika Trust.

  6. Spatially varying cross-correlation coefficients in the presence of nugget effects

    KAUST Repository

    Kleiber, William

    2012-11-29

    We derive sufficient conditions for the cross-correlation coefficient of a multivariate spatial process to vary with location when the spatial model is augmented with nugget effects. The derived class is valid for any choice of covariance functions, and yields substantial flexibility between multiple processes. The key is to identify the cross-correlation coefficient matrix with a contraction matrix, which can be either diagonal, implying a parsimonious formulation, or a fully general contraction matrix, yielding greater flexibility but added model complexity. We illustrate the approach with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature dataset in Colorado, allowing the two variables to be positively correlated at low elevations and nearly independent at high elevations, while still yielding a positive definite covariance matrix. © 2012 Biometrika Trust.

  7. Heat transfer coefficient correlation for convective boiling inside plain and micro fin tubes using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picanco, Marco Antonio Silva; Bandarra Filho, Enio Pedone; Passos, Julio Cesar

    2006-01-01

    Two-phase flow heat transfer has been exhaustively studied over recent years. However, in this field several questions remain unanswered. Heat transfer coefficient prediction related to nucleate and convective boiling have been studied using different approaches, numerical, analytical and experimental. In this work, an experimental analysis, data representation and heat transfer coefficient prediction on two-phase heat transfer on nucleate and convective boiling are presented. An empirical correlation is obtained based on genetic algorithms search engine over a dimensional analysis of the two-phase flow heat transfer problem. (author)

  8. Flexibility of internal and external glenohumeral rotation of junior female tennis players and its correlation with performance ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ching-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Chia; Chiang, Jinn-Yen; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Tsai, Jong-Chang

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the internal and external rotation of the dominant and nondominant shoulders of adolescent female tennis players. The correlation between the shoulder rotation range of motion and the player's ranking was also analyzed. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one female junior tennis players who were 13 to 18 years old participated in this study. A standard goniometer was used to measure the internal and external rotation of both glenohumeral joints. The difference in internal and external rotation was calculated as the glenohumeral rotation deficit. The year-end ranking of each player was obtained from the Chinese Taipei Tennis Association. [Results] The internal rotation of the dominant shoulder was significantly smaller than that of the nondominant shoulder. Moreover, player ranking was significantly and negatively correlated with the internal rotation range of motion of both shoulders. On the other hand, the correlations of the internal and external rotation ranges of motion with the age, height, and weight were not significant. [Conclusion] The flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation is smaller in the dominant shoulder than of the nondominant shoulder in these junior female tennis players. Flexibility of the glenohumeral internal rotation may be a factor affecting performance in junior female tennis players.

  9. An efficient sensitivity analysis method for modified geometry of Macpherson suspension based on Pearson correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hasan; Khalkhali, Abolfazl; Yarmohammadisatri, Sadegh

    2017-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to propose a new method for designing Macpherson suspension, based on the Sobol indices in terms of Pearson correlation which determines the importance of each member on the behaviour of vehicle suspension. The formulation of dynamic analysis of Macpherson suspension system is developed using the suspension members as the modified links in order to achieve the desired kinematic behaviour. The mechanical system is replaced with an equivalent constrained links and then kinematic laws are utilised to obtain a new modified geometry of Macpherson suspension. The equivalent mechanism of Macpherson suspension increased the speed of analysis and reduced its complexity. The ADAMS/CAR software is utilised to simulate a full vehicle, Renault Logan car, in order to analyse the accuracy of modified geometry model. An experimental 4-poster test rig is considered for validating both ADAMS/CAR simulation and analytical geometry model. Pearson correlation coefficient is applied to analyse the sensitivity of each suspension member according to vehicle objective functions such as sprung mass acceleration, etc. Besides this matter, the estimation of Pearson correlation coefficient between variables is analysed in this method. It is understood that the Pearson correlation coefficient is an efficient method for analysing the vehicle suspension which leads to a better design of Macpherson suspension system.

  10. Cluster structure in the correlation coefficient matrix can be characterized by abnormal eigenvalues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao

    2018-02-01

    In a large number of previous studies, the researchers found that some of the eigenvalues of the financial correlation matrix were greater than the predicted values of the random matrix theory (RMT). Here, we call these eigenvalues as abnormal eigenvalues. In order to reveal the hidden meaning of these abnormal eigenvalues, we study the toy model with cluster structure and find that these eigenvalues are related to the cluster structure of the correlation coefficient matrix. In this paper, model-based experiments show that in most cases, the number of abnormal eigenvalues of the correlation matrix is equal to the number of clusters. In addition, empirical studies show that the sum of the abnormal eigenvalues is related to the clarity of the cluster structure and is negatively correlated with the correlation dimension.

  11. Threshold network of a financial market using the P-value of correlation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Gyeong-Gyun; Lee, Jae Woo; Nobi, Ashadun

    2015-06-01

    Threshold methods in financial networks are important tools for obtaining important information about the financial state of a market. Previously, absolute thresholds of correlation coefficients have been used; however, they have no relation to the length of time. We assign a threshold value depending on the size of the time window by using the P-value concept of statistics. We construct a threshold network (TN) at the same threshold value for two different time window sizes in the Korean Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI). We measure network properties, such as the edge density, clustering coefficient, assortativity coefficient, and modularity. We determine that a significant difference exists between the network properties of the two time windows at the same threshold, especially during crises. This implies that the market information depends on the length of the time window when constructing the TN. We apply the same technique to Standard and Poor's 500 (S&P500) and observe similar results.

  12. Thermal expansion coefficient determination of polylactic acid using digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botean, Adrian-Ioan

    2018-02-01

    This paper aims determining the linear thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of polylactic acid (PLA) using an optical method for measuring deformations called digital image correlation method (DIC). Because PLA is often used in making many pieces with 3D printing technology, it is opportune to know this coefficient to obtain a higher degree of precision in the construction of parts and to monitor deformations when these parts are subjected to a thermal gradient. Are used two PLA discs with 20 and 40% degree of filling. In parallel with this approach was determined the linear thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) for the copper cylinder on the surface of which are placed the two discs of PLA.

  13. Thermal expansion coefficient determination of polylactic acid using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botean Adrian - Ioan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims determining the linear thermal expansion coefficient (CTE of polylactic acid (PLA using an optical method for measuring deformations called digital image correlation method (DIC. Because PLA is often used in making many pieces with 3D printing technology, it is opportune to know this coefficient to obtain a higher degree of precision in the construction of parts and to monitor deformations when these parts are subjected to a thermal gradient. Are used two PLA discs with 20 and 40% degree of filling. In parallel with this approach was determined the linear thermal expansion coefficient (CTE for the copper cylinder on the surface of which are placed the two discs of PLA.

  14. Determination and correlation of mass transfer coefficients in a stirred cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, J.; Bloxom, S.R.; Keeler, J.B.; Roth, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    In the proposed Molten Salt Breeder Reactor flowsheet, a fraction of the rare earth fission products is removed from the fuel salt in mass transfer cells. To obtain design parameters for this extraction, the effect of cell size, blade diameter, phase volume, and agitation rate on the mass transfer for a high density ratio system (mercury/water) in nondispersing square cross section contactors was determined. Aqueous side mass transfer coefficients were measured by polarography over a wide range of operating conditions. Correlations for the experimental mass transfer coefficients as functions of the operating parameters are presented. Several techniques for measuring mercury-side mass transfer coefficients were evaluated and a new one is recommended

  15. Improving residue-residue contact prediction via low-rank and sparse decomposition of residue correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haicang; Gao, Yujuan; Deng, Minghua; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Shuai Cheng; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Bu, Dongbo

    2016-03-25

    Strategies for correlation analysis in protein contact prediction often encounter two challenges, namely, the indirect coupling among residues, and the background correlations mainly caused by phylogenetic biases. While various studies have been conducted on how to disentangle indirect coupling, the removal of background correlations still remains unresolved. Here, we present an approach for removing background correlations via low-rank and sparse decomposition (LRS) of a residue correlation matrix. The correlation matrix can be constructed using either local inference strategies (e.g., mutual information, or MI) or global inference strategies (e.g., direct coupling analysis, or DCA). In our approach, a correlation matrix was decomposed into two components, i.e., a low-rank component representing background correlations, and a sparse component representing true correlations. Finally the residue contacts were inferred from the sparse component of correlation matrix. We trained our LRS-based method on the PSICOV dataset, and tested it on both GREMLIN and CASP11 datasets. Our experimental results suggested that LRS significantly improves the contact prediction precision. For example, when equipped with the LRS technique, the prediction precision of MI and mfDCA increased from 0.25 to 0.67 and from 0.58 to 0.70, respectively (Top L/10 predicted contacts, sequence separation: 5 AA, dataset: GREMLIN). In addition, our LRS technique also consistently outperforms the popular denoising technique APC (average product correction), on both local (MI_LRS: 0.67 vs MI_APC: 0.34) and global measures (mfDCA_LRS: 0.70 vs mfDCA_APC: 0.67). Interestingly, we found out that when equipped with our LRS technique, local inference strategies performed in a comparable manner to that of global inference strategies, implying that the application of LRS technique narrowed down the performance gap between local and global inference strategies. Overall, our LRS technique greatly facilitates

  16. Requirements for a cocitation similarity measure, with special reference to Pearson's correlation coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlgren, P.; Jarneving, B.; ROUSSEAU, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Author cocitation analysis (ACA), a special type of cocitation analysis, was introduced by White and Griffith in 1981. This technique is used to analyze the intellectual structure of a given scientific field. In 1990, McCain published a technical overview that has been largely adopted as a standard. Here, McCain notes that Pearson's correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) is often used as a similarity measure in ACA and presents some advantages of its use. The present article criticizes the use...

  17. The relation between Pearson’s correlation coefficient r and Salton’s cosine measure

    OpenAIRE

    EGGHE, Leo; Leydesdorff, L.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Salton’s cosine measure is revealed based on the different possible values of the division of the -norm and the norm of a vector. These different values yield a sheaf of increasingly straight lines which form together a cloud of points, being the investigated relation. These theoretical results are tested against the author co-citation relations among 24 informetricians for who two matrices can be constructed, based on co-citations: t...

  18. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Mose, Kristian Fredløv; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben

    2017-06-06

    Modeling complex time-course patterns is a challenging issue in microarray study due to complex gene expression patterns in response to the time-course experiment. We introduce the generalized correlation coefficient and propose a combinatory approach for detecting, testing and clustering the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health.

  19. Ground reaction force analysed with correlation coefficient matrix in group of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbik, Ewa; Krawczyk, Maciej; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of death in contemporary society and causes many disorders. Clinical scales, ground reaction force (GRF) and objective gait analysis are used for assessment of patient's rehabilitation progress during treatment. The goal of this paper is to assess whether signal correlation coefficient matrix applied to GRF can be used for evaluation of the status of post-stroke patients. A group of patients underwent clinical assessment and instrumented gait analysis simultaneously three times. The difference between components of patient's GRF (vertical, fore/aft, med/lat) and normal ones (reference GRF of healthy subjects) was calculated as correlation coefficient. Patients were divided into two groups ("worse" and "better") based on the clinical functional scale tests done at the beginning of rehabilitation process. The results obtained by these two groups were compared using statistical analysis. An increase of median value of correlation coefficient is observed in all components of GRF, but only in non-paretic leg. Analysis of GRF signal can be helpful in assessment of post-stroke patients during rehabilitation. Improvement in stroke patients was observed in non-paretic leg of the "worse" group. GRF analysis should not be the only tool for objective validation of patient's improvement, but could be used as additional source of information.

  20. Negative Correlation between the Diffusion Coefficient and Transcriptional Activity of the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuni, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Horio, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2017-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor, which interacts with DNA and other cofactors to regulate gene transcription. Binding to other partners in the cell nucleus alters the diffusion properties of GR. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) was applied to quantitatively characterize the diffusion properties of EGFP labeled human GR (EGFP-hGR) and its mutants in the cell nucleus. RICS is an image correlation technique that evaluates the spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient as a diffusion map. Interestingly, we observed that the averaged diffusion coefficient of EGFP-hGR strongly and negatively correlated with its transcriptional activities in comparison to that of EGFP-hGR wild type and mutants with various transcriptional activities. This result suggests that the decreasing of the diffusion coefficient of hGR was reflected in the high-affinity binding to DNA. Moreover, the hyper-phosphorylation of hGR can enhance the transcriptional activity by reduction of the interaction between the hGR and the nuclear corepressors.

  1. Statistical analysis of solid waste composition data: Arithmetic mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    -derived food waste amounted to 2.21 ± 3.12% with a confidence interval of (−4.03; 8.45), which highlights the problem of the biased negative proportions. A Pearson’s correlation test, applied to waste fraction generation (kg mass), indicated a positive correlation between avoidable vegetable food waste...... and plastic packaging. However, correlation tests applied to waste fraction compositions (percentage values) showed a negative association in this regard, thus demonstrating that statistical analyses applied to compositional waste fraction data, without addressing the closed characteristics of these data......, have the potential to generate spurious or misleading results. Therefore, ¨compositional data should be transformed adequately prior to any statistical analysis, such as computing mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients....

  2. Male ruff colour as a rank signal in a monomorphic-horned mammal: behavioural correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovari, S.; Fattorini, N.; Boesi, R.; Bocci, A.

    2015-08-01

    Coexistence of individuals within a social group is possible through the establishment of a hierarchy. Social dominance is achieved through aggressive interactions, and, in wild sheep and goats, it is related mainly to age, body size and weapon size as rank signals. Adult male Himalayan tahr are much larger than females and subadult males. They have a prominent neck ruff, ranging in colour from yellow (5.5-9.5 years old, i.e. young adults, golden males) to brown (7.5-14.5 years old, i.e. older individuals, pale and dark brown males), with golden males being the most dominant. We investigated the social behaviour of male tahr and analysed the relationships between ruff colour, courtship and agonistic behaviour patterns during the rut. Colour classes varied in their use of several behaviour patterns (male dominance: approach, stare, horning vegetation; courtship: low stretch, naso- genital contact, rush). Golden-ruffed males used more threats than darker ones. Pale brown and dark brown males addressed threats significantly more often to males of lower or their own colour classes, respectively, whereas golden ones addressed threats to all colour classes, including their own. The courtship of dominant males was characterised by the assertive rush, whereas that of subordinates did not. Ruff colour of male Himalayan tahr may have evolved as a rank signal, homologous to horn size in wild sheep and goats.

  3. Application of the Gini correlation coefficient to infer regulatory relationships in transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-09-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey's biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses.

  4. Application of the Gini Correlation Coefficient to Infer Regulatory Relationships in Transcriptome Analysis[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey’s biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses. PMID:22797655

  5. Transformation of correlation coefficients between normal and lognormal distribution and implications for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žerovnik, Gašper, E-mail: gasper.zerovnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Trkov, Andrej, E-mail: andrej.trkov@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Smith, Donald L., E-mail: donald.l.smith@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 1710 Avenida del Mundo, Coronado, CA 92118-3073 (United States); Capote, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.capotenoy@iaea.org [NAPC–Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, PO Box 100, Vienna-A-1400 (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Inherently positive parameters with large relative uncertainties (typically ≳30%) are often considered to be governed by the lognormal distribution. This assumption has the practical benefit of avoiding the possibility of sampling negative values in stochastic applications. Furthermore, it is typically assumed that the correlation coefficients for comparable multivariate normal and lognormal distributions are equivalent. However, this ideal situation is approached only in the linear approximation which happens to be applicable just for small uncertainties. This paper derives and discusses the proper transformation of correlation coefficients between both distributions for the most general case which is applicable for arbitrary uncertainties. It is seen that for lognormal distributions with large relative uncertainties strong anti-correlations (negative correlations) are mathematically forbidden. This is due to the asymmetry that is an inherent feature of these distributions. Some implications of these results for practical nuclear applications are discussed and they are illustrated with examples in this paper. Finally, modifications to the ENDF-6 format used for representing uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data libraries are suggested, as needed to deal with this issue.

  6. The correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and tumor cellularity in patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Liu, Min; Bao, Jing; Xia, Yunbao; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Xuequan; Wang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    To perform a meta-analysis exploring the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and tumor cellularity in patients. We searched medical and scientific literature databases for studies discussing the correlation between the ADC and tumor cellularity in patients. Only studies that were published in English or Chinese prior to November 2012 were considered for inclusion. Summary correlation coefficient (r) values were extracted from each study, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses were performed to investigate potential heterogeneity. Of 189 studies, 28 were included in the meta-analysis, comprising 729 patients. The pooled r for all studies was -0.57 (95% CI: -0.62, -0.52), indicating notable heterogeneity (Pcorrelation between the ADC and cellularity for brain tumors. There was no notable evidence of publication bias. There is a strong negative correlation between the ADC and tumor cellularity in patients, particularly in the brain. However, larger, prospective studies are warranted to validate these findings in other cancer types.

  7. Transformation of correlation coefficients between normal and lognormal distribution and implications for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Smith, Donald L.; Capote, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Inherently positive parameters with large relative uncertainties (typically ≳30%) are often considered to be governed by the lognormal distribution. This assumption has the practical benefit of avoiding the possibility of sampling negative values in stochastic applications. Furthermore, it is typically assumed that the correlation coefficients for comparable multivariate normal and lognormal distributions are equivalent. However, this ideal situation is approached only in the linear approximation which happens to be applicable just for small uncertainties. This paper derives and discusses the proper transformation of correlation coefficients between both distributions for the most general case which is applicable for arbitrary uncertainties. It is seen that for lognormal distributions with large relative uncertainties strong anti-correlations (negative correlations) are mathematically forbidden. This is due to the asymmetry that is an inherent feature of these distributions. Some implications of these results for practical nuclear applications are discussed and they are illustrated with examples in this paper. Finally, modifications to the ENDF-6 format used for representing uncertainties in evaluated nuclear data libraries are suggested, as needed to deal with this issue

  8. [Correlation coefficient-based classification method of hydrological dependence variability: With auto-regression model as example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu Xi; Xie, Ping; Sang, Yan Fang; Wu, Zi Yi

    2018-04-01

    Hydrological process evaluation is temporal dependent. Hydrological time series including dependence components do not meet the data consistency assumption for hydrological computation. Both of those factors cause great difficulty for water researches. Given the existence of hydrological dependence variability, we proposed a correlationcoefficient-based method for significance evaluation of hydrological dependence based on auto-regression model. By calculating the correlation coefficient between the original series and its dependence component and selecting reasonable thresholds of correlation coefficient, this method divided significance degree of dependence into no variability, weak variability, mid variability, strong variability, and drastic variability. By deducing the relationship between correlation coefficient and auto-correlation coefficient in each order of series, we found that the correlation coefficient was mainly determined by the magnitude of auto-correlation coefficient from the 1 order to p order, which clarified the theoretical basis of this method. With the first-order and second-order auto-regression models as examples, the reasonability of the deduced formula was verified through Monte-Carlo experiments to classify the relationship between correlation coefficient and auto-correlation coefficient. This method was used to analyze three observed hydrological time series. The results indicated the coexistence of stochastic and dependence characteristics in hydrological process.

  9. Measurement of the polarization correlation coefficient in elastic pp scattering at 610 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, N.S.; Glonti, L.N.; Kazarinov, M.Yu.

    1977-01-01

    The polarization correlation coefficient Csub(nn) for elastic pp scattering at 610+-10 MeV was measured for four scattering angles: 40, 67, 78 and 90 deg (c.m.s.). A polarized proton beam with a maximum polarization of 0.39+-0.02 and a polarized proton target of the frozen type were used. The maximum polarization of the target was 0.97+-0.04. The experimental procedure is described in detail. The Csub(nn) measured are compared with the results of a phase analysis and the findings at 575 MeV obtained elsewhere. The Csub(nn) coefficients are shown to be valuable to discriminate alternative solutions of the phase analysis. The polarized proton targets of the frozen type, no accounting the complexity of their design, are emphasized to be rather reliable and convenient devices for conducting experiments at accelerators

  10. SPSS and SAS programs for comparing Pearson correlations and OLS regression coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Bruce; Wuensch, Karl L

    2013-09-01

    Several procedures that use summary data to test hypotheses about Pearson correlations and ordinary least squares regression coefficients have been described in various books and articles. To our knowledge, however, no single resource describes all of the most common tests. Furthermore, many of these tests have not yet been implemented in popular statistical software packages such as SPSS and SAS. In this article, we describe all of the most common tests and provide SPSS and SAS programs to perform them. When they are applicable, our code also computes 100 × (1 - α)% confidence intervals corresponding to the tests. For testing hypotheses about independent regression coefficients, we demonstrate one method that uses summary data and another that uses raw data (i.e., Potthoff analysis). When the raw data are available, the latter method is preferred, because use of summary data entails some loss of precision due to rounding.

  11. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-04-17

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse structure, we assume that each multimedia object could be represented as a sparse linear combination of all other objects, and combination coefficients are regarded as a similarity measure between objects and used to regularize their ranking scores. Moreover, we propose to learn the sparse combination coefficients and the ranking scores simultaneously. A unified objective function is constructed with regard to both the combination coefficients and the ranking scores, and is optimized by an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two multimedia database retrieval data sets demonstrate the significant improvements of the propose algorithm over state-of-the-art ranking score learning algorithms.

  12. Correlation and path coefficient analysis of quantitative characters in spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliya, F; Begum, H; Reddy, M T; Sivaraj, N; Pandravada, S R; Narshimulu, G

    2014-05-01

    Fifty genotypes of spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb.) were evaluated in a randomized block design with two replications at the Vegetable Research Station, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India during kharif, 2012. Correlation and path coefficient analysis were carried out to study the character association and contribution, respectively for twelve quantitative characters namely vine length (m), number of stems per plant, days to first female flower appearance, first female flowering node, days to first fruit harvest, days to last fruit harvest, fruiting period (days), fruit length (cm), fruit width (cm), fruit weight (g), number of fruits per plant and fruit yield per plant (kg) for identification of the potential selection indices. Correlation and path coefficient analyses revealed that fruiting period and number of fruits per plant not only had positively significant correlation with fruit yield but also had positively high direct effect on it and are regarded as the main determinants of fruit yield. Days to first fruit harvest had positively moderate direct effect on fruit yield and its association was negatively significant, days to last fruit harvest had negatively high direct effect on fruit yield and its association was significant positively, hence restricted simultaneous selection can be made for days to first fruit harvest and days to last fruit harvest. The improvement in fruit yield can be effective if selection is based on days to first fruit harvest, days to last fruit harvest, fruiting period and number of fruits per plant.

  13. On the construction of bivariate exponential distributions with an arbitrary correlation coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    In this paper we use a concept of multivariate phase-type distributions to define a class of bivariate exponential distributions. This class has the following three appealing properties. Firstly, we may construct a pair of exponentially distributed random variables with any feasible correlation...... coefficient (also negative). Secondly, the class satisfies that any linear combination (projection) of the marginal random variables is a phase {type distributions, The latter property is potentially important for the development hypothesis testing in linear models. Thirdly, it is very easy to simulate...

  14. A Bayesian Framework for Estimating the Concordance Correlation Coefficient Using Skew-elliptical Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2018-04-05

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a widely used scaled index in the study of agreement. In this article, we propose estimating the CCC by a unified Bayesian framework that can (1) accommodate symmetric or asymmetric and light- or heavy-tailed data; (2) select model from several candidates; and (3) address other issues frequently encountered in practice such as confounding covariates and missing data. The performance of the proposal was studied and demonstrated using simulated as well as real-life biomarker data from a clinical study of an insomnia drug. The implementation of the proposal is accessible through a package in the Comprehensive R Archive Network.

  15. Frontal Face Detection using Haar Wavelet Coefficients and Local Histogram Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Setyawan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Face detection is the main building block on which all automatic systems dealing with human faces is built. For example, a face recognition system must rely on face detection to process an input image and determine which areas contain human faces. These areas then become the input for the face recognition system for further processing. This paper presents a face detection system designed to detect frontal faces. The system uses Haar wavelet coefficients and local histogram correlation as differentiating features. Our proposed system is trained using 100 training images. Our experiments show that the proposed system performed well during testing, achieving a detection rate of 91.5%.

  16. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  17. Ranking the Online Documents Based on Relative Credibility Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Dahlan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Information searching is the most popular activity in Internet. Usually the search engine provides the search results ranked by the relevance. However, for a certain purpose that concerns with information credibility, particularly citing information for scientific works, another approach of ranking the search engine results is required. This paper presents a study on developing a new ranking method based on the credibility of information. The method is built up upon two well-known algorithms, PageRank and Citation Analysis. The result of the experiment that used Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient to compare the proposed rank (generated by the method with the standard rank (generated manually by a group of experts showed that the average Spearman 0 < rS < critical value. It means that the correlation was proven but it was not significant. Hence the proposed rank does not satisfy the standard but the performance could be improved.

  18. Common pediatric cerebellar tumors: correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, Korgün; Mathis, Derek; Gimi, Barjor; Gargan, Lynn; Weprin, Bradley; Bowers, Daniel C; Margraf, Linda

    2013-08-01

    To test whether there is correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. This study was reviewed for issues of patient safety and confidentiality and was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and was compliant with HIPAA. The need for informed consent was waived. Ninety-five patients who had preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical pathologic findings available between January 2003 and June 2011 were included. There were 37 pilocytic astrocytomas, 34 medulloblastomas (23 classic, eight desmoplastic-nodular, two large cell, one anaplastic), 17 ependymomas (13 World Health Organization [WHO] grade II, four WHO grade III), and seven atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. ADCs of solid tumor components and normal cerebellum were measured. Tumor-to-normal brain ADC ratios (hereafter, ADC ratio) were calculated. The medulloblastomas and ependymomas were subcategorized according to the latest WHO classification, and tumor cellularity was calculated. Correlation was sought between cell densities and mean tumor ADCs, minimum tumor ADCs, and ADC ratio. When all tumors were considered together, negative correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADCs (ρ = -0.737, P correlation between cellularity and ADC ratio. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and minimum tumor ADC in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ρ = -0.786, P correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADC and ADC ratio. There was no correlation between the ADC metrics and cellularity of the pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and ADC metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. Although ADC metrics are useful in the preoperative diagnosis of common pediatric cerebellar tumors and this utility is generally attributed to differences in cellularity of tumors

  19. Optimal portfolio strategy with cross-correlation matrix composed by DCCA coefficients: Evidence from the Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuelian; Liu, Zixian

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new estimator of correlation matrix is proposed, which is composed of the detrended cross-correlation coefficients (DCCA coefficients), to improve portfolio optimization. In contrast to Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), DCCA coefficients acquired by the detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) method can describe the nonlinear correlation between assets, and can be decomposed in different time scales. These properties of DCCA make it possible to improve the investment effect and more valuable to investigate the scale behaviors of portfolios. The minimum variance portfolio (MVP) model and the Mean-Variance (MV) model are used to evaluate the effectiveness of this improvement. Stability analysis shows the effect of two kinds of correlation matrices on the estimation error of portfolio weights. The observed scale behaviors are significant to risk management and could be used to optimize the portfolio selection.

  20. Systematic bias of correlation coefficient may explain negative accuracy of genomic prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao; Vales, M Isabel; Wang, Aoxue; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2017-09-01

    Accuracy of genomic prediction is commonly calculated as the Pearson correlation coefficient between the predicted and observed phenotypes in the inference population by using cross-validation analysis. More frequently than expected, significant negative accuracies of genomic prediction have been reported in genomic selection studies. These negative values are surprising, given that the minimum value for prediction accuracy should hover around zero when randomly permuted data sets are analyzed. We reviewed the two common approaches for calculating the Pearson correlation and hypothesized that these negative accuracy values reflect potential bias owing to artifacts caused by the mathematical formulas used to calculate prediction accuracy. The first approach, Instant accuracy, calculates correlations for each fold and reports prediction accuracy as the mean of correlations across fold. The other approach, Hold accuracy, predicts all phenotypes in all fold and calculates correlation between the observed and predicted phenotypes at the end of the cross-validation process. Using simulated and real data, we demonstrated that our hypothesis is true. Both approaches are biased downward under certain conditions. The biases become larger when more fold are employed and when the expected accuracy is low. The bias of Instant accuracy can be corrected using a modified formula. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Comparison of boiling heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop correlations for evaporators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskin, N.; Arslan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evaporator design is an important aspect for the HVAC industry. As the demand for more efficient and compact heat exchangers increase, researches on estimation of two-phase flow heat transfer and pressure drop gain importance. Due to complexity of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer of the two-phase flow, there are many experimental studies available for refrigerants int he literature. In this study, a model for boiling heat transfer in a horizontal tube has been developed and the simulation results are compared with experimental ones published in the literature. In these comparisons, heat transfer coefficient is calculated by using Kattan-Thome-Favrat (1998), Shah (1982), Kandilikar (1990), Chaddock and Brunemann (1967) correlations under different operational conditions such as saturation pressure, mass flux, the type of refrigerant and two phase flow pattern. Besides that flow pattern has also been considered in the simulation by using Thome and El Hajal (2002) model. For pressure drop Lockhart-Martinelli (1949), Mueller-Steinhagen-Hack (1986) and Groennerund (1979) correlations are used in simulations. Local vapor quality change at each experimental condition through the model is determined. Roughness is an important parameter for frictional pressure drop. Friction coefficient is determined by using Churchill (1977) model. (author)

  2. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter egd(G), defined as the smallest integer r ≥ 1 for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of G, can be completed to a matrix in the convex hull

  3. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter $egd(G)$, defined as the smallest integer $r\\ge 1$ for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of $G$, can be completed to a matrix in the convex

  4. Statistical analysis of solid waste composition data: Arithmetic mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Martín-Fernández, Josep Antoni; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2017-11-01

    Data for fractional solid waste composition provide relative magnitudes of individual waste fractions, the percentages of which always sum to 100, thereby connecting them intrinsically. Due to this sum constraint, waste composition data represent closed data, and their interpretation and analysis require statistical methods, other than classical statistics that are suitable only for non-constrained data such as absolute values. However, the closed characteristics of waste composition data are often ignored when analysed. The results of this study showed, for example, that unavoidable animal-derived food waste amounted to 2.21±3.12% with a confidence interval of (-4.03; 8.45), which highlights the problem of the biased negative proportions. A Pearson's correlation test, applied to waste fraction generation (kg mass), indicated a positive correlation between avoidable vegetable food waste and plastic packaging. However, correlation tests applied to waste fraction compositions (percentage values) showed a negative association in this regard, thus demonstrating that statistical analyses applied to compositional waste fraction data, without addressing the closed characteristics of these data, have the potential to generate spurious or misleading results. Therefore, ¨compositional data should be transformed adequately prior to any statistical analysis, such as computing mean, standard deviation and correlation coefficients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation between 3 T apparent diffusion coefficient values and grading of invasive breast carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipolla, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.cipolla@yahoo.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Santucci, Domiziana; Guerrieri, Daniele; Drudi, Francesco Maria [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Meggiorini, Maria Letizia [Department of Gynaecological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy); Felice, Carlo de [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Apparent diffusion coefficient is a quantitative parameter which reflects molecular water movement. • Grading is an independent prognostic factor which correlates with other histopathological features. • Apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly different between G1 and G3 classes. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) provided by 3.0 T (3 T) magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) varied according to the grading of invasive breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A total of 92 patients with 96 invasive breast cancer lesions were enrolled; all had undergone 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local staging. All lesions were confirmed by histological analysis, and tumor grade was established according to the Nottingham Grading System (NGS). MRI included both dynamic contrast-enhanced and DWI sequences, and ADC value was calculated for each lesion. ADC values were compared with NGS classification using the Mann–Whitney U and the Kruskal–Wallis H tests. Grading was considered as a comprehensive prognostic factor, and Rho Spearman test was performed to determine correlation between grading and tumor size, hormonal receptor status, HER2 expression and Ki67 index. Pearson's Chi square test was carried out to compare grading with the other prognostic factors. Results: ADC values were significantly higher in G1 than in G3 tumors. No significant difference was observed when G1 and G3 were compared with G2. Tumor size, hormonal receptor status, HER2 expression and Ki67 index correlated significantly with grading but there was a significant difference only between G1 and G3 related to the ER and PR status, HER2 expression and Ki67 index. There was no statistically significant difference in lesion size between the two groups. Conclusion: ADC values obtained on 3 T DWI correlated with low-grade (G1) and high-grade (G3) invasive breast carcinoma. 3

  6. Calculation of the correlation coefficients between the numbers of counts (peak areas and backgrounds) obtained from gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korun, M.; Vodenik, B.; Zorko, B.

    2016-01-01

    Two simple methods for calculating the correlations between peaks appearing in gamma-ray spectra are described. We show how the areas are correlated when the peaks do not overlap, but the spectral regions used for the calculation of the background below the peaks do. When the peaks overlap, the correlation can be stronger than in the case of the non-overlapping peaks. The methods presented are simplified to the extent of allowing their implementation with manual calculations. They are intended for practitioners as additional tools to be used when the correlations between the areas of the peaks in the gamma-ray spectra are to be calculated. Also, the correlation coefficient between the number of counts in the peak and the number of counts in the continuous background below the peak is derived. - Highlights: • The correlation coefficients between areas of closely spaced peaks are assessed. • For isolated peaks the correlation arises from the common continuous background. • If peaks overlap the correlation coefficient depends on how much they overlap. • If peaks overlap also the background height affects the correlation coefficient. • The correlation coefficient between the peak area and its background is −1.

  7. Endometrial cancer: correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with tumor cellularity and tumor grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Tajima, Shinya; Maeda, Ichiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Ueno, Takahiko; Suzuki, Nao; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) are widely used for detecting uterine endometrial cancer. The relationships between ADC values and pathological features of endometrial cancer have not yet been established. To investigate whether ADC values of endometrial cancer vary according to histologic tumor cellularity and tumor grade. We retrospectively reviewed 30 pathologically confirmed endometrial cancers. All patients underwent conventional non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI procedures, and ADC values were calculated. Tumor cellularity was evaluated by counting cancer cells in three high-power ( × 400) fields. The correlation between ADC values and tumor cellularity was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test for statistical analysis. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) ADC value ( ×10(-3) mm(2)/s) of endometrial cancer was 0.85 ± 0.22 (range, 0.55-1.71). The mean ± SD tumor cellularity was 528.36 ± 16.89 (range, 298.0-763.6). ADC values were significantly inversely correlated with tumor cellularity. No significant relationship was observed between ADC values and tumor grade (mean ADC values: G1, 0.88 ± 0.265 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s; G2, 0.80 ± 0.178 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s; G3, 0.81 ± 0.117 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s). There is a significant inverse relationship between ADC values and tumor cellularity in endometrial cancer. No significant differences in average ADC value were observed between G1, G2, and G3 tumors. However, the lower the tumor grade, the wider the SD. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  8. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  9. Reduced Rank Mixed Effects Models for Spatially Correlated Hierarchical Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lan

    2010-03-01

    Hierarchical functional data are widely seen in complex studies where sub-units are nested within units, which in turn are nested within treatment groups. We propose a general framework of functional mixed effects model for such data: within unit and within sub-unit variations are modeled through two separate sets of principal components; the sub-unit level functions are allowed to be correlated. Penalized splines are used to model both the mean functions and the principal components functions, where roughness penalties are used to regularize the spline fit. An EM algorithm is developed to fit the model, while the specific covariance structure of the model is utilized for computational efficiency to avoid storage and inversion of large matrices. Our dimension reduction with principal components provides an effective solution to the difficult tasks of modeling the covariance kernel of a random function and modeling the correlation between functions. The proposed methodology is illustrated using simulations and an empirical data set from a colon carcinogenesis study. Supplemental materials are available online.

  10. DCCA cross-correlation coefficients reveals the change of both synchronization and oscillation in EEG of Alzheimer disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingyuan; Cai, Lihui; Wang, Ruofan; Song, Zhenxi; Deng, Bin; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disorder of neural system that affects mainly the older population. Recently, many researches show that the EEG of AD patients can be characterized by EEG slowing, enhanced complexity of the EEG signals, and EEG synchrony. In order to examine the neural synchrony at multi scales, and to find a biomarker that help detecting AD in diagnosis, detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) of EEG signals is applied in this paper. Several parameters, namely DCCA coefficients in the whole brain, DCCA coefficients at a specific scale, maximum DCCA coefficient over the span of all time scales and the corresponding scale of such coefficients, were extracted to examine the synchronization, respectively. The results show that DCCA coefficients have a trend of increase as scale increases, and decreases as electrode distance increases. Comparing DCCA coefficients in AD patients with healthy controls, a decrease of synchronization in the whole brain, and a bigger scale corresponding to maximum correlation is discovered in AD patients. The change of max-correlation scale may relate to the slowing of oscillatory activities. Linear combination of max DCCA coefficient and max-correlation scale reaches a classification accuracy of 90%. From the above results, it is reasonable to conclude that DCCA coefficient reveals the change of both oscillation and synchrony in AD, and thus is a powerful tool to differentiate AD patients from healthy elderly individuals.

  11. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients in Hierarchical Design Studies with Discrete Response Variables: A Note on a Direct Interval Estimation Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling procedure that can be used to evaluate intraclass correlation coefficients in two-level settings with discrete response variables is discussed. The approach is readily applied when the purpose is to furnish confidence intervals at prespecified confidence levels for these coefficients in setups with binary or ordinal…

  12. Spatial correlation in 3D MIMO channels using fourier coefficients of power spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an exact closed-form expression for the Spatial Correlation Function (SCF) is derived for the standardized three-dimensional (3D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) channel. This novel SCF is developed for a uniform linear array of antennas with non-isotropic antenna patterns. The proposed method resorts to the spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) of plane waves and the trigonometric expansion of Legendre and associated Legendre polynomials to obtain a closed-form expression for the SCF for arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns. The resulting expression depends on the underlying angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the SCF being valid for any 3D propagation environment. Numerical results validate the proposed analytical expression and study the impact of angular spreads on the correlation. The derived SCF will help evaluate the performance of correlated 3D MIMO channels in the future. © 2015 IEEE.

  13. Mental Task Classification Scheme Utilizing Correlation Coefficient Extracted from Interchannel Intrinsic Mode Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Fattah, Shaikh Anowarul

    2017-01-01

    In view of recent increase of brain computer interface (BCI) based applications, the importance of efficient classification of various mental tasks has increased prodigiously nowadays. In order to obtain effective classification, efficient feature extraction scheme is necessary, for which, in the proposed method, the interchannel relationship among electroencephalogram (EEG) data is utilized. It is expected that the correlation obtained from different combination of channels will be different for different mental tasks, which can be exploited to extract distinctive feature. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique is employed on a test EEG signal obtained from a channel, which provides a number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and correlation coefficient is extracted from interchannel IMF data. Simultaneously, different statistical features are also obtained from each IMF. Finally, the feature matrix is formed utilizing interchannel correlation features and intrachannel statistical features of the selected IMFs of EEG signal. Different kernels of the support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used to carry out the classification task. An EEG dataset containing ten different combinations of five different mental tasks is utilized to demonstrate the classification performance and a very high level of accuracy is achieved by the proposed scheme compared to existing methods.

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: Correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient or WHO classification with recurrence-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mimi; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kwon, Wooil; Ha, Sang Yun; Ji, Sang A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the correlation between grade of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) based on the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and to assess whether the ADC value and WHO classification can predict recurrence-free survival (RFS) after surgery for pNETs. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The requirement for informed consent was waived. Between March 2009 and November 2014, forty-nine patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with diffusion-weighted image and subsequent surgery for single pNETs were included. Correlations among qualitative MR imaging findings, quantitative ADC values, and WHO classifications were assessed. An ordered logistic regression test was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The association between ADC value (or WHO classification) and RFS was analysed. All tumors (n=49) were classified as low- (n=29, grade 1), intermediate- (n=17, grade 2), and high-grade (n=3, grade 3), respectively. The mean ADC of pNETs was moderately negatively correlated with WHO classification before and after adjustment for tumour size (ρ=-0.64, pcorrelated with WHO tumour grade, regardless of tumour size. However, the WHO tumour classification of pNET may be more suitable for predicting RFS than the ADC value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Significant Differences Characterise the Correlation Coefficients between Biocide and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggioni, Marco R; Coelho, Joana Rosado; Furi, Leonardo; Knight, Daniel R; Viti, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella; Martinez, Jose-Luis; Freitas, Ana Teresa; Coque, Teresa M; Morrissey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing concern by regulatory authorities for the selection of antibiotic resistance caused by the use of biocidal products. We aimed to complete the detailed information on large surveys by investigating the relationship between biocide and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of a large number of Staphylococcus aureus isolates using four biocides and antibiotics commonly used in clinical practice. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for most clinically-relevant antibiotics was determined according to the standardized methodology for over 1600 clinical S. aureus isolates and compared to susceptibility profiles of benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, triclosan, and sodium hypochlorite. The relationship between antibiotic and biocide susceptibility profiles was evaluated using non-linear correlations. The main outcome evidenced was an absence of any strong or moderate statistically significant correlation when susceptibilities of either triclosan or sodium hypochlorite were compared for any of the tested antibiotics. On the other hand, correlation coefficients for MICs of benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine were calculated above 0.4 for susceptibility to quinolones, beta-lactams, and also macrolides. Our data do not support any selective pressure for association between biocides and antibiotics resistance and furthermore do not allow for a defined risk evaluation for some of the compounds. Importantly, our data clearly indicate that there does not involve any risk of selection for antibiotic resistance for the compounds triclosan and sodium hypochlorite. These data hence infer that biocide selection for antibiotic resistance has had so far a less significant impact than feared.

  16. Genetic Variability, Correlation Studies and Path Coefficient Analysis in Gladiolus Alatus Cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, A.; Nawab, N. N.; Tariq, M. S.; Ikram, S.; Ahad, A.

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to find out the estimates of genetic variability, genetic parameters and character association among different flower traits between three gladiolus cultivars viz: Sancerre, Fado and Advanced Red. The experiment was repeated three times by using RCBD (Randomized complete block design) at Department of Horticulture, PMAS-UAAR, Rawalpindi. The highest genotypic coefficient variation (GCV) and phenotypic coefficient variation (PCV) magnitude was observed for spike length (16.00) and number of florets per spike (14.84) followed by number of leaves (10.00). Among the traits studied the highest heritability estimates was recorded in spike length (99.5 percent) followed by number of florets/spike (99.6 percent) and lowest in plant height (98.2 percent). The genetic advance as percent of mean was ranged from 2.8 percent to 24.75 percent. Genetic advance was highest for floret breadth (24.75 percent) and lowest for plant height (2.8 percent). High heritability combined with high genetic advance was noticed for number of florets per spike, spike length and floret breadth indicating additive gene action which suggested that improvement of these traits would be effective for further selection of superior genotypes. Plant height and number of florets per spike showed highly positive and significant association with spike length, number of leaves, leaf area, floret length and floret breadth while, spike length registered positive and significant correlation with number of leaves and floret breadth. The path coefficient analysis based on spike length, as responsible variable exposed that all of the traits exerted direct positive effect except leaf area and floret length. Spike length imparted maximum positive direct effect on the number of florets per spike. Hence, spike length and number of florets per spike may be considered for further improvement. However, Floret length and floret breadth may also be considered as a criterion for selection. (author)

  17. Using Generalizability Theory to Disattenuate Correlation Coefficients for Multiple Sources of Measurement Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2018-05-02

    Over the years, research in the social sciences has been dominated by reporting of reliability coefficients that fail to account for key sources of measurement error. Use of these coefficients, in turn, to correct for measurement error can hinder scientific progress by misrepresenting true relationships among the underlying constructs being investigated. In the research reported here, we addressed these issues using generalizability theory (G-theory) in both traditional and new ways to account for the three key sources of measurement error (random-response, specific-factor, and transient) that affect scores from objectively scored measures. Results from 20 widely used measures of personality, self-concept, and socially desirable responding showed that conventional indices consistently misrepresented reliability and relationships among psychological constructs by failing to account for key sources of measurement error and correlated transient errors within occasions. The results further revealed that G-theory served as an effective framework for remedying these problems. We discuss possible extensions in future research and provide code from the computer package R in an online supplement to enable readers to apply the procedures we demonstrate to their own research.

  18. Correlation between incidences of self-inflicted burns and means of inbreeding coefficients, an ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Mostafa; Zendeh-Boodi, Zahra

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the study is to obtain more insight into the possible association between consanguinity and the incidence of deliberate self-burning. Data were obtained by analysis of medical records of patients hospitalized in two referral burn centers: Chormy Burn Center (Bushehr Province, south of Iran) from March 21, 1998, through March 20, 2004, and Shahid Sadoqi Center of Burns and Injuries (Yazd Province, center of Iran) from March 21, 2000, through March 20, 2004. The incidence of suicidal burns was 6.51 and 2.32/100,000 person-years for Bushehr and Yazd Provinces, respectively. The observed sex ratio of patients in both centers indicated there was a female predominance in patients with self-inflicted burns. Using patients' home addresses, patients were sorted into 16 cities. The incidence of suicide by self-burning ranged from 0.80 (for Tabas, located in Yazd Province) to 12.60/100,000 person-years (for Dilam, located in Bushehr Province). The coefficient of inbreeding defines the probability that an individual received both alleles of a pair from an identical ancestral source. There was a significant correlation between incidences of suicidal burns and mean coefficient of inbreeding (r = 0.782, df = 14, p < 0.001). In addition to other factors, consanguineous marriage may be a risk factor that influences the incidence of suicidal burns in a population.

  19. Detrended cross-correlation coefficient: Application to predict apoptosis protein subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis, or programed cell death, plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of an organism. Obtaining information on subcellular location of apoptosis proteins is very helpful for understanding the apoptosis mechanism. The prediction of subcellular localization of an apoptosis protein is still a challenging task, and existing methods mainly based on protein primary sequences. In this paper, we introduce a new position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based method by using detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient of non-overlapping windows. Then a 190-dimensional (190D) feature vector is constructed on two widely used datasets: CL317 and ZD98, and support vector machine is adopted as classifier. To evaluate the proposed method, objective and rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on the two datasets. The results show that our approach offers a novel and reliable PSSM-based tool for prediction of apoptosis protein subcellular localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How Many Alternatives Can Be Ranked? A Comparison of the Paired Comparison and Ranking Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ock, Minsu; Yi, Nari; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of converting ranking data into paired comparison (PC) data and suggest the number of alternatives that can be ranked by comparing a PC and a ranking method. Using a total of 222 health states, a household survey was conducted in a sample of 300 individuals from the general population. Each respondent performed a PC 15 times and a ranking method 6 times (two attempts of ranking three, four, and five health states, respectively). The health states of the PC and the ranking method were constructed to overlap each other. We converted the ranked data into PC data and examined the consistency of the response rate. Applying probit regression, we obtained the predicted probability of each method. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between the predicted probabilities of those methods. The mean absolute error was also assessed between the observed and the predicted values. The overall consistency of the response rate was 82.8%. The Pearson correlation coefficients were 0.789, 0.852, and 0.893 for ranking three, four, and five health states, respectively. The lowest mean absolute error was 0.082 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.074-0.090) in ranking five health states, followed by 0.123 (95% CI 0.111-0.135) in ranking four health states and 0.126 (95% CI 0.113-0.138) in ranking three health states. After empirically examining the consistency of the response rate between a PC and a ranking method, we suggest that using five alternatives in the ranking method may be superior to using three or four alternatives. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Research on Ship-Radiated Noise Denoising Using Secondary Variational Mode Decomposition and Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuxing; Li, Yaan; Chen, Xiao; Yu, Jing

    2017-12-26

    As the sound signal of ships obtained by sensors contains other many significant characteristics of ships and called ship-radiated noise (SN), research into a denoising algorithm and its application has obtained great significance. Using the advantage of variational mode decomposition (VMD) combined with the correlation coefficient for denoising, a hybrid secondary denoising algorithm is proposed using secondary VMD combined with a correlation coefficient (CC). First, different kinds of simulation signals are decomposed into several bandwidth-limited intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using VMD, where the decomposition number by VMD is equal to the number by empirical mode decomposition (EMD); then, the CCs between the IMFs and the simulation signal are calculated respectively. The noise IMFs are identified by the CC threshold and the rest of the IMFs are reconstructed in order to realize the first denoising process. Finally, secondary denoising of the simulation signal can be accomplished by repeating the above steps of decomposition, screening and reconstruction. The final denoising result is determined according to the CC threshold. The denoising effect is compared under the different signal-to-noise ratio and the time of decomposition by VMD. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed denoising algorithm using secondary VMD (2VMD) combined with CC compared to EMD denoising, ensemble EMD (EEMD) denoising, VMD denoising and cubic VMD (3VMD) denoising, as well as two denoising algorithms presented recently. The proposed denoising algorithm is applied to feature extraction and classification for SN signals, which can effectively improve the recognition rate of different kinds of ships.

  2. Research on Ship-Radiated Noise Denoising Using Secondary Variational Mode Decomposition and Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxing Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As the sound signal of ships obtained by sensors contains other many significant characteristics of ships and called ship-radiated noise (SN, research into a denoising algorithm and its application has obtained great significance. Using the advantage of variational mode decomposition (VMD combined with the correlation coefficient for denoising, a hybrid secondary denoising algorithm is proposed using secondary VMD combined with a correlation coefficient (CC. First, different kinds of simulation signals are decomposed into several bandwidth-limited intrinsic mode functions (IMFs using VMD, where the decomposition number by VMD is equal to the number by empirical mode decomposition (EMD; then, the CCs between the IMFs and the simulation signal are calculated respectively. The noise IMFs are identified by the CC threshold and the rest of the IMFs are reconstructed in order to realize the first denoising process. Finally, secondary denoising of the simulation signal can be accomplished by repeating the above steps of decomposition, screening and reconstruction. The final denoising result is determined according to the CC threshold. The denoising effect is compared under the different signal-to-noise ratio and the time of decomposition by VMD. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed denoising algorithm using secondary VMD (2VMD combined with CC compared to EMD denoising, ensemble EMD (EEMD denoising, VMD denoising and cubic VMD (3VMD denoising, as well as two denoising algorithms presented recently. The proposed denoising algorithm is applied to feature extraction and classification for SN signals, which can effectively improve the recognition rate of different kinds of ships.

  3. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Crosara Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2, Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P, Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I and Duceram (D ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01 for the MCBS test results (MPa, with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72 than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 oC-1 differences were: VBI (0.54, VBD (1.33, VB2I (-0.14, VB2D (0.63, PI (1.84 and PD (2.62. Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17 was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  4. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Stella Crosara; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length) made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length) of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01) for the MCBS test results (MPa), with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72) than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10(-6) oC(-1)) differences were: VBI (0.54), VBD (1.33), VB2I (-0.14), VB2D (0.63), PI (1.84) and PD (2.62). Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17) was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  5. R package to estimate intracluster correlation coefficient with confidence interval for binary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Hossain, Akhtar

    2018-03-01

    The Intracluster Correlation Coefficient (ICC) is a major parameter of interest in cluster randomized trials that measures the degree to which responses within the same cluster are correlated. There are several types of ICC estimators and its confidence intervals (CI) suggested in the literature for binary data. Studies have compared relative weaknesses and advantages of ICC estimators as well as its CI for binary data and suggested situations where one is advantageous in practical research. The commonly used statistical computing systems currently facilitate estimation of only a very few variants of ICC and its CI. To address the limitations of current statistical packages, we developed an R package, ICCbin, to facilitate estimating ICC and its CI for binary responses using different methods. The ICCbin package is designed to provide estimates of ICC in 16 different ways including analysis of variance methods, moments based estimation, direct probabilistic methods, correlation based estimation, and resampling method. CI of ICC is estimated using 5 different methods. It also generates cluster binary data using exchangeable correlation structure. ICCbin package provides two functions for users. The function rcbin() generates cluster binary data and the function iccbin() estimates ICC and it's CI. The users can choose appropriate ICC and its CI estimate from the wide selection of estimates from the outputs. The R package ICCbin presents very flexible and easy to use ways to generate cluster binary data and to estimate ICC and it's CI for binary response using different methods. The package ICCbin is freely available for use with R from the CRAN repository (https://cran.r-project.org/package=ICCbin). We believe that this package can be a very useful tool for researchers to design cluster randomized trials with binary outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Validity studies among hierarchical methods of cluster analysis using cophenetic correlation coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Priscilla R.; Munita, Casimiro S.; Lapolli, André L., E-mail: prii.ramos@gmail.com, E-mail: camunita@ipen.br, E-mail: alapolli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The literature presents many methods for partitioning of data base, and is difficult choose which is the most suitable, since the various combinations of methods based on different measures of dissimilarity can lead to different patterns of grouping and false interpretations. Nevertheless, little effort has been expended in evaluating these methods empirically using an archaeological data base. In this way, the objective of this work is make a comparative study of the different cluster analysis methods and identify which is the most appropriate. For this, the study was carried out using a data base of the Archaeometric Studies Group from IPEN-CNEN/SP, in which 45 samples of ceramic fragments from three archaeological sites were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) which were determinate the mass fraction of 13 elements (As, Ce, Cr, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Nd, Sc, Sm, Th, U). The methods used for this study were: single linkage, complete linkage, average linkage, centroid and Ward. The validation was done using the cophenetic correlation coefficient and comparing these values the average linkage method obtained better results. A script of the statistical program R with some functions was created to obtain the cophenetic correlation. By means of these values was possible to choose the most appropriate method to be used in the data base. (author)

  7. Validity studies among hierarchical methods of cluster analysis using cophenetic correlation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Priscilla R.; Munita, Casimiro S.; Lapolli, André L.

    2017-01-01

    The literature presents many methods for partitioning of data base, and is difficult choose which is the most suitable, since the various combinations of methods based on different measures of dissimilarity can lead to different patterns of grouping and false interpretations. Nevertheless, little effort has been expended in evaluating these methods empirically using an archaeological data base. In this way, the objective of this work is make a comparative study of the different cluster analysis methods and identify which is the most appropriate. For this, the study was carried out using a data base of the Archaeometric Studies Group from IPEN-CNEN/SP, in which 45 samples of ceramic fragments from three archaeological sites were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) which were determinate the mass fraction of 13 elements (As, Ce, Cr, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Nd, Sc, Sm, Th, U). The methods used for this study were: single linkage, complete linkage, average linkage, centroid and Ward. The validation was done using the cophenetic correlation coefficient and comparing these values the average linkage method obtained better results. A script of the statistical program R with some functions was created to obtain the cophenetic correlation. By means of these values was possible to choose the most appropriate method to be used in the data base. (author)

  8. Blinded versus unblinded estimation of a correlation coefficient to inform interim design adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Cornelia U; Stallard, Nigel; Parsons, Nicholas; Todd, Susan; Friede, Tim

    2017-03-01

    Regulatory authorities require that the sample size of a confirmatory trial is calculated prior to the start of the trial. However, the sample size quite often depends on parameters that might not be known in advance of the study. Misspecification of these parameters can lead to under- or overestimation of the sample size. Both situations are unfavourable as the first one decreases the power and the latter one leads to a waste of resources. Hence, designs have been suggested that allow a re-assessment of the sample size in an ongoing trial. These methods usually focus on estimating the variance. However, for some methods the performance depends not only on the variance but also on the correlation between measurements. We develop and compare different methods for blinded estimation of the correlation coefficient that are less likely to introduce operational bias when the blinding is maintained. Their performance with respect to bias and standard error is compared to the unblinded estimator. We simulated two different settings: one assuming that all group means are the same and one assuming that different groups have different means. Simulation results show that the naïve (one-sample) estimator is only slightly biased and has a standard error comparable to that of the unblinded estimator. However, if the group means differ, other estimators have better performance depending on the sample size per group and the number of groups. © 2016 The Authors. Biometrical Journal Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficients and HER2 status in gastric cancers: pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jian; Shi, Hua; Zhou, Zhuping; Chen, Jun; Guan, Wenxian; Wang, Hao; Yu, Haiping; Liu, Song; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of gastric cancer obtained from diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) correlates with the HER2 status. Forty-five patients, who had been diagnosed with gastric cancer through biopsy, were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Each patient underwent a DWI (b values: 0 and 1,000 sec/mm 2 ) prior to surgery (curative gastrectomy or palliative resection). Postoperative microscopic findings, HER2 status by immunohistochemical analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were obtained. HER2 status was compared among gastric cancers with various histopathological features using the chi square test. The ADC values of gastric cancers with positive and negative HER2 were compared using the student t test. A weak yet significant correlation was observed between the mean ADC values and HER2 status (r = 0.312, P = 0.037) and scores (r = 0.419, P = 0.004). The mean ADC value of HER2-positive gastric cancers was significantly higher than those of HER2-negative tumors (1.211 vs. 0.984 mm 2 /s, P = 0.020). The minimal ADC value of HER2-positive gastric cancers was significantly higher than those of HER2-negative tumors (1.105 vs. 0.905 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s, P = 0.036). In this pilot study, we have demonstrated that the ADC values of gastric cancer correlate with the HER2 status. Future research is warranted to see if DWI can predict HER2 status and help in tailoring therapy for gastric cancer

  10. AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF NONNORMALITY UPON THE SAMPLING DISTRIBUTION OF THE PROJECT MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HJELM, HOWARD; NORRIS, RAYMOND C.

    THE STUDY EMPIRICALLY DETERMINED THE EFFECTS OF NONNORMALITY UPON SOME SAMPLING DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE PRODUCT MOMENT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT (PMCC). SAMPLING DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE PMCC WERE OBTAINED BY DRAWING NUMEROUS SAMPLES FROM CONTROL AND EXPERIMENTAL POPULATIONS HAVING VARIOUS DEGREES OF NONNORMALITY AND BY CALCULATING CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS…

  11. Technical characterization of dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer rate in dialyzers with various filtration coefficients using dimensionless correlation equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yoshimura, Kengo; Namekawa, Koki; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of filtration coefficient and internal filtration on dialysis fluid flow and mass transfer coefficient in dialyzers using dimensionless mass transfer correlation equations. Aqueous solution of vitamin B 12 clearances were obtained for REXEED-15L as a low flux dialyzer, and APS-15EA and APS-15UA as high flux dialyzers. All the other design specifications were identical for these dialyzers except for filtration coefficient. The overall mass transfer coefficient was calculated, moreover, the exponents of Reynolds number (Re) and film mass transfer coefficient of the dialysis-side fluid (k D ) for each flow rate were derived from the Wilson plot and dimensionless correlation equation. The exponents of Re were 0.4 for the low flux dialyzer whereas 0.5 for the high flux dialyzers. Dialysis fluid of the low flux dialyzer was close to laminar flow because of its low filtration coefficient. On the other hand, dialysis fluid of the high flux dialyzers was assumed to be orthogonal flow. Higher filtration coefficient was associated with higher k D influenced by mass transfer rate through diffusion and internal filtration. Higher filtration coefficient of dialyzers and internal filtration affect orthogonal flow of dialysis fluid.

  12. Evaluation of the Correlation Coefficient of Polyethylene Glycol Treated and Direct Prolactin Results and Comparability with Different Assay System Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shyamali

    2017-12-01

    The presence of Macro prolactin is a significant cause of elevated prolactin resulting in misdiagnosis in all automated systems. Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) pretreatment is the preventive process but such process includes the probability of loss of a fraction of bioactive prolactin. Surprisingly, PEG treated EQAS & IQAS samples in Cobas e 411 are found out to be correlating with direct results of at least 3 immunoassay systems and treated and untreated Cobas e 411 results are comparable by a correlation coefficient. Comparison of EQAS, IQAS and patient samples were done to find out the trueness of such correlation factor. Study with patient's results have established the correlation coefficient is valid for very small concentration of prolactin also. EQAS, IQAS and 150 patient samples were treated with PEG and prolactin results of treated and untreated samples obtained from Roche Cobas e 411. 25 patient's results (treated) were compared with direct results in Advia Centaur, Architect I & Access2 systems. Correlation coefficient was obtained from trend line of the treated and untreated results. Two tailed p-value obtained from regression coefficient(r) and sample size. The correlation coefficient is in the range (0.761-0.771). Reverse correlation range is (1.289-1.301). r value of two sets of calculated results were 0.995. Two tailed p- value is zero approving dismissal of null hypothesis. The z-score of EQAS does not always assure authenticity of resultsPEG precipitation is correlated by the factor 0.761 even in very small concentrationsAbbreviationsGFCgel filtration chromatographyPEGpolyethylene glycolEQASexternal quality assurance systemM-PRLmacro prolactinPRLprolactinECLIAelectro-chemiluminescence immunoassayCLIAclinical laboratory improvement amendmentsIQASinternal quality assurance systemrregression coefficient.

  13. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) does not correlate with different serological parameters in myositis and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hans-Jonas; Ziemann, Oliver; Kornhuber, Malte; Emmer, Alexander; Quäschling, Ulf; Schob, Stefan; Surov, Alexey

    2018-06-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in several muscle disorders. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an imaging modality, which can reflect microstructural tissue composition. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is used to quantify the random motion of water molecules in tissue. Purpose To investigate ADC values in patients with myositis and non-inflammatory myopathy and to analyze possible associations between ADC and laboratory parameters in these patients. Material and Methods Overall, 17 patients with several myositis entities, eight patients with non-inflammatory myopathies, and nine patients without muscle disorder as a control group were included in the study (mean age = 55.3 ± 14.3 years). The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in every case. DWI was obtained in a 1.5-T scanner using two b-values: 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 . In all patients, the blood sample was acquired within three days to the MRI. The following serological parameters were estimated: C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and myoglobine. Results The estimated mean ADC value for the myositis group was 1.89 ± 0.37 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s and for the non-inflammatory myopathy group was 1.79 ± 0.33 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s, respectively. The mean ADC values (1.15 ± 0.37 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s) were significantly higher to unaffected muscles (vs. myositis P = 0.0002 and vs. myopathy P = 0.0021). There were no significant correlations between serological parameters and ADC values. Conclusion Affected muscles showed statistically significantly higher ADC values than normal muscles. No linear correlations between ADC and serological parameters were identified.

  14. Hepatic hemangioma: Correlation of enhancement types with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshima, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)], E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp; Kanematsu, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kajita, Kimihiro [Department of Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Tsuge, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shiratori, Yoshimune [Department of Medical Informatics, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Onozuka, Minoru [Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, Kanagawa Dental College, Yokosuka (Japan); Moriyama, Noriyuki [Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tsukiji (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To correlate hepatic hemangioma enhancement types in gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images with diffusion-weighted MR findings and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Materials and methods: Respiratory-triggered diffusion-weighted MR images (TR/TE, 2422/46 ms; parallel imaging factor, 2; b factor, 500 s/mm{sup 2}; number of averaging, 6) obtained in 35 patients with 44 hepatic hemangiomas diagnosed by gadolinium-enhanced MR and by follow-up imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Hemangiomas were classified into three enhancement types based on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging findings: type I, early-enhancement type; type II, peripheral nodular enhancement type; type III, delayed enhancement type. Two blinded readers qualitatively assessed lesion sizes and signal intensities on T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and diffusion-weighted images. The ADCs of hemangiomas were also measured. Results: No significant difference was observed between the three enhancement types in terms of signal intensities on T2-weighted images. Signal intensities on diffusion-weighted images were lower in the order type I to III (P < .01), and mean ADCs were 2.18 x 10{sup -3}, 1.86 x 10{sup -3}, and 1.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for types I, II, and III, respectively (P < .01). No correlation was found between lesion sizes and ADCs. Conclusion: Hepatic hemangiomas were found to have enhancement type dependent signal intensities and ADCs on diffusion-weighted MR images. Further studies will have to substantiate that these diffusion patterns might reflect intratumoral blood flow or perfusion.

  15. Automated collimation testing by determining the statistical correlation coefficient of Talbot self-images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Santosh; Dhanotia, Jitendra; Bhatia, Vimal; Prakash, Shashi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple, fast, and accurate technique for detection of collimation position of an optical beam using the self-imaging phenomenon and correlation analysis. Herrera-Fernandez et al. [J. Opt.18, 075608 (2016)JOOPDB0150-536X10.1088/2040-8978/18/7/075608] proposed an experimental arrangement for collimation testing by comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. Following their approach, we propose a testing procedure based on correlation coefficient (CC) for efficient detection of variation in the size and fringe width of the Talbot self-images and thereby the collimation position. When the beam is collimated, the physical properties of the self-images of the grating, such as its size and fringe width, do not vary from one Talbot plane to the other and are identical; the CC is maximum in such a situation. For the de-collimated position, the size and fringe width of the self-images vary, and correspondingly the CC decreases. Hence, the magnitude of CC is a measure of degree of collimation. Using the method, we could set the collimation position to a resolution of 1 μm, which relates to ±0.25   μ    radians in terms of collimation angle (for testing a collimating lens of diameter 46 mm and focal length 300 mm). In contrast to most collimation techniques reported to date, the proposed technique does not require a translation/rotation of the grating, use of complicated phase evaluation algorithms, or an intricate method for determination of period of the grating or its self-images. The technique is fully automated and provides high resolution and precision.

  16. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-06-01

    Engagement in research and academic productivity are crucial components in the training of a neurosurgeon. This process typically begins in residency training. In this study, we analyzed individual resident productivity as it correlated to publications across all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery training programs in an attempt to identify how programs have developed and fostered a research culture and environment. We obtained a list of current neurosurgery residents in ACGME-accredited programs from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons database. An expanded PubMed and Scopus search was conducted for each resident through the present time. We tabulated all articles attributed to each resident. We then categorized the publications based on each neurosurgical subspecialty while in residency. A spreadsheet-based statistical analysis was performed. This formulated the average number of resident articles, h-indices, and most common subspecialty categories by training program. We analyzed 1352 current neurosurgery residents in 105 programs. There were a total of 10 645 publications, of which 3985 were resident first-author publications during the period of study. The most common subspecialties among all resident publications were vascular (24.9%), spine (16.9%), oncology (16.1%), pediatric (5.6%), functional (4.9%), and trauma (3.8%). The average resident published 2.9 first-author papers with average of 38.0 first-author publications by total residents at each program (range 0-241). The average h-index per resident is 2.47 ± 3.25. When comparing previously published faculty h-index program rankings against our resident h-index rankings, there is a strong correlation between the 2 datasets with a clear delineation between Top-20 productivity and that of other programs (average h-index 4.2 vs 1.7, respectively, P productivity on both the resident and faculty level (average h-index 1.6, 1.9, 3.9 for 1, 2, and

  17. A Guideline of Selecting and Reporting Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for Reliability Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Terry K; Li, Mae Y

    2016-06-01

    Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) is a widely used reliability index in test-retest, intrarater, and interrater reliability analyses. This article introduces the basic concept of ICC in the content of reliability analysis. There are 10 forms of ICCs. Because each form involves distinct assumptions in their calculation and will lead to different interpretations, researchers should explicitly specify the ICC form they used in their calculation. A thorough review of the research design is needed in selecting the appropriate form of ICC to evaluate reliability. The best practice of reporting ICC should include software information, "model," "type," and "definition" selections. When coming across an article that includes ICC, readers should first check whether information about the ICC form has been reported and if an appropriate ICC form was used. Based on the 95% confident interval of the ICC estimate, values less than 0.5, between 0.5 and 0.75, between 0.75 and 0.9, and greater than 0.90 are indicative of poor, moderate, good, and excellent reliability, respectively. This article provides a practical guideline for clinical researchers to choose the correct form of ICC and suggests the best practice of reporting ICC parameters in scientific publications. This article also gives readers an appreciation for what to look for when coming across ICC while reading an article.

  18. Oblique rotaton in canonical correlation analysis reformulated as maximizing the generalized coefficient of determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Hironori; Adachi, Kohei

    2013-07-01

    To facilitate the interpretation of canonical correlation analysis (CCA) solutions, procedures have been proposed in which CCA solutions are orthogonally rotated to a simple structure. In this paper, we consider oblique rotation for CCA to provide solutions that are much easier to interpret, though only orthogonal rotation is allowed in the existing formulations of CCA. Our task is thus to reformulate CCA so that its solutions have the freedom of oblique rotation. Such a task can be achieved using Yanai's (Jpn. J. Behaviormetrics 1:46-54, 1974; J. Jpn. Stat. Soc. 11:43-53, 1981) generalized coefficient of determination for the objective function to be maximized in CCA. The resulting solutions are proved to include the existing orthogonal ones as special cases and to be rotated obliquely without affecting the objective function value, where ten Berge's (Psychometrika 48:519-523, 1983) theorems on suborthonormal matrices are used. A real data example demonstrates that the proposed oblique rotation can provide simple, easily interpreted CCA solutions.

  19. A novel fractal image compression scheme with block classification and sorting based on Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianji; Zheng, Nanning

    2013-09-01

    Fractal image compression (FIC) is an image coding technology based on the local similarity of image structure. It is widely used in many fields such as image retrieval, image denoising, image authentication, and encryption. FIC, however, suffers from the high computational complexity in encoding. Although many schemes are published to speed up encoding, they do not easily satisfy the encoding time or the reconstructed image quality requirements. In this paper, a new FIC scheme is proposed based on the fact that the affine similarity between two blocks in FIC is equivalent to the absolute value of Pearson's correlation coefficient (APCC) between them. First, all blocks in the range and domain pools are chosen and classified using an APCC-based block classification method to increase the matching probability. Second, by sorting the domain blocks with respect to APCCs between these domain blocks and a preset block in each class, the matching domain block for a range block can be searched in the selected domain set in which these APCCs are closer to APCC between the range block and the preset block. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can significantly speed up the encoding process in FIC while preserving the reconstructed image quality well.

  20. Reliability of environmental sampling culture results using the negative binomial intraclass correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Sharif S; Zhao, Jianyang; Li, Ben; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) is commonly used to estimate the similarity between quantitative measures obtained from different sources. Overdispersed data is traditionally transformed so that linear mixed model (LMM) based ICC can be estimated. A common transformation used is the natural logarithm. The reliability of environmental sampling of fecal slurry on freestall pens has been estimated for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis using the natural logarithm transformed culture results. Recently, the negative binomial ICC was defined based on a generalized linear mixed model for negative binomial distributed data. The current study reports on the negative binomial ICC estimate which includes fixed effects using culture results of environmental samples. Simulations using a wide variety of inputs and negative binomial distribution parameters (r; p) showed better performance of the new negative binomial ICC compared to the ICC based on LMM even when negative binomial data was logarithm, and square root transformed. A second comparison that targeted a wider range of ICC values showed that the mean of estimated ICC closely approximated the true ICC.

  1. A Bayesian estimate of the concordance correlation coefficient with skewed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is one of the most popular scaled indices used to evaluate agreement. Most commonly, it is used under the assumption that data is normally distributed. This assumption, however, does not apply to skewed data sets. While methods for the estimation of the CCC of skewed data sets have been introduced and studied, the Bayesian approach and its comparison with the previous methods has been lacking. In this study, we propose a Bayesian method for the estimation of the CCC of skewed data sets and compare it with the best method previously investigated. The proposed method has certain advantages. It tends to outperform the best method studied before when the variation of the data is mainly from the random subject effect instead of error. Furthermore, it allows for greater flexibility in application by enabling incorporation of missing data, confounding covariates, and replications, which was not considered previously. The superiority of this new approach is demonstrated using simulation as well as real-life biomarker data sets used in an electroencephalography clinical study. The implementation of the Bayesian method is accessible through the Comprehensive R Archive Network. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and histopathology subtypes of osteosarcoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jifei; Sun, Meili; Liu, Dawei; Hu, Xiaoshu; Pui, Margaret H; Meng, Quanfei; Gao, Zhenhua

    2017-08-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has made limb-salvage surgery possible for the patients with osteosarcoma. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) has been used to monitor chemotherapy response. Purpose To correlate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with histopathology subtypes of osteosarcoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Material and Methods Twelve patients with osteoblastic (n = 7), chondroblastic (n = 4), and fibroblastic (n = 1) osteosarcomas underwent post-chemotherapy DWI before limb-salvage surgery. ADCs corresponding to 127 histological tissue samples from the 12 resected specimens were compared to histological features. Results The mean ADC value of non-cartilaginous viable tumor (38/91, ADC = 1.22 ± 0.03 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s) was significantly ( P  0.05) different between viable cartilaginous tumor and cystic/hemorrhagic necrosis. Conclusion DWI allows assessment of tumor necrosis after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by ADC differences between viable tumor and necrosis in fibroblastic and osteoblastic osteosarcomas whereas viable chondroblastic osteosarcoma has high ADC and cannot be distinguished reliably from necrosis.

  3. A novel coefficient for detecting and quantifying asymmetry of California electricity market based on asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang

    2016-06-01

    In order to detect and quantify asymmetry of two time series, a novel cross-correlation coefficient is proposed based on recent asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis (A-DXA), which we called A-DXA coefficient. The A-DXA coefficient, as an important extension of DXA coefficient ρDXA, contains two directional asymmetric cross-correlated indexes, describing upwards and downwards asymmetric cross-correlations, respectively. By using the information of directional covariance function of two time series and directional variance function of each series itself instead of power-law between the covariance function and time scale, the proposed A-DXA coefficient can well detect asymmetry between the two series no matter whether the cross-correlation is significant or not. By means of the proposed A-DXA coefficient conducted over the asymmetry for California electricity market, we found that the asymmetry between the prices and loads is not significant for daily average data in 1999 yr market (before electricity crisis) but extremely significant for those in 2000 yr market (during the crisis). To further uncover the difference of asymmetry between the years 1999 and 2000, a modified H statistic (MH) and ΔMH statistic are proposed. One of the present contributions is that the high MH values calculated for hourly data exist in majority months in 2000 market. Another important conclusion is that the cross-correlation with downwards dominates over the whole 1999 yr in contrast to the cross-correlation with upwards dominates over the 2000 yr.

  4. A novel coefficient for detecting and quantifying asymmetry of California electricity market based on asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang

    2016-06-01

    In order to detect and quantify asymmetry of two time series, a novel cross-correlation coefficient is proposed based on recent asymmetric detrended cross-correlation analysis (A-DXA), which we called A-DXA coefficient. The A-DXA coefficient, as an important extension of DXA coefficient ρ D X A , contains two directional asymmetric cross-correlated indexes, describing upwards and downwards asymmetric cross-correlations, respectively. By using the information of directional covariance function of two time series and directional variance function of each series itself instead of power-law between the covariance function and time scale, the proposed A-DXA coefficient can well detect asymmetry between the two series no matter whether the cross-correlation is significant or not. By means of the proposed A-DXA coefficient conducted over the asymmetry for California electricity market, we found that the asymmetry between the prices and loads is not significant for daily average data in 1999 yr market (before electricity crisis) but extremely significant for those in 2000 yr market (during the crisis). To further uncover the difference of asymmetry between the years 1999 and 2000, a modified H statistic (MH) and ΔMH statistic are proposed. One of the present contributions is that the high MH values calculated for hourly data exist in majority months in 2000 market. Another important conclusion is that the cross-correlation with downwards dominates over the whole 1999 yr in contrast to the cross-correlation with upwards dominates over the 2000 yr.

  5. The Physical Significance of the Synthetic Running Correlation Coefficient and Its Applications in Oceanic and Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinping; Cao, Yong; Wang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    In order to study the temporal variations of correlations between two time series, a running correlation coefficient (RCC) could be used. An RCC is calculated for a given time window, and the window is then moved sequentially through time. The current calculation method for RCCs is based on the general definition of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, calculated with the data within the time window, which we call the local running correlation coefficient (LRCC). The LRCC is calculated via the two anomalies corresponding to the two local means, meanwhile, the local means also vary. It is cleared up that the LRCC reflects only the correlation between the two anomalies within the time window but fails to exhibit the contributions of the two varying means. To address this problem, two unchanged means obtained from all available data are adopted to calculate an RCC, which is called the synthetic running correlation coefficient (SRCC). When the anomaly variations are dominant, the two RCCs are similar. However, when the variations of the means are dominant, the difference between the two RCCs becomes obvious. The SRCC reflects the correlations of both the anomaly variations and the variations of the means. Therefore, the SRCCs from different time points are intercomparable. A criterion for the superiority of the RCC algorithm is that the average value of the RCC should be close to the global correlation coefficient calculated using all data. The SRCC always meets this criterion, while the LRCC sometimes fails. Therefore, the SRCC is better than the LRCC for running correlations. We suggest using the SRCC to calculate the RCCs.

  6. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Characteristics and Correlation With Histopathologic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanling; Li, Na; Zhao, Weiwei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Mengqi; Yang, Yong; Wang, Yingmei; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Zhuoli; Larson, Andrew C; Huan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify diffusion and perfusion abnormalities and evaluate correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), MR perfusion and histopathologic parameters of pancreatic cancer (PC). Eighteen patients with PC underwent diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Parameters of DCE-MRI and ADC of cancer and non-cancerous tissue were compared. Correlation between the rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the arterial blood into the extravascular extracellular space (K, volume of the extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve), and ADC of PC and histopathologic parameters were analyzed. The rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the extravascular extracellular space into blood plasma, K, tissue volume fraction occupied by vascular space, and ADC of PC were significantly lower than nontumoral pancreases. Ve of PC was significantly higher than that of nontumoral pancreas. Apparent diffusion coefficient and K values of PC were negatively correlated to fibrosis content and fibroblast activation protein staining score. Fibrosis content was positively correlated to Ve. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and parameters of DCE-MRI can differentiate PC from nontumoral pancreases. There are correlations between ADC, K, Ve, and fibrosis content of PC. Fibroblast activation protein staining score of PC is negatively correlated to ADC and K. Apparent diffusion coefficient, K, and Ve may be feasible to predict prognosis of PC.

  7. A COMPARATIVE LOOK INTO HOW TO MEASURE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VOCABULARY LEARNING STRATEGIES: THROUGH USING PERCENTAGES OR CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Hakkı ERTEN

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare the appropriateness of two statistical procedures for measuring the effectiveness of vocabulary learning strategies: percentages and correlation coefficients. To do this a group of 20 learners of English were asked to study 12 words in a written list, with their pronunciations, dictionary definitions, and example sentences. Data was collected through introspection where students were asked to verbalize their mental processes as they studied the target words. A pre-test and post-test were given to measure the task achievement. The qualitative data was transcribed verbatim and content-analysed for tokens of strategy use as well as by noting whether each use of strategies led to successful recall of the words on which they were used. To calculate the strategy effectiveness, both simple percentage calculation and correlation coefficients were employed for comparison. The findings indicated that percentage calculation can give a more realistic picture of strategy effectiveness than correlation coefficients.

  8. Correlated linear response calculations of the C6 dispersion coefficients of hydrogen halides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sauer, S. P. A.; Paidarová, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2-4 (2007), s. 399-421 ISSN 1574-0404 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA401870702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : hydrogen halides * C6 dospersion coefficients * van der Waals coefficients * polarizability at imaginary frequences * SOPPA Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  9. Pitfalls and important issues in testing reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients in orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jaebong; Chung, Chin Youb; Ahn, Soyeon; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Hui Jong; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-06-01

    Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) provide a statistical means of testing the reliability. However, their interpretation is not well documented in the orthopedic field. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of ICCs in the orthopedic literature and to demonstrate pitfalls regarding their use. First, orthopedic articles that used ICCs were retrieved from the Pubmed database, and journal demography, ICC models and concurrent statistics used were evaluated. Second, reliability test was performed on three common physical examinations in cerebral palsy, namely, the Thomas test, the Staheli test, and popliteal angle measurement. Thirty patients were assessed by three orthopedic surgeons to explore the statistical methods testing reliability. Third, the factors affecting the ICC values were examined by simulating the data sets based on the physical examination data where the ranges, slopes, and interobserver variability were modified. Of the 92 orthopedic articles identified, 58 articles (63%) did not clarify the ICC model used, and only 5 articles (5%) described all models, types, and measures. In reliability testing, although the popliteal angle showed a larger mean absolute difference than the Thomas test and the Staheli test, the ICC of popliteal angle was higher, which was believed to be contrary to the context of measurement. In addition, the ICC values were affected by the model, type, and measures used. In simulated data sets, the ICC showed higher values when the range of data sets were larger, the slopes of the data sets were parallel, and the interobserver variability was smaller. Care should be taken when interpreting the absolute ICC values, i.e., a higher ICC does not necessarily mean less variability because the ICC values can also be affected by various factors. The authors recommend that researchers clarify ICC models used and ICC values are interpreted in the context of measurement.

  10. Correlation of MRI apparent diffusion coefficient of invasive breast cancer with tumor tissue growth and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Hong Fu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value of invasive breast cancer with tumor tissue growth and angiogenesis. Methods: Patients with breast mass who were treated in Wuhan No. 6 Hospital between March 2014 and May 2017 were selected as the research subjects and divided into group A with invasive ductal carcinoma, group B with intraductal carcinoma and group C with benign lesion according to the biopsy results, magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging was conducted to determine ADC values, and biopsy tissue was taken to determine the expression of proliferation genes and angiogenesis genes. Results: USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in lesions of group A and group B were significantly higher than those of group C while ADC value as well as ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels were significantly lower than those of group C; USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in lesions of group A were significantly higher than those of group B while ADC value as well as ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels was significantly lower than those of group B; USP39, CyclinD1, VEGF, bFGF, Angplt-2, Angplt-3 and Angplt-4 protein expression levels in invasive breast cancer tissue with high ADC value were significantly lower than those in invasive breast cancer tissue with low ADC value while ALEX1 and Bax protein expression levels were significantly higher than those in invasive breast cancer tissue with low ADC value. Conclusion: The decrease of ADC value of invasive breast cancer is closely related to cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  11. Correlation Coefficients Between Different Methods of Expressing Bacterial Quantification Using Real Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Navidshad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The applications of conventional culture-dependent assays to quantify bacteria populations are limited by their dependence on the inconsistent success of the different culture-steps involved. In addition, some bacteria can be pathogenic or a source of endotoxins and pose a health risk to the researchers. Bacterial quantification based on the real-time PCR method can overcome the above-mentioned problems. However, the quantification of bacteria using this approach is commonly expressed as absolute quantities even though the composition of samples (like those of digesta can vary widely; thus, the final results may be affected if the samples are not properly homogenized, especially when multiple samples are to be pooled together before DNA extraction. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation coefficients between four different methods of expressing the output data of real-time PCR-based bacterial quantification. The four methods were: (i the common absolute method expressed as the cell number of specific bacteria per gram of digesta; (ii the Livak and Schmittgen, ΔΔCt method; (iii the Pfaffl equation; and (iv a simple relative method based on the ratio of cell number of specific bacteria to the total bacterial cells. Because of the effect on total bacteria population in the results obtained using ΔCt-based methods (ΔΔCt and Pfaffl, these methods lack the acceptable consistency to be used as valid and reliable methods in real-time PCR-based bacterial quantification studies. On the other hand, because of the variable compositions of digesta samples, a simple ratio of cell number of specific bacteria to the corresponding total bacterial cells of the same sample can be a more accurate method to quantify the population.

  12. Cross correlation coefficients of turbulent boundary layer with micro-bubble injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudia del Carmen Gutierrez-Torres; Yassin A Hassan; Jose Alfredo Jimenez-Bernal

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Injection of micro-bubbles within the turbulent boundary layer has been investigated for a several years as a method to achieve drag reduction. However, the physical mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood yet. Experiments in a channel flow for single phase (water) and two phase (water and micro-bubbles) flows under different void fraction conditions are reported for a Reynolds number of 5128. Particle Image Velocimetry technique is used to measure instantaneous velocity fields. Consequently the cross-correlation coefficient Ruv can be calculated along the stream-wise direction for various different y + positions and along the normal direction for the fluctuating components of the velocity obtained from the instantaneous velocity fields. The experiments were carried out in a rectangular acrylic channel, whose dimensions are 4.8 m length, 20.6 cm wide and 5.6 cm height. Water was driven trough the channel by gravity from a tank, which was located 3 m above the channel. Then, water was conducted to a lower tank; from which water was pumped to the upper thank forming a closed loop. Upper tank's water level was kept constant through the tests to ensure constant flow rate trough the channel. The velocity field in the x-y plane was obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) at 3.15 m downstream from the channel inlet. A Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm (green light) and power of 350 mJ per pulse is utilized. The particles used for seeding have a diameter that goes from 6-9 μm with a specific gravity almost identical to water s specific gravity. The laser light scattered from the seeding particles was recorded using a CCD Kodak Megaplus camera, Model ES 1.0, 1008 x 1018 pixels. The viewing area was 1.28 cm 2 and was located close to the channel wall. The system recorded 30 velocity fields per second. Each velocity field was obtained from a pair of consecutive images capturing the second image of the pair 1 ms after

  13. Cross correlation coefficients of turbulent boundary layer with micro-bubble injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudia del Carmen Gutierrez-Torres [LABINTHAP-SEPI-ESIME, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos Edif. 5 3er. Piso, Col Lindavista, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Yassin A Hassan; Jose Alfredo Jimenez-Bernal [Texas A and M University, College Station, Tx. 77843-3133 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Injection of micro-bubbles within the turbulent boundary layer has been investigated for a several years as a method to achieve drag reduction. However, the physical mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood yet. Experiments in a channel flow for single phase (water) and two phase (water and micro-bubbles) flows under different void fraction conditions are reported for a Reynolds number of 5128. Particle Image Velocimetry technique is used to measure instantaneous velocity fields. Consequently the cross-correlation coefficient Ruv can be calculated along the stream-wise direction for various different y{sup +} positions and along the normal direction for the fluctuating components of the velocity obtained from the instantaneous velocity fields. The experiments were carried out in a rectangular acrylic channel, whose dimensions are 4.8 m length, 20.6 cm wide and 5.6 cm height. Water was driven trough the channel by gravity from a tank, which was located 3 m above the channel. Then, water was conducted to a lower tank; from which water was pumped to the upper thank forming a closed loop. Upper tank's water level was kept constant through the tests to ensure constant flow rate trough the channel. The velocity field in the x-y plane was obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) at 3.15 m downstream from the channel inlet. A Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm (green light) and power of 350 mJ per pulse is utilized. The particles used for seeding have a diameter that goes from 6-9 {mu}m with a specific gravity almost identical to water s specific gravity. The laser light scattered from the seeding particles was recorded using a CCD Kodak Megaplus camera, Model ES 1.0, 1008 x 1018 pixels. The viewing area was 1.28 cm{sup 2} and was located close to the channel wall. The system recorded 30 velocity fields per second. Each velocity field was obtained from a pair of consecutive images capturing the second image of

  14. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in free neutron decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, B; Bateman, F; Bauder, W K; Byrne, J; Byron, W A; Chen, W; Darius, G; DeAngelis, C; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Hassan, M T; Jones, G L; Komives, A; Laptev, A; Mendenhall, M P; Nico, J S; Noid, G; Park, H; Stephenson, E J; Stern, I; Stockton, K J S; Trull, C; Wietfeldt, F E; Yerozolimsky, B G

    2017-08-01

    We describe an apparatus used to measure the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient in free neutron decay. The apparatus employs a novel measurement technique in which the angular correlation is converted into a proton time-of-flight asymmetry that is counted directly, avoiding the need for proton spectroscopy. Details of the method, apparatus, detectors, data acquisition, and data reduction scheme are presented, along with a discussion of the important systematic effects.

  15. Spatial correlation in 3D MIMO channels using fourier coefficients of power spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain; Kammoun, Abla; Debbah, Mé rouane; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    for arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns. The resulting expression depends on the underlying angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty

  16. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon

    2017-01-01

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  17. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable...... routine measurements of diffusion coefficients directly from images of fluorescently tagged plasma membrane proteins, that avoided systematic biases introduced by probe photophysics. Although the theoretical basis for the analysis is complex, the method can be implemented by nonexperts using a freely...... to the correlation function yields the diffusion coefficient. This paper provides a step-by-step guide to the image analysis and measurement of diffusion coefficients via kICS. First, a high frame rate image sequence of a fluorescently labeled plasma membrane protein is acquired using a fluorescence microscope Then...

  18. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  19. Meta-Analysis of the Correlation between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Standardized Uptake Value in Malignant Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this meta-analysis is to explore the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC on diffusion-weighted MR and the standard uptake value (SUV of 18F-FDG on PET/CT in patients with cancer. Databases such as PubMed (MEDLINE included, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Review were searched for relevant original articles that explored the correlation between SUV and ADC in English. After applying Fisher’s r-to-z transformation, correlation coefficient (r values were extracted from each study and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on tumor type were performed to investigate the potential heterogeneity. Forty-nine studies were eligible for the meta-analysis, comprising 1927 patients. Pooled r for all studies was −0.35 (95% CI: −0.42–0.28 and exhibited a notable heterogeneity (I2 = 78.4%; P < 0.01. In terms of the cancer type subgroup analysis, combined correlation coefficients of ADC/SUV range from −0.12 (lymphoma, n = 5 to −0.59 (pancreatic cancer, n = 2. We concluded that there is an average negative correlation between ADC and SUV in patients with cancer. Higher correlations were found in the brain tumor, cervix carcinoma, and pancreas cancer. However, a larger, prospective study is warranted to validate these findings in different cancer types.

  20. Meta-Analysis of the Correlation between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Standardized Uptake Value in Malignant Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shengming; Wu, Zhifang; Wu, Yiwei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jihui; Dai, Na; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to explore the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on diffusion-weighted MR and the standard uptake value (SUV) of 18 F-FDG on PET/CT in patients with cancer. Databases such as PubMed (MEDLINE included), EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Review were searched for relevant original articles that explored the correlation between SUV and ADC in English. After applying Fisher's r -to- z transformation, correlation coefficient ( r ) values were extracted from each study and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on tumor type were performed to investigate the potential heterogeneity. Forty-nine studies were eligible for the meta-analysis, comprising 1927 patients. Pooled r for all studies was -0.35 (95% CI: -0.42-0.28) and exhibited a notable heterogeneity ( I 2 = 78.4%; P correlation coefficients of ADC/SUV range from -0.12 (lymphoma, n = 5) to -0.59 (pancreatic cancer, n = 2). We concluded that there is an average negative correlation between ADC and SUV in patients with cancer. Higher correlations were found in the brain tumor, cervix carcinoma, and pancreas cancer. However, a larger, prospective study is warranted to validate these findings in different cancer types.

  1. The intraclass correlation coefficient applied for evaluation of data correction, labeling methods and rectal biopsy sampling in DNA microarray experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, E.P.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Burema, J.; Keijer, J.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) can be used as a relatively simple statistical measure to assess methodological and biological variation in DNA microarray analysis. The ICC is a measure that determines the reproducibility of a variable, which can easily be calculated from

  2. A classification and ranking system on the H2 gas sensing capabilities of nanomaterials based on proposed coefficients of sensor performance and sensor efficiency equations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mwakikunga, BW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A coefficient of performance is defined based on the traditional definitions of response, S, of a chemoresistive sensing material to a specific gas from resistance–time data. The new definition not only considers the S(sub response) and S...

  3. The coefficient of determination R2 and intra-class correlation coefficient from generalized linear mixed-effects models revisited and expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shinichi; Johnson, Paul C D; Schielzeth, Holger

    2017-09-01

    The coefficient of determination R 2 quantifies the proportion of variance explained by a statistical model and is an important summary statistic of biological interest. However, estimating R 2 for generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) remains challenging. We have previously introduced a version of R 2 that we called [Formula: see text] for Poisson and binomial GLMMs, but not for other distributional families. Similarly, we earlier discussed how to estimate intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) using Poisson and binomial GLMMs. In this paper, we generalize our methods to all other non-Gaussian distributions, in particular to negative binomial and gamma distributions that are commonly used for modelling biological data. While expanding our approach, we highlight two useful concepts for biologists, Jensen's inequality and the delta method, both of which help us in understanding the properties of GLMMs. Jensen's inequality has important implications for biologically meaningful interpretation of GLMMs, whereas the delta method allows a general derivation of variance associated with non-Gaussian distributions. We also discuss some special considerations for binomial GLMMs with binary or proportion data. We illustrate the implementation of our extension by worked examples from the field of ecology and evolution in the R environment. However, our method can be used across disciplines and regardless of statistical environments. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Cationic agent contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging of cartilage correlates with the compressive modulus and coefficient of friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, B A; Grasso, D J; Shah, S S; Stewart, R C; Bansal, P N; Freedman, J D; Grinstaff, M W; Snyder, B D

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) attenuation, using a cationic contrast agent (CA4+), correlates with the equilibrium compressive modulus (E) and coefficient of friction (μ) of ex vivo bovine articular cartilage. Correlations between CECT attenuation and E (Group 1, n = 12) and μ (Group 2, n = 10) were determined using 7 mm diameter bovine osteochondral plugs from the stifle joints of six freshly slaughtered, skeletally mature cows. The equilibrium compressive modulus was measured using a four-step, unconfined, compressive stress-relaxation test, and the coefficients of friction were determined from a torsional friction test. Following mechanical testing, samples were immersed in CA4+, imaged using μCT, rinsed, and analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. The CECT attenuation was positively correlated with the GAG content of bovine cartilage (R(2) = 0.87, P coefficients of friction: CECT vs μ(static) (R(2) = 0.71, P = 0.002), CECT vs μ(static_equilibrium) (R(2) = 0.79, P coefficient of friction. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On the Construction of Bivariate Exponential Distributions with an Arbitrary Correlation Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    coefficient (also negative). Secondly, the class satisfies that any linear combination (projection) of the marginal random variables is a phase-type distribution. The latter property is partially important for the development of hypothesis testing in linear models. Finally, it is easy to simulate...

  6. Determination of molecular diffusion coefficient in n-alkane binary mixtures: empirical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mezquia, D Alonso; Bou-Ali, M Mounir; Larrañaga, M; Madariaga, J A; Santamaría, C

    2012-03-08

    In this work we have measured the molecular diffusion coefficient of the n-alkane binary series nC(i)-nC(6), nC(i)-nC(10), and nC(i)-nC(12) at 298 K and 1 atm and a mass fraction of 0.5 by using the so-called sliding symmetric tubes technique. The results show that the diffusion coefficient at this concentration is proportional to the inverse viscosity of the mixture. In addition, we have also measured the diffusion coefficient of the systems nC(12)-nC(6), nC(12)-nC(7), and nC(12)-nC(8) as a function of concentration. From the data obtained, it is shown that the diffusion coefficient of the n-alkane binary mixtures at any concentration can be calculated from the molecular weight of the components and the dynamic viscosity of the corresponding mixture at 50% mass fraction.

  7. Discharge coefficient correlations for circular-arc venturi flowmeters at critical /sonic/ flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnberg, B. T.; Britton, C. L.; Seidl, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental data are analyzed to support theoretical predictions for discharge coefficients in circular-arc venturi flow meters operating in the critical sonic flow regime at throat Reynolds numbers above 150 thousand. The data tend to verify the predicted 0.25% decrease in the discharge coefficient during transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer. Four different test gases and three flow measurement facilities were used in the experiments with 17 venturis with throat sizes from 0.15 to 1.37 in. and Beta ratios ranging from 0.014 to 0.25. Recommendations are given as to how the effectiveness of future studies in the field could be improved.

  8. Rank Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  9. Lipid–water partition coefficients and correlations with uptakes by algae of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Wei-Nung; Chiou, Cary T.; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Partition coefficients of contaminants with lipid triolein (K tw ) are measured. • Measured K tw values are nearly the same as the respective K ow . • Sorption of the contaminants to a dry algal powder is similarly measured. • Algal uptake of a compound occurs primarily by partition into the algal lipid. - Abstract: In view of the scarcity of the lipid–water partition coefficients (K tw ) for organic compounds, the log K tw values for many environmental contaminants were measured using ultra-pure triolein as the model lipid. Classes of compounds studied include alkyl benzenes, halogenated benzenes, short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. In addition to log K tw determination, the uptakes of these compounds from water by a dry algal species were measured to evaluate the lipid effect on the algal uptake. The measured log K tw are closely related to their respective log K ow (octanol–water), with log K ow = 1.9 to 6.5. A significant difference is observed between the present and early measured log K tw for compounds with log K ow > ∼5, which is attributed to the presence and absence of a triolein microemulsion in water affecting the solute partitioning. The observed lipid-normalized algae–water distribution coefficients (log K aw/lipid ) are virtually identical to the respective log K tw values, which manifests the dominant lipid-partition effect of the compounds with algae

  10. Correlation between oral drug absorption in humans and apparent drug permeability coefficients in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artursson, P.; Karlsson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Monolayers of a well differentiated human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, were used as a model to study passive drug absorption across the intestinal epithelium. Absorption rate constants (expressed as apparent permeability coefficients) were determined for 20 drugs and peptides with different structural properties. The permeability coefficients ranged from approximately 5 x 10 - 8 to 5 x 10 - 5 cm/s. A good correlation was obtained between data on oral absorption in humans and the results in the Caco-2 model. Drugs that are completely absorbed in humans had permeability coefficients greater than 1 x 10 - 6 cm/s. Drugs that are absorbed to greater than 1% but less than 100% had permeability coefficients of 0.1-1.0 x 10 - 6 cm/s while drugs and peptides that are absorbed to less than 1% had permeability coefficients of less than or equal to 1 x 10 - 7 cm/s. The results indicate that Caco-2 monolayers can be used as a model for studies on intestinal drug absorption

  11. The Effect of a Fluorophore Photo-Physics on the Lipid Vesicle Diffusion Coefficient Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Sikorski, Aleksander; Langner, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique, which allows determination of the diffusion coefficient and concentration of fluorescent objects suspended in the solution. The measured parameter is the fluctuation of the fluorescence signal emitted by diffusing molecules. When 100 nm DOPC vesicles labeled with various fluorescent dyes (Fluorescein-PE, NBD-PE, Atto488 DOPE or βBodipy FL) were measured, different values of diffusion coefficients have been obtained. These diffusion coefficients were different from the expected values measured using the dynamic light scattering method (DLS). The FCS was initially developed for solutions containing small fluorescent molecules therefore the observed inconsistency may result from the nature of vesicle suspension itself. The duration of the fluorescence signal may depend on the following factors: the exposure time of the labeled object to the excitation beam, the photo-physical properties (e.g., stability) of a fluorophore, the theoretical model used for the calculations of the diffusion coefficient and optical properties of the vesicle suspension. The diffusion coefficients determined for differently labeled liposomes show that its dependence on vesicle size and quantity of fluorescent probed used for labeling was significant demonstrating that the fluorescence properties of the fluorophore itself (bleaching and/or blinking) were critical factors for a correct outcome of FCS experiment. The new, based on combined FCS and DLS measurements, method for the determination of the focal volume prove itself to be useful for the evaluation of a fluorescence dye with respect to its applicability for FCS experiment.

  12. An improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to filter noise in Doppler ultrasound blood flow signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Renzhi; Zu, Yunxiao; Shao, Lin

    2018-04-01

    The blood echo signal maintained through Medical ultrasound Doppler devices would always include vascular wall pulsation signal .The traditional method to de-noise wall signal is using high-pass filter, which will also remove the lowfrequency part of the blood flow signal. Some scholars put forward a method based on region selective reduction, which at first estimates of the wall pulsation signals and then removes the wall signal from the mixed signal. Apparently, this method uses the correlation between wavelet coefficients to distinguish blood signal from wall signal, but in fact it is a kind of wavelet threshold de-noising method, whose effect is not so much ideal. In order to maintain a better effect, this paper proposes an improved method based on wavelet coefficient correlation to separate blood signal and wall signal, and simulates the algorithm by computer to verify its validity.

  13. [Correlation coefficient-based principle and method for the classification of jump degree in hydrological time series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zi Yi; Xie, Ping; Sang, Yan Fang; Gu, Hai Ting

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of jump is one of the importantly external forms of hydrological variabi-lity under environmental changes, representing the adaption of hydrological nonlinear systems to the influence of external disturbances. Presently, the related studies mainly focus on the methods for identifying the jump positions and jump times in hydrological time series. In contrast, few studies have focused on the quantitative description and classification of jump degree in hydrological time series, which make it difficult to understand the environmental changes and evaluate its potential impacts. Here, we proposed a theatrically reliable and easy-to-apply method for the classification of jump degree in hydrological time series, using the correlation coefficient as a basic index. The statistical tests verified the accuracy, reasonability, and applicability of this method. The relationship between the correlation coefficient and the jump degree of series were described using mathematical equation by derivation. After that, several thresholds of correlation coefficients under different statistical significance levels were chosen, based on which the jump degree could be classified into five levels: no, weak, moderate, strong and very strong. Finally, our method was applied to five diffe-rent observed hydrological time series, with diverse geographic and hydrological conditions in China. The results of the classification of jump degrees in those series were closely accorded with their physically hydrological mechanisms, indicating the practicability of our method.

  14. Lipid–water partition coefficients and correlations with uptakes by algae of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Wei-Nung [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 30011, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Cary T., E-mail: carychio@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Environment Research Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Lin, Tsair-Fuh, E-mail: tflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Environment Research Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Partition coefficients of contaminants with lipid triolein (K{sub tw}) are measured. • Measured K{sub tw} values are nearly the same as the respective K{sub ow}. • Sorption of the contaminants to a dry algal powder is similarly measured. • Algal uptake of a compound occurs primarily by partition into the algal lipid. - Abstract: In view of the scarcity of the lipid–water partition coefficients (K{sub tw}) for organic compounds, the log K{sub tw} values for many environmental contaminants were measured using ultra-pure triolein as the model lipid. Classes of compounds studied include alkyl benzenes, halogenated benzenes, short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. In addition to log K{sub tw} determination, the uptakes of these compounds from water by a dry algal species were measured to evaluate the lipid effect on the algal uptake. The measured log K{sub tw} are closely related to their respective log K{sub ow} (octanol–water), with log K{sub ow} = 1.9 to 6.5. A significant difference is observed between the present and early measured log K{sub tw} for compounds with log K{sub ow} > ∼5, which is attributed to the presence and absence of a triolein microemulsion in water affecting the solute partitioning. The observed lipid-normalized algae–water distribution coefficients (log K{sub aw/lipid}) are virtually identical to the respective log K{sub tw} values, which manifests the dominant lipid-partition effect of the compounds with algae.

  15. The functional correlation between rainfall rate and extinction coefficient for frequencies from 3 to 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rainfall rate (R) obtained from radiometric brightness temperatures and the extinction coefficient (k sub e) is investigated by computing the values of k sub e over a wide range of rainfall rates, for frequencies from 3 to 25 GHz. The results show that the strength of the relation between the R and the k sub e values exhibits considerable variation for frequencies at this range. Practical suggestions are made concerning the selection of particular frequencies for rain measurements to minimize the error in R determinations.

  16. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficients and standardized uptake values in hybrid {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR: Preliminary results in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ju Hye [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kong, Eun Jung; Kwon, Sang Don; Kim, Jae Hwang [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) share the same role in clinical oncology and it is feasible to obtain the standardized uptake value (SUV) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) simultaneously by emerging the hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR). This study investigated the correlation between the ADCs of rectal cancer lesions and their SUVs derived from hybrid PET/MR. Nine patients with histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma (5 men, 4 women; mean age, 70 ± 15.91 years) underwent torso {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and regional hybrid {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR sequentially. A fixed threshold value of 40 % of maximum uptake was used to determine tumor volume of interest (VOI) on PET image; SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, and SUV{sub mean} were calculated automatically. A single freehand region of interest (ROI) was drawn on high b-value (b1000) DWI image and copied to corresponding ADC map to determine the ADCmean of rectal cancer lesion. Spearman'rank correlation coefficient (ρ) was calculated to determine the correlation between SUVs and ADC values. SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, and SUV{sub mean} derived by hybrid PET/MR were 12.35 ± 4.66 (mean ± standard deviation), 9.66  ± 3.15 and 7.41 ± 2.54, respectively. The ADCmean value of rectal cancer lesions was 1.02 ± 0.08 × 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s. ADCmean was significantly and inversely correlated with SUV values (SUV{sub max}, ρ = -0.95, p < 0.001; SUV{sub peak}, ρ = -0.93, p < 0.001; SUV{sub mean}, ρ = -0.91, p = 0.001). This preliminary hybrid PET/MR study demonstrates a significant inverse correlation exists between metabolic activity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and water diffusion on DWI in rectal cancer.

  17. Detrending moving-average cross-correlation coefficient: Measuring cross-correlations between non-stationary series

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištoufek, Ladislav

    Roč. 406 , č. 1 (2014), s. 169-175 ISSN 0378-4371 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-11402P Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : correlations * econophysics * non-stationarity Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.732, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/kristoufek-0433529.pdf

  18. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and cellularity is different in several tumors: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Wienke, Andreas

    2017-08-29

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to provide clinical evidence regarding relationship between ADC and cellularity in different tumors based on large patient data. Medline library was screened for associations between ADC and cell count in different tumors up to September 2016. Only publications in English were extracted. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA) was used for the research. Overall, 39 publications with 1530 patients were included into the analysis. The following data were extracted from the literature: authors, year of publication, number of patients, tumor type, and correlation coefficients. The pooled correlation coefficient for all studies was ρ = -0.56 (95 % CI = [-0.62; -0.50]),. Correlation coefficients ranged from ρ =-0.25 (95 % CI = [-0.63; 0.12]) in lymphoma to ρ=-0.66 (95 % CI = [-0.85; -0.47]) in glioma. Other coefficients were as follows: ovarian cancer, ρ = -0.64 (95% CI = [-0.76; -0.52]); lung cancer, ρ = -0.63 (95 % CI = [-0.78; -0.48]); uterine cervical cancer, ρ = -0.57 (95 % CI = [-0.80; -0.34]); prostatic cancer, ρ = -0.56 (95 % CI = [-0.69; -0.42]); renal cell carcinoma, ρ = -0.53 (95 % CI = [-0.93; -0.13]); head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, ρ = -0.53 (95 % CI = [-0.74; -0.32]); breast cancer, ρ = -0.48 (95 % CI = [-0.74; -0.23]); and meningioma, ρ = -0.45 (95 % CI = [-0.73; -0.17]).

  19. CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS BETWEEN THE NUMBERS OF CATEGORIES TILLERS ON SIGNALGRASS PASTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo Rozalino Santos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of relationship between the numbers of tillers categories allows the identification of compensatory mechanisms that ensure plants adaptation to grazing. Thus, this work was conducted to evaluate the associations between densities of various tillers categories in same Brachiaria decumbens pasture under continuous stocking with cattle. The tillers were measured with different growth sources, developmental stages, and defoliation and sizes levels in sites of same pasture with plants of 10, 20, 30 and 40 cm. Pearson linear correlation between the different tillers categories were estimated. The vegetative tillers number (VTN correlated positively with percentage of tillers with up to 20 cm. The response pattern opposite occurred with reproductive (RTN and dead (DTN tillers numbers. The correlations of number of leafless tillers were positive with the percentage of tillers with less than 20 cm and negative with the percentage of tillers with more than 20 cm. The VTN correlated positively with numbers of tillers with and without defoliation, and negatively with the RNT and DNT. The number of aerial tiller was positively correlated with the number of tillers without apical meristem. In B. decumbens pasture there are tradeoffs between percentage of longer tillers and VNT, between numbers of vegetative and leafless tillers, and between VNT and RNT.

  20. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  1. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Alajmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE, Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE, and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE. The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR and coefficient of friction (COF of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs, as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  2. Correlation between Mechanical Properties with Specific Wear Rate and the Coefficient of Friction of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajmi, Mahdi; Shalwan, Abdullah

    2015-07-08

    The correlation between the mechanical properties of Fillers/Epoxy composites and their tribological behavior was investigated. Tensile, hardness, wear, and friction tests were conducted for Neat Epoxy (NE), Graphite/Epoxy composites (GE), and Data Palm Fiber/Epoxy with or without Graphite composites (GFE and FE). The correlation was made between the tensile strength, the modulus of elasticity, elongation at the break, and the hardness, as an individual or a combined factor, with the specific wear rate (SWR) and coefficient of friction (COF) of composites. In general, graphite as an additive to polymeric composite has had an eclectic effect on mechanical properties, whereas it has led to a positive effect on tribological properties, whilst date palm fibers (DPFs), as reinforcement for polymeric composite, promoted a mechanical performance with a slight improvement to the tribological performance. Statistically, this study reveals that there is no strong confirmation of any marked correlation between the mechanical and the specific wear rate of filler/Epoxy composites. There is, however, a remarkable correlation between the mechanical properties and the friction coefficient of filler/Epoxy composites.

  3. Correlation between tissue metabolism and cellularity assessed by standardized uptake value and apparent diffusion coefficient in peritoneal metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue; Lee, Elaine Yuen Phin; Lai, Vincent; Chan, Queenie

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the correlation between standardized uptake value (SUV) (tissue metabolism) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) (water diffusivity) in peritoneal metastases. Patients with peritoneal dissemination detected on (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) were prospectively recruited for MRI examinations with informed consent and the study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. FDG-PET/CT, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MRI, and DWI/MRI images were independently reviewed by two radiologists based on visual analysis. SUVmax/SUVmean and ADCmin/ADCmean were obtained manually by drawing ROIs over the peritoneal metastases on FDG-PET/CT and DWI, respectively. Diagnostic characteristics of each technique were evaluated. Pearson's coefficient and McNemar and Kappa tests were used for statistical analysis. Eight patients were recruited for this prospective study and 34 peritoneal metastases were evaluated. ADCmean was significantly and negatively correlated with SUVmax (r = -0.528, P = 0.001) and SUVmean (r = -0.548, P = 0.001). ADCmin had similar correlation with SUVmax (r = -0.508, P = 0.002) and SUVmean (r = -0.513, P = 0.002). DWI/MRI had high diagnostic performance (accuracy = 98%) comparable to FDG-PET/CT, in peritoneal metastasis detection. Kappa values were excellent for all techniques. There was a significant inverse correlation between SUV and ADC. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genetic variability, correlation and path coefficients of yield and its components analysis in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch Ex Poir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GM Mohsin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability, correlation and path coefficient were studied for yield and yield component traits in twenty one diverse genotypes of pumpkin. Highest genotypic coefficient of variation was recorded for fruit length (cm, single fruit weight (kg, Brix (% and yield per plant (kg. Heritability estimates in broad sense were higher for almost all the characters. The characters namely, fruit length, single fruit weight, yield per plant and brix% had high genotypic coefficient of variation coupled with heritability gave high genetic advance expressed as percentage of mean ranged from 76.84 to 96.06 which indicated that these characters were less influenced by environment confirming additive gene action, and therefore, selection of these characters would be more effective for yield improvement of pumpkins. Total six traits likely fruit length, fruit diameter, flesh thickness, single fruit weight and number of fruits per plant were positively and significantly associated with yield per plant. Path coefficient analysis also revealed maximum contribution of single fruit weight (0.869 to yield and this was followed by the contribution of number of fruit per plant (0.527 at genotypic level.

  5. Path coefficient and correlation of yield and yield associated traits in candidate bread wheat (triticum aestivum l)lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, T.; Haider, S.; Qureshi, M. J.; Shah, G. S.; Zamir, R.

    2005-01-01

    Yield and yield contributing traits were studied in candidate bread wheat lines to find out the genetic contribution of the different characters towards grain yield at NIFA, Peshawar during 2001-02. All the characteristics studied differed significantly from each other. Days to heading showed negative and significant correlation with harvest index and grain yield but was negative and non-significant with the biological yield. Days to maturity were negatively correlated at both genotypic and phenotypic levels with biological yield; harvest index and grain yield and level of correlations were significant with harvest index and grain yield. Plant height showed negative genotypic and phenotypic correlation with harvest index and grain yield. Biological yield had positive and significant genotypic and phenotypic correlations with harvest index and grain yield. Harvest index had positive and highly significant genotypic and phenotypic correlation with grain yield. Genotypic and phenotypic correlation coefficients revealed that important characters influencing grain yield are harvest index and biological yield. Path analysis showed the importance in order of harvest index, biological yield, plant height, days to maturity and days to heading with grain yield. (author)

  6. Matrix correlations for high-dimensional data: The modified RV-coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, A.K.; Kiers, H.A.L.; Bijlsma, S.; Rubingh, C.M.; Erk, M.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Modern functional genomics generates high-dimensional datasets. It is often convenient to have a single simple number characterizing the relationship between pairs of such high-dimensional datasets in a comprehensive way. Matrix correlations are such numbers and are appealing since they

  7. Examining the Reliability of Interval Level Data Using Root Mean Square Differences and Concordance Correlation Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchard, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces new statistics for evaluating score consistency. Psychologists usually use correlations to measure the degree of linear relationship between 2 sets of scores, ignoring differences in means and standard deviations. In medicine, biology, chemistry, and physics, a more stringent criterion is often used: the extent to which…

  8. Personality correlates (BAS-BIS), self-perception of social ranking, and cortical (alpha frequency band) modulation in peer-group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Pagani, Silvia

    2014-06-22

    The perception and interpretation of social hierarchies are a key part of our social life. In the present research we considered the activation of cortical areas, mainly the prefrontal cortex, related to social ranking perception in conjunction with some personality components (BAS - Behavioral Activation System - and BIS - Behavioral Inhibition System). In two experiments we manipulated the perceived superior/inferior status during a competitive cognitive task. Indeed, we created an explicit and strongly reinforced social hierarchy based on incidental rating in an attentional task. Specifically, a peer group comparison was undertaken and improved (Experiment 1) or decreased (Experiment 2) performance was artificially manipulated by the experimenter. For each experiment two groups were compared, based on a BAS and BIS dichotomy. Alpha band modulation in prefrontal cortex, behavioral measures (performance: error rate, ER; response times, RTs), and self-perceived ranking were considered. Repeated measures ANOVAs and regression analyses showed in Experiment 1 a significant improved cognitive performance (decreased ER and RTs) and higher self-perceived ranking in high-BAS participants. Moreover, their prefrontal activity was increased within the left side (alpha band decreasing). Conversely, in Experiment 2 a significant decreased cognitive performance (increased ER and RTs) and lower self-perceived ranking was observed in higher-BIS participants. Their prefrontal right activity was increased in comparison with higher BAS. The regression analyses confirmed the significant predictive role of alpha band modulation with respect of subjects' performance and self-perception of social ranking, differently for BAS/BIS components. The present results suggest that social status perception is directly modulated by cortical activity and personality correlates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MEASUREMENT AND CORRELATION OF THE MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FOR A LIQUID-LIQUID SYSTEM WITH HIGH DENSITY DIFFERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixian Huang

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the mass transfer behavior of a liquid-liquid system with high density difference (∆ρ≈500 kg/m3, single drop experiments were performed by using the ternary chloroform-ethanol-water system. The mass transfer direction was from the dispersed phase to the continuous phase, while the aqueous phase was dispersed in chloroform to generate drops. The influences of drop diameter, initial solute concentration and temperature on the mass transfer were investigated. The effects of the drop diameter and initial solute concentration on interfacial instability of droplets hanging in the continuous phase were also observed. For the purpose of correlation, a mass transfer enhancement factor F was introduced and then correlated as a function of dimensionless variables. The modified correlation from the mass transfer coefficient model was found to fit well with the experimental values.

  10. Generalized Correlation Coefficient for Non-Parametric Analysis of Microarray Time-Course Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    the heterogeneous time-course gene expression patterns. Application of the method identified nonlinear time-course patterns in high agreement with parametric analysis. We conclude that the non-parametric nature in the generalized correlation analysis could be an useful and efficient tool for analyzing microarray...... time-course data and for exploring the complex relationships in the omics data for studying their association with disease and health....

  11. Time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions model based on dynamic correlation with an application to crude oil and stock markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fengbin, E-mail: fblu@amss.ac.cn [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qiao, Han, E-mail: qiaohan@ucas.ac.cn [School of Economics and Management, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Shouyang, E-mail: sywang@amss.ac.cn [School of Economics and Management, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lai, Kin Keung, E-mail: mskklai@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Management Sciences, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Yuze, E-mail: richardyz.li@mail.utoronto.ca [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    This paper proposes a new time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions (VAR) model, in which the coefficient is a linear function of dynamic lagged correlation. The proposed model allows for flexibility in choices of dynamic correlation models (e.g. dynamic conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, Markov-switching GARCH models and multivariate stochastic volatility models), which indicates that it can describe many types of time-varying causal effects. Time-varying causal relations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil and the US Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) stock markets are examined by the proposed model. The empirical results show that their causal relations evolve with time and display complex characters. Both positive and negative causal effects of the WTI on the S&P 500 in the subperiods have been found and confirmed by the traditional VAR models. Similar results have been obtained in the causal effects of S&P 500 on WTI. In addition, the proposed model outperforms the traditional VAR model.

  12. Time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions model based on dynamic correlation with an application to crude oil and stock markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Fengbin; Qiao, Han; Wang, Shouyang; Lai, Kin Keung; Li, Yuze

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions (VAR) model, in which the coefficient is a linear function of dynamic lagged correlation. The proposed model allows for flexibility in choices of dynamic correlation models (e.g. dynamic conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, Markov-switching GARCH models and multivariate stochastic volatility models), which indicates that it can describe many types of time-varying causal effects. Time-varying causal relations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil and the US Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) stock markets are examined by the proposed model. The empirical results show that their causal relations evolve with time and display complex characters. Both positive and negative causal effects of the WTI on the S&P 500 in the subperiods have been found and confirmed by the traditional VAR models. Similar results have been obtained in the causal effects of S&P 500 on WTI. In addition, the proposed model outperforms the traditional VAR model.

  13. Time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions model based on dynamic correlation with an application to crude oil and stock markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fengbin; Qiao, Han; Wang, Shouyang; Lai, Kin Keung; Li, Yuze

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions (VAR) model, in which the coefficient is a linear function of dynamic lagged correlation. The proposed model allows for flexibility in choices of dynamic correlation models (e.g. dynamic conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, Markov-switching GARCH models and multivariate stochastic volatility models), which indicates that it can describe many types of time-varying causal effects. Time-varying causal relations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil and the US Standard and Poor's 500 (S&P 500) stock markets are examined by the proposed model. The empirical results show that their causal relations evolve with time and display complex characters. Both positive and negative causal effects of the WTI on the S&P 500 in the subperiods have been found and confirmed by the traditional VAR models. Similar results have been obtained in the causal effects of S&P 500 on WTI. In addition, the proposed model outperforms the traditional VAR model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of random errors in Williams’ series coefficients obtained with digital image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lychak, Oleh V; Holyns’kiy, Ivan S

    2016-01-01

    The use of the Williams’ series parameters for fracture analysis requires valid information about their error values. The aim of this investigation is the development of the method for estimation of the standard deviation of random errors of the Williams’ series parameters, obtained from the measured components of the stress field. Also, the criteria for choosing the optimal number of terms in the truncated Williams’ series for derivation of their parameters with minimal errors is proposed. The method was used for the evaluation of the Williams’ parameters, obtained from the data, and measured by the digital image correlation technique for testing a three-point bending specimen. (paper)

  15. Correlation of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient with uterine cervical pathologic finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuning; Li, Hui; Chen, Ziqian; Ni, Ping; Zhong, Qun; Huang, Huijuan; Sandrasegaran, Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the application of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in characterizing pathologic features of cervical cancer and benign cervical lesions. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained. Seventy-three patients with cervical cancer (33-69 years old; 35 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB cervical cancer) and 38 patients (38-61 years old) with normal cervix or cervical benign lesions (control group) were enrolled. All patients underwent 3-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm(2). ADC values of the entire tumor in the patient group and the whole cervix volume in the control group were assessed. Mean ADC, median ADC, 25th and 75th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis were calculated. Histogram parameters were compared between different pathologic features, as well as between stage IB cervical cancer and control groups. Mean ADC, median ADC, and 25th percentile of ADC were significantly higher for adenocarcinoma (p = 0.021, 0.006, and 0.004, respectively), and skewness was significantly higher for squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.011). Median ADC was statistically significantly higher for well or moderately differentiated tumors (p = 0.044), and skewness was statistically significantly higher for poorly differentiated tumors (p = 0.004). No statistically significant difference of ADC histogram was observed between lymphovascular space invasion subgroups. All histogram parameters differed significantly between stage IB cervical cancer and control groups (p histogram analysis may help to distinguish early-stage cervical cancer from normal cervix or cervical benign lesions and may be useful for evaluating the different pathologic features of cervical cancer.

  16. Use of the correlation coefficient in agricultural sciences: problems, pitfalls and how to deal with them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kozak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a number of aspects concerning the analysis, interpretation and reporting of correlations in agricultural sciences. Various problems that one might encounter with these aspects are identified, and suggestions of how to overcome these problems are proposed. Some of the examples presented show how mistaken and even misleading the interpretation of correlation can be when one ignores simple rules of analysis.Este artigo discute uma série de aspectos relacionados a análise, interpretação e forma de relatar correlações em ciências Agrárias. São identificados vários problemas que podem ser encontrados, bem como feitas sugestões de como superá-los. Alguns dos exemplos apresentados mostram quão erradas e mesmo enganosas podem ser as interpretações de correlação quando regras simples de análise são ignoradas.

  17. Simulation data for an estimation of the maximum theoretical value and confidence interval for the correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Paolo; Cilurzo, Francesco; Minghetti, Paola; Vistoli, Giulio; Pedretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article titled "Molecular Dynamics as a tool for in silico screening of skin permeability" (Rocco et al., 2017) [1]. Knowledge of the confidence interval and maximum theoretical value of the correlation coefficient r can prove useful to estimate the reliability of developed predictive models, in particular when there is great variability in compiled experimental datasets. In this Data in Brief article, data from purposely designed numerical simulations are presented to show how much the maximum r value is worsened by increasing the data uncertainty. The corresponding confidence interval of r is determined by using the Fisher r → Z transform.

  18. 'aspect' - a new spectrometer for the measurement of the angular correlation coefficient a in neutron beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmer, O; Grinten, M G D; Heil, W; Glück, F

    2000-01-01

    The combination of the coefficient a of the antineutrino/electron angular correlation with the beta asymmetry of the neutron provides a sensitive test for scalar and tensor contributions to the electroweak Lagrangian, as well as for right-handed currents. A method is given for measuring a with high sensitivity from the proton recoil spectrum. The method is based on a magnetic spectrometer with electrostatic retardation potentials such as used for searches of the neutrino mass in tritium beta decay. The spectrometer can also be used for similar studies using radioactive nuclei.

  19. Correlation between electrical conductivity and apparent diffusion coefficient in breast cancer: effect of necrosis on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Shin, Jaewook; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; You, Jai Kyung; Kim, Min Jung

    2018-03-06

    To investigate the correlation between conductivity and ADC in invasive ductal carcinoma according to the presence of necrosis on MRI. Eighty-one women with invasive ductal carcinoma ≥1 cm on T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence of preoperative MRI were included. Phase-based MR electric properties tomography was used to reconstruct conductivity. Mean ADC was measured. Necrosis was defined as an area with very high T2 signal intensity. The relationship between conductivity and ADC was examined using Spearman's correlation coefficient (r). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with conductivity or ADC. In the total group, conductivity showed negative correlation with ADC (r = -0.357, p = 0.001). This correlation was maintained in the subgroup without necrosis (n = 53, r = -0.455, p = 0.001), but not in the subgroup with necrosis (n = 28, r = -0.080, p = 0.687). The correlation between the two parameters was different according to necrosis (r = -0.455 vs -0.080, p = 0.047). HER2 enriched subtype was independently associated with conductivity (p = 0.029). Necrosis on MRI was independently associated with ADC (p = 0.027). Conductivity shows negative correlation with ADC that is abolished by the presence of necrosis on MRI. • Electric conductivity showed negative correlation with ADC • However, the correlation was abolished by the presence of necrosis on MRI • HER2-enriched subtype was independently associated with conductivity • Necrosis on MRI was independently associated with ADC.

  20. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient and the standardized uptake value in neoplastic lesions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guohua; Ma, Huan; Liu, Bin; Ren, Pengwei; Kuang, Anren

    2017-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET are increasingly being recognized as feasible oncological techniques. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by diffusion-weighted imaging and the standardized uptake value (SUV) from fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET have similar clinical applications. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between these two parameters in various cancers. Several major databases were searched for eligible studies. The correlation coefficient (ρ) values were pooled in a random-effects model. Begg's test was used to analyze the existence of publication bias and the sources of heterogeneity were explored in subgroup analyses on the basis of study design, diagnostic method, scanning modality, and tumor type. Thirty-five articles were accepted. The pooled ρ value of all of the accepted studies was -0.30 (95% confidence interval: -0.33 to -0.27), and notable heterogeneity was present (I=69.4%, Pcorrelation. The pooled ρ values were -0.26, -0.33, -0.32, and -0.33 for the SUVmax/ADCmean, SUVmax/ADCmin, SUVmean/ADCmean, and SUVmean/ADCmin relationships, respectively. The study design and diagnostic method were potential sources of heterogeneity. Lung cancer showed a stronger correlation (ρ=-0.42) than head and neck cancer (ρ=-0.27), cervical cancer (ρ=-0.21), and breast cancer (ρ=-0.23). A Begg's test indicated no significant publication bias among the accepted studies (P>0.05). The two functional parameters of ADC and SUV showed a very weak inverse correlation, which may contribute toward a sophisticated characterization of tumor biology. However, the findings require further validation with trials with large samples and different tumor types.

  1. How to Rank Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows.

  2. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement imaging of glioblastoma at 7 Tesla: region specific correlation with apparent diffusion coefficient and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Daniel; Burth, Sina; Windschuh, Johannes; Meissner, Jan-Eric; Zaiss, Moritz; Eidel, Oliver; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Wiestler, Benedikt; Sahm, Felix; Floca, Ralf Omar; Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Ladd, Mark Edward; Bachert, Peter; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To explore the correlation between Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE)-mediated signals and tumor cellularity in glioblastoma utilizing the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and cell density from histologic specimens. NOE is one type of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) that originates from mobile macromolecules such as proteins and might be associated with tumor cellularity via altered protein synthesis in proliferating cells. For 15 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, NOE-mediated CEST-contrast was acquired at 7 Tesla (asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.3ppm, B1 = 0.7 μT). Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1), T2 and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) were acquired at 3 Tesla and coregistered. The T2 edema and the CE-T1 tumor were segmented. ADC and MTRasym values within both regions of interest were correlated voxelwise yielding the correlation coefficient rSpearman (rSp). In three patients who underwent stereotactic biopsy, cell density of 12 specimens per patient was correlated with corresponding MTRasym and ADC values of the biopsy site. Eight of 15 patients showed a weak or moderate positive correlation of MTRasym and ADC within the T2 edema (0.16≤rSp≤0.53, pcorrelations were statistically insignificant (p>0.05, n = 4) or yielded rSp≈0 (pcorrelation between MTRasym and ADC was found in CE-T1 tumor (-0.310.05, n = 6). The biopsy-analysis within CE-T1 tumor revealed a strong positive correlation between tumor cellularity and MTRasym values in two of the three patients (rSppatient3 = 0.69 and rSppatient15 = 0.87, pcorrelation of ADC and cellularity was heterogeneous (rSppatient3 = 0.545 (p = 0.067), rSppatient4 = -0.021 (p = 0.948), rSppatient15 = -0.755 (p = 0.005)). NOE-imaging is a new contrast promising insight into pathophysiologic processes in glioblastoma regarding cell density and protein content, setting itself apart from DWI. Future studies might be based on the assumption that NOE-mediated CEST visualizes

  3. Updating the ranking of the coefficients of variation from maize experiments=Atualização da proposta de classificação dos coeficientes de variação para a cultura do milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Moreira Rezende

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to update the ranking of the coefficients of variation (CVs from maize experiments and evaluate the accuracy of the data from the latest Brazilian publications. We rank-ordered the CVs for grain yield, plant and ear heights, number of ears per plant, and weight of commercial ears, except for the weight of 100 grains. The data were obtained from 143 scientific papers published from 2005 to 2010. The classification was based on the average (m and standard deviation (SD and the CVs were ranked as low, intermediate, high and very high. All of the random variables had the CVs normally distributed. For most of the traits, we observed a large difference between the ranks from Scapim and Pimentel Gomes. In summary, the coefficients of variation have to be classified for each variable, significant improvement occurred in the accuracy of the national maize experiments in the last 15 years, and they still require periodic updating.O objetivo desse trabalho foi fazer a atualização na proposta de classificação dos coeficientes de variação (CV para a cultura do milho e avaliar a qualidade dos dados dos artigos mais recentes publicados no Brasil. Os CV das diferentes variáveis aleatórias foram obtidos a partir da consulta de 143 artigos científicos publicados de 2005 e 2010. As faixas de classificação dos (CV foram baseadas na média (m e no desvio-padrão (DP da seguinte forma: baixo; médio; alto; muito alto. Todos os cv das variáveis aleatórias apresentaram distribuição normal. Foi possível observar que para a maioria dos caracteres avaliados houve uma grande diferença entre a classificação proposta e a de Pimentel-Gomes. Houve melhoria significativa na qualidade experimental na cultura do milho para os principais caracteres produtividade de grãos, alturas de planta e espiga, número de espigas por planta e peso de espigas comerciais, sendo a única exceção o peso de 100 grãos. Conclui-se que as faixas

  4. A new method of spatio-temporal topographic mapping by correlation coefficient of K-means cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Yao, Dezhong

    2007-01-01

    It would be of the utmost interest to map correlated sources in the working human brain by Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). This work is to develop a new method to map correlated neural sources based on the time courses of the scalp ERPs waveforms. The ERP data are classified first by k-means cluster analysis, and then the Correlation Coefficients (CC) between the original data of each electrode channel and the time course of each cluster centroid are calculated and utilized as the mapping variable on the scalp surface. With a normalized 4-concentric-sphere head model with radius 1, the performance of the method is evaluated by simulated data. CC, between simulated four sources (s (1)-s (4)) and the estimated cluster centroids (c (1)-c (4)), and the distances (Ds), between the scalp projection points of the s (1)-s (4) and that of the c (1)-c (4), are utilized as the evaluation indexes. Applied to four sources with two of them partially correlated (with maximum mutual CC = 0.4892), CC (Ds) between s (1)-s (4) and c (1)-c (4) are larger (smaller) than 0.893 (0.108) for noise levels NSRclusters located at left, right occipital and frontal. The estimated vectors of the contra-occipital area demonstrate that attention to the stimulus location produces increased amplitude of the P1 and N1 components over the contra-occipital scalp. The estimated vector in the frontal area displays two large processing negativity waves around 100 ms and 250 ms when subjects are attentive, and there is a small negative wave around 140 ms and a P300 when subjects are unattentive. The results of simulations and real Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) data demonstrate the validity of the method in mapping correlated sources. This method may be an objective, heuristic and important tool to study the properties of cerebral, neural networks in cognitive and clinical neurosciences.

  5. A Generalized Spatial Correlation Model for 3D MIMO Channels based on the Fourier Coefficients of Power Spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-05-07

    Previous studies have confirmed the adverse impact of fading correlation on the mutual information (MI) of two-dimensional (2D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance by exploiting the channel’s degrees of freedom in the elevation, which necessitates the derivation and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) channels in the presence of spatial correlation. In this paper, an exact closed-form expression for the Spatial Correlation Function (SCF) is derived for 3D MIMO channels. This novel SCF is developed for a uniform linear array of antennas with nonisotropic antenna patterns. The proposed method resorts to the spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) of plane waves and the trigonometric expansion of Legendre and associated Legendre polynomials. The resulting expression depends on the underlying arbitrary angular distributions and antenna patterns through the Fourier Series (FS) coefficients of power azimuth and elevation spectrums. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the SCF being valid for any 3D propagation environment. The developed SCF determines the covariance matrices at the transmitter and the receiver that form the Kronecker channel model. In order to quantify the effects of correlation on the system performance, the information-theoretic deterministic equivalents of the MI for the Kronecker model are utilized in both mono-user and multi-user cases. Numerical results validate the proposed analytical expressions and elucidate the dependence of the system performance on azimuth and elevation angular spreads and antenna patterns. Some useful insights into the behaviour of MI as a function of downtilt angles are provided. The derived model will help evaluate the performance of correlated 3D MIMO channels in the future.

  6. Apparent diffusion coefficient value of gastric cancer by diffusion-weighted imaging: Correlations with the histological differentiation and Lauren classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Song; Guan, Wenxian; Wang, Hao; Pan, Liang; Zhou, Zhuping; Yu, Haiping; Liu, Tian; Yang, Xiaofeng; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gastric cancers’ ADC values were significantly lower than normal gastric wall. • Gastric adenocarcinomas with different differentiation had different ADC values. • Gastric adenocarcinomas’ ADC values correlated with histologic differentiations. • Gastric cancers’ ADC values correlated with Lauren classifications. • Mean ADC value was better than min ADC value in characterizing gastric cancers. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlations between histological differentiation and Lauren classification of gastric cancer and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Materials and methods: Sixty-nine patients with gastric cancer lesions underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (3.0T) and surgical resection. DWI was obtained with a single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence in the axial plane (b values: 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 ). Mean and minimum ADC values were obtained for each gastric cancer and normal gastric walls by two radiologists, who were blinded to the histological findings. Histological type, degree of differentiation and Lauren classification of each resected specimen were determined by one pathologist. Mean and minimum ADC values of gastric cancers with different histological types, degrees of differentiation and Lauren classifications were compared. Correlations between ADC values and histological differentiation and Lauren classification were analyzed. Results: The mean and minimum ADC values of gastric cancers, as a whole and separately, were significantly lower than those of normal gastric walls (all p values <0.001). There were significant differences in the mean and minimum ADC values among gastric cancers with different histological types, degrees of differentiation and Lauren classifications (p < 0.05). Mean and minimum ADC values correlated significantly (all p < 0.001) with histological differentiation (r = 0.564, 0.578) and Lauren

  7. Decreased apparent diffusion coefficient in the pituitary and correlation with hypopituitarism in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ping; He, Bin; Guo, Yijun; Zeng, Jingsong; Tong, Wusong

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between microstructural abnormality in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hormone-secreting status remains unknown. In this study, the authors aimed to identify the role of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) technique and to evaluate the association of such changes with hypopituitarism in patients with TBI. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained in 164 consecutive patients with TBI within 2 weeks after injury to generate the pituitary ADC as a measure of microstructural change. Patients with TBI were further grouped into those with and those without hypopituitarism based on the secretion status of pituitary hormones at 6 months postinjury. Thirty healthy individuals were enrolled in the study and underwent MRI examinations for comparison. Mean ADC values were compared between this control group, the patients with TBI and hypopituitarism, and the patients with TBI without hypopituitarism; correlational studies were also performed. Neurological outcome was assessed with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) for all TBI patients 6 months postinjury. In the TBI group, 84 patients had hypopituitarism and 80 had normal pituitary function. The pituitary ADC in TBI patients was significantly less than that in controls (1.83 ± 0.16 vs 4.13 ± 0.33, p correlated with neurological outcome at 6 months following TBI (r = 0.602, p correlated with hormone-secreting status in TBI patients. The authors suggest that pituitary ADC may be a useful biomarker to predict pituitary function in patients with TBI.

  8. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient value on diffusion-weighted MR imaging and Gleason score in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Reinikainen, P; Vanhanen, A; Kapanen, M; Vierikko, T; Ryymin, P; Hyödynmaa, S; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P-L

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlates with prostate cancer aggressiveness and further to compare the diagnostic performance of ADC and normalized ADC (nADC: normalized to non-tumor tissue). Thirty pre-treatment patients (mean age, 69years; range: 59-78years) with prostate cancer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, including DWI with three b values: 50, 400, and 800s/mm 2 . Both ADC and nADC were correlated with the Gleason score obtained through transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. The tumor minimum ADC (ADC min : the lowest ADC value within tumor) had an inverse correlation with the Gleason score (r=-0.43, Pcorrelated with the Gleason score (r=-0.52 and r=-0.55, P<0.01; respectively), and they were lower in patients with Gleason score 3+4 than those with Gleason score 3+3 (P<0.01; respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the area under the ROC curve was 0.765, 0.818, or 0.833 for the ADC min , nADC min , or nADC mean ; respectively, in differentiating between Gleason score 3+4 and 3+3 tumors. Tumor ADC min , nADC min , and nADC mean are useful markers to predict the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on GPS Common-view Observation Data with Multiscale Kalman Filter Based on Correlation Structure of the Discrete Wavelet Coefficients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaojuan, Ou; Wei, Zhou; Jianguo, Yu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we pay our attention to the multiscale kalman algorithm based on correlation structure of the discrete wavelet coefficients for the restoration of the GPS common-view observation data...

  10. Measurement of the electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes measurements with the retardation spectrometer aSPECT at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. The goal of the measurement is to determine the angular correlation coefficient a from the form of the proton recoil spectrum in the decay of the free neutron in order to determine a precise value for the ratio of the weak axial vector and vector coupling constants of the nucleon. A big improvement was achieved with the use of a silicon drift detector which was used here for the first time to detect low energetic protons. A saturation effect of the electronics that was only discovered during the analysis of the data from neutron decay proved to be not correctable. The findings from analysis, simulations and test experiments gained in this work should allow a measurement of a with high precision in a future beamtime. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of the electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simson, Martin

    2010-09-21

    This thesis describes measurements with the retardation spectrometer aSPECT at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. The goal of the measurement is to determine the angular correlation coefficient a from the form of the proton recoil spectrum in the decay of the free neutron in order to determine a precise value for the ratio of the weak axial vector and vector coupling constants of the nucleon. A big improvement was achieved with the use of a silicon drift detector which was used here for the first time to detect low energetic protons. A saturation effect of the electronics that was only discovered during the analysis of the data from neutron decay proved to be not correctable. The findings from analysis, simulations and test experiments gained in this work should allow a measurement of a with high precision in a future beamtime. (orig.)

  12. Movie Popularity Classification based on Inherent Movie Attributes using C4.5, PART and Correlation Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibnal Asad, Khalid; Ahmed, Tanvir; Rahman, Md. Saiedur

    2012-01-01

    Abundance of movie data across the internet makes it an obvious candidate for machine learning and knowledge discovery. But most researches are directed towards bi-polar classification of movie or generation of a movie recommendation system based on reviews given by viewers on various internet...... sites. Classification of movie popularity based solely on attributes of a movie i.e. actor, actress, director rating, language, country and budget etc. has been less highlighted due to large number of attributes that are associated with each movie and their differences in dimensions. In this paper, we...... propose classification scheme of pre-release movie popularity based on inherent attributes using C4.S and PART classifier algorithm and define the relation between attributes of post release movies using correlation coefficient....

  13. Moving-window bis-correlation coefficients method for visible and near-infrared spectral discriminant analysis with applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Yao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The moving-window bis-correlation coefficients (MW-BiCC was proposed and employed for the discriminant analysis of transgenic sugarcane leaves and β-thalassemia with visible and near-infrared (Vis–NIR spectroscopy. The well-performed moving-window principal component analysis linear discriminant analysis (MW-PCA–LDA was also conducted for comparison. A total of 306 transgenic (positive and 150 nontransgenic (negative leave samples of sugarcane were collected and divided to calibration, prediction, and validation. The diffuse reflection spectra were corrected using Savitzky–Golay (SG smoothing with first-order derivative (d=1, third-degree polynomial (p=3 and 25 smoothing points (m=25. The selected waveband was 736–1054nm with MW-BiCC, and the positive and negative validation recognition rates (V_REC+, V_REC− were 100%, 98.0%, which achieved the same effect as MW-PCA–LDA. Another example, the 93 β-thalassemia (positive and 148 nonthalassemia (negative of human hemolytic samples were collected. The transmission spectra were corrected using SG smoothing with d=1, p=3 and m=53. Using MW-BiCC, many best wavebands were selected (e.g., 1116–1146, 1794–1848 and 2284–2342nm. The V_REC+ and V_REC− were both 100%, which achieved the same effect as MW-PCA–LDA. Importantly, the BiCC only required calculating correlation coefficients between the spectrum of prediction sample and the average spectra of two types of calibration samples. Thus, BiCC was very simple in algorithm, and expected to obtain more applications. The results first confirmed the feasibility of distinguishing β-thalassemia and normal control samples by NIR spectroscopy, and provided a promising simple tool for large population thalassemia screening.

  14. Correlation of the octanol/water partition coefficient with clearance halftimes of intratracheally instilled aromatic hydrocarbons in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.A.; Baker, S.M.; Bechtold, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on the lung retention of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) after inhalation have indicated that, in general, the PAH are rapidly cleared from the respiratory tract. Clearance of the PAH from the lungs is best described as bi-phasic, with the long-term component of the clearance curve having a half-time of greater than 24 h. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the lipophilicity (as measured by the octanol/water partition coefficient, P) of various PAH and the short-term and long-term clearance half-times of PAH in rat lungs. Female F344/Crl rats were administered intratracheally 1 nmol of 14 C-labelled anthracene (AN), benz (a) anthracene (BA), 1-nitropyrene (NP), 6-nitrobenzo (a) pyrene (6-NBP), or dibenzo (c, g) carbazole (DBC). At various times after instillation rats were sacrificed and the amount of 14 C from rat lungs following instillation of the different PAH was biphasic. In all cases, greater than 85% of the initial dose instilled was cleared with a half-time of less than 1 h. The half-times for clearance of the residual 14 C (1-15% of the dose) were 26, 30, 36, 53 and 63 h for AN, NP, 6-NBP, BA and DCB, respectively. The log of the octanol-water partition coefficients for the different PAH examined ranged from 4.1 (AN) to 6.05 (DBC). Plots of the octanol/water coefficients vs. the long-term clearance half-time for the PAH indicated a linear correlation (p 2 =0.96). The results from this study indicate that the greater the lipophilicity of the PAH, the slower the long-term clearance of a small fraction (1-15%) of PAH from rat lungs. These data suggest that predictions of long-term lung clearance can be made for PAH with log octanol-water partition coefficients between 4 and 6. (author)

  15. Correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient ratio on 3.0 T MRI with prostate cancer Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Rajeev; Jain, Tarun Pankaj; Haxhimolla, Hodo; Liddell, Heath; Barrett, Sean Edward

    2018-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the usefulness of ADC ratio on Diffusion MRI to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions of Prostate. Images of patients who underwent in-gantry MRI guided prostate lesion biopsy were retrospectively analyzed. Prostate Cancers with 20% or more Gleason score (GS) pattern 3 + 3 = 6 in each core or any volume of higher Gleason score pattern were included. ADC ratio was calculated by two reviewers for each lesion. The ADC ratio was calculated for each lesion by dividing the lowest ADC value in a lesion and highest ADC value in normal prostate in peripheral zone (PZ). ADC ratio values were compared with the biopsy result. Data was analysed using independent samples T-test, Spearman correlation, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. 45 lesions in 33 patients were analyzed. 12 lesions were in transitional zone (TZ) and 33 in perpheral zone PZ. All lesions demonstrated an ADC ratio of 0.45 or lower. GS demonstrated a negative correlation with both the ADC value and ADC ratio . However, ADC ratio (p correlation compared to ADC value alone (p = 0.014). There was no significant statistical difference between GS 3 + 4 and GS 4 + 3 mean ADC tumour value (p = 0.167). However when using ADC ratio , there was a significant difference (p = 0.032). ROC curve analysis demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.83 using ADC ratio and 0.76 when using ADC tumour value when discriminating Gleason 6 from Gleason ≥7 tumours. Inter-observer reliability in the calculation of ADC ratios was excellent, with ICC of 0.964. ADC ratio is a reliable and reproducible tool in quantification of diffusion restriction for clinically significant prostate cancer foci.

  16. Correlation of human papillomavirus status with apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Juliette P; van Bemmel, Alexander J M; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Janssen, Luuk M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Pameijer, Frank A; Willems, Stefan M; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2016-04-01

    Identification of prognostic patient characteristics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of great importance. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive HNSCCs have favorable response to (chemo)radiotherapy. Apparent diffusion coefficient, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI, has also shown to predict treatment response. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between HPV status and apparent diffusion coefficient. Seventy-three patients with histologically proven HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Mean pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated by delineation of total tumor volume on diffusion-weighted MRI. HPV status was analyzed and correlated to apparent diffusion coefficient. Six HNSCCs were HPV-positive. HPV-positive HNSCC showed significantly lower apparent diffusion coefficient compared to HPV-negative. This correlation was independent of other patient characteristics. In HNSCC, positive HPV status correlates with low mean apparent diffusion coefficient. The favorable prognostic value of low pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient might be partially attributed to patients with a positive HPV status. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E613-E618, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Correlation Coefficient, Path Analysis and Drought Tolerance Indices for Wheat under Deficit Irrigation Conditions and Nitrogen Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Tavakoli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the indices of drought tolerance, correlation coefficient and path analysis at deficit irrigation and nitrogen experiment, this experiment was conducted as split plot arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications during 2000-2003 for wheat at Maragheh agricultural research station of DARI. The treatments were included four levels of deficit irrigation (Rainfed, 100, 160 and 220mm of water use as main plots and five nitrogen rates (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 kg.N.ha-1 as sub plots. Grain, straw and biological yield, harvest index, productivity degree, plant height, kernel number per spike, Spike number per square meter and TKW determined from the middle of each plot. There were positive significant correlations due to grain yield with all variables: harvest index (r = 0.969 , Productivity degree (r = 0.952 , straw yield (r = 0.904 , plant height (r = 0.904 , biological yield (r = 0.824 , Spike number per square meter (r = 0.817 , kernel number per spike (r = 0.773 and TKW (r = 0.612 respectively. Results of path analysis showed that increase in grain yield was due to increase spike number per square meter and kernel number per spike respectively. On based of indices of drought tolerance (Tolerance Index, Mean Productivity, Geometric Mean Productivity and Harmonic Mean, treatment of %66full irrigation combined with 90KgN.ha-1 was substantially increased water productivity.

  18. Correlation functions for the distribution coefficients of U(IV) and Pu(III) ions between aqueous nitric acid and 30% TBP in an aliphatic diluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldard, J.F.; Beyerlein, A.L.; Phillips, L.

    1985-09-01

    Distribution coefficient correlations for U(IV) and Pu(III) are obtained in terms of a modified form of the total nitrate ion salting strength that was successfully used to obtain distribution coefficient correlations for U(VI) and Pu(IV) in the earlier work of G.L. Richardson. The modification of salting strength was needed to account for the fact that the U(IV) distribution coefficients measured under conditions where U(VI) is present consistently fall below those obtained when it is absent. The correlations were incorporated into the mixer-settler computer model PUBG, and in the simulation of a 20-stage 1B partitioning contactor, calculated product stream concentrations were in excellent agreement with experiment. Earlier mixer-settler computer models, which failed to account for U(IV) distribution coefficients, predicted that U(IV) remained in the aqueous product stream, which is contrary to the experimental measurements.

  19. Correlation functions for the distribution coefficients of U(IV) and Pu(III) ions between aqueous nitric acid and 30% TBP in an aliphatic diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldard, J.F.; Beyerlein, A.L.; Phillips, L.

    1985-01-01

    Distribution coefficient correlations for U(IV) and Pu(III) are obtained in terms of a modified form of the total nitrate ion salting strength that was successfully used to obtain distribution coefficient correlations for U(VI) and Pu(IV) in the earlier work of G.L. Richardson. The modification of salting strength was needed to account for the fact that the U(IV) distribution coefficients measured under conditions where U(VI) is present consistently fall below those obtained when it is absent. The correlations were incorporated into the mixer-settler computer model PUBG, and in the simulation of a 20-stage 1B partitioning contactor, calculated product stream concentrations were in excellent agreement with experiment. Earlier mixer-settler computer models, which failed to account for U(IV) distribution coefficients, predicted that U(IV) remained in the aqueous product stream, which is contrary to the experimental measurements

  20. A comparison of confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient in community-based cluster randomization trials with a binary outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braschel, Melissa C; Svec, Ivana; Darlington, Gerarda A; Donner, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Many investigators rely on previously published point estimates of the intraclass correlation coefficient rather than on their associated confidence intervals to determine the required size of a newly planned cluster randomized trial. Although confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient that can be applied to community-based trials have been developed for a continuous outcome variable, fewer methods exist for a binary outcome variable. The aim of this study is to evaluate confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient applied to binary outcomes in community intervention trials enrolling a small number of large clusters. Existing methods for confidence interval construction are examined and compared to a new ad hoc approach based on dividing clusters into a large number of smaller sub-clusters and subsequently applying existing methods to the resulting data. Monte Carlo simulation is used to assess the width and coverage of confidence intervals for the intraclass correlation coefficient based on Smith's large sample approximation of the standard error of the one-way analysis of variance estimator, an inverted modified Wald test for the Fleiss-Cuzick estimator, and intervals constructed using a bootstrap-t applied to a variance-stabilizing transformation of the intraclass correlation coefficient estimate. In addition, a new approach is applied in which clusters are randomly divided into a large number of smaller sub-clusters with the same methods applied to these data (with the exception of the bootstrap-t interval, which assumes large cluster sizes). These methods are also applied to a cluster randomized trial on adolescent tobacco use for illustration. When applied to a binary outcome variable in a small number of large clusters, existing confidence interval methods for the intraclass correlation coefficient provide poor coverage. However, confidence intervals constructed using the new approach combined with Smith

  1. Removal of dissolved organic carbon by aquifer material: Correlations between column parameters, sorption isotherms and octanol-water partition coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Snigdhendubala; Boernick, Hilmar; Kumar, Pradeep; Mehrotra, Indu

    2016-07-15

    The correlation between octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW) and the transport of aqueous samples containing single organic compound is well documented. The concept of the KOW of river water containing the mixture of organics was evolved by Pradhan et al. (2015). The present study aims at determining the KOW and sorption parameters of synthetic aqueous samples and river water to finding out the correlation, if any. The laboratory scale columns packed with aquifer materials were fed with synthetic and river water samples. Under the operating conditions, the compounds in the samples did not separate, and all the samples that contain more than one organic compound yielded a single breakthrough curve. Breakthrough curves simulated from sorption isotherms were compared with those from the column runs. The sorption parameters such as retardation factor (Rf), height of mass transfer zone (HMTZ), rate of mass transfer zone (RMTZ), breakpoint column capacity (qb) and maximum column capacity (qx) estimated from column runs, sorption isotherms and models developed by Yoon-Nelson, Bohart-Adam and Thomas were in agreement. The empirical correlations were found between the KOW and sorption parameters. The transport of the organics measured as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through the aquifer can be predicted from the KOW of the river water and other water samples. The novelty of the study is to measure KOW and to envisage the fate of the DOC of the river water, particularly during riverbank filtration. Statistical analysis of the results revealed a fair agreement between the observed and computed values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. University Rankings: The Web Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguillo, Isidro F.

    2012-01-01

    The publication in 2003 of the Ranking of Universities by Jiao Tong University of Shanghai has revolutionized not only academic studies on Higher Education, but has also had an important impact on the national policies and the individual strategies of the sector. The work gathers the main characteristics of this and other global university…

  3. Trachomatous Scar Ranking: A Novel Outcome for Trachoma Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Angela; Ryner, Alexander M; Tadesse, Zerihun; Shiferaw, Ayalew; Callahan, Kelly; Fry, Dionna M; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Lietman, Thomas M; Keenan, Jeremy D

    2017-06-01

    AbstractWe evaluated a new trachoma scarring ranking system with potential use in clinical research. The upper right tarsal conjunctivas of 427 individuals from Ethiopian villages with hyperendemic trachoma were photographed. An expert grader first assigned a scar grade to each photograph using the 1981 World Health Organization (WHO) grading system. Then, all photographs were ranked from least (rank = 1) to most scarring (rank = 427). Photographic grading found 79 (18.5%) conjunctivae without scarring (C0), 191 (44.7%) with minimal scarring (C1), 105 (24.6%) with moderate scarring (C2), and 52 (12.2%) with severe scarring (C3). The ranking method demonstrated good internal validity, exhibiting a monotonic increase in the median rank across the levels of the 1981 WHO grading system. Intrarater repeatability was better for the ranking method (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.74-0.94). Exhibiting better internal and external validity, this ranking method may be useful for evaluating the difference in scarring between groups of individuals.

  4. HiCRep: assessing the reproducibility of Hi-C data using a stratum-adjusted correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Feipeng; Yardımcı, Galip Gürkan; Song, Fan; Hardison, Ross C; Noble, William Stafford; Yue, Feng; Li, Qunhua

    2017-11-01

    Hi-C is a powerful technology for studying genome-wide chromatin interactions. However, current methods for assessing Hi-C data reproducibility can produce misleading results because they ignore spatial features in Hi-C data, such as domain structure and distance dependence. We present HiCRep, a framework for assessing the reproducibility of Hi-C data that systematically accounts for these features. In particular, we introduce a novel similarity measure, the stratum adjusted correlation coefficient (SCC), for quantifying the similarity between Hi-C interaction matrices. Not only does it provide a statistically sound and reliable evaluation of reproducibility, SCC can also be used to quantify differences between Hi-C contact matrices and to determine the optimal sequencing depth for a desired resolution. The measure consistently shows higher accuracy than existing approaches in distinguishing subtle differences in reproducibility and depicting interrelationships of cell lineages. The proposed measure is straightforward to interpret and easy to compute, making it well-suited for providing standardized, interpretable, automatable, and scalable quality control. The freely available R package HiCRep implements our approach. © 2017 Yang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Reconstructing gene regulatory networks from knock-out data using Gaussian Noise Model and Pearson Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Salleh, Faridah Hani; Arif, Shereena Mohd; Zainudin, Suhaila; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) is a large and complex network consisting of interacting elements that, over time, affect each other's state. The dynamics of complex gene regulatory processes are difficult to understand using intuitive approaches alone. To overcome this problem, we propose an algorithm for inferring the regulatory interactions from knock-out data using a Gaussian model combines with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). There are several problems relating to GRN construction that have been outlined in this paper. We demonstrated the ability of our proposed method to (1) predict the presence of regulatory interactions between genes, (2) their directionality and (3) their states (activation or suppression). The algorithm was applied to network sizes of 10 and 50 genes from DREAM3 datasets and network sizes of 10 from DREAM4 datasets. The predicted networks were evaluated based on AUROC and AUPR. We discovered that high false positive values were generated by our GRN prediction methods because the indirect regulations have been wrongly predicted as true relationships. We achieved satisfactory results as the majority of sub-networks achieved AUROC values above 0.5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Performance of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) as a reliability index under various distributions in scale reliability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shraddha; Bastero-Caballero, Rowena F; Sun, Yijun; Zhu, Ray; Murphy, Diane K; Hardas, Bhushan; Koch, Gary

    2018-04-29

    Many published scale validation studies determine inter-rater reliability using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). However, the use of this statistic must consider its advantages, limitations, and applicability. This paper evaluates how interaction of subject distribution, sample size, and levels of rater disagreement affects ICC and provides an approach for obtaining relevant ICC estimates under suboptimal conditions. Simulation results suggest that for a fixed number of subjects, ICC from the convex distribution is smaller than ICC for the uniform distribution, which in turn is smaller than ICC for the concave distribution. The variance component estimates also show that the dissimilarity of ICC among distributions is attributed to the study design (ie, distribution of subjects) component of subject variability and not the scale quality component of rater error variability. The dependency of ICC on the distribution of subjects makes it difficult to compare results across reliability studies. Hence, it is proposed that reliability studies should be designed using a uniform distribution of subjects because of the standardization it provides for representing objective disagreement. In the absence of uniform distribution, a sampling method is proposed to reduce the non-uniformity. In addition, as expected, high levels of disagreement result in low ICC, and when the type of distribution is fixed, any increase in the number of subjects beyond a moderately large specification such as n = 80 does not have a major impact on ICC. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient calculation for temporal networks (applied to a real-world pig trade network).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The average topological overlap of two graphs of two consecutive time steps measures the amount of changes in the edge configuration between the two snapshots. This value has to be zero if the edge configuration changes completely and one if the two consecutive graphs are identical. Current methods depend on the number of nodes in the network or on the maximal number of connected nodes in the consecutive time steps. In the first case, this methodology breaks down if there are nodes with no edges. In the second case, it fails if the maximal number of active nodes is larger than the maximal number of connected nodes. In the following, an adaption of the calculation of the temporal correlation coefficient and of the topological overlap of the graph between two consecutive time steps is presented, which shows the expected behaviour mentioned above. The newly proposed adaption uses the maximal number of active nodes, i.e. the number of nodes with at least one edge, for the calculation of the topological overlap. The three methods were compared with the help of vivid example networks to reveal the differences between the proposed notations. Furthermore, these three calculation methods were applied to a real-world network of animal movements in order to detect influences of the network structure on the outcome of the different methods.

  8. Variations of DOM quality in inflows of a drinking water reservoir: linking of van Krevelen diagrams with EEMF spectra by rank correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzsprung, Peter; von Tümpling, Wolf; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Büttner, Olaf; Bravidor, Jenny; Friese, Kurt; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2012-05-15

    Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) such as humic substances in raw water pose significant challenges during the processing of the commercial drinking water supplies. This is a relevant issue in Saxony, Central East Germany, and many other regions worldwide, where drinking water is produced from raw waters with noticeable presence of chromophoric DOM (CDOM), which is assumed to originate from forested watersheds in spring regions of the catchment area. For improved comprehension of DOM molecular composition, the seasonal and spatial variations of humic-like fluorescence and elemental formulas in the catchment area of the Muldenberg reservoir were recorded by excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). The Spearman rank correlation was applied to link the EEMF intensities with exact molecular formulas and their corresponding relative mass peak abundances. Thereby, humic-like fluorescence could be allocated to the pool of oxygen-rich and relatively unsaturated components with stoichiometries similar to those of tannic acids, which are suspected to have a comparatively high disinfection byproduct formation potential associated with the chlorination of raw water. Analogous relationships were established for UV absorption at 254 nm (UV(254)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and compared to the EEMF correlation.

  9. Satisfaction with Information Centers, E-Journals and Specilized Databases and their Correlation with the Age and Academic Rank of Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Salajegheh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study intends to study the extent of utilization of information centers and e-journals as well as satisfaction rate and to correlate these with age and academic status of faculty members at medical schools in Iranian medical universities. A questionnaire was used for data collection. 700 faculty members were selected using regular random sampling. Results indicate that faculty members use e-journals more than printed journals. Satisfaction rate with databases as well as their utilization is high. Digital libraries are used heavily for document access. A combination of digital library and print library comes second, followed by using print libraries exclusively. The study further demonstrates that there is a link between variables such as age and using e-journals, age and using information centers, age and satisfaction with specialized databases. There was no correlation between academic status and e-journal usage, academic status and satisfaction with electronic databases and academic ranking with using information centers.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI of epithelial ovarian cancers: Correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient values with histologic grade and surgical stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ji-Won, E-mail: fromentin@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Sung Eun, E-mail: serha@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Soon Nam, E-mail: hiohsn@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Michael Yong, E-mail: digirave@kmle.com [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Young, E-mail: jybyun@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ahwon, E-mail: klee@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The solid component of all invasive epithelial cancers showed high b{sub 1000} signal intensity. •ADCs can predict the histologic grade of epithelial ovarian cancer. •ADCs correlate negatively to the surgical stage of epithelial ovarian cancer. •ADCs may be useful imaging biomarkers to assess epithelial ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this article is to correlate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of epithelial ovarian cancers with histologic grade and surgical stage. Materials and methods: We enrolled 43 patients with pathologically proven epithelial ovarian cancers for this retrospective study. All patients underwent preoperative pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted images with b value of 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} at 3.0-T unit. The mean ADC values of the solid portion of the tumor were measured and compared among different histologic grades and surgical stages. Results: The mean ADC values of epithelial ovarian cancers differed significantly between grade 1 (well-differentiated) and grade 2 (moderately-differentiated) (P = 0.013) as well as between grade 1 and grade 3 (poorly-differentiated) (P = 0.01); however, no statistically significant difference existed between grade 2 and grade 3 (P = 0.737). The receiver-operating characteristic analysis indicated that a cutoff ADC value of less than or equal to 1.09 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s was associated with 94.4% sensitivity and 85.7% specificity in distinguishing grade 1 and grade 2/3 cancer. The difference in mean ADC values was statistically significant for early stage (FIGO stage I) and advanced stage (FIGO stage II-IV) cancer (P = 0.011). The interobserver agreement for the mean ADC values of epithelial ovarian cancers was excellent. Conclusion: The mean ADC values of the solid portion of epithelial ovarian cancers negatively correlated to histologic grade and surgical stage. The mean ADC values may be useful imaging

  11. Correlation and prediction of osmotic coefficient and water activity of aqueous electrolyte solutions by a two-ionic parameter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazuki, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, osmotic coefficients and water activities in aqueous solutions have been modeled using a new approach based on the Pitzer model. This model contains two physically significant ionic parameters regarding ionic solvation and the closest distance of approach between ions in a solution. The proposed model was evaluated by estimating the osmotic coefficients of nine electrolytes in aqueous solutions. The obtained results showed that the model is suitable for predicting the osmotic coefficients in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Using adjustable parameters, which have been calculated from regression between the experimental osmotic coefficient and the results of this model, the water activity coefficients of aqueous solutions were calculated. The average absolute relative deviations of the osmotic coefficients between the experimental data and the calculated results were in agreement

  12. Correlation Coefficient, Path Analysis and Drought Tolerance Indices for Different Wheat Cultivars under Deficit Irrigation Conditions of Isfahan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R Salemi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Water crisis as a main factor of agronomy limitation exists in all over the arid and semiarid regions such as Isfahan province which is located in the central part of the Zayandehrud River Basin. This study aimed to use path analysis and indices of drought to evaluate the correlation coefficients between main physiological parameter (grain yield with yield components and water use efficiency of winter wheat under three water conditions. Materials and Methods The experiment was carried out in Kaboutar Abad Agricultural Research Station, Isfahan in the central region of Iran (32º 31’N, 51º 51’E is located at the altitude of 1545 m above the sea level with a split plot in a randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications in three cropping seasons on irrigated wheat cultivars. The treatments were included three levels of irrigation (60%FI, 80%FI and full irrigation as main plots and six wheat cultivars (Pishtaz, Shiraz, Sepahan, Marvdasht, Mahdavi and BC-Roshan as sub plots. Grain yield, straw and stubble, biological yield, harvest index (H.I., productivity degree (P.D., water use efficiency (WUE, plant height, grain number per spike, spike number per m2 and TGW were determined. Winter wheat cultivars were sown at the beginning of November and harvested in mid-June of the following year. The seed rate was 400 seed m-2, with a row spacing of 0.75 m. The first irrigation was by furrow method, implemented one day after seeding. Seeds emergence was observed about 5 days later. The N application was 250, 200 and 300 kgha-1 of N (urea at 46% N for each year divided into installments (10 days before planting, 30 days after planting, and every 30 days until the last irrigation. The P2O5 (phosphate ammonium and super-phosphate triple application to soil was 200, 100 and 50 kg ha-1 during the 3 years, respectively. At this stage, cultivation was done to mix the fertilizers with top soil manually. Pests and weeds were

  13. Ecology of Floristic Quality Assessment: testing for correlations between coefficients of conservatism, species traits and mycorrhizal responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jonathan T; Koziol, Liz; Bever, James D

    2018-02-01

    Many plant species are limited to habitats relatively unaffected by anthropogenic disturbance, so protecting these undisturbed habitats is essential for plant conservation. Coefficients of conservatism (C values) were developed as indicators of a species' sensitivity to anthropogenic disturbance, and these values are used in Floristic Quality Assessment as a means of assessing natural areas and ecological restoration. However, assigning of these values is subjective and improved quantitative validation of C values is needed. We tested whether there are consistent differences in life histories between species with high and low C values. To do this, we grew 54 species of tallgrass prairie plants in a greenhouse and measured traits that are associated with trade-offs on the fast-slow continuum of life-history strategies. We also grew plants with and without mycorrhizal fungi as a test of these species' reliance on this mutualism. We compared these traits and mycorrhizal responsiveness to C values. We found that six of the nine traits we measured were correlated with C values, and together, traits predicted up to 50 % of the variation in C values. Traits including fast growth rates and greater investment in reproduction were associated with lower C values, and slow growth rates, long-lived leaves and high root:shoot ratios were associated with higher C values. Additionally, plants with high C values and a slow life history were more responsive to mutualisms with mycorrhizal fungi. Overall, our results connect C values with life-history trade-offs, indicating that high C value species tend to share a suite of traits associated with a slow life history.

  14. Revealing Layers of Pristine Oriented Crystals Embedded Within Deep Ice Clouds Using Differential Reflectivity and the Copolar Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, W. J.; Westbrook, C. D.

    2017-11-01

    Pristine ice crystals typically have high aspect ratios (≫ 1), have a high density and tend to fall preferentially with their major axis aligned horizontally. Consequently, they can, in certain circumstances, be readily identified by measurements of differential reflectivity (ZDR), which is related to their average aspect ratio. However, because ZDR is reflectivity weighted, its interpretation becomes ambiguous in the presence of even a few, larger aggregates or irregular polycrystals. An example of this is in mixed-phase regions that are embedded within deeper ice cloud. Currently, our understanding of the microphysical processes within these regions is hindered by a lack of good observations. In this paper, a novel technique is presented that removes this ambiguity using measurements from the 3 GHz Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar in Southern England. By combining measurements of ZDR and the copolar correlation coefficient (ρhv), we show that it is possible to retrieve both the relative contribution to the radar signal and "intrinsic" ZDR (ZDRIP) of the pristine oriented crystals, even in circumstances where their signal is being masked by the presence of aggregates. Results from two case studies indicate that enhancements in ZDR embedded within deep ice clouds are typically produced by pristine oriented crystals with ZDRIP values between 3 and 7 dB (equivalent to 5-9 dB at horizontal incidence) but with varying contributions to the radar reflectivity. Vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud radar Doppler spectra and in situ particle images from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 aircraft support the conceptual model used and are consistent with the retrieval interpretation.

  15. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient at 3.0 T in urinary bladder lesions: correlation with pathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Shi-Teng; Chen, Xiao-Xi; Fan, Yu; Wu, Lian-Ming; Yao, Qiu-Ying; Cao, Meng-Qiu; Liu, Qiang; Xu, Jian-Rong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the potential value of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained at standard (700 s/mm(2)) and high (1500 s/mm(2)) b values on a 3.0-T scanner in the differentiation of bladder cancer from benign lesions and in assessing bladder tumors of different pathologic T stages and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ADC-based histogram parameters. In all, 52 patients with bladder lesions, including benign lesions (n = 7) and malignant tumors (n = 45; T1 stage or less, 23; T2 stage, 7; T3 stage, 8; and T4 stage, 7), were retrospectively evaluated. Magnetic resonance examination at 3.0 T and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed. ADC maps were obtained at two b values (b = 700 and 1500 s/mm(2); ie, ADC-700 and ADC-1500). Parameters of histogram analysis included mean, kurtosis, skewness, and entropy. The correlations between these parameters and pathologic results were revealed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the diagnostic value of histogram parameters. Significant differences were found in mean ADC-700, mean ADC-1500, skewness ADC-1500, and kurtosis ADC-1500 between bladder cancer and benign lesions (P = .002-.032). There were also significant differences in mean ADC-700, mean ADC-1500, and kurtosis ADC-1500 among bladder tumors of different pathologic T stages (P = .000-.046). No significant differences were observed in other parameters. Mean ADC-1500 and kurtosis ADC-1500 were significantly correlated with T stage, respectively (ρ = -0.614, P Histogram analysis of ADC-1500 at 3.0 T can be useful in evaluation of bladder lesions. A combination of mean ADC-1500 and kurtosis ADC-1500 may be more beneficial in the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions. Mean ADC-1500 was the most promising parameter for differentiating low- from high-stage bladder cancer. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Statistical methods for ranking data

    CERN Document Server

    Alvo, Mayer

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced undergraduate, graduate students and practitioners to statistical methods for ranking data. An important aspect of nonparametric statistics is oriented towards the use of ranking data. Rank correlation is defined through the notion of distance functions and the notion of compatibility is introduced to deal with incomplete data. Ranking data are also modeled using a variety of modern tools such as CART, MCMC, EM algorithm and factor analysis. This book deals with statistical methods used for analyzing such data and provides a novel and unifying approach for hypotheses testing. The techniques described in the book are illustrated with examples and the statistical software is provided on the authors’ website.

  17. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  18. Development of the loss coefficient correlation for cross flow between graphite fuel blocks in the core of prismatic very high temperature reactor-PMR200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun, E-mail: huny12@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr; Park, Goon-Cherl, E-mail: parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Cross flow experimental data are produced with wedge-shaped and parallel gaps. • The results of a CFD analysis and experimental data are in good agreement. • Pressure loss coefficient for the cross gap between fuel blocks in PMR200 is found. • A new correlation of the cross flow loss coefficient for PMR200 is proposed. - Abstract: The core of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) PMR200 (a prismatic modular reactor rated at 200 MW of thermal power) consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of graphite. If the core bypass flow ratio increases, the coolant channel flow is decreased and can then lower the heat removal efficiency, resulting in a locally increased fuel block temperature. The coolant channels in the fuel blocks are connected to bypass gaps by the cross gap, complicating flow distribution in the VHTR core. Therefore, reliable estimation of the bypass flow is highly important for the design and safety analysis of the VHTR core. Because of the complexity of the core geometry and gap configuration, it is challenging to predict the flow distribution in the VHTR core. To analyze this flow distribution accurately, it is necessary to determine the cross flow phenomena, and the loss coefficient across the cross gap has to be evaluated to determine the flow distribution in the VHTR core when a lumped parameter code or a flow network analysis code that uses the correlation of the loss coefficient is employed. The purpose of this paper is to develop a loss coefficient correlation applicable to the cross gap in the PMR200 core. The cross flow was evaluated experimentally using the difference between the measured inlet and outlet mass flow rates. Next, the applicability of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX 15, was confirmed by comparing the experimental data and CFD analysis results. To understand the cross flow phenomena, the loss coefficient was evaluated; in the high Reynolds number region

  19. Correlation of Benzene, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, and Naphthalene Distribution Coefficients to the Characteristics of Aquifer Materials With Low Organic Carbon Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas; Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    area of the aquifer materials as a second regression parameter did not significantly improve the correlation. Estimated Koc values were up to 3 times higher than those predicted from regression equations based on the octanol-water partition coefficient. The reason for this is not known, but may...

  20. Complex versus Simple Modeling for DIF Detection: When the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (?) of the Studied Item Is Less Than the ? of the Total Score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Myers, Nicholas D.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that differential item functioning (DIF) methods that do not account for multilevel data structure could result in too frequent rejection of the null hypothesis (i.e., no DIF) when the intraclass correlation coefficient (?) of the studied item was the same as the ? of the total score. The current study extended…

  1. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for Obesity Indicators and Energy Balance-Related Behaviors Among New York City Public Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Heewon Lee; Burgermaster, Marissa; Tipton, Elizabeth; Contento, Isobel R; Koch, Pamela A; Di Noia, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Sample size and statistical power calculation should consider clustering effects when schools are the unit of randomization in intervention studies. The objective of the current study was to investigate how student outcomes are clustered within schools in an obesity prevention trial. Baseline data from the Food, Health & Choices project were used. Participants were 9- to 13-year-old students enrolled in 20 New York City public schools (n= 1,387). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated based on measures of height and weight, and body fat percentage was measured with a Tanita® body composition analyzer (Model SC-331s). Energy balance-related behaviors were self-reported with a frequency questionnaire. To examine the cluster effects, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated as school variance over total variance for outcome variables. School-level covariates, percentage students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch, percentage Black or Hispanic, and English language learners were added in the model to examine ICC changes. The ICCs for obesity indicators are: .026 for BMI-percentile, .031 for BMIz-score, .035 for percentage of overweight students, .037 for body fat percentage, and .041 for absolute BMI. The ICC range for the six energy balance-related behaviors are .008 to .044 for fruit and vegetables, .013 to .055 for physical activity, .031 to .052 for recreational screen time, .013 to .091 for sweetened beverages, .033 to .121 for processed packaged snacks, and .020 to .083 for fast food. When school-level covariates were included in the model, ICC changes varied from -95% to 85%. This is the first study reporting ICCs for obesity-related anthropometric and behavioral outcomes among New York City public schools. The results of the study may aid sample size estimation for future school-based cluster randomized controlled trials in similar urban setting and population. Additionally, identifying school-level covariates that can reduce cluster

  2. Real external predictivity of QSAR models: how to evaluate it? Comparison of different validation criteria and proposal of using the concordance correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Nicola; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-09-26

    The main utility of QSAR models is their ability to predict activities/properties for new chemicals, and this external prediction ability is evaluated by means of various validation criteria. As a measure for such evaluation the OECD guidelines have proposed the predictive squared correlation coefficient Q(2)(F1) (Shi et al.). However, other validation criteria have been proposed by other authors: the Golbraikh-Tropsha method, r(2)(m) (Roy), Q(2)(F2) (Schüürmann et al.), Q(2)(F3) (Consonni et al.). In QSAR studies these measures are usually in accordance, though this is not always the case, thus doubts can arise when contradictory results are obtained. It is likely that none of the aforementioned criteria is the best in every situation, so a comparative study using simulated data sets is proposed here, using threshold values suggested by the proponents or those widely used in QSAR modeling. In addition, a different and simple external validation measure, the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), is proposed and compared with other criteria. Huge data sets were used to study the general behavior of validation measures, and the concordance correlation coefficient was shown to be the most restrictive. On using simulated data sets of a more realistic size, it was found that CCC was broadly in agreement, about 96% of the time, with other validation measures in accepting models as predictive, and in almost all the examples it was the most precautionary. The proposed concordance correlation coefficient also works well on real data sets, where it seems to be more stable, and helps in making decisions when the validation measures are in conflict. Since it is conceptually simple, and given its stability and restrictiveness, we propose the concordance correlation coefficient as a complementary, or alternative, more prudent measure of a QSAR model to be externally predictive.

  3. Correlation between mass transfer coefficient kLa and relevant operating parameters in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors on a bench-to-pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, Wolf; Gacem, Riad; Anderlei, Tibor; Raven, Nicole; Schillberg, Stefan; Lattermann, Clemens; Büchs, Jochen

    2013-12-02

    Among disposable bioreactor systems, cylindrical orbitally shaken bioreactors show important advantages. They provide a well-defined hydrodynamic flow combined with excellent mixing and oxygen transfer for mammalian and plant cell cultivations. Since there is no known universal correlation between the volumetric mass transfer coefficient for oxygen kLa and relevant operating parameters in such bioreactor systems, the aim of this current study is to experimentally determine a universal kLa correlation. A Respiration Activity Monitoring System (RAMOS) was used to measure kLa values in cylindrical disposable shaken bioreactors and Buckingham's π-Theorem was applied to define a dimensionless equation for kLa. In this way, a scale- and volume-independent kLa correlation was developed and validated in bioreactors with volumes from 2 L to 200 L. The final correlation was used to calculate cultivation parameters at different scales to allow a sufficient oxygen supply of tobacco BY-2 cell suspension cultures. The resulting equation can be universally applied to calculate the mass transfer coefficient for any of seven relevant cultivation parameters such as the reactor diameter, the shaking frequency, the filling volume, the viscosity, the oxygen diffusion coefficient, the gravitational acceleration or the shaking diameter within an accuracy range of +/- 30%. To our knowledge, this is the first kLa correlation that has been defined and validated for the cited bioreactor system on a bench-to-pilot scale.

  4. Gene interference regulates aquaporin-4 expression in swollen tissue of rats with cerebral ischemic edema: Correlation with variation in apparent diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Lu, Hong; He, Zhanping; Han, Xiangjun; Chen, Jing; Tu, Rong

    2012-07-25

    To investigate the effects of mRNA interference on aquaporin-4 expression in swollen tissue of rats with ischemic cerebral edema, and diagnose the significance of diffusion-weighted MRI, we injected 5 μL shRNA- aquaporin-4 (control group) or siRNA- aquaporin-4 solution (1:800) (RNA interference group) into the rat right basal ganglia immediately before occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. At 0.25 hours after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, diffusion-weighted MRI displayed a high signal; within 2 hours, the relative apparent diffusion coefficient decreased markedly, aquaporin-4 expression increased rapidly, and intracellular edema was obviously aggravated; at 4 and 6 hours, the relative apparent diffusion coefficient slowly returned to control levels, aquaporin-4 expression slightly increased, and angioedema was observed. In the RNA interference group, during 0.25-6 hours after injection of siRNA- aquaporin-4 solution, the relative apparent diffusion coefficient slightly fluctuated and aquaporin-4 expression was upregulated; during 0.5-4 hours, the relative apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly higher, while aquaporin-4 expression was significantly lower when compared with the control group, and intracellular edema was markedly reduced; at 0.25 and 6 hours, the relative apparent diffusion coefficient and aquaporin-4 expression were similar when compared with the control group; obvious angioedema remained at 6 hours. Pearson's correlation test results showed that aquaporin-4 expression was negatively correlated with the apparent diffusion coefficient (r = -0.806, P coefficient. Aquaporin-4 gene interference can effectively inhibit the upregulation of aquaporin-4 expression during the stage of intracellular edema with time-effectiveness. Moreover, diffusion-weighted MRI can accurately detect intracellular edema.

  5. Correlation of standardized uptake value and apparent diffusion coefficient in integrated whole-body PET/MRI of primary and recurrent cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Heusch, Philipp; Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye; Gratz, Marcel; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas; Ruhlmann, Verena; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a potential correlation of the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) in primary and recurrent cervical cancer based on integrated PET/MRI examinations. 19 consecutive patients (mean age 51.6 years; range 30-72 years) with histopathologically confirmed primary cervical cancer (n = 9) or suspected tumor recurrence (n = 10) were prospectively enrolled for an integrated PET/MRI examination. Two radiologists performed a consensus reading in random order, using a dedicated post-processing software. Polygonal regions of interest (ROI) covering the entire tumor lesions were drawn into PET/MR images to assess SUVmax and into ADC parameter maps to determine ADCmin values. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to assess a potential correlation between the mean values of ADCmin and SUVmax. In 15 out of 19 patients cervical cancer lesions (n = 12) or lymph node metastases (n = 42) were detected. Mean SUVmax (12.5 ± 6.5) and ADCmin (644.5 ± 179.7 × 10(-5) mm2/s) values for all assessed tumor lesions showed a significant but weak inverse correlation (R = -0.342, p correlation between SUVmax and ADCmin (R = -0.692, p correlation. These initial results of this emerging hybrid imaging technique demonstrate the high diagnostic potential of simultaneous PET/MR imaging for the assessment of functional biomarkers, revealing a significant and strong correlation of tumor metabolism and higher cellularity in cervical cancer lesions.

  6. Fast-GPU-PCC: A GPU-Based Technique to Compute Pairwise Pearson's Correlation Coefficients for Time Series Data-fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Taban; Saeed, Fahad

    2018-04-20

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique, which has been regularly used for studying brain’s functional activities in the past few years. A very well-used measure for capturing functional associations in brain is Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Pearson’s correlation is widely used for constructing functional network and studying dynamic functional connectivity of the brain. These are useful measures for understanding the effects of brain disorders on connectivities among brain regions. The fMRI scanners produce huge number of voxels and using traditional central processing unit (CPU)-based techniques for computing pairwise correlations is very time consuming especially when large number of subjects are being studied. In this paper, we propose a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based algorithm called Fast-GPU-PCC for computing pairwise Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Based on the symmetric property of Pearson’s correlation, this approach returns N ( N − 1 ) / 2 correlation coefficients located at strictly upper triangle part of the correlation matrix. Storing correlations in a one-dimensional array with the order as proposed in this paper is useful for further usage. Our experiments on real and synthetic fMRI data for different number of voxels and varying length of time series show that the proposed approach outperformed state of the art GPU-based techniques as well as the sequential CPU-based versions. We show that Fast-GPU-PCC runs 62 times faster than CPU-based version and about 2 to 3 times faster than two other state of the art GPU-based methods.

  7. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation coefficients for the (2n, n) Lennard-Jones system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friisberg, Ida Marie; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potentialenergy coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ syste...

  8. Derivation of a correlation for Drag coefficient in two-dimensional bounded supercavitating flows, using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaghat, R.; Hosseinalipour, S.M.; Derakhshani, S.M.E. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-07-15

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used as a new approach for the determination of the relations between drag coefficient and Cavitation Number with cavity geometry in supercavitating flows which have been most widely used in the hydrodynamics researches. Also the result of the ANNs as a cost function potentially will be used in an optimization algorithm. Instead of complex differential equations and limited experimental data, faster and simpler solutions were obtained using equations derived from the ANN model. For training of the ANN the numerical results are used that are obtained from a boundary element method (BEM). At this problem, a two-dimensional supercavitation potential inviscid flow pasts a symmetric two-dimensional cavitator, which is placed perpendicular to the flow in a channel of infinite width and immediately a cavity is formed behind the cavitator. It was found that the coefficient of multiple determination (R{sup 2}-value) between the actual and ANN predicted data is equal to about 0.9998 for the drag coefficient and Cavitation number. As seen from the obtained results, the calculated cavity geometry for all drag coefficients and Cavitation Numbers are obviously within acceptable limits. (orig.)

  9. A new method for comparing rankings through complex networks: Model and analysis of competitiveness of major European soccer leagues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Regino; García, Esther; Pedroche, Francisco; Romance, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show a new technique to analyze families of rankings. In particular, we focus on sports rankings and, more precisely, on soccer leagues. We consider that two teams compete when they change their relative positions in consecutive rankings. This allows to define a graph by linking teams that compete. We show how to use some structural properties of this competitivity graph to measure to what extend the teams in a league compete. These structural properties are the mean degree, the mean strength, and the clustering coefficient. We give a generalization of the Kendall's correlation coefficient to more than two rankings. We also show how to make a dynamic analysis of a league and how to compare different leagues. We apply this technique to analyze the four major European soccer leagues: Bundesliga, Italian Lega, Spanish Liga, and Premier League. We compare our results with the classical analysis of sport ranking based on measures of competitive balance.

  10. Standardized uptake value and apparent diffusion coefficient of endometrial cancer evaluated with integrated whole-body PET/MR: Correlation with pathological prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, I-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Chen, Chi-An; Chen, Bang-Bin; Wei, Shwu-Yuan; Chang, Wen-Chun; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Chen, Xin-Jia; Chen, Chi-Hau; Wei, Lin-Hung; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Torng, Pao-Ling; Yen, Men-Luh; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the correlation between maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax ) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin ) of endometrial cancer derived from an integrated positron emission tomography / magnetic resonance (PET/MR) system and to determine their correlation with pathological prognostic factors. This prospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the hospital, and informed consent was obtained. Between April and December 2014, 47 consecutive patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled and underwent simultaneous PET/MR examinations before surgery. Thirty-six patients with measurable tumors on PET/MR were included for image analysis. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between SUVmax and ADCmin of the tumors. The Mann-Whitney U-test was utilized to evaluate relationships between these two imaging biomarkers and pathological prognostic factors. The mean SUVmax and ADCmin were 14.7 ± 7.1 and 0.48 ± 0.13 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s, respectively. A significant inverse correlation was found between SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.53; P = 0.001). SUVmax was significantly higher in tumors with advanced stage, deep myometrial invasion, cervical invasion, lymphovascular space involvement, and lymph node metastasis (P correlated and are associated with pathological prognostic factors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Distribution coefficients for 85Sr and 137Cs in Japanese agricultural soils and their correlations with soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei-Ishikawa, N.; Uchida, S.; Tagami, K.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, soil-soil solution distribution coefficients (K d ) of Sr and Cs were obtained for 112 Japanese agricultural soil samples (50 paddy soil and 62 upland soil samples) using batch sorption test. The relationships between Sr- or Cs-K d values and soil properties were discussed. Furthermore, the amount of Cs fixed in soil was estimated for 22 selected soil samples using a sequential extraction method. Then, cross effects of some soil properties for Cs fixation were evaluated. (author)

  12. Experiments and correlations of pressure loss coefficients for hexagonal arranged rod bundles (P/D > 1.02) with helical wire spacers in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.; Yonekawa, S.; Hoffmann, H.

    1987-05-01

    Advanced pressurized water reactors as well as sodium cooled fast reactors, in their breeding and absorber elements, use tightly packed rod bundles with hexagonally arranged rods. Helical wires or helical fins serve as spacers. The pressure loss coefficients of twelve bundles with helical wires were determined systematically in water experiments. High measuring accuracy was achieved by very precise fabrication of the bundles and the shroud as well as by investigations of the proper measuring techniques. The results show a dependency of the loss coefficients on the Reynolds number and on the P/D and H/D ratios of the bundles. These results together with available systematic experimental results of investigations at P/D > 1.1 were used to develop a correlation to determine the pressure loss coefficients of tightly and widely packed hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wire spacers. These correlations were used to recalculate and compare results of pressure loss investigations found in the literature; good agreement was demonstrated. Hence, calculation methods exist for a broad range of applications to determine the pressure loss coefficients of hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wires for spacers. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Classification of criticality calculations with correlation coefficient method and its application to OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmarks phase III-A and II-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A method for classifying benchmark results of criticality calculations according to similarity was proposed in this paper. After formulation of the method utilizing correlation coefficients, it was applied to burnup credit criticality benchmarks Phase III-A and II-A, which were conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Phase III-A benchmark was a series of criticality calculations for irradiated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies, whereas Phase II-A benchmark was a suite of criticality calculations for irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. These benchmark problems and their results were summarized. The correlation coefficients were calculated and sets of benchmark calculation results were classified according to the criterion that the values of the correlation coefficients were no less than 0.15 for Phase III-A and 0.10 for Phase II-A benchmarks. When a couple of benchmark calculation results belonged to the same group, one calculation result was found predictable from the other. An example was shown for each of the Benchmarks. While the evaluated nuclear data seemed the main factor for the classification, further investigations were required for finding other factors. (author)

  14. A Generalized Spatial Correlation Model for 3D MIMO Channels based on the Fourier Coefficients of Power Spectrums

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain; Kammoun, Abla; Debbah, Merouane; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed the adverse impact of fading correlation on the mutual information (MI) of two-dimensional (2D) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance

  15. The mathematical modeling of the experiment on the determination of correlation coefficients in neutron beta-decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Klyushnikov, G. N.

    2018-05-01

    An experiment on the measurement of the ratio of the axial coupling constant to the vector one is under development. The main idea of the experiment is to measure the values of A and B in the same setup. An additional measurement of the polarization is not necessary. The accuracy achieved to date in measuring λ is 2 × 10-3. It is expected that in the experiment the accuracy will be of the order of 10-4. Some particular problems of mathematical modeling concerning the experiment on the measurement of the ratio of the axial coupling constant to the vector one are considered. The force lines for the given tabular field of a magnetic trap are studied. The dependences of the longitudinal and transverse field non-uniformity coefficients on the coordinates are regarded. A special computational algorithm based on the law of a charged particle motion along a local magnetic force line is performed for the calculation of the electrons and protons motion time as well as for the evaluation of the total number of electrons colliding with the detector surface. The average values of the cosines of the angles with the coefficients of a, A and B have been estimated.

  16. Sparse structure regularized ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Sun, Yijun; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Learning ranking scores is critical for the multimedia database retrieval problem. In this paper, we propose a novel ranking score learning algorithm by exploring the sparse structure and using it to regularize ranking scores. To explore the sparse

  17. Momentum, sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficient variability: what can we learn from 20 years of continuous eddy covariance measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdebise, Quentin; Heinesch, Bernard; De Ligne, Anne; Vincke, Caroline; Aubinet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Long-term data series of carbon dioxide and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere become more and more numerous. Long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) an ICOS candidate site located in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardenne. Fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide and sensible heat have been continuously measured there by eddy covariance for more than 20 years. During this period, changes in canopy height and measurement height occurred. The correlation coefficients (for momemtum, sensible heat and CO2) and the normalized standard deviations measured for the past 20 years at the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) were analysed in order to define how the fluxes, independently of climate conditions, were affected by the surrounding environment evolution, including tree growth, forest thinning and tower height change. A relationship between canopy aerodynamic distance and the momentum correlation coefficient was found which is characteristic of the roughness sublayer, and suggests that momentum transport processes were affected by z-d. In contrast, no relationship was found for sensible heat and CO2 correlation coefficients, suggesting that the z-d variability observed did not affect their turbulent transport. There were strong differences in these coefficients, however, between two wind sectors, characterized by contrasted stands (height differences, homogeneity) and different hypotheses were raised to explain it. This study highlighted the importance of taking the surrounding environment variability into account in order to ensure the spatio

  18. The electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in free neutron decay. Testing the standard model with the aSPECT-spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The β-decay of free neutrons is a strongly over-determined process in the Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics and is described by a multitude of observables. Some of those observables are sensitive to physics beyond the SM. For example, the correlation coefficients of the involved particles belong to them. The spectrometer aSPECT was designed to measure precisely the shape of the proton energy spectrum and to extract from it the electron anti-neutrino angular correlation coefficient a. A first test period (2005/2006) showed the ''proof-of-principles''. The limiting influence of uncontrollable background conditions in the spectrometer made it impossible to extract a reliable value for the coefficient a (published in 2008). A second measurement cycle (2007/2008) aimed to under-run the relative accuracy of previous experiments (δa)/(a)=5%. I performed the analysis of the data taken there which is the emphasis of this doctoral thesis. A central point are background studies. The systematic impact of background on a was reduced to (δa (syst.) )/(a)=0.61 %. The statistical accuracy of the analyzed measurements is (δa (stat.) )/(a)∼1.4 %. Besides, saturation effects of the detector electronics were investigated which were initially observed. These turned out not to be correctable on a sufficient level. An applicable idea how to avoid the saturation effects is discussed in the last chapter. (orig.)

  19. Theoretical study to determine the heat transfer by forced convection coefficient in an empirical correlation in single phase, for annular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.

    1994-01-01

    In the heat transfer studies by forced convection, we have few data about behavior of the fluids in an annular channel heated by a concentric pipe, such date is necessary to know the heat transfer coefficient that establish the interchange of energy and the thermic properties of the fluid with the geometry of the flow. In this work the objective, was to compare some empirical correlations that we needed for determinate the heat transfer coefficient for annular channels, where we obtained similar at the theoretical results of an experiment made by Miller and Benforado. It is important to know such coefficients because we can determinate the heat quantity transmitted to a probe zone, in which we simulate a nuclear fuel element that developed huge heat quantity that must be dispersed in short time. We give theoretical data of the heat forced transfer convection and we analyzed the phenomena in annular channels given some empirical correlations employed by some investigators and we analyzed each one. (Author)

  20. Chemical analysis of industrial scale deposits by combined use of correlation coefficients with emission line detection of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, P.; Philippidis, A.; Hadjistefanou, M.; Gounarakis, C.; Anglos, D.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to determine the mineral composition of various industrial scale samples. The aim of the study has been to investigate the capacity of LIBS to provide a fast, reliable analytical tool for carrying out routine analysis of inorganic scales, potentially on site, as a means to facilitate decision making concerning scale removal procedures. LIBS spectra collected in the range of 200–660 nm conveyed information about the metal content of the minerals. Via a straightforward analysis based on linear correlation of LIBS spectra it was possible to successfully discriminate scale samples into three main groups, Fe-rich, Ca-rich and Ba-rich, on the basis of correlation coefficients. By combining correlation coefficients with spectral data collected in the NIR, 860–960 nm, where sulfur emissions are detected, it became further possible to discriminate sulfates from carbonates as confirmed by independent analysis based on Raman spectroscopy. It is emphasized that the proposed LIBS-based method successfully identifies the major mineral or minerals present in the samples classifying the scales into relevant groups hence enabling process engineers to select appropriate scale dissolution strategies. - Highlights: • LIBS was used to determine the mineral composition of industrial scale samples. • Three groups of inorganic scales were identified: Ca rich, Ba rich and Fe rich. • A method that combines correlation coefficients and line detection is proposed. • The method successfully identifies the main mineral, or minerals, in the samples. • The results were compared with results obtained by use of Raman analysis

  1. Measurement of the angular correlation coefficient a between electron and antineutrino in neutron β-decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonobe, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Neutron β-decay is parametrized by several measurable correlation coefficients which are used to determine parameters of the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The aim of the retardation spectrometer aSPECT is to measure the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a with an unprecedented accuracy of well below 1%. The coefficient is extracted from a high precision measurement of the proton energy spectrum. A central point of this PhD thesis is the analysis of the background, motivated by the observations of discharges during the beam time of 2011, and an earlier indication for a dependence on the retardation potential. During this thesis, several measurements were conducted off-line, without ionizing particles from neutron decay. An 'internal' background (X-rays and ions) was identified. It has an influence of 10 -5 to 10 -4 on Δa/a depending on the vacuum level (∼10 -9 mbar) and the spectrometer settings. Within the analysis of the data from the beam time in 2013, a model was built to correct for backgrounds present in neutron decay experiment, taking into account its time dependence. The correction is about 3% on the coefficient for standard settings and vacuum but it can reach 7% for unfavorable settings. To reduce the background, a drift electric field was applied close to the maximum of the retardation potential. Additional measurements performed during this beam time included tests of systematics, in particular the edge effect (beam profile) and different electrode settings. In order to obtain the final result, the analysis has to be extended by including the different corrections and by comparing with simulations of the systematic effects. (author)

  2. Experimental determination of new statistical correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficient by convection for flat plates, cylinders and tube banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Fernando Meza Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This project carried out an experimental research with the design, assembly, and commissioning of a convection heat transfer test bench. Objective: To determine new statistical correlations that allow knowing the heat transfer coefficients by air convection with greater accuracy in applications with different heating geometry configurations. Methodology: Three geometric configurations, such as flat plate, cylinders and tube banks were studied according to their physical properties through Reynolds and Prandtl numbers, using a data transmission interface using Arduino® controllers Measured the air temperature through the duct to obtain real-time data and to relate the heat transferred from the heating element to the fluid and to perform mathematical modeling in specialized statistical software. The study was made for the three geometries mentioned, one power per heating element and two air velocities with 10 repetitions. Results: Three mathematical correlations were obtained with regression coefficients greater than 0.972, one for each heating element, obtaining prediction errors in the heat transfer convective coefficients of 7.50% for the flat plate, 2.85% for the plate Cylindrical and 1.57% for the tube bank. Conclusions: It was observed that in geometries constituted by several individual elements, a much more accurate statistical adjustment was obtained to predict the behavior of the convection heat coefficients, since each unit reaches a stability in the surface temperature profile with Greater speed, giving the geometry in general, a more precise measurement of the parameters that govern the transfer of heat, as it is in the case of the geometry of the tube bank.

  3. [Characteristics of high resolution diffusion weighted imaging apparent diffusion coefficient histogram and its correlations with cancer stages in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G J; Wang, Y; Ye, Y; Chen, F; Lu, Y T; Li, S L

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To investigate the features of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters based on entire tumor volume data in high resolution diffusion weighted imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to evaluate its correlations with cancer stages. Methods: This retrospective study included 154 cases of NPC patients[102 males and 52 females, mean age (48±11) years]who had received readout segmentation of long variable echo trains of MRI scan before radiation therapy. The area of tumor was delineated on each section of axial ADC maps to generate ADC histogram by using Image J. ADC histogram of entire tumor along with the histogram parameters-the tumor voxels, ADC(mean), ADC(25%), ADC(50%), ADC(75%), skewness and kurtosis were obtained by merging all sections with SPSS 22.0 software. Intra-observer repeatability was assessed by using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The patients were subdivided into two groups according to cancer volume: small cancer group (histogram parameters and cancer stages was evaluated with Spearman test. Results: The ICC of measuring ADC histogram parameters of tumor voxels, ADC(mean), ADC(25%), ADC(50%), ADC(75%), skewness, kurtosis was 0.938, 0.861, 0.885, 0.838, 0.836, 0.358 and 0.456, respectively. The tumor voxels was positively correlated with T staging ( r =0.368, P histogram (ADC(mean), ADC(25%), ADC(50%)) increases with T staging in NPC smaller than 2 cm(3).

  4. Does resident ranking during recruitment accurately predict subsequent performance as a surgical resident?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Jonathan P; Corcoran, Noreen; George, Brian; Wang, Ed; Darosa, Debra

    2012-01-01

    While the primary goal of ranking applicants for surgical residency training positions is to identify the candidates who will subsequently perform best as surgical residents, the effectiveness of the ranking process has not been adequately studied. We evaluated our general surgery resident recruitment process between 2001 and 2011 inclusive, to determine if our recruitment ranking parameters effectively predicted subsequent resident performance. We identified 3 candidate ranking parameters (United States Medical Licensing Examination [USMLE] Step 1 score, unadjusted ranking score [URS], and final adjusted ranking [FAR]), and 4 resident performance parameters (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination [ABSITE] score, PGY1 resident evaluation grade [REG], overall REG, and independent faculty rating ranking [IFRR]), and assessed whether the former were predictive of the latter. Analyses utilized Spearman correlation coefficient. We found that the URS, which is based on objective and criterion based parameters, was a better predictor of subsequent performance than the FAR, which is a modification of the URS based on subsequent determinations of the resident selection committee. USMLE score was a reliable predictor of ABSITE scores only. However, when we compared our worst residence performances with the performances of the other residents in this evaluation, the data did not produce convincing evidence that poor resident performances could be reliably predicted by any of the recruitment ranking parameters. Finally, stratifying candidates based on their rank range did not effectively define a ranking cut-off beyond which resident performance would drop off. Based on these findings, we recommend surgery programs may be better served by utilizing a more structured resident ranking process and that subsequent adjustments to the rank list generated by this process should be undertaken with caution. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  5. Additional Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Evaluate Prognostic Factors of Breast Cancer: Correlation with the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with diverse prognoses. The main prognostic determinants are lymph node status, tumor size, histological grade, and biological factors, such as hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67 protein levels, and p53 expression. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be used to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that provides information related to tumor cellularity and the integrity of the cell membranes. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ADC measurements could provide information on the prognostic factors of breast cancer. A total of 71 women with invasive breast cancer, treated consecutively, who underwent preoperative breast MRIs with DWI at 3.0 Tesla and subsequent surgery, were prospectively included in this study. Each DWI was acquired with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 . The mean ADC values of the lesions were measured, including the entire lesion on the three largest sections. We performed histopathological analyses for the tumor size, lymph node status, histological grade, hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, p53, and molecular subtypes. The associations with the ADC values and prognostic factors of breast cancer were evaluated using the independent-samples t test and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A low ADC value was associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01) and with high Ki-67 protein levels (P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the ADC values among the histological grade (P = 0.48), molecular subtype (P = 0.51), tumor size (P = 0.46), and p53 protein level (P = 0.62). The pre-operative use of the 3.0 Tesla DWI could provide information about the lymph node status and tumor proliferation for breast cancer patients, and could help determine the optimal treatment plan

  6. FDG-PET/CT and diffusion-weighted imaging for resected lung cancer: correlation of maximum standardized uptake value and apparent diffusion coefficient value with prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Katsuo; Funasaki, Aika; Sekimura, Atsushi; Motono, Nozomu; Matoba, Munetaka; Doai, Mariko; Yamada, Sohsuke; Ueda, Yoshimichi; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2018-04-09

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is useful for detecting malignant tumors and the assessment of lymph nodes, as FDG-PET/CT is. But it is not clear how DWI influences the prognosis of lung cancer patients. The focus of this study is to evaluate the correlations between maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of FDG-PET/CT and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of DWI with known prognostic factors in resected lung cancer. A total of 227 patients with resected lung cancers were enrolled in this study. FEG-PET/CT and DWI were performed in each patient before surgery. There were 168 patients with adenocarcinoma, 44 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and 15 patients with other cell types. SUVmax was a factor that was correlated to T factor, N factor, or cell differentiation. ADC of lung cancer was a factor that was not correlated to T factor, or N factor. There was a significantly weak inverse relationship between SUVmax and ADC (Correlation coefficient r = - 0.227). In analysis of survival, there were significant differences between the categories of sex, age, pT factor, pN factor, cell differentiation, cell type, and SUVmax. Univariate analysis revealed that SUVmax, pN factor, age, cell differentiation, cell type, sex, and pT factor were significant factors. Multivariate analysis revealed that SUVmax and pN factor were independent significant prognostic factors. SUVmax was a significant prognostic factor that is correlated to T factor, N factor, or cell differentiation, but ADC was not. SUVmax may be more useful for predicting the prognosis of lung cancer than ADC values.

  7. Measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in neutron beta decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the four beam times we performed at the FRM-II, we were able to show that the spectrometer works in principle and that a determination of a with it is possible. A set of routines has been written for decoding and analyzing the raw data. The routines are written in C using the ROOT libraries and can be easily adapted or expanded. We have found a reliable way to extract the proton count rates from the data by building pulseheight spectra for each measurement, subtracting background measurements from those and fitting the resulting peak with a Gaussian. The background of the measurements was studied in detail. The background caused by electrons from neutron decay is very well understood and conforms quantitatively to our expectation. Due to the spatial resolution of our detector and the time resolution provided by our DAQ electronics, we were able to study correlated electron-proton pairs from one neutron decay event. They form a clearly visible peak in a time- and channel-distance spectrum, which can be shifted in the channel-dimension by varying the voltages applied to the lower and upper E x B electrodes. Performing a pulseheight analysis for both involved particles allowed us to obtain a fairly clean energy spectrum of the background caused by electrons from neutron decay in our detector. Using these correlations for data analysis may be of interest for future neutron decay experiments which use segmented detectors. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in neutron beta decay with the spectrometer aSPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzoldt, G.

    2007-08-29

    In the four beam times we performed at the FRM-II, we were able to show that the spectrometer works in principle and that a determination of a with it is possible. A set of routines has been written for decoding and analyzing the raw data. The routines are written in C using the ROOT libraries and can be easily adapted or expanded. We have found a reliable way to extract the proton count rates from the data by building pulseheight spectra for each measurement, subtracting background measurements from those and fitting the resulting peak with a Gaussian. The background of the measurements was studied in detail. The background caused by electrons from neutron decay is very well understood and conforms quantitatively to our expectation. Due to the spatial resolution of our detector and the time resolution provided by our DAQ electronics, we were able to study correlated electron-proton pairs from one neutron decay event. They form a clearly visible peak in a time- and channel-distance spectrum, which can be shifted in the channel-dimension by varying the voltages applied to the lower and upper E x B electrodes. Performing a pulseheight analysis for both involved particles allowed us to obtain a fairly clean energy spectrum of the background caused by electrons from neutron decay in our detector. Using these correlations for data analysis may be of interest for future neutron decay experiments which use segmented detectors. (orig.)

  9. Correlation between standardized uptake value and apparent diffusion coefficient of neoplastic lesions evaluated with whole-body simultaneous hybrid PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Rajan; Chandarana, Hersh; DeMello, Linda; Jackson, Kimberly; Geppert, Christian; Faul, David; Glielmi, Christopher; Friedman, Kent P

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between standardized uptake value (SUV) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of neoplastic lesions in the use of a simultaneous PET/MRI hybrid system. Twenty-four patients with known primary malignancies underwent FDG PET/CT. They then underwent whole-body PET/MRI. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with free breathing and a single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with b values of 0, 350, and 750 s/mm(2). Regions of interest were manually drawn along the contours of neoplastic lesions larger than 1 cm, which were clearly identified on PET and diffusion-weighted images. Maximum SUV (SUVmax) on PET/MRI and PET/CT images, mean SUV (SUVmean), minimum ADC (ADCmin), and mean ADC (ADCmean) were recorded on PET/MR images for each FDG-avid neoplastic soft-tissue lesion with a maximum of three lesions per patient. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to asses the following relations: SUVmax versus ADCmin on PET/MR and PET/CT images, SUVmean versus ADCmean, and ratio of SUVmax to mean liver SUV (SUV ratio) versus ADCmin. A subanalysis of patients with progressive disease versus partial treatment response was performed with the ratio of SUVmax to ADCmin for the most metabolically active lesion. Sixty-nine neoplastic lesions (52 nonosseous lesions, 17 bone metastatic lesions) were evaluated. The mean SUVmax from PET/MRI was 7.0 ± 6.0; SUVmean, 5.6 ± 4.6; mean ADCmin, 1.10 ± 0.58; and mean ADCmean, 1.48 ± 0.72. A significant inverse Pearson correlation coefficient was found between PET/MRI SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.21, p = 0.04), between SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.18, p = 0.07), and between SUV ratio and ADCmin (r = -0.27, p = 0.01). A similar inverse Pearson correlation coefficient was found between the PET/CT SUVmax and ADCmin. Twenty of 24 patients had previously undergone PET/CT; five patients had a partial treatment response, and six had progressive disease according to Response Evaluation

  10. Genetic variability, path-coefficient and correlation studies in twenty elite bread-wheat (triticum aestivum L.) lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, M.Y.; Asif, M.; Ahmad, I.; Kisana, N.A.; Ahmad, Z.; Asim, M.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty bread-wheat elite lines of diverse origin, developed by various research institutes in the country, were tested and evaluated at National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC) under optimum irrigated conditions. Significant variation was observed for all the traits studied viz: days to heading, days to maturity, kernel weight, test weight and grain yield. Genotypic and phenotypic correlations were computed and the direct and indirect contributions of each trait towards grain-yield were determined. Grain-yield showed significant association with test weight and kernel weight. Direct positive effects of kernel weight and test weight towards grain-yield suggest the effectiveness of these traits to select and identify the desirable wheat- genotypes for a target environment. (author)

  11. Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient: Evaluation of the correlation with subtypes of mucinous breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuan; Kong, Qing-Cong; Zhu, Ye-Qing; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Peng, Ling-Rong; Tang, Wen-Jie; Yang, Rui-Meng; Xie, Jia-Jun; Liu, Chun-Ling

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the utility of the whole-lesion histogram apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for characterizing the heterogeneity of mucinous breast carcinoma (MBC) and to determine which ADC metrics may help to best differentiate subtypes of MBC. This retrospective study involved 52 MBC patients, including 37 pure MBC (PMBC) and 15 mixed MBC (MMBC). The PMBC patients were subtyped into PMBC-A (20 cases) and PMBC-B (17 cases) groups. All patients underwent preoperative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 1.5T and the whole-lesion ADC assessments were generated. Histogram-derived ADC parameters were compared between PMBC vs. MMBC and PMBC-A vs. PMBC-B, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine optimal histogram parameters for differentiating these groups. The PMBC group exhibited significantly higher ADC values for the mean (P = 0.004), 25 th (P = 0.004), 50 th (P = 0.004), 75 th (P = 0.006), and 90 th percentiles (P = 0.013) and skewness (P = 0.021) than did the MMBC group. The 25 th percentile of ADC values achieved the highest area under the curve (AUC) (0.792), with a cutoff value of 1.345 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, in distinguishing PMBC and MMBC. The PMBC-A group showed significantly higher ADC values for the mean (P = 0.049), 25 th (P = 0.015), and 50 th (P = 0.026) percentiles and skewness (P = 0.004) than did the PMBC-B group. The 25 th percentile of the ADC cutoff value (1.476 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) demonstrated the best AUC (0.837) among the ADC values for distinguishing PMBC-A and PMBC-B. Whole-lesion ADC histogram analysis enables comprehensive evaluation of an MBC in its entirety and differentiating subtypes of MBC. Thus, it may be a helpful and supportive tool for conventional MRI. 4 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:391-400. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. A Rapid Identification Method for Calamine Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Based on Multi-Reference Correlation Coefficient Method and Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yangbo; Chen, Long; Huang, Bisheng; Chen, Keli

    2017-07-01

    As a mineral, the traditional Chinese medicine calamine has a similar shape to many other minerals. Investigations of commercially available calamine samples have shown that there are many fake and inferior calamine goods sold on the market. The conventional identification method for calamine is complicated, therefore as a result of the large scale of calamine samples, a rapid identification method is needed. To establish a qualitative model using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for rapid identification of various calamine samples, large quantities of calamine samples including crude products, counterfeits and processed products were collected and correctly identified using the physicochemical and powder X-ray diffraction method. The NIR spectroscopy method was used to analyze these samples by combining the multi-reference correlation coefficient (MRCC) method and the error back propagation artificial neural network algorithm (BP-ANN), so as to realize the qualitative identification of calamine samples. The accuracy rate of the model based on NIR and MRCC methods was 85%; in addition, the model, which took comprehensive multiple factors into consideration, can be used to identify crude calamine products, its counterfeits and processed products. Furthermore, by in-putting the correlation coefficients of multiple references as the spectral feature data of samples into BP-ANN, a BP-ANN model of qualitative identification was established, of which the accuracy rate was increased to 95%. The MRCC method can be used as a NIR-based method in the process of BP-ANN modeling.

  13. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d0=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d0.

  14. PageRank and rank-reversal dependence on the damping factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S-W; Christensen, C; Grassberger, P; Paczuski, M

    2012-12-01

    PageRank (PR) is an algorithm originally developed by Google to evaluate the importance of web pages. Considering how deeply rooted Google's PR algorithm is to gathering relevant information or to the success of modern businesses, the question of rank stability and choice of the damping factor (a parameter in the algorithm) is clearly important. We investigate PR as a function of the damping factor d on a network obtained from a domain of the World Wide Web, finding that rank reversal happens frequently over a broad range of PR (and of d). We use three different correlation measures, Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall, to study rank reversal as d changes, and we show that the correlation of PR vectors drops rapidly as d changes from its frequently cited value, d_{0}=0.85. Rank reversal is also observed by measuring the Spearman and Kendall rank correlation, which evaluate relative ranks rather than absolute PR. Rank reversal happens not only in directed networks containing rank sinks but also in a single strongly connected component, which by definition does not contain any sinks. We relate rank reversals to rank pockets and bottlenecks in the directed network structure. For the network studied, the relative rank is more stable by our measures around d=0.65 than at d=d_{0}.

  15. Generalized reduced rank tests using the singular value decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.; Paap, R.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: necessity of a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson (1951), sensitivity to the ordering of the variables for the LDU

  16. Generalized Reduced Rank Tests using the Singular Value Decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Kleibergen (Frank); R. Paap (Richard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: necessity of a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson (1951), sensitivity to the ordering of the variables

  17. Determination of Spearman Correlation Coefficient (r to Evaluate the Linear Association of Dermal Collagen and Elastic Fibers in the Perspectives of Skin Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Difference in scar formation at different sites, in different directions at the same site, but with changes in the elasticity of skin with age, sex, and race or in some pathological conditions, is well known to clinicians. The inappropriate collagen syntheses and delayed or lack of epithelialization are known to induce scar formation with negligible elasticity at the site of damage. Changes in the elasticity of scars may be due to an unequal distribution of dermal collagen (C and elastic (E fibers. Materials and Methods. Spearman correlation coefficients (r of collagen and elastic fibers in horizontal (H and in vertical (V directions (variables CV, CH, EV, and EH were measured from the respective quantitative fraction data in 320 skin samples from 32 human cadavers collected at five selected sites over extremities. Results. Spearman’s correlation analysis revealed the statistically significant (p<0.01 strong positive correlation between CH and CV in all the areas, that is, shoulder joint area (r=0.66, wrist (r=0.75, forearm (r=0.75, and thigh (r=0.80, except at the ankle (r=0.26, p=0.14 region. Similarly, positive correlation between EH and EV has been observed at the forearm (r=0.65, moderate and thigh (r=0.42, low regions. However, a significant moderate negative correlation was observed between CV and EV at the forearm (r=-0.51 and between CH and EH at the thigh region (r=-0.65. Conclusion. Significant differences of correlations of collagen and elastic fibers in different directions from different areas of extremities were noted. This may be one of the possible anatomical reasons of scar behavior in different areas and different directions of the same area.

  18. Determination of Spearman Correlation Coefficient (r) to Evaluate the Linear Association of Dermal Collagen and Elastic Fibers in the Perspectives of Skin Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Pramod; Badagabettu, Satheesha Nayak; Lewis, Melissa Glenda; Adiga, Murali; Padur, Ashwini Aithal

    2018-01-01

    Difference in scar formation at different sites, in different directions at the same site, but with changes in the elasticity of skin with age, sex, and race or in some pathological conditions, is well known to clinicians. The inappropriate collagen syntheses and delayed or lack of epithelialization are known to induce scar formation with negligible elasticity at the site of damage. Changes in the elasticity of scars may be due to an unequal distribution of dermal collagen (C) and elastic (E) fibers. Spearman correlation coefficients ( r ) of collagen and elastic fibers in horizontal (H) and in vertical (V) directions (variables CV, CH, EV, and EH) were measured from the respective quantitative fraction data in 320 skin samples from 32 human cadavers collected at five selected sites over extremities. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed the statistically significant ( p < 0.01) strong positive correlation between C H and C V in all the areas, that is, shoulder joint area ( r = 0.66), wrist ( r = 0.75), forearm ( r = 0.75), and thigh ( r = 0.80), except at the ankle ( r = 0.26, p = 0.14) region. Similarly, positive correlation between E H and E V has been observed at the forearm ( r = 0.65, moderate) and thigh ( r = 0.42, low) regions. However, a significant moderate negative correlation was observed between C V and E V at the forearm ( r = -0.51) and between C H and E H at the thigh region ( r = -0.65). Significant differences of correlations of collagen and elastic fibers in different directions from different areas of extremities were noted. This may be one of the possible anatomical reasons of scar behavior in different areas and different directions of the same area.

  19. A custom correlation coefficient (CCC) approach for fast identification of multi-SNP association patterns in genome-wide SNPs data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climer, Sharlee; Yang, Wei; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Dávila-Román, Victor G; Gu, C Charles

    2014-11-01

    Complex diseases are often associated with sets of multiple interacting genetic factors and possibly with unique sets of the genetic factors in different groups of individuals (genetic heterogeneity). We introduce a novel concept of custom correlation coefficient (CCC) between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that address genetic heterogeneity by measuring subset correlations autonomously. It is used to develop a 3-step process to identify candidate multi-SNP patterns: (1) pairwise (SNP-SNP) correlations are computed using CCC; (2) clusters of so-correlated SNPs identified; and (3) frequencies of these clusters in disease cases and controls compared to identify disease-associated multi-SNP patterns. This method identified 42 candidate multi-SNP associations with hypertensive heart disease (HHD), among which one cluster of 22 SNPs (six genes) included 13 in SLC8A1 (aka NCX1, an essential component of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling) and another of 32 SNPs had 29 from a different segment of SLC8A1. While allele frequencies show little difference between cases and controls, the cluster of 22 associated alleles were found in 20% of controls but no cases and the other in 3% of controls but 20% of cases. These suggest that both protective and risk effects on HHD could be exerted by combinations of variants in different regions of SLC8A1, modified by variants from other genes. The results demonstrate that this new correlation metric identifies disease-associated multi-SNP patterns overlooked by commonly used correlation measures. Furthermore, computation time using CCC is a small fraction of that required by other methods, thereby enabling the analyses of large GWAS datasets. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  1. Measurement and correlation of infinite dilution activity coefficients of alcohols in hexadecane and tetradecane; Hexadecane oyobi tetradecane chu no alcohol rui no mugen kishaku katsuryo keisu no sokutei narabini sokan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuchi, K.; Miyoshi, K. [Ube National College of Technology, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    1996-03-10

    The infinite dilution activity coefficients of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propano, 1-butanol, and 2-butanol) in heavy paraffinic hydrocarbons (hexadecane and tetradecane) were measured in the region 20-80{degree}C by a gas stripping method. The ASOG model was applied to calculate the infinite dilution activity coefficients. The infinite dilution activity coefficients can be correlated by adjusting the group interaction parameters between hydroxy and methyl groups. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A new correlation for convective heat transfer coefficient of water–alumina nanofluid in a square array subchannel under PWR condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Jubair A.; Bhowmik, Palash K.; Xiangyi, Chen; Suh, Kune Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydrodynamic properties of water–Al_2O_3 nanofluid at PWR condition is analyzed. • Details of CFD simulation and validation procedure is outlined. • Augmented heat transfer capacity of nanofluid is governed by larger pumping power. • A new correlation for nanofluid Nusselt number in subchannel geometry is proposed. - Abstract: The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is performed to determine on the thermo- and hydrodynamic performance of the water–alumina (Al_2O_3) nanofluid in a square array subchannel featuring pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 1.35. Two fundamental aspects of thermal hydraulics, viz. heat transfer and pressure drop, are assessed under typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions at various flow rates (3 × 10"5 ⩽ Re ⩽ 6 × 10"5) using pure water and differing concentrations of water–alumina nanofluid (0.5–3.0 vol.%) as coolant. Numerical results are compared against predictions made by conventional single-phase convective heat transfer and pressure loss correlations for fully developed turbulent flow. It is observed that addition of tiny nanoparticles in PWR coolant can give rise to the convective heat transfer coefficient at the expense of larger pressure drop. Nevertheless, a modified correlation as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction is proposed to estimate nanofluid Nusselt number more precisely in square array subchannel.

  3. A new correlation for convective heat transfer coefficient of water–alumina nanofluid in a square array subchannel under PWR condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Jubair A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Bhowmik, Palash K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1201 N. State St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Xiangyi, Chen [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kune Y., E-mail: kysuh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Thermo-hydrodynamic properties of water–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofluid at PWR condition is analyzed. • Details of CFD simulation and validation procedure is outlined. • Augmented heat transfer capacity of nanofluid is governed by larger pumping power. • A new correlation for nanofluid Nusselt number in subchannel geometry is proposed. - Abstract: The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation is performed to determine on the thermo- and hydrodynamic performance of the water–alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofluid in a square array subchannel featuring pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 1.35. Two fundamental aspects of thermal hydraulics, viz. heat transfer and pressure drop, are assessed under typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions at various flow rates (3 × 10{sup 5} ⩽ Re ⩽ 6 × 10{sup 5}) using pure water and differing concentrations of water–alumina nanofluid (0.5–3.0 vol.%) as coolant. Numerical results are compared against predictions made by conventional single-phase convective heat transfer and pressure loss correlations for fully developed turbulent flow. It is observed that addition of tiny nanoparticles in PWR coolant can give rise to the convective heat transfer coefficient at the expense of larger pressure drop. Nevertheless, a modified correlation as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction is proposed to estimate nanofluid Nusselt number more precisely in square array subchannel.

  4. The prognosis was poorer in colorectal cancers that expressed both VEGF and PROK1 (No correlation coefficient between VEGF and PROK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goi, Takanori; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Hirono, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-10-06

    The angiogenic proteins vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prokineticin1 (PROK1) proteins are considered important in colorectal cancer, the relationship between their simultaneous expression and prognosis was investigated in the present study. VEGF and PROK1 expression in 620 primary human colorectal cancer lesions was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining with anti-VEGF and anti-PROK1 antibodies, and the correlation between the expression of these 2 proteins and recurrence/prognosis were investigated. VEGF protein was expressed in 329 (53.1%) and PROK1 protein was expressed in 223 (36.0%). PROK1 and VEGF were simultaneously expressed in 116 (18.7%) of the 620 cases. The correlation coefficient between VEGF expression and PROK1 expression was r = 0.11, and therefore correlation was not observed. Clinical pathology revealed that substantially lymphnode matastasis, hematogenous metastasis, or TMN advanced-stage IV was significantly more prevalent in cases that expressed both VEGF and PROK1 than in the cases negative for both proteins or those positive for only 1 of the proteins. Also the cases positive for both proteins exhibited the worst recurrence and prognosis. In the Cox proportional hazards model, VEGF and PROK1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The prognosis was poorer in colorectal cancers that expressed both PROK1 and VEGF relative to the cases that expressed only 1 protein, and the expression of both proteins was found to be an independent prognostic factor.

  5. Search for a nonzero triple-correlation coefficient and new experimental limit on T invariance in polarized-neutron beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Liaud, P.; Vignon, B.; Hughes, V.W.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description of an experimental test of time-reversal invariance in the β decay of the polarized free neutron is presented. The experiment consists of a measurement of the triple-correlation coefficient D between the neutron polarization vector and the electron and antineutrino momentum vectors. A nonzero value for this coefficient would imply T violation, since final-state interactions and other corrections may be neglected at the present level of precision. The experiment was performed using a cold-neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. A polarizing neutron guide tube yielded a beam intensity of 10 9 neutrons/sec with a polarization of 70%. Our result, based upon observation of approximately 6 x 10 6 decays, is D = (-1.1 +- 1.7) x 10 -3 , consistent with time-reversal invariance in the ΔS = 0 weak interaction. In terms of the relative phase angle between axial-vector and vector coupling constants, the result may be expressed as phi = 180.14 +- 0.22 0

  6. University rankings in computer science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Philip; Zuccala, Alesia Ann; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    This is a research-in-progress paper concerning two types of institutional rankings, the Leiden and QS World ranking, and their relationship to a list of universities’ ‘geo-based’ impact scores, and Computing Research and Education Conference (CORE) participation scores in the field of computer...... science. A ‘geo-based’ impact measure examines the geographical distribution of incoming citations to a particular university’s journal articles for a specific period of time. It takes into account both the number of citations and the geographical variability in these citations. The CORE participation...... score is calculated on the basis of the number of weighted proceedings papers that a university has contributed to either an A*, A, B, or C conference as ranked by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia. In addition to calculating the correlations between the distinct university...

  7. About the use of rank transformation in sensitivity analysis of model output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltelli, Andrea; Sobol', Ilya M

    1995-01-01

    Rank transformations are frequently employed in numerical experiments involving a computational model, especially in the context of sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Response surface replacement and parameter screening are tasks which may benefit from a rank transformation. Ranks can cope with nonlinear (albeit monotonic) input-output distributions, allowing the use of linear regression techniques. Rank transformed statistics are more robust, and provide a useful solution in the presence of long tailed input and output distributions. As is known to practitioners, care must be employed when interpreting the results of such analyses, as any conclusion drawn using ranks does not translate easily to the original model. In the present note an heuristic approach is taken, to explore, by way of practical examples, the effect of a rank transformation on the outcome of a sensitivity analysis. An attempt is made to identify trends, and to correlate these effects to a model taxonomy. Employing sensitivity indices, whereby the total variance of the model output is decomposed into a sum of terms of increasing dimensionality, we show that the main effect of the rank transformation is to increase the relative weight of the first order terms (the 'main effects'), at the expense of the 'interactions' and 'higher order interactions'. As a result the influence of those parameters which influence the output mostly by way of interactions may be overlooked in an analysis based on the ranks. This difficulty increases with the dimensionality of the problem, and may lead to the failure of a rank based sensitivity analysis. We suggest that the models can be ranked, with respect to the complexity of their input-output relationship, by mean of an 'Association' index I y . I y may complement the usual model coefficient of determination R y 2 as a measure of model complexity for the purpose of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

  8. The spatiotemporal dynamic analysis of the implied market information and characteristics of the correlation coefficient matrix of the international crude oil price returns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Lixin; Ding, Zhenqi; Zhen, Zaili; Wang, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    The international crude oil market plays a crucial role in economies, and the studies of the correlation, risk and synchronization of the international crude oil market have important implications for the security and stability of the country, avoidance of business risk and people's daily lives. We investigate the information and characteristics of the international crude oil market (1999-2015) based on the random matrix theory (RMT). Firstly, we identify richer information in the largest eigenvalues deviating from RMT predictions for the international crude oil market; the international crude oil market can be roughly divided into ten different periods by the methods of eigenvectors and characteristic combination, and the implied market information of the correlation coefficient matrix is advanced. Secondly, we study the characteristics of the international crude oil market by the methods of system risk entropy, dynamic synchronous ratio, dynamic non-synchronous ratio and dynamic clustering algorithm. The results show that the international crude oil market is full of risk. The synchronization of the international crude oil market is very strong, and WTI and Brent occupy a very important position in the international crude oil market. (orig.)

  9. Correlation between octanol/water and liposome/water distribution coefficients and drug absorption of a set of pharmacologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Freddy; Moutinho, Carla; Matos, Carla

    2013-06-01

    Absorption and consequent therapeutic action are key issues in the development of new drugs by the pharmaceutical industry. In this sense, different models can be used to simulate biological membranes to predict the absorption of a drug. This work compared the octanol/water and the liposome/water models. The parameters used to relate the two models were the distribution coefficients between liposomes and water and octanol and water and the fraction of drug orally absorbed. For this study, 66 drugs were collected from literature sources and divided into four groups according to charge and ionization degree: neutral; positively charged; negatively charged; and partially ionized/zwitterionic. The results show a satisfactory linear correlation between the octanol and liposome systems for the neutral (R²= 0.9324) and partially ionized compounds (R²= 0.9367), contrary to the positive (R²= 0.4684) and negatively charged compounds (R²= 0.1487). In the case of neutral drugs, results were similar in both models because of the high fraction orally absorbed. However, for the charged drugs (positively, negatively, and partially ionized/zwitterionic), the liposomal model has a more-appropriate correlation with absorption than the octanol model. These results show that the neutral compounds only interact with membranes through hydrophobic bonds, whereas charged drugs favor electrostatic interactions established with the liposomes. With this work, we concluded that liposomes may be a more-appropriate biomembrane model than octanol for charged compounds.

  10. The spatiotemporal dynamic analysis of the implied market information and characteristics of the correlation coefficient matrix of the international crude oil price returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lixin [Jiangsu University, Energy Development and Environmental Protection Strategy Research Center, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing Normal University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Ding, Zhenqi; Zhen, Zaili [Jiangsu University, Energy Development and Environmental Protection Strategy Research Center, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Minggang [Nanjing Normal University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    The international crude oil market plays a crucial role in economies, and the studies of the correlation, risk and synchronization of the international crude oil market have important implications for the security and stability of the country, avoidance of business risk and people's daily lives. We investigate the information and characteristics of the international crude oil market (1999-2015) based on the random matrix theory (RMT). Firstly, we identify richer information in the largest eigenvalues deviating from RMT predictions for the international crude oil market; the international crude oil market can be roughly divided into ten different periods by the methods of eigenvectors and characteristic combination, and the implied market information of the correlation coefficient matrix is advanced. Secondly, we study the characteristics of the international crude oil market by the methods of system risk entropy, dynamic synchronous ratio, dynamic non-synchronous ratio and dynamic clustering algorithm. The results show that the international crude oil market is full of risk. The synchronization of the international crude oil market is very strong, and WTI and Brent occupy a very important position in the international crude oil market. (orig.)

  11. Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma of the Uterus: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Including Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Value and Its Correlation With Ki-67 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai Ming; Liu, Jia; Qiang, Jin Wei; Gu, Wei Yong; Zhang, Guo Fu; Ma, Feng Hua

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) features of endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) including a preliminary investigation of the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and Ki-67 expression. The clinical and MRI data of 15 patients with ESS confirmed by surgery and pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The conventional MR morphological features, signal intensity on DWI, ADC value (n = 14), and clinicopathological marker Ki-67 (n = 13) were evaluated. Of 15 patients with ESS, 13 tumors were low-grade ESS (LGESS), and the remaining 2 were high-grade ESS (HGESS); 9 tumors were located in the myometrium, 5 were located in the endometrium and/or cervical canal, and 1 was located in extrauterine. Thirteen (87%) of 15 tumors showed a homo- or heterogeneous isointensity on T1-weighted imaging and a heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging. The hypointense bands were observed in 11 tumors (73%) on T2-weighted imaging. The degenerations (cystic/necrosis/hemorrhage) were observed in 7 LGESS tumors and 2 HGESS tumors. The DWI hyperintensity was observed in 13 tumors (93%) and isointensity in remaining 1. The mean ADC value of the solid components in 14 ESSs was (1.05 ± 0.20) × 10mm/s. The contrast-enhanced MRI showed an obvious enhancement in 14 tumors (93%) (heterogeneous in 7 LGESSs and 2 HGESSs; homogeneous in 5 LGESSs). The ADC value was inversely correlated with the Ki-67 expression (r = -0.613, P = 0.026). Patients with ESS showed some characteristics on conventional MRI and DWI, and there was an inverse correlation between the ADC value and Ki-67 expression.

  12. [Correlation between the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and apparent diffusion coefficient on diffusion-weighted imaging in rats' liver fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yuefu; Liang, Xianwen; Han, Xiangjun; Chen, Jianqiang; Zhang, Shufang; Tan, Shun; Li, Qun; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Fan

    2017-02-28

    To explore the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in different stages of liver fibrosis in rats.
 Methods: A model of liver fibrosis in rats was established by intraperitoneal injection of high-fat diet combined with porcine serum. After drug administration for 4 weeks, 48 rats served as a model group and 12 rats served as a control group, then they underwent diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scanning. The value of ADC was calculated at b value=800 s/mm2. The rats were sacrificed and carried out pathologic examination after DWI scanning immediately. The mRNA expression of TIMP-1 was detected by real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The rats of hepatic fibrosis were also divided into a S0 group (n=4), a S1 group (n=11), a S2 group (n=12), a S3 group (n=10), and a S4 group (n=9) according to their pathological stage. The value of ADC and the expression of TIMP-1 mRNA among the different stage groups of liver fibrosis were compared, and the correlation between ADC and the TIMP-1 mRNA were analyzed.
 Results: The ADC value and the TIMP-1 mRNA expression were significantly different between the control group and the liver fibrosis group (F=46.54 and 53.87, P0.05). For the comparison of TIMP-1 mRNA, there was no significant difference between the S1 group and the S2 group, the S3 group and the S4 group (both P>0.05). There were significant differences among the rest of the groups (all Pcorrelation analysis showed that there was a negative correlation between the ADC value and the TIMP-1 mRNA expression (r=-0.76, Pcorrelation between them.

  13. Validating rankings in soccer championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Parracho Sant'Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The final ranking of a championship is determined by quality attributes combined with other factors which should be filtered out of any decision on relegation or draft for upper level tournaments. Factors like referees' mistakes and difficulty of certain matches due to its accidental importance to the opponents should have their influence reduced. This work tests approaches to combine classification rules considering the imprecision of the number of points as a measure of quality and of the variables that provide reliable explanation for it. Two home-advantage variables are tested and shown to be apt to enter as explanatory variables. Independence between the criteria is checked against the hypothesis of maximal correlation. The importance of factors and of composition rules is evaluated on the basis of correlation between rank vectors, number of classes and number of clubs in tail classes. Data from five years of the Brazilian Soccer Championship are analyzed.

  14. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics of activated carbons produced from coals of different ranks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, B; Lin, Chin-Jung; Davaajav, Y; Ariunaa, A; Batbileg, S; Avid, B; Jargalmaa, S; Huang, Yu; Liou, Sofia Ya-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) from six coals, ranging from low-rank lignite brown coal to high-rank stone coal, were utilized as adsorbents to remove basic methylene blue (MB) from an aqueous solution. The surface properties of the obtained ACs were characterized via thermal analysis, N2 isothermal sorption, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. As coal rank decreased, an increase in the heterogeneity of the pore structures and abundance of oxygen-containing functional groups increased MB coverage on its surface. The equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, and adsorption capacity of MB ranged from 51.8 to 344.8 mg g⁻¹. Good correlation coefficients were obtained using the intra-particle diffusion model, indicating that the adsorption of MB onto ACs is diffusion controlled. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient ranged from 0.61 × 10⁻¹⁰ to 7.1 × 10⁻¹⁰ m² s⁻¹, indicating that ACs from lower-rank coals have higher effective diffusivities. Among all the ACs obtained from selected coals, the AC from low-rank lignite brown coal was the most effective in removing MB from an aqueous solution.

  15. Diffusion-Tensor Imaging of Thigh Muscles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy Values With Fatty Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui Dian; Liang, Ying Yin; Xu, Ping; Ling, Jian; Chen, Ying Ming

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values with fatty infiltration in the thigh muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-one boys with DMD were recruited. The grade of fatty infiltration and the ADC and FA values of four thigh muscles (rectus femoris, semitendinosus, sartorius, and gracilis) were measured, and the FA and ADC values were compared with the grade of fatty infiltration. Twenty age-matched healthy boys were enrolled as the control group. The differences in the ADC and FA values of the thigh muscles between patients with DMD and the control group were compared. The patients with DMD showed lower FA values and higher ADC values in all measured muscles when compared with the control group. The FA and ADC values were correlated with the grade of fatty infiltration. For the rectus femoris muscle, r = -0.753 and p = 0.007 for FA, and r = 0.685 and p = 0.001 for ADC. For the semitendinosus muscle, r = -0.621 and p = 0.041 for FA, and r = 0.705 and p = 0.021 for ADC. For the sartorius muscle, r = -0.662 and p = 0.027 for FA, and r = 0.701 and p = 0.017 for ADC. For the gracilis muscle, r = -0.618 and p = 0.043 for FA, and r = 0.695 and p = 0.022 for ADC. Damage to the thigh muscles in patients with DMD can be detected by ADC and FA values using DTI. DTI can be used to assess the severity of the disease.

  16. On Page Rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.

    In this paper the concept of page rank for the world wide web is discussed. The possibility of describing the distribution of page rank by an exponential law is considered. It is shown that the concept is essentially equal to that of status score, a centrality measure discussed already in 1953 by

  17. On Rank and Nullity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    This note explains how Emil Artin's proof that row rank equals column rank for a matrix with entries in a field leads naturally to the formula for the nullity of a matrix and also to an algorithm for solving any system of linear equations in any number of variables. This material could be used in any course on matrix theory or linear algebra.

  18. Hitting the Rankings Jackpot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Samford University was ranked 27th in the nation in a report released by "Forbes" magazine. In this article, the author relates how the people working at Samford University were surprised at its ranking. Although Samford is the largest privately institution in Alabama, its distinguished academic achievements aren't even…

  19. Correlations between the Hall coefficient and the superconducting transport properties of oxygen-deficient YBa2Cu3O7-δ epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.C.; Christen, D.K.; Thompson, J.R.; Feenstra, R.; Zhu, S.; Lowndes, D.H.; Phillips, J.M.; Siegal, M.P.; Budai, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Strong correlations between the Hall coefficient R H , the transition temperature T c , and the critical current density J c were established in a series of epitaxial YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin films as a function of oxygen deficiency δ. Steady increases in R H with δ suggest that deoxygenation reduces the density of states which, according to BCS theory, should lead to corresponding decreases in T c . In contrast, two well-known plateaus occurring at 90 K and 60 K were observed in T c vs δ. Others have ascribed these plateaus to either electronic phenomena or phase separations. We find that in the 90-K plateau, the critical current density J c (δ,H=0) decreases with δ and extrapolates toward zero at the edge of the plateau, while the relative-field dependence of J c (δ,H) and the flux-creep pinning energies are independent of δ. These observations suggest that the phase-separation scenario occurs on the 90-K plateau. However, electronic origins cannot be ruled out at present due to difficulties in determining the equilibrium superconducting properties of oxygen-deficient YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ films

  20. Wayside Bearing Fault Diagnosis Based on Envelope Analysis Paved with Time-Domain Interpolation Resampling and Weighted-Correlation-Coefficient-Guided Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Envelope spectrum analysis is a simple, effective, and classic method for bearing fault identification. However, in the wayside acoustic health monitoring system, owing to the high relative moving speed between the railway vehicle and the wayside mounted microphone, the recorded signal is embedded with Doppler effect, which brings in shift and expansion of the bearing fault characteristic frequency (FCF. What is more, the background noise is relatively heavy, which makes it difficult to identify the FCF. To solve the two problems, this study introduces solutions for the wayside acoustic fault diagnosis of train bearing based on Doppler effect reduction using the improved time-domain interpolation resampling (TIR method and diagnosis-relevant information enhancement using Weighted-Correlation-Coefficient-Guided Stochastic Resonance (WCCSR method. First, the traditional TIR method is improved by incorporating the original method with kinematic parameter estimation based on time-frequency analysis and curve fitting. Based on the estimated parameters, the Doppler effect is removed using the TIR easily. Second, WCCSR is employed to enhance the diagnosis-relevant period signal component in the obtained Doppler-free signal. Finally, paved with the above two procedures, the local fault is identified using envelope spectrum analysis. Simulated and experimental cases have verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Tutorial on use of intraclass correlation coefficients for assessing intertest reliability and its application in functional near-infrared spectroscopy-based brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zeng, Li; Lin, Zi-Jing; Cazzell, Mary; Liu, Hanli

    2015-05-01

    Test-retest reliability of neuroimaging measurements is an important concern in the investigation of cognitive functions in the human brain. To date, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), originally used in interrater reliability studies in behavioral sciences, have become commonly used metrics in reliability studies on neuroimaging and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). However, as there are six popular forms of ICC, the adequateness of the comprehensive understanding of ICCs will affect how one may appropriately select, use, and interpret ICCs toward a reliability study. We first offer a brief review and tutorial on the statistical rationale of ICCs, including their underlying analysis of variance models and technical definitions, in the context of assessment on intertest reliability. Second, we provide general guidelines on the selection and interpretation of ICCs. Third, we illustrate the proposed approach by using an actual research study to assess interest reliability of fNIRS-based, volumetric diffuse optical tomography of brain activities stimulated by a risk decision-making protocol. Last, special issues that may arise in reliability assessment using ICCs are discussed and solutions are suggested.

  2. Tutorial on use of intraclass correlation coefficients for assessing intertest reliability and its application in functional near-infrared spectroscopy-based brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zeng, Li; Lin, Zi-Jing; Cazzell, Mary; Liu, Hanli

    2015-05-01

    Test-retest reliability of neuroimaging measurements is an important concern in the investigation of cognitive functions in the human brain. To date, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), originally used in inter-rater reliability studies in behavioral sciences, have become commonly used metrics in reliability studies on neuroimaging and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). However, as there are six popular forms of ICC, the adequateness of the comprehensive understanding of ICCs will affect how one may appropriately select, use, and interpret ICCs toward a reliability study. We first offer a brief review and tutorial on the statistical rationale of ICCs, including their underlying analysis of variance models and technical definitions, in the context of assessment on intertest reliability. Second, we provide general guidelines on the selection and interpretation of ICCs. Third, we illustrate the proposed approach by using an actual research study to assess intertest reliability of fNIRS-based, volumetric diffuse optical tomography of brain activities stimulated by a risk decision-making protocol. Last, special issues that may arise in reliability assessment using ICCs are discussed and solutions are suggested.

  3. The relationship between multilevel models and non-parametric multilevel mixture models: Discrete approximation of intraclass correlation, random coefficient distributions, and residual heteroscedasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rights, Jason D; Sterba, Sonya K

    2016-11-01

    Multilevel data structures are common in the social sciences. Often, such nested data are analysed with multilevel models (MLMs) in which heterogeneity between clusters is modelled by continuously distributed random intercepts and/or slopes. Alternatively, the non-parametric multilevel regression mixture model (NPMM) can accommodate the same nested data structures through discrete latent class variation. The purpose of this article is to delineate analytic relationships between NPMM and MLM parameters that are useful for understanding the indirect interpretation of the NPMM as a non-parametric approximation of the MLM, with relaxed distributional assumptions. We define how seven standard and non-standard MLM specifications can be indirectly approximated by particular NPMM specifications. We provide formulas showing how the NPMM can serve as an approximation of the MLM in terms of intraclass correlation, random coefficient means and (co)variances, heteroscedasticity of residuals at level 1, and heteroscedasticity of residuals at level 2. Further, we discuss how these relationships can be useful in practice. The specific relationships are illustrated with simulated graphical demonstrations, and direct and indirect interpretations of NPMM classes are contrasted. We provide an R function to aid in implementing and visualizing an indirect interpretation of NPMM classes. An empirical example is presented and future directions are discussed. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  4. A Ranking Approach to Genomic Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Mathieu; Onogi, Akio; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Ueda, Naonori

    2015-01-01

    Genomic selection (GS) is a recent selective breeding method which uses predictive models based on whole-genome molecular markers. Until now, existing studies formulated GS as the problem of modeling an individual's breeding value for a particular trait of interest, i.e., as a regression problem. To assess predictive accuracy of the model, the Pearson correlation between observed and predicted trait values was used. In this paper, we propose to formulate GS as the problem of ranking individuals according to their breeding value. Our proposed framework allows us to employ machine learning methods for ranking which had previously not been considered in the GS literature. To assess ranking accuracy of a model, we introduce a new measure originating from the information retrieval literature called normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG). NDCG rewards more strongly models which assign a high rank to individuals with high breeding value. Therefore, NDCG reflects a prerequisite objective in selective breeding: accurate selection of individuals with high breeding value. We conducted a comparison of 10 existing regression methods and 3 new ranking methods on 6 datasets, consisting of 4 plant species and 25 traits. Our experimental results suggest that tree-based ensemble methods including McRank, Random Forests and Gradient Boosting Regression Trees achieve excellent ranking accuracy. RKHS regression and RankSVM also achieve good accuracy when used with an RBF kernel. Traditional regression methods such as Bayesian lasso, wBSR and BayesC were found less suitable for ranking. Pearson correlation was found to correlate poorly with NDCG. Our study suggests two important messages. First, ranking methods are a promising research direction in GS. Second, NDCG can be a useful evaluation measure for GS.

  5. Measurement of Activity Coefficients of Solvents in Poly ( ethylene oxide ) Using Gas-Chromatographic Method and Correlation by Polymer-ASOG; Poriechirenokishido chu no yobai katsuryo keisu no gasukuromatogurafu ho ni yoru sokutei to Polymer-ASOG ni yoru sokan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochigi, K.; Kurita, S.; Ohashi, M. [Yuki Gosei Kogyo Co. LTd., (Japan); Kojima, K. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Industrial Chemistry

    1997-09-01

    Infinite dilution activity coefficients (353.15-393.15 K) of six solvents (benzene, toluene, p-xylene, cyclohexane, acetone and methylethylketone) and activity coefficient at finite concentrations (353.15 K, 373.15 K) of these solvents in poly (ethylene oxide) are measured using gas-chromatographic method. The experimental data are then correlated by a polymer-ASOG model. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The role of growth form and correlated traits in competitive ranking of six perennial ruderal plant species grown in unbalanced mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Hansjörg; Steinlein, Thomas; Ullmann, Isolde

    1998-02-01

    The competitive abilities of six perennial ruderal plants of three different growth forms were compared via yield measures using an additive diallel experimental design with unbalanced mixtures (9:3 or 3:9 plants per pot, respectively). Thus, in a given mixture species A was grown in two configurations: three individuals in centre position of the pot together with nine plants of species B in border position and vice versa. Effect competitive abilities as well as response competitive abilities of the species were significantly related to canopy height and plant biomass. The species with lower rosette growth form and smaller biomasses were weaker competitors than the species possessing elevated canopies along with higher biomasses, whereas total leaf area was not significantly correlated with competitive ability between species. Species differences in competitive ability were stronger between the plants grown in the central position than between those grown in the border position. Furthermore, interactions between species-specific traits and configuration could be observed, indicating the importance of species proportions and arrangement patterns for evaluation of competitive outcome in the field. The degree of complete transitivity of the competitive network of the six ruderal species, which was significantly higher than expected under the null model in our experimental design, also seemed to depend on species proportions in mixture. Shifts in root:shoot ratio of the centre plants when faced with competition by the border plants were in the direction of higher shoot allocation for the weak competitors with rosette growth form irrespective of the neighbour species, except for Bunias orientalis, which showed a more plastic response. The stronger competitors showed higher root allocation ( Urtica dioica) or were hardly affected at all. Consistent with the results of our experiment, the weaker competitors occur at rather frequently disturbed and therefore transient

  7. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  8. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram metrics correlate with survival in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: a report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussaint, Tina Young; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Ricci, Kelsey I.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Kocak, Mehmet; Kun, Larry E.; Boyett, James M.; Pollack, Ian F.; Fouladi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is associated with poor survival regardless of therapy. We used volumetric apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics to determine associations with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at baseline and after radiation therapy (RT). Methods Baseline and post-RT quantitative ADC histograms were generated from fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and enhancement regions of interest. Metrics assessed included number of peaks (ie, unimodal or bimodal), mean and median ADC, standard deviation, mode, skewness, and kurtosis. Results Based on FLAIR images, the majority of tumors had unimodal peaks with significantly shorter average survival. Pre-RT FLAIR mean, mode, and median values were significantly associated with decreased risk of progression; higher pre-RT ADC values had longer PFS on average. Pre-RT FLAIR skewness and standard deviation were significantly associated with increased risk of progression; higher pre-RT FLAIR skewness and standard deviation had shorter PFS. Nonenhancing tumors at baseline showed higher ADC FLAIR mean values, lower kurtosis, and higher PFS. For enhancing tumors at baseline, bimodal enhancement histograms had much worse PFS and OS than unimodal cases and significantly lower mean peak values. Enhancement in tumors only after RT led to significantly shorter PFS and OS than in patients with baseline or no baseline enhancement. Conclusions ADC histogram metrics in DIPG demonstrate significant correlations between diffusion metrics and survival, with lower diffusion values (increased cellularity), increased skewness, and enhancement associated with shorter survival, requiring future investigations in large DIPG clinical trials. PMID:26487690

  9. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakashima, Torahiko; Nishikawa, Kei; Honda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  10. Degree-Day Prediction Models for the Flight Phenology of Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Assessed with the Concordance Correlation Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, A A; Moon, R D; Wright, R J; Hunt, T E; Hutchison, W D

    2015-08-01

    Western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a native, univoltine pest of corn and dry beans in North America. The current degree-day model for predicting a specified percentage of yearly moth flight involves heat unit accumulation above 10°C after 1 May. However, because the moth's observed range has expanded into the northern and eastern United States, there is concern that suitable temperatures before May could allow for significant S. albicosta development. Daily blacklight moth catch and temperature data from four Nebraska locations were used to construct degree-day models using simple or sine-wave methods, starting dates between 1 January and 1 May, and lower (-5 to 15°C) and upper (20 to 43.3°C) developmental thresholds. Predicted dates of flight from these models were compared with observed flight dates using independent datasets to assess model performance. Model performance was assessed with the concordance correlation coefficient to concurrently evaluate precision and accuracy. The best model for predicting timing of S. albicosta flight used simple degree-day calculations beginning on 1 March, a 3.3°C (38°F) lower threshold, and a 23.9°C (75°F) upper threshold. The revised cumulative flight model indicated field scouting to estimate moth egg density at the time of 25% flight should begin when 1,432 degree-days (2,577 degree-days °F) have accumulated. These results underscore the importance of assessing multiple parameters in phenological models and utilizing appropriate assessment methods, which in this case may allow for improved timing of field scouting for S. albicosta. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Concordance-based Kendall's Correlation for Computationally-Light vs. Computationally-Heavy Centrality Metrics: Lower Bound for Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We identify three different levels of correlation (pair-wise relative ordering, network-wide ranking and linear regression that could be assessed between a computationally-light centrality metric and a computationally-heavy centrality metric for real-world networks. The Kendall's concordance-based correlation measure could be used to quantitatively assess how well we could consider the relative ordering of two vertices vi and vj with respect to a computationally-light centrality metric as the relative ordering of the same two vertices with respect to a computationally-heavy centrality metric. We hypothesize that the pair-wise relative ordering (concordance-based assessment of the correlation between centrality metrics is the most strictest of all the three levels of correlation and claim that the Kendall's concordance-based correlation coefficient will be lower than the correlation coefficient observed with the more relaxed levels of correlation measures (linear regression-based Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient and the network wide ranking-based Spearman's correlation coefficient. We validate our hypothesis by evaluating the three correlation coefficients between two sets of centrality metrics: the computationally-light degree and local clustering coefficient complement-based degree centrality metrics and the computationally-heavy eigenvector centrality, betweenness centrality and closeness centrality metrics for a diverse collection of 50 real-world networks.

  12. Citation ranking versus peer evaluation of senior faculty research performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meho, Lokman I.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between citation ranking and peer evaluation in assessing senior faculty research performance. Other studies typically derive their peer evaluation data directly from referees, often in the form of ranking. This study uses two additional...... indicator of research performance of senior faculty members? Citation data, book reviews, and peer ranking were compiled and examined for faculty members specializing in Kurdish studies. Analysis shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis data yield identical ranking results....... Analysis also shows that normalized citation ranking and citation content analysis, book reviews, and peer ranking perform similarly (i.e., are highly correlated) for high-ranked and low-ranked senior scholars. Additional evaluation methods and measures that take into account the context and content...

  13. PageRank as a method to rank biomedical literature by importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Elliot J; Dixon, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    Optimal ranking of literature importance is vital in overcoming article overload. Existing ranking methods are typically based on raw citation counts, giving a sum of 'inbound' links with no consideration of citation importance. PageRank, an algorithm originally developed for ranking webpages at the search engine, Google, could potentially be adapted to bibliometrics to quantify the relative importance weightings of a citation network. This article seeks to validate such an approach on the freely available, PubMed Central open access subset (PMC-OAS) of biomedical literature. On-demand cloud computing infrastructure was used to extract a citation network from over 600,000 full-text PMC-OAS articles. PageRanks and citation counts were calculated for each node in this network. PageRank is highly correlated with citation count (R = 0.905, P PageRank can be trivially computed on commodity cluster hardware and is linearly correlated with citation count. Given its putative benefits in quantifying relative importance, we suggest it may enrich the citation network, thereby overcoming the existing inadequacy of citation counts alone. We thus suggest PageRank as a feasible supplement to, or replacement of, existing bibliometric ranking methods.

  14. Ranking as parameter estimation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kárný, Miroslav; Guy, Tatiana Valentine

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2009), s. 142-158 ISSN 1745-7645 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2C06001; GA AV ČR 1ET100750401; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : ranking * Bayesian estimation * negotiation * modelling Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/karny- ranking as parameter estimation.pdf

  15. Hierarchical partial order ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritisation of polluted sites is given. - Hierarchical partial order ranking of polluted sites has been developed for prioritization based on a large number of parameters

  16. Third-rank chromatic aberrations of electron lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhixiong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients of round electron lenses are analytically derived and numerically calculated by Mathematica. Furthermore, the numerical results are cross-checked by the differential algebraic (DA) method, which verifies that all the formulas for the third-rank chromatic aberration coefficients are completely correct. It is hoped that this work would be helpful for further chromatic aberration correction in electron microscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiplex PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  18. Multiplex PageRank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Halu

    Full Text Available Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation.

  19. Functional Multiplex PageRank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Rahmede, Christoph; Arenas, Alex; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-10-01

    Recently it has been recognized that many complex social, technological and biological networks have a multilayer nature and can be described by multiplex networks. Multiplex networks are formed by a set of nodes connected by links having different connotations forming the different layers of the multiplex. Characterizing the centrality of the nodes in a multiplex network is a challenging task since the centrality of the node naturally depends on the importance associated to links of a certain type. Here we propose to assign to each node of a multiplex network a centrality called Functional Multiplex PageRank that is a function of the weights given to every different pattern of connections (multilinks) existent in the multiplex network between any two nodes. Since multilinks distinguish all the possible ways in which the links in different layers can overlap, the Functional Multiplex PageRank can describe important non-linear effects when large relevance or small relevance is assigned to multilinks with overlap. Here we apply the Functional Page Rank to the multiplex airport networks, to the neuronal network of the nematode C. elegans, and to social collaboration and citation networks between scientists. This analysis reveals important differences existing between the most central nodes of these networks, and the correlations between their so-called pattern to success.

  20. Tables of the 3-j, 6-j, Fsub(k)-, Asub(k)-, Rsub(k)-, and Asub(kk)-coefficients for angular correlation measurements involving half integer spins up to 15/2 and transitions up to L = 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, H.H.; Kardon, B.; Seyfarth, H.

    1975-07-01

    Theoretical directional correlation coefficiencts are given as 3-j, 6-j, Fsub(k), Asub(k), Rsub(k) and Asub(kk) coefficients for half integer spins up to 15/2 and for transitions up to L = 3. (WL) [de

  1. Using the value of Lin's concordance correlation coefficient as a criterion for efficient estimation of areas of leaves of eelgrass from noisy digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echavarría-Heras, Héctor; Leal-Ramírez, Cecilia; Villa-Diharce, Enrique; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Eelgrass is a cosmopolitan seagrass species that provides important ecological services in coastal and near-shore environments. Despite its relevance, loss of eelgrass habitats is noted worldwide. Restoration by replanting plays an important role, and accurate measurements of the standing crop and productivity of transplants are important for evaluating restoration of the ecological functions of natural populations. Traditional assessments are destructive, and although they do not harm natural populations, in transplants the destruction of shoots might cause undesirable alterations. Non-destructive assessments of the aforementioned variables are obtained through allometric proxies expressed in terms of measurements of the lengths or areas of leaves. Digital imagery could produce measurements of leaf attributes without the removal of shoots, but sediment attachments, damage infringed by drag forces or humidity contents induce noise-effects, reducing precision. Available techniques for dealing with noise caused by humidity contents on leaves use the concepts of adjacency, vicinity, connectivity and tolerance of similarity between pixels. Selection of an interval of tolerance of similarity for efficient measurements requires extended computational routines with tied statistical inferences making concomitant tasks complicated and time consuming. The present approach proposes a simplified and cost-effective alternative, and also a general tool aimed to deal with any sort of noise modifying eelgrass leaves images. Moreover, this selection criterion relies only on a single statistics; the calculation of the maximum value of the Concordance Correlation Coefficient for reproducibility of observed areas of leaves through proxies obtained from digital images. Available data reveals that the present method delivers simplified, consistent estimations of areas of eelgrass leaves taken from noisy digital images. Moreover, the proposed procedure is robust because both the optimal

  2. Groundwater contaminant plume ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    Containment plumes at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites were ranked to assist in Subpart B (i.e., restoration requirements of 40 CFR Part 192) compliance strategies for each site, to prioritize aquifer restoration, and to budget future requests and allocations. The rankings roughly estimate hazards to the environment and human health, and thus assist in determining for which sites cleanup, if appropriate, will provide the greatest benefits for funds available. The rankings are based on the scores that were obtained using the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Modified Hazard Ranking System (MHRS). The MHRS and HRS consider and score three hazard modes for a site: migration, fire and explosion, and direct contact. The migration hazard mode score reflects the potential for harm to humans or the environment from migration of a hazardous substance off a site by groundwater, surface water, and air; it is a composite of separate scores for each of these routes. For ranking the containment plumes at UMTRA Project sites, it was assumed that each site had been remediated in compliance with the EPA standards and that relict contaminant plumes were present. Therefore, only the groundwater route was scored, and the surface water and air routes were not considered. Section 2.0 of this document describes the assumptions and procedures used to score the groundwater route, and Section 3.0 provides the resulting scores for each site. 40 tabs

  3. Multi-Label Classification Based on Low Rank Representation for Image Annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyu Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Annotating remote sensing images is a challenging task for its labor demanding annotation process and requirement of expert knowledge, especially when images can be annotated with multiple semantic concepts (or labels. To automatically annotate these multi-label images, we introduce an approach called Multi-Label Classification based on Low Rank Representation (MLC-LRR. MLC-LRR firstly utilizes low rank representation in the feature space of images to compute the low rank constrained coefficient matrix, then it adapts the coefficient matrix to define a feature-based graph and to capture the global relationships between images. Next, it utilizes low rank representation in the label space of labeled images to construct a semantic graph. Finally, these two graphs are exploited to train a graph-based multi-label classifier. To validate the performance of MLC-LRR against other related graph-based multi-label methods in annotating images, we conduct experiments on a public available multi-label remote sensing images (Land Cover. We perform additional experiments on five real-world multi-label image datasets to further investigate the performance of MLC-LRR. Empirical study demonstrates that MLC-LRR achieves better performance on annotating images than these comparing methods across various evaluation criteria; it also can effectively exploit global structure and label correlations of multi-label images.

  4. Ranking economic history journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    This study ranks-for the first time-12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We also...... compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential for economic...... history, and that, although economic history is quite independent from economics as a whole, knowledge exchange between the two fields is indeed going on....

  5. Ranking Economic History Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study ranks - for the first time - 12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We...... also compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential...... for economic history, and that, although economic history is quite independent from economics as a whole, knowledge exchange between the two fields is indeed going on....

  6. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  7. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf

    2015-03-23

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective: The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods: We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results: There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions: ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  8. Ranking adverse drug reactions with crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-03-23

    There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  9. Physiological Background of Differences in Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Between Acute Malignant and Benign Vertebral Body Fractures: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient With Quantitative Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using the 2-Compartment Exchange Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Biffar, Andreas; Schmidt, Gerwin; Sourbron, Steven; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vertebral bone marrow of benign and malignant fractures is related to the volume of the interstitial space, determined with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with acute benign (n = 24) and malignant (n = 19) vertebral body fractures were examined at 1.5 T. A diffusion-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (b = 100 to 600 s/mm) and DCE turbo-FLASH sequence were evaluated. Regions of interest were manually selected for each fracture. Apparent diffusion coefficient was determined with a monoexponential decay model. The DCE magnetic resonance imaging concentration-time curves were analyzed using a 2-compartment tracer-kinetic model. Apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant positive correlation with interstitial volume in the whole study population (Pearson r = 0.66, P correlation between ADC and the permeability-surface area product could be observed when analyzing the whole study population (Spearman rs = 0.40, P = 0.008), but not when separately examining the subgroups. Plasma flow showed a significant correlation with ADC in benign fractures (Pearson r = 0.23, P = 0.03). Plasma volume did not show significant correlations with ADC. The results support the hypothesis that the ADC of a lesion is inversely correlated to its cellularity. This explains previous observations that ADC is reduced in more malignant lesions.

  10. PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

    2001-10-01

    Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

  11. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. College Rankings. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Tamara

    The popularity of college ranking surveys published by "U.S. News and World Report" and other magazines is indisputable, but the methodologies used to measure the quality of higher education institutions have come under fire by scholars and college officials. Criticisms have focused on methodological flaws, such as failure to consider…

  13. OutRank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Steinhausen, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Outlier detection is an important data mining task for consistency checks, fraud detection, etc. Binary decision making on whether or not an object is an outlier is not appropriate in many applications and moreover hard to parametrize. Thus, recently, methods for outlier ranking have been proposed...

  14. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heethal Jaiprakash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors’ performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group’s tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group’s tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors’ performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors’ scores in group 1 was 0.099 (p<0.001 and for group 2 was 0.305 (p<0.001. The higher correlation coefficient in the group where tutors received the PBL training reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  15. Improving Ranking Using Quantum Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Melucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows that ranking information units by quantum probability differs from ranking them by classical probability provided the same data used for parameter estimation. As probability of detection (also known as recall or power) and probability of false alarm (also known as fallout or size) measure the quality of ranking, we point out and show that ranking by quantum probability yields higher probability of detection than ranking by classical probability provided a given probability of ...

  16. Estimation of soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of radiostrontium using soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Nao K; Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko

    2009-02-01

    We propose a new approach for estimation of soil-soil solution distribution coefficient (K(d)) of radiostrontium using some selected soil properties. We used 142 Japanese agricultural soil samples (35 Andosol, 25 Cambisol, 77 Fluvisol, and 5 others) for which Sr-K(d) values had been determined by a batch sorption test and listed in our database. Spearman's rank correlation test was carried out to investigate correlations between Sr-K(d) values and soil properties. Electrical conductivity and water soluble Ca had good correlations with Sr-K(d) values for all soil groups. Then, we found a high correlation between the ratio of exchangeable Ca to Ca concentration in water soluble fraction and Sr-K(d) values with correlation coefficient R=0.72. This pointed us toward a relatively easy way to estimate Sr-K(d) values.

  17. Composite multi-parameter ranking of real and virtual compounds for design of MC4R agonists: renaissance of the Free-Wilson methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ingemar; Polla, Magnus O

    2012-10-01

    Drug design is a multi-parameter task present in the analysis of experimental data for synthesized compounds and in the prediction of new compounds with desired properties. This article describes the implementation of a binned scoring and composite ranking scheme for 11 experimental parameters that were identified as key drivers in the MC4R project. The composite ranking scheme was implemented in an AstraZeneca tool for analysis of project data, thereby providing an immediate re-ranking as new experimental data was added. The automated ranking also highlighted compounds overlooked by the project team. The successful implementation of a composite ranking on experimental data led to the development of an equivalent virtual score, which was based on Free-Wilson models of the parameters from the experimental ranking. The individual Free-Wilson models showed good to high predictive power with a correlation coefficient between 0.45 and 0.97 based on the external test set. The virtual ranking adds value to the selection of compounds for synthesis but error propagation must be controlled. The experimental ranking approach adds significant value, is parameter independent and can be tuned and applied to any drug discovery project.

  18. Limiting partition coefficients of solutes in biphasic trihexyltetradecylphosphonium chloride ionic liquid-supercritical CO2 system: measurement and LSER-based correlation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Planeta, Josef; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 26 (2007), s. 7620-7625 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400310504; GA ČR GA203/05/2106; GA ČR GA203/07/0886 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : phosphonium ionic liquid * supercritical carbon dioxide * solute partition coefficient Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.086, year: 2007

  19. 1991 Acceptance priority ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High- Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR Part 961) that the Department of Energy (DOE) has executed with the owners and generators of civilian spent nuclear fuel requires annual publication of the Acceptance Priority Ranking (APR). The 1991 APR details the order in which DOE will allocate Federal waste acceptance capacity. As required by the Standard Contract, the ranking is based on the age of permanently discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), with the owners of the oldest SNF, on an industry-wide basis, given the highest priority. the 1991 APR will be the basis for the annual allocation of waste acceptance capacity to the Purchasers in the 1991 Annual Capacity Report (ACR), to be issued later this year. This document is based on SNF discharges as of December 31, 1990, and reflects Purchaser comments and corrections, as appropriate, to the draft APR issued on May 15, 1991

  20. 40 CFR Figure C-4 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM10−2.5 Class II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Minimum Limits for Correlation Coefficient for PM2.5 and PM10â2.5 Class II and III Methods C Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-4 Figure C-4 to Subpart C of Part 53—Illustration...

  1. Tail-weighted dependence measures with limit being the tail dependence coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, David

    2017-12-02

    For bivariate continuous data, measures of monotonic dependence are based on the rank transformations of the two variables. For bivariate extreme value copulas, there is a family of estimators (Formula presented.), for (Formula presented.), of the extremal coefficient, based on a transform of the absolute difference of the α power of the ranks. In the case of general bivariate copulas, we obtain the probability limit (Formula presented.) of (Formula presented.) as the sample size goes to infinity and show that (i) (Formula presented.) for (Formula presented.) is a measure of central dependence with properties similar to Kendall\\'s tau and Spearman\\'s rank correlation, (ii) (Formula presented.) is a tail-weighted dependence measure for large α, and (iii) the limit as (Formula presented.) is the upper tail dependence coefficient. We obtain asymptotic properties for the rank-based measure (Formula presented.) and estimate tail dependence coefficients through extrapolation on (Formula presented.). A data example illustrates the use of the new dependence measures for tail inference.

  2. Tail-weighted dependence measures with limit being the tail dependence coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, David; Joe, Harry; Krupskii, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    For bivariate continuous data, measures of monotonic dependence are based on the rank transformations of the two variables. For bivariate extreme value copulas, there is a family of estimators (Formula presented.), for (Formula presented.), of the extremal coefficient, based on a transform of the absolute difference of the α power of the ranks. In the case of general bivariate copulas, we obtain the probability limit (Formula presented.) of (Formula presented.) as the sample size goes to infinity and show that (i) (Formula presented.) for (Formula presented.) is a measure of central dependence with properties similar to Kendall's tau and Spearman's rank correlation, (ii) (Formula presented.) is a tail-weighted dependence measure for large α, and (iii) the limit as (Formula presented.) is the upper tail dependence coefficient. We obtain asymptotic properties for the rank-based measure (Formula presented.) and estimate tail dependence coefficients through extrapolation on (Formula presented.). A data example illustrates the use of the new dependence measures for tail inference.

  3. Increased correlation coefficient between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores after training of tutors for assessment of medical students during problem-based learning course in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiprakash, Heethal; Min, Aung Ko Ko; Ghosh, Sarmishtha

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at finding if there was a change of correlation between the written test score and tutors' performance test scores in the assessment of medical students during a problem-based learning (PBL) course in Malaysia. This is a cross-sectional observational study, conducted among 264 medical students in two groups from November 2010 to November 2012. The first group's tutors did not receive tutor training; while the second group's tutors were trained in the PBL process. Each group was divided into high, middle and low achievers based on their end-of-semester exam scores. PBL scores were taken which included written test scores and tutors' performance test scores. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the two kinds of scores in each group. The correlation coefficient between the written scores and tutors' scores in group 1 was 0.099 (pcorrelation coefficient in the group where tutors received the PBL training reinforces the importance of tutor training before their participation in the PBL course.

  4. Global network centrality of university rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisi; Del Vecchio, Marco; Pogrebna, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    Universities and higher education institutions form an integral part of the national infrastructure and prestige. As academic research benefits increasingly from international exchange and cooperation, many universities have increased investment in improving and enabling their global connectivity. Yet, the relationship of university performance and its global physical connectedness has not been explored in detail. We conduct, to our knowledge, the first large-scale data-driven analysis into whether there is a correlation between university relative ranking performance and its global connectivity via the air transport network. The results show that local access to global hubs (as measured by air transport network betweenness) strongly and positively correlates with the ranking growth (statistical significance in different models ranges between 5% and 1% level). We also found that the local airport's aggregate flight paths (degree) and capacity (weighted degree) has no effect on university ranking, further showing that global connectivity distance is more important than the capacity of flight connections. We also examined the effect of local city economic development as a confounding variable and no effect was observed suggesting that access to global transportation hubs outweighs economic performance as a determinant of university ranking. The impact of this research is that we have determined the importance of the centrality of global connectivity and, hence, established initial evidence for further exploring potential connections between university ranking and regional investment policies on improving global connectivity.

  5. Diversity rankings among bacterial lineages in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2009-03-01

    We used rarefaction curve analysis and diversity ordering-based approaches to rank the 11 most frequently encountered bacterial lineages in soil according to diversity in 5 previously reported 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from agricultural, undisturbed tall grass prairie and forest soils (n=26,140, 28 328, 31 818, 13 001 and 53 533). The Planctomycetes, Firmicutes and the delta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the most diverse lineages in all data sets, whereas the Verrucomicrobia, Gemmatimonadetes and beta-Proteobacteria were consistently ranked among the least diverse. On the other hand, the rankings of alpha-Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi varied widely in different soil clone libraries. In general, lineages exhibiting largest differences in diversity rankings also exhibited the largest difference in relative abundance in the data sets examined. Within these lineages, a positive correlation between relative abundance and diversity was observed within the Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi, and a negative diversity-abundance correlation was observed within the Bacteroidetes. The ecological and evolutionary implications of these results are discussed.

  6. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  7. Predicting cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge using MOSCED and the SMD solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Sebastian; Bozada, Samantha M.; Phifer, Jeremy R.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2016-11-01

    We present blind predictions using the solubility parameter based method MOSCED submitted for the SAMPL5 challenge on calculating cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients at 298 K. Reference data to parameterize MOSCED was generated with knowledge only of chemical structure by performing solvation free energy calculations using electronic structure calculations in the SMD continuum solvent. To maintain simplicity and use only a single method, we approximate the distribution coefficient with the partition coefficient of the neutral species. Over the final SAMPL5 set of 53 compounds, we achieved an average unsigned error of 2.2± 0.2 log units (ranking 15 out of 62 entries), the correlation coefficient ( R) was 0.6± 0.1 (ranking 35), and 72± 6 % of the predictions had the correct sign (ranking 30). While used here to predict cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients at 298 K, MOSCED is broadly applicable, allowing one to predict temperature dependent infinite dilution activity coefficients in any solvent for which parameters exist, and provides a means by which an excess Gibbs free energy model may be parameterized to predict composition dependent phase-equilibrium.

  8. Ranking Baltic States Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, using the h-index and the total number of citations, the best 10 Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian researchers from several disciplines are ranked. The list may be formed based on the h-index and the total number of citations, given in Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish Program and Google Scholar database. Data for the first 10 researchers are presented. Google Scholar is the most complete. Therefore, to define a single indicator, h-index calculated by Google Scholar may be a good and simple one. The author chooses the Google Scholar database as it is the broadest one.

  9. Fourth-rank cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrakchi, A.E.L.; Tapia, V.

    1992-05-01

    Some cosmological implications of the recently proposed fourth-rank theory of gravitation are studied. The model exhibits the possibility of being free from the horizon and flatness problems at the price of introducing a negative pressure. The field equations we obtain are compatible with k obs =0 and Ω obs t clas approx. 10 20 t Planck approx. 10 -23 s. When interpreted at the light of General Relativity the treatment is shown to be almost equivalent to that of the standard model of cosmology combined with the inflationary scenario. Hence, an interpretation of the negative pressure hypothesis is provided. (author). 8 refs

  10. University Rankings and Social Science

    OpenAIRE

    Marginson, S.

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real outputs are of no common value. It is necessary that rankings be soundly based in scientific terms if a virtuous relationship between performance and...

  11. Below-unitarity-threshold branch cut in the left angle anti q q right angle coefficient of the axial-vector two-current correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, V.; Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON; Murison, J.L.; Scadron, M.D.; Steele, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The dimension-3 quark-condensate component of the flavour-diagonal axial-vector two-current correlation function is evaluated to all orders in the quark mass m qk through use of the quark-condensate component of the nonperturbative fermion propagator. The result obtained is analytic in p 2 except for a branch cut for 0 2 qk ) 2 , corresponding to a branch cut occurring helow the anti qq kinematic threshold. The deep Euclidean region of the longitudinal component of this correlation function is utilized to obtain leading and subleading contributions to the QCD sum-rule relating m qk to . These same sum-rule results are obtained by means of an alternative derivation involving integration over the discontinuity in the correlation function along the branch cut, demonstrating the consistency of the physical-momentum-region branch cut with results obtained via standard means in the deep Euclidean region. (orig.)

  12. University Rankings and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  13. Impact factor, eigenfactor, article influence, scopus SNIP, and SCImage journal rank of occupational therapy journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Gutman, Sharon A

    2018-05-18

    Journals are currently assessed and ranked using a number of different quantitative performance metrics. To compare and correlate the publication metrics of English-language occupational therapy journals published in 2015. Bibliometric data was sourced for 14 English-language occupational therapy journals including the Journal Citations Report (JCR) 2-year impact factor (IF), Eigenfactor Score (EFS), Article Influence Score (AIS), Scopus Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP), Scopus Citescore, and SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) score. The JCR, Scopus, and SJR 2015 bibliometric data were correlated. The top six English-language occupational therapy journals in relation to JCR IF, EFS, AIS, SNIP, Citescore, SJR score, and SJR IIF were AJOT, AOTJ, POPT, CJOT, SJOT, and BJOT. JCR IF, EFS, JCR AIS, SNIP, Citescore, SJR score and SJR IIF were all significantly correlated with coefficients ranging from 0.751 to 0.961 (p article rankings rather than the singular use of IF scores that currently and frequently occurs in many jurisdictions.

  14. Source Determination of Red Gel Pen Inks using Raman Spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy combined with Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficients and Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Asri, Muhammad Naeim; Mat Desa, Wan Nur Syuhaila; Ismail, Dzulkiflee

    2018-01-01

    The potential combination of two nondestructive techniques, that is, Raman spectroscopy (RS) and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with Pearson's product moment correlation (PPMC) coefficient (r) and principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the actual source of red gel pen ink used to write a simulated threatening note, was examined. Eighteen (18) red gel pens purchased from Japan and Malaysia from November to December 2014 where one of the pens was used to write a simulated threatening note were analyzed using RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The spectra of all the red gel pen inks including the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note gathered from the RS and ATR-FTIR analyses were subjected to PPMC coefficient (r) calculation and principal component analysis (PCA). The coefficients r = 0.9985 and r = 0.9912 for pairwise combination of RS and ATR-FTIR spectra respectively and similarities in terms of PC1 and PC2 scores of one of the inks to the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note substantiated the feasibility of combining RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with PPMC coefficient (r) and PCA for successful source determination of red gel pen inks. The development of pigment spectral library had allowed the ink deposited on the threatening note to be identified as XSL Poppy Red (CI Pigment Red 112). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Coefficients of Correlation of IQ's on the WAIS-R with Standard Age Scores on the Stanford-Binet, 4th Edition for Previously Identified Mentally Handicapped Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John C.

    This paper presents a study regarding the correlation of the Stanford-Binet: 4th Edition Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ scores for the purpose of improving the identification process for educable mentally handicapped (EMH) school age adolescents and young adults. The sample included…

  16. Robust Visual Tracking via Online Discriminative and Low-Rank Dictionary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Liu, Fanghui; Bhaskar, Harish; Yang, Jie

    2017-09-12

    In this paper, we propose a novel and robust tracking framework based on online discriminative and low-rank dictionary learning. The primary aim of this paper is to obtain compact and low-rank dictionaries that can provide good discriminative representations of both target and background. We accomplish this by exploiting the recovery ability of low-rank matrices. That is if we assume that the data from the same class are linearly correlated, then the corresponding basis vectors learned from the training set of each class shall render the dictionary to become approximately low-rank. The proposed dictionary learning technique incorporates a reconstruction error that improves the reliability of classification. Also, a multiconstraint objective function is designed to enable active learning of a discriminative and robust dictionary. Further, an optimal solution is obtained by iteratively computing the dictionary, coefficients, and by simultaneously learning the classifier parameters. Finally, a simple yet effective likelihood function is implemented to estimate the optimal state of the target during tracking. Moreover, to make the dictionary adaptive to the variations of the target and background during tracking, an online update criterion is employed while learning the new dictionary. Experimental results on a publicly available benchmark dataset have demonstrated that the proposed tracking algorithm performs better than other state-of-the-art trackers.

  17. Correlating heat and mass transfer coefficients for thermosolutal convection within a porous annulus of a circular shape: case of internal pollutants spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragui, Karim; Boutra, Abdelkader; Bennacer, Rachid; Labsi, Nabila; Benkahla, Youb Khaled

    2018-02-01

    The main purpose of our investigation is to show the impact of pertinent parameters; such Lewis and porous thermal Rayleigh numbers as well as the buoyancy and the aspect ratios; on the double-diffusive convection phenomena which occur within a porous annulus; found between a cold (and less concentric) outer circular cylinder and a hot (and concentric) inner one, to come out with global correlations which predict the mean transfer rates in such annulus. To do so, the physical model for the momentum conservation equation is made using the Brinkman extension of the classical Darcy equation. The set of coupled equations is solved using the finite volume method and the SIMPLER algorithm. Summarizing the numerical predictions, global correlations of overall transfer within the porous annulus as a function of the governing studied parameters are set forth which predict within ±2% the numerical results. These correlations may count as a complement to previous researches done in the case a Newtonian-fluid annulus. It is to note that the validity of the computing code used was ascertained by comparing our results with the experimental data and numerical ones already available in the literature.

  18. Reconsidering the use of rankings in the valuation of health states: a model for estimating cardinal values from ordinal data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomon Joshua A

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In survey studies on health-state valuations, ordinal ranking exercises often are used as precursors to other elicitation methods such as the time trade-off (TTO or standard gamble, but the ranking data have not been used in deriving cardinal valuations. This study reconsiders the role of ordinal ranks in valuing health and introduces a new approach to estimate interval-scaled valuations based on aggregate ranking data. Methods Analyses were undertaken on data from a previously published general population survey study in the United Kingdom that included rankings and TTO values for hypothetical states described using the EQ-5D classification system. The EQ-5D includes five domains (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression with three possible levels on each. Rank data were analysed using a random utility model, operationalized through conditional logit regression. In the statistical model, probabilities of observed rankings were related to the latent utilities of different health states, modeled as a linear function of EQ-5D domain scores, as in previously reported EQ-5D valuation functions. Predicted valuations based on the conditional logit model were compared to observed TTO values for the 42 states in the study and to predictions based on a model estimated directly from the TTO values. Models were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC between predictions and mean observations, and the root mean squared error of predictions at the individual level. Results Agreement between predicted valuations from the rank model and observed TTO values was very high, with an ICC of 0.97, only marginally lower than for predictions based on the model estimated directly from TTO values (ICC = 0.99. Individual-level errors were also comparable in the two models, with root mean squared errors of 0.503 and 0.496 for the rank-based and TTO-based predictions, respectively. Conclusions

  19. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps for assessing thymic epithelial tumours: correlation with world health organization classification and clinical staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yue; Xu, Hai; Shi, Hai-Bin; Feng, Qing; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Yu, Tong-Fu

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the value of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) histogram analysis for assessing World Health Organization (WHO) pathological classification and Masaoka clinical stages of thymic epithelial tumours. 37 patients with histologically confirmed thymic epithelial tumours were enrolled. ADC measurements were performed using hot-spot ROI (ADC HS-ROI ) and histogram-based approach. ADC histogram parameters included mean ADC (ADC mean ), median ADC (ADC median ), 10 and 90 percentile of ADC (ADC 10 and ADC 90 ), kurtosis and skewness. One-way ANOVA, independent-sample t-test, and receiver operating characteristic were used for statistical analyses. There were significant differences in ADC mean , ADC median , ADC 10 , ADC 90 and ADC HS-ROI among low-risk thymoma (type A, AB, B1; n = 14), high-risk thymoma (type B2, B3; n = 9) and thymic carcinoma (type C, n = 14) groups (all p-values histogram analysis may assist in assessing the WHO pathological classification and Masaoka clinical stages of thymic epithelial tumours. Advances in knowledge: 1. ADC histogram analysis could help to assess WHO pathological classification of thymic epithelial tumours. 2. ADC histogram analysis could help to evaluate Masaoka clinical stages of thymic epithelial tumours. 3. ADC 10 might be a promising imaging biomarker for assessing and characterizing thymic epithelial tumours.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine in elite horseback riders: correlations with back pain, body mass index, trunk/leg-length coefficient, and riding discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Clayton N; Pennekamp, Peter H; Becker, Ute; Young, Mei; Diedrich, Oliver; Lüring, Christian; von Falkenhausen, Makus

    2009-11-01

    Most orthopaedic problems experienced by competitive horseback riders are related to pain in the lower back, hip joint, and hamstring muscles. Riders-especially, show jumpers-are frequently hampered in their performance because of lumbar pain. To date, there has been no research into lumbar disk degeneration in elite competitive riders. Competitive horseback riding accelerates lumbar disk degeneration. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty-eight elite riders (18 men, 40 women; mean age, 32.4 years) and a control group of 30 nonriding volunteers (17 men, 13 women; mean age, 28.7 years) were evaluated for lumbar disk degeneration, cross-sectional area of paraspinal muscles, spondylolysis, and spondylolisthesis, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of disk degeneration between the 2 groups was compared, and the relationship was investigated between low back pain (LBP), riding discipline, body mass index (BMI), trunk/leg-length coefficient, and MRI results. Eighty-eight percent of elite riders (n = 51) had a history of LBP, versus 33% of the controls (P back pain. Although riders have a high prevalence of LBP, there is no conclusive MRI evidence to suggest that the cause lies in undue disk degeneration, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, or pathologic changes of the paraspinal muscles of the lumbar spine.

  1. Fractional cointegration rank estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna; Velasco, Carlos

    the parameters of the model under the null hypothesis of the cointegration rank r = 1, 2, ..., p-1. This step provides consistent estimates of the cointegration degree, the cointegration vectors, the speed of adjustment to the equilibrium parameters and the common trends. In the second step we carry out a sup......-likelihood ratio test of no-cointegration on the estimated p - r common trends that are not cointegrated under the null. The cointegration degree is re-estimated in the second step to allow for new cointegration relationships with different memory. We augment the error correction model in the second step...... to control for stochastic trend estimation effects from the first step. The critical values of the tests proposed depend only on the number of common trends under the null, p - r, and on the interval of the cointegration degrees b allowed, but not on the true cointegration degree b0. Hence, no additional...

  2. Rankings, creatividad y urbanismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAQUÍN SABATÉ

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available La competencia entre ciudades constituye uno de los factores impulsores de procesos de renovación urbana y los rankings han devenido instrumentos de medida de la calidad de las ciudades. Nos detendremos en el caso de un antiguo barrio industrial hoy en vías de transformación en distrito "creativo" por medio de una intervención urbanística de gran escala. Su análisis nos descubre tres claves críticas. En primer lugar, nos obliga a plantearnos la definición de innovación urbana y cómo se integran el pasado, la identidad y la memoria en la construcción del futuro. Nos lleva a comprender que la innovación y el conocimiento no se "dan" casualmente, sino que son el fruto de una larga y compleja red en la que participan saberes, espacios, actores e instituciones diversas en naturaleza, escala y magnitud. Por último nos obliga a reflexionar sobre el valor que se le otorga a lo local en los procesos de renovación urbana.Competition among cities constitutes one ofthe main factors o furban renewal, and rankings have become instruments to indícate cities quality. Studying the transformation of an old industrial quarter into a "creative district" by the means ofa large scale urban project we highlight three main conclusions. First, itasks us to reconsider the notion ofurban innovation and hoto past, identity and memory should intégrate the future development. Second, it shows that innovation and knowledge doesn't yield per chance, but are the result ofa large and complex grid of diverse knowledges, spaces, agents and institutions. Finally itforces us to reflect about the valué attributed to the "local" in urban renewalprocesses.

  3. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  4. Lipidomics study of plasma phospholipid metabolism in early type 2 diabetes rats with ancient prescription Huang-Qi-San intervention by UPLC/Q-TOF-MS and correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Zhu, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Wei-Min; Rong, Xiang-Lu; Feng, Yi-Fan

    2016-08-25

    Potential impact of lipid research has been increasingly realized both in disease treatment and prevention. An effective metabolomics approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS) along with multivariate statistic analysis has been applied for investigating the dynamic change of plasma phospholipids compositions in early type 2 diabetic rats after the treatment of an ancient prescription of Chinese Medicine Huang-Qi-San. The exported UPLC/Q-TOF-MS data of plasma samples were subjected to SIMCA-P and processed by bioMark, mixOmics, Rcomdr packages with R software. A clear score plots of plasma sample groups, including normal control group (NC), model group (MC), positive medicine control group (Flu) and Huang-Qi-San group (HQS), were achieved by principal-components analysis (PCA), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Biomarkers were screened out using student T test, principal component regression (PCR), partial least-squares regression (PLS) and important variable method (variable influence on projection, VIP). Structures of metabolites were identified and metabolic pathways were deduced by correlation coefficient. The relationship between compounds was explained by the correlation coefficient diagram, and the metabolic differences between similar compounds were illustrated. Based on KEGG database, the biological significances of identified biomarkers were described. The correlation coefficient was firstly applied to identify the structure and deduce the metabolic pathways of phospholipids metabolites, and the study provided a new methodological cue for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of metabolites in the process of regulating Huang-Qi-San for treating early type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packalen, Mikko; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The ranking of scientific journals is important because of the signal it sends to scientists about what is considered most vital for scientific progress. Existing ranking systems focus on measuring the influence of a scientific paper (citations)-these rankings do not reward journals for publishing innovative work that builds on new ideas. We propose an alternative ranking based on the proclivity of journals to publish papers that build on new ideas, and we implement this ranking via a text-based analysis of all published biomedical papers dating back to 1946. In addition, we compare our neophilia ranking to citation-based (impact factor) rankings; this comparison shows that the two ranking approaches are distinct. Prior theoretical work suggests an active role for our neophilia index in science policy. Absent an explicit incentive to pursue novel science, scientists underinvest in innovative work because of a coordination problem: for work on a new idea to flourish, many scientists must decide to adopt it in their work. Rankings that are based purely on influence thus do not provide sufficient incentives for publishing innovative work. By contrast, adoption of the neophilia index as part of journal-ranking procedures by funding agencies and university administrators would provide an explicit incentive for journals to publish innovative work and thus help solve the coordination problem by increasing scientists' incentives to pursue innovative work.

  6. An experiment to measure lambda=G sub A /G sub V from a combination of angular correlation coefficients in the beta decay of polarized neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, I A; Serebrov, A P; Solovei, V A; Stepanenko, I V; Vasilev, A V; Mostovoy, Y A; Zimmer, O; Yerozolimsky, B G; Dewey, M S; Wietfeldt, F E

    2000-01-01

    A technique is described which allows us to measure the ratio lambda=G sub A /G sub V of the weak axial-vector and vector coupling constants in neutron decay without any measurement of the neutron beam polarization. lambda is determined from a combination of the parity-odd angular correlations sigma-> centre dot p-> sub e and sigma-> centre dot p-> subnu between the neutron spin sigma-> and the electron momentum p-> sub e and the anti-neutrino momentum p-> subnu, respectively, both of which are measured in a single experiment using the same neutron beam. A description of the experiment and the results of the first run at the cold neutron beam facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin are presented.

  7. Low-rank coal research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  8. Ranking Specific Sets of Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Jan; Woltran, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Ranking sets of objects based on an order between the single elements has been thoroughly studied in the literature. In particular, it has been shown that it is in general impossible to find a total ranking - jointly satisfying properties as dominance and independence - on the whole power set of objects. However, in many applications certain elements from the entire power set might not be required and can be neglected in the ranking process. For instance, certain sets might be ruled out due to hard constraints or are not satisfying some background theory. In this paper, we treat the computational problem whether an order on a given subset of the power set of elements satisfying different variants of dominance and independence can be found, given a ranking on the elements. We show that this problem is tractable for partial rankings and NP-complete for total rankings.

  9. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  10. Tensor models, Kronecker coefficients and permutation centralizer algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloun, Joseph Ben; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2017-11-01

    We show that the counting of observables and correlators for a 3-index tensor model are organized by the structure of a family of permutation centralizer algebras. These algebras are shown to be semi-simple and their Wedderburn-Artin decompositions into matrix blocks are given in terms of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients of symmetric groups. The matrix basis for the algebras also gives an orthogonal basis for the tensor observables which diagonalizes the Gaussian two-point functions. The centres of the algebras are associated with correlators which are expressible in terms of Kronecker coefficients (Clebsch-Gordan multiplicities of symmetric groups). The color-exchange symmetry present in the Gaussian model, as well as a large class of interacting models, is used to refine the description of the permutation centralizer algebras. This discussion is extended to a general number of colors d: it is used to prove the integrality of an infinite family of number sequences related to color-symmetrizations of colored graphs, and expressible in terms of symmetric group representation theory data. Generalizing a connection between matrix models and Belyi maps, correlators in Gaussian tensor models are interpreted in terms of covers of singular 2-complexes. There is an intriguing difference, between matrix and higher rank tensor models, in the computational complexity of superficially comparable correlators of observables parametrized by Young diagrams.

  11. Correlations for heat transfer coefficient and friction factor for turbulent flow of air through square and hexagonal ducts with twisted tape insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupesh J.; Kore, Sandeep S.; Joshi, Prathamesh S.

    2018-05-01

    The experimental and numerical Nusselt number and friction factor investigation for turbulent flow through a non-circular duct with twisted-tape inserts have been presented. The non-circular ducts include square, hexagonal duct. The results of non-circular ducts are compared with circular duct. All the ducts have same equivalent diameter. The twist ratios used for the experiment are Y = 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5. Experiments were carried out on square duct, hexagonal duct and circular duct. The Reynolds number lied between 10,000 and 1, 05,000. The present study is restricted to the flow of air at Pr = 0.7 only and within a narrow temperature range of 40 to 75 ΟC, within which the compressible nature of air can be neglected. The results reveal that, both Nusselt number and friction factor increases as the side of non-circular duct increases. Maximum Nusselt number and friction factor is obtained in case of circular duct with twisted tape. Further the correlations of Nu and f are given for different non circular duct with twisted tape insert for engineering applications for the turbulent regime. Since the thermal performance factor (η) is observed to be within the range of 0.8 to 1.13 for both circular and noncircular ducts, the overall benefit of using twisted tape in the flow field shall nevertheless be marginal.

  12. Diffusion weighted MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Does the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlate with tracer uptake (SUV)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regier, M.; Derlin, T.; Schwarz, D.; Laqmani, A.; Henes, F.O.; Groth, M.; Buhk, J.-H.; Kooijman, H.; Adam, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate the potential correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient assessed by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and glucose metabolism determined by the standardized uptake value (SUV) at 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT and DWI (TR/TE, 2000/66 ms; b-values, 0 and 500 s/mm 2 ) were performed in 41 consecutive patients with histologically verified NSCLC. Analysing the PET-CT data calculation of the mean (SUV mean ) and maximum (SUV max ) SUV was performed. By placing a region-of-interest (ROI) encovering the entire tumor mean (ADC mean ) and minimum ADC (ADC min ) were determined by two independent radiologists. Results of 18F-FDG PET-CT and DWI were compared on a per-patient basis. For statistical analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient, Bland–Altman and regression analysis were assessed. Results: Data analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation of the ADC min and SUV max (r = −0.46; p = 0.032). Testing the correlation of the ADC min and SUV max for each histological subtype separately revealed that the inverse correlation was good for both adenocarcinomas (r = −0.47; p = 0.03) and squamouscell carcinomas (r = −0.71; p = 0.002), respectively. No significant correlation was found for the comparison of ADC min and SUV mean (r = −0.29; p = 0.27), ADC mean vs. SUV mean (r = −0.28; p = 0.31) or ADC mean vs. SUV max (r = −0.33; p = 0.23). The κ-value of 0.88 indicated a good agreement between both observers. Conclusion: This preliminary study is the first to verify the relation between the SUV and the ADC in NSCLC. The significant inverse correlation of these two quantitative imaging approaches points out the association of metabolic activity and tumor cellularity. Therefore, DWI with ADC measurement might represent a new prognostic marker in NSCLC

  13. Polarization observable of the elastic vector-p vector-p scattering fort energies up to 2.5 GeV. Experimental determination of spin correlation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, F.

    2001-01-01

    EDDA is an internal experiment at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich. The detector is specialized for a detailed study of the elastic proton-proton-scattering and consists of two concentric scintillator hodoscopes of cylindrical symmetry, covering an angular range of 30 ≤θ cm ≤90 in the center of mass system. The reaction vertex and the scattering angle are reconstructed from the points of incidence through the two layers of the detector. The EDDA-Experiment measures angular distributions and excitation functions of five observables of the elastic proton-proton scattering in the energy range 500 MeV≤Tp ≤ 2500 MeV with focus on polarization observables. The first phase was devoted to the measurement of the unpolarized differential cross section dσ/dΩ, the second phase consisted of the measurement of the analyzing power A N . Both are finished and first results have been published. This work deals with the third phase of the EDDA-experiment: the determination of the three spin correlation coeffcients A SS , A NN and A SL , which were measured during three successive beam-times in November/December 1999, May/June 2000 and November/December 2000. For the measurements of the spin observables, a polarized atomic beam target was used with a typical target thickness of 1.8.10 11 cm-2 and effective polarizations between 60% and 70%. Some development during the different beam-times resulted in a polarized COSY-beam with up to 65% polarization at highest energies with 4.10 9 stored protons. These numbers convert into luminosities of 9.0.10 26 cm -2 s -1 ; they were insufficient to perform measurements only during beam acceleration, as it was done for dσ/dΩ and A N to obtain data with sufficient statistics needed for high internal consistency. To accumulate statistics at higher energies, data acquisition for A SS , A NN and A SL during beam acceleration (approx. 2 mio. events) was combined with measurements at some fixed energies. The

  14. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  15. Associations of Power at V̇O2peak and Anaerobic Threshold with Rank in British High Performance Junior Surfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow Matthew John

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective of this study was to determine the relationships of peak oxygen uptake ( V̇O2peak, power at V̇O2peak and power at the anaerobic threshold (AT with national ranking in a sample of British high performance junior surfers. Methods. Eighteen male surfers (aged 15.4 ± 1.4 years from the British Junior Surfing team were tested for V̇O2peak and AT using an adapted kayak ergometer; national ranking was used to indicate performance level. The AT was identified as the point at which V̇E/V̇O2 started to rise without a concomitant increase in V̇E/V̇CO2. Spearman’s rank (rs and partial correlations (rp controlling for age were used to identify the relationships between the physiological variables and national ranking. Results. Mean V̇O2peak was 3.1 ± 0.5 l · min-1 (47.7 ± 7.2 ml · kg-1 · min-1 and mean AT occurred at 48.1 ± 12.2 W. There were significant correlations between national ranking and power at V̇O2peak (rs = -0.549, p = 0.028, power at AT (rs = -0.646, p = 0.009, and age (rs = -0.579, p = 0.012. Significant partial correlations were established controlling for age between national ranking and power at V̇O2peak (rp = -0.839, p = 0.000 and power at AT (rp = -0.541, p < 0.046. Conclusions. The power outputs associated with V̇O2peak and AT were significantly related to surfer ranking in this sample. However, due to the low coefficient of determination associated with the AT/ranking relationship, AT does not discriminate well between the ranking of surfers. These findings support the inclusion of power at V̇O2peak in assessment batteries for junior competitive surfers.

  16. Correlations between radiographic assessments and MRI features of knee osteoarthritis--a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, H; Lohmander, L S; Jones, G

    2013-01-01

    an outpatient clinic (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00655941). Inclusion criteria were age ≥50 years, body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) plus symptomatic and verified KOA. 1.5 T MRI scans were assessed using BLOKS and bi-plane radiography by mJSW and KL. Statistics used were Spearman rank correlation coefficients...

  17. Weight-correction of carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient (DCO2 ) reduces its inter-individual variability and improves its correlation with blood carbon dioxide levels in neonates receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belteki, Gusztav; Lin, Benjamin; Morley, Colin J

    2017-10-01

    Carbon-dioxide elimination during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is thought to be proportional to the carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient (DCO 2 ) which is calculated as frequency x (tidal volume) 2 . DCO 2 can be used to as an indicator of CO 2 elimination but values obtained in different patients cannot be directly compared. To analyze the relationship between DCO 2 , the weight-corrected DCO 2 (DCO 2 corr) and blood gas PCO 2 values obtained from infants receiving HFOV. DCO 2 data were obtained from 14 infants at 1/s sampling rate and the mean DCO 2 was determined over 10 min periods preceding the time of the blood gas. DCO 2 corr was calculated by dividing the DCO 2 by the square of the body weight in kg. Weight-correction significantly reduced the inter-individual variability of DCO 2 . When data from all the babies were combined, standard DCO 2 showed no correlation with PCO 2 but DCO 2 corr showed a weak but statistically significant inverse correlation. The correlation was better when the endotracheal leak was correlation between the HFOV tidal volume (VThf) and the PCO 2 . In any baby, DCO 2 corr >50 mL 2 /sec/kg 2 or VThf > 2.5 mL/kg was rarely needed to avoid hypercapnia. Weight-correction of DCO 2 values improved its comparability between patients. Weight-corrected DCO 2 correlated better with PCO 2 than uncorrected DCO 2 but the correlation was weak. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Econophysics of a ranked demand and supply resource allocation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priel, Avner; Tamir, Boaz

    2018-01-01

    We present a two sided resource allocation problem, between demands and supplies, where both parties are ranked. For example, in Big Data problems where a set of different computational tasks is divided between a set of computers each with its own resources, or between employees and employers where both parties are ranked, the employees by their fitness and the employers by their package benefits. The allocation process can be viewed as a repeated game where in each iteration the strategy is decided by a meta-rule, based on the ranks of both parties and the results of the previous games. We show the existence of a phase transition between an absorbing state, where all demands are satisfied, and an active one where part of the demands are always left unsatisfied. The phase transition is governed by the ratio between supplies and demand. In a job allocation problem we find positive correlation between the rank of the workers and the rank of the factories; higher rank workers are usually allocated to higher ranked factories. These all suggest global emergent properties stemming from local variables. To demonstrate the global versus local relations, we introduce a local inertial force that increases the rank of employees in proportion to their persistence time in the same factory. We show that such a local force induces non trivial global effects, mostly to benefit the lower ranked employees.

  19. PageRank tracker: from ranking to tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Fu, Keren; Loza, Artur; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jia; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Video object tracking is widely used in many real-world applications, and it has been extensively studied for over two decades. However, tracking robustness is still an issue in most existing methods, due to the difficulties with adaptation to environmental or target changes. In order to improve adaptability, this paper formulates the tracking process as a ranking problem, and the PageRank algorithm, which is a well-known webpage ranking algorithm used by Google, is applied. Labeled and unlabeled samples in tracking application are analogous to query webpages and the webpages to be ranked, respectively. Therefore, determining the target is equivalent to finding the unlabeled sample that is the most associated with existing labeled set. We modify the conventional PageRank algorithm in three aspects for tracking application, including graph construction, PageRank vector acquisition and target filtering. Our simulations with the use of various challenging public-domain video sequences reveal that the proposed PageRank tracker outperforms mean-shift tracker, co-tracker, semiboosting and beyond semiboosting trackers in terms of accuracy, robustness and stability.

  20. Spin correlation parameters A{sub xx} and A{sub yy} measurements in p-p scattering from 11 to 26 MeV; Mesure des coefficients de correlation de spins A{sub xx} et A{sub yy} dans la diffusion p-p de 11 a 26 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catillon, Ph; Chapellier, M; Garreta, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The A{sub xx} and A{sub yy} spin correlation coefficients of the proton-proton scattering have been measured at the laboratory energies of 11,40 - 19,15 - 23,45 and 26,50 MeV for the center of mass scattering angle 90 degrees. These measurements have been made by scattering a polarized proton beam on a polarized proton target. (authors) [French] Les coefficients de correlation de spins A{sub xx} et A{sub yy} de la diffusion proton-proton ont ete mesures aux energies laboratoire de 11,40 - 19,15 - 23,45 et 26,50 MeV pour un angle de diffusion dans le centre de masse egal a 90 degres. Ces mesures ont ete effectuees par la diffusion d'un faisceau de protons polarises sur une cible de protons polarises. (auteur)

  1. Correlation of 18F-FDG PET and MRI Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram Metrics with Survival in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Fahey, Frederic H; Kocak, Mehmet; Brown, Douglas; Ricci, Kelsey I; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Fouladi, Maryam; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe baseline 18 F-FDG PET voxel characteristics in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and to correlate these metrics with baseline MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival. Methods: Baseline brain 18 F-FDG PET and MRI scans were obtained in 33 children from Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium clinical DIPG trials. 18 F-FDG PET images, postgadolinium MR images, and ADC MR images were registered to baseline fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images. Three-dimensional regions of interest on fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images and postgadolinium MR images and 18 F-FDG PET and MR ADC histograms were generated. Metrics evaluated included peak number, skewness, and kurtosis. Correlation between PET and MR ADC histogram metrics was evaluated. PET pixel values within the region of interest for each tumor were plotted against MR ADC values. The association of these imaging markers with survival was described. Results: PET histograms were almost always unimodal (94%, vs. 6% bimodal). None of the PET histogram parameters (skewness or kurtosis) had a significant association with PFS, although a higher PET postgadolinium skewness tended toward a less favorable PFS (hazard ratio, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-16.28 [ P = 0.11]). There was a significant association between higher MR ADC postgadolinium skewness and shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.11-5.91 [ P = 0.028]), and there was the suggestion that this also led to shorter overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.18; 95% CI, 0.95-5.04 [ P = 0.067]). Higher MR ADC postgadolinium kurtosis tended toward shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.98-1.74 [ P = 0.073]). PET and MR ADC pixel values were negatively correlated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Further, the level of PET and MR ADC correlation was significantly positively associated with PFS; tumors with higher

  2. Can Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values Assist PI-RADS Version 2 DWI Scoring? A Correlation Study Using the PI-RADSv2 and International Society of Urological Pathology Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Sonia; Harmon, Stephanie; Rosenblum, Lauren; Greer, Matthew D; Mehralivand, Sherif; Coskun, Mehmet; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Shih, Joanna H; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2018-05-07

    The purposes of this study were to assess correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and normalized ADC (ratio of tumor to nontumor tissue) with the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System version 2 (PI-RADSv2) and updated International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) categories and to determine how to optimally use ADC metrics for objective assistance in categorizing lesions within PI-RADSv2 guidelines. In this retrospective study, 100 patients (median age, 62 years; range, 44-75 years; prostate-specific antigen level, 7.18 ng/mL; range, 1.70-84.56 ng/mL) underwent 3-T multiparametric MRI of the prostate with an endorectal coil. Mean ADC was extracted from ROIs based on subsequent prostatectomy specimens. Histopathologic analysis revealed 172 lesions (113 peripheral, 59 transition zone). Two radiologists blinded to histopathologic outcome assigned PI-RADSv2 categories. Kendall tau was used to correlate ADC metrics with PI-RADSv2 and ISUP categories. ROC curves were used to assess the utility of ADC metrics in differentiating each reader's PI-RADSv2 DWI category 4 or 5 assessment in the whole prostate and by zone. ADC metrics negatively correlated with ISUP category in the whole prostate (ADC, τ = -0.21, p = 0.0002; normalized ADC, τ = -0.21, p = 0.0001). Moderate negative correlation was found in expert PI-RADSv2 DWI categories (ADC, τ = -0.34; normalized ADC, τ = -0.31; each p correlate with PI-RADSv2 and ISUP categories and can serve as quantitative metrics to assist with assigning PI-RADSv2 DWI category 4 or 5.

  3. The Spatial Relationship between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Standardized Uptake Value of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Has a Crucial Influence on the Numeric Correlation of Both Parameters in PET/MRI of Lung Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Alexander W; Stieltjes, Bram; Weikert, Thomas; Gatidis, Sergios; Wiese, Mark; Klarhöfer, Markus; Wild, Damian; Lardinois, Didier; Bremerich, Jens; Sommer, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC min ) derived from diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of FDG-PET are markers of aggressiveness in lung cancer. The numeric correlation of the two parameters has been extensively studied, but their spatial interplay is not well understood. After FDG-PET and DW-MRI coregistration, values and location of ADC min - and SUV max -voxels were analyzed. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for registration accuracy of sequential PET/MRI was 12 mm, and the mean distance ( D ) between ADC min - and SUV max -voxels was 14.0 mm (average of two readers). Spatial mismatch ( D > 12 mm) between ADC min and SUV max was found in 9/25 patients. A considerable number of mismatch cases (65%) was also seen in a control group that underwent simultaneous PET/MRI. In the entire patient cohort, no statistically significant correlation between SUV max and ADC min was seen, while a moderate negative linear relationship ( r = -0.5) between SUV max and ADC min was observed in tumors with a spatial match ( D ≤ 12 mm). In conclusion, spatial mismatch between ADC min and SUV max is found in a considerable percentage of patients. The spatial connection of the two parameters SUV max and ADC min has a crucial influence on their numeric correlation.

  4. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Weibing; Li Wei; Cai Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang Qiuping A

    2012-01-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters. (paper)

  5. Population based ranking of frameless CT-MRI registration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opposits, Gabor; Kis, Sandor A.; Tron, Lajos; Emri, Miklos [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Berenyi, Ervin [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory and Imaging Science; Takacs, Endre [Rotating Gamma Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Dobai, Jozsef G.; Bognar, Laszlo [Debrecen Univ., Medical Center (Hungary). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Szuecs, Bernadett [ScanoMed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    Clinical practice often requires simultaneous information obtained by two different imaging modalities. Registration algorithms are commonly used for this purpose. Automated procedures are very helpful in cases when the same kind of registration has to be performed on images of a high number of subjects. Radiotherapists would prefer to use the best automated method to assist therapy planning, however there are not accepted procedures for ranking the different registration algorithms. We were interested in developing a method to measure the population level performance of CT-MRI registration algorithms by a parameter of values in the [0,1] interval. Pairs of CT and MRI images were collected from 1051 subjects. Results of an automated registration were corrected manually until a radiologist and a neurosurgeon expert both accepted the result as good. This way 1051 registered MRI images were produced by the same pair of experts to be used as gold standards for the evaluation of the performance of other registration algorithms. Pearson correlation coefficient, mutual information, normalized mutual information, Kullback-Leibler divergence, L{sub 1} norm and square L{sub 2} norm (dis)similarity measures were tested for sensitivity to indicate the extent of (dis)similarity of a pair of individual mismatched images. The square Hellinger distance proved suitable to grade the performance of registration algorithms at population level providing the developers with a valuable tool to rank algorithms. The developed procedure provides an objective method to find the registration algorithm performing the best on the population level out of newly constructed or available preselected ones.

  6. Prediction of friction coefficients for gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical relations are used for correlating laminar and turbulent friction coefficients for gases, with large variations in the physical properties, flowing through smooth tubes. These relations have been used to correlate friction coefficients for hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and air.

  7. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC with the standardized uptake value (SUV in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Michael Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with standardized uptake values (SUV derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI.38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™ 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR. During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm² was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean.A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5 mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, p<0.05 and r = -0.36, p<0.05 existed.The present data show a weak inverse correlation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  8. A DYNAMIC FEATURE SELECTION METHOD FOR DOCUMENT RANKING WITH RELEVANCE FEEDBACK APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Latha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ranking search results is essential for information retrieval and Web search. Search engines need to not only return highly relevant results, but also be fast to satisfy users. As a result, not all available features can be used for ranking, and in fact only a small percentage of these features can be used. Thus, it is crucial to have a feature selection mechanism that can find a subset of features that both meets latency requirements and achieves high relevance. In this paper we describe a 0/1 knapsack procedure for automatically selecting features to use within Generalization model for Document Ranking. We propose an approach for Relevance Feedback using Expectation Maximization method and evaluate the algorithm on the TREC Collection for describing classes of feedback textual information retrieval features. Experimental results, evaluated on standard TREC-9 part of the OHSUMED collections, show that our feature selection algorithm produces models that are either significantly more effective than, or equally effective as, models such as Markov Random Field model, Correlation Co-efficient and Count Difference method

  9. Correlation analysis of expressions of PTEN and p53 with the value obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and apparent diffusion coefficient in the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area in magnetic resonance imaging for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyun; Ji, Feng; Jiang, Yuzhi; Zhao, Ting; Xu, Chongfu

    2018-01-01

    To explore the correlation of the expression levels of phosphate and tension homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and p53 of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with the value obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 38 patients were operated for GBM. All the patients had received diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MRS prior to surgery. ADC of water molecules and values of metabolite indexes of MRS, including n-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr), were recorded, and the ratios of Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr were calculated. Hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining was done to examine the morphology of tumor and of tumor-adjacent tissues; immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to examine the expressions of PTEN and p53 in the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area. Finally, the correlations of the expressions of PTEN and p53 with ADC, Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr of the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area were analyzed. H&E staining showed that GBM tissues had disordered morphology, different sizes of cells, large cell nuclei and significant cell heterogeneity. IHC indicated that the expression level of p53 protein in the tumor was significantly higher than in the tumor-adjacent tissues (pCorrelation analysis indicated that PTEN levels in the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area were positively correlated with ADC in the corresponding area, while p53 in the tumor and the tumor-adjacent area was negatively correlated with ADC in the corresponding area. Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr in the tumor were positively correlated with p53 in the tumor, but negatively correlated with PTEN in the tumor. However, NAA/Cr of the tumor was irrelevant to the levels of PTEN and p53. The test results of DWI and MRS of patients with GBM can accurately reflect the inactivation or mutation of PTEN and p53.

  10. PageRank of integers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, K M; Shepelyansky, D L; Chepelianskii, A D

    2012-01-01

    We up a directed network tracing links from a given integer to its divisors and analyze the properties of the Google matrix of this network. The PageRank vector of this matrix is computed numerically and it is shown that its probability is approximately inversely proportional to the PageRank index thus being similar to the Zipf law and the dependence established for the World Wide Web. The spectrum of the Google matrix of integers is characterized by a large gap and a relatively small number of nonzero eigenvalues. A simple semi-analytical expression for the PageRank of integers is derived that allows us to find this vector for matrices of billion size. This network provides a new PageRank order of integers. (paper)

  11. Freudenthal ranks: GHZ versus W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsten, L

    2013-01-01

    The Hilbert space of three-qubit pure states may be identified with a Freudenthal triple system. Every state has an unique Freudenthal rank ranging from 1 to 4, which is determined by a set of automorphism group covariants. It is shown here that the optimal success rates for winning a three-player non-local game, varying over all local strategies, are strictly ordered by the Freudenthal rank of the shared three-qubit resource. (paper)

  12. Ranking Queries on Uncertain Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hua, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Uncertain data is inherent in many important applications, such as environmental surveillance, market analysis, and quantitative economics research. Due to the importance of those applications and rapidly increasing amounts of uncertain data collected and accumulated, analyzing large collections of uncertain data has become an important task. Ranking queries (also known as top-k queries) are often natural and useful in analyzing uncertain data. Ranking Queries on Uncertain Data discusses the motivations/applications, challenging problems, the fundamental principles, and the evaluation algorith

  13. A Ranking Analysis/An Interlinking Approach of New Triangular Fuzzy Cognitive Maps and Combined Effective Time Dependent Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Shreemathi; Saraswathi, A.; Praveen Prakash, A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims an interlinking approach of new Triangular Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (TrFCM) and Combined Effective Time Dependent (CETD) matrix to find the ranking of the problems of Transgenders. Section one begins with an introduction that briefly describes the scope of Triangular Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (TrFCM) and CETD Matrix. Section two provides the process of causes of problems faced by Transgenders using Fuzzy Triangular Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (TrFCM) method and performs the calculations using the collected data among the Transgender. In Section 3, the reasons for the main causes for the problems of the Transgenders. Section 4 describes the Charles Spearmans coefficients of rank correlation method by interlinking of Triangular Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (TrFCM) Method and CETD Matrix. Section 5 shows the results based on our study.

  14. Biostatistics Series Module 6: Correlation and Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Correlation and linear regression are the most commonly used techniques for quantifying the association between two numeric variables. Correlation quantifies the strength of the linear relationship between paired variables, expressing this as a correlation coefficient. If both variables x and y are normally distributed, we calculate Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r ). If normality assumption is not met for one or both variables in a correlation analysis, a rank correlation coefficient, such as Spearman's rho (ρ) may be calculated. A hypothesis test of correlation tests whether the linear relationship between the two variables holds in the underlying population, in which case it returns a P correlation coefficient can also be calculated for an idea of the correlation in the population. The value r 2 denotes the proportion of the variability of the dependent variable y that can be attributed to its linear relation with the independent variable x and is called the coefficient of determination. Linear regression is a technique that attempts to link two correlated variables x and y in the form of a mathematical equation ( y = a + bx ), such that given the value of one variable the other may be predicted. In general, the method of least squares is applied to obtain the equation of the regression line. Correlation and linear regression analysis are based on certain assumptions pertaining to the data sets. If these assumptions are not met, misleading conclusions may be drawn. The first assumption is that of linear relationship between the two variables. A scatter plot is essential before embarking on any correlation-regression analysis to show that this is indeed the case. Outliers or clustering within data sets can distort the correlation coefficient value. Finally, it is vital to remember that though strong correlation can be a pointer toward causation, the two are not synonymous.

  15. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  16. K-Bessel functions associated to a 3-rank Jordan algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacen Dib

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the Bessel-Muirhead system, we can express the K-Bessel function defined on a Jordan algebra as a linear combination of the J-solutions. We determine explicitly the coefficients when the rank of this Jordan algebra is three after a reduction to the rank two. The main tools are some algebraic identities developed for this occasion.

  17. Heat transfer coefficient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The calculated heat transfer coeeficient has been compared with the Chart correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predits too low heat transfer coefficient but the ratio...... between the measured and the calculated heat transfer coefficient is nearly constant and equal 1.9. With this factor the correlation predicts the measured data within 14% (RMS). The pressure drop is of the same order as the measuring uncertainty and the pressure drop has not been compared with correlation's....

  18. Effect of harmonic rank on the streaming of complex tones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sara Miay Kim; Dau, Torsten; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the rank of the harmonics on sequential stream segregation of complex tones was investigated for normal-hearing participants with no musical training. It was hypothesized that stream segregation would be greater for tones with high pitch salience, as assessed by fundamental frequency....... There was a significant trend for less stream segregation with increasing harmonic rank. The amount of stream segregation was inversely correlated with the f0 difference limens, consistent with the hypothesis....

  19. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Branstetter

    2015-09-01

    Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79 of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy would not directly affect the tumor.

  20. Demographic Ranking of the Baltic Sea States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluka N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study lies in the acute need to modernise the tools for a more accurate and comparable reflection of the demographic reality of spatial objects of different scales. This article aims to test the methods of “demographic rankings” developed by Yermakov and Shmakov. The method is based on the principles of indirect standardisation of the major demographic coefficients relative to the age structure.The article describes the first attempt to apply the method to the analysis of birth and mortality rates in 1995 and 2010 for 140 countries against the global average, and for the Baltic Sea states against the European average. The grouping of countries and the analysis of changes over the given period confirmed a number of demographic development trends and the persistence of wide territorial disparities in major indicators. The authors identify opposite trends in ranking based on the standardised birth (country consolidation at the level of averaged values and mortality (polarisation rates. The features of demographic process development in the Baltic regions states are described against the global and European background. The study confirmed the validity of the demographic ranking method, which can be instrumental in solving not only scientific but also practical tasks, including those in the field of demographic and social policy.

  1. Estimating the intra-cluster correlation coefficient for evaluating an educational intervention program to improve rabies awareness and dog bite prevention among children in Sikkim, India: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auplish, Aashima; Clarke, Alison S; Van Zanten, Trent; Abel, Kate; Tham, Charmaine; Bhutia, Thinlay N; Wilks, Colin R; Stevenson, Mark A; Firestone, Simon M

    2017-05-01

    Educational initiatives targeting at-risk populations have long been recognized as a mainstay of ongoing rabies control efforts. Cluster-based studies are often utilized to assess levels of knowledge, attitudes and practices of a population in response to education campaigns. The design of cluster-based studies requires estimates of intra-cluster correlation coefficients obtained from previous studies. This study estimates the school-level intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC) for rabies knowledge change following an educational intervention program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 226 students from 7 schools in Sikkim, India, using cluster sampling. In order to assess knowledge uptake, rabies education sessions with pre- and post-session questionnaires were administered. Paired differences of proportions were estimated for questions answered correctly. A mixed effects logistic regression model was developed to estimate school-level and student-level ICCs and to test for associations between gender, age, school location and educational level. The school- and student-level ICCs for rabies knowledge and awareness were 0.04 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.19) and 0.05 (95% CI: 0.2, 0.09), respectively. These ICCs suggest design effect multipliers of 5.45 schools and 1.05 students per school, will be required when estimating sample sizes and designing future cluster randomized trials. There was a good baseline level of rabies knowledge (mean pre-session score 71%), however, key knowledge gaps were identified in understanding appropriate behavior around scared dogs, potential sources of rabies and how to correctly order post rabies exposure precaution steps. After adjusting for the effect of gender, age, school location and education level, school and individual post-session test scores improved by 19%, with similar performance amongst boys and girls attending schools in urban and rural regions. The proportion of participants that were able to correctly order post

  2. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic ``nested'' structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm -similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity- here we propose a method which -by exploiting their nested architecture- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  3. Ranking Theory and Conditional Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard-Olsen, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Ranking theory is a formal epistemology that has been developed in over 600 pages in Spohn's recent book The Laws of Belief, which aims to provide a normative account of the dynamics of beliefs that presents an alternative to current probabilistic approaches. It has long been received in the AI community, but it has not yet found application in experimental psychology. The purpose of this paper is to derive clear, quantitative predictions by exploiting a parallel between ranking theory and a statistical model called logistic regression. This approach is illustrated by the development of a model for the conditional inference task using Spohn's (2013) ranking theoretic approach to conditionals. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Subtracting a best rank-1 approximation may increase tensor rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Alwin; Comon, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that a best rank-R approximation of an order-k tensor may not exist when R >= 2 and k >= 3. This poses a serious problem to data analysts using tensor decompositions it has been observed numerically that, generally, this issue cannot be solved by consecutively computing and

  5. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...... variance in out-of-sample evaluations rather than the squared return. We derive the theoretical results in a general framework that is not specific to the comparison of volatility models. Similar problems can arise in comparisons of forecasting models whenever the predicted variable is a latent variable....

  6. Predictive-property-ranked variable reduction in partial least squares modelling with final complexity adapted models: comparison of properties for ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Jan P M; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Buydens, Lutgarde M C

    2013-01-14

    The calibration performance of partial least squares regression for one response (PLS1) can be improved by eliminating uninformative variables. Many variable-reduction methods are based on so-called predictor-variable properties or predictive properties, which are functions of various PLS-model parameters, and which may change during the steps of the variable-reduction process. Recently, a new predictive-property-ranked variable reduction method with final complexity adapted models, denoted as PPRVR-FCAM or simply FCAM, was introduced. It is a backward variable elimination method applied on the predictive-property-ranked variables. The variable number is first reduced, with constant PLS1 model complexity A, until A variables remain, followed by a further decrease in PLS complexity, allowing the final selection of small numbers of variables. In this study for three data sets the utility and effectiveness of six individual and nine combined predictor-variable properties are investigated, when used in the FCAM method. The individual properties include the absolute value of the PLS1 regression coefficient (REG), the significance of the PLS1 regression coefficient (SIG), the norm of the loading weight (NLW) vector, the variable importance in the projection (VIP), the selectivity ratio (SR), and the squared correlation coefficient of a predictor variable with the response y (COR). The selective and predictive performances of the models resulting from the use of these properties are statistically compared using the one-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test. The results indicate that the models, resulting from variable reduction with the FCAM method, using individual or combined properties, have similar or better predictive abilities than the full spectrum models. After mean-centring of the data, REG and SIG, provide low numbers of informative variables, with a meaning relevant to the response, and lower than the other individual properties, while the predictive abilities are

  7. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  8. On Rank Driven Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Prieto, F. J.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a class of models related to the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model, initially proposed to study evolution. The BS model is extremely simple and yet captures some forms of "complex behavior" such as self-organized criticality that is often observed in physical and biological systems. In this model, random fitnesses in are associated to agents located at the vertices of a graph . Their fitnesses are ranked from worst (0) to best (1). At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and some others with a priori given rank probabilities are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. We consider two cases: The exogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from an a priori fixed distribution, and the endogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from the current distribution as it evolves. We approximate the dynamics by making a simplifying independence assumption. We use Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems to define a rank-driven dynamical system that approximates the evolution of the distribution of the fitnesses in these rank-driven models, as well as in the BS model. For this simplified model we can find the limiting marginal distribution as a function of the initial conditions. Agreement with experimental results of the BS model is excellent.

  9. PageRank (II): Mathematics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maths/stats

    ... GAUSS SEIDEL'S. NUMERICAL ALGORITHMS IN PAGE RANK ANALYSIS. ... The convergence is guaranteed, if the absolute value of the largest eigen ... improved Gauss-Seidel iteration algorithm, based on the decomposition. U. L. D. M. +. +. = ..... This corresponds to determine the eigen vector of T with eigen value 1.

  10. Maximising information recovery from rank-order codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, B.; Furber, S.

    2007-04-01

    The central nervous system encodes information in sequences of asynchronously generated voltage spikes, but the precise details of this encoding are not well understood. Thorpe proposed rank-order codes as an explanation of the observed speed of information processing in the human visual system. The work described in this paper is inspired by the performance of SpikeNET, a biologically inspired neural architecture using rank-order codes for information processing, and is based on the retinal model developed by VanRullen and Thorpe. This model mimics retinal information processing by passing an input image through a bank of Difference of Gaussian (DoG) filters and then encoding the resulting coefficients in rank-order. To test the effectiveness of this encoding in capturing the information content of an image, the rank-order representation is decoded to reconstruct an image that can be compared with the original. The reconstruction uses a look-up table to infer the filter coefficients from their rank in the encoded image. Since the DoG filters are approximately orthogonal functions, they are treated as their own inverses in the reconstruction process. We obtained a quantitative measure of the perceptually important information retained in the reconstructed image relative to the original using a slightly modified version of an objective metric proposed by Petrovic. It is observed that around 75% of the perceptually important information is retained in the reconstruction. In the present work we reconstruct the input using a pseudo-inverse of the DoG filter-bank with the aim of improving the reconstruction and thereby extracting more information from the rank-order encoded stimulus. We observe that there is an increase of 10 - 15% in the information retrieved from a reconstructed stimulus as a result of inverting the filter-bank.

  11. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Bensmail, Halima; Gao, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105... Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination of... preference will be included in this final ranking in accordance with applicable regulations. ...

  14. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Bensmail, Halima; Gao, Xin

    2012-11-19

    Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  15. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications.

  16. A Survey on PageRank Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Berkhin, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    This survey reviews the research related to PageRank computing. Components of a PageRank vector serve as authority weights for web pages independent of their textual content, solely based on the hyperlink structure of the web. PageRank is typically used as a web search ranking component. This defines the importance of the model and the data structures that underly PageRank processing. Computing even a single PageRank is a difficult computational task. Computing many PageRanks is a much mor...

  17. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  18. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O.; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 108 to 26.8 × 108 M−1cm−1. Measured values correl...

  19. Variation in performance measure criteria significantly affects cardiology practice rankings: Insights from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Phil G; Maddox, Thomas M; Oetgen, William J; Spertus, John A; Rumsfeld, John S; Heidenreich, Paul A; Peterson, Eric D; Drozda, Joseph P

    2015-06-01

    Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over 5 years by improving cardiovascular prevention. An important tool in the success of programs like Million Hearts is public ranking on the quality of practices, yet different measures may provide different rankings, so the true quality of practices is difficult to discern. We evaluated the quality of ambulatory cardiology care using performance measure metrics. We compared rankings of practices participating in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence Registry using measures from (1) the physician quality reporting system and (2) the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement. We compared achievement rates for measures between the 2 frameworks and determined correlations in rankings using Spearman correlation coefficients. From January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012, there were 1,711,326 patients enrolled from 111 US practices. Among eligible patients, the physician quality reporting system and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement measures were achieved in 76.1% versus 77.4% for antiplatelet prescription (P performance and failing to achieve public health goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ranking hospitals for outcomes in total hip replacement - administrative data with or without additional patient surveys? - Part 1: Administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörning, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many hospital rankings rely on the frequency of adverse outcomes and are based on administrative data. In the study presented here, we tried to find out, to what extent available administrative data of German Sickness Funds allow for an adequate hospital ranking and compared this with rankings based on additional information derived from a patient survey. Total hip replacement was chosen as an example procedure. In part I of the publication, we present the results of the approach based on administrative data. Methods: We used administrative data from the AOK-Lower Saxony of the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The study population comprised all beneficiaries, who received total hip replacement in the years 2000 or 2001. Performance indicators used where “critical incident (Mortality or revision” and “number of revisions” within the first year. Hospitals were ranked if they performed at least 20 procedures on AOK-beneficiaries in each of the two years. Multivariate modelling (logistic and poisson regression was used to estimate the performance indicators by case-mix variables (age, sex, co-diagnoses and hospital characteristics (hospital size, surgical volume. The actual ranking was based on these multivariate models, excluding hospital variables and adding dummy-variables for each hospital. Hospitals were ranked by their case-mix adjusted odds ratio or SMR respectively with respect to a pre-selected reference hospital. The resulting rankings were compared with each other, with regard to temporal stability, and the impact of case-mix variables.Results: About 4500 beneficiaries received total hip replacement in each year (n2000: 4482; n2001: 4579. The ranking included 65 hospitals. Comparing the years 2000 and 2001, the temporal stability of the rankings based on a single performance indicator was low (Spearman rang correlation coefficients 0.158 and 0.191. The agreement of rankings based on different performance indicators in the