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Sample records for ranging types sequential

  1. Discrete filtering techniques applied to sequential GPS range measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangraas, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The basic navigation solution is described for position and velocity based on range and delta range (Doppler) measurements from NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellites. The application of discrete filtering techniques is examined to reduce the white noise distortions on the sequential range measurements. A second order (position and velocity states) Kalman filter is implemented to obtain smoothed estimates of range by filtering the dynamics of the signal from each satellite separately. Test results using a simulated GPS receiver show a steady-state noise reduction, the input noise variance divided by the output noise variance, of a factor of four. Recommendations for further noise reduction based on higher order Kalman filters or additional delta range measurements are included.

  2. Updating cover type maps using sequential indicator simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnussen, S.; Bruin, de S.

    2003-01-01

    Maximum posterior probability (MAP) maps of forest inventory (FI) cover type classes were produced from a maximum likelihood (ML) classified TM image and 5% (2%) systematic reference sampling of actual cover types for of nine 2 x 2 kin study sites in New Brunswick, Canada. MAP cover type maps were

  3. A Bayesian sequential design using alpha spending function to control type I error.

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    Zhu, Han; Yu, Qingzhao

    2017-10-01

    We propose in this article a Bayesian sequential design using alpha spending functions to control the overall type I error in phase III clinical trials. We provide algorithms to calculate critical values, power, and sample sizes for the proposed design. Sensitivity analysis is implemented to check the effects from different prior distributions, and conservative priors are recommended. We compare the power and actual sample sizes of the proposed Bayesian sequential design with different alpha spending functions through simulations. We also compare the power of the proposed method with frequentist sequential design using the same alpha spending function. Simulations show that, at the same sample size, the proposed method provides larger power than the corresponding frequentist sequential design. It also has larger power than traditional Bayesian sequential design which sets equal critical values for all interim analyses. When compared with other alpha spending functions, O'Brien-Fleming alpha spending function has the largest power and is the most conservative in terms that at the same sample size, the null hypothesis is the least likely to be rejected at early stage of clinical trials. And finally, we show that adding a step of stop for futility in the Bayesian sequential design can reduce the overall type I error and reduce the actual sample sizes.

  4. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  5. [Surgical treatment of acetabular type C1 acetabular fracture by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shu-Hua; Zhu, Jun-Kun; Huang, Shu-Ming; Ye, Ji-Fei; Wu, Quan-Zhou; Ye, Fang; Lü, Guo-Qiang

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the operative reduction techniques and clinical results of surgical treatment of type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation. From August 2004 to January 2012, 13 patients with type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture were treated by posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation. Of them, 8 cases were male and 5 cases were female with an average age of 42 years years old (ranged, 18 to 64). Pelvis 3-dimentional CT reconstruction were used to confirmed the classification of fracture, and the operation were performed during from 5 to 20 days with an average of 9.5 days. Operation time, blood loss, complications and reduction were recorded and evaluated. The function of hip joint were accessed at the final follow-up. The operation time ranged from 190 to 290 min with an average of 240 min. The mean blood loss was 1 800 ml (ranged, 1 300 to 3 000 ml). One case had superficial infection and healed after 3 weeks. According to Matta reduction criteria, 8 cases obtained anatomical reduction, 4 cases got satisfied results and 1 cases got unsatisfied results. Eleven cases were followed up with an average of (24.0 +/- 8.0) months, and 2 cases were lost to follow-up. According to revised Mede d'Aubingne and Postel evaluation system, 7 cases got excellent results, 2 good, 1 moderate and 1 poor. Posteroproximal-posteroanterior sequential reduction and internal fixation for the treatment of type C1 (AO/ASIF) acetabular fracture can achieve satisfied surgical proces and operation quality.

  6. Existence theory for sequential fractional differential equations with anti-periodic type boundary conditions

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    Aqlan Mohammed H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the existence theory for sequential fractional differential equations involving Liouville-Caputo fractional derivative equipped with anti-periodic type (non-separated and nonlocal integral boundary conditions. Several existence criteria depending on the nonlinearity involved in the problems are presented by means of a variety of tools of the fixed point theory. The applicability of the results is shown with the aid of examples. Our results are not only new in the given configuration but also yield some new special cases for specific choices of parameters involved in the problems.

  7. Effects of model types in observational learning on implicit sequential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2017-08-31

    This study investigated whether implicit learning of sequence by observation occurred in a serial reaction time task and if the learning effects were modulated by model behavioral type. In Experiment 1, we let 20 participants perform a sequence for 12 blocks and chose the best and worst performance models based on reaction time and errors. In Experiment 2, new observers viewed a movie clip chosen from the following three: the best model performing the sequential task in the first (the first six blocks) or second session (the last six blocks), or the worst model performing the task in the first session. Then, the observers performed the observed sequence, a test sequence, and awareness test. We found that (1) implicit sequential learning occurred by observation regardless of model behavior type, (2) the learning effects were not susceptible to model behavior type, and (3) speed index reflecting reaction time became larger even in the test session when the observers viewed the best model performing the second session. Overall, observers developed general motor-representations through action-observation. In addition, their responses were also contagious; if the model performed the sequence faster, the observer might be able to perform the sequence faster.

  8. Structure Controlled Long-Range Sequential Tunneling in Carbon-Based Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morteza Najarian, Amin; McCreery, Richard L

    2017-04-25

    Carbon-based molecular junctions consisting of aromatic oligomers between conducting sp(2) hybridized carbon electrodes exhibit structure-dependent current densities (J) when the molecular layer thickness (d) exceeds ∼5 nm. All four of the molecular structures examined exhibit an unusual, nonlinear ln J vs bias voltage (V) dependence which is not expected for conventional coherent tunneling or activated hopping mechanisms. All molecules exhibit a weak temperature dependence, with J increasing typically by a factor of 2 over the range of 200-440 K. Fluorene and anthraquinone show linear plots of ln J vs d with nearly identical J values for the range d = 3-10 nm, despite significant differences in their free-molecule orbital energy levels. The observed current densities for anthraquinone, fluorene, nitroazobenzene, and bis-thienyl benzene for d = 7-10 nm show no correlation with occupied (HOMO) or unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital energies, contrary to expectations for transport mechanisms based on the offset between orbital energies and the electrode Fermi level. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy of molecular layers bonded to carbon electrodes revealed internal energy levels of the chemisorbed films and also indicated limited delocalization in the film interior. The observed current densities correlate well with the observed UV-vis absorption maxima for the molecular layers, implying a transport mechanism determined by the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. We conclude that transport in carbon-based aromatic molecular junctions is consistent with multistep tunneling through a barrier defined by the HOMO-LUMO gap, and not by charge transport at the electrode interfaces. In effect, interfacial "injection" at the molecule/electrode interfaces is not rate limiting due to relatively strong electronic coupling, and transport is controlled by the "bulk" properties of the molecular layer interior.

  9. Fractionation of metals by sequential extraction procedures (BCR and Tessier) in soil exposed to fire of wide temperature range

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    Fajkovic, Hana; Rončević, Sanda; Nemet, Ivan; Prohić, Esad; Leontić-Vazdar, Dana

    2017-04-01

    Forest fire presents serious problem, especially in Mediterranean Region. Effects of fire are numerous, from climate change and deforestation to loss of soil organic matter and changes in soil properties. One of the effects, not well documented, is possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of pollutants previously deposited in the soil, due to the new physical and chemical soil properties and changes in equilibrium conditions. For understanding and predicting possible redistribution and/or remobilisation of potential pollutants from soil, affected by fire different in temperature, several laboratory investigations were carried out. To evaluate the influence of organic matter on soil under fire, three soil samples were analysed and compared: (a) the one with added coniferous organic matter; (b) deciduous organic matter (b) and (c) soil without additional organic matter. Type of organic matter is closely related to pH of soil, as pH is influencing the mobility of some pollutants, e.g. metals. For that reason pH was also measured through all experimental steps. Each of mentioned soil samples (a, b and c) were heated at 1+3 different temperatures (25°C, 200°C, 500°C and 850°C). After heating, whereby fire effect on soil was simulated, samples were analysed by BCR protocol with the addition of a first step of sequential extraction procedure by Tessier and analysis of residual by aqua regia. Element fractionation of heavy metals by this procedure was used to determine the amounts of selected elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn). Selected metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Further on, loss of organic matter was calculated after each heating procedure as well as the mineral composition. The mineral composition was determined using an X-ray diffraction. From obtained results, it can be concluded that temperature has an influence on concentration of elements in specific step of

  10. Rapid and systematic access to quasi-diblock copolymer libraries covering a comprehensive composition range by sequential RAFT polymerization in an Automated synthesizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Joris J; Guerrero-Sanchez, Carlos; Keddie, Daniel J; Moad, Graeme

    2014-02-01

    A versatile, cost-effective approach to the rapid, fully unattended preparation of systematic quasi-diblock copolymer libraries via sequential RAFT polymerization in an automated synthesizer is reported. The procedure is demonstrated with the synthesis of a 23 member library of low dispersity poly(butyl methacrylate)-quasiblock-poly(methyl methacrylate) covering a wide (fivefold) range of molar mass for the second block in a one-pot, sequential, RAFT polymerization. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A competing risk analysis of sequential complication development in Asian type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Chen, Jeng-Huei; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chen, Li-Chia; Lao, Chun-Huan; Luh, Hsing; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2015-10-28

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the progression risk of sequential complication in Asian type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients using the Taiwan Pay-for-Performance Diabetes Registry and claim data from November 2003 to February 2009. 226,310 adult T2D patients without complication were followed from diagnosis to complications, including myocardial infarction (MI), other ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), retinopathy, amputation, death or to the end of study. Cumulative incidences (CIs) of first and second complications were analyzed in 30 and 4 years using the cumulative incidence competing risk method. IHD (29.8%), CKD (24.5%) and stroke (16.0%) are the most common first complications. The further development of T2D complications depends on a patient's existing complication profiles. Patients who initially developed cardiovascular complications had a higher risk (9.2% to 24.4%) of developing IHD or CKD, respectively. All-cause mortality was the most likely consequence for patients with a prior MI (12.0%), so as stroke in patients with a prior MI (10.8%) or IHD (8.9%). Patients with CKD had higher risk of developing IHD (16.3%), stroke (8.9%) and all-cause mortality (8.7%) than end-stage renal disease (4.0%). Following an amputation, patients had a considerable risk of all-cause mortality (42.1%).

  12. Experience Playing a Musical Instrument and Overnight Sleep Enhance Performance on a Sequential Typing Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Matthew A; Nguyen, Nam; Stickgold, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The smooth, coordinated fine motor movements required to play a musical instrument are not only highly valued in our society; they also predict academic success in areas that generalize beyond the motor domain, including reading and math readiness, and verbal abilities. Interestingly, motor skills that overlap with those required to play a musical instrument (e.g., sequential finger tapping) markedly improve (get faster) over a night of sleep, but not after a day spent awake. Here we studied whether individuals who play musical instruments that require fine finger motor skill are better able to learn and consolidate a simple motor skill task compared to those who do not play an instrument, and whether sleep-specific motor skill benefits interact with those imparted by musical experience. We used the motor sequence task (MST), which taps into a core skill learned and used by musicians, namely, the repetition of learned sequences of key presses. Not surprisingly, we found that musicians were faster than non-musicians throughout the learning session, typing more correct sequences per 30-sec trial. In the 12hrs that followed learning we found that sleep and musical experience both led to greater improvement in performance. Surprisingly, musicians retested after a day of wake performed slightly better than non-musicians who had slept between training and retest, suggesting that musicians have the capacity to consolidate a motor skill across waking hours, while non-musicians appear to lack this capacity. These findings suggest that the musically trained brain is optimized for motor skill consolidation across both wake and sleep, and that sleep may simply promote a more effective use of this machinery. In sum, there may be something special about musicians, perhaps a neurophysiological advantage, that leads to both the expected-greater motor speed at learning-and the surprising-greater motor skill improvement over time.

  13. Experience Playing a Musical Instrument and Overnight Sleep Enhance Performance on a Sequential Typing Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Tucker

    Full Text Available The smooth, coordinated fine motor movements required to play a musical instrument are not only highly valued in our society; they also predict academic success in areas that generalize beyond the motor domain, including reading and math readiness, and verbal abilities. Interestingly, motor skills that overlap with those required to play a musical instrument (e.g., sequential finger tapping markedly improve (get faster over a night of sleep, but not after a day spent awake. Here we studied whether individuals who play musical instruments that require fine finger motor skill are better able to learn and consolidate a simple motor skill task compared to those who do not play an instrument, and whether sleep-specific motor skill benefits interact with those imparted by musical experience. We used the motor sequence task (MST, which taps into a core skill learned and used by musicians, namely, the repetition of learned sequences of key presses. Not surprisingly, we found that musicians were faster than non-musicians throughout the learning session, typing more correct sequences per 30-sec trial. In the 12hrs that followed learning we found that sleep and musical experience both led to greater improvement in performance. Surprisingly, musicians retested after a day of wake performed slightly better than non-musicians who had slept between training and retest, suggesting that musicians have the capacity to consolidate a motor skill across waking hours, while non-musicians appear to lack this capacity. These findings suggest that the musically trained brain is optimized for motor skill consolidation across both wake and sleep, and that sleep may simply promote a more effective use of this machinery. In sum, there may be something special about musicians, perhaps a neurophysiological advantage, that leads to both the expected-greater motor speed at learning-and the surprising-greater motor skill improvement over time.

  14. Sequential Events in the Irreversible Thermal Denaturation of Human Brain-Type Creatine Kinase by Spectroscopic Methods

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    Yan-Song Gao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-cooperative or sequential events which occur during protein thermal denaturation are closely correlated with protein folding, stability, and physiological functions. In this research, the sequential events of human brain-type creatine kinase (hBBCK thermal denaturation were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, CD, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. DSC experiments revealed that the thermal denaturation of hBBCK was calorimetrically irreversible. The existence of several endothermic peaks suggested that the denaturation involved stepwise conformational changes, which were further verified by the discrepancy in the transition curves obtained from various spectroscopic probes. During heating, the disruption of the active site structure occurred prior to the secondary and tertiary structural changes. The thermal unfolding and aggregation of hBBCK was found to occur through sequential events. This is quite different from that of muscle-type CK (MMCK. The results herein suggest that BBCK and MMCK undergo quite dissimilar thermal unfolding pathways, although they are highly conserved in the primary and tertiary structures. A minor difference in structure might endow the isoenzymes dissimilar local stabilities in structure, which further contribute to isoenzyme-specific thermal stabilities.

  15. Existence of Solutions and Ulam Stability for Caputo Type Sequential Fractional Differential Equations of Order α ∈ (2,3

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    Bashir Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study initial value problems of sequential fractional differential equations and inclusions involving a Caputo type differential operator of the form: $\\left(^{C}D_{a+}^{\\alpha }+\\lambda _{1}~^{C}D_{a+}^{\\alpha -1}+\\lambda _{2}~^{C}D_{a+}^{\\alpha -2}\\right,$ where $\\alpha \\in (2,3$ and $\\lambda _{i} (i=1, 2 $ are nonzero constants. Several existence and uniqueness results are accomplished by means of fixed point theorems. Sufficient conditions for Ulam stability of the given problem are also presented. Examples are constructed for the illustration of obtained results. Then we investigate the inclusions case of the problem at hand. An initial value problem for coupled sequential fractional differential equations is also discussed.

  16. Regression of microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetic patients: results of a sequential intervention with improved metabolic control and ACE inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarrasa, N; Soler, J; Montanya, E

    2005-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of improved metabolic control and ACE inhibition used sequentially in the treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. We studied 44 consecutive type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria not previously treated with ACE inhibitors. Improved metabolic control (optimisation period) was attempted for 6-12 months and patients with persistent microalbuminuria were subsequently treated with ACE inhibitors. Stepwise logistic regression analysis included the variables age, age at diabetes onset, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, initial albumin excretion rate (AER) and mean blood pressure as predictors of final AER. Thirty per cent of patients regressed to normoalbuminuria after the optimisation period, and 58% of them maintained normal AER 4.5+/-1.3 years later (3-7 years). Patients achieving normoalbuminuria had lower baseline AER (53+/-22 vs. 94+/-63 mg/24 h, p=0.012). The initial AER level was the only factor associated with final AER (r=0.58, p=0.021). Thirty patients with persistent microalbuminuria were treated with ACE inhibitors for two years, 35.5% of whom regressed to normal AER. Patients achieving normoalbuminuria after ACE inhibitor treatment had lower baseline AER (55+/-24 vs. 132+/-75 mg/24 h, p=0.03). The initial AER was the sole predictor of final AER (r=0.51, ptherapy resulted in long-term normalisation of AER in 47.4% of patients. The sequential implementation of improved metabolic control and ACE inhibitor therapy had a long-term beneficial effect in type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. We propose that type 1 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria could benefit from a period of metabolic improvement before the initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy.

  17. Retuning Rieske-type Oxygenases to Expand Substrate Range

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    Mohammadi, Mahmood; Viger, Jean-François; Kumar, Pravindra; Barriault, Diane; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Sylvestre, Michel (INRS); (Purdue)

    2012-09-17

    Rieske-type oxygenases are promising biocatalysts for the destruction of persistent pollutants or for the synthesis of fine chemicals. In this work, we explored pathways through which Rieske-type oxygenases evolve to expand their substrate range. BphAE{sub p4}, a variant biphenyl dioxygenase generated from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 BphAE{sub LB400} by the double substitution T335A/F336M, and BphAE{sub RR41}, obtained by changing Asn{sup 338}, Ile{sup 341}, and Leu{sup 409} of BphAE{sub p4} to Gln{sup 338}, Val{sup 341}, and Phe{sup 409}, metabolize dibenzofuran two and three times faster than BphAE{sub LB400}, respectively. Steady-state kinetic measurements of single- and multiple-substitution mutants of BphAE{sub LB400} showed that the single T335A and the double N338Q/L409F substitutions contribute significantly to enhanced catalytic activity toward dibenzofuran. Analysis of crystal structures showed that the T335A substitution relieves constraints on a segment lining the catalytic cavity, allowing a significant displacement in response to dibenzofuran binding. The combined N338Q/L409F substitutions alter substrate-induced conformational changes of protein groups involved in subunit assembly and in the chemical steps of the reaction. This suggests a responsive induced fit mechanism that retunes the alignment of protein atoms involved in the chemical steps of the reaction. These enzymes can thus expand their substrate range through mutations that alter the constraints or plasticity of the catalytic cavity to accommodate new substrates or that alter the induced fit mechanism required to achieve proper alignment of reaction-critical atoms or groups.

  18. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackart, David F.; Richardson, Michael A.; DiLisio, James E.; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. PMID:28093504

  19. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Brendan K; Ackart, David F; Richardson, Michael A; DiLisio, James E; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J

    2017-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. © 2017. Published by

  20. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores in a tsuyu sauce using continuous ohmic heating with five sequential elbow-type electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryang, J H; Kim, N H; Lee, B S; Kim, C T; Lee, S H; Hwang, I G; Rhee, M S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ohmic heating (OH) in a pilot plant system which had a zig-zag shaped (elbow-type) ohmic heater with five sequential voltage electrodes was investigated on Bacillus cereus spores in a commercial tsuyu sauce. The electrical field was fixed at 26·7 V cm(-1) with an alternating current frequency of 25 kHz. Raw tsuyu sauce (50 l) inoculated with B. cereus spores was submitted in a 4 × 3 factorial design to the OH system and heated at 95, 105, 115, and 125°C each for 30, 60, and 90 s. Survival of B. cereus spores and colour change in the commercial tsuyu sauce were both measured before and after treatment. As the treatment temperature and time increased, the number of surviving B. cereus spores decreased. The OH treatment in a bath-type process at 105°C for more than 30 s resulted in the total inactivation of the inoculated B. cereus spores (average 5·4 log reductions to undetectable levels after treatment). The OH protocol of heating at 105°C for 60 s which ensure complete eradication of the inoculated spores without compromising product quality was chosen and investigated for its suitability for commercial application on bulk quantities of samples (500 l). Reliable and reproducible reductions in B. cereus spore counts of 4·7-5·5 log CFU ml(-1) (mean ± standard deviation = 5·1 ± 0·3 CFU ml(-1) ) were achieved by the selected protocol of the continuous OH treatment (105°C for 60 s). This study suggests that OH treatment with five sequential elbow-type electrodes has great potential as an industrial sterilizing method for liquid food contaminated with B. cereus spores. This procedure will enhance the microbiological quality of liquid foods while minimizing quality deterioration. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Dynamics and thermodynamics of systems with long-range dipole-type interactions.

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    Atenas, Boris; Curilef, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    A Hamiltonian mean field model, where the potential is inspired by dipole-dipole interactions, is proposed to characterize the behavior of systems with long-range interactions. The dynamics of the system remains in quasistationary states before arriving at equilibrium. The equilibrium is analytically derived from the canonical ensemble and coincides with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (microcanonical ensemble) at only long time scales. The dynamics of the system is characterized by the behavior of the mean value of the kinetic energy. The significance of the results, compared to others in the recent literature, is that two plateaus sequentially emerge in the evolution of the model under the special considerations of the initial conditions and systems of finite size. The first plateau decays to a different second one before the system reaches equilibrium, but the dynamics of the system is expected to have only one plateau when the thermodynamics limit is reached because the difference between them tends to disappear as N tends to infinity. Hence, the first plateau is a type of quasistationary state the lifetime of which depends on a power law of N and the second seems to be a true quasistationary state as reported in the literature. We characterize the general behavior of the model according to its dynamics and thermodynamics.

  2. Analysis of the temporal relationship between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 quasispecies in sequential blood samples and various organs obtained at autopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Wout, A. B.; Ran, L. J.; Kuiken, C. L.; Kootstra, N. A.; Pals, S. T.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the temporal relationship between human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies in tissues and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of infected individuals. Sequential PBMC and tissue samples from various organs obtained at autopsy from three patients who died of AIDS-related

  3. Predictive power of sequential measures of albuminuria for progression to ESRD or death in Pima Indians with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavkov, Meda E; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G

    2008-05-01

    To determine whether historic albuminuria measurements provide additional predictive value for diabetic end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and natural mortality over the most recent measurement, ie, whether "regression" from high albuminuria has a different prognosis than stability at the lower level. Observational longitudinal study. Pima Indians 15 years or older with type 2 diabetes and at least 2 consecutive measurements of urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) within 6 years. Sequential measurements of urinary ACR. Proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate the risk of ESRD and natural death associated with the first and second ACR measurement. The ability of these highly correlated variables to predict outcome was compared with receiver operating characteristic curves calculated by means of the generalized c statistic. In 983 subjects, 136 developed ESRD and 180 died of natural causes during a maximum follow-up of 12.6 years. Each doubling in the second ACR was associated with a 1.71-fold greater incidence of ESRD (95% confidence interval, 1.54 to 1.89) and 1.16-fold greater natural mortality (95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.27) adjusted for age, sex, diabetes duration, and antihypertensive medication. The addition of the first ACR measurement to the model did not add to the predictive value for ESRD or mortality. In pairwise comparisons of c statistics, the second ACR was a significantly better predictor of ESRD than the first ACR. The predictive value of ACR measurements is decreased to the extent that its precision is based on a single measure. The predictive power of the latest ACR for ESRD and natural mortality in patients with diabetes is not enhanced by knowledge of the preceding ACR. Therefore, ACR changes over time, ie, regression or progression, add minimal predictive value beyond the latest measurement in the series.

  4. Sequential analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wald, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    In 1943, while in charge of Columbia University's Statistical Research Group, Abraham Wald devised Sequential Design, an innovative statistical inference system. Because the decision to terminate an experiment is not predetermined, sequential analysis can arrive at a decision much sooner and with substantially fewer observations than equally reliable test procedures based on a predetermined number of observations. The system's immense value was immediately recognized, and its use was restricted to wartime research and procedures. In 1945, it was released to the public and has since revolutio

  5. A roadmap of cell-type specific gene expression during sequential stages of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogekamp, Claudia; Küster, Helge

    2013-05-07

    About 80% of today's land plants are able to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis with Glomeromycota fungi to improve their access to nutrients and water in the soil. On the molecular level, the development of AM symbioses is only partly understood, due to the asynchronous development of the microsymbionts in the host roots. Although many genes specifically activated during fungal colonization have been identified, genome-wide information on the exact place and time point of their activation remains limited. In this study, we relied on a combination of laser-microdissection and the use of Medicago GeneChips to perform a genome-wide analysis of transcription patterns in defined cell-types of Medicago truncatula roots mycorrhized with Glomus intraradices. To cover major stages of AM development, we harvested cells at 5-6 and at 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Early developmental stages of the AM symbiosis were analysed by monitoring gene expression in appressorial and non-appressorial areas from roots harbouring infection units at 5-6 dpi. Here, the use of laser-microdissection for the first time enabled the targeted harvest of those sites, where fungal hyphae first penetrate the root. Circumventing contamination with developing arbuscules, we were able to specifically detect gene expression related to early infection events. To cover the late stages of AM formation, we studied arbusculated cells, cortical cells colonized by intraradical hyphae, and epidermal cells from mature mycorrhizal roots at 21 dpi. Taken together, the cell-specific expression patterns of 18014 genes were revealed, including 1392 genes whose transcription was influenced by mycorrhizal colonization at different stages, namely the pre-contact phase, the infection of roots via fungal appressoria, the subsequent colonization of the cortex by fungal hyphae, and finally the formation of arbuscules. Our cellular expression patterns identified distinct groups of AM-activated genes

  6. A roadmap of cell-type specific gene expression during sequential stages of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background About 80% of today’s land plants are able to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis with Glomeromycota fungi to improve their access to nutrients and water in the soil. On the molecular level, the development of AM symbioses is only partly understood, due to the asynchronous development of the microsymbionts in the host roots. Although many genes specifically activated during fungal colonization have been identified, genome-wide information on the exact place and time point of their activation remains limited. Results In this study, we relied on a combination of laser-microdissection and the use of Medicago GeneChips to perform a genome-wide analysis of transcription patterns in defined cell-types of Medicago truncatula roots mycorrhized with Glomus intraradices. To cover major stages of AM development, we harvested cells at 5-6 and at 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Early developmental stages of the AM symbiosis were analysed by monitoring gene expression in appressorial and non-appressorial areas from roots harbouring infection units at 5-6 dpi. Here, the use of laser-microdissection for the first time enabled the targeted harvest of those sites, where fungal hyphae first penetrate the root. Circumventing contamination with developing arbuscules, we were able to specifically detect gene expression related to early infection events. To cover the late stages of AM formation, we studied arbusculated cells, cortical cells colonized by intraradical hyphae, and epidermal cells from mature mycorrhizal roots at 21 dpi. Taken together, the cell-specific expression patterns of 18014 genes were revealed, including 1392 genes whose transcription was influenced by mycorrhizal colonization at different stages, namely the pre-contact phase, the infection of roots via fungal appressoria, the subsequent colonization of the cortex by fungal hyphae, and finally the formation of arbuscules. Our cellular expression patterns identified distinct groups of AM

  7. Ecological types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron F. Wells; Janis L. Boettinger; Kent E. Houston; David W. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    This guide presents a classification of the Ecological Types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range (WRR) on the Shoshone National Forest in west-central Wyoming. Ecological Types integrate vegetation and environmental characteristics, including climate, geology, landform, and soils, into a comprehensive ecosystem classification. The three objectives are: (1)...

  8. Expanding the Range of Text Types Used in the Primary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary-grade students' experiences with text should prepare them to critically read an extensive range of text types throughout their schooling and career, a primary goal of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). However, research demonstrates that narrative text overshadows other text types in the primary grades. The purpose of this…

  9. Operational characteristics in the three-phase transformer-type SFCL with neutral line based on sequential reclosing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. S.; Choi, H. S.; Jung, B. I.

    2011-11-01

    In a transformer-type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) with a neutral line, which is connected between the superconducting elements and secondary windings, we verified that the SFCL has excellent characteristics that induce the perfect simultaneous quench of the superconducting elements in the previous study. The application of the SFCL to the power networks requires its coordination with the reclosing operation duty, which protects a circuit. In this study, the fault current limiting and recovery characteristics of superconducting elements in the three-phase transformer-type SFCL with the neutral line were analyzed. The limiting rate of the fault current in the transformer-type SFCL could increased by an iron core, which allows quenching of the superconducting elements in a sound phase as well as in a faulted phase. In addition, the simultaneous quench led to uniform burdens on superconducting elements, all of which recovered their superconducting state within an opening cycle of a circuit breaker. Thus, the transformer-type SFCL with the neutral line could reliably conduct the fault current limiting and recovery operations of superconducting elements according to the reclosing operation duty and fault types.

  10. Gunshot wounds: a review of firearm type, range, and location as pertaining to manner of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, D Kimberley; DiMaio, Vincent; Cave, Rowena

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have examined the characteristics of gunshot wounds by manner of death; however, no published study has directly compared these characteristics for the different types of firearms. This study was designed to address that deficiency. Existing data sets of nonaccidental deaths by handguns, shotguns, and rifles were reviewed. The victim data were analyzed by age and sex of the victims, wound location, range of fire, manner of death, and type of firearm. Handguns were the most common firearm used in both suicides and homicides, followed by rifles and then shotguns. For both homicides and suicides, there were significant differences between the firearm types for age of victims, range of fire, and wound locations. Possible reasons for those differences are discussed. It is concluded that information about the type of firearm is crucial to have when examining the nature of a firearm injury and determining the manner of death.

  11. Life Course Socioeconomic Transition and its Association with Early Onset Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol for a Sequential Exploratory Mixed Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, Sankar Vadassery; Raman, V Kutty; Nochikattil, Santhosh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of early onset type 2 diabetes (Diabetes below the age of 45 years) is increasing worldwide. Transition in socio-economic position-i.e. Life Course Socio-Economic Transition (LSET) - may contribute to the development of early onset T2D through complex processes involving economic and occupational opportunities as well as individual life style choices. To develop and validate the life course socioeconomic transition questionnaire and to know the association between life courses socioeconomic transition and early onset type 2 diabetes. This study follows sequential exploratory mixed method study design. It consists of one qualitative strand followed by two quantitative strands. Qualitative strand consist of in- depth interview among the community dwellers to develop a tool for measuring LSET. Two quantitative strands consist of the validation of the questionnaire by conducting cross-sectional survey among 200 randomly selected community dwellers and a hospital based case control study using the same questionnaire. Those who have a history of lower SEP during his childhood period and enjoying higher SEP during his adulthood period have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes at their younger age (18-45 years). This study will help to develop a validated life course socioeconomic transition questionnaire and application of that tool in an epidemiological study.

  12. Sequential HER2 blockade as effective therapy in chemorefractory, HER2 gene-amplified, RAS wild-type, metastatic colorectal cancer: learning from a clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Cardone, Claudia; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Ciardiello, Davide; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Normanno, Nicola; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Marsoni, Silvia; Bardelli, Alberto; Siena, Salvatore; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive activation of HER2-dependent intracellular signalling by HER2 gene amplification or by HER2 mutations has been demonstrated as a mechanism of primary and secondary cancer resistance to cetuximab or panitumumab in preclinical and clinical models of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Both HER2 Amplification for Colorectal Cancer Enhanced Stratification (HERACLES) cohort A and My Pathway clinical trials provided clinical evidence that anti-HER2 therapies could be active in these patients. HER2 gene amplification and HER2 protein overexpression analysis were performed in tumour tissue by fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. HER2 positivity was defined according to HERACLES CRC-specific HER2 scoring criteria. DNA analysis for multiple assessment of gene mutations or amplifications was carried out with the next-generation sequencing (NGS) Ion AmpliSeq Colon and Lung Cancer Panel and by using a more extensive targeted high-multiplex PCR-based NGS panel (OncoMine Comprehensive Assay). We report the clinical case of a patient with HER2 gene amplified and RAS/BRAF wild-type mCRC who experienced a long lasting and relevant clinical efficacy from sequential anti-HER2 therapies (trastuzumab plus lapatinib, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab, trastuzumab emtansine, trastuzumab plus capecitabine) achieving a cumulative clinical benefit of 29 months, after failure of the first three lines of standard treatments, which included all the potentially active drugs in mCRC, and which accounted for only 14 months of disease control. HER gene amplification was confirmed by NGS on two different metastatic lesions during the evolution of the disease. The clinical case highlights the role of HER2 gene amplification as a key genetic driver of cancer development and progression in mCRC and suggests that sequential HER2 blockade could be a potential therapeutic strategy.

  13. Identification of a type I nitroreductase gene in non-virulent Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Montenegro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Trypanosomatid type I nitroreductases (NTRs, i.e., mitochondrial enzymes that metabolise nitroaromatic pro-drugs, are essential for parasite growth, infection, and survival. Here, a type I NTR of non-virulent protozoan Trypanosoma rangeli is described and compared to those of other trypanosomatids. The NTR gene was isolated from KP1(+ and KP1(- strains, and its corresponding transcript and 5’ untranslated region (5’UTR were determined. Bioinformatics analyses and nitro-drug activation assays were also performed. The results indicated that the type I NTR gene is present in both KP1(- and KP1(+ strains, with 98% identity. However, the predicted subcellular localisation of the protein differed among the strains (predicted as mitochondrial in the KP1(+ strain. Comparisons of the domains and 3D structures of the NTRs with those of orthologs demonstrated that the nitroreductase domain of T. rangeli NTR is conserved across all the strains, including the residues involved in the interaction with the FMN cofactor and in the tertiary structure characteristics of this oxidoreductase protein family. mRNA processing and expression were also observed. In addition, T. rangeli was shown to be sensitive to benznidazole and nifurtimox in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, T. rangeli appears to have a newly discovered functional type I NTR.

  14. Optimal adaptive sequential designs for crossover bioequivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jialin; Audet, Charles; DiLiberti, Charles E; Hauck, Walter W; Montague, Timothy H; Parr, Alan F; Potvin, Diane; Schuirmann, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    In prior works, this group demonstrated the feasibility of valid adaptive sequential designs for crossover bioequivalence studies. In this paper, we extend the prior work to optimize adaptive sequential designs over a range of geometric mean test/reference ratios (GMRs) of 70-143% within each of two ranges of intra-subject coefficient of variation (10-30% and 30-55%). These designs also introduce a futility decision for stopping the study after the first stage if there is sufficiently low likelihood of meeting bioequivalence criteria if the second stage were completed, as well as an upper limit on total study size. The optimized designs exhibited substantially improved performance characteristics over our previous adaptive sequential designs. Even though the optimized designs avoided undue inflation of type I error and maintained power at ≥ 80%, their average sample sizes were similar to or less than those of conventional single stage designs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Range vegetation type mapping and above-ground green biomass estimations using multispectral imagery. [Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Range vegetation types have been successfully mapped on a portion of the 68,000 acre study site located west of Baggs, Wyoming, using ERTS-1 imagery. These types have been ascertained from field transects over a five year period. Comparable studies will be made with EREP imagery. Above-ground biomass estimation studies are being conducted utilizing double sampling techniques on two similar study sites. Information obtained will be correlated with percent relative reflectance measurements obtained on the ground which will be related to image brightness levels. This will provide an estimate of above-ground green biomass with multispectral imagery.

  16. Effect of three types of flexibility training on active and passive hip range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bedoya, J; Vernetta-Santana, M; Robles-Fuentes, A; Ariza-Vargas, L

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effect of 3 types of flexibility training, hold-relax (HR, N.=9), active isolated stretching (AIS, N.=9) and passive static stretching (PSS, N.=11) on passive and active range of motion of hip flexion after 9 weeks of flexibility training. The subjects were physical education college students (14 men and 15 women) whose ages ranged between 20 and 24 years (age mean 21.79, SD: 2.45). A multigroup pre- post-test design with three experimental groups was used. The range of movement was measured by digitalization of pre-test and post-test images. Significant differences were found among the pre- and post-test for the three groups (P<0.05) on passive range of motion of the hip flexion, although there were no significant post-test differences between experimental groups. However, on the active range of motion of hip flexion there was only significant improvement among the pre-test and post-tests for PSS group (P<0.05). The results suggest that PSS is the best option for the improvement of both active and passive range of motion.

  17. Home range differences by habitat type of raccoon dogs Nyctereutes procyonoides (Carnivora: Canidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseog Jeong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available From July 2013 to November 2014, this research was conducted to secure baseline data to find long-term preventive measures against epidemics from the analysis of home range and movement characteristics of raccoon dogs, which are known as carriers of zoonosis. Researchers conducted a follow-up study with 12 raccoon dogs, each attached with a Global Positioning System mobile transmitter. Analysis of home range used the minimum convex polygon (MCP method and kernel density estimation (KDE with accumulating data of time-based locations. Except for three animals that showed unique behavior, the researchers analyzed nine animals and calculated their average home range. As a result, average home range was 0.48±0.35 km2 (MCP method, and KDE result analysis was verified as 0.65±0.66 km2 (95%, 0.31±0.35 km2 (75%, and 0.23±0.28 km2 (50%. Based on the MCP method, acted in range of minimum 0.07 km2 and maximum 1.08 km2, and the core habitat, KDE 50% level showed activity range in 0.02 km2 to 0.37 km2. Three individuals of unique behavior were classified into two types. Two individuals moved 10–20 km and settled at a place different from the existing habitat, and one individual kept moving without a regular sphere of influence. Generally, raccoon dogs are not considered to move if they secure their area of influence; animals in urban areas have a wider area of influence than those living in areas with a rich source of food such as forest and agricultural land.

  18. Element patterns in albatrosses and petrels: Influence of trophic position, foraging range, and prey type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, O.R.J., E-mail: oanderson02@qub.ac.u [School of Biological Sciences, MBC, Queen' s University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Phillips, R.A. [British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environmental Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET (United Kingdom); Shore, R.F. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); McGill, R.A.R. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride G75 0QF (United Kingdom); McDonald, R.A. [Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom); Bearhop, S. [School of Biological Sciences, MBC, Queen' s University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Centre for Ecology and Conservation, School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn TR10 9EZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    We investigated the concentrations of 22 essential and non-essential elements among a community of Procellariiformes (and their prey) to identify the extent to which trophic position and foraging range governed element accumulation. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) was used to characterise trophic (delta{sup 15}N) and spatial patterns (delta{sup 13}C) among species. Few consistent patterns were observed in element distributions among species and diet appeared to be highly influential in some instances. Arsenic levels in seabird red blood cells correlated with delta{sup 15}N and delta{sup 13}C, demonstrating the importance of trophic position and foraging range for arsenic distribution. Arsenic concentrations in prey varied significantly across taxa, and in the strength of association with delta{sup 15}N values (trophic level). In most instances, element patterns in Procellariiformes showed the clearest separation among species, indicating that a combination of prey selection and other complex species-specific characteristics (e.g. moult patterns) were generally more important determining factors than trophic level per se. - Trophic position, foraging range, and prey type were found to influence element compositions and concentrations in Procellariiformes from South Georgia.

  19. Novel Cross-Type Network for Wide-Tuning-Range Reconfigurable Multiband Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Sen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a cross-type network design with a novel reconfigurable functionality to realize a tunable multiband antenna. By attaching a reconfigurable network at the feeding port of a broadband antenna, multi-input impedance adjustment enables the production of multimatching operating bands. Each band can be independently controlled by a single component with a considerably wide tuning range and high selectivity. The experiments in this study involved using an ultra-wideband (UWB antenna connected to the proposed cross-type network. The tunable antenna operates in a dual band of fL (1.39 to 2.34 GHz and fH (2.1 to 3.6 GHz with tunable frequency ratios of 168% and 132%, respectively. The average bandwidths at fL and fH are approximately 50 MHz and 148 MHz, respectively, implying narrowband operation. The measured radiation pattern revealed that the tunable antenna exhibits a nearly omnidirectional radiation pattern at both 1.8 and 3.5 GHz. The network circuit architecture can be extended to the multiband function type by adopting this matching approach. The amount of shunt matches determines the number of operation bands.

  20. Application of Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance for ABO Blood Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanida Tangkawsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a long-range surface plasmon resonance (LR-SPR biosensor for the detection of whole cell by captured antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs as a model. The LR-SPR sensor chip consists of high-refractive index glass, a Cytop film layer, and a thin gold (Au film, which makes the evanescent field intensity and the penetration depth longer than conventional SPR. Therefore, the LR-SPR biosensor has improved capability for detecting large analytes, such as RBCs. The antibodies specific to blood group A and group B (Anti-A and Anti-B are covalently immobilized on a grafting self-assembled monolayer (SAM/Au surface on the biosensor. For blood typing, RBC samples can be detected by the LR-SPR biosensor through a change in the refractive index. We determined that the results of blood typing using the LR-SPR biosensor are consistent with the results obtained from the agglutination test. We obtained the lowest detection limits of 1.58 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-A and 3.83 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-B, indicating that the LR-SPR chip has a higher sensitivity than conventional SPR biosensors (3.3 × 108 cells/ml. The surface of the biosensor can be efficiently regenerated using 20 mM NaOH. In summary, as the LR-SPR technique is sensitive and has a simple experimental setup, it can easily be applied for ABO blood group typing.

  1. Quality-control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth dilution of the Brachyspira hyodysenteriae type strain (ATCC 27164(T))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pringle, M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Bergsjø, B.

    2006-01-01

    There are no approved standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the fastidious spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. An interlaboratory study was performed to establish MIC quality control ranges for six antimicrobial agents for the type strain of B. hyodysenteriae using broth diluti...

  2. A prospective randomized study comparing two commercially available types of human embryo culture media: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential medium (Vitrolife) and the GL BLAST™ sole medium (Ingamed).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, Ianae I; Ribas, Mariana H; Ceschin, Alvaro P; Nishikawa, Lucileine; Rocha, Claudia C; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Baroneza, José Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    To check the efficacy of two types of commercially available embryo culture medium: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential (Vitrolife, Gothenburg, Sweden) and GV BLAST™ sole (Ingamed, Maringá, Brazil) with regards to fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst and pregnancy rates. Prospective and randomized study conducted from March to July 2015, using the medical records of 60 patients submitted to Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection techniques (ICSI). Data regarding the age of patients, together with fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst and pregnancy rates, were collected and compared in relation to the: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential and GV BLAST™ sole mediums. The data were tabulated and compared using the Pearson's Chi-Square test (95% CI). There was no significant difference when comparing patients divided into higher and lower fertility age. No significant statistical difference was noted between the fertilization rates (P=0.59), cleavage (P=0.91), evolution to blastocyst (P=0.33) and total pregnancy (P=0.83) when comparing the embryos cultured in the different media analysed. We conclude that the G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential and GV BLAST™ sole mediums are equally effective with regards to fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst development and total pregnancy rates.

  3. Lattice Model of Fractional Gradient and Integral Elasticity: Long-Range Interaction of Grunwald-Letnikov-Riesz Type

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2015-01-01

    Lattice model with long-range interaction of power-law type that is connected with difference of non-integer order is suggested. The continuous limit maps the equations of motion of lattice particles into continuum equations with fractional Grunwald-Letnikov-Riesz derivatives. The suggested continuum equations describe fractional generalizations of the gradient and integral elasticity. The proposed type of long-range interaction allows us to have united approach to describe of lattice models ...

  4. Mass-gathering medicine: a descriptive analysis of a range of mass-gathering event types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locoh-Donou, Samuel; Guofen, Yan; Welcher, Melanie; Berry, Thomas; O'Connor, Robert E; Brady, William J

    2013-05-01

    transport to hospital, with 3 cases being life-threatening. The average patient age was 33 years, with 60.3% female sex. These features are similar to the published information on large event medical attendance. In this retrospective, descriptive study of a broad range of event type, the most common patient presentations at mass-gathering events were mild in severity, requiring minimal medical intervention. Both transports from the event to a hospital and the occurrence of life threats were uncommon. Our findings are similar to the data found in the existing medical literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vortex Lattice UXO Mobility Model for Reef-Type Range Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Technologies Roundtable GIS Geographic Information System GPS Global Positioning System LIDAR Light Detection and Ranging MBBS MultiBeam BackScatter MCC...Kokee Highlands, remnant of a shield volcano that is dissected on its western side by numerous small intermittent streams and outwash areas. Drainage

  6. Echo signal from rough planar interfaces influence of roughness, angle, range and transducer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pedersen, P.C.; Jacobsen, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The received electrical signal from a pulse-echo system insonifying a planar acoustical interface was measured for varying degrees of rms roughness (0-0.16 mm), angle of incidence (typically +/-7°) and range to the transducer. A planar and a focused 5 MHz transducer was used. When insonifying a s...

  7. The influence of roughness, angle, range, and transducer type on the echo signal from planar interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pedersen, Peter C.; Jacobsen, Søren Mehl

    2001-01-01

    point. For focused transducers with the interface located closer than the geometrical point of focus, two maxima can sometimes be observed when varying the incident angle. As is generally known, the width of E(/spl theta/) is strongly dependent on transducer type, e.g., for a smooth interface, the -3 d...

  8. Diet of free ranging Angora goats in a False Upper Karoo veld type

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grassld Srrc. Sth. A.fr. ll, 135*138. BRYANT, F.C., KOTHMANN, M.M. & MERRILL. L.8., 1979. Diets of sheep, Angora goats, Spanish goats and white-tailed deer under excellent range conditions. J. Rctnge Munage. 32,412417 . S. Afr. Tydskr. Veek., 1994,24(3). CAMPBELL, Q.p., EBERS6HN, F.p. & VON BROEMBSEN, H.H.,.

  9. Determination of normal range for fasting salivary glucose in Type 1 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Karandeep Singh; Binjoo, Nagesh; Reddy, G V Ramachandra; Kaur, Prabhpreet; Modgil, Richa; Negi, Lalit Singh

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly employed investigative procedure for monitoring glucose levels is blood investigation, which is invasive and gives discomfort to the patient. The purpose of the study was to validate a noninvasive, easy, and reliable method for predicting glucose levels in Type 1 diabetics and to validate a regression equation for converting the known values of salivary glucose to blood glucose. 200 volunteers consisting of 100 Type 1 diabetics and 100 healthy controls were included, and their fasting blood and salivary glucose levels were assessed, using a semi-auto analyzer. On analysis of the data, statistically significant positive results were obtained (P blood and salivary glucose levels were considered among the study group participants, control group participants, and both study and control group participants. A cut-off value for salivary glucose (11.60 mg%) was defined, above which a person may be considered as diabetic. Also, the regression equation was obtained which could be used for the conversion of known value of salivary glucose to blood glucose and vice versa. The present study successfully demonstrated the role of saliva as a noninvasive and reliable marker for the prediction of glucose levels in Type 1 diabetics who show elevated blood glucose levels.

  10. Assessing SWOT discharge algorithms performance across a range of river types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, M. T.; Smith, L. C.; Gleason, C. J.; Bjerklie, D. M.; Garambois, P. A.; Roux, H.

    2014-12-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2020, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will measure river height, width, and slope, globally, as well as characterizing storage change in lakes, and ocean surface dynamics. Four discharge algorithms have been formulated to solve the inverse problem of river discharge from SWOT observations. Three of these approaches are based on Manning's equation, while the fourth utilizes at-many-stations hydraulic geometry relating width and discharge. In all cases, SWOT will provide some but not all of the information required to estimate discharge. The focus of the inverse approaches is estimation of the unknown parameters. The algorithms use a range of a priori information. This paper will generate synthetic measurements of height, width, and slope for a number of rivers, including reaches of the Sacramento, Ohio, Mississippi, Platte, Amazon, Garonne, Po, Severn, St. Lawrence, and Tanana. These rivers have a wide range of flows, geometries, hydraulic regimes, floodplain interactions, and planforms. One-year synthetic datasets will be generated in each case. We will add white noise to the simulated quantities and generate scenarios with different repeat time. The focus will be on retrievability of the hydraulic parameters across a range of space-time sampling, rather than on ability to retrieve under the specific SWOT orbit. We will focus on several specific research questions affecting algorithm performance, including river characteristics, temporal sampling, and algorithm accuracy. The overall goal is to be able to predict which algorithms will work better for different kinds of rivers, and potentially to combine the outputs of the various algorithms to obtain more robust estimates. Preliminary results on the Sacramento River indicate that all algorithms perform well for this single-channel river, with diffusive hydraulics, with relative RMSE values ranging from 9% to 26% for the various algorithms. Preliminary

  11. Sequential stochastic optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Cairoli, Renzo

    1996-01-01

    Sequential Stochastic Optimization provides mathematicians and applied researchers with a well-developed framework in which stochastic optimization problems can be formulated and solved. Offering much material that is either new or has never before appeared in book form, it lucidly presents a unified theory of optimal stopping and optimal sequential control of stochastic processes. This book has been carefully organized so that little prior knowledge of the subject is assumed; its only prerequisites are a standard graduate course in probability theory and some familiarity with discrete-paramet

  12. Quality of broiler meat of the free-range type submitted to diets containing alternative feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Faria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The work had the intention of investigating the effect of the use of alternative feeds as part replacers in diet-formulating, evaluating the characteristic physicochemical alterations and centesimal composition of the free-range chicken. In the experiment a total of 192 (one hundred and ninety-two birds of the Pescoço Pelado (Label Rouge strain arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD formed by 4 treatments (Treatment 1 (Control, Treatment 2 (10% of the inclusion of rice bran, Treatment 3 (10% of the inclusion of ground cassava leaf and Treatment 4 (10% of the inclusion of ground leucaena hay with 8 replicates per treatment were used. The results revealed greater values of b* (yellow, Saturation (C* and pH for broiler meat with inclusion of ground cassava leaf and leucaena, while for the other variables of physicochemical composition, no influences of the treatments were not found. For centesimal composition the treatments showed greater values of moisture in relation to the control treatment. For sex, only a difference for the content of b* and C* was found, with higher values for female. The use of the alternative feedstuffs has not revealed marked influences on the chemical composition and quality parameters of free-ranging chicken’s meat with the use of replacement up to 10% in the diets.

  13. A quick and robust MHC typing method for free-ranging and captive primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, N; Stanbury, K; de Vos-Rouweler, A J M; de Groot, N G; Poirier, N; Blancho, G; de Luna, C; Doxiadis, G G M; Bontrop, R E

    2017-04-01

    Gene products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of human and non-human primates play a crucial role in adaptive immunity, and most of the relevant genes not only show a high degree of variability (polymorphism) but also copy number variation (CNV) is observed. Due to this diversity, MHC proteins influence the capability of individuals to cope with various pathogens. MHC and/or MHC-linked gene products such as odorant receptor genes are thought to influence mate choice and reproductive success. Therefore, MHC typing of wild and captive primate populations is considered to be useful in conservation biology, which is, however, often hampered by the need of invasive and time-consuming methods. All intact Mhc-DRB genes in primates appear to possess a complex and highly divergent microsatellite, DRB-STR. A panel of 154 pedigreed olive baboons (Papio anubis) was examined for their DRB content by DRB-STR analysis of genomic DNA. Using the same methodology on DNA of feces samples, DRB variability of a silvery gibbon population (Hylobates moloch) (N = 24), an endangered species, could successfully be studied. In both species, length determination of the DRB-STR resulted in the definition of unique genotyping patterns that appeared to be specific for a certain chromosome. Moreover, the different STR lengths were shown to segregate with the allelic variation of the respective gene. The results obtained expand data gained previously on DRB-STR typing in macaques, great apes, and humans and strengthen the conclusion that this protocol is applicable in molecular ecology, conservation biology, and colony management, especially of endangered primate species.

  14. Forced Sequence Sequential Decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Riis

    In this thesis we describe a new concatenated decoding scheme based on iterations between an inner sequentially decoded convolutional code of rate R=1/4 and memory M=23, and block interleaved outer Reed-Solomon codes with non-uniform profile. With this scheme decoding with good performance is pos...

  15. Forced Sequence Sequential Decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Riis; Paaske, Erik

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new concatenated decoding scheme based on iterations between an inner sequentially decoded convolutional code of rate R=1/4 and memory M=23, and block interleaved outer Reed-Solomon (RS) codes with nonuniform profile. With this scheme decoding with good performance is possible as lo...

  16. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  17. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) technique denoted Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) suitable for 2D and 3D imaging is presented. The technique differ from prior art of SAF in the sense that SAF is performed on pre-beamformed data contrary to channel data. The objective is to im...

  18. Fasting Cycles Retard Growth of Tumors and Sensitize a Range of Cancer Cell Types to Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Safdie, Fernando M.; Bianchi, Giovanna; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pistoia, Vito; Wei, Min; Hwang, Saewon; Merlino, Annalisa; Emionite, Laura; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D.

    2013-01-01

    Short-term starvation (or fasting) protects normal cells, mice, and potentially humans from the harmful side effects of a variety of chemotherapy drugs. Here, we show that treatment with starvation conditions sensitized yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the oncogene-like RAS2val19 to oxidative stress and 15 of 17 mammalian cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutic agents. Cycles of starvation were as effective as chemotherapeutic agents in delaying progression of different tumors and increased the effectiveness of these drugs against melanoma, glioma, and breast cancer cells. In mouse models of neuroblastoma, fasting cycles plus chemotherapy drugs—but not either treatment alone—resulted in long-term cancer-free survival. In 4T1 breast cancer cells, short-term starvation resulted in increased phosphorylation of the stress-sensitizing Akt and S6 kinases, increased oxidative stress, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA damage, and apoptosis. These studies suggest that multiple cycles of fasting promote differential stress sensitization in a wide range of tumors and could potentially replace or augment the efficacy of certain chemotherapy drugs in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:22323820

  19. Fasting cycles retard growth of tumors and sensitize a range of cancer cell types to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Safdie, Fernando M; Bianchi, Giovanna; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pistoia, Vito; Wei, Min; Hwang, Saewon; Merlino, Annalisa; Emionite, Laura; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D

    2012-03-07

    Short-term starvation (or fasting) protects normal cells, mice, and potentially humans from the harmful side effects of a variety of chemotherapy drugs. Here, we show that treatment with starvation conditions sensitized yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expressing the oncogene-like RAS2(val19) to oxidative stress and 15 of 17 mammalian cancer cell lines to chemotherapeutic agents. Cycles of starvation were as effective as chemotherapeutic agents in delaying progression of different tumors and increased the effectiveness of these drugs against melanoma, glioma, and breast cancer cells. In mouse models of neuroblastoma, fasting cycles plus chemotherapy drugs--but not either treatment alone--resulted in long-term cancer-free survival. In 4T1 breast cancer cells, short-term starvation resulted in increased phosphorylation of the stress-sensitizing Akt and S6 kinases, increased oxidative stress, caspase-3 cleavage, DNA damage, and apoptosis. These studies suggest that multiple cycles of fasting promote differential stress sensitization in a wide range of tumors and could potentially replace or augment the efficacy of certain chemotherapy drugs in the treatment of various cancers.

  20. Usefulness of Skylab color photography and ERTS-1 multispectral imagery for mapping range vegetation types in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Aerial photography at scales of 1:43,400 and 1:104,500 was used to evaluate the usefulness of Skylab color photography (scales of 1:477,979 and 1:712,917) and ERTS-1 multispectral imagery (scale 1:1,000,000) for mapping range vegetation types. The project was successful in producing a range vegetation map of the 68,000 acres of salt desert shrub type in southwestern Wyoming. Techniques for estimation of above-ground green biomass have not yet been confirmed due to the mechanical failure of the photometer used in obtaining relative reflectance measurement. However, graphs of log transmittance versus above-ground green biomass indicate that production estimates may be made for some vegetation types from ERTS imagery. Other vegetation types not suitable for direct ERTS estimation of green biomass may possibly be related to those vegetation types whose production has been estimated from the multispectral imagery.

  1. A sequential tree approach for incremental sequential pattern mining

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Data mining; STISPM; sequential tree; incremental mining; backward tracking. Abstract. ''Sequential pattern mining'' is a prominent and significant method to explore the knowledge and innovation from the large database. Common sequential pattern mining algorithms handle static databases.Pragmatically, looking into the ...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of gas models of Lennard-Jones type interactions: Extensivity associated with interaction range and external noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadijani, M. Nouri; Abbasi, H.; Nezamipour, S.

    2017-06-01

    Statistics of a two-dimensional gas model interacting through a Lennard-Jones type potential, is considered. The goal is to examine the extensivity of internal energy in respect to the potential range and external white noise through molecular dynamics simulation. Accordingly a molecular dynamics simulation model is designed that provides reasonable evidence, in this respect. It is shown that for the long range potential the internal energy scales according to non-extensive thermodynamics expectation and the criteria is specified. Besides, for the short range case we demonstrate that the external noise drastically modifies the statistics of gas and makes the internal energy non-extensive. The relation between the non-extensive parameter, q, and the relaxation time and the noise intensity is obtained.

  3. Sequential Intensification of Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes With Liraglutide Followed by Randomized Addition of Basal Insulin Prompted by A1C Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, J. Hans; Bain, Stephen C.; Rodbard, Helena W.; Seufert, Jochen; D'Alessio, David; Thomsen, Anne B.; Zychma, Marcin; Rosenstock, Julio; Mathieu, C.; Vercammen, C.; Blumer, I.; Bowering, K.; Clayton, D. B.; Conway, J.; Gottesman, I.; Harris, S.; Woo, V.; Allesis, C.; Angeletti, S.; Avignon, A.; Ayon, F.; Benichou, M.; Boitard, C.; Catargi, B.; Charpentier, G.; Clavel, S.; Courreges, J. P.; Debussche, X.; Delemer, B.; Fontaine, P.; Ghanassia, E.; Gouet, D.; Haddad, E.; Hadjadj, S.; Hassler, P.; Hochner, I.; Le Moullec, N.; Lecomte, P.; Mira, R.; Moulin, P.; Reynaud, D.; Vexiau, P.; Barakat, A.; Behnke, T.; Burchert, D.; Daikeler, R.; Dietlein, M.; Drynda, K.; Fach, E. M.; Goelz, S.; Hamann, A.; Hammer, H.; Hanefeld, M.; Hinz, A.; Jordan, R.; Kaiser, M.; Klinge, A.; Kohn, W.; Lundershausen, R.; Maxeiner, S.; Merfort, F.; Milek, K.; Mölle, A.; Paschen, B.; Pohl, A.; Rose, L.; Sauter, J.; Schlecht, K.; Schramm, C.; Schumm-Draeger, P. M.; Schwinn, J.; Segner, A.; Seufert, J.; Siegel, E.; Simon, J.; Steindorf, J.; Stübler, P.; Tosch-Sisting, R.; Vidal, S.; Weber, M.; Wenzl-Bauer, V.; Wilhelm, K.; Arcangeli, A.; Baroni, M. G.; Boemi, M.; Bonomo, M.; Bossi, A.; Buscemi, S.; Caputo, S.; Ciavarella, A.; Corsi, L.; Dal Moro, E.; D'Amico, E.; Di Bartolo, P.; Fatati, G.; Gambardella, S.; Morviducci, L.; Orsi, E.; Paleari, F.; Parillo, M.; Pipicelli, G.; Puccio, L.; Pupillo, M.; Sforza, A.; Tomasi, F.; Venezia, A.; Vespasiani, G.; Zavaroni, D.; Agous, I.; Arntzenius, A. B.; Bianchi, R.; Brouwer, C. B.; de Valk, H. W.; Feis, W. L.; Hentenaar, G. A. P. M.; Hoogenberg, K.; Jebbink, M. C. W.; Kok, S.; Kooy, A.; Lokhorst, B.; Mevissen, H. G. M.; Oldenburg-Ligtenberg, P. C.; Schweitzer, D.; van de Walle, V. E. K. M.; van Doesburg, G. J. M.; Verhage, A. H.; Willink, M. G. J.; Albero Gamboa, R.; Ampudia-Blasco, F. J.; Anglada Barcelo, J.; Brito Sanfiel, M.; Cañizo, F.; Domínguez, R.; Dominguez Escribano, J.; Escalada, J.; Faure Nogueras, E.; Gómez Cerezo, J.; González Sarmiento, E.; Izaguirre, J.; Jodar, E.; Llorente Gómez de Segura, I.; López Tinoco, C.; Lucas, A.; Merchante Alfaro, A.; Mezquita Raya, P.; Morales Pérez, F.; Muros de Fuentes, T.; Paja Fano, M.; Paniagua González, J. A.; Pujol de La Llave, E.; Ramírez Muñoz, L.; Ricart, W.; Rovira, A.; Sánchez Rodríguez, A.; Varela Aguilar, J. M.; Abraham, P.; Andrews, J.; Atkin, S.; Bain, S.; Davies, M.; Dayan, C.; Gibson, M.; Harper, R.; Hitman, G.; Hunter, S.; Jude, E.; Kilvert, A.; Kumar, S.; Lindsay, J.; Mackie, A.; MacRury, S.; Matthews, D.; Mcknight, J.; Narendran, P.; O'Hare, J.; Ramtoola, S.; Robinson, A.; Rooney, D.; Russell-Jones, D.; Saravanan, P.; Stephens, W. P.; Tan, G.; Vaidya, B.; Vora, J.; Whitelaw, D.; Wilding, J.; Wiles, P.; Winocour, P.; Abreu, F.; Acampora, M.; Ahmed, A.; Bays, H.; Bergenstal, R.; Brusco, O.; Chaykin, L.; Cherlin, R.; Chilka, S.; Christina, M.; Chuck, L.; Cohen, J.; Comulada-Rivera, A.; Corder, C.; D'Alessio, D.; Dunn, L.; Dwarakanathan, A.; Feinglos, M.; Forbes, R.; Gilbert, J.; Greco, S.; Griffing, G.; Harris, M.; Harris, R.; Hershon, K.; Hoekstra, J.; Hollander, P.; Hone, J.; Huffman, D.; Jain, R.; Kapoor, A.; Kayne, D.; Kennedy, J.; Levin, P.; Lipetz, R.; Lubin, B.; McCartney, M.; Meneghini, L.; Murillo, A.; Ovalle, F.; Perez, E.; Phillips, L.; Popov, D.; Ramos-Roman, M.; Ratcliff, L.; Ratner, R.; Reed, J.; Rodbard, H. W.; Rosenstock, J.; Sachson, R.; Saponaro, J.; Scott, C.; Selam, J.-L.; Stoever, J.; Sulman, S.; Testa, J.; Philis-Tsimikas, A.; Unger, J.; Vigersky, R.; Weissman, P.; Wheeler, K.; Wittmer, B.; Yeoman, G.; Zamora, B.; Zieve, F.; Zimmerman, T.; Zonszein, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-We evaluated the addition of liraglutide to metformin in type 2 diabetes followed by intensification with basal insulin (detemir) if glycated hemoglobin (A1C) >= 7%. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-In 988 participants from North America and Europe uncontrolled on metformin +/- sulfonylurea,

  4. Clinicopathological features of diabetic and nondiabetic renal diseases in type 2 diabetic patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Ki-Pyo; Kim, Yang Gyun; Moon, Ju-Young; Jung, Su Woong; Park, Eunji; Kim, Jin Sug; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Jo, Young-Il; Choi, Hoon-Young; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Lee, So-Young; Yang, Dong-Ho; Yi, Joo-Hark; Han, Sang-Woong; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2017-09-01

    Heavy proteinuria with or without features of nephrotic syndrome is associated with many primary and systemic diseases. For diabetic patients, distinguishing nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) from diabetic nephropathy (DN) is important in choosing treatment modalities and determining renal prognosis. However, clinical relevance of heavy proteinuria is inconsistent with clinical DN assessments. This study investigated the clinicopathological features and renal outcomes of DN and NDRD in type 2 diabetic patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria.We enrolled 220 cases of type 2 diabetic patients who underwent renal biopsy. They were grouped according to the presence of nephritic-range proteinuria and pathological features. Baseline characteristics, laboratory findings, types of pathological diagnosis, and renal outcomes were analyzed in patients with heavy proteinuria.Upon kidney biopsy, 129 patients (58.6%) showed nephritic-range proteinuria. Patients with heavy proteinuria (an average urine protein-to-creatinine ratio of 10,008 ± 7307 mg/gCr) showed lower serum albumin levels and higher total cholesterol levels, but did not show any difference in age, duration of diabetes, renal function, or the presence of retinopathy compared with those with mild-to-moderate proteinuria (an average urine protein-to-creatinine ratio of 1581 ± 979 mg/gCr). Renal biopsy revealed that the prevalence of NDRD was 37.2% in patients with heavy proteinuria, which was significantly lower than that in patients with mild-to-moderate proteinuria (63.7%). The most common pathological types of NDRD were membranous nephropathy (41.7%), IgA nephropathy (14.6%), and minimal change disease (10.4%). NDRD patients showed lower prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and better kidney function irrespective of proteinuria. Immunosuppressive treatment was administered more frequently in patients with heavy proteinuria (56.3%) compared with patients with mild-to-moderate proteinuria (20%) because

  5. Exploring trophic strategies of exotic caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda): Comparison between habitat types and native vs introduced distribution ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Macarena; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Lacerda, Mariana Baptista; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Masunari, Setuko

    2014-02-01

    The trophic ecology of non-native species is a key aspect to understand their invasion success and the community effects. Despite the important role of caprellid amphipods as trophic intermediates between primary producers and higher levels of marine food webs, there is very little information on their feeding habits. This is the first comprehensive study on the trophic strategies of two co-occurring introduced caprellids in the Spanish coasts: Caprella scaura and Paracaprella pusilla. The diet of 446 specimens of C. scaura and 230 of P. pusilla was analyzed to investigate whether there were differences in the feeding habits in relation to habitat characteristics (natural vs artificial hard substrata), type of host substrata (bryozoans and hydroids) and native vs introduced distribution ranges (Brazil vs Spain). Results revealed differences in diet preferences of the two species that have important implications for their trophic behaviour and showed a limited food overlap, which may favour their coexistence in introduced areas. In general terms, P. pusilla is a predator species, showing preference by crustacean prey in all of its life stages, while C. scaura feeds mainly on detritus. Although no sex-related diet shifts were observed in either of the species, evidence of ontogenetic variation in diet of C. scaura was found, with juveniles feeding on more amount of prey than adults. No diet differences were found between native and introduced populations within the same habitat type. However, P. pusilla exhibited a shift in its diet when different habitats were compared in the same distribution area, and C. scaura showed a flexible feeding behaviour between different host substrata in the same habitat type. This study shows that habitat characteristics at different scales can have greater influence on the feeding ecology of exotic species than different distribution ranges, and support the hypothesis that a switch between feeding strategies depending on habitat

  6. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Rui Gan

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs, intermediate alleles (AIs and expanded alleles (AEs. It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  7. Satellite monitoring of different vegetation types by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS in the red spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the satellite remote sensing of different types of vegetation and ocean colour is presented. In contrast to existing algorithms relying on the strong change of the reflectivity in the red and near infrared spectral region, our method analyses weak narrow-band (few nm reflectance structures (i.e. "fingerprint" structures of vegetation in the red spectral range. It is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS, which is usually applied for the analysis of atmospheric trace gas absorptions. Since the spectra of atmospheric absorption and vegetation reflectance are simultaneously included in the analysis, the effects of atmospheric absorptions are automatically corrected (in contrast to other algorithms. The inclusion of the vegetation spectra also significantly improves the results of the trace gas retrieval. The global maps of the results illustrate the seasonal cycles of different vegetation types. In addition to the vegetation distribution on land, they also show patterns of biological activity in the oceans. Our results indicate that improved sets of vegetation spectra might lead to more accurate and more specific identification of vegetation type in the future.

  8. Windthrow Dynamics in Boreal Ontario: A Simulation of the Vulnerability of Several Stand Types across a Range of Wind Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Anyomi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Boreal North America, management approaches inspired by the variability in natural disturbances are expected to produce more resilient forests. Wind storms are recurrent within Boreal Ontario. The objective of this study was to simulate wind damage for common Boreal forest types for regular as well as extreme wind speeds. The ForestGALES_BC windthrow prediction model was used for these simulations. Input tree-level data were derived from permanent sample plot (PSP data provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. PSPs were assigned to one of nine stand types: Balsam fir-, Jack pine-, Black spruce-, and hardwood-dominated stands, and, Jack pine-, spruce-, conifer-, hardwood-, and Red and White pine-mixed species stands. Morphological and biomechanical parameters for the major tree species were obtained from the literature. At 5 m/s, predicted windthrow ranged from 0 to 20%, with damage increasing to 2 to 90% for winds of 20 m/s and to 10 to 100% for winds of 40 m/s. Windthrow varied by forest stand type, with lower vulnerability within hardwoods. This is the first study to provide such broad simulations of windthrow vulnerability data for Boreal North America, and we believe this will benefit policy decisions regarding risk management and forest planning.

  9. Influence of meat type, sex and storage time on fatty acid profile of free range Dalmatian turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Mauric

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dalmatian turkey is a slow growing breed kept in free range systems. It is a type of “old fashioned poultry” whose meat is present on the market and accepted by consumers. However, no information about its meat quality and fatty acid profile is available. The chemical composition of the meat was influenced by gender and meat type and these differences could be important from the consumer’s point of view. Fatty acid composition was characterized by the predominance of n6 fatty acids, especially C18:2n6 and a high n6/n3 ratio. Increased time of storage strongly reduced the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC PUFA and increased atherogenicity and thrombogenicity indices (AI and TI in thigh tissue. The content of beneficial n3 PUFA was influenced by meat type, with lower values of C18:3n3 and higher values of LC PUFA in the breast compared to the thighs. The potential intake of LC PUFA of comercial turkey in the human diet was lower in comparison to poultry fed with complete feed mixtures. An interesting fact was the higher DHA values in comparison with DPA values in breast tissue, which is characteristic of old poultry breeds. The Dalmatian turkey is a highly valued traditional product and an important archaic breed for gene preservation and biodiversity. Nevertheless, Dalmatian turkey meat could be even further improved by minimal dietary manipulation to become a product with additional health promoting effects.

  10. Effect of free-range access, shelter type and weather conditions on free-range use and welfare of slow-growing broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadig, Lisanne M.; Rodenburg, Bas; Ampe, Bart; Reubens, Bert; Tuyttens, Frank A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Free-range access for broiler chickens can benefit animal welfare because the birds have access to a more natural environment and more opportunities to perform natural behaviours than in indoor systems. Also, they have more space and more environmental enrichment, which could lead to better leg

  11. Products of sequentially pseudocompact spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Lipparini

    2012-01-01

    We show that the product of any number of sequentially pseudocompact topological spaces is still sequentially pseudocompact. The definition of sequential pseudocompactness can be given in (at least) two ways: we show their equivalence. Some of the results of the present note already appeared in A. Dow, J. R. Porter, R. M. Stephenson, R. G. Woods, Spaces whose pseudocompact subspaces are closed subsets, Appl. Gen. Topol. 5 (2004), 243-264.

  12. Yeast silent mating type loci form heterochromatic clusters through silencer protein-dependent long-range interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Miele

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The organization of eukaryotic genomes is characterized by the presence of distinct euchromatic and heterochromatic sub-nuclear compartments. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterochromatic loci, including telomeres and silent mating type loci, form clusters at the nuclear periphery. We have employed live cell 3-D imaging and chromosome conformation capture (3C to determine the contribution of nuclear positioning and heterochromatic factors in mediating associations of the silent mating type loci. We identify specific long-range interactions between HML and HMR that are dependent upon silencing proteins Sir2p, Sir3p, and Sir4p as well as Sir1p and Esc2p, two proteins involved in establishment of silencing. Although clustering of these loci frequently occurs near the nuclear periphery, colocalization can occur equally at more internal positions and is not affected in strains deleted for membrane anchoring proteins yKu70p and Esc1p. In addition, appropriate nucleosome assembly plays a role, as deletion of ASF1 or combined disruption of the CAF-1 and HIR complexes abolishes the HML-HMR interaction. Further, silencer proteins are required for clustering, but complete loss of clustering in asf1 and esc2 mutants had only minor effects on silencing. Our results indicate that formation of heterochromatic clusters depends on correctly assembled heterochromatin at the silent loci and, in addition, identify an Asf1p-, Esc2p-, and Sir1p-dependent step in heterochromatin formation that is not essential for gene silencing but is required for long-range interactions.

  13. Water sorption properties of Dutch type semi-hard cheese edge in the range of common storing temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Soares Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms of Dutch type semi-hard cheese edge in the temperature range of 10–25 ºC and water activity (Aw from 0.11 to 0.98 were determined using manometric method. The sorption curves had a sigmoid shape. The equilibrium moisture content (EMC of cheese samples increased with an increase in Aw at a constant temperature both for water adsorption and desorption. An increase in temperature caused an increase in Aw for the same moisture content (MC and, if Aw was kept constant, an increase in temperature caused a decrease in the amount of absorbed water. Critical values of equilibrium moisture content, corresponding to the Aw = 0.6, were between 11 % MC (w.b. and 17 % MC (w.b. both for moisture adsorption and desorption. Values of sorption heat were calculated from moisture sorption isotherms by applying the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Values of the heat of desorption are higher than those of adsorption and the difference increases with the MC decrease. Heat of sorption decreased from 48.5 kJ/mol (~5.5 % MC w.b. to the values approaching the heat of vaporization of pure water, free MC. The critical value for free water evaporation is about w = 27 % (w.b. for the range of temperature 10–25 ºC.

  14. Expanding the body mass range: associations between BMR and tissue morphology in wild type and mutant dwarf mice (David mice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carola W; Neubronner, Juliane; Rozman, Jan; Stumm, Gabi; Osanger, Andreas; Stoeger, Claudia; Augustin, Martin; Grosse, Johannes; Klingenspor, Martin; Heldmaier, Gerhard

    2007-02-01

    We sought to identify associations of basal metabolic rate (BMR) with morphological traits in laboratory mice. In order to expand the body mass (BM) range at the intra-strain level, and to minimize relevant genetic variation, we used male and female wild type mice (C3HeB/FeJ) and previously unpublished ENU-induced dwarf mutant littermates (David mice), covering a body mass range from 13.5 g through 32.3 g. BMR was measured at 30 degrees C, mice were killed by means of CO(2 )overdose, and body composition (fat mass and lean mass) was subsequently analyzed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), after which mice were dissected into 12 (males) and 10 (females) components, respectively. Across the 44 individuals, 43% of the variation in the basal rates of metabolism was associated with BM. The latter explained 47% to 98% of the variability in morphology of the different tissues. Our results demonstrate that sex is a major determinant of body composition and BMR in mice: when adjusted for BM, females contained many larger organs, more fat mass, and less lean mass compared to males. This could be associated with a higher mass adjusted BMR in females. Once the dominant effects of sex and BM on BMR and tissue mass were removed, and after accounting for multiple comparisons, no further significant association between individual variation in BMR and tissue mass emerged.

  15. Scaling the Teflon Peaks: Rock type and the generation of extreme relief in the glaciated western Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dylan J.; Anderson, Robert S.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Parts of the Alaska Range (Alaska, USA) stand in prominent exception to the “glacial buzzsaw hypothesis,” which postulates that terrain raised above the ELA is rapidly denuded by glaciers. In this paper, we discuss the role of a strong contrast in rock type in the development of this exceptional terrain. Much of the range is developed on pervasively fractured flysch, with local relief of 1000–1500 m, and mean summit elevations that are similar to modern snow line elevations. In contrast, Cretaceous and Tertiary plutons of relatively intact granite support the range's tallest mountains (including Mt. McKinley, or Denali, at 6194 m), with 2500–5000 m of local relief. The high granitic peaks protrude well above modern snow lines and support many large glaciers. We focus on the plutons of the Denali massif and the Kichatna Mountains, to the west. We use field observations, satellite photos, and digital elevation data to demonstrate how exhumation of these plutons affects glacier longitudinal profiles, the glacial drainage network, and the effectiveness of periglacial processes. In strong granite, steep, smooth valley walls are maintained by detachment of rock slabs along sheeting joints. These steep walls act as low-friction surfaces (“Teflon”), efficiently shedding snow. Simple scaling calculations show that this avalanching may greatly enhance the health of the modern glaciers. We conclude that, in places such as Denali, unusual combinations of rapid tectonic uplift and great rock strength have created the highest relief in North America by enhancing glacial erosion in the valleys while preserving the peaks.

  16. Multi-Attribute Sequential Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, J. Neil; Connolly, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article describes empirical and theoretical results from two multi-attribute sequential search tasks. In both tasks, the DM sequentially encounters options described by two attributes and must pay to learn the values of the attributes. In the "continuous" version of the task the DM learns the precise numerical value of an attribute when she…

  17. Sequential therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P; Calvet, Xavier; O'Connor, Anthony; Mégraud, Francis; O'Morain, Colm A

    2010-01-01

    Alternative treatment regimens for standard triple therapy are urgently needed. To critically review the evidence on the role of "sequential" regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. Bibliographical searches were performed in MEDLINE and international congresses. Several pooled-data analyses and meta-analyses have demonstrated that sequential regimen is more effective than standard triple therapy. Sequential therapy is not affected by bacterial (CagA status, infection density) and host factors (underlying disease, smoking). Clarithromycin resistance seems to be the only factor reducing their efficacy. However, even in these patients, an acceptable >75% eradication rate can be achieved. Unfortunately, almost all the studies have been performed in Italy. Whether it is necessary to provide the drugs sequentially or if the 4 components of sequential therapy can be given concurrently is unclear. Nonbismuth quadruple therapy seems to be an effective and safe alternative to triple therapy and is less complex than sequential therapy. Sequential therapy is a novel promising treatment approach that deserves consideration as a treatment strategy for H. pylori infection. However, further robust assessment across a much broader range of patients is required before sequential therapy could supplant existing treatment regimens and be generally recommended in clinical practice.

  18. On Delayed Sequential Coding of Correlated Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ye; Ishwar, Prakash

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by video coding applications, the problem of sequential coding of correlated sources with encoding and/or decoding frame-delays is studied. The fundamental tradeoffs between individual frame rates, individual frame distortions, and encoding/decoding frame-delays are derived in terms of a single-letter information-theoretic characterization of the rate-distortion region for general inter-frame source correlations and certain types of potentially frame specific and coupled single-lett...

  19. Sequential Design of Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine Michaela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-30

    A sequential design of experiments strategy is being developed and implemented that allows for adaptive learning based on incoming results as the experiment is being run. The plan is to incorporate these strategies for the NCCC and TCM experimental campaigns to be run in the coming months. This strategy for experimentation has the advantages of allowing new data collected during the experiment to inform future experimental runs based on their projected utility for a particular goal. For example, the current effort for the MEA capture system at NCCC plans to focus on maximally improving the quality of prediction of CO2 capture efficiency as measured by the width of the confidence interval for the underlying response surface that is modeled as a function of 1) Flue Gas Flowrate [1000-3000] kg/hr; 2) CO2 weight fraction [0.125-0.175]; 3) Lean solvent loading [0.1-0.3], and; 4) Lean solvent flowrate [3000-12000] kg/hr.

  20. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  1. Solubility parameter of drugs for predicting the solubility profile type within a wide polarity range in solvent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, M A; Reíllo, A; Escalera, B; Bustamante, P

    2006-09-14

    The solubility enhancement produced by two binary mixtures with a common cosolvent (ethanol-water and ethyl acetate-ethanol) was studied against the solubility parameter of the mixtures (delta1) to characterize different types of solubility profiles. Benzocaine, salicylic acid and acetanilide show a single peak in the least polar mixture (ethanol-ethyl acetate) at delta1=22.59, 21.70 and 20.91 MPa1/2, respectively. Phenacetin displays two solubility maxima, at delta1=25.71 (ethanol-water) and at delta1=23.30 (ethyl acetate-ethanol). Acetanilide shows an inflexion point in ethanol-water instead of a peak, and the sign of the slope does not vary when changing the cosolvent. The solubility profiles were compared to those obtained in dioxane-water, having a solubility parameter range similar to that covered with the common cosolvent system. All the drugs reach a maximum at about 90% dioxane (delta1=23 MPa1/2). A modification of the extended Hildebrand method is applicable for curves with a single maximum whereas a model including the Hildebrand solubility parameter delta1 and the acidic partial solubility parameter delta1a is required to calculate more complex solubility profiles (with inflexion point or two maxima). A single equation was able to fit the solubility curves of all drugs in the common cosolvent system. The polarity of the drug is related to the shape of the solubility profile against the solubility parameter delta1 of the solvent mixtures. The drugs with solubility parameters below 24 MPa1/2 display a single peak in ethanol-ethyl acetate. The drugs with delta2 values above 25 MPa1/2 show two maxima, one in each solvent mixture (ethanol-water and ethanol-ethyl acetate). The position of the maximum in ethanol-ethyl acetate shifts to larger polarity values (higher delta1 values) as the solubility parameter of the drug delta2 increases.

  2. A spread spectrum system with frequency hopping and sequentially balanced modulation. II - Operation in jamming and multipath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, R. F.; Pawula, R. F.

    1980-10-01

    The performance of a spread spectrum system which incorporates frequency hopping, sequentially balanced modulation, phase-comparison tone ranging, and pseudoorthogonal block coding of BPSK data with maximum likelihood of soft decision decoding, is evaluated in jamming environments and multipath. The jamming models considered include partial-band noise jamming, comb-type partial-band noise jamming, multitone jamming, and comb-type multitone jamming. Specular multipath with broad-band noise are shown to be the most serious form of interference. Bit-error probability and ranging accuracy curves are presented.

  3. The Progression of Sequential Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack McGeachy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential reactions consist of linked reactions in which the product of the first reaction becomes the substrate of a second reaction. Sequential reactions occur in industrially important processes, such as the chlorination of methane. A generalized series of three sequential reactions was analyzed in order to determine the times at which each chemical species reaches its maximum. To determine the concentration of each species as a function of time, the differential rate laws for each species were solved. The solution of each gave the concentration curve of the chemical species. The concentration curves of species A1 and A2 possessed discreet maxima, which were determined through slope-analysis. The concentration curve of the final product, A3, did not possess a discreet maximum, but rather approached a finite limit.

  4. Sequential Divestiture and Firm Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple Cournot models of divestiture tend to generate incentives to divest which are too strong, predicting that firms will break up into an infinite number of divisions resulting in perfect competition. This paper shows that if the order of divestitures is endogenized, firms will always choose sequential, and hence very limited, divestitures. Divestitures favor the larger firm and the follower in a sequential game. Divestitures in which the larger firm is the follower generate greater industry profit and social welfare, but a smaller consumer surplus.

  5. Sequential versus simultaneous market delineation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Niels; Møllgaard, Peter; Kastberg Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    and geographical markets. Using a unique data setfor prices of Norwegian and Scottish salmon, we propose a methodologyfor simultaneous market delineation and we demonstrate that comparedto a sequential approach conclusions will be reversed.JEL: C3, K21, L41, Q22Keywords: Relevant market, econometric delineation......Delineation of the relevant market forms a pivotal part of most antitrustcases. The standard approach is sequential. First the product marketis delineated, then the geographical market is defined. Demand andsupply substitution in both the product dimension and the geographicaldimension...

  6. Average fast neutron flux in three energy ranges in the Quinta assembly irradiated by two types of beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strugalska-Gola Elzbieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed within the international project “Energy plus Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T - RAW for investigations of energy production and transmutation of radioactive waste of the nuclear power industry. 89Y (Yttrium 89 samples were located in the Quinta assembly in order to measure an average high neutron flux density in three different energy ranges using deuteron and proton beams from Dubna accelerators. Our analysis showed that the neutron density flux for the neutron energy range 20.8 - 32.7 MeV is higher than for the neutron energy range 11.5 - 20.8 MeV both for protons with an energy of 0.66 GeV and deuterons with an energy of 2 GeV, while for deuteron beams of 4 and 6 GeV we did not observe this.

  7. Dream Characters’ Types of Involvement and Range of Relational Capacities in Non-lucid Problem-Solving Dreams (Part 1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kozmová, Miloslava

    2017-01-01

    ...’ involvement and range of their relational capacities in non-lucid problem-solving dreams?” In this study, 979 cross-cultural operationally defined problem-solving dreams were analyzed by the method of grounded theory for the dream characters...

  8. An experimental comparison of leaf decomposition rates in a wide range of temperate plant species and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J. H.C.

    1996-01-01

    1 An experimental multispecies screening of leaf decomposition rates was undertaken in order to identify and quantify general patterns in leaf decomposition rates in functional plant types and taxa. Functional species groups were characterized using whole-plant and whole-leaf features relevant to

  9. Attack Trees with Sequential Conjunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhawar, Ravi; Kordy, Barbara; Mauw, Sjouke; Radomirović, Sasa; Trujillo-Rasua, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first formal foundation of SAND attack trees which are a popular extension of the well-known attack trees. The SAND at- tack tree formalism increases the expressivity of attack trees by intro- ducing the sequential conjunctive operator SAND. This operator enables the modeling of

  10. Performance of a 100V Half-Bridge MOSFET Driver, Type MIC4103, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The operation of a high frequency, high voltage MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors) driver was investigated over a wide temperature regime that extended beyond its specified range. The Micrel MIC4103 is a 100V, non-inverting, dual driver that is designed to independently drive both high-side and low-side N-channel MOSFETs. It features fast propagation delay times and can drive 1000 pF load with 10ns rise times and 6 ns fall times [1]. The device consumes very little power, has supply under-voltage protection, and is rated for a -40 C to +125 C junction temperature range. The floating high-side driver of the chip can sustain boost voltages up to 100 V. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specification.

  11. Spatiotemporal Mining of Time-Series Remote Sensing Images Based on Sequential Pattern Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. C.; He, G. J.; Zhang, X. M.; Jiang, W.; Ling, S. G.

    2015-07-01

    With the continuous development of satellite techniques, it is now possible to acquire a regular series of images concerning a given geographical zone with both high accuracy and low cost. Research on how best to effectively process huge volumes of observational data obtained on different dates for a specific geographical zone, and to exploit the valuable information regarding land cover contained in these images has received increasing interest from the remote sensing community. In contrast to traditional land cover change measures using pair-wise comparisons that emphasize the compositional or configurational changes between dates, this research focuses on the analysis of the temporal sequence of land cover dynamics, which refers to the succession of land cover types for a given area over more than two observational periods. Using a time series of classified Landsat images, ranging from 2006 to 2011, a sequential pattern mining method was extended to this spatiotemporal context to extract sets of connected pixels sharing similar temporal evolutions. The resultant sequential patterns could be selected (or not) based on the range of support values. These selected patterns were used to explore the spatial compositions and temporal evolutions of land cover change within the study region. Experimental results showed that continuous patterns that represent consistent land cover over time appeared as quite homogeneous zones, which agreed with our domain knowledge. Discontinuous patterns that represent land cover change trajectories were dominated by the transition from vegetation to bare land, especially during 2009-2010. This approach quantified land cover changes in terms of the percentage area affected and mapped the spatial distribution of these changes. Sequential pattern mining has been used for string mining or itemset mining in transactions analysis. The expected novel significance of this study is the generalization of the application of the sequential pattern

  12. Mapping Type IV Secretion Signals on the Primase Encoded by the Broad-Host-Range Plasmid R1162 (RSF1010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The plasmid R1162 (RSF1010) encodes a primase essential for its replication. This primase makes up the C-terminal part of MobA, a multifunctional protein with the relaxase as a separate N-terminal domain. The primase is also translated separately as the protein RepB'. Here, we map two signals for type IV secretion onto the recently solved structure of RepB'. One signal is located internally within RepB' and consists of a long α-helix and an adjacent disordered region rich in arginines. The second signal is made up of the same α-helix and a second, arginine-rich region at the C-terminal end of the protein. Successive arginine-to-alanine substitutions revealed that either signal can be utilized by the type IV secretion complex of the plasmid R751. The internal signal also enables conjugal transfer when linked to the relaxase part of MobA. Both signals are similar to those previously identified for type IV secretion substrates in the Vir system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Moreover, the C-terminal arginine-rich segment of RepB' has been shown to be secreted by Vir. However, with R751, the signals require MobB, an R1162-encoded accessory protein active in conjugal transfer. The results of two-hybrid assays revealed that MobB interacts, via its membrane-associated domain, with the R751 plasmid coupling protein TraG. In addition, MobB interacts with a region of MobA just outside the RepB' domain. Therefore, MobB is likely an adaptor that is essential for recognition of the primase-associated signals by the R751 secretion machinery. For most plasmids, type IV secretion is an intrinsic part of the mechanism for conjugal transfer. Protein relaxases, bound to the 5' end of the transferring strand, are mobilized into recipient cells by the type IV pathway. In this work, we identify and characterize two signals for secretion in the primase domain of MobA, the relaxase of the IncQ plasmid R1162 (RSF1010). We also show that the adaptor protein MobB is required for engagement

  13. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Letsou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps.

  14. Initial combination therapy with metformin, pioglitazone and exenatide is more effective than sequential add-on therapy in subjects with new-onset diabetes. Results from the Efficacy and Durability of Initial Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes (EDICT): a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, M A; Puckett, C; Triplitt, C; Maggs, D; Adams, J; Cersosimo, E; DeFronzo, R A

    2015-03-01

    To test our hypothesis that initiating therapy with a combination of agents known to improve insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in subjects with new-onset diabetes would produce greater, more durable reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, while avoiding hypoglycaemia and weight gain, compared with sequential addition of agents that lower plasma glucose but do not correct established pathophysiological abnormalities. Drug-naïve, recently diagnosed subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were randomized in an open-fashion design in a single-centre study to metformin/pioglitazone/exenatide (triple therapy; n = 106) or an escalating dose of metformin followed by sequential addition of sulfonylurea and glargine insulin (conventional therapy; n = 115) to maintain HbA1c levels at metformin/pioglitazone/exenatide in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM is more effective and results in fewer hypoglycaemic events than sequential add-on therapy with metformin, sulfonylurea and then basal insulin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Threshold for detection of diabetic peripheral sensory neuropathy using a range of research grade monofilaments in persons with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finch Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To identify the threshold of reduced sensory perception in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM using a range of research grade monofilaments. Methods Three groups of participants were recruited into a between subject, cross-sectional study. Group 1(NEW, persons with Type 2 DM diagnosed for less than 2 years (n = 80; Group 2 (EST persons with Type 2 DM diagnosed for more than 2 years (n = 91, and Group 3, a Comparison group without Type 2 DM (n = 73, resulted in a total study population, n = 244. Research grade monofilaments (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10-gram were employed using standardised protocol, at 6 sites on the plantar aspect of both feet. The demographic and anthropometric measures of gender, age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI, blood pressure and duration of Type 2 DM since diagnosis (if applicable of the participants were analysed. Results Perception of the research grade monofilaments differed significantly between the 3 groups (p Conclusion The 6-gram monofilament was identified as the threshold of normal sensory perception. Inability to perceive the 6-gram monofilament indicates, when using the method described in this study, that diminution of sensory perception is evident. Employing a range of monofilaments, 6, 8 and 10-grams in Type 2 DM foot screening would allow the clinical detection of deteriorating sensory perception and enable implementation of foot protection strategies at an earlier stage than is currently practised.

  16. Sequential extraction protocol for organic matter from soils and sediments using high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfaily, Malak M; Chu, Rosalie K; Toyoda, Jason; Tolić, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Hess, Nancy J

    2017-06-15

    A vast number of organic compounds are present in soil organic matter (SOM) and play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, facilitate interactions between organisms, and represent a sink for atmospheric CO2. The diversity of different SOM compounds and their molecular characteristics is a function of the organic source material and biogeochemical history. By understanding how SOM composition changes with sources and the processes by which it is biogeochemically altered in different terrestrial ecosystems, it may be possible to predict nutrient and carbon cycling, response to system perturbations, and impact of climate change will have on SOM composition. In this study, a sequential chemical extraction procedure was developed to reveal the diversity of organic matter (OM) in different ecosystems and was compared to the previously published protocol using parallel solvent extraction (PSE). We compared six extraction methods using three sample types, peat soil, spruce forest soil and river sediment, so as to select the best method for extracting a representative fraction of organic matter from soils and sediments from a wide range of ecosystems. We estimated the extraction yield of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by total organic carbon analysis, and measured the composition of extracted OM using high resolution mass spectrometry. This study showed that OM composition depends primarily on soil and sediment characteristics. Two sequential extraction protocols, progressing from polar to non-polar solvents, were found to provide the highest number and diversity of organic compounds extracted from the soil and sediments. Water (H2O) is the first solvent used for both protocols followed by either co-extraction with methanol-chloroform (MeOH-CHCl3) mixture, or acetonitrile (ACN) and CHCl3 sequentially. The sequential extraction protocol developed in this study offers improved sensitivity, and requires less sample compared to the PSE workflow where a new sample

  17. Sequential extraction protocol for organic matter from soils and sediments using high resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Toyoda, Jason; Toli?, Nikola; Robinson, Errol W.; Pa?a-Toli?, Ljiljana; Hess, Nancy J.

    2017-03-31

    A vast number of organic compounds are present in soil organic matter (SOM) and play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, facilitate interactions between organisms, and represent a sink for atmospheric CO2. The diversity of different SOM compounds and their molecular characteristics is a function of the organic source material and biogeochemical history. By understanding how SOM composition changes with sources and the processes by which it is biogeochemically altered in different terrestrial ecosystems, it may be possible to predict nutrient and carbon cycling, response to system perturbations, and impact of climate change will have on SOM composition. In this study, a sequential chemical extraction procedure was developed to reveal the diversity of organic matter (OM) in different ecosystems and was compared to the previously published protocol using parallel solvent extraction (PSE). We compared six extraction methods using three sample types, peat soil, spruce forest soil and river sediment, so as to select the best method for extracting a representative fraction of organic matter from soils and sediments from a wide range of ecosystems. We estimated the extraction yield of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by total organic carbon analysis, and measured the composition of extracted OM using high resolution mass spectrometry. This study showed that OM composition depends primarily on soil and sediment characteristics. Two sequential extraction protocols, progressing from polar to non-polar solvents, were found to provide the highest number and diversity of organic compounds extracted from the soil and sediments. Water (H2O) is the first solvent used for both protocols followed by either co-extraction with methanol-chloroform (MeOH-CHCl3) mixture, or acetonitrile (ACN) and CHCl3 sequentially. The sequential extraction protocol developed in this study offers improved sensitivity, and requires less sample compared to the PSE workflow where a new sample

  18. Sequential Stereotype Priming: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Ciara K; White, Katherine R; Hinojos, Michelle R; Sandoval, Mayra; Crites, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Psychological interest in stereotype measurement has spanned nearly a century, with researchers adopting implicit measures in the 1980s to complement explicit measures. One of the most frequently used implicit measures of stereotypes is the sequential priming paradigm. The current meta-analysis examines stereotype priming, focusing specifically on this paradigm. To contribute to ongoing discussions regarding methodological rigor in social psychology, one primary goal was to identify methodological moderators of the stereotype priming effect-whether priming is due to a relation between the prime and target stimuli, the prime and target response, participant task, stereotype dimension, stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and stimuli type. Data from 39 studies yielded 87 individual effect sizes from 5,497 participants. Analyses revealed that stereotype priming is significantly moderated by the presence of prime-response relations, participant task, stereotype dimension, target stimulus type, SOA, and prime repetition. These results carry both practical and theoretical implications for future research on stereotype priming.

  19. Thermodynamic Aspects of Homogeneous Nucleation Enhanced by Icosahedral Short Range Order in Liquid Fcc-Type Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Michel; Kurtuldu, Güven

    2015-08-01

    We have recently shown that minute solute element additions to liquid metallic alloys can strongly influence the nucleation of the fcc phase and act as a grain refinement method. Electron back-scattered diffraction observations revealed a concomitant increase in the percentage of nearest neighbor (nn) grains that are in a twin relationship. Furthermore, multiple-twinned (MT) nn grain configurations with a fivefold symmetry around a common direction have been identified, an occurrence that can be explained when the symmetry of the icosahedron is accounted for. It was then conjectured that a new nucleation mechanism occurs in two steps: first, the formation of small icosahedral quasicrystals in the melt, followed by heteroepitaxy of the fcc phase on facets of these quasicrystals. In the present contribution, based on thermodynamics arguments, it is proposed that the first step occurs by spinodal decomposition of the liquid, in a manner similar to Guinier-Preston zones formation in solid state precipitation, while the second step is a transformation of these quasicrystal precursors into MT-fcc nanocrystals once the driving force for this transformation is sufficient to overcome the fcc-liquid interfacial energy and the elastic strains associated with MT-fcc nanoparticles. This explanation sets up guidelines for finding solute elements and composition ranges that favor this grain refinement mechanism.

  20. Nonlocality in sequential correlation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Rodrigo; Würflinger, Lars Erik; Chaves, Rafael; Acín, Antonio; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    As first shown by Popescu (1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 2619), some quantum states only reveal their nonlocality when subjected to a sequence of measurements while giving rise to local correlations in standard Bell tests. Motivated by this manifestation of ‘hidden nonlocality’ we set out to develop a general framework for the study of nonlocality when sequences of measurements are performed. Similar to Gallego et al (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 070401) our approach is operational, i.e. the task is to identify the set of allowed operations in sequential correlation scenarios and define nonlocality as the resource that cannot be created by these operations. This leads to a characterization of sequential nonlocality that contains as particular cases standard nonlocality and hidden nonlocality.

  1. Grafting aptamers onto gold nanostars increases in vitro efficacy in a wide range of cancer cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Culver, Kayla S B; Odom, Teri W

    2014-02-03

    We report the design of a nanoconstruct that can function as a cell-type independent agent by targeting the ubiquitous protein nucleolin. Gold nanostars (AuNS) loaded with high densities of nucleolin-specific DNA aptamer AS1411 (Apt-AuNS) produced anticancer effects in a panel of 12 cancer lines containing four representative subcategories. We found that the nanoconstructs could be internalized by cancer cells and trafficked to perinuclear regions. Apt-AuNS resulted in downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA expression by ca. 200% compared to cells without the nanoconstructs. The caspase 3/7 activity (apoptosis) and cell death in cancer cells treated with Apt-AuNS increased by 1.5 times and by ca. 17%, respectively, compared to cells treated with free AS1411 at over 10 times the concentration. Moreover, light-triggered release of aptamer from the AuNS further enhanced the in vitro efficacy of the nanoconstructs in the cancer line panel with a 2-fold increase in caspase activity and a 40% decrease in cell viability compared to treatment with Apt-AuNS only. In contrast, treatments of the nanoconstructs with or without light-triggered release on a panel of normal cell lines had no adverse effects.

  2. Trial Sequential Analysis in systematic reviews with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian

    2017-03-06

    Most meta-analyses in systematic reviews, including Cochrane ones, do not have sufficient statistical power to detect or refute even large intervention effects. This is why a meta-analysis ought to be regarded as an interim analysis on its way towards a required information size. The results of the meta-analyses should relate the total number of randomised participants to the estimated required meta-analytic information size accounting for statistical diversity. When the number of participants and the corresponding number of trials in a meta-analysis are insufficient, the use of the traditional 95% confidence interval or the 5% statistical significance threshold will lead to too many false positive conclusions (type I errors) and too many false negative conclusions (type II errors). We developed a methodology for interpreting meta-analysis results, using generally accepted, valid evidence on how to adjust thresholds for significance in randomised clinical trials when the required sample size has not been reached. The Lan-DeMets trial sequential monitoring boundaries in Trial Sequential Analysis offer adjusted confidence intervals and restricted thresholds for statistical significance when the diversity-adjusted required information size and the corresponding number of required trials for the meta-analysis have not been reached. Trial Sequential Analysis provides a frequentistic approach to control both type I and type II errors. We define the required information size and the corresponding number of required trials in a meta-analysis and the diversity (D2) measure of heterogeneity. We explain the reasons for using Trial Sequential Analysis of meta-analysis when the actual information size fails to reach the required information size. We present examples drawn from traditional meta-analyses using unadjusted naïve 95% confidence intervals and 5% thresholds for statistical significance. Spurious conclusions in systematic reviews with traditional meta-analyses can be

  3. Trial Sequential Analysis in systematic reviews with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørn Wetterslev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most meta-analyses in systematic reviews, including Cochrane ones, do not have sufficient statistical power to detect or refute even large intervention effects. This is why a meta-analysis ought to be regarded as an interim analysis on its way towards a required information size. The results of the meta-analyses should relate the total number of randomised participants to the estimated required meta-analytic information size accounting for statistical diversity. When the number of participants and the corresponding number of trials in a meta-analysis are insufficient, the use of the traditional 95% confidence interval or the 5% statistical significance threshold will lead to too many false positive conclusions (type I errors and too many false negative conclusions (type II errors. Methods We developed a methodology for interpreting meta-analysis results, using generally accepted, valid evidence on how to adjust thresholds for significance in randomised clinical trials when the required sample size has not been reached. Results The Lan-DeMets trial sequential monitoring boundaries in Trial Sequential Analysis offer adjusted confidence intervals and restricted thresholds for statistical significance when the diversity-adjusted required information size and the corresponding number of required trials for the meta-analysis have not been reached. Trial Sequential Analysis provides a frequentistic approach to control both type I and type II errors. We define the required information size and the corresponding number of required trials in a meta-analysis and the diversity (D2 measure of heterogeneity. We explain the reasons for using Trial Sequential Analysis of meta-analysis when the actual information size fails to reach the required information size. We present examples drawn from traditional meta-analyses using unadjusted naïve 95% confidence intervals and 5% thresholds for statistical significance. Spurious conclusions in

  4. Random sequential adsorption of cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Michał; Kubala, Piotr

    2018-01-14

    Random packings built of cubes are studied numerically using a random sequential adsorption algorithm. To compare the obtained results with previous reports, three different models of cube orientation sampling were used. Also, three different cube-cube intersection algorithms were tested to find the most efficient one. The study focuses on the mean saturated packing fraction as well as kinetics of packing growth. Microstructural properties of packings were analyzed using density autocorrelation function.

  5. Range and distribution of NT-proBNP values in stable corrected congenital heart disease of various types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelová, Jana; Kotaška, Karel; Černý, Stěpán; Prokopová, Milena; Rubáček, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are an expected finding in many adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) but no reports have described the range of values within different diagnostic groups. Between the years 2003 and 2011 we measured NT-proBNP in consecutive ACHD patients attending the outpatient department. Further NT-proBNP analysis was performed on 705 blood samples from 394 stable patients with the defect corrected. The results were compared among different diagnostic groups and with a control group of healthy volunteers. The median value of NT-proBNP in the whole cohort was signifinatly higher than in the control group (211 vs 42 pg/mL; P < 0.0001). The median value of NT-proBNP in pg/mL and the percentage of normal NT-proBNP values in the listed diagnostic groups were as follows: coarctation of the aorta (COA), 97 (64%); pulmonary stenosis (PS),160 (48%); secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), 254 (44%); incomplete atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD), 211 (32%); ventricular septal defect (VSD), 154 (58%); tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), 177 (38%); transposition of the great arteries (TGA) after Mustard, 237 (20%) or Senning correction, 143 (39%); Ebstein anomaly 287, (26%); pulmonary atresia (PA), 327 (18%); and complex defects after Fontan procedure, 184 (31%). Normal levels of NT-proBNP were found most often in patients after the correction of coarctation of the aorta and ventricular septal defect with the highest levels found in pulmonary atresia and Ebstein anomaly. Our results may serve as reference values for different ACHD groups. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic effect of different types of stretching on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Diulian Muniz; Martini, Tamara Fenner

    2017-10-27

    The calf muscles are one of the muscle groups that have the most need for adequate flexibility since they are deeply related to normal lower limb function. When the goal is to increase flexibility, the most commonly used technique is stretching. However, it remains unknown which stretching technique and parameters are the most effective to increase flexibility. Hence, the aim of the current review was to investigate the influence of chronic stretching on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) of healthy individuals. The search strategy included MEDLINE, PEDro, Cochrane CENTRAL, LILACS, and manual search from inception to February 2017. Randomized and controlled clinical trials that have analyzed the influence of chronic stretching on DFROM were included. On the other hand, studies with special populations (children, and people with any dysfunction/disease), and articles with no control group were excluded. Twenty studies were included out of 493 identified. The meta-analysis was performed according to the stretching technique used in the study. The results show that static stretching (5.17°; 95% CI: 4.39-5.95; I2: 0%) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (4.32°; 95% CI: 1.59-7.04; I2: 46%) are effective in increasing DFROM. Ballistic stretching did not show positive results to increase DFROM (3.77°; 95% CI: -0.03 to 7.56; I2: 46%). In conclusion, chronic stretching is an effective way of improving ankle mobility in healthy individuals, especially when it contains a static component. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nephrotic range proteinuria as a strong risk factor for rapid renal function decline during pre-dialysis phase in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Yuichiro; Doi, Yohei; Osaki, Keisuke; Sugioka, Sayaka; Koshikawa, Masao; Sugawara, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Proteinuria is an established risk factor for progression of renal disease, including diabetic nephropathy. The predictive power of proteinuria, especially nephrotic range proteinuria, for progressive renal deterioration has been well demonstrated in diabetic patients with normal to relatively preserved renal function. However, little is known about the relationship between severity of proteinuria and renal outcome in pre-dialysis diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function. 125 incident dialysis patients with type 2 diabetes were identified. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the impact of nephrotic range proteinuria (urinary protein-creatinine ratio above 3.5 g/gCr) on renal function decline during the 3 months just prior to dialysis initiation. In total, 103 patients (82.4 %) had nephrotic range proteinuria. The median rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in this study population was 0.98 (interquartile range 0.51-1.46) ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Compared to patients without nephrotic range proteinuria, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed significantly faster renal function decline (0.46 [0.24-1.25] versus 1.07 [0.64-1.54] ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month; p = 0.007). After adjusting for gender, age, systolic blood pressure, serum albumin, calcium-phosphorus product, hemoglobin A1c, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed a 3.89-fold (95 % CI 1.08-14.5) increased risk for rapid renal function decline defined as a decline in eGFR ≥0.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Nephrotic range proteinuria is the predominant renal risk factor in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function receiving pre-dialysis care.

  8. An Integrated Rock Typing Approach for Unraveling the Reservoir Heterogeneity of Tight Sands in the Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin, Western Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkhchi, Rahim Kadkhodaie; Rezaee, Reza; Harami, Reza Moussavi

    2014-01-01

    between pore system properties and depositional and diagenetic characteristics in each sand type, reservoir rock types were extracted. The identified reservoir rock types are in fact a reflection of internal reservoir heterogeneity related to pore system properties. All reservoir rock types......Tight gas sands in Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin show large heterogeneity in reservoir characteristics and production behavior related to depositional and diagenetic features. Diagenetic events (compaction and cementation) have severely affected the pore system. In order to investigate...... the petrophysical characteristics, reservoir sandstone facies were correlated with core porosity and permeability and their equivalent well log responses to describe hydraulic flow units and electrofacies, respectively. Thus, very tight, tight, and sub-tight sands were differentiated. To reveal the relationship...

  9. Mining Emerging Sequential Patterns for Activity Recognition in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Chen, Hanhua

    2010-01-01

    Body Sensor Networks oer many applications in healthcare, well-being and entertainment. One of the emerging applications is recognizing activities of daily living. In this paper, we introduce a novel knowledge pattern named Emerging Sequential Pattern (ESP)|a sequential pattern that discovers...... signicant class dierences|to recognize both simple (i.e., sequential) and complex (i.e., interleaved and concurrent) activities. Based on ESPs, we build our complex activity models directly upon the sequential model to recognize both activity types. We conduct comprehensive empirical studies to evaluate...

  10. Composite sequential Monte Carlo test for post-market vaccine safety surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ivair R

    2016-04-30

    Group sequential hypothesis testing is now widely used to analyze prospective data. If Monte Carlo simulation is used to construct the signaling threshold, the challenge is how to manage the type I error probability for each one of the multiple tests without losing control on the overall significance level. This paper introduces a valid method for a true management of the alpha spending at each one of a sequence of Monte Carlo tests. The method also enables the use of a sequential simulation strategy for each Monte Carlo test, which is useful for saving computational execution time. Thus, the proposed procedure allows for sequential Monte Carlo test in sequential analysis, and this is the reason that it is called 'composite sequential' test. An upper bound for the potential power losses from the proposed method is deduced. The composite sequential design is illustrated through an application for post-market vaccine safety surveillance data. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dating phylogenies with sequentially sampled tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Tanja; Yang, Ziheng

    2013-09-01

    We develop a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating divergence times using sequentially sampled molecular sequences. This type of data is commonly collected during viral epidemics and is sometimes available from different species in ancient DNA studies. We derive the distribution of ages of nodes in the tree under a birth-death-sequential-sampling (BDSS) model and use it as the prior for divergence times in the dating analysis. We implement the prior in the MCMCtree program in the PAML package for divergence dating. The BDSS prior is very flexible and, with different parameters, can generate trees of very different shapes, suitable for examining the sensitivity of posterior time estimates. We apply the method to a data set of SIV/HIV-2 genes in comparison with a likelihood-based dating method, and to a data set of influenza H1 genes from different hosts in comparison with the Bayesian program BEAST. We examined the impact of tree topology on time estimates and suggest that multifurcating consensus trees should be avoided in dating analysis. We found posterior time estimates for old nodes to be sensitive to the priors on times and rates and suggest that previous Bayesian dating studies may have produced overconfident estimates.

  12. Expanding the Range of Plant Functional Diversity Represented in Global Vegetation Models: Towards Lineage-based Plant Functional Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, C. J.; Griffith, D.; Edwards, E.; Forrestel, E.; Lehmann, C.; Anderson, M.; Craine, J.; Pau, S.; Osborne, C.

    2014-12-01

    Variation in plant species traits, such as photosynthetic and hydraulic properties, can indicate vulnerability or resilience to climate change, and feed back to broad-scale spatial and temporal patterns in biogeochemistry, demographics, and biogeography. Yet, predicting how vegetation will respond to future environmental changes is severely limited by the inability of our models to represent species-level trait variation in processes and properties, as current generation process-based models are mostly based on the generalized and abstracted concept of plant functional types (PFTs) which were originally developed for hydrological modeling. For example, there are close to 11,000 grass species, but most vegetation models have only a single C4 grass and one or two C3 grass PFTs. However, while species trait databases are expanding rapidly, they have been produced mostly from unstructured research, with a focus on easily researched traits that are not necessarily the most important for determining plant function. Additionally, implementing realistic species-level trait variation in models is challenging. Combining related and ecologically similar species in these models might ameliorate this limitation. Here we argue for an intermediate, lineage-based approach to PFTs, which draws upon recent advances in gene sequencing and phylogenetic modeling, and where trait complex variations and anatomical features are constrained by a shared evolutionary history. We provide an example of this approach with grass lineages that vary in photosynthetic pathway (C3 or C4) and other functional and structural traits. We use machine learning approaches and geospatial databases to infer the most important environmental controls and climate niche variation for the distribution of grass lineages, and utilize a rapidly expanding grass trait database to demonstrate examples of lineage-based grass PFTs. For example, grasses in the Andropogoneae are typically tall species that dominate wet and

  13. Self-welding evaluation of type 304 and A286 stainless steel in the temperature range 800/sup 0/-1140/sup 0/F in flowing sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.Y.; Flagella, P.N.; Schrock, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers two material combinations, Type 304 SS vs Type 304 SS and Type 304 SS vs A286, tested at temperatures from 800 to 1140/sup 0/F for time periods up to six months in flowing sodium. Contact stresses ranged from 2 to 30 ksi on contact areas for 0.63 to 1.00 in./sup 2/. Tests were performed in either tensile or shear modes on the flat-on-flat samples. Surface morphologies of the sample before and after the test were presented. Self-welding of Type 304 SS was significant at temperatures above 1080/sup 0/F while no self-welding was detected at 800/sup 0/F. Sliding friction coefficient (..mu..) data for a Type 304 SS couple at 800/sup 0/F under compressive stresses from 2000 to 30,000 psi in sodium could be correlated quite accurately by W/sigma = 0.08e/sup 9..mu../, where W is the waviness height in microinches and sigma is the compressive stress in kilo-pound per square inch. One self-weld couple of Type 304 SS/Type 304 SS exposed at 1080/sup 0/F for 3 months was not separated but rather removed intact from the test apparatus and examined in cross-section. Scanning electron micrographs of the contacted area revealed that portions of the original interface were no longer discernible. (auth)

  14. Effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range behaviour of slow-growing broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadig, L M; Rodenburg, T B; Ampe, B; Reubens, B; Tuyttens, F A M

    2017-06-01

    Free-range use by broiler chickens is often limited, whereas better use of the free-range area could benefit animal welfare. Use of free-range areas could be stimulated by more appropriate shelter or environmental enrichment (by decreasing birds' fearfulness). This study aimed to assess the effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range use. Three production rounds with 440 slow-growing broiler chickens (Sasso T451) were carried out. Birds were housed indoors in four groups (two with males, two with females) from days 0 to 25, during which two of the groups received environmental enrichment. At day 23 birds' fearfulness was assessed with a tonic immobility (TI) test (n=100). At day 25 all birds were moved (in mixed-sex groups) to mobile houses, and provided with free-range access from day 28 onwards. Each group could access a range consisting for 50% of grassland with 21 artificial shelters (ASs, wooden A-frames) and for 50% of short rotation coppice (SRC) with willow (dense vegetation). Free-range use was recorded by live observations at 0900, 1300 and 1700 h for 15 to 21 days between days 28 and 63. For each bird observed outside the shelter type (AS or SRC), distance from the house (0 to 2, 2 to 5, >5 m) and its behaviour (only rounds 2 and 3) were recorded. Weather conditions were recorded by four weather stations. On average, 27.1% of the birds were observed outside at any given moment of observation. Early environmental enrichment did not decrease fearfulness as measured by the TI test. It only had a minor effect on the percentage of birds outside (0.4% more birds outside). At all distances from the house, SRC was preferred over AS. In AS, areas closer to the house were preferred over farther ones, in SRC this was less pronounced. Free-range use increased with age and temperature and decreased with wind speed. In AS, rainfall and decreasing solar radiation were related to finding more birds outside, whereas the

  15. A Bayesian sequential processor approach to spectroscopic portal system decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, K; Candy, J; Breitfeller, E; Guidry, B; Manatt, D; Gosnell, T; Chambers, D

    2007-07-31

    The development of faster more reliable techniques to detect radioactive contraband in a portal type scenario is an extremely important problem especially in this era of constant terrorist threats. Towards this goal the development of a model-based, Bayesian sequential data processor for the detection problem is discussed. In the sequential processor each datum (detector energy deposit and pulse arrival time) is used to update the posterior probability distribution over the space of model parameters. The nature of the sequential processor approach is that a detection is produced as soon as it is statistically justified by the data rather than waiting for a fixed counting interval before any analysis is performed. In this paper the Bayesian model-based approach, physics and signal processing models and decision functions are discussed along with the first results of our research.

  16. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  17. Compound imaging using Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Jensen, Jonas; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is a technique with low complexity and the ability to yield a more uniform lateral resolution with range. However, the presence of speckle artifacts in ultrasound images degrades the contrast. In conventional imaging speckle is reduced by using...... spatial compounding at the cost of a reduced frame rate. The objective is to apply spatial compounding to SASB and evaluate if the images have a reduced speckle appearance and thereby an improved image quality in terms of contrast compared to ordinary SASB. Using the simulation software Field II, RF data...... detection the five second stage images are added to form the compounded image. Using a ProFocus scanner and the 8804 linear array transducer (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) measurements of a phantom containing water filled cysts are obtained to validate the simulation results. The setup is the same...

  18. Isoscaling in Statistical Sequential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wen-Dong; Ma, Yu-Gang; Cai, Xiang-Zhou; Fang, De-Qing; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chun-Wang; Liu, Gui-Hua; Shen, Wen-Qing; Shi, Yu; Su, Qian-Min; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Kun; Yan, Ting-Zhi

    2007-02-01

    A sequential decay model is used to study isoscaling, i.e. the factorization of the isotope ratios from sources of different isospins and sizes over a broad range of excitation energies, into fugacity terms of proton and neutron number, R21(N,Z) = Y2(N,Z)/Y1(N,Z) = Ce(αN+βZ). It is found that the isoscaling parameters α and β have a strong dependence on the isospin difference of equilibrated source and excitation energy, no significant influence of the source size on α and β has been observed. It is found that α and β decrease with the excitation energy and are linear functions of 1/T and Δ(Z/A)2 or Δ(N/A)2 of the sources. Symmetry energy coefficient Csym is constrained from the relationship of α and source Δ(Z/A)2, β and source Δ(N/A)2.

  19. On-line Flagging of Anomalies and Adaptive Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Fine-feature Characterization of Geosynchronous Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-18

    1 AMOS Technical Conference 2015 On-line Flagging of Anomalies and Adaptive Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Fine-feature Characterization of...features will be reported along with the probabilities of type I and type II errors. The objective of adaptive sequential hypothesis testing in this...chosen fine feature. The combined objective of on-line flagging and adaptive sequential hypothesis testing is to progressively discover new

  20. Composite system reliability evaluation using sequential Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnavithula, Annapoorani

    Monte Carlo simulation methods can be effectively used to assess the adequacy of composite power system networks. The sequential simulation approach is the most fundamental technique available and can be used to provide a wide range of indices. It can also be used to provide estimates which can serve as benchmarks against which other approximate techniques can be compared. The focus of this research work is on the reliability evaluation of composite generation and transmission systems with special reference to frequency and duration related indices and estimated power interruption costs at each load bus. One of the main objectives is to use the sequential simulation method to create a comprehensive technique for composite system adequacy evaluation. This thesis recognizes the need for an accurate representation of the load model at the load buses which depends on the mix of customer sectors at each bus. Chronological hourly load curves are developed in this thesis, recognizing the individual load profiles of the customers at each load bus. Reliability worth considerations are playing an ever increasing role in power system planning and operation. Different methods for bus outage cost evaluation are proposed in this thesis. It may not be computationally feasible to use the sequential simulation method with time varying loads at each bus in large electric power system networks. Time varying load data may also not be available at each bus. This research work uses the sequential methodology as a fundamental technique to calibrate other non sequential methods such as the state sampling and state transition sampling techniques. Variance reduction techniques that improve the efficiency of the sequential simulation procedure are investigated as a part of this research work. Pertinent features that influence reliability worth assessment are also incorporated. All the proposed methods in this thesis are illustrated by application to two reliability test systems. In addition

  1. 2 μm wavelength range InP-based type-II quantum well photodiodes heterogeneously integrated on silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruijun; Sprengel, Stephan; Muneeb, Muhammad; Boehm, Gerhard; Baets, Roel; Amann, Markus-Christian; Roelkens, Gunther

    2015-10-05

    The heterogeneous integration of InP-based type-II quantum well photodiodes on silicon photonic integrated circuits for the 2 µm wavelength range is presented. A responsivity of 1.2 A/W at a wavelength of 2.32 µm and 0.6 A/W at 2.4 µm wavelength is demonstrated. The photodiodes have a dark current of 12 nA at -0.5 V at room temperature. The absorbing active region of the integrated photodiodes consists of six periods of a "W"-shaped quantum well, also allowing for laser integration on the same platform.

  2. The Bacterial Sequential Markov Coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Wilson, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria can exchange and acquire new genetic material from other organisms directly and via the environment. This process, known as bacterial recombination, has a strong impact on the evolution of bacteria, for example, leading to the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, and to the avoidance of clonal interference. Recombination hinders phylogenetic and transmission inference because it creates patterns of substitutions (homoplasies) inconsistent with the hypothesis of a single evolutionary tree. Bacterial recombination is typically modeled as statistically akin to gene conversion in eukaryotes, i.e. , using the coalescent with gene conversion (CGC). However, this model can be very computationally demanding as it needs to account for the correlations of evolutionary histories of even distant loci. So, with the increasing popularity of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for a faster approach to model and simulate bacterial genome evolution. We present a new model that approximates the coalescent with gene conversion: the bacterial sequential Markov coalescent (BSMC). Our approach is based on a similar idea to the sequential Markov coalescent (SMC)-an approximation of the coalescent with crossover recombination. However, bacterial recombination poses hurdles to a sequential Markov approximation, as it leads to strong correlations and linkage disequilibrium across very distant sites in the genome. Our BSMC overcomes these difficulties, and shows a considerable reduction in computational demand compared to the exact CGC, and very similar patterns in simulated data. We implemented our BSMC model within new simulation software FastSimBac. In addition to the decreased computational demand compared to previous bacterial genome evolution simulators, FastSimBac provides more general options for evolutionary scenarios, allowing population structure with migration, speciation, population size changes, and recombination hotspots. FastSimBac is

  3. Sequential Release of Proteins from Structured Multishell Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovich, Ulyana; Michaels, Thomas C T; De Genst, Erwin; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-10-09

    In nature, a wide range of functional materials is based on proteins. Increasing attention is also turning to the use of proteins as artificial biomaterials in the form of films, gels, particles, and fibrils that offer great potential for applications in areas ranging from molecular medicine to materials science. To date, however, most such applications have been limited to single component materials despite the fact that their natural analogues are composed of multiple types of proteins with a variety of functionalities that are coassembled in a highly organized manner on the micrometer scale, a process that is currently challenging to achieve in the laboratory. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of multicomponent protein microcapsules where the different components are positioned in a controlled manner. We use molecular self-assembly to generate multicomponent structures on the nanometer scale and droplet microfluidics to bring together the different components on the micrometer scale. Using this approach, we synthesize a wide range of multiprotein microcapsules containing three well-characterized proteins: glucagon, insulin, and lysozyme. The localization of each protein component in multishell microcapsules has been detected by labeling protein molecules with different fluorophores, and the final three-dimensional microcapsule structure has been resolved by using confocal microscopy together with image analysis techniques. In addition, we show that these structures can be used to tailor the release of such functional proteins in a sequential manner. Moreover, our observations demonstrate that the protein release mechanism from multishell capsules is driven by the kinetic control of mass transport of the cargo and by the dissolution of the shells. The ability to generate artificial materials that incorporate a variety of different proteins with distinct functionalities increases the breadth of the potential applications of artificial protein-based materials

  4. On Sequential Communication Schemes with Information Feedback,

    Science.gov (United States)

    INFORMATION THEORY, FEEDBACK), CODING, DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS , WHITE NOISE, DECISION THEORY, STOCHASTIC PROCESSES, SEQUENTIAL ANALYSIS, ERRORS, PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTIONS, PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, NUMERICAL INTEGRATION

  5. The sequential propensity household projection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Wilson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The standard method of projecting living arrangements and households in Australia and New Zealand is the 'propensity model', a type of extended headship rate model. Unfortunately it possesses a number of serious shortcomings, including internal inconsistencies, difficulties in setting living arrangement assumptions, and very limited scenario creation capabilities. Data allowing the application of more sophisticated dynamic household projection models are unavailable in Australia. OBJECTIVE The aim was create a projection model to overcome these shortcomings whilst minimising input data requirements and costs, and retaining the projection outputs users are familiar with. METHODS The sequential propensity household projection model is proposed. Living arrangement projections take place in a sequence of calculations, with progressively more detailed living arrangement categories calculated in each step. In doing so the model largely overcomes the three serious deficiencies of the standard propensity model noted above. RESULTS The model is illustrated by three scenarios produced for one case study State, Queensland. They are: a baseline scenario in which all propensities are held constant to demonstrate the effects of population growth and ageing, a housing crisis scenario where housing affordability declines, and a prosperity scenario where families and individuals enjoy greater real incomes. A sensitivity analysis in which assumptions are varied one by one is also presented. CONCLUSIONS The sequential propensity model offers a more effective method of producing household and living arrangement projections than the standard propensity model, and is a practical alternative to dynamic projection models for countries and regions where the data and resources to apply such models are unavailable.

  6. Sequential Objective Structured Clinical Examination based on item response theory in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mortaz Hejri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose In a sequential objective structured clinical examination (OSCE, all students initially take a short screening OSCE. Examinees who pass are excused from further testing, but an additional OSCE is administered to the remaining examinees. Previous investigations of sequential OSCE were based on classical test theory. We aimed to design and evaluate screening OSCEs based on item response theory (IRT. Methods We carried out a retrospective observational study. At each station of a 10-station OSCE, the students’ performance was graded on a Likert-type scale. Since the data were polytomous, the difficulty parameters, discrimination parameters, and students’ ability were calculated using a graded response model. To design several screening OSCEs, we identified the 5 most difficult stations and the 5 most discriminative ones. For each test, 5, 4, or 3 stations were selected. Normal and stringent cut-scores were defined for each test. We compared the results of each of the 12 screening OSCEs to the main OSCE and calculated the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, as well as the exam cost. Results A total of 253 students (95.1% passed the main OSCE, while 72.6% to 94.4% of examinees passed the screening tests. The PPV values ranged from 0.98 to 1.00, and the NPV values ranged from 0.18 to 0.59. Two tests effectively predicted the results of the main exam, resulting in financial savings of 34% to 40%. Conclusion If stations with the highest IRT-based discrimination values and stringent cut-scores are utilized in the screening test, sequential OSCE can be an efficient and convenient way to conduct an OSCE.

  7. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  8. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to examine the benefits and harms associated with immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) with specific emphasis on the rate of complications, postoperative anisometropia, and subjective visual function in order to formulate evidence......-based national Danish guidelines for cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central databases identified three randomized controlled trials that compared outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or bilateral cataract surgery on two different dates. Meta-analyses were...... performed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE method (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation). We did not find any difference in the risk of complications or visual outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or surgery...

  9. Online Learning and Sequential Anomaly Detection in Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxhammar, Rikard; Falkman, Göran

    2014-06-01

    Detection of anomalous trajectories is an important problem in the surveillance domain. Various algorithms based on learning of normal trajectory patterns have been proposed for this problem. Yet, these algorithms typically suffer from one or more limitations: They are not designed for sequential analysis of incomplete trajectories or online learning based on an incrementally updated training set. Moreover, they typically involve tuning of many parameters, including ad-hoc anomaly thresholds, and may therefore suffer from overfitting and poorly-calibrated alarm rates. In this article, we propose and investigate the Sequential Hausdorff Nearest-Neighbor Conformal Anomaly Detector (SHNN-CAD) for online learning and sequential anomaly detection in trajectories. This is a parameter-light algorithm that offers a well-founded approach to the calibration of the anomaly threshold. The discords algorithm, originally proposed by Keogh et al. , is another parameter-light anomaly detection algorithm that has previously been shown to have good classification performance on a wide range of time-series datasets, including trajectory data. We implement and investigate the performance of SHNN-CAD and the discords algorithm on four different labeled trajectory datasets. The results show that SHNN-CAD achieves competitive classification performance with minimum parameter tuning during unsupervised online learning and sequential anomaly detection in trajectories.

  10. Fe sub 3 Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  11. Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  12. Principle and basic property of the sequential flow pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shintaro; Maeno, Erina; Li, Xinyang; Yurimoto, Terumi; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2017-09-01

    In the emergency care field, early treatment of acute heart or respiratory failure has been a global concern. In severe cases, patients are frequently required to be on an extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) life support. To make the ECMO system more compact and portable, we proposed a sequential flow-type centrifugal pump named the sequential flow pump (SFP). In this study, principle and basic properties of this novel blood pump were examined by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis and an experimental model. In the SFP, fluid is given centrifugal force sequentially twice with a single closed impeller. This sequential pressurization mechanism enables high-pressure output without high impeller speed. To realize easy integration of a blood pump with an artificial lung, the inlet and outlet ports are located at lateral side and center of the pump, respectively, which is the reverse configuration of conventional centrifugal pumps. The computational model was composed for CFD analysis and the experimental model was developed for the experiment of the actual pump. For both models, dimension of the impeller and volute was designed to be equal. In the CFD analysis, the SFP could generate higher performance than the single pressurization model with the same rotational speed of the impeller. Basic property of the experimental model was very similar to that of the computational model. The results showed the possibility that the SFP would be more suitable for the compact ECMO system than conventional centrifugal pumps.

  13. Sequential association rules in atonal music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honingh, A.; Weyde, T.; Conklin, D.; Chew, E.; Childs, A.; Chuan, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study on the structure of atonal music. In the same way as sequential association rules of chords can be found in tonal music, sequential association rules of pitch class set categories can be found in atonal music. It has been noted before that certain pitch class

  14. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  15. Visual Appearance-Based Unmanned Vehicle Sequential Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Liu; Nanning Zheng; Jianru Xue; Xuetao Zhang; Zejian Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Localizationis of vital importance for an unmanned vehicle to drive on the road. Most of the existing algorithms are based on laser range finders, inertial equipment, artificial landmarks, distributing sensors or global positioning system (GPS) information. Currently, the problem of localization with vision information is most concerned. However, vision‐based localization techniquesare still unavailable for practical applications. In this paper, we present a vision‐based sequential probabilit...

  16. Multi-agent sequential hypothesis testing

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Kwang-Ki K.

    2014-12-15

    This paper considers multi-agent sequential hypothesis testing and presents a framework for strategic learning in sequential games with explicit consideration of both temporal and spatial coordination. The associated Bayes risk functions explicitly incorporate costs of taking private/public measurements, costs of time-difference and disagreement in actions of agents, and costs of false declaration/choices in the sequential hypothesis testing. The corresponding sequential decision processes have well-defined value functions with respect to (a) the belief states for the case of conditional independent private noisy measurements that are also assumed to be independent identically distributed over time, and (b) the information states for the case of correlated private noisy measurements. A sequential investment game of strategic coordination and delay is also discussed as an application of the proposed strategic learning rules.

  17. A Fixed Ratio Combination of Insulin Degludec and Liraglutide (IDegLira) Reduces Glycemic Fluctuation and Brings More Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Within Blood Glucose Target Ranges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Allen B; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Kilpatrick, Eric S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing glycemic fluctuation is important for optimal diabetes management. This post hoc analysis examined glycemic fluctuations and the proportion of subjects achieving recommended blood glucose targets with the fixed ratio combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide (IDeg......Lira) compared to insulin degludec (IDeg) and liraglutide alone. METHODS: We analyzed nine-point self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) profiles from two randomized trials involving IDegLira in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data from a subset of patients in one......). IDegLira also resulted in a greater reduction in the range of SMBG values over 24 h than IDeg (P ≤ 0.0001). CGM data showed that IDegLira provided greater reductions in interstitial glucose (IG) fluctuation (P = 0.0018) and postprandial IG increment (P = 0.0288) compared with IDeg. Compared...

  18. Sequential Decay of 26F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrick, Hayden; Frank, Nathan; Kuchera, Anthony; Sword, Caleb; Brett, Jaclyn; Deyoung, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; Mona Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Unstable neutron rich nuclides show interesting characteristics including multi-neutron emission. By using Jacobi coordinates, multi-neutron emissions from unstable nuclides may be characterized. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory experiment, a 101.3 MeV/u 27Ne ion beam hit a liquid deuterium target, causing reactions which produced several nuclides. Many of these nuclides decayed, resulting in a charged fragment and one or more neutrons. A superconducting dipole magnet bent the path of the fragments into a series of charged-particle detectors. Neutrons from these decays were measured as they interacted with arrays of scintillating plastic bars called the MoNA-LISA. The four-momentum vectors of the charged particle and neutron(s) were used to reconstruct the invariant mass. 26F was formed by 1-proton stripping from the 27Ne beam, which resulted in either one or two neutrons emission. A GEANT4 simulation comparison to the experimental data shows that sequential neutron emission resulted from some of the 26F produced. The results of these comparisons will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1404236.

  19. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results.

  20. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Beskos, Alexandros

    2016-08-29

    In this article we consider the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods which depend on the step-size level . hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretization levels . ∞>h0>h1⋯>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence and a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. It is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context. That is, relative to exact sampling and Monte Carlo for the distribution at the finest level . hL. The approach is numerically illustrated on a Bayesian inverse problem. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Sequential hypothesis testing with spatially correlated presence-absence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePalma, Elijah; Jeske, Daniel R; Lara, Jesus R; Hoddle, Mark

    2012-06-01

    A pest management decision to initiate a control treatment depends upon an accurate estimate of mean pest density. Presence-absence sampling plans significantly reduce sampling efforts to make treatment decisions by using the proportion of infested leaves to estimate mean pest density in lieu of counting individual pests. The use of sequential hypothesis testing procedures can significantly reduce the number of samples required to make a treatment decision. Here we construct a mean-proportion relationship for Oligonychus perseae Tuttle, Baker, and Abatiello, a mite pest of avocados, from empirical data, and develop a sequential presence-absence sampling plan using Bartlett's sequential test procedure. Bartlett's test can accommodate pest population models that contain nuisance parameters that are not of primary interest. However, it requires that population measurements be independent, which may not be realistic because of spatial correlation of pest densities across trees within an orchard. We propose to mitigate the effect of spatial correlation in a sequential sampling procedure by using a tree-selection rule (i.e., maximin) that sequentially selects each newly sampled tree to be maximally spaced from all other previously sampled trees. Our proposed presence-absence sampling methodology applies Bartlett's test to a hypothesis test developed using an empirical mean-proportion relationship coupled with a spatial, statistical model of pest populations, with spatial correlation mitigated via the aforementioned tree-selection rule. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methodology over a range of parameter estimates appropriate for densities of O. perseae that would be observed in avocado orchards in California.

  2. Effect of BST additive on the complex permeability and permittivity of Z-type hexaferrite in the range of 1 MHz-1 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, P. E-mail: hpxyxa@163.com; Deng, L.J.; Xie, J.X.; Liang, D.F.; Chen, L

    2004-04-01

    Z-type hexaferrite (Ba{sub 3}(Co{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}){sub 2}Fe{sub 23.4}O{sub 41}) with BST(Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}) additive was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. We have investigated the effects of BST additive on the complex permeability, permittivity and microwave absorption in the range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The results from XRD and SEM indicate that as the amount of BST increases, the major phase changes to Z-phase, simultaneously M-phase and perovskite phase appear, and grain size increases. When the weight percent of BST additive in Z-type hexaferrite varied from 0% to 1.5%, the BST additive not only improved complex permeability and complex permittivity, but also provided broadband reflectivity characteristics. Meanwhile the minimum reflection point shifts to lower frequency with increase of BST content.

  3. Comparison of improved range of motion between cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip -evaluation by virtual osteochondroplasty using computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, So; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Choe, Hyonmin; Tezuka, Taro; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-16

    While cam resection is essential to achieve a good clinical result with respect to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), it is unclear whether it should also be performed in cases of borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) with a cam deformity. The aim of this study was to evaluate improvements in range of motion (ROM) in cases of cam-type FAI and borderline DDH after virtual osteochondroplasty using a computer impingement simulation. Thirty-eight symptomatic hips in 31 patients (11male and 20 female) diagnosed with cam-type FAI or borderline DDH were analyzed. There were divided into a cam-type FAI group (cam-FAI group: 15 hips), borderline DDH without cam group (DDH W/O cam group: 12 hips), and borderline DDH with cam group (DDH W/ cam group: 11 hips). The bony impingement point on the femoral head-neck junction at 90° flexion and maximum internal rotation of the hip joint was identified using ZedHip® software. Virtual osteochondroplasty of the impingement point was then performed in all cases. The maximum flexion angle and maximum internal rotation angle at 90° flexion were measured before and after virtual osteochondroplasty at two resection ranges (i.e., slight and sufficient). The mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam group after slight resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (P = 0.046). Furthermore, the mean improvement in the internal rotation angle in the DDH W/ cam and cam-FAI groups after sufficient resection was significantly greater than that in the DDH W/O cam group (DDH W/ cam vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.002, cam-FAI vs DDH W/O cam: P = 0.043). Virtual osteochondroplasty resulted in a significant improvement in internal rotation angle in DDH W/ cam group but not in DDH W/O cam group. Thus, borderline DDH cases with cam deformity may be better to consider performing osteochondroplasty.

  4. Hierarchical Chunking of Sequential Memory on Neuromorphic Architecture with Reduced Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqi; Deng, Lei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Fei; Zhang, Ziyang; Li, Huanglong; Song, Sen; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Chunking refers to a phenomenon whereby individuals group items together when performing a memory task to improve the performance of sequential memory. In this work, we build a bio-plausible hierarchical chunking of sequential memory (HCSM) model to explain why such improvement happens. We address this issue by linking hierarchical chunking with synaptic plasticity and neuromorphic engineering. We uncover that a chunking mechanism reduces the requirements of synaptic plasticity since it allows applying synapses with narrow dynamic range and low precision to perform a memory task. We validate a hardware version of the model through simulation, based on measured memristor behavior with narrow dynamic range in neuromorphic circuits, which reveals how chunking works and what role it plays in encoding sequential memory. Our work deepens the understanding of sequential memory and enables incorporating it for the investigation of the brain-inspired computing on neuromorphic architecture.

  5. GLP-1 and Calcitonin Concentration in Humans: Lack of Evidence of Calcitonin Release from Sequential Screening in over 5000 Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes or Nondiabetic Obese Subjects Treated with the Human GLP-1 Analog, Liraglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Moses, Alan C; Zdravkovic, Milan

    2011-01-01

    . There are no longitudinal studies measuring CT in humans without medullary thyroid carcinoma or a family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma and no published studies on the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on human serum CT concentrations. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine serum CT response over time....... Results: Basal mean CT concentrations were at the low end of normal range in all treatment groups and remained low throughout the trials. At 2 yr, estimated geometric mean values were no greater than 1.0 ng/liter, well below upper normal ranges for males and females. Proportions of subjects whose CT...... levels increased above a clinically relevant cutoff of 20 ng/liter were very low in all groups. There was no consistent dose or time-dependent relationship and no consistent difference between treatment groups. Conclusions: These data do not support an effect of GLP-1 receptor activation on serum CT...

  6. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2015-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what 'immunity' means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first 'immune' cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1-3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide 'layers' of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Sequential detection of learning in cognitive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sangbeak; Fellouris, Georgios; Culpepper, Steven; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    In order to look more closely at the many particular skills examinees utilize to answer items, cognitive diagnosis models have received much attention, and perhaps are preferable to item response models that ordinarily involve just one or a few broadly defined skills, when the objective is to hasten learning. If these fine-grained skills can be identified, a sharpened focus on learning and remediation can be achieved. The focus here is on how to detect when learning has taken place for a particular attribute and efficiently guide a student through a sequence of items to ultimately attain mastery of all attributes while administering as few items as possible. This can be seen as a problem in sequential change-point detection for which there is a long history and a well-developed literature. Though some ad hoc rules for determining learning may be used, such as stopping after M consecutive items have been successfully answered, more efficient methods that are optimal under various conditions are available. The CUSUM, Shiryaev-Roberts and Shiryaev procedures can dramatically reduce the time required to detect learning while maintaining rigorous Type I error control, and they are studied in this context through simulation. Future directions for modelling and detection of learning are discussed. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  9. Sequential parameter estimation for stochastic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kivman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prediction of dynamical system evolution is determined by the accuracy to which initial conditions and forcing are known. Availability of future observations permits reducing the effects of errors in assessment the external model parameters by means of a filtering algorithm. Usually, uncertainties in specifying internal model parameters describing the inner system dynamics are neglected. Since they are characterized by strongly non-Gaussian distributions (parameters are positive, as a rule, traditional Kalman filtering schemes are badly suited to reducing the contribution of this type of uncertainties to the forecast errors. An extension of the Sequential Importance Resampling filter (SIR is proposed to this aim. The filter is verified against the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF in application to the stochastic Lorenz system. It is shown that the SIR is capable of estimating the system parameters and to predict the evolution of the system with a remarkably better accuracy than the EnKF. This highlights a severe drawback of any Kalman filtering scheme: due to utilizing only first two statistical moments in the analysis step it is unable to deal with probability density functions badly approximated by the normal distribution.

  10. Functional control of the renal transplant via sequential computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treugut, H.; Nyman, U.; Hildell, J.; Molde, A.

    1981-08-01

    The enhancement of cortex medulla and arteria iliaca can be visualized separately, evaluated densitometrically and represented graphically by means of sequential computerized tomography of the renal transplant following intravenous contrast medium bolus injection. Since this enhancement performance is mainly dependent on perfusion, it is possible to determine the perfusion value of individual measurement areas. For example, a cortical defective perfusion, as is known in rejection, becomes evident as a flattening-out of the initial rise of cortex enhancement and can be distinguished from the largely normal type of curve obtained in acute tubular necrosis (ATN). The angiographically known prolonged 'wash-out time' in rejection corresponds to a long-lasting corticomedullary density gradient. Despite restricted informative value because of the relatively small number of patients, it appears that sequential computerized tomography enables differentiation of postoperative anuria.

  11. Optimal sequential measurements for bipartite state discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croke, Sarah; Barnett, Stephen M.; Weir, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    State discrimination is a useful test problem with which to clarify the power and limitations of different classes of measurement. We consider the problem of discriminating between given states of a bipartite quantum system via sequential measurement of the subsystems, with classical feed-forward of measurement results. Our aim is to understand when sequential measurements, which are relatively easy to implement experimentally, perform as well, or almost as well, as optimal joint measurements, which are in general more technologically challenging. We construct conditions that the optimal sequential measurement must satisfy, analogous to the well-known Helstrom conditions for minimum error discrimination in the unrestricted case. We give several examples and compare the optimal probability of correctly identifying the state via global versus sequential measurement strategies.

  12. Efficacy of premixed versus sequential administration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine premixed with dexmeditomidine compared with sequential administration in separate syringes on block characteristics, haemodynamic parameters, side effect profile and postoperative analgesic requirement. Trial design: This was a prospective, ...

  13. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-02

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1-2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1–2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. PMID:26507855

  15. Sequential testing problems for Poisson processes

    OpenAIRE

    Peskir, G; A.N. Shiryaev

    2000-01-01

    We present the explicit solution of the Bayesian problem of sequential testing of two simple hypotheses about the intensity of an observed Poisson process. The method of proof consists of reducing the initial problem to a free-boundary differential-difference Stephan problem and solving the latter by use of the principles of smooth and continuous fit. A rigorous proof of the optimality of the Wald’s sequential probability ratio test in the variational formulation of the prob...

  16. Panchromatic Sequentially Cast Ternary Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Masoud; Ye, Long; Zhang, Qianqian; Yan, Liang; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Awartani, Omar; You, Wei; Gadisa, Abay; Ade, Harald

    2017-01-01

    A sequential-casting ternary method is developed to create stratified bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, in which the two BHJ layers are spin cast sequentially without the need of adopting a middle electrode and orthogonal solvents. This method is found to be particularly useful for polymers that form a mechanically alloyed morphology due to the high degree of miscibility in the blend. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Simultaneous vs sequential adjustments in a duopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Adyda; Karim, Sharmila; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-12-01

    In a duopoly situation, two firms can move towards the equilibrium point either sequentially or simultaneously. In the case of equal costs and equal initial outputs, numerical results in this paper show the effect of simultaneous adjustment and sequential adjustment on the length of time it takes for a firm to reach the Cournot equilibrium, and the total profit accumulated up until reaching the equilibrium point.

  18. Somatic embryogenesis from seeds in a broad range of Vitis vinifera L. varieties: rescue of true-to-type virus-free plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Tània; Gammoudi, Najet; Peiró, Rosa; Olmos, Antonio; Gisbert, Carmina

    2017-11-29

    Somatic embryogenesis is the preferred method for cell to plant regeneration in Vitis vinifera L. However, low frequencies of plant embryo conversion are commonly found. In a previous work we obtained from cut-seeds of a grapevine infected with the Grapevine leafroll associated viruses 1 and 3 (GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3), high rates of direct regeneration, embryo plant conversion and sanitation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of this procedure for regeneration of other grapevine varieties which include some infected with one to three common grapevine viruses (GLRaV-3, Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)). As grapevine is highly heterozygous, it was necessary to select from among the virus-free plants those that regenerated from mother tissues around the embryo, (true-to-type). Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration were achieved in a first experiment, using cut-seeds from the 14 grapevine varieties Airén, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mencía, Merlot, Monastrell, Petit Verdot, Pinot Blanc (infected by GFLV and GFkV), Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Tempranillo (infected by GFLV), and Verdil. All regenerated plants were confirmed to be free of GFkV whereas at least 68% sanitation was obtained for GFLV. The SSR profiles of the virus-free plants showed, in both varieties, around 10% regeneration from mother tissue (the same genetic make-up as the mother plant). In a second experiment, this procedure was used to sanitize the varieties Cabernet Franc, Godello, Merlot and Valencí Blanc infected by GLRaV-3, GFkV and/or GFLV. Cut-seeds can be used as explants for embryogenesis induction and plant conversion in a broad range of grapevine varieties. The high regeneration rates obtained with this procedure facilitate the posterior selection of true-to-type virus-free plants. A sanitation rate of 100% was obtained for GFkV as this virus is not seed-transmitted. However, the presence of GLRaV-3 and GFLV in

  19. Method to estimate the effective temperatures of late-type giants using line-depth ratios in the wavelength range 0.97-1.32 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Fukue, Kei; Hamano, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Yasui, Chikako

    2018-02-01

    The effective temperature, one of the most fundamental atmospheric parameters of a star, can be estimated using various methods; here, we focus on a method using line-depth ratios (LDRs). This method combines low- and high-excitation lines and makes use of relations between LDRs of these line pairs and the effective temperature. It has an advantage, for example, of being minimally affected by interstellar reddening, which changes stellar colours. We report 81 relations between LDRs and effective temperature established with high-resolution, λ/Δλ ∼ 28 000, spectra of nine G- to M-type giants in the Y and J bands. Our analysis gives the first comprehensive set of LDR relations for this wavelength range. The combination of all these relations can be used to determine the effective temperatures of stars that have 3700 < Teff < 5400 K and -0.5 < [Fe/H] < +0.3 dex, to a precision of ±10 K in the best cases.

  20. Computer-assisted 2-D agarose electrophoresis of Haemophilus influenzae type B meningitis vaccines and analysis of polydisperse particle populations in the size range of viruses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Dietmar

    2007-02-01

    When protein-polysaccharide conjugated vaccines were first developed for the immunization of small children against meningitis caused by infection with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), the vaccine preparations varied in immunogenicity. Testing for immunogenicity was time-consuming and alternative analytical procedures for determining vaccine quality were unsatisfactory. For example, due to the very high molecular weight of the vaccine particles, immunogens could only be physically characterized as a fraction in the void volume of Sepharose gel filtration. In search of better analytical methods, a computer-assisted electrophoretic technique for analyzing such vaccines was developed in the period from 1983 to 1995. This new approach made it possible to analyze highly negatively charged particles as large as or larger than intact viruses. 2-D gel patterns were generated that varied depending on the conditions of the particular vaccine preparation and were therefore characteristic of each vaccine sample. Thus, vaccine particle populations with a continuous size variation over a wide range (polydisperse) could be characterized according to size and free mobility (related to particle surface net charge density). These advances are reviewed in this article, since the developed methods are still a promising tool for vaccine quality control and for predicting immunogen effectiveness in the production of vaccines. The technique is potentially beneficial for Hib immunogens and other high-molecular-mass vaccines. Additional biomedical applications for this nondenaturing electrophoretic technique are briefly discussed and detailed information about computational and mathematical procedures and theoretical aspects is provided in the Appendices.

  1. Effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range behaviour of slow-growing broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadig, L.M.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Ampe, B.; Reubens, B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Free-range use by broiler chickens is often limited, whereas better use of the free-range area could benefit animal welfare. Use of free-range areas could be stimulated by more appropriate shelter or environmental enrichment (by decreasing birds’ fearfulness). This study aimed to assess the

  2. Batch sequential designs for computer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Leslie M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loeppky, Jason L [UBC-OKANAGAN

    2009-01-01

    Computer models simulating a physical process are used in many areas of science. Due to the complex nature of these codes it is often necessary to approximate the code, which is typically done using a Gaussian process. In many situations the number of code runs available to build the Guassian process approximation is limited. When the initial design is small or the underlying response surface is complicated this can lead to poor approximations of the code output. In order to improve the fit of the model, sequential design strategies must be employed. In this paper we introduce two simple distance based metrics that can be used to augment an initial design in a batch sequential manner. In addition we propose a sequential updating strategy to an orthogonal array based Latin hypercube sample. We show via various real and simulated examples that the distance metrics and the extension of the orthogonal array based Latin hypercubes work well in practice.

  3. Sequential Path Entanglement for Quantum Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xian-Min; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Deng, Youjin; Barbieri, Marco; Nunn, Joshua; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Path entanglement is a key resource for quantum metrology. Using path-entangled states, the standard quantum limit can be beaten, and the Heisenberg limit can be achieved. However, the preparation and detection of such states scales unfavourably with the number of photons. Here we introduce sequential path entanglement, in which photons are distributed across distinct time bins with arbitrary separation, as a resource for quantum metrology. We demonstrate a scheme for converting polarization Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement into sequential path entanglement. We observe the same enhanced phase resolution expected for conventional path entanglement, independent of the delay between consecutive photons. Sequential path entanglement can be prepared comparably easily from polarization entanglement, can be detected without using photon-number-resolving detectors, and enables novel applications.

  4. Design and application of a drip-type rainfall simulator adapted to steep topography and low intensity-rainfall characteristics in the Coastal Range of Southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Christian; Anton, Huber

    2010-05-01

    Besides being adaptable for measuring infiltration, overland flow and sediment transport simultaneously, rainfall simulator systems allow the observation of the processes of runoff generation and soil erosion, too. This enables the assimilation of additional qualitative data and makes a rainfall simulator system a very valid method in the investigation of soil-hydrological response to precipitation events. In the present study a cheap, handy, transportable and easy to set up rainfall simulator applicable for the steep terrain conditions of the Southern Chilean Coastal range was designed based on Bowyer-Bower & Burt (1989). The used drip-type rainfall simulator had to fulfill two main requirements: adaptive to steep topography and little in water consumption. The used simulator is set up by a dismountable rectangular metal rack of 0.5x1.0m basal surface and 2.5m height. The metallic structure enables the attachment of plastic boards for wind protection. Fixable telescopic extensions allow a firm adjustment to slopes up to 45°. Horizontal metallic frames at different heights increase the stability of the structure and carry the devices of the rainfall simulator. On the uppermost frame, two containers provided with calibrated scales spend the water to a fast reacting receptacle assuring constant water supply and pressure by the Mariotte's principle. The rainfall intensity is adjusted by a control-panel according to the Bernoulli principle. This guarantees a constant water flow which was verified by the water-volume leaving the calibrated containers on top. Interchangeable glass-tubes of different diameters in the control-panel permit the generation of various precipitation intensities (4-60 mm/h; SD =0.16mm). The frame beneath carries an acrylic glass box with approx. 600 drop-formers (fishing line inside a 0.76mm Tygon-tube) at its bottom. 20 cm below, a framed 5mm-spacing-mesh serves as a raindrop randomizer. At the base of the simulator sheet metals avoid lateral

  5. Two dose-ranging studies with PF-04937319, a systemic partial activator of glucokinase, as add-on therapy to metformin in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, N B; Aggarwal, N; Pall, D; Paragh, G; Denney, W S; Le, V; Riggs, M; Calle, R A

    2015-08-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of a range of doses of a systemic, partial, glucokinase activator, PF-04937319, as add-on therapy to metformin, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients were randomized to once-daily PF-04937319 doses of 10, 50, 100 mg, or matching placebo (Study B1621002); or PF-04937319 doses of 3, 20, 50, 100 mg, or matching placebo (Study B1621007). Titrated glimepiride (Study B1621002) or sitagliptin (Study B1621007) were included in a double-dummy manner. The primary measure was change from baseline in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at week 12. Key secondary measures included other glycaemic variables and safety and tolerability. In the 639 patients randomized, the minimally efficacious PF-04937319 dose was identified as 50 mg once daily. At the highest PF-04937319 dose tested (100 mg), on average, a clinically significant reduction in HbA1c [-4.94 or -5.11 mmol/mol (-0.45 or -0.47%), placebo-adjusted], which was similar to that achieved with sitagliptin [-4.69 mmol/mol (-0.43%)] but lower than that achieved with titrated glimepiride [-9.07 mmol/mol (-0.83%)], was observed. At this dose, the effect on fasting plasma glucose was not consistent between the two studies (Study B1621002 vs Study B1621007: placebo-adjusted mean change of -0.83 vs +0.50 mmol/l). PF-04937319 was well tolerated at doses up to 100 mg. Hypoglycaemia was reported in 2.5% of patients (on placebo), 5.1% of patients (on PF-04937319 100 mg), 1.8% of patients (on sitagliptin) and 34.4% of patients (on titrated glimepiride). In patients on metformin monotherapy, the addition of a 100-mg dose of PF-04937319 improved glycaemic control and was well tolerated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Passive Baited Sequential Filth Fly Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert L; Britch, Seth C; Snelling, Melissa; Gutierez, Arturo; White, Gregory; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2015-09-01

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted-cone design to passively confine flies in 8 modified collection bottles corresponding to 8 intervals. Efficacy trials in a hot-arid desert environment indicate no significant difference (P  =  0.896) between the modified sequential trap and a Rid-Max® fly trap.

  7. Double sequential defibrillation for refractory ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tawil, Chady; Mrad, Sandra; Khishfe, Basem F

    2017-12-01

    A 54-year-old suffered from an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Compressions were started within minutes and the patient was in refractory ventricular fibrillation despite multiple asynchronized shocks and maximal doses of antiarrhythmic agents. Double sequential defibrillation was attempted with successful Return Of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) after a total of 61min of cardiac arrest. The patient was discharged home neurologically intact. Double sequential defibrillation could be a simple effective approach to patients with refractory ventricular fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequential and Adaptive Learning Algorithms for M-Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Deng

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The M-estimate of a linear observation model has many important engineering applications such as identifying a linear system under non-Gaussian noise. Batch algorithms based on the EM algorithm or the iterative reweighted least squares algorithm have been widely adopted. In recent years, several sequential algorithms have been proposed. In this paper, we propose a family of sequential algorithms based on the Bayesian formulation of the problem. The basic idea is that in each step we use a Gaussian approximation for the posterior and a quadratic approximation for the log-likelihood function. The maximum a posteriori (MAP estimation leads naturally to algorithms similar to the recursive least squares (RLSs algorithm. We discuss the quality of the estimate, issues related to the initialization and estimation of parameters, and robustness of the proposed algorithm. We then develop LMS-type algorithms by replacing the covariance matrix with a scaled identity matrix under the constraint that the determinant of the covariance matrix is preserved. We have proposed two LMS-type algorithms which are effective and low-cost replacement of RLS-type of algorithms working under Gaussian and impulsive noise, respectively. Numerical examples show that the performance of the proposed algorithms are very competitive to that of other recently published algorithms.

  9. Isolation and RFLP genotyping of toxoplasma gondii in free-range chicken(Gallus domesticus) in Grenada, West Indies, revealed widespread and dominance of clonal type III parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the present cross sectional study were to estimate the prevalence and to isolate and genotype Toxoplasma gondii in free range chickens from Grenada, West Indies. Using the modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 39 (26.9%) of 145 free-range chickens with ...

  10. Cross-neutralizing antibodies elicited by the Cervarix® human papillomavirus vaccine display a range of Alpha-9 inter-type specificities ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Bissett, Sara L; Draper, Eve; Myers, Richard E.; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The highly efficacious human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) representing genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, which together account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Vaccine-type protection is thought to be mediated by high titer, type-specific neutralizing antibodies. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically-related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39...

  11. Cross-neutralizing antibodies elicited by the Cervarix® human papillomavirus vaccine display a range of Alpha-9 inter-type specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Sara L; Draper, Eve; Myers, Richard E; Godi, Anna; Beddows, Simon

    2014-02-26

    The highly efficacious human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) representing genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, which together account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Vaccine-type protection is thought to be mediated by high titer, type-specific neutralizing antibodies. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically-related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68) species groups. Cross-protection is coincident with the detection of low titer serum responses against non-vaccine types by vaccinees. Such antibodies may be the effectors of cross-protection or their detection may be useful as a correlate or surrogate. This study evaluated whether cross-neutralization of HPV types from the Alpha-9 species group is mediated by antibodies with a predominantly type-restricted specificity for HPV16 that nevertheless exhibit low affinity interactions with non-vaccine types, or by antibody specificities that demonstrate similar recognition of vaccine and non-vaccine types but are present at very low levels. Antibodies generated following Cervarix® vaccination of 13-14 year old girls were evaluated by pseudovirus neutralization, VLP ELISA and by enrichment of target antigen specificity using VLP-immobilized beads. Two-dimensional hierarchical clustering of serology data demonstrated that the antibody specificity profile generated by VLP ELISA was both quantitatively and qualitatively different from the neutralizing antibody specificity profile. Target-specific antibody enrichment demonstrated that cross-neutralization of non-vaccine types was due to a minority of antibodies rather than by the weak interactions of a predominantly type-restricted HPV16 antibody specificity. Furthermore, cross-neutralization of non-vaccine types appeared to be mediated by multiple antibody specificities, recognizing single and multiple non

  12. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  13. Bringing sequential feature explanations to life

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokoena, Tshepiso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available with no information about what caused the anomalies. A sequential feature explanation(SFE) of a detected data point is an ordered sequence of features which are presented to the analysts, one at a time until the information contained in the set of already presented...

  14. Sequential auctions for full truckload allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we examine the use of sequential auctions for the dynamic allocation of transportation jobs. For all players, buyers and sellers, we develop strategies and examine their performance both in terms of individual benefits and with respect to the global logistical performance (resource

  15. Hierarchical Knowledge Gradient for Sequential Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.; Powell, Warren B.; Frazier, Peter I.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a sequential sampling policy for noisy discrete global optimization and ranking and selection, in which we aim to efficiently explore a finite set of alternatives before selecting an alternative as best when exploration stops. Each alternative may be characterized by a multidimensional

  16. Sequential Bayesian technique: An alternative approach for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a sequential Bayesian approach similar to Kalman filter for estimating reliability growth or decay of software. The main advantage of proposed method is that it shows the variation of the parameter over a time, as new failure data become available. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated with ...

  17. The curse of sequentiality in routing games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correa, José; de Jong, Jasper; de Keijzer, Bart; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Markakis, Evangelos; Schäfer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In the "The curse of simultaneity", Paes Leme at al. show that there are interesting classes of games for which sequential decision making and corresponding subgame perfect equilibria avoid worst case Nash equilibria, resulting in substantial improvements for the price of anarchy. This is called the

  18. Sequential Bayesian technique: An alternative approach for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 8 October 2007; revised 15 July 2008. Abstract. This paper proposes a sequential Bayesian approach similar to Kalman filter for estimating reliability growth or decay of software. The main advantage of proposed method is that it shows the variation of the parameter over a time, as new failure data become ...

  19. Sequential and Simultaneous Logit: A Nested Model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, J.C.M.; Schram, A.J.H.C.

    1997-01-01

    A nested model is presented which has both the sequential and the multinomial logit model as special cases. This model provides a simple test to investigate the validity of these specifications. Some theoretical properties of the model are discussed. In the analysis a distribution function is

  20. Adult Word Recognition and Visual Sequential Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted investigating the role of visual sequential memory skill in the word recognition efficiency of undergraduate university students. Word recognition was assessed in a lexical decision task using regularly and strangely spelt words, and nonwords that were either standard orthographically legal strings or items made from…

  1. A Scalable Algorithm for Clustering Sequential Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-16

    can be computed e cient using a variety of sequential pattern discovery algorithms AS SA Zak JKK HPMA Projecting in to the Feature...matrices from protein blocks Proc Natl Academy Science HPMA J Han J Pei B MortazaviAsl Q Chen U Dayal and M

  2. Consistency of self-reported alcohol consumption on randomized and sequential alcohol purchase tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eAmlung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral economic demand for addictive substances is commonly assessed via purchase tasks that measure estimated drug consumption at a range of prices. Purchase tasks typically use escalating prices in sequential order, which may influence performance by providing explicit price reference points. This study investigated the consistency of value preferences on two alcohol purchase tasks (APTs that used either a randomized or sequential price order (price range: free to $30 per drink in a sample of ninety-one young adult monthly drinkers. Randomization of prices significantly reduced relative response consistency (p < .01, although absolute consistency was high for both versions (>95%. Self-reported alcohol consumption across prices and indices of demand were highly similar across versions, although a few notable exceptions were found. These results suggest generally high consistency and overlapping performance between randomized and sequential price assessment. Implications for the behavioral economics literature and priorities for future research are discussed.

  3. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, dose-ranging study of botulinum toxin type A in men with glabellar rhytids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean

    2005-10-01

    The effective dose for treating glabellar lines with botulinum toxin type A in men has not been studied adequately. To compare the safety, efficacy, and duration of response of four doses of botulinum toxin type A on glabellar rhytids in men. Eighty men were randomized to receive a total dose of either 20, 40, 60, or 80 U of botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX, BOTOX Cosmetic, or Vistabel, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) in the glabellar area. Glabellar lines were assessed at rest and maximum frown by a trained observer at baseline, 2 and 4 weeks, and monthly thereafter. Patients provided self-evaluations at the same visits. Adverse events were monitored throughout. The 40, 60, and 80 U doses of botulinum toxin type A were consistently more effective in reducing glabellar lines than the 20 U dose (duration, peak response rate, improvement from baseline). There was a dose-dependent increase in both the response rate at maximum frown and the duration of effect assessed by the trained observer. In addition, the participants reported a dose-dependent reduction in the ability to frown, improvement in their global assessment, and increased feelings of attractiveness, self-confidence, and satisfaction. The incidence of adverse events was not increased with higher doses. Male participants with glabellar rhytids benefit from starting doses of at least 40 U of botulinum toxin type A.

  4. Reducing exposure to pathogens in the horse: a preliminary study into the survival of bacteria on a range of equine bedding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, K; Le Bon, M; Turton, N; Savova, M; McGlennon, A; Forsythe, S

    2017-01-01

    To compare the rate of growth of four microbial strains that cause disease in the horse, on four commonly used types of bedding. The moisture-holding capacity of each bedding type was also tested. Microbial strains included Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Dichelobacter nodosus and Dermatophilus congolensis. The bedding types tested were Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine shavings), Pinus nigra (Corsican pine shavings), Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce shavings), Cannabis sativa (hemp) and chopped wheat straw. A suspension of each microbial strain was spread in triplicate on agar media and incubated in its optimal growth conditions. The viable count (colony-forming unit per ml) was determined for each bacterial strain for the five different bedding types. Pinus sylvestris bedding resulted in significantly less (P = 0·001) bacterial growth of all strains tested. Factors resulting in the inhibition of bacterial growth include the antibacterial effects reported in the Pinacea family and the physical properties of the bedding substrate. Research is currently focussed on the diagnosis and management of disease. Prevention of disease is also important for matters of biosecurity. Strategies should include the provision of a hygienic environment and the use of specific types of bedding. Bedding choice has implications for global equine health and disease prevention as well as potential benefits in other animal species. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. High Accuracy Radiation TSP-type Thermometers for Radiometric Scale Realization in the Temperature Range from 600 to 3200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, M. L.; Ogarev, S. A.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Khromchenko, V. B.; Mekhontsev, S. N.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2003-09-01

    We have designed at VNIIOFI a high-accuracy radiation thermometer, model TSP-2 (Transfer Standard Pyrometer), for radiometric scale dissemination within the temperature range from 600°C to 3200 °C. This thermometer has been recently modified and investigated. The new TSP-4 model of radiation thermometer is under development now.

  6. Functional genomic mRNA profiling of a large cancer data base demonstrates mesothelin overexpression in a broad range of tumor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E.; de Groot, Derk Jan A.; Bense, Rico D.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane bound glycoprotein mesothelin (MSLN) is a highly specific tumor marker, which is currently exploited as target for drugs. There are only limited data available on MSLN expression by human tumors. Therefore we determined overexpression of MSLN across different tumor types with Functional

  7. Determination of isoxsuprine hydrochloride by sequential injection visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Negussie W; Van Staden, Jacobus F; Stefan, Raluca-Ioana; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2005-01-01

    An automated sequential injection (SI) spectrophotometric method for the determination of isoxsuprine hydrochloride is described. The method is based on the condensation of aminoantipyrine with phenols (isoxsuprine hydrochloride) in the presence of an alkaline oxidizing agent (potassium hexacyanoferrate) to yield a pink colored product, the absorbance of which is monitored at 507 nm. Chemical as well as physical SI parameters that affect the signal response have been optimized in order to get better sensitivity, higher sampling rate and better reagent economy. Using the optimized aforesaid parameters, a linear relationship between the relative peak height and concentration was obtained in the range 1-60 mg l-1. The detection limit (as 3sigma value) was 0.3 mg l-1 and precision was 1.4% and 1.6% at 5 and 10 mg l-1, respectively. As compared to previous reports, wide linear range, low detection limit, and highly economical reagent consumption are the advantages of this automated method.

  8. The effects of sequential attention shifts within visual working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown conflicting data as to whether it is possible to sequentially shift spatial attention among visual working memory (VWM representations. The present study investigated this issue by asynchronously presenting attentional cues during the retention interval of a change detection task. In particular, we focused on two types of sequential attention shifts: 1 orienting attention to one location, and then withdrawing attention from it, and 2 switching the focus of attention from one location to another. In Experiment 1, a withdrawal cue was presented after a spatial retro-cue to measure the effect of withdrawing attention. The withdrawal cue significantly reduced the cost of invalid spatial cues, but surprisingly, did not attenuate the benefit of valid spatial cues. This indicates that the withdrawal cue only triggered the activation of facilitative components but not inhibitory components of attention. In Experiment 2, two spatial retro-cues were presented successively to examine the effect of switching the focus of attention. We observed benefits of both the first and second cues in sequential cueing, indicating that participants were able to reorient attention from one location to another within VWM, and the reallocation of attention did not attenuate memory at the first cued location. In Experiment 3, we found that reducing the validity of the preceding spatial cue did lead to a significant reduction in its benefit. However, performance at the first-cued location was still better than the neutral baseline or performance at the uncued locations, indicating that the first cue benefit might have been preserved both partially under automatic control and partially under voluntary control. Our findings revealed new properties of dynamic attentional control in VWM maintenance.

  9. Impact of Contrasted Diagenetic History on the Pore Type and Acoustic Properties Acquisition of Non-Tropical Carbonates (Cape Range, Western Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonti, C.; Bourget, J.; Fournier, F.; Riera, R.; Haig, D.; Håkansson, E.; Pellerin, M.; Hong, F.; Reijmer, J.

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic response of sedimentary rocks is related to their mineralogy, porosity amount and pore type. In carbonate rocks these properties are controlled by the initial deposition parameters but often even more by the diagenetic history, due to their sensitivity to chemical processes. Diagenesis, by multiple cementation and/or dissolution phases, strongly controls the pore type variations and the pore network acquisition. Besides the non-tropical carbonates often display heterogeneous mineralogy that can raise more complexity. Oligo-Miocene carbonates from the NW-Shelf of Australia present non-tropical facies deposited along a ramp which have underwent highly contrasted diagenetic processes. The uppermost sedimentary unit is characterized by completely different diagenetic processes compared to the lower ones. To decipher the links between the acoustic properties and the complexity of these rocks we performed 50 ultrasonic velocity measurements on plugs sampled from outcrops. Then thin section 2D analyses and 3D CT-scan models made from the same plugs were used to accurately characterize the dominant pore type of each sample. Their diagenetic history was reconstructed from field and cathodoluminescence observations. The acoustic data were analyzed in the light of the EPAR (Equivalent Pore Aspect Ratio) proxy that allowed us to deconvolve combined effects of mineralogy and pore types on ultrasonic velocity (Fournier et al., 2014). First we underline by comparing the computed EPAR values with the actual dominant pore type that (i) microporous samples always exhibit EPAR ≤ 0.2, (ii) intergranular samples show EPAR around 0.3 and (iii) moldic to vuggy samples mainly show EPAR > 0.3. Therefore, even in this complex sedimento diagenetic context, the EPAR proxy seems to be relevant to retrieve the dominant pore type information from acoustic data only. Second, we emphasize the importance of emersion events on the acoustic response acquisition of rocks. Here, a middle

  10. Rationalizing Boundedly Rational Choice : Sequential Rationalizability and Rational Shortlist Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Manzini, Paola; Mariotti, Marco

    2004-01-01

    A sequentially rationalizable choice function is a choice function which can be obtained by applying sequentially a fixed set of asymmetric binary relations (rationales). A Rational ShortlistMethod (RSM) is a choice function which is sequentially rationalizable by two rationales. These concepts translate into economic language some human choice heuristics studied in psychology. We provide a full characterization of RSMs and study some properties of sequential rationalizability. These properti...

  11. Least Limiting Water Range and Load Bearing Capacity of Soil under Types of Tractor-Trailers for Mechanical Harvesting of Green Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Higino Frederico Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The expansion of the sugarcane industry in Brazil has intensified the mechanization of agriculture and caused effects on the soil physical quality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the limiting water range and soil bearing capacity of a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico (Rhodic Hapludox under the influence of different tractor-trailers used in mechanical sugarcane harvesting. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with five replications. The treatments consisted of green sugarcane harvesting with: harvester without trailer (T1; harvester with two trailers with a capacity of 10 Mg each (T2; harvester with trailer with a capacity of 20 Mg (T3 and harvester and truck with trailer with a capacity of 20 Mg (10 Mg per compartment (T4. The least limiting water range and soil bearing capacity were evaluated. The transport equipment to remove the harvested sugarcane from the field (trailer at harvest decreased the least limiting water range, reducing the structural soil quality. The truck trailer caused the greatest impact on the soil physical properties studied. The soil load bearing capacity was unaffected by the treatments, since the pressure of the harvester (T1 exceeded the pre-consolidation pressure of the soil.

  12. A magnetosensitive thin-film silicon Hall-type field-effect transistor with operating temperature range expanded up to 350°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. V.; Malykh, A. A.; Mordkovich, V. N.; Pavlyuk, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a magnetosensitive device consisting of a combination of a thin-film Si transistor with built-in conducting channel (fabricated by the silicon-on-insulator technology) and a Hall-type sensor (HS). The transistor has a double-gate field control system of the metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal type and operates in the regime of carrier accumulation in the channel at partial depletion of adjacent regions of the Si film. It is established that the device can operate at temperatures up to about 350°C, which is 160-180°C higher than the maximum operating temperature of HSs based on bulk Si crystals and comparable with HSs based on wide-bandgap semiconductors.

  13. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-07-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays.

  14. Sequential motif profile of natural visibility graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    The concept of sequential visibility graph motifs—subgraphs appearing with characteristic frequencies in the visibility graphs associated to time series—has been advanced recently along with a theoretical framework to compute analytically the motif profiles associated to horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs). Here we develop a theory to compute the profile of sequential visibility graph motifs in the context of natural visibility graphs (VGs). This theory gives exact results for deterministic aperiodic processes with a smooth invariant density or stochastic processes that fulfill the Markov property and have a continuous marginal distribution. The framework also allows for a linear time numerical estimation in the case of empirical time series. A comparison between the HVG and the VG case (including evaluation of their robustness for short series polluted with measurement noise) is also presented.

  15. Info-Greedy Sequential Adaptive Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Gabor; Pokutta, Sebastian; Xie, Yao

    2015-06-01

    We present an information-theoretic framework for sequential adaptive compressed sensing, Info-Greedy Sensing, where measurements are chosen to maximize the extracted information conditioned on the previous measurements. We show that the widely used bisection approach is Info-Greedy for a family of $k$-sparse signals by connecting compressed sensing and blackbox complexity of sequential query algorithms, and present Info-Greedy algorithms for Gaussian and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) signals, as well as ways to design sparse Info-Greedy measurements. Numerical examples demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms using simulated and real data: Info-Greedy Sensing shows significant improvement over random projection for signals with sparse and low-rank covariance matrices, and adaptivity brings robustness when there is a mismatch between the assumed and the true distributions.

  16. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, D; Shreim, S; Jayadev, S; Lew, V; Botvinick, E; Khine, M

    2011-01-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographi...

  17. Sequential decision analysis for nonstationary stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B.

    1974-01-01

    A formulation of the problem of making decisions concerning the state of nonstationary stochastic processes is given. An optimal decision rule, for the case in which the stochastic process is independent of the decisions made, is derived. It is shown that this rule is a generalization of the Bayesian likelihood ratio test; and an analog to Wald's sequential likelihood ratio test is given, in which the optimal thresholds may vary with time.

  18. Sequential Medical Trials Involving Paired Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-22

    solution exists for this sequential decision problem if it is posed in a Bayesian framework with ~i being given a prior norma l 2distribution with mean and...AOOREU ‘-‘- ~~ OIT SAT E Office of Naval Research ‘~“ J~~ May ~~ ~~79Statistics & Prthabi1i~y Progran Code 436 ~‘ ~~~~~~ FAISSS—ii

  19. Analysis on Realization of Sequential Queue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min

    Analyzed and introduced the sequential storage structure of the queue, detailed analyzed several specific methods for the circular queue to resolve the "false overflow", gave the algorithm descriptions in C of the corresponding basic operations of the queue, compared and analyzed each algorithm the time complexity and the space complexity, so as to complement and play a guiding role in the relevant chapters in "Data Structure" curriculum.

  20. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  1. Tinnitus after Simultaneous and Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geerte G. J. Ramakers

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ImportanceThere is an ongoing global discussion on whether or not bilateral cochlear implantation should be standard care for bilateral deafness. Contrary to unilateral cochlear implantation, however, little is known about the effect of bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus.ObjectiveTo investigate tinnitus outcomes 1 year after bilateral cochlear implantation. Secondarily, to compare tinnitus outcomes between simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation and to investigate long-term follow-up (3 years.Study designThis study is a secondary analysis as part of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.MethodsThirty-eight postlingually deafened adults were included in the original trial, in which the presence of tinnitus was not an inclusion criterion. All participants received cochlear implants (CIs because of profound hearing loss. Nineteen participants received bilateral CIs simultaneously and 19 participants received bilateral CIs sequentially with an inter-implant interval of 2 years. The prevalence and severity of tinnitus before and after simultaneous and sequential bilateral cochlear implantation were measured preoperatively and each year after implantation with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI and Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ.ResultsThe prevalence of preoperative tinnitus was 42% (16/38. One year after bilateral implantation, there was a median difference of −8 (inter-quartile range (IQR: −28 to 4 in THI score and −9 (IQR: −17 to −9 in TQ score in the participants with preoperative tinnitus. Induction of tinnitus occurred in five participants, all in the simultaneous group, in the year after bilateral implantation. Although the preoperative and also the postoperative median THI and TQ scores were higher in the simultaneous group, the median difference scores were equal in both groups. In the simultaneous group, tinnitus scores fluctuated in the 3 years after implantation. In the sequential group

  2. Proactive control of sequential saccades in the human supplementary eye field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharika, K.M.; Neggers, S.F.W.; Gutteling, T.P.; Stigchel, S. van der; Dijkerman, H.C.; Murthy, A.

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to regulate behavior based on past experience has thus far been examined using single movements. However, natural behavior typically involves a sequence of movements. Here, we examined the effect of previous trial type on the concurrent planning of sequential saccades using a unique

  3. Optimized sequential extraction for carbonates : Quantification and δ13C analysis of calcite, dolomite and siderite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morera-Chavarría, A.; Griffioen, J.; Behrends, T.

    2016-01-01

    Siderite is present in diverse types of rocks and sediments, but its quantification is cumbersome when present in relatively low contents. A new analytical method for the sequential separation of different carbonate phases is presented. The separation, quantification and characterization of the

  4. Simultaneous Versus Sequential Complementarity in the Adoption of Technological and Organizational Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battisti, Giuliana; Rabbiosi, Larissa; Colombo, Massimo G.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally suggested that technological and organizational innovations, being complementary, need to be adopted simultaneously. Nevertheless, sequential rather than simultaneous adoption of these two types of innovation may be optimal. In this paper, we analyze the pattern of mutual causation...

  5. Visual Appearance-Based Unmanned Vehicle Sequential Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Localizationis of vital importance for an unmanned vehicle to drive on the road. Most of the existing algorithms are based on laser range finders, inertial equipment, artificial landmarks, distributing sensors or global positioning system(GPS information. Currently, the problem of localization with vision information is most concerned. However, vision-based localization techniquesare still unavailable for practical applications. In this paper, we present a vision-based sequential probability localization method. This method uses the surface information of the roadside to locate the vehicle, especially in the situation where GPS information is unavailable. It is composed of two step, first, in a recording stage, we construct a ground truthmap with the appearance of the roadside environment. Then in an on-line stage, we use a sequential matching approach to localize the vehicle. In the experiment, we use two independent cameras to observe the environment, one is left-orientated and the other is right. SIFT features and Daisy features are used to represent for the visual appearance of the environment. The experiment results show that the proposed method could locate the vehicle in a complicated, large environment with high reliability.

  6. Learning Orthographic Structure With Sequential Generative Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin; Sperduti, Alessandro; Zorzi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Learning the structure of event sequences is a ubiquitous problem in cognition and particularly in language. One possible solution is to learn a probabilistic generative model of sequences that allows making predictions about upcoming events. Though appealing from a neurobiological standpoint, this approach is typically not pursued in connectionist modeling. Here, we investigated a sequential version of the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM), a stochastic recurrent neural network that extracts high-order structure from sensory data through unsupervised generative learning and can encode contextual information in the form of internal, distributed representations. We assessed whether this type of network can extract the orthographic structure of English monosyllables by learning a generative model of the letter sequences forming a word training corpus. We show that the network learned an accurate probabilistic model of English graphotactics, which can be used to make predictions about the letter following a given context as well as to autonomously generate high-quality pseudowords. The model was compared to an extended version of simple recurrent networks, augmented with a stochastic process that allows autonomous generation of sequences, and to non-connectionist probabilistic models (n-grams and hidden Markov models). We conclude that sequential RBMs and stochastic simple recurrent networks are promising candidates for modeling cognition in the temporal domain. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. [Sequential contraceptive pills in the immediate postabortion period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, P; Viala, J L

    1982-05-01

    2637 abortions were done during 1980 at the Bionne Orthogenic Center in Montpellier, France. 12.83% of women treated were not using contraception at the time of conception; 61.89% had been using OC (oral contraception); reasons for not using contraception were lack of information, negligence, 1st sexual relation, and fear. 8.9% of women had undergone a previous induced abortion; 47.26% were unmarried, 35.52% were married, and 52.12% had no children. A sequential combination pill, 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol for 7 days, and 50 mcg of ethinyl estradiol and 2.5 mg of lynestrenol for the next 15 days, was prescribed beginning the day after abortion for 2320 women, or 88% of the total. Purpose of this treatment was to prevent hemorrhage, the formation of synechiae, and to favor an early return to normal endometrial physiology. Sequential OCs have the advantage of simulating a regular biphasic cycle, thus allowing the cicatrization of the placental scar, the return to normal of the uterine mucosa, and the hypervascularization of the endometrium; all these factors contribute to decreasing the risk of infection, such as endometritis. Effectiveness and acceptability of this method were excellent. After 3 months of this treatment a more specific type of contraception may be advisable.

  8. Sequentially acting Sox transcription factors in neural lineage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsland, Maria; Ramsköld, Daniel; Zaouter, Cécile; Klum, Susanne; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can generate all cell types, but how cell lineages are initially specified and maintained during development remains largely unknown. Different classes of Sox transcription factors are expressed during neurogenesis and have been assigned important roles from early lineage specification to neuronal differentiation. Here we characterize the genome-wide binding for Sox2, Sox3, and Sox11, which have vital functions in ES cells, neural precursor cells (NPCs), and maturing neurons, respectively. The data demonstrate that Sox factor binding depends on developmental stage-specific constraints and reveal a remarkable sequential binding of Sox proteins to a common set of neural genes. Interestingly, in ES cells, Sox2 preselects for neural lineage-specific genes destined to be bound and activated by Sox3 in NPCs. In NPCs, Sox3 binds genes that are later bound and activated by Sox11 in differentiating neurons. Genes prebound by Sox proteins are associated with a bivalent chromatin signature, which is resolved into a permissive monovalent state upon binding of activating Sox factors. These data indicate that a single key transcription factor family acts sequentially to coordinate neural gene expression from the early lineage specification in pluripotent cells to later stages of neuronal development.

  9. Simultaneous computation within a sequential process simulation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Endrestøl

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an equation solver superstructure developed for a sequential modular dynamic process simulation system as part of a Eureka project with Norwegian and British participation. The purpose of the development was combining some of the advantages of equation based and purely sequential systems, enabling implicit treatment of key variables independent of module boundaries, and use of numerical integration techniques suitable for each individual type of variable. For training simulator applications the main advantages are gains in speed due to increased stability limits on time steps and improved consistency of simulation results. The system is split into an off-line analysis phase and an on-line equation solver. The off-line processing consists of automatic determination of the topological structure of the system connectivity from standard process description files and derivation of an optimized sparse matrix solution procedure for the resulting set of equations. The on-line routine collects equation coefficients from involved modules, solves the combined sets of structured equations, and stores the results appropriately. This method minimizes the processing cost during the actual simulation. The solver has been applied in the Veslefrikk training simulator project.

  10. Implementation of Temperature Sequential Controller on Variable Speed Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Z. X.; Barsoum, N. N.

    2008-10-01

    There are many pump and motor installations with quite extensive speed variation, such as Sago conveyor, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and water pumping system. A common solution for these applications is to run several fixed speed motors in parallel, with flow control accomplish by turning the motors on and off. This type of control method causes high in-rush current, and adds a risk of damage caused by pressure transients. This paper explains the design and implementation of a temperature speed control system for use in industrial and commercial sectors. Advanced temperature speed control can be achieved by using ABB ACS800 variable speed drive-direct torque sequential control macro, programmable logic controller and temperature transmitter. The principle of direct torque sequential control macro (DTC-SC) is based on the control of torque and flux utilizing the stator flux field orientation over seven preset constant speed. As a result of continuous comparison of ambient temperature to the references temperatures; electromagnetic torque response is particularly fast to the motor state and it is able maintain constant speeds. Experimental tests have been carried out by using ABB ACS800-U1-0003-2, to validate the effectiveness and dynamic respond of ABB ACS800 against temperature variation, loads, and mechanical shocks.

  11. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum-dot intermediate band with extended optical absorption range for efficient solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustanji, Hela; Jaziri, Sihem

    2018-02-01

    GaSb/GaAs type-II quantum-dot solar cells (QD SCs) have attracted attention as highly efficient intermediate band SCs due to their infrared absorption. Type-II QDs exhibited a staggered confinement potential, where only holes are strongly confined within the dots. Long wavelength light absorption of the QDSCs is enhanced through the improved carriers number in the IB. The absorption of dots depends on their shape, material quality, and composition. Therefore, the optical properties of the GaSbGaAs QDs before and after thermal treatment are studied. Our intraband studies have shown an extended absorption into the long wavelength region 1.77 μ {m}. The annealed QDs have shown significantly more infrared response of 7.2 μ {m} compared to as-grown sample. The photon absorption and hole extraction depend strongly on the thermal annealing process. In this context, emission of holes from localized states in GaSb QDs has been studied using conductance-voltage ( G- V ) characteristics.

  13. Monitoring the extent and occurrence of fire in the different veld types of South Africa with particular reference to its ecological role and role in range management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Veld burning was recorded from LANDSAT imagery covering approximately 75 million ha or 62% of the surface of the eastern part of South Africa. All basic data on the location, areas, and numbers of burns for 10 biomes, composed of 67 veld types, are available on 1:250,000 and 1:500,000 map overlays, and are summarized on small scale maps showing fire distribution and amount burned in classes per 15 minute square of latitude and longitude. Veld burning is not randomly distributed, but is almost continuous over a broad belt, widest in the north and narrowing southeastwards, and then southwestwards between the eastern escarpment and the area. It is shown that over almost the whole sea, the overall pattern of veld burning is clearly marked out as early as July in midwinter, subsequent development being merely an intensification of the pattern.

  14. Petrogenesis of Miller Range 07273, a new type of anomalous melt breccia: Implications for impact effects on the H chondrite asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Hutson, Melinda; Friedrich, Jon M.; Rivers, Mark L.; Weisberg, Michael K.; Ebel, Denton S.; Ziegler, Karen; Rumble, Douglas; Dolan, Alyssa A.

    2017-09-01

    Miller Range 07273 is a chondritic melt breccia that contains clasts of equilibrated ordinary chondrite set in a fine-grained (shapes for coarse metal grains, unusual internal textures and compositions for coarse metal, a matrix composed chiefly of clinoenstatite and omphacitic pigeonite, and troilite veining most common in coarse olivine and orthopyroxene. These features can be explained by a model involving impact into a porous target that produced brief but intense heating at high pressure, a sudden pressure drop, and a slower drop in temperature. Olivine and orthopyroxene in chondrule clasts were the least melted and the most deformed, whereas matrix and troilite melted completely and crystallized to nearly strain-free minerals. Coarse metal was largely but incompletely liquefied, and matrix silicates formed by the breakdown during melting of albitic feldspar and some olivine to form pyroxene at high pressure (>3 GPa, possibly to 15-19 GPa) and temperature (>1350 °C, possibly to ≥2000 °C). The higher pressures and temperatures would have involved back-reaction of high-pressure polymorphs to pyroxene and olivine upon cooling. Silicates outside of melt matrix have compositions that were relatively unchanged owing to brief heating duration.

  15. Transaminase levels in the upper normal range are associated with oral hypoglycemic drug therapy failure in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, Concetta; Rossetti, Marco; Carallo, Claudio; Morano, Susanna; Vespertini, Viviana; Mandosi, Elisabetta; Maranghi, Marianna; Fiorentino, Raffaella; Filetti, Sebastiano; Gnasso, Agostino

    2012-06-01

    Incident diabetes and the worsening of diabetes have recently been linked to hepatic steatosis. Aim of our study was to determine whether oral hypoglycemic agent failure is associated with higher transaminase levels (valid measure of liver steatosis). We selected 200 patients, attenders (3 consecutive annual evaluations) in our clinic, with type 2 diabetes among which 100 with oral hypoglycemic agents failure and 100 who were still responsive to oral therapy. Failure to therapy was defined as glycated hemoglobin >7.5% despite maximal-dose oral therapy. We analyzed patient histories and laboratory data. Compared with oral-therapy-responsive patients, those with failure had a significantly higher level mostly of alanine aminotransferase at the time of therapy failure and 2 years before. They were more likely to have had symptoms of hyperglycemia at the time of diabetes diagnosis. Regression analysis indicated that each 5-unit increase in transaminase levels independently increased the risk for oral hypoglycemic agents failure by 1.70. Higher liver transaminase levels, especially in patients who had symptomatic hyperglycemia at diabetes diagnosis, associate with oral hypoglycemic agent failure. The possible pathogenetic link between transaminase and declining islet function might consist of insulin resistance and increased circulating fatty acid levels, in turn causing liver steatosis and beta-cell dysfunction.

  16. Sequential Retraction Segregates SGN Processes during Target Selection in the Cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druckenbrod, Noah R.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the nervous system is the presence of precise patterns of connections between different types of neurons. Many mechanisms can be used to establish specificity, including homophilic adhesion and synaptic refinement, but the range of strategies used across the nervous system remains unclear. To broaden the understanding of how neurons find their targets, we studied the developing murine cochlea, where two classes of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), type I and type II, navigate together to the sensory epithelium and then diverge to contact inner hair cells (IHCs) or outer hair cells (OHCs), respectively. Neurons with type I and type II morphologies are apparent before birth, suggesting that target selection might be accomplished by excluding type I processes from the OHC region. However, because type I processes appear to overshoot into type II territory postnatally, specificity may also depend on elimination of inappropriate synapses. To resolve these differences, we analyzed the morphology and dynamic behaviors of individual fibers and their branches as they interact with potential partners. We found that SGN processes continue to be segregated anatomically in the postnatal cochlea. Although type I-like fibers branched locally, few branches contacted OHCs, arguing against synaptic elimination. Instead, time-lapse imaging studies suggest a prominent role for retraction, first positioning processes to the appropriate region and then corralling branches during a subsequent period of exuberant growth and refinement. Thus, sequential stages of retraction can help to achieve target specificity, adding to the list of mechanisms available for sculpting neural circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT During development, different types of neurons must form connections with specific synaptic targets, thereby creating the precise wiring diagram necessary for adult function. Although studies have revealed multiple mechanisms for target selection, we still know little about

  17. Synthesis of nanostructures in nanowires using sequential catalyst reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, F.; Chou, Y.-C.; Reuter, M.C.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E.A.; Hofmann, S.; Ross, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanowire growth by the vapor-liquid-solid process enables a high level of control over nanowire composition, diameter, growth direction, branching and kinking, periodic twinning, and crystal structure. The tremendous impact of VLS-grown nanowires is due to this structural versatility, generating applications ranging from solid state lighting and single photon sources to thermoelectric devices. Here we show that the morphology of these nanostructures can be further tailored by using the liquid droplets that catalyze nanowire growth as a “mixing bowl”, in which growth materials are sequentially supplied to nucleate new phases. Growing within the liquid, these phases adopt the shape of faceted nanocrystals that are then incorporated into the nanowires by further growth. We demonstrate this concept by epitaxially incorporating metal silicide nanocrystals into Si nanowires with defect-free interfaces, and discuss how this process can be generalized to create complex nanowire-based heterostructures. PMID:26168344

  18. Sequential tool use in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Schumacher, Lena; Call, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Sequential tool use is defined as using a tool to obtain another non-food object which subsequently itself will serve as a tool to act upon a further (sub)goal. Previous studies have shown that birds and great apes succeed in such tasks. However, the inclusion of a training phase for each of the sequential steps and the low cost associated with retrieving the longest tools limits the scope of the conclusions. The goal of the experiments presented here was, first to replicate a previous study on sequential tool use conducted on New Caledonian crows and, second, extend this work by increasing the cost of retrieving a tool in order to test tool selectivity of apes. In Experiment 1, we presented chimpanzees, orangutans and bonobos with an out-of-reach reward, two tools that were available but too short to reach the food and four out-of-reach tools differing in functionality. Similar to crows, apes spontaneously used up to 3 tools in sequence to get the reward and also showed a strong preference for the longest out-of reach tool independently of the distance of the food. In Experiment 2, we increased the cost of reaching for the longest out-of reach tool. Now apes used up to 5 tools in sequence to get the reward and became more selective in their choice of the longest tool as the costs of its retrieval increased. The findings of the studies presented here contribute to the growing body of comparative research on tool use.

  19. Sequential tool use in great apes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Martin-Ordas

    Full Text Available Sequential tool use is defined as using a tool to obtain another non-food object which subsequently itself will serve as a tool to act upon a further (subgoal. Previous studies have shown that birds and great apes succeed in such tasks. However, the inclusion of a training phase for each of the sequential steps and the low cost associated with retrieving the longest tools limits the scope of the conclusions. The goal of the experiments presented here was, first to replicate a previous study on sequential tool use conducted on New Caledonian crows and, second, extend this work by increasing the cost of retrieving a tool in order to test tool selectivity of apes. In Experiment 1, we presented chimpanzees, orangutans and bonobos with an out-of-reach reward, two tools that were available but too short to reach the food and four out-of-reach tools differing in functionality. Similar to crows, apes spontaneously used up to 3 tools in sequence to get the reward and also showed a strong preference for the longest out-of reach tool independently of the distance of the food. In Experiment 2, we increased the cost of reaching for the longest out-of reach tool. Now apes used up to 5 tools in sequence to get the reward and became more selective in their choice of the longest tool as the costs of its retrieval increased. The findings of the studies presented here contribute to the growing body of comparative research on tool use.

  20. Engineering Pyrite-Type Bimetallic Ni-Doped CoS2 Nanoneedle Arrays over a Wide Compositional Range for Enhanced Oxygen and Hydrogen Electrocatalysis with Flexible Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of cheap and efficient catalytic electrodes is of great importance, to promote the sluggish overall water-splitting systems associated with the large-scale application of clean and renewable energy technologies. In this work, we report the controlled synthesis of pyrite-type bimetallic Ni-doped CoS2 nanoneedle (NN arrays supported on stainless steel (SS (designated as NixCo1−xS2 NN/SS, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 and the related compositional influence on electrocatalytic efficiencies for the oxygen and hydrogen evolution reaction (OER/HER. Impressively, the Ni0.33Co0.67S2 NN/SS displays superior activity and faster kinetics for catalyzing OER (low overpotential of 286 mV at 50 mA cm−2; Tafel value of 55 mV dec−1 and HER (low overpotential of 350 mV at 30 mA cm−2; Tafel value of 76 mV dec−1 than those of counterparts with other Ni/Co ratios and also monometallic Ni- or Co-based sulfides, which is attributed to the optimized balance from the improved electron transfer capability, increased exposure of electrocatalytic active sites, and favorable dissipation of gaseous products over the nanoneedle surface. Furthermore, the conductive, flexible SS support and firmly attached in-situ integrated feature, result in the flexibility and remarkable long-term stability of as-prepared binder-free Ni0.33Co0.67S2 NN/SS electrode. These results demonstrate element-doping could be an efficient route at the atomic level to design new materials and further optimize the surface physicochemical properties for enhancing the overall electrochemical water splitting activity.

  1. Item Overexposure in Computerized Classification Tests Using Sequential Item Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Huebner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Computerized classification tests (CCTs often use sequential item selection which administers items according to maximizing psychometric information at a cut point demarcating passing and failing scores. This paper illustrates why this method of item selection leads to the overexposure of a significant number of items, and the performances of three different methods for controlling maximum item exposure rates in CCTs are compared. Specifically, the Sympson-Hetter, restricted, and item eligibility methods are examined in two studies realistically simulating different types of CCTs and are evaluated based upon criteria including classification accuracy, the number of items exceeding the desired maximum exposure rate, and test overlap. The pros and cons of each method are discussed from a practical perspective.

  2. Models of sequential decision making in consumer lending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanshukan Rajaratnam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we introduce models of sequential decision making in consumer lending. From the definition of adverse selection in static lending models, we show that homogenous borrowers take-up offers at different instances of time when faced with a sequence of loan offers. We postulate that bounded rationality and diverse decision heuristics used by consumers drive the decisions they make about credit offers. Under that postulate, we show how observation of early decisions in a sequence can be informative about later decisions and can, when coupled with a type of adverse selection, also inform credit risk. We show through two examples how lenders may use such information in setting their offer rates.

  3. Decoding restricted participation in sequential electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaut, Andreas; Paschmann, Martin

    2017-06-15

    Restricted participation in sequential markets may cause high price volatility and welfare losses. In this paper we therefore analyze the drivers of restricted participation in the German intraday auction which is a short-term electricity market with quarter-hourly products. Applying a fundamental electricity market model with 15-minute temporal resolution, we identify the lack of sub-hourly market coupling being the most relevant driver of restricted participation. We derive a proxy for price volatility and find that full market coupling may trigger quarter-hourly price volatility to decrease by a factor close to four.

  4. Sequential neural models with stochastic layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraccaro, Marco; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Paquet, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    How can we efficiently propagate uncertainty in a latent state representation with recurrent neural networks? This paper introduces stochastic recurrent neural networks which glue a deterministic recurrent neural network and a state space model together to form a stochastic and sequential neural ...... the uncertainty in a latent path, like a state space model, we improve the state of the art results on the Blizzard and TIMIT speech modeling data sets by a large margin, while achieving comparable performances to competing methods on polyphonic music modeling....

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIAL SEQUENTIALLY-TIMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav LICHOROBIEC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article documents the development of the noninvasive use of explosives during the destruction of ice mass in river flows. The system of special sequentially-timed charges utilizes the increase in efficiency of cutting charges by covering them with bags filled with water, while simultaneously increasing the effect of the entire system of timed charges. Timing, spatial combinations during placement, and the linking of these charges results in the loosening of ice barriers on a frozen waterway, while at the same time regulating the size of the ice fragments. The developed charges will increase the operability and safety of IRS units.

  6. A novel C-type lectin, Nattectin-like protein, with a wide range of bacterial agglutination activity in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changhuan; Zhang, Dongling; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are generally recognized as a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins, which serve as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity of vertebrates. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune roles of a novel CTL from Larimichthys crocea (designated as LcNTC) were investigated. LcNTC is a novel protein that shared 33%-49% homology with other teleosts CTLs. The full-length cDNA of LcNTC was composed of 859 bp with a 465 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 154 residues. LcNTC contained a single CRD with four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues (Cys(57)-Cys(148), Cys(126)-Cys(140)) and EPN/AND motifs instead of invariant EPN/WND motifs required for carbohydrate-binding specificity and constructing Ca(2+)-binding sites. LcNTC mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the most abundant in the gill. After challenged with poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the temporal expression of LcNTC was significantly up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head-kidney. LcNTC transcripts were also induced in the gill, skin, spleen and head-kidney post-infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. The recombinant LcNTC (rLcNTC) purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) exhibited strong agglutination activity against erythrocytes from human, rabbit and large yellow croaker in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the agglutination could be inhibited by D-Mannose, D-Glucose, D-Fructose, α-Lactose, D-Maltose and LPS. Positive microbial agglutination activities of rLcNTC were observed against all tested bacteria in the presence of Ca(2+), including Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysoleikticus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila). These findings collectively indicated that LcNTC might be involved in the innate immunity of L. crocea as a PRR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. A sequential Monte Carlo approach to gene expression deconvolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetunji E Ogundijo

    Full Text Available High-throughput gene expression data are often obtained from pure or complex (heterogeneous biological samples. In the latter case, data obtained are a mixture of different cell types and the heterogeneity imposes some difficulties in the analysis of such data. In order to make conclusions on gene expresssion data obtained from heterogeneous samples, methods such as microdissection and flow cytometry have been employed to physically separate the constituting cell types. However, these manual approaches are time consuming when measuring the responses of multiple cell types simultaneously. In addition, exposed samples, on many occasions, end up being contaminated with external perturbations and this may result in an altered yield of molecular content. In this paper, we model the heterogeneous gene expression data using a Bayesian framework, treating the cell type proportions and the cell-type specific expressions as the parameters of the model. Specifically, we present a novel sequential Monte Carlo (SMC sampler for estimating the model parameters by approximating their posterior distributions with a set of weighted samples. The SMC framework is a robust and efficient approach where we construct a sequence of artificial target (posterior distributions on spaces of increasing dimensions which admit the distributions of interest as marginals. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on simulated datasets and publicly available real datasets, including Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays and national center for biotechnology information (NCBI gene expression omnibus (GEO, with varying number of cell types. The results obtained on all datasets show a superior performance with an improved accuracy in the estimation of cell type proportions and the cell-type specific expressions, and in addition, more accurate identification of differentially expressed genes when compared to other widely known methods for blind decomposition of heterogeneous gene expression

  8. Sequential processing during noun phrase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Audrey; Sadat, Jasmin; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alario, F-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the brain operations involved during the processing of successive words in multi word noun phrase production take place sequentially or simultaneously. German speakers named pictures while ignoring a written distractor superimposed on the picture (picture-word interference paradigm) using the definite determiner and corresponding German noun. The gender congruency and the phonological congruency (i.e., overlap in first phonemes) between target and distractor were manipulated. Naming responses and EEG were recorded. The behavioural performance replicated both the phonology and the gender congruency effects (i.e., shorter naming latencies for gender congruent than incongruent and for phonologically congruent than incongruent trials). The phonological and gender manipulations also influenced the EEG data. Crucially, the two effects occurred in different time windows and over different sets of electrodes. The phonological effect was observed substantially earlier than the gender congruency effect. This finding suggests that the processing of determiners and nouns during determiner noun phrase production occurs at least partly sequentially. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Sequential and Variational Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado Montero, Rodolfo; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Weerts, Albrecht

    2017-04-01

    Data assimilation is a valuable tool to improve model state estimates by combining measured observations with model simulations. It has recently gained significant attention due to its potential in using remote sensing products to improve operational hydrological forecasts and for reanalysis purposes. This has been supported by the application of sequential techniques such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter which require no additional features within the modeling process, i.e. it can use arbitrary black-box models. Alternatively, variational techniques rely on optimization algorithms to minimize a pre-defined objective function. This function describes the trade-off between the amount of noise introduced into the system and the mismatch between simulated and observed variables. While sequential techniques have been commonly applied to hydrological processes, variational techniques are seldom used. In our believe, this is mainly attributed to the required computation of first order sensitivities by algorithmic differentiation techniques and related model enhancements, but also to lack of comparison between both techniques. We contribute to filling this gap and present the results from the assimilation of streamflow data in two basins located in Germany and Canada. The assimilation introduces noise to precipitation and temperature to produce better initial estimates of an HBV model. The results are computed for a hindcast period and assessed using lead time performance metrics. The study concludes with a discussion of the main features of each technique and their advantages/disadvantages in hydrological applications.

  10. Sequential evidence accumulation in decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hausmann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Judgments and decisions under uncertainty are frequently linked to a prior sequential search for relevant information. In such cases, the subject has to decide when to stop the search for information. Evidence accumulation models from social and cognitive psychology assume an active and sequential information search until enough evidence has been accumulated to pass a decision threshold. In line with such theories, we conceptualize the evidence threshold as the ``desired level of confidence'' (DLC of a person. This model is tested against a fixed stopping rule (one-reason decision making and against the class of multi-attribute information integrating models. A series of experiments using an information board for horse race betting demonstrates an advantage of the proposed model by measuring the individual DLC of each subject and confirming its correctness in two separate stages. In addition to a better understanding of the stopping rule (within the narrow framework of simple heuristics, the results indicate that individual aspiration levels might be a relevant factor when modelling decision making by task analysis of statistical environments.

  11. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  12. Digital monitoring by whole body photography and sequential digital dermoscopy detects thinner melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Marius; Oakley, Amanda

    2010-12-01

    Population screening for melanoma remains controversial. There are no studies demonstrating that population screening increases survival. As prognosis of melanoma is directly related to Breslow thickness, a surrogate marker of survival is thickness of melanoma. The development of several self-referred, whole-body photography and sequential digital dermoscopy imaging services reflects the public's concern regarding melanoma. To assess the ability of one of these services to detect melanoma at an early, thin stage. Demographic and histological details from 100 melanomas diagnosed through self-referred whole-body photography and sequential digital dermoscopy imaging service compared to those diagnosed through traditional methods from data held by the New Zealand Cancer Registry. There were 52 invasive and 48 in-situ melanomas: 90% superficial spreading type, 6% lentigo-maligna type and 4% nodular on histology. Forty-eight were diagnosed on first visit; the remainder by serial digital dermoscopy. Thirty-five percent of patients reported having had previous primary melanoma. In 60%, patients had been concerned by the lesion, the rest (40%) detected solely by screening. Patients diagnosed by whole-body photography and sequential digital dermoscopy screening had thinner melanomas compared to the Registry data: 69% Melanomas detected by self-referred, whole-body photography with sequential digital dermoscopy service are thinner than melanomas detected by traditional diagnostic methods. It remains to be determined whether earlier diagnosis results in improved survival.

  13. iHADAMAC: A complementary tool for sequential resonance assignment of globular and highly disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Sophie; Plevin, Michael J.; Willbold, Dieter; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    An experiment, iHADAMAC, is presented that yields information on the amino-acid type of individual residues in a protein by editing the 1H- 15N correlations into seven different 2D spectra, each corresponding to a different class of amino-acid types. Amino-acid type discrimination is realized via a Hadamard encoding scheme based on four different spin manipulations as recently introduced in the context of the sequential HADAMAC experiment. Both sequential and intra-residue HADAMAC experiments yield highly complementary information that greatly facilitate resonance assignment of proteins with high frequency degeneracy, as demonstrated here for a 188-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A.

  14. Preemptive Behavior in Sequential-Move Tournaments with Heterogeneous Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, Peter-Jürgen; Kräkel, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Rank-order tournaments are usually modeled simultaneously. However, real tournaments are often sequential. We show that agents? strategic behavior in sequential-move tournaments significantly differ from the one in simultaneous-move tournaments: In a sequential-move tournament with heterogeneous agents, there may be either a first-mover or a second-mover advantage. Under certain conditions the first acting agent chooses a preemptively high effort so that the following agent gives up. The prin...

  15. Co-immobilization of glucoamylase and glucose oxidase for electrochemical sequential enzyme electrode for starch biosensor and biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Qiaolin; Yin, Long; Shi, Jianguo; Li, Liang; Xia, Lin; Liu, Aihua

    2014-01-15

    A novel electrochemical sequential biosensor was constructed by co-immobilizing glucoamylase (GA) and glucose oxidase (GOD) on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by chemical crosslinking method, where glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin was used as crosslinking and blocking agent, respectively. The proposed biosensor (GA/GOD/MWNTs/GCE) is capable of determining starch without using extra sensors such as Clark-type oxygen sensor or H2O2 sensor. The current linearly decreased with the increasing concentration of starch ranging from 0.005% to 0.7% (w/w) with the limit of detection of 0.003% (w/w) starch. The as-fabricated sequential biosensor can be applicable to the detection of the content of starch in real samples, which are in good accordance with traditional Fehling's titration. Finally, a stable starch/O2 biofuel cell was assembled using the GA/GOD/MWNTs/GCE as bioanode and laccase/MWNTs/GCE as biocathode, which exhibited open circuit voltage of ca. 0.53 V and the maximum power density of 8.15 μW cm(-2) at 0.31 V, comparable with the other glucose/O2 based biofuel cells reported recently. Therefore, the proposed biosensor exhibited attractive features such as good stability in weak acidic buffer, good operational stability, wide linear range and capable of determination of starch in real samples as well as optimal bioanode for the biofuel cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Sequential reduction and fixation for zygomatic complex fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Chunming; Hua, Wenmei; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Xiguang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Zhanle; Li, Meifang; Duan, Hainan

    2013-10-01

    To explore the procedure and effectiveness of sequential reduction and fixation for zygomatic complex fractures. Between March 2004 and February 2012, 32 patients with zygomatic complex fractures were treated. There were 28 males and 4 females with a median age of 29 years (range, 17-55 years). Fractures were caused by traffic accident in 29 cases and by tumble in 3 cases. The time between injury and admission was 1-12 days (mean, 3 days) in 28 fresh fractures and 22-60 days (mean, 40 days) in 4 old fractures. All patients were diagnosed by clinical symptom and CT scan. Coronal scalp incision, lower eyelid aesthetic incision, and intraoral incision were used to expose the zygomatic bone segments. The sequence of fractures reduction and fixation was horizontal first, and then longitudinal. In horizontal orientation, reduction and simultaneous fixation started from the root of the zygoma, to zygomatic arch, body of the zygoma, and inferior orbital rim in turn. Longitudinally, fracture reduction of zygomatico-frontal suture and orbital posterolateral walls was done first, followed by fracture reduction of zygomaticomaxillary buttress. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all 32 cases, without complications of maxillary sinus fistula and infection. Eighteen patients were followed up 6 months to 6 years with a median time of 32 months. All the patients gained satisfactory results with normal zygomatic contour and symmetric midface. All patients restored normal mouth opening. No eye and vision damage occurred. Frontal disappearance and brow ptosis were observed in 2 cases. Hair loss (2-3 mm) was seen at the site of coronal scalp incision, without scar hyperplasia; there was no obvious scar at lower eyelid. CT and X-ray films showed bony healing at 6 months after operation. Sequential reduction and fixation is accord with the mechanical characters of complicated zygomatic fractures. It is very easy to achieve anatomic reduction of the bone segments and facial

  17. Multilevel sequential Monte-Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Jasra, Ajay

    2016-01-05

    Multilevel Monte-Carlo methods provide a powerful computational technique for reducing the computational cost of estimating expectations for a given computational effort. They are particularly relevant for computational problems when approximate distributions are determined via a resolution parameter h, with h=0 giving the theoretical exact distribution (e.g. SDEs or inverse problems with PDEs). The method provides a benefit by coupling samples from successive resolutions, and estimating differences of successive expectations. We develop a methodology that brings Sequential Monte-Carlo (SMC) algorithms within the framework of the Multilevel idea, as SMC provides a natural set-up for coupling samples over different resolutions. We prove that the new algorithm indeed preserves the benefits of the multilevel principle, even if samples at all resolutions are now correlated.

  18. Prosody and alignment: a sequential perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepek Reed, Beatrice

    2010-12-01

    In their analysis of a corpus of classroom interactions in an inner city high school, Roth and Tobin describe how teachers and students accomplish interactional alignment by prosodically matching each other's turns. Prosodic matching, and specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as signs of, and contributions to successful interactional outcomes and positive emotions. Lack of prosodic matching, and other specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as features of unsuccessful interactions, and negative emotions. This forum focuses on the article's analysis of the relation between interpersonal alignment, emotion and prosody. It argues that prosodic matching, and other prosodic linking practices, play a primarily sequential role, i.e. one that displays the way in which participants place and design their turns in relation to other participants' turns. Prosodic matching, rather than being a conversational action in itself, is argued to be an interactional practice (Schegloff 1997), which is not always employed for the accomplishment of `positive', or aligning actions.

  19. Dihydroazulene photoswitch operating in sequential tunneling regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Thisted, Christine Lindbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Molecular switches play a central role for the development of molecular electronics. In this work it is demonstrated that the reproducibility and robustness of a single-molecule dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) switch can be remarkably enhanced if the switching kernel is weakly coupled...... to electrodes so that the electron transport goes by sequential tunneling. To assure weak coupling, the DHA switching kernel is modified by incorporating p-MeSC6H4 end-groups. Molecules are prepared by Suzuki cross-couplings on suitable halogenated derivatives of DHA. The synthesis presents an expansion of our...... previously reported brominationeliminationcross-coupling protocol for functionalization of the DHA core. For all new derivatives the kinetics of DHA/VHF transition has been thoroughly studied in solution. The kinetics reveals the effect of sulfur end-groups on the thermal ring-closure of VHF. One derivative...

  20. Prototype color field sequential television lens assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and evaluation of a prototype modular lens assembly with a self-contained field sequential color wheel is presented. The design of a color wheel of maximum efficiency, the selection of spectral filters, and the design of a quiet, efficient wheel drive system are included. Design tradeoffs considered for each aspect of the modular assembly are discussed. Emphasis is placed on achieving a design which can be attached directly to an unmodified camera, thus permitting use of the assembly in evaluating various candidate camera and sensor designs. A technique is described which permits maintaining high optical efficiency with an unmodified camera. A motor synchronization system is developed which requires only the vertical synchronization signal as a reference frequency input. Equations and tradeoff curves are developed to permit optimizing the filter wheel aperture shapes for a variety of different design conditions.

  1. Sequential infiltration synthesis for advanced lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Seth B.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Peng, Qing

    2017-10-10

    A plasma etch resist material modified by an inorganic protective component via sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) and methods of preparing the modified resist material. The modified resist material is characterized by an improved resistance to a plasma etching or related process relative to the unmodified resist material, thereby allowing formation of patterned features into a substrate material, which may be high-aspect ratio features. The SIS process forms the protective component within the bulk resist material through a plurality of alternating exposures to gas phase precursors which infiltrate the resist material. The plasma etch resist material may be initially patterned using photolithography, electron-beam lithography or a block copolymer self-assembly process.

  2. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Jörg, David J; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentatio...

  3. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Russel B

    2017-04-04

    A sequential flow cooling insert for a turbine stator vane of a small gas turbine engine, where the impingement cooling insert is formed as a single piece from a metal additive manufacturing process such as 3D metal printing, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of radial extending impingement cooling air holes alternating with rows of radial extending return air holes on a pressure side wall, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of chordwise extending second impingement cooling air holes on a suction side wall. The insert includes alternating rows of radial extending cooling air supply channels and return air channels that form a series of impingement cooling on the pressure side followed by the suction side of the insert.

  4. Composite SAR imaging using sequential joint sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Toby; Gelb, Anne; Platte, Rodrigo B.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates accurate and efficient ℓ1 regularization methods for generating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Although ℓ1 regularization algorithms are already employed in SAR imaging, practical and efficient implementation in terms of real time imaging remain a challenge. Here we demonstrate that fast numerical operators can be used to robustly implement ℓ1 regularization methods that are as or more efficient than traditional approaches such as back projection, while providing superior image quality. In particular, we develop a sequential joint sparsity model for composite SAR imaging which naturally combines the joint sparsity methodology with composite SAR. Our technique, which can be implemented using standard, fractional, or higher order total variation regularization, is able to reduce the effects of speckle and other noisy artifacts with little additional computational cost. Finally we show that generalizing total variation regularization to non-integer and higher orders provides improved flexibility and robustness for SAR imaging.

  5. Merging particle filter for sequential data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakano

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A new filtering technique for sequential data assimilation, the merging particle filter (MPF, is proposed. The MPF is devised to avoid the degeneration problem, which is inevitable in the particle filter (PF, without prohibitive computational cost. In addition, it is applicable to cases in which a nonlinear relationship exists between a state and observed data where the application of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF is not effectual. In the MPF, the filtering procedure is performed based on sampling of a forecast ensemble as in the PF. However, unlike the PF, each member of a filtered ensemble is generated by merging multiple samples from the forecast ensemble such that the mean and covariance of the filtered distribution are approximately preserved. This merging of multiple samples allows the degeneration problem to be avoided. In the present study, the newly proposed MPF technique is introduced, and its performance is demonstrated experimentally.

  6. Sequential extraction techniques applied to a porphyry copper deposit in the basin and range province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipek, L.H.; Theobald, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of minus-80-mesh (weathering processes. However, the relative proportions of elements dissolved in each step of the jarosite and chrysocolla extractions could be used as a "fingerprint" for recognition of the presence of these two minerals in the stream-sediment and rock samples. The relative abundance of hydrous Fe oxide and jarosite and the alteration zoning could be mapped using data from jarosite and chrysocolla extractions. Manganese oxides were also found to have a greater influence on Zn than on Cu or Pb during supergene alteration. The rapid change in relative importance of the first (1M-acetic acid) extraction for Cu, Zn, and Pb near the mineralized zone suggested the occurrence of minor hydromorphic processes within the stream sediments. Thus, the acetic acid extraction proved the most effective for pinpointing mineralization in sediments. In contrast, the residual fraction had the longest dispersion train, suggesting that total metal concentrations are most effective in arid environments for reconnaissance surveys. ?? 1981.

  7. Sequential Method with Incremental Analysis Update to Retrieve Leaf Area Index from Time Series MODIS Reflectance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-quality leaf area index (LAI products retrieved from satellite observations are urgently needed for crop growth monitoring and yield estimation, land-surface process simulation and global change studies. In recent years, sequential assimilation methods have been increasingly used to retrieve LAI from time series remote-sensing data. However, the inherent characteristics of these sequential assimilation methods result in temporal discontinuities in the retrieved LAI profiles. In this study, a sequential assimilation method with incremental analysis update (IAU was developed to jointly update model states and parameters and to retrieve temporally continuous LAI profiles from time series Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS reflectance data. Based on the existing multi-year Global Land Surface Satellite (GLASS LAI product, a dynamic model was constructed to evolve LAI anomalies over time. The sequential assimilation method with an IAU technique takes advantage of the Kalman filter (KF technique to update model parameters, uses the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF technique to update LAI anomalies recursively from time series MODIS reflectance data and then calculates the temporally continuous LAI values by combining the LAI climatology data. The method was tested over eight Committee on Earth Observing Satellites-Benchmark Land Multisite Analysis and Intercomparison of Products (CEOS-BELMANIP sites with different vegetation types. The results indicate that the sequential method with IAU can precisely reconstruct the seasonal variation patterns of LAI and that the LAI profiles derived from the sequential method with IAU are smooth and continuous.

  8. Conceptual scoring of receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in simultaneous and sequential bilingual children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana; Kaushanskaya, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    The authors examined the effects of conceptual scoring on the performance of simultaneous and sequential bilinguals on standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and Spanish. Participants included 40 English-speaking monolingual children, 39 simultaneous Spanish-English bilingual children, and 19 sequential bilingual children, ages 5-7. The children completed standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and also in Spanish for those who were bilingual. After the standardized administration, bilingual children were given the opportunity to respond to missed items in their other language to obtain a conceptual score. Controlling for group differences in socioeconomic status (SES), both simultaneous and sequential bilingual children scored significantly below monolingual children on single-language measures of English receptive and expressive vocabulary. Conceptual scoring removed the significant difference between monolingual and simultaneous bilingual children in the receptive modality but not in the expressive modality; differences remained between monolingual and sequential bilingual children in both modalities. However, in both bilingual groups, conceptual scoring increased the proportion of children with vocabulary scores within the average range. Conceptual scoring does not fully ameliorate the bias inherent in single-language standardized vocabulary measures for bilingual children, but the procedures employed here may assist in ruling out vocabulary deficits, particularly in typically developing simultaneous bilingual children.

  9. Conceptual scoring of receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in simultaneous and sequential bilingual children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana; Kaushanskaya, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the effects of conceptual scoring on the performance of simultaneous and sequential bilinguals on standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and Spanish. Method Participants included 40 English-speaking monolingual children, 39 simultaneous Spanish-English bilingual children, and 19 sequential bilinguals, ages 5–7. The children completed standardized receptive and expressive vocabulary measures in English and also in Spanish for bilinguals. After the standardized administration, bilinguals were given the opportunity to respond to missed items in their other language to obtain a conceptual score. Results Controlling for group differences in socioeconomic status (SES), both simultaneous and sequential bilinguals scored significantly below monolinguals on single-language measures of English receptive and expressive vocabulary. Conceptual scoring removed the significant difference between monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals in the receptive modality, but not in the expressive modality; differences remained between monolinguals and sequential bilinguals in both modalities. However, in both bilingual groups conceptual scoring increased the proportion of children with vocabulary scores within the average range. Conclusions Conceptual scoring does not fully ameliorate the bias inherent in single-language standardized vocabulary measures for bilinguals, but the procedures employed here may assist in ruling out vocabulary deficits, particularly in typically-developing simultaneous bilingual children. PMID:24811415

  10. Mining of high utility-probability sequential patterns from uncertain databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Zhang

    Full Text Available High-utility sequential pattern mining (HUSPM has become an important issue in the field of data mining. Several HUSPM algorithms have been designed to mine high-utility sequential patterns (HUPSPs. They have been applied in several real-life situations such as for consumer behavior analysis and event detection in sensor networks. Nonetheless, most studies on HUSPM have focused on mining HUPSPs in precise data. But in real-life, uncertainty is an important factor as data is collected using various types of sensors that are more or less accurate. Hence, data collected in a real-life database can be annotated with existing probabilities. This paper presents a novel pattern mining framework called high utility-probability sequential pattern mining (HUPSPM for mining high utility-probability sequential patterns (HUPSPs in uncertain sequence databases. A baseline algorithm with three optional pruning strategies is presented to mine HUPSPs. Moroever, to speed up the mining process, a projection mechanism is designed to create a database projection for each processed sequence, which is smaller than the original database. Thus, the number of unpromising candidates can be greatly reduced, as well as the execution time for mining HUPSPs. Substantial experiments both on real-life and synthetic datasets show that the designed algorithm performs well in terms of runtime, number of candidates, memory usage, and scalability for different minimum utility and minimum probability thresholds.

  11. Mining of high utility-probability sequential patterns from uncertain databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Lin, Jerry Chun-Wei; Fournier-Viger, Philippe; Li, Ting

    2017-01-01

    High-utility sequential pattern mining (HUSPM) has become an important issue in the field of data mining. Several HUSPM algorithms have been designed to mine high-utility sequential patterns (HUPSPs). They have been applied in several real-life situations such as for consumer behavior analysis and event detection in sensor networks. Nonetheless, most studies on HUSPM have focused on mining HUPSPs in precise data. But in real-life, uncertainty is an important factor as data is collected using various types of sensors that are more or less accurate. Hence, data collected in a real-life database can be annotated with existing probabilities. This paper presents a novel pattern mining framework called high utility-probability sequential pattern mining (HUPSPM) for mining high utility-probability sequential patterns (HUPSPs) in uncertain sequence databases. A baseline algorithm with three optional pruning strategies is presented to mine HUPSPs. Moroever, to speed up the mining process, a projection mechanism is designed to create a database projection for each processed sequence, which is smaller than the original database. Thus, the number of unpromising candidates can be greatly reduced, as well as the execution time for mining HUPSPs. Substantial experiments both on real-life and synthetic datasets show that the designed algorithm performs well in terms of runtime, number of candidates, memory usage, and scalability for different minimum utility and minimum probability thresholds.

  12. The efficacy of sequential therapy in eradication of Helicobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And 40 patients received standard triple therapy for 2 weeks, 40 patients received bismuth containing quadruple therapy for 2 weeks, 40 patients received 5 + 5 clarithromycin-based sequential therapy, and 40 patients received 7 + 7 clarithromycin-based sequential therapy. H. pylori eradication was assessed by C 14 urea ...

  13. The sequential price of anarchy for atomic congestion games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jasper; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Liu, Tie-Yan; Qi, Qi; Ye, Yinyu

    2014-01-01

    In situations without central coordination, the price of anarchy relates the quality of any Nash equilibrium to the quality of a global optimum. Instead of assuming that all players choose their actions simultaneously, we consider games where players choose their actions sequentially. The sequential

  14. Derivation of sequential, real-time, process-control programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzullo, Keith; Schneider, Fred B.; Budhiraja, Navin

    1991-01-01

    The use of weakest-precondition predicate transformers in the derivation of sequential, process-control software is discussed. Only one extension to Dijkstra's calculus for deriving ordinary sequential programs was found to be necessary: function-valued auxiliary variables. These auxiliary variables are needed for reasoning about states of a physical process that exists during program transitions.

  15. The Clinical effectiveness of sequential treatment of skeletal class III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the dentofacial changes induced by the sequential treatment in the skeletal class III malocclusion with maxillary retrognathism. Study design: Controlled clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of sequential treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The treated group consisted of 30 ...

  16. Revenue Prediction in Budget-constrained Sequential Auctions with Complementarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Verwer (Sicco); Y. Zhang (Yingqian)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWhen multiple items are auctioned sequentially, the ordering of auctions plays an important role in the total revenue collected by the auctioneer. This is true especially with budget constrained bidders and the presence of complementarities among items. In such sequential auction

  17. Accounting for Heterogeneous Returns in Sequential Schooling Decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamarro, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating returns to schooling that takes into account that returns may be heterogeneous among agents and that educational decisions are made sequentially.A sequential decision model is interesting because it explicitly considers that the level of education of each

  18. Applications of Bayesian decision theory to sequential mastery testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Hendrik J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to formulate optimal sequential rules for mastery tests. The framework for the approach is derived from Bayesian sequential decision theory. Both a threshold and linear loss structure are considered. The binomial probability distribution is adopted as the psychometric

  19. Adaptive Learning in Extensive Form Games and Sequential Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies adaptive learning in extensive form games and provides conditions for convergence points of adaptive learning to be sequential equilibria. Precisely, we present a set of conditions on learning sequences such that an assessment is a sequential equilibrium if and only...... if there is a learning sequence fulfilling the conditions, which leads to the assessment...

  20. Induction of simultaneous and sequential malolactic fermentation in durian wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniasuri, Fransisca; Lee, Pin-Rou; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2016-08-02

    This study represented for the first time the impact of malolactic fermentation (MLF) induced by Oenococcus oeni and its inoculation strategies (simultaneous vs. sequential) on the fermentation performance as well as aroma compound profile of durian wine. There was no negative impact of simultaneous inoculation of O. oeni and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth and fermentation kinetics of S. cerevisiae as compared to sequential fermentation. Simultaneous MLF did not lead to an excessive increase in volatile acidity as compared to sequential MLF. The kinetic changes of organic acids (i.e. malic, lactic, succinic, acetic and α-ketoglutaric acids) varied with simultaneous and sequential MLF relative to yeast alone. MLF, regardless of inoculation mode, resulted in higher production of fermentation-derived volatiles as compared to control (alcoholic fermentation only), including esters, volatile fatty acids, and terpenes, except for higher alcohols. Most indigenous volatile sulphur compounds in durian were decreased to trace levels with little differences among the control, simultaneous and sequential MLF. Among the different wines, the wine with simultaneous MLF had higher concentrations of terpenes and acetate esters while sequential MLF had increased concentrations of medium- and long-chain ethyl esters. Relative to alcoholic fermentation only, both simultaneous and sequential MLF reduced acetaldehyde substantially with sequential MLF being more effective. These findings illustrate that MLF is an effective and novel way of modulating the volatile and aroma compound profile of durian wine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sequential Dependencies in Categorical Judgments of Radiographic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W.; Boutis, Kathy; Pecaric, Martin; Pusic, Martin V.

    2017-01-01

    Sequential context effects, the psychological interactions occurring between the events of successive trials when a sequence of similar stimuli are judged, have interested psychologists for decades. It has been well established that individuals exhibit sequential context effects in psychophysical experiments involving unidimensional stimuli.…

  2. Development of decision making: sequential versus integrative rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.R.J.; van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Huizenga, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Decisions can be made by applying a variety of decision-making rules-sequential rules in which decisions are based on a sequential evaluation of choice dimensions and the integrative normative rule in which decisions are based on an integration of choice dimensions. In this study, we investigated

  3. Influence of sequential fermentations with Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on wine quality

    OpenAIRE

    Loira, Iris; Vejarano Mantilla, Ricardo David; Bañuelos Bernabe, Maria Antonia; Morata Barrado, Antonio Dionisio; Tesfaye Yimer, Wendu; Uthurry Weinberger, Carlos A; Villa Viradoz, Ana; Cintora, Isabel; Suarez Lepe, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is a non-Saccharomyces yeast with interesting metabolic and physiological properties of potential use in oenology. This work examines the fermentative behaviour of five strains of T. delbrueckii in sequential fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, analysing the formation of aromatic compounds, polyalcohols and pigments. The fermentative power of these five strains ranged between 7.6 and 9.0% v/v ethanol; the associated volatile acidity was 0.2e0.7 g/l acetic acid...

  4. Reverse sequential therapy achieves a similar eradication rate as standard sequential therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Feng-Woei; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Tsai, Tzung-Jium; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Wang, Huay-Min; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Peng, Nan-Jin; Hsu, Ping-I

    2015-02-01

    Sequential therapy is a two-step therapy achieving a promising eradication rate for Helicobacter pylori infection. The rationale of sequential method has been proposed that amoxicillin weakens bacterial cell walls in the initial phase of treatment, preventing the development of drug efflux channels for clarithromycin and metronidazole used in the second phase. The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled study was to investigate whether the efficacy of reverse sequential therapy was noninferior to sequential therapy in the treatment of H. pylori infection. From January 2009 to December 2010, consecutive H. pylori-infected patients were randomly assigned to receive either sequential therapy (a 5-day dual therapy with pantoprazole plus amoxicillin, followed by a 5-day triple therapy with pantoprazole plus clarithromycin and metronidazole) or reverse sequential therapy (a 5-day triple therapy with pantoprazole plus clarithromycin and metronidazole, followed by a 5-day dual therapy with pantoprazole plus amoxicillin). H. pylori status was examined 6 weeks after the end of treatment by rapid urease and histology or urea breath test. One hundred and twenty-two H. pylori-infected participants were randomized to receive sequential (n = 60) or reverse sequential therapy (n = 62). The eradication rates, by intention-to-treat analysis, were similar: 91.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 85.1-98.7%) for sequential therapy and 96.7% (95% CI: 92.2-101.2%) for reverse sequential therapy (p = .44). Per-protocol analysis also showed similar results: 91.8% (95% CI: 84.9-98.7%) for sequential group and 96.7% (95% CI: 92.2-101.2%) for reverse sequential therapy (p = .43). The two treatments exhibited comparable frequencies of adverse events (11.3% vs 6.7%, respectively) and drug compliance (98.4% vs 100%, respectively). The overall resistance rates of antibiotics were clarithromycin 10.5%, amoxicillin 0%, and metronidazole 44.2% of patients, respectively. The dual

  5. Sequential methods for random-effects meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Julian P T; Whitehead, Anne; Simmonds, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although meta-analyses are typically viewed as retrospective activities, they are increasingly being applied prospectively to provide up-to-date evidence on specific research questions. When meta-analyses are updated account should be taken of the possibility of false-positive findings due to repeated significance tests. We discuss the use of sequential methods for meta-analyses that incorporate random effects to allow for heterogeneity across studies. We propose a method that uses an approximate semi-Bayes procedure to update evidence on the among-study variance, starting with an informative prior distribution that might be based on findings from previous meta-analyses. We compare our methods with other approaches, including the traditional method of cumulative meta-analysis, in a simulation study and observe that it has Type I and Type II error rates close to the nominal level. We illustrate the method using an example in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21472757

  6. On the Possibility to Combine the Order Effect with Sequential Reproducibility for Quantum Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we study the problem of a possibility to use quantum observables to describe a possible combination of the order effect with sequential reproducibility for quantum measurements. By the order effect we mean a dependence of probability distributions (of measurement results) on the order of measurements. We consider two types of the sequential reproducibility: adjacent reproducibility (A-A) (the standard perfect repeatability) and separated reproducibility(A-B-A). The first one is reproducibility with probability 1 of a result of measurement of some observable A measured twice, one A measurement after the other. The second one, A-B-A, is reproducibility with probability 1 of a result of A measurement when another quantum observable B is measured between two A's. Heuristically, it is clear that the second type of reproducibility is complementary to the order effect. We show that, surprisingly, this may not be the case. The order effect can coexist with a separated reproducibility as well as adjacent reproducibility for both observables A and B. However, the additional constraint in the form of separated reproducibility of the B-A-B type makes this coexistence impossible. The problem under consideration was motivated by attempts to apply the quantum formalism outside of physics, especially, in cognitive psychology and psychophysics. However, it is also important for foundations of quantum physics as a part of the problem about the structure of sequential quantum measurements.

  7. Social Influences in Sequential Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöbel, Markus; Rieskamp, Jörg; Huber, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    People often make decisions in a social environment. The present work examines social influence on people's decisions in a sequential decision-making situation. In the first experimental study, we implemented an information cascade paradigm, illustrating that people infer information from decisions of others and use this information to make their own decisions. We followed a cognitive modeling approach to elicit the weight people give to social as compared to private individual information. The proposed social influence model shows that participants overweight their own private information relative to social information, contrary to the normative Bayesian account. In our second study, we embedded the abstract decision problem of Study 1 in a medical decision-making problem. We examined whether in a medical situation people also take others' authority into account in addition to the information that their decisions convey. The social influence model illustrates that people weight social information differentially according to the authority of other decision makers. The influence of authority was strongest when an authority's decision contrasted with private information. Both studies illustrate how the social environment provides sources of information that people integrate differently for their decisions.

  8. Social Influences in Sequential Decision Making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schöbel

    Full Text Available People often make decisions in a social environment. The present work examines social influence on people's decisions in a sequential decision-making situation. In the first experimental study, we implemented an information cascade paradigm, illustrating that people infer information from decisions of others and use this information to make their own decisions. We followed a cognitive modeling approach to elicit the weight people give to social as compared to private individual information. The proposed social influence model shows that participants overweight their own private information relative to social information, contrary to the normative Bayesian account. In our second study, we embedded the abstract decision problem of Study 1 in a medical decision-making problem. We examined whether in a medical situation people also take others' authority into account in addition to the information that their decisions convey. The social influence model illustrates that people weight social information differentially according to the authority of other decision makers. The influence of authority was strongest when an authority's decision contrasted with private information. Both studies illustrate how the social environment provides sources of information that people integrate differently for their decisions.

  9. An Improved Sequential Smoothing Particle Filtering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Shijie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to cope with the challenges of non-cooperative targets such as stealth targets to modern radar, especially when traditional threshold detection and tracking methods can hardly detect fast-moving stealth targets, technological innovation has long been required. In this paper we have proposed a new algorithm which can reduce computational cost and improve tracking accuracy. Firstly, the number of particles in the traditional particle filter is reduced and a small number of sampling points are derived from the possible distribution of the target to be tracked, each given a proper weight. Then, the transformed sampling points are sequentially smoothed. And finally, the target positions are estimated. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate than the traditional particle filter algorithm and has lower computational complexity. In the case when SNR is between 0dB to 15dB, a total of 100 Monte Carlo simulations are carried out, obtaining a high detection probability. The detection probability of the improved algorithm is higher than that of the existing particle filter at 7dB. Also, the computational cost is lower than the existing particle filter algorithm.

  10. Sequential Steps of CRAC Channel Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raz Palty

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum protein STIM1 and the plasma membrane channel ORAI1 generates calcium signals that are central for diverse cellular functions. How STIM1 binds and activates ORAI1 remains poorly understood. Using electrophysiological, optical, and biochemical techniques, we examined the effects of mutations in the STIM1-ORAI1 activating region (SOAR of STIM1. We find that SOAR mutants that are deficient in binding to resting ORAI1 channels are able to bind to and boost activation of partially activated ORAI1 channels. We further show that the STIM1 binding regions on ORAI1 undergo structural rearrangement during channel activation. The results suggest that activation of ORAI1 by SOAR occurs in multiple steps. In the first step, SOAR binds to ORAI1, partially activates the channel, and induces a rearrangement in the SOAR-binding site of ORAI1. That rearrangement of ORAI1 then permits sequential steps of SOAR binding, via distinct molecular interactions, to fully activate the channel.

  11. Sequential stages of human T lymphocyte differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Jean-Louis; Hadden, John W.; Good, Robert A.

    1977-01-01

    Induction of thymus-dependent lymphocyte (T cell) differentiation was performed in vitro with thymic factors as inducers. T cell precursors from human bone marrow first expressed surface differentiation antigens and then acquired the capacity to form rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The latter marker could not be induced when cells with differentiation antigens had been eliminated. The proliferative responses to phytomitogens or to allogeneic stimuli appeared to be characteristics of later stages in differentiation that also can be induced or amplified by in vitro incubation of marrow cells or thymocytes with thymic factors. When phytomitogen-responsive cells from peripheral blood were inactivated in vitro, the allogeneic response was enhanced. Although these responses are acquired almost concomitantly, they are therefore envisioned to be characteristics of separate T cell subsets. After immunological reconstitution of patients, the T cell development in vivo involves a succession of differentiation events similar to that described above. Our experiments with mice, using similar methods, have also shown that graft-versus-host inducing capacity is a function of a cell population distinct from that which yields a proliferative response to in vitro stimulation by phytohemagglutinin. These results support our model of sequential differentiation of human prothymocytes into various subsets of mature T cells. Images PMID:302943

  12. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitenstein Michael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element.

  13. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  14. Preceding movement effects on sequential aiming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Darian T; De Grosbois, John; Smirl, Jonathan; Heath, Matthew; Binsted, Gordon

    2011-11-01

    In this study, two experiments were devised to examine the control strategy used by individuals when performing sequential aiming movements. Of particular interest was the aiming behavior displayed when task difficulty was changed midway through a sequence of movements. In Experiment 1, target size was manipulated, as the targets were made either larger or smaller, between the 8th and 12th movement of the sequence. In Experiment 2, the amplitude between the two targets was similarly changed while the target size remained constant. Results revealed that in Experiment 1, individuals took two movements following the perturbation to target size, to re-tune their movement times in order to correspond with the new task difficulty. Conversely for Experiment 2, movement time changed immediately and in correspondence with the new target amplitude. These findings demonstrate that participants can use information from the preceding movement to prepare and guide subsequent movements--but only when target size is changed. When response amplitude changes mid-sequence, it seems individuals rely more on immediate, target-derived information. Therefore, counter to some current accounts of visual movement control, it appears that memory representations of the preceding movement can guide subsequent movements; however, this information appears selectively accessed in a context-dependent fashion.

  15. The Origin of Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, M. S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, J.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2017-01-01

    Sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs) are often observed in the immediate vicinity of erupting flares and are associated with coronal mass ejections. Since their initial discovery in 2005, there have been several subsequent investigations of SCBs. These studies have used differing detection and analysis techniques, making it difficult to compare results between studies. This work employs the automated detection algorithm of Kirk et al. (Solar Phys. 283, 97, 2013) to extract the physical characteristics of SCBs in 11 flares of varying size and intensity. We demonstrate that the magnetic substructure within the SCB appears to have a significantly smaller area than the corresponding H(alpha) emission. We conclude that SCBs originate in the lower corona around 0.1 R above the photosphere, propagate away from the flare center at speeds of 35-85 km/s, and have peak photosphere magnetic intensities of 148+/- 2.9 G. In light of these measurements, we infer SCBs to be distinctive chromospheric signatures of erupting coronal mass ejections.

  16. Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine With Kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardapane, Simone; Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) was recently proposed as a unifying framework for different families of learning algorithms. The classical ELM model consists of a linear combination of a fixed number of nonlinear expansions of the input vector. Learning in ELM is hence equivalent to finding the optimal weights that minimize the error on a dataset. The update works in batch mode, either with explicit feature mappings or with implicit mappings defined by kernels. Although an online version has been proposed for the former, no work has been done up to this point for the latter, and whether an efficient learning algorithm for online kernel-based ELM exists remains an open problem. By explicating some connections between nonlinear adaptive filtering and ELM theory, in this brief, we present an algorithm for this task. In particular, we propose a straightforward extension of the well-known kernel recursive least-squares, belonging to the kernel adaptive filtering (KAF) family, to the ELM framework. We call the resulting algorithm the kernel online sequential ELM (KOS-ELM). Moreover, we consider two different criteria used in the KAF field to obtain sparse filters and extend them to our context. We show that KOS-ELM, with their integration, can result in a highly efficient algorithm, both in terms of obtained generalization error and training time. Empirical evaluations demonstrate interesting results on some benchmarking datasets.

  17. Sequential decoders for large MIMO systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Konpal S.

    2014-05-01

    Due to their ability to provide high data rates, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems have become increasingly popular. Decoding of these systems with acceptable error performance is computationally very demanding. In this paper, we employ the Sequential Decoder using the Fano Algorithm for large MIMO systems. A parameter called the bias is varied to attain different performance-complexity trade-offs. Low values of the bias result in excellent performance but at the expense of high complexity and vice versa for higher bias values. Numerical results are done that show moderate bias values result in a decent performance-complexity trade-off. We also attempt to bound the error by bounding the bias, using the minimum distance of a lattice. The variations in complexity with SNR have an interesting trend that shows room for considerable improvement. Our work is compared against linear decoders (LDs) aided with Element-based Lattice Reduction (ELR) and Complex Lenstra-Lenstra-Lovasz (CLLL) reduction. © 2014 IFIP.

  18. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Souvik, E-mail: csouvik41@gmail.com; Chowdhury, Rajib, E-mail: rajibfce@iitr.ac.in

    2016-07-15

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  19. Investigation for improving Global Positioning System (GPS) orbits using a discrete sequential estimator and stochastic models of selected physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Clyde C.; Chadwell, C. David

    1993-01-01

    GEODYNII is a conventional batch least-squares differential corrector computer program with deterministic models of the physical environment. Conventional algorithms were used to process differenced phase and pseudorange data to determine eight-day Global Positioning system (GPS) orbits with several meter accuracy. However, random physical processes drive the errors whose magnitudes prevent improving the GPS orbit accuracy. To improve the orbit accuracy, these random processes should be modeled stochastically. The conventional batch least-squares algorithm cannot accommodate stochastic models, only a stochastic estimation algorithm is suitable, such as a sequential filter/smoother. Also, GEODYNII cannot currently model the correlation among data values. Differenced pseudorange, and especially differenced phase, are precise data types that can be used to improve the GPS orbit precision. To overcome these limitations and improve the accuracy of GPS orbits computed using GEODYNII, we proposed to develop a sequential stochastic filter/smoother processor by using GEODYNII as a type of trajectory preprocessor. Our proposed processor is now completed. It contains a correlated double difference range processing capability, first order Gauss Markov models for the solar radiation pressure scale coefficient and y-bias acceleration, and a random walk model for the tropospheric refraction correction. The development approach was to interface the standard GEODYNII output files (measurement partials and variationals) with software modules containing the stochastic estimator, the stochastic models, and a double differenced phase range processing routine. Thus, no modifications to the original GEODYNII software were required. A schematic of the development is shown. The observational data are edited in the preprocessor and the data are passed to GEODYNII as one of its standard data types. A reference orbit is determined using GEODYNII as a batch least-squares processor and the

  20. Sequential management of post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Kalyani R; Aldebert, Philippe; Riberi, Alberto; Mancini, Julien; Levy, Gilles; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Quilicci, Jacques; Habib, Gilbert; Fraisse, Alain

    2015-05-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) after acute myocardial infarction is a catastrophic event. We describe our multicentre experience of a defect closure strategy that combined surgery and transcatheter closure. Data were obtained by retrospective chart review. Twenty patients (mean age, 67 years) from three centres were studied. Median time from myocardial infarction to VSD was 6 (range, 3-9) days. Acute cardiogenic shock occurred in 12 (60%) patients. Median defect diameter by echocardiography was 18 (range, 12-28) mm. Median time to first surgical or percutaneous closure was 18 (range, 4-96) days. Twenty-seven procedures were performed in the 20 patients. Surgical closure was undertaken in 14 patients and contraindicated in eight, six of whom underwent percutaneous closure; the other two, after reconsideration, proceeded to surgical closure. No procedural complications occurred with percutaneous closure. Percutaneous closure patients were older than surgical patients (75 vs. 64 years; P=0.01) and had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE (87% vs. 67%; P=0.02). Rates of residual shunt and mortality did not differ between surgical and percutaneous patients (P=0.12 and 0.3, respectively). Those who underwent early VSD closure (<21 days after myocardial infarction) had higher rates of residual shunt (P=0.09) and mortality (P=0.01), irrespective of closure strategy. The mortality rate was also higher after early percutaneous closure (P=0.001), but not after early surgery. Finally, predicted mortality (logistic EuroSCORE) was higher than hospital mortality (≤30 days) in our patient population (75% vs. 30%; P=0.01). Vigorous pursuit of closure of post-myocardial infarction VSD with a sequential surgical and/or percutaneous approach is recommended for improved outcomes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    2008-12-08

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  2. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, E J; Candy, J V

    2007-08-13

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  3. The sequential trauma score - a new instrument for the sequential mortality prediction in major trauma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber-Wagner S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several well established scores for the assessment of the prognosis of major trauma patients that all have in common that they can be calculated at the earliest during intensive care unit stay. We intended to develop a sequential trauma score (STS that allows prognosis at several early stages based on the information that is available at a particular time. Study design In a retrospective, multicenter study using data derived from the Trauma Registry of the German Trauma Society (2002-2006, we identified the most relevant prognostic factors from the patients basic data (P, prehospital phase (A, early (B1, and late (B2 trauma room phase. Univariate and logistic regression models as well as score quality criteria and the explanatory power have been calculated. Results A total of 2,354 patients with complete data were identified. From the patients basic data (P, logistic regression showed that age was a significant predictor of survival (AUCmodel p, area under the curve = 0.63. Logistic regression of the prehospital data (A showed that blood pressure, pulse rate, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, and anisocoria were significant predictors (AUCmodel A = 0.76; AUCmodel P + A = 0.82. Logistic regression of the early trauma room phase (B1 showed that peripheral oxygen saturation, GCS, anisocoria, base excess, and thromboplastin time to be significant predictors of survival (AUCmodel B1 = 0.78; AUCmodel P +A + B1 = 0.85. Multivariate analysis of the late trauma room phase (B2 detected cardiac massage, abbreviated injury score (AIS of the head ≥ 3, the maximum AIS, the need for transfusion or massive blood transfusion, to be the most important predictors (AUCmodel B2 = 0.84; AUCfinal model P + A + B1 + B2 = 0.90. The explanatory power - a tool for the assessment of the relative impact of each segment to mortality - is 25% for P, 7% for A, 17% for B1 and 51% for B2. A spreadsheet for the easy calculation of the sequential trauma

  4. An algorithm for sequential tail value at risk for path-independent payoffs in a binomial tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berend

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm that determines Sequential Tail Value at Risk (STVaR) for path-independent payoffs in a binomial tree. STVaR is a dynamic version of Tail-Value-at-Risk (TVaR) characterized by the property that risk levels at any moment must be in the range of risk levels later on. The

  5. Sequential optimality conditions for composed convex optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Radu Ioan; Csetnek, Ernö Robert; Wanka, Gert

    2008-06-01

    Using a general approach which provides sequential optimality conditions for a general convex optimization problem, we derive necessary and sufficient optimality conditions for composed convex optimization problems. Further, we give sequential characterizations for a subgradient of the precomposition of a K-increasing lower semicontinuous convex function with a K-convex and K-epi-closed (continuous) function, where K is a nonempty convex cone. We prove that several results from the literature dealing with sequential characterizations of subgradients are obtained as particular cases of our results. We also improve the above mentioned statements.

  6. Fast sequential Monte Carlo methods for counting and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Reuven Y; Vaisman, Radislav

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive account of the theory and application of Monte Carlo methods Based on years of research in efficient Monte Carlo methods for estimation of rare-event probabilities, counting problems, and combinatorial optimization, Fast Sequential Monte Carlo Methods for Counting and Optimization is a complete illustration of fast sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The book provides an accessible overview of current work in the field of Monte Carlo methods, specifically sequential Monte Carlo techniques, for solving abstract counting and optimization problems. Written by authorities in the

  7. Sequential transitions of bathtub vortex flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2017-08-01

    The bathtub vortex has been found to autonomously arise owing to instability of a symmetric flow in a rectangular vessel when water is drained. We consider a model flow through a vessel with a rectangular horizontal cross section and a drain hole at the center of the bottom to investigate the physical mechanism for generation of swirling fluid motion like the bathtub vortex and the sequential transitions of the flow by numerical simulations and the linear stability analyses. The water surface is assumed to be flat even after instability. If the flow becomes unstable under this assumption, it assures that the surface deformation is irrelevant to the instability. It is emphasized that our interest is not limited to the real bathtub vortex but directed to occurrence of a large vortex in a flow having two reflectional symmetries. The configuration of the vessel has the double plane symmetry (DPS), which allows the flow have the same DPS at small Reynolds numbers. It is found that the instabilities and hence transitions occur accompanying symmetry-breaking of the flow field. Namely, the DPS flow experiences instability to yield vortical motion above a critical Reynolds number, losing the DPS but retaining the π -rotational (twofold rotational) symmetry around the center axis. The vortical flow also becomes unstable at a higher Reynolds number, makes a transition, and loses the π -rotational symmetry, but still keeps the time-translation symmetry, i.e., steadiness. The steadiness is broken at an even higher Reynolds number, owing to instability caused by an oscillatory mode of disturbance. The first and second transitions of the flow are identified as pitchfork bifurcations, and the third transition is identified as a Hopf bifurcation.

  8. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  9. The prevalence of hypertension in relation with the normal albuminuria range in type 2 diabetes mellitus within the South Korean population: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Koh-Eun; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Cho, Kyung-Hwan; Han, Kyung-Do; Park, Yong-Gyu; Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Yang-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    The coexistence of hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. In some studies, normal albuminuria has also been associated with cardiovascular disease and HTN. Therefore, we examined the relationships between albuminuria and the prevalence of HTN and its control rate in type 2 DM patients. We analyzed data from the 2011-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and 1188 subjects with type 2 DM were included in the study. We divided albuminuria into 3 albuminuria tertiles (T): T1: <4.82mg/g; T2: 4.82-17.56mg/g; and T3: ≥17.56mg/g. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure were positively correlated with the albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) after adjusting for all covariates (P<0.001). Type 2 DM subjects with hypertension had more ACR T3 (odds ratio=2.018, 95% confidence interval=1.445-2.818) than subjects without HTN. Subjects with controlled HTN had less ACR T3 than subjects without controlled HTN (odds ratio=0.566, 95% confidence interval=0.384-0.836). When, we redivided albuminuria by <10, 10-30 (high normal albuminuria), 30-300mg/g (microalbuminuria), and 300mg/g≤(macroalbuminuria), the odds ratio for high normal albuminuria and microalbuminuria was 1.52 and 2.24, respectively in the presence of HTN, however, high normal albuminuria was not associated with HTN control. In conclusion, albuminuria within the high normal range was associated with the prevalence of HTN in South Korean patients with type 2 DM. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Group sequential and confirmatory adaptive designs in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Wassmer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of the general principles of and techniques for confirmatory adaptive designs. Confirmatory adaptive designs are a generalization of group sequential designs. With these designs, interim analyses are performed in order to stop the trial prematurely under control of the Type I error rate. In adaptive designs, it is also permissible to perform a data-driven change of relevant aspects of the study design at interim stages. This includes, for example, a sample-size reassessment, a treatment-arm selection or a selection of a pre-specified sub-population. Essentially, this adaptive methodology was introduced in the 1990s. Since then, it has become popular and the object of intense discussion and still represents a rapidly growing field of statistical research. This book describes adaptive design methodology at an elementary level, while also considering designing and planning issues as well as methods for analyzing an adaptively planned trial. This includes estimation methods...

  11. Decentralized enforcement, sequential bargaining, and the clean development mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovi, Jon

    2001-07-01

    While there is a vast literature both on international bargaining and on how international agreements can be enforced, very little work has been done on how bargaining and enforcement interact. An important exception is Fearon (1998), who models international cooperation as a two-stage process in which the bargaining process is constrained by a need for decentralized enforcement (meaning that the agreement must be enforced by the parties themselves rather than a third party, such as a court). Using the Clean Development Mechanism as an example, the present paper proposes a different model of this kind of interaction. The model follows Fearon's in so far as we both use the infinitely repeated Prisoners' Dilemma to capture the enforcement phase of the game. However, while Fearon depicts the bargaining stage as a War of Attrition, the present model sees that stage as a sequential bargaining game of the Staahl-Rubinstein type. The implications of the present model are compared both to those of the Staahl-Rubinstein model and to those of the Fearon model. A surprising conclusion is that a need for decentralized enforcement tends to make the bargaining outcome more symmetrical than otherwise. Thus, the impact of bargaining power is actually smaller when the resulting agreement must be enforced by the parties themselves than it is if enforcement is taken care of by a third party. (author)

  12. Sequential hypothesis testing with Bayes factors: Efficiently testing mean differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, Felix D; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Zehetleitner, Michael; Perugini, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Unplanned optional stopping rules have been criticized for inflating Type I error rates under the null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) paradigm. Despite these criticisms, this research practice is not uncommon, probably because it appeals to researcher's intuition to collect more data to push an indecisive result into a decisive region. In this contribution, we investigate the properties of a procedure for Bayesian hypothesis testing that allows optional stopping with unlimited multiple testing, even after each participant. In this procedure, which we call Sequential Bayes Factors (SBFs), Bayes factors are computed until an a priori defined level of evidence is reached. This allows flexible sampling plans and is not dependent upon correct effect size guesses in an a priori power analysis. We investigated the long-term rate of misleading evidence, the average expected sample sizes, and the biasedness of effect size estimates when an SBF design is applied to a test of mean differences between 2 groups. Compared with optimal NHST, the SBF design typically needs 50% to 70% smaller samples to reach a conclusion about the presence of an effect, while having the same or lower long-term rate of wrong inference. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Still seeking for an explanation of the Sequential Compatibility Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Privado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of the Compatibility Effect (CE according to the compatibility of the previous trial (Sequential Compatibility Effect, SCE in three types of attentional tasks is explored. The flankers and spatial Stroop tasks have different degrees of cognitive complexity. In all three tasks it is analyzed whether the SCE varies when the stimuli in consecutive trials are exactly the same (pure replicas or not. The data, collected from three independent samples (total N = 1.159, show the CE in the three tasks. However, SCE only shows up in the spatial Stroop task. The effect is smaller albeit still significant when the pure replica trials are removed, a result inconsistent with those of Mayr et al. (2003 and Hommel (1998 but consistent with the Conflict Theory (Botvinick et al., 2001. Furthermore, we also discuss the importance of cognitive complexity in relation to the perspective of Botvinick et al. (2004. From this point of view more complexity should be reflected in a greater presence of cognitive conflict, and therefore a higher SCE.

  14. Combined search for the quarks of a sequential fourth generation

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; De Remigis, Paolo; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for a fourth generation of quarks produced singly or in pairs in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011. A novel strategy has been developed for a combined search for quarks of the up- and down-type in decay channels with at least one isolated muon or electron. Limits on the mass of the fourth-generation quarks and the relevant CKM matrix elements are derived in the context of a simple extension of the standard model with a sequential fourth generation of fermions. The existence of mass-degenerate fourth-generation quarks with masses below 685 GeV is excluded at 95% confidence level for minimal off-diagonal mixing between the third- and the fourth-generation quarks. With a mass difference of 25 GeV between the quark masses, the obtained limit on the masses of the fourth-generation quarks shifts by about +/- 20 GeV. This result significantly reduces the allowed parameter space for a fourt...

  15. Map of sequential B cell epitopes of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein using human antibodies as probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Meloen, R. H.; Brasseur, R.

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were used to probe the antigenicity of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein of 41 kD (gp41) by antibody-reactive peptide scanning (Pepscan). Eleven distinct sequential antibody-binding sites were defined by testing

  16. A new approach to detect congestive heart failure using sequential spectrum of electrocardiogram signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Chandrakar

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the discriminative power of sequential spectrum analysis of the short-term electrocardiogram (ECG) time series in separating normal and congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects. The raw ECG time series is transformed into a series of discretized binary symbols and the distribution of mono-sequences (i.e., tuples containing only one type of symbol '0' or '1') is computed. The relative distribution of mono-sequences containing only one type of symbol constitutes binary occupancy for that symbol in the sequential spectrum. The quantified approximate entropies of the binary occupancies in the sequential spectra are found to have potential in discriminating normal and CHF subjects and thus can significantly add to the prognostic value of traditional cardiac analysis. The statistical analyses and the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis confirm the robustness of this new approach, which exhibits an average accuracy, average sensitivity, average positive predictivity, and average specificity, all 100.0%. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential solvent extraction for forms of antimony in five selected coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, C.; Liu, Gaisheng; Kong, Y.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, R.

    2008-01-01

    Abundance of antimony in bulk samples has been determined in five selected coals, three coals from Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, China, and two from the Illinois Basin in the United States. The Sb abundance in these samples is in the range of 0.11-0.43 ??g/g. The forms of Sb in coals were studied by sequential solvent extraction. The six forms of Sb are water soluble, ion changeable, organic matter bound, carbonate bound, silicate bound, and sulfide bound. Results of sequential extraction show that silicate-bound Sb is the most abundant form in these coals. Silicate- plus sulfide-bound Sb accounts for more than half of the total Sb in all coals. Bituminous coals are higher in organic matterbound Sb than anthracite and natural coke, indicating that the Sb in the organic matter may be incorporated into silicate and sulfide minerals during metamorphism. ?? 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  18. Eye movements in a sequential scanning task: evidence for distributed processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukenbrod, Hans A; Engbert, Ralf

    2012-01-10

    Current models of eye movement control are derived from theories assuming serial processing of single items or from theories based on parallel processing of multiple items at a time. This issue has persisted because most investigated paradigms generated data compatible with both serial and parallel models. Here, we study eye movements in a sequential scanning task, where stimulus n indicates the position of the next stimulus n + 1. We investigate whether eye movements are controlled by sequential attention shifts when the task requires serial order of processing. Our measures of distributed processing in the form of parafoveal-on-foveal effects, long-range modulations of target selection, and skipping saccades provide evidence against models strictly based on serial attention shifts. We conclude that our results lend support to parallel processing as a strategy for eye movement control.

  19. Sequential ensemble-based optimal design for parameter estimation: SEQUENTIAL ENSEMBLE-BASED OPTIMAL DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Jun [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou China; Zhang, Jiangjiang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou China; Li, Weixuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Zeng, Lingzao [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou China; Wu, Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside California USA

    2016-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been widely used in parameter estimation for hydrological models. The focus of most previous studies was to develop more efficient analysis (estimation) algorithms. On the other hand, it is intuitively understandable that a well-designed sampling (data-collection) strategy should provide more informative measurements and subsequently improve the parameter estimation. In this work, a Sequential Ensemble-based Optimal Design (SEOD) method, coupled with EnKF, information theory and sequential optimal design, is proposed to improve the performance of parameter estimation. Based on the first-order and second-order statistics, different information metrics including the Shannon entropy difference (SD), degrees of freedom for signal (DFS) and relative entropy (RE) are used to design the optimal sampling strategy, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by synthetic one-dimensional and two-dimensional unsaturated flow case studies. It is shown that the designed sampling strategies can provide more accurate parameter estimation and state prediction compared with conventional sampling strategies. Optimal sampling designs based on various information metrics perform similarly in our cases. The effect of ensemble size on the optimal design is also investigated. Overall, larger ensemble size improves the parameter estimation and convergence of optimal sampling strategy. Although the proposed method is applied to unsaturated flow problems in this study, it can be equally applied in any other hydrological problems.

  20. [Primary age-related tauopathy (PART): a novel term to describe age-related tangle pathology encompassing a wide range from cognitively normal condition to senile dementia of the neurofibrillary tangle type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are commonly observed in older people, and that some of older individuals with dementia have a large amount of NFTs in the medial temporal lobe without amyloid(Aβ) plaques, which have been referred to as senile dementia of the NFT type (SD-NFT), tangle-predominant senile dementia (TPSD), or tangle-only dementia. In 2014, our international collaborative group proposed a new term, "primary age-related tauopathy(PART)", to describe such age-related tangle pathology, clinically encompassing a wide range from normal to cognitive impairment/ dementia (SD-NFT). This nomenclature would provide a conceptual foundation for future studies leading to development of clinical diagnosis for this condition.

  1. Synthesizing genetic sequential logic circuit with clock pulse generator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chuang, Chia-Hua; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper presents a genetic sequential logic circuit with a clock pulse generator based on a synthesized genetic oscillator, which generates a consecutive clock signal whose frequency is an inverse...

  2. Process tomography via sequential measurements on a single quantum system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bassa, H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors utilize a discrete (sequential) measurement protocol to investigate quantum process tomography of a single two-level quantum system, with an unknown initial state, undergoing Rabi oscillations. The ignorance of the dynamical parameters...

  3. On Riesz-Caputo Formulation for Sequential Fractional Variational Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahd Jarad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with sequential Riesz-Caputo fractional variational problems with and without the presence of delay in the state variables and their derivatives. In both cases the necessary conditions for the optimal control are reported.

  4. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems.

  5. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part I: Sequential Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the most important methods for blood velocity vector flow imaging (VFI) for conventional, sequential data acquisition. This includes multibeam methods, speckle tracking, transverse oscillation, color flow mapping derived vector flow imaging, directional beamforming, an...

  6. sequential low cost interventions double hand hygiene rates among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 91 No. 2 February 2014. SEQUENTIAL LOW COST INTERVENTIONS DOUBLE HAND HYGIENE RATES AMONG MEDICAL TEAMS IN A. RESOURCE LIMITED SETTING. RESULTS OF A HAND HYGIENE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT CONDUCTED. AT UNIVERSITY TEACHING ...

  7. Sequential Low Cost Interventions Double Hand Hygiene Rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequential Low Cost Interventions Double Hand Hygiene Rates Among Medical Teams in a Resource Limited Setting. Results of a Hand Hygiene Quality Improvement Project Conducted At University Teaching Hospital of Kigali (Chuk), Kigali, Rwanda.

  8. Auditory cortical maturation in children with sequential bilateral cochlear implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparreboom, M.; Beynon, A.J.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation on auditory, cortical maturation after various periods of unilateral cochlear implant use. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary academic referral center. PATIENTS: Thirty prelingually deaf children,

  9. Multi-Level Sequential Pattern Mining Based on Prime Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianglei, Sun; Yun, Li; Jiang, Yin

    Encoding is not only to express the hierarchical relationship, but also to facilitate the identification of the relationship between different levels, which will directly affect the efficiency of the algorithm in the area of mining the multi-level sequential pattern. In this paper, we prove that one step of division operation can decide the parent-child relationship between different levels by using prime encoding and present PMSM algorithm and CROSS-PMSM algorithm which are based on prime encoding for mining multi-level sequential pattern and cross-level sequential pattern respectively. Experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively extract multi-level and cross-level sequential pattern from the sequence database.

  10. Critical evaluation of novel dynamic flow-through methods for automatic sequential BCR extraction of trace metals in fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonjob, Warunya; Rosende, Maria; Miro, Manuel; Cerda, Victor [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Two novel dynamic extraction approaches, the so-called sequential injection microcolumn extraction and sequential injection stirred-flow chamber extraction, based on the implementation of a sample-containing container as an external extraction reactor in a sequential injection network, are for the first time, optimized and critically appraised for fractionation assays. The three steps of the original Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction scheme have been performed in both automated dynamic fractionation systems to evaluate the extractability of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a standard reference material of coal fly ash (NIST 1633b). In order to find the experimental conditions with the greatest influence on metal leachability in dynamic BCR fractionation, a full-factorial design was applied, in which the solid sample weight (100-500 mg) and the extraction flow rate (3.0-6.0 mL min{sup -1}) were selected as experimental factors. Identical cumulative extractabilities were found in both sequential injection (SI)-based methods for most of assayed trace elements regardless of the extraction conditions selected, revealing that both dynamic fractionation systems, as opposed to conventional steady-state BCR extraction, are not operationally defined within the selected range of experimental conditions. Besides, the proposed automated SI assemblies offer a significant saving of operational time with respect to classical BCR test, that is, 3.3 h versus 48 h, for complete fractionation with minimum analyst involvement. (orig.)

  11. Conventional, microwave, and ultrasound sequential extractions for the fractionation of metals in sediments within the Petrochemical Industry, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relić, Dubravka; Dorđević, Dragana; Sakan, Sanja; Anđelković, Ivan; Pantelić, Ana; Stanković, Ratomir; Popović, Aleksandar

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the main objective was fractionation of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Ca, Fe, and K in certificate material and sediment samples gathered from and around the Petrochemical Industry using the conventional, microwave and ultrasonic sequential extraction. Microwave oven and ultrasound bath were used as an energy source for achieving faster extraction. Additional heating and boiling of samples were avoided by using lower power and shorter time for microwave and ultrasound extraction. Precision and accuracy of procedure were evaluated by using certificate material (BCR701). Acceptable accuracy of metals (87.0-111.3 %) was achieved for all three-step sequential of conventional extraction protocol. An accuracy of the fourth step has been verified with two certificate materials: BCR143R and 146R. The range of total extracted metal concentrations from sediments was similar for all three extraction techniques. A significant high percentage of Cd, Cu, and Zn were obtained after extraction of the exchangeable and acid soluble sediment fraction. Principal component analysis of values obtained after determination of risk assessment code using conventional and ultrasound sequential extraction show similarity of these values. Accuracy, recovery, and risk assessment code values imply that ultrasound sequential extraction is a more suitable, accelerated sequential extraction procedure (30 min per extraction step) than microwave extraction in applied conditions.

  12. Sequential Organization and Room Reverberation for Speech Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    rooms. Wechoose two acoustic rooms with the reverberation time (T^)) equal to 0.3 and 0.5 s, respectively. In each room, two RIRs corresponding to...Labeling accuracy of the proposed and comparison systems shown as a function of reverberation time for (a) two-talker and (b) three-talker mixtures...of reverberation time . This sequential organization approach was published in a 2010 paper by J. Woodruff and D.L. Wang, entitled ’’Sequential

  13. Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Modeling of Sequential Skill Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0320 Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Modeling of Sequential Skill Learning David Schnyer UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN...2015-30/06/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Modeling of Sequential Skill Learning 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The University of Texas at Austin 108 E Dean Keeton Stop A8000 Austin, TX

  14. Concatenated coding system with iterated sequential inner decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Riis; Paaske, Erik

    1995-01-01

    We describe a concatenated coding system with iterated sequential inner decoding. The system uses convolutional codes of very long constraint length and operates on iterations between an inner Fano decoder and an outer Reed-Solomon decoder......We describe a concatenated coding system with iterated sequential inner decoding. The system uses convolutional codes of very long constraint length and operates on iterations between an inner Fano decoder and an outer Reed-Solomon decoder...

  15. A Trust-region-based Sequential Quadratic Programming Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Christian; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    This technical note documents the trust-region-based sequential quadratic programming algorithm used in other works by the authors. The algorithm seeks to minimize a convex nonlinear cost function subject to linear inequalty constraints and nonlinear equality constraints.......This technical note documents the trust-region-based sequential quadratic programming algorithm used in other works by the authors. The algorithm seeks to minimize a convex nonlinear cost function subject to linear inequalty constraints and nonlinear equality constraints....

  16. Sequential unilateral lung volume reduction for emphysema - Stretching the benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorramnia, Sadie; Holsworth, Lynda; Mestitz, Hugh; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Gooi, Julian H; Snell, Gregory I

    2017-01-01

    Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction (BLVR) and Surgical Lung Volume Reduction (SLVR) and are two different approaches used to remodel severely emphysematous lungs to improve lung function and quality-of-life. We present a case initially referred for lung transplantation, where sequential left upper lobe BLVR and 7 years later right upper lobe SLVR, providing enduring physiological and functional improvement. The potential for sustained benefit via sequential unilateral lung volume reduction is under-appreciated.

  17. The impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder on the response to sequential pharmacological trials for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Juliana B; Costa, Daniel Lc; Cassab, Raony Cc; Pereira, Carlos Ab; Miguel, Euripedes C; Shavitt, Roseli G

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of comorbid body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on the response to sequential pharmacological trials in adult obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. The sequential trial initially involved fluoxetine monotherapy followed by one of three randomized, add-on strategies: placebo, clomipramine or quetiapine. We included 138 patients in the initial phase of fluoxetine, up to 80 mg or the maximum tolerated dosage, for 12 weeks. We invited 70 non-responders to participate in the add-on trial; as 54 accepted, we allocated 18 to each treatment group and followed them for an additional 12 weeks. To evaluate the combined effects of sex, age, age at onset, initial severity, type of augmentation and BDD on the response to sequential treatments, we constructed a model using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Of the 39 patients who completed the study (OCD-BDD, n = 13; OCD-non-BDD, n = 26), the OCD-BDD patients were less likely to be classified as responders than the OCD-non-BDD patients (Pearson Chi-Square = 4.4; p = 0.036). In the GEE model, BDD was not significantly associated with a worse response to sequential treatments (z-robust = 1.77; p = 0.07). The predictive potential of BDD regarding sequential treatment strategies for OCD did not survive when the analyses were controlled for other clinical characteristics. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. A novel mechanism for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II targeting to L-type Ca2+channels that initiates long-range signaling to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Marks, Christian R; Perfitt, Tyler L; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Lee, Amy; Jacobson, David A; Colbran, Roger J

    2017-10-20

    Neuronal excitation can induce new mRNA transcription, a phenomenon called excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. Among several pathways implicated in E-T coupling, activation of voltage-gated L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) in the plasma membrane can initiate a signaling pathway that ultimately increases nuclear CREB phosphorylation and, in most cases, expression of immediate early genes. Initiation of this long-range pathway has been shown to require recruitment of Ca 2+ -sensitive enzymes to a nanodomain in the immediate vicinity of the LTCC by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that activated Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) strongly interacts with a novel binding motif in the N-terminal domain of Ca V 1 LTCC α1 subunits that is not conserved in Ca V 2 or Ca V 3 voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel subunits. Mutations in the Ca V 1.3 α1 subunit N-terminal domain or in the CaMKII catalytic domain that largely prevent the in vitro interaction also disrupt CaMKII association with intact LTCC complexes isolated by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, these same mutations interfere with E-T coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our findings define a novel molecular interaction with the neuronal LTCC that is required for the initiation of a long-range signal to the nucleus that is critical for learning and memory. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Sequential expression and differential hormonal regulation of proteolytic activities during germination in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, B S; Casacuberta, J M; Puigdomènech, P

    1990-07-01

    We have characterized the proteolytic activities (proteases in cooperation with carboxypeptidases) involved in the different stages of germination of maize (Zea mays L.) grains. A sequential expression of different groups of proteases (aspartic, cysteine, serine and metallo-proteases) with pH optima in the acidic range has been found by using specific protease inhibitors. Pepstatin-sensitive proteolytic activity (aspartic-protease activity) is dominant in resting grains. Germination is accompanied by the appearance of a proteolytic activity which can be enhanced by low-molecular-weight thiol compounds and inhibited by thiol-protease inhibitors, which is indicative of the involvement of cysteine protease(s). This burst of cysteine-protease activity is coincident with the disappearance of the main storage-protein fractions. We conclude from this that cysteine protease(s), with an acid pH optimum, are good candidate(s) for the proteolytic attack of stored protein reserves in maize. After this stage, where cysteine-protease activity is dominant, a period with larger total proteolytic activity starts, coincidentally with the expression of the different types of other proteolytic activities (serine, aspartic and metallo proteases), in addition to the cysteine-protease activity above mentioned. When the development of carboxypeptidase activity during germination was analyzed, the highest activities were found during the earlier and later stages. This result is indicative of a cooperative interaction between carboxypeptidase and endoproteolytic systems in order to obtain a more effective mobilization of storage proteins in germinating maize grains. The phytohormones, gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA) which can stimulate or inhibit, respectively, the total proteolytic activity in extracts from germinating grains, exert a differential effect on the different proteolytic activities here detected.

  20. A computer-based auditory sequential pattern test for school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Natalie A; Smales, Caroline J; Rickard, Kurt L

    2013-05-01

    One type of test commonly used to assess auditory processing disorders (APD) is the Frequency Pattern Test, in which triads of pure tones of two different frequencies are presented, and participants are required to accurately report the sequence of tones, typically using a verbal response. The test is widely used clinically, but in its current format, is an under-exploited means of addressing some candidate processes, such as temporal ordering and frequency discrimination, which might be affected in APD. Here we describe a computer-based version of an auditory pattern perception test, the BirdSong Game, which was designed to be an engaging research tool for use with school-aged children. In this study, 128 children aged 6-10 with normal peripheral hearing were tested. The BirdSong Game application was used to administer auditory sequential pattern tests, via a touch-screen presentation and response interface. A conditioning step was included prior to testing, in order to ensure that participants were able to adequately discriminate between the test tones, and reliably describe the difference using their own vocabulary. Responses were collected either verbally or manually, by having participants press cartoon images on the touch-screen in the appropriate sequence. The data was examined for age, gender and response mode differences. Findings on the auditory tests indicated a significant maturational effect across the age range studied, with no difference between response modes or gender. The BirdSong Game is sensitive to maturational changes in auditory sequencing ability, and the computer-based design of the test has several advantages which make it a potentially useful clinical and research tool. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a multilayered association polymer system for sequential drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakavanam Sundararaj, Sharath kumar

    As all the physiological processes in our body are controlled by multiple biomolecules, comprehensive treatment of certain disease conditions may be more effectively achieved by administration of more than one type of drug. Thus, the primary objective of this research was to develop a multilayered, polymer-based system for sequential delivery of multiple drugs. This particular device was designed aimed at the treatment of periodontitis, a highly prevalent oral inflammatory disease that affects 90% of the world population. This condition is caused by bacterial biofilm on the teeth, resulting in a chronic inflammatory response that leads to loss of alveolar bone and, ultimately, the tooth. Current treatment methods for periodontitis address specific parts of the disease, with no individual treatment serving as a complete therapy. The polymers used for the fabrication of this multilayered device consists of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) complexed with Pluronic F-127 (P). After evaluating morphology of the resulting CAPP system, in vitro release of small molecule drugs and a model protein was studied from both single and multilayered devices. Drug release from single-layered CAPP films followed zero-order kinetics related to surface erosion property of the association polymer. Release studies from multilayered CAPP devices showed the possibility of achieving intermittent release of one type of drug as well as sequential release of more than one type of drug. Mathematical modeling accurately predicted the release profiles for both single layer and multilayered devices. After the initial characterization of the CAPP system, the device was specifically modified to achieve sequential release of drugs aimed at the treatment of periodontitis. The four types of drugs used were metronidazole, ketoprofen, doxycycline, and simvastatin to eliminate infection, inhibit inflammation, prevent tissue destruction, and aid bone regeneration, respectively. To obtain different erosion

  2. Detection Rates for Aneuploidy by First-Trimester and Sequential Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Rebecca J; Flessel, Monica C; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L; Goldman, Sara; Hudgins, Louanne; Hull, Andrew D; Norton, Mary E; Currier, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    To estimate detection rates for aneuploidy by first-trimester and sequential screening. The study included women with singleton pregnancies who participated in the California Prenatal Screening Program with estimated delivery dates from August 2009 to December 2012 who had first- or first- and second-trimester (sequential) screening. Detection rates were measured for target (trisomies 21 and 18) and other aneuploidies identified from the California Chromosome Defect Registry. Of 452,901 women screened, 17,435 (3.8%) were screen-positive for Down syndrome only; 433 (0.1%) for trisomy 18 only; 1,689 (0.4%) for both Down syndrome and trisomy 18; and 2,947 (0.7%) for neural tube defects, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, or for multiple conditions. The detection rates were Down syndrome-92.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 91.4-94.2); trisomy 18-93.2% (95% CI 90.5-95.9); trisomy 13-80.4% (95% CI 73.9-86.9); 45,X-80.1% (95% CI 73.9-86.3), and triploidy-91.0% (95% CI 84.2-97.9). Overall, the detection rate for chromosome abnormalities was 81.6% (95% CI 80.0-83.1) at an overall false-positive rate of 4.5%. First-trimester and sequential screening are sensitive and specific for the broad range of karyotype abnormalities seen in the population. II.

  3. Automated Discovery and Modeling of Sequential Patterns Preceding Events of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohloff, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The integration of emerging data manipulation technologies has enabled a paradigm shift in practitioners' abilities to understand and anticipate events of interest in complex systems. Example events of interest include outbreaks of socio-political violence in nation-states. Rather than relying on human-centric modeling efforts that are limited by the availability of SMEs, automated data processing technologies has enabled the development of innovative automated complex system modeling and predictive analysis technologies. We introduce one such emerging modeling technology - the sequential pattern methodology. We have applied the sequential pattern methodology to automatically identify patterns of observed behavior that precede outbreaks of socio-political violence such as riots, rebellions and coups in nation-states. The sequential pattern methodology is a groundbreaking approach to automated complex system model discovery because it generates easily interpretable patterns based on direct observations of sampled factor data for a deeper understanding of societal behaviors that is tolerant of observation noise and missing data. The discovered patterns are simple to interpret and mimic human's identifications of observed trends in temporal data. Discovered patterns also provide an automated forecasting ability: we discuss an example of using discovered patterns coupled with a rich data environment to forecast various types of socio-political violence in nation-states.

  4. Complex regional pain syndrome: are there distinct subtypes and sequential stages of the syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Harden, R Norman; Galer, Bradley S; Saltz, Samuel; Backonja, Miroslav; Stanton-Hicks, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study tested for evidence supporting the clinical lore of three sequential stages of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and examined the characteristics of possible CRPS subtypes. A series of 113 patients meeting IASP criteria for CRPS underwent standardized history and physical examinations to assess CRPS signs and symptoms in four domains identified in previous research: pain/sensory abnormalities, vasomotor dysfunction, edema/sudomotor dysfunction, and motor/trophic changes. K-Means cluster analysis was used to derive three relatively homogeneous CRPS patient subgroups based on similarity of sign/symptom patterns in these domains. The resulting CRPS subgroups did not differ significantly regarding pain duration as might be expected in a sequential staging model. However, the derived subgroups were statistically-distinct, and suggested three possible CRPS subtypes: (1) a relatively limited syndrome with vasomotor signs predominating, (2) a relatively limited syndrome with neuropathic pain/sensory abnormalities predominating, and (3) a florid CRPS syndrome similar to "classic RSD" descriptions. Subtype 3 showed the highest levels of motor/trophic signs and possible disuse-related changes (osteopenia) on bone scan, despite having directionally the briefest pain duration of the three groups. EMG/NCV testing suggests that Subtype 2 may reflect CRPS-Type 2 (causalgia). Overall, these results are consistent with limited previous work that argues against three sequential stages of CRPS. However, several distinct CRPS subtypes are suggested, and these could ultimately have utility in targeting treatment more effectively.

  5. Combined and sequential treatment of oral and maxillofacial malignancies: an evolving concept and clinical protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-wei; Qiu, Wei-liu; Zhang, Zhi-yuan

    2008-10-05

    To introduce the concept and rational regimens and present the latest development of combined treatment of oral and maxillofacial malignancies. Data sources The related published literature was searched through the CNKI database and MEDLINE using the terms of oral cancer, oral and maxillofacial malignancies, combined and sequential therapy, multidisciplinary approach. Study selection The available related literature was read and evaluated. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected. The results show that oral and maxillofacial malignancies diagnosed at an early stages (stages I and II) can be well treated with surgery alone and/or radiotherapy with optimal outcome, but advanced or recurrent diseases should be treated with rational combined and sequential treatment modalities. The use of concomitant chemoradiotherapy, taxane-containing, three-drug induction regimens and Cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy demonstrated favorable results in previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The concept of combined and sequential treatment of advanced oral and maxillofacial malignancies should be widely accepted, and the rational regimen for individual and each type of entity should be determined based on the anatomical site and the patient's performance status.

  6. Dysfunction of bulbar central pattern generator in ALS patients with dysphagia during sequential deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate a probable dysfunction of the central pattern generator (CPG) in dysphagic patients with ALS. We investigated 58 patients with ALS, 23 patients with PD, and 33 normal subjects. The laryngeal movements and EMG of the submental muscles were recorded during sequential water swallowing (SWS) of 100ml of water. The coordination of SWS and respiration was also studied in some normal cases and ALS patients. Normal subjects could complete the SWS optimally within 10s using 7 swallows, while in dysphagic ALS patients, the total duration and the number of swallows were significantly increased. The novel finding was that the regularity and rhythmicity of the swallowing pattern during SWS was disorganized to irregular and arhythmic pattern in 43% of the ALS patients. The duration and speed of swallowing were the most sensitive parameters for the disturbed oropharyngeal motility during SWS. The corticobulbar control of swallowing is insufficient in ALS, and the swallowing CPG cannot work very well to produce segmental muscle activation and sequential swallowing. CPG dysfunction can result in irregular and arhythmical sequential swallowing in ALS patients with bulbar plus pseudobulbar types. The arhythmical SWS pattern can be considered as a kind of dysfunction of CPG in human ALS cases with dysphagia. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Is sequential cranial ultrasound reliable for detection of white matter injury in very preterm infants?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijser, Lara M.; Steggerda, Sylke J.; Walther, Frans J.; Wezel-Meijler, Gerda van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Bruine, Francisca T. de; Grond, Jeroen van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Cranial ultrasound (cUS) may not be reliable for detection of diffuse white matter (WM) injury. Our aim was to assess in very preterm infants the reliability of a classification system for WM injury on sequential cUS throughout the neonatal period, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as reference standard. In 110 very preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks), serial cUS during admission (median 8, range 4-22) and again around term equivalent age (TEA) and a single MRI around TEA were performed. cUS during admission were assessed for presence of WM changes, and contemporaneous cUS and MRI around TEA additionally for abnormality of lateral ventricles. Sequential cUS (from birth up to TEA) and MRI were classified as normal/mildly abnormal, moderately abnormal, or severely abnormal, based on a combination of findings of the WM and lateral ventricles. Predictive values of the cUS classification were calculated. Sequential cUS were classified as normal/mildly abnormal, moderately abnormal, and severely abnormal in, respectively, 22%, 65%, and 13% of infants and MRI in, respectively, 30%, 52%, and 18%. The positive predictive value of the cUS classification for the MRI classification was high for severely abnormal WM (0.79) but lower for normal/mildly abnormal (0.67) and moderately abnormal (0.64) WM. Sequential cUS during the neonatal period detects severely abnormal WM in very preterm infants but is less reliable for mildly and moderately abnormal WM. MRI around TEA seems needed to reliably detect WM injury in very preterm infants. (orig.)

  8. Speech-perception-in-noise and bilateral spatial abilities in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Oosthuizen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine speech-perception-in-noise (with speech and noise spatially distinct and coincident and bilateral spatial benefits of head-shadow effect, summation, squelch and spatial release of masking in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implants. Study design: A cross-sectional one group post-test-only exploratory design was employed. Eleven adults (mean age 47 years; range 21 – 69 years of the Pretoria Cochlear Implant Programme (PCIP in South Africa with a bilateral severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Prerecorded Everyday Speech Sentences of The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID were used to evaluate participants’ speech-in-noise perception at sentence level. An adaptive procedure was used to determine the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, in dB at which the participant’s speech reception threshold (SRT was achieved. Specific calculations were used to estimate bilateral spatial benefit effects. Results: A minimal bilateral benefit for speech-in-noise perception was observed with noise directed to the first implant (CI 1 (1.69 dB and in the speech and noise spatial listening condition (0.78 dB, but was not statistically significant. The head-shadow effect at 180° was the most robust bilateral spatial benefit. An improvement in speech perception in spatially distinct speech and noise indicates the contribution of the second implant (CI 2 is greater than that of the first implant (CI 1 for bilateral spatial benefit. Conclusion: Bilateral benefit for delayed sequentially implanted adults is less than previously reported for simultaneous and sequentially implanted adults. Delayed sequential implantation benefit seems to relate to the availability of the ear with the most favourable SNR.

  9. Photoluminescence of Sequential Infiltration Synthesized ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, Leonidas; Gosztola, David; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Connolly, Aine

    We have investigated a variation of atomic layer deposition (ALD), called sequential infiltration synthesis (SiS), as an alternate method to incorporate ZnO and other oxides inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and other polymers. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that we synthesize ZnO up to 300 nm inside a PMMA film. Photoluminescence data on a PMMA film shows that we achieve a factor of 400X increase in photoluminescence (PL) intensity when comparing a blank Si sample and a 270 nm thick PMMA film, where both were treated with the same 12 alternating cycles of H2O and diethyl zinc (DEZ). PMMA is a well-known ebeam resist. We can expose and develop patterns useful for photonics or sensing applications first, and then convert them afterwards into a hybrid polymer-oxide material. We show that patterning does indeed affect the photoluminescence signature of native ZnO. We demonstrate we can track the growth of the ZnO inside the PMMA polymer using both photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy and determine the point in the process where ZnO is first photoluminescent and also at which point ZnO first exhibits long range order in the polymer. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. "Time sequential high dose of Cytarabine in acute myelocytic leukemia "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavamzadeh A

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Given preliminary evidence of timed, sequential chemotherapy of high dose cytosine arabinoside the current study was initiated to assess the side effects and efficacy of this regimen in patients with newly acute myelocytic leukemia (AML. Nineteen adults who referred to Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT research center of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in a trial from Aug 1999 to Nov 2000. All patients had a Karnofski classification above 60%. At this time induction therapy consisted of daunorubicin or idarubicin given at a dose of 60 mg/m² and 12 mg/m² IV respectively on days 1-3, and cytarabine (Ara-C 100 mg/m² intravenously by continuous infusion on days 1-7, followed by Ara-C 1000 mg/m² given on day 8-10 every 12 hours by IV infusion. Consolidation therapy started after 35th day. Of 19 fully evaluable patients, 10 patients achieved a complete remission, whereas 36.6% patients succumbed to death due to regeneration failure. The clinical data show that the overall survival rate from diagnosis 55.5% (95% CI, 30.8-78.5 at 6 months for the entire cohort of the patients. Disease free survival is also 50% (95% CI, 26-74. Mean duration of death due to treatment was 20 days (range 17-29 after beginning the regimen. Presenting WBC counts, French-American-British (FAB classification, sex and age were not useful prognostic variables. Fever, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and GI hemorrhage were seen in 19, 6, 4, 7 patients respectively. It seems the 3+7+3 regimen is a promising approach for the AML patients regarding to high complete remission rate, but more supportive care should be considered. Furthermore any, benefit in long-term outcome can’t be determined regardless to the choice of post remission therapy (e.g., GCSF, appropriate antibiotics and etc.

  11. Programmable colloidal molecules from sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Songbo; Leemann, Jessica; Buttinoni, Ivo; Isa, Lucio; Wolf, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of artificial nanostructured and microstructured materials which display structures and functionalities that mimic nature’s complexity requires building blocks with specific and directional interactions, analogous to those displayed at the molecular level. Despite remarkable progress in synthesizing “patchy” particles encoding anisotropic interactions, most current methods are restricted to integrating up to two compositional patches on a single “molecule” and to objects with simple shapes. Currently, decoupling functionality and shape to achieve full compositional and geometrical programmability remains an elusive task. We use sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly which uniquely fulfills the demands described above. This is a new method based on simple, yet essential, adaptations to the well-known capillary assembly of particles over topographical templates. Tuning the depth of the assembly sites (traps) and the surface tension of moving droplets of colloidal suspensions enables controlled stepwise filling of traps to “synthesize” colloidal molecules. After deposition and mechanical linkage, the colloidal molecules can be dispersed in a solvent. The template’s shape solely controls the molecule’s geometry, whereas the filling sequence independently determines its composition. No specific surface chemistry is required, and multifunctional molecules with organic and inorganic moieties can be fabricated. We demonstrate the “synthesis” of a library of structures, ranging from dumbbells and triangles to units resembling bar codes, block copolymers, surfactants, and three-dimensional chiral objects. The full programmability of our approach opens up new directions not only for assembling and studying complex materials with single-particle-level control but also for fabricating new microscale devices for sensing, patterning, and delivery applications. PMID:27051882

  12. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 in combination with a statin in patients with hypercholesterolaemia (LAPLACE-TIMI 57): a randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, phase 2 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Robert P; Desai, Nihar R; Kohli, Payal; Rogers, William J; Somaratne, Ransi; Huang, Fannie; Liu, Thomas; Mohanavelu, Satishkumar; Hoffman, Elaine B; McDonald, Shannon T; Abrahamsen, Timothy E; Wasserman, Scott M; Scott, Robert; Sabatine, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds LDL receptors, targeting them for degradation. We therefore assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of AMG 145, a human monoclonal IgG2 antibody against PCSK9, in stable patients with hypercholesterolemia on a statin. Methods In a phase 2, dose-ranging study done in 78 centres in the USA, Canada, Denmark, Hungary, and Czech Republic, patients (aged 18–80 years) with LDL-C greater than 2.2 mmol/L on a stable dose of statin (with or without ezetimibe), were randomly assigned equally, through an interactive voice response system, to subcutaneous injections of AMG 145 70 mg, 105 mg, or 140 mg, or matching placebo every 2 weeks; or subcutaneous injections of AMG 145 280 mg, 350 mg, or 420 mg, or matching placebo every 4 weeks. Everyone was masked to treatment assignment within the every 2 weeks and every 4 weeks schedules. The primary endpoint was the percentage change in LDL-C concentration from baseline after 12 weeks. Analysis was by modified intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01380730. Findings 631 patients with hypercholesterolaemia were randomly assigned to AMG 145 70 mg (n=79), 105 mg (n=79), or 140 mg (n=78), or matching placebo (n=78) every 2 weeks; or AMG 145 280 mg (n=79), 350 mg (n=79), and 420 mg (n=80), and matching placebo (n=79) every 4 weeks. At the end of the dosing interval at week 12, the mean LDL-C concentrations were reduced generally dose dependently by AMG 145 every 2 weeks (ranging from 41.8% to 66.1%; p<0.0001 for each dose vs placebo) and AMG 145 every 4 weeks (ranging from 41.8% to 50.3%; p<0.0001). No treatment-related serious adverse events occurred. The frequencies of treatment-related adverse events were similar in the AMG 145 and placebo groups (39 [8%] of 474 vs 11 [7%] of 155); none of these events were severe or life

  13. Evalution of sequential extractions on dry and wet sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, W; Monteny, F; Leermakers, M; Bouillon, S

    2003-07-01

    A five-step sequential extraction procedure was applied on dried and wet Ballastplaat Scheldt estuary sediments. When wet (fresh) sediments were used, all sample handling up to the 3rd extraction step, inclusive, was carried out under inert atmosphere. The repeatability of the procedure was very good on dry samples. For Fe as for Mn, RSD values are lower than 4%, except for Mn in the fifth extraction step where a spread of 10% is observed. The observed RSDs for Pb are of the same order of magnitude as those for Mn. On wet samples the spread of the results is higher than on dried ones. The highest RSDs observed for Fe amount to 20%, for Mn to 15% but for Pb an RSD of up to 44% was found. Better homogenization of the solid sediment part of lyophilized sediments and different porosities of wet sediment sub-samples may be the explanation. These results also indicated that drying/oxidizing of the sediment sample causes a shift from less available/mobile metal fractions to more available/mobile fractions. The Mn and Fe oxyhydroxide spikes added to a wet sediment sample were recovered between 100+/-10%. The results obtained after changing the sequence of the extraction steps (multiple rotations and inversions were tested) corroborated the progressive increase in the aggressive nature of the extraction solutions in our standard scheme. Although there is also no need to change the ratio volume of extractant to amount of sediment, increasing the number of extraction repetitions in steps 1 to 3 resulted, for some of those extraction steps, in a partially modified analyte distribution. Finally the method was applied to sandy and muddy sediment cores of the Scheldt estuary and revealed clear differences between metal distributions in both types of sediment.

  14. Embedding responses in spontaneous neural activity shaped through sequential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, "memories-as-bifurcations," that differs from the traditional "memories-as-attractors" viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in our previous study.

  15. Embedding responses in spontaneous neural activity shaped through sequential learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Kurikawa

    Full Text Available Recent experimental measurements have demonstrated that spontaneous neural activity in the absence of explicit external stimuli has remarkable spatiotemporal structure. This spontaneous activity has also been shown to play a key role in the response to external stimuli. To better understand this role, we proposed a viewpoint, "memories-as-bifurcations," that differs from the traditional "memories-as-attractors" viewpoint. Memory recall from the memories-as-bifurcations viewpoint occurs when the spontaneous neural activity is changed to an appropriate output activity upon application of an input, known as a bifurcation in dynamical systems theory, wherein the input modifies the flow structure of the neural dynamics. Learning, then, is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems such that a target output pattern is generated as an attractor upon a given input. Based on this novel viewpoint, we introduce in this paper an associative memory model with a sequential learning process. Using a simple hebbian-type learning, the model is able to memorize a large number of input/output mappings. The neural dynamics shaped through the learning exhibit different bifurcations to make the requested targets stable upon an increase in the input, and the neural activity in the absence of input shows chaotic dynamics with occasional approaches to the memorized target patterns. These results suggest that these dynamics facilitate the bifurcations to each target attractor upon application of the corresponding input, which thus increases the capacity for learning. This theoretical finding about the behavior of the spontaneous neural activity is consistent with recent experimental observations in which the neural activity without stimuli wanders among patterns evoked by previously applied signals. In addition, the neural networks shaped by learning properly reflect the correlations of input and target-output patterns in a similar manner to those designed in

  16. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  17. Description and effects of sequential behavior practice in teacher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, T; Lounsbery, M; Bahls, V

    1997-09-01

    This study examined the effects of a sequential behavior feedback protocol on the practice-teaching experiences of undergraduate teacher trainees. The performance competencies of teacher trainees were analyzed using an alternative opportunities for appropriate action measure. Data support the added utility of sequential (Sharpe, 1997a, 1997b) behavior analysis information in systematic observation approaches to teacher education. One field-based undergraduate practicum using sequential behavior (i.e., field systems analysis) principles was monitored. Summarized are the key elements of the (a) classroom instruction provided as a precursor to the practice teaching experience, (b) practice teaching experience, and (c) field systems observation tool used for evaluation and feedback, including multiple-baseline data (N = 4) to support this approach to teacher education. Results point to (a) the strong relationship between sequential behavior feedback and the positive change in four preservice teachers' day-to-day teaching practices in challenging situational contexts, and (b) the relationship between changes in teacher practices and positive changes in the behavioral practices of gymnasium pupils. Sequential behavior feedback was also socially validated by the undergraduate participants and Professional Development School teacher supervisors in the study.

  18. Can post-error dynamics explain sequential reaction time patterns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eGoldfarb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate human error dynamics in sequential two-alternative choice tasks. When subjects repeatedly discriminate between two stimuli, their error rates and mean reaction times (RTs systematically depend on prior sequences of stimuli. We analyze these sequential effects on RTs, separating error and correct responses, and identify a sequential RT tradeoff: a sequence of stimuli which yields a relatively fast RT on error trials will produce a relatively slow RT on correct trials and vice versa. We reanalyze previous data and acquire and analyze new data in a choice task with stimulus sequences generated by a first-order Markov process having unequal probabilities of repetitions and alternations. We then show that relationships among these stimulus sequences and the corresponding RTs for correct trials, error trials, and averaged over all trials are significantly influenced by the probability of alternations; these relationships have not been captured by previous models. Finally, we show that simple, sequential updates to the initial condition and thresholds of a pure drift diffusion model can account for the trends in RT for correct and error trials. Our results suggest that error-based parameter adjustments are critical to modeling sequential effects.

  19. Group-sequential clinical trials with multiple co-objectives

    CERN Document Server

    Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R; Ochiai, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on group sequential methods for clinical trials with co-primary endpoints based on the decision-making frameworks for: (1) rejecting the null hypothesis (stopping for efficacy), (2) rejecting the alternative hypothesis (stopping for futility), and (3) rejecting the null or alternative hypothesis (stopping for either futility or efficacy), where the trial is designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on all endpoints. For assessing futility, there are two fundamental approaches, i.e., the decision to stop for futility based on the conditional probability of rejecting the null hypothesis, and the other based on stopping boundaries using group sequential methods. In this book, the latter approach is discussed. The book also briefly deals with the group sequential methods for clinical trials designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on at least one endpoint. In addition, the book describes sample size recalculation and the resulting ef...

  20. Finding a Path for Segmentation Through Sequential Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Cao, Yu; Syed-Mahmood, Tanveer F

    2015-01-01

    Sequential learning techniques, such as auto-context, that applies the output of an intermediate classifier as contextual features for its subsequent classifier has shown impressive performance for semantic segmentation. We show that these methods can be interpreted as an approximation technique derived from a Bayesian formulation. To improve the effectiveness of applying this approximation technique, we propose a new sequential learning approach for semantic segmentation that solves a segmentation problem by breaking it into a series of simplified segmentation problems. Sequentially solving each of the simplified problems along the path leads to a more effective way for solving the original segmentation problem. To achieve this goal, we also propose a learning-based method to generate simplified segmentation problems by explicitly controlling the complexities of the modeling classifiers. We report promising results on the 2013 SATA canine leg muscle segmentation dataset.

  1. [Clinical observation of sequential occlusal adjustment for kinetic food impaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Fang, Bi-Song; Ma, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Qiang

    2009-12-01

    To study the effectiveness of sequential occlusal adjustment for kinetic food impaction. 36 patients who claiming food impaction with normal proximal contact were examined and analyzed about their occlusal relationship and configuration. Sequential occlusal adjustment was made to reduce pestle-mortar-like cusp, to create food escaping groove and to decrease mesial surface of the distal tooth cusp. One week, two weeks and six months later, the patients were reexamined and their oral conditions were evaluated. An elimination of food impaction was claimed for 32 patients in one week appointment and all 36 patients in two-week appointment. Six months later, no patient reported food impaction. The use of sequential occlusal adjustment results in an effective elimination of some kind of kinetic food impaction.

  2. A sequential point process model and Bayesian inference for spatial point patterns with linear structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a flexible spatial point process model for spatial point patterns exhibiting linear structures, without incorporating a latent line process. The model is given by an underlying sequential point process model. Under this model, the points can be of one of three types: a ‘background...... for producing point patterns with linear structures and propose to use the model as the likelihood in a Bayesian setting when analysing a spatial point pattern exhibiting linear structures. We illustrate this methodology by analysing two spatial point pattern datasets (locations of bronze age graves in Denmark...

  3. A sequential quadratic programming algorithm using an incomplete solution of the subproblem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Systems Optimization Lab.; Prieto, F.J. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Estadistica y Econometria

    1993-05-01

    We analyze sequential quadratic programming (SQP) methods to solve nonlinear constrained optimization problems that are more flexible in their definition than standard SQP methods. The type of flexibility introduced is motivated by the necessity to deviate from the standard approach when solving large problems. Specifically we no longer require a minimizer of the QP subproblem to be determined or particular Lagrange multiplier estimates to be used. Our main focus is on an SQP algorithm that uses a particular augmented Lagrangian merit function. New results are derived for this algorithm under weaker conditions than previously assumed; in particular, it is not assumed that the iterates lie on a compact set.

  4. Basic Results for Sequential Caputo Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvaneswari Sambandham

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a representation form for the linear fractional differential equation of order q when 0 < q < 1, with variable coefficients. We have also obtained a closed form of the solution for sequential Caputo fractional differential equation of order 2q, with initial and boundary conditions, for 0 < 2q < 1. The solutions are in terms of Mittag–Leffler functions of order q only. Our results yield the known results of integer order when q = 1. We have also presented some numerical results to bring the salient features of sequential fractional differential equations.

  5. TELEGRAPHS TO INCANDESCENT LAMPS: A SEQUENTIAL PROCESS OF INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence J. Malone

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a sequential process of technological innovation in the emergence of the electrical industry in the United States from 1830 to 1880. Successive inventions that realize the commercial possibilities of electricity provided the foundation for an industry where technical knowledge, invention and diffusion were ultimately consolidated within the managerial structure of new firms. The genesis of the industry is traced, sequentially, through the development of the telegraph, arc light and incandescent lamp. Exploring the origins of the telegraph and incandescent lamp reveals a process where a series of inventions and firms result from successful efforts touse scientific principles to create new commodities and markets.

  6. Comparison of Sequential Designs of Computer Experiments in High Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupresanin, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johannesson, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We continue a long line of research in applying the design and analysis of computer experiments to the study of real world systems. The problem we consider is that of fitting a Gaussian process model for a computer model in applications where the simulation output is a function of a high dimensional input vector. Our computer experiments are designed sequentially as we learn about the model. We perform an empirical comparison of the effectiveness and efficiency of several statistical criteria that have been used in sequential experimental designs. The specific application that motivates this work comes from climatology.

  7. The pursuit of balance in sequential randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond P. Guiteras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In many randomized trials, subjects enter the sample sequentially. Because the covariates for all units are not known in advance, standard methods of stratification do not apply. We describe and assess the method of DA-optimal sequential allocation (Atkinson, 1982 for balancing stratification covariates across treatment arms. We provide simulation evidence that the method can provide substantial improvements in precision over commonly employed alternatives. We also describe our experience implementing the method in a field trial of a clean water and handwashing intervention in Dhaka, Bangladesh, the first time the method has been used. We provide advice and software for future researchers.

  8. Dismal: a spreadsheet for sequential data analysis and HCI experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Frank E; Wood, Alexander B

    2005-02-01

    Dismal is a spreadsheet that works within GNU Emacs, a widely available programmable editor. Dismal has three features of particular interest to those who study behavior: (1) the ability to manipulate and align sequential data, (2) an open architecture that allows users to expand it to meet their particular needs, and (3) an instrumented and accessible interface for studies of human-computer interaction (HCI). Example uses of each of these capabilities are provided, including cognitive models that have had their sequential behavior aligned with subject's protocols, extensions useful for teaching and doing HCI design, and studies in which keystroke logs from the timing package in Dismal have been used.

  9. From non-sequential to sequential strong-field multiple ionization: identification of pure and mixed reaction channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, A; Ergler, Th; Zrost, K; Feuerstein, B; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jesus, V L B de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis/RJ, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, Centro-Nilopolis-26530-060, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-04-28

    Momentum distributions of Ne{sup 3-4+} ions created by 795 nm, 25 fs laser pulses have been measured at 10{sup 15}-2 x 10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} using a 'reaction microscope' in order to characterize the transition regime between non-sequential and sequential strong-field ionizations. We can clearly separate pure and/or mixed recollision-induced (e, ne)-like reactions and sequential (field-induced) processes, and observe transition intensities which agree with recently reported ion-yield data. Our results provide consistent qualitative description of Ne strong-field multiple ionization for all non-relativistic intensities. (fast track communication)

  10. A Pilot Study Validating Select Research-Grade and Consumer-Based Wearables Throughout a Range of Dynamic Exercise Intensities in Persons With and Without Type 1 Diabetes: A Novel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavelberg, Loren; Zaharieva, Dessi; Cinar, Ali; Riddell, Michael C; Jamnik, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    The increasing popularity of wearable technology necessitates the evaluation of their accuracy to differentiate physical activity (PA) intensities. These devices may play an integral role in customizing PA interventions for primary prevention and secondary management of chronic diseases. For example, in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D), PA greatly affects glucose concentrations depending on the intensity, mode (ie, aerobic, anaerobic, mixed), and duration. This variability in glucose responses underscores the importance of implementing dependable wearable technology in emerging avenues such as artificial pancreas systems. Participants completed three 40-minute, dynamic non-steady-state exercise sessions, while outfitted with multiple research (Fitmate, Metria, Bioharness) and consumer (Garmin, Fitbit) grade wearables. The data were extracted according to the devices' maximum sensitivity (eg, breath by breath, beat to beat, or minute time stamps) and averaged into minute-by-minute data. The variables of interest, heart rate (HR), breathing frequency, and energy expenditure (EE), were compared to validated criterion measures. Compared to deriving EE by laboratory indirect calorimetry standard, the Metria activity patch overestimates EE during light-to-moderate PA intensities (L-MI) and moderate-to-vigorous PA intensities (M-VI) (mean ± SD) (0.28 ± 1.62 kilocalories· minute-1, P Garmin device, compared to the Fitmate ( P < .001) during continuous L-MI activity. Overall, our study demonstrates that current research-grade wearable technologies operate within a ~10% error for both HR and EE during a wide range of dynamic exercise intensities. This level of accuracy for emerging research-grade instruments is considered both clinically and practically acceptable for research-based or consumer use. In conclusion, research-grade wearable technology that uses EE kilocalories · minute-1 and HR reliably differentiates PA intensities.

  11. (Pea)nuts and bolts of visual narrative: Structure and meaning in sequential image comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Neil; Paczynski, Martin; Jackendoff, Ray; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Kuperberg, Gina R.

    2012-01-01

    Just as syntax differentiates coherent sentences from scrambled word strings, the comprehension of sequential images must also use a cognitive system to distinguish coherent narrative sequences from random strings of images. We conducted experiments analogous to two classic studies of language processing to examine the contributions of narrative structure and semantic relatedness to processing sequential images. We compared four types of comic strips: 1) Normal sequences with both structure and meaning, 2) Semantic Only sequences (in which the panels were related to a common semantic theme, but had no narrative structure), 3) Structural Only sequences (narrative structure but no semantic relatedness), and 4) Scrambled sequences of randomly-ordered panels. In Experiment 1, participants monitored for target panels in sequences presented panel-by-panel. Reaction times were slowest to panels in Scrambled sequences, intermediate in both Structural Only and Semantic Only sequences, and fastest in Normal sequences. This suggests that both semantic relatedness and narrative structure offer advantages to processing. Experiment 2 measured ERPs to all panels across the whole sequence. The N300/N400 was largest to panels in both the Scrambled and Structural Only sequences, intermediate in Semantic Only sequences and smallest in the Normal sequences. This implies that a combination of narrative structure and semantic relatedness can facilitate semantic processing of upcoming panels (as reflected by the N300/N400). Also, panels in the Scrambled sequences evoked a larger left-lateralized anterior negativity than panels in the Structural Only sequences. This localized effect was distinct from the N300/N400, and appeared despite the fact that these two sequence types were matched on local semantic relatedness between individual panels. These findings suggest that sequential image comprehension uses a narrative structure that may be independent of semantic relatedness. Altogether

  12. Compact Stars with Sequential QCD Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark; Sedrakian, Armen

    2017-10-20

    Compact stars may contain quark matter in their interiors at densities exceeding several times the nuclear saturation density. We explore models of such compact stars where there are two first-order phase transitions: the first from nuclear matter to a quark-matter phase, followed at a higher density by another first-order transition to a different quark-matter phase [e.g., from the two-flavor color-superconducting (2SC) to the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase]. We show that this can give rise to two separate branches of hybrid stars, separated from each other and from the nuclear branch by instability regions, and, therefore, to a new family of compact stars, denser than the ordinary hybrid stars. In a range of parameters, one may obtain twin hybrid stars (hybrid stars with the same masses but different radii) and even triplets where three stars, with inner cores of nuclear matter, 2SC matter, and CFL matter, respectively, all have the same mass but different radii.

  13. Computing Sequential Equilibria for Two-Player Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2006-01-01

    obtained by the algorithm are not necessarily sequentially rational and that this deficiency is often problematic for the practical applications. We show how to remove this deficiency by modifying the linear programs constructed by Koller, Megiddo and von Stengel so that pairs of strategies forming...

  14. The sequential price of anarchy for atomic congestion games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jasper; Uetz, Marc Jochen

    2014-01-01

    In situations without central coordination, the price of anarchy relates the quality of any Nash equilibrium to the quality of a global optimum. Instead of assuming that all players choose their actions simultaneously, here we consider games where players choose their actions sequentially. The

  15. Simulated sequential laser therapy of twin-twin transfusion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, M. J. C.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H. M.; Lopriore, E.; Lewi, L.; Deprest, J.; Vandenbussche, F. P. H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequential laser therapy of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) includes laser obliteration of arteriovenous (AV) anastomoses from donor to recipient (AVDR) before obliterating AV anastomoses from recipient to donor (AVRD). This strategy allows for a beneficial intra-operative transfusion of blood

  16. Linear topologies and sequential compactness in topological modules

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We prove that an absolute semi-valued ring is rst-countable if the set of invertibles is separable and its closure contains 0. We also show that every linearly topologized topological module over an absolute semi-valued ring whose invertibles approach 0 has the trivial topology. We also show that every sequentially compact ...

  17. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming implemented on multi-core platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Thomas; Lassen, Lee; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares several computational ap- proaches to Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) targeting consumer level parallel processors such as multi-core CPUs and GPUs. The proposed implementations demonstrate that ultrasound imaging using SASB can be executed in real- time with ...

  18. Sequential and simultaneous revascularization in adult orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polak, WG; Miyamoto, S; Nemes, BA; Peeters, PMJG; de Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Slooff, MJH

    The aim of the study was to assess whether there is a difference in outcome after sequential or simultaneous revascularization during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in terms of patient and graft survival, mortality, morbidity, and liver function. The study population consisted of 102 adult

  19. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming using Spatial Matched Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Mikkel; di Ianni, Tommaso; Bouzari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) has shown to achieve a good resolution and high penetration depth. The low complexity at the transducer level of the beamformer makes it ideal for use with a handheld device. SASB with a low F# (≤ 0.5) can achieve even better resolution at the cost...

  20. Sequential bilateral lesser trochanter avulsion fractures in an adolescent patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, Nnamdi Jonathan; Allman, Claire; Moore-Thompson, Elizabeth; Latimer, Mark David

    2014-01-01

    We report the rare case of a 15-year-old boy who sustained sequential bilateral lesser trochanter avulsion fractures over a 6-month period while playing football. No malignancy or associated metabolic bone disease was found. He subsequently made a full recovery with non-operative treatment. PMID:25422350

  1. The one-shot deviation principle for sequential rationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendon, Ebbe; Whitta-Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1996-01-01

    We present a decentralization result which is useful for practical and theoretical work with sequential equilibrium, perfect Bayesian equilibrium, and related equilibrium concepts for extensive form games. A weak consistency condition is sufficient to obtain an analogy to the well known One-Stage......-Stage-Deviation Principle for subgame perfect equilibrium...

  2. A sequential hypothesis test based on a generalized Azuma inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijsbergen, D.P.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk

    We present a new power-one sequential hypothesis test based on a bound for the probability that a bounded zero-mean martingale ever crosses a curve of the form $a(n+k)^b$. The proof of the bound is of independent interest.

  3. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation applied to medical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is applied to medical ultrasound imaging using a multi element convex array transducer. The main motivation for SASB is to apply synthetic aperture techniques without the need for storing RF-data for a number of elements and hereby devise a system ...

  4. A randomized sequential trial of creatine in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, G. J.; Veldink, Jan H.; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Kalmijn, Sandra; Beijer, Cornelis; de Visser, Marianne; Wokke, John H. J.; Franssen, Hessel; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2003-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease with no cure. In a transgenic mouse model of ALS, creatine monohydrate showed a promising increase in survival. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, sequential clinical trial to assess the effect of creatine monohydrate on survival

  5. Sequential infiltration synthesis for enhancing multiple-patterning lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, Seth B.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Tseng, Yu-Chih

    2017-06-20

    Simplified methods of multiple-patterning photolithography using sequential infiltration synthesis to modify the photoresist such that it withstands plasma etching better than unmodified resist and replaces one or more hard masks and/or a freezing step in MPL processes including litho-etch-litho-etch photolithography or litho-freeze-litho-etch photolithography.

  6. The design and analysis of sequential clinical trials | Merabet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus we can make available to the user an implementable tool and fully Bayesian. The sequential aspect of the treatment adopted in this paper is a particularly innovative element compared to existing technology; it also helps to reduce multiphase studies more ambitious than the existing, which for the patient makes the ...

  7. Variations on Stochastic Curtailment in Sequential Mastery Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew David

    2010-01-01

    In sequential mastery testing (SMT), assessment via computer is used to classify examinees into one of two mutually exclusive categories. Unlike paper-and-pencil tests, SMT has the capability to use variable-length stopping rules. One approach to shortening variable-length tests is stochastic curtailment, which halts examination if the probability…

  8. A Sequential and Comprehensive Method for Effective Substitute Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, John L.

    2008-01-01

    This article dealt with methods for making substitute teaching more effective. The purpose was to articulate a sequential method for maximizing the effectiveness of substitute teaching while providing substitutes with a comprehensive method for diligently and flexibly earning respect and using reflection to continually improve substitute teaching.…

  9. Designing bidding strategies in sequential auctions for risk averse agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Robu (Valentin); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDesigning efficient bidding strategies for sequential auctions represents an important, open problem area in agent-mediated electronic markets. In existing literature, a variety of bidding strategies have been proposed and have been shown to perform with varying degrees of efficiency.

  10. Unsupervised land cover change detection: meaningful sequential time series analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available -1 Unsupervised Land Cover Change Detection: Meaningful Sequential Time Series Analysis Salmon, B.P.; Olivier, J.C.; Wessels, K.J.; Kleynhans, W.; van den Bergh, F.; Steenkamp, K.C.; Dept. of Electr., Electron. & Comput. Eng., Univ. of Pretoria, Pretoria...

  11. Sequential injection spectrophotometric determination of V(V) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-01-15

    Jan 15, 2009 ... Requimte, Serviço de Química-Física, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Aníbal Cunha, 164,. 4099-030 Porto, Portugal. Abstract. A fast and robust sequential injection analysis (SIA) methodology for routine determination of V(V) in environmental polluted waters is presented.

  12. Truth or Efficiency? Communication in a Sequential Public Good Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra Garcia, M.; van Damme, E.E.C.; Potters, J.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    We examine communication in a 2-player sequential public good game in which the leader has private information about the return from contributing to it. The leader decides first and the follower observes the leader's contribution, before deciding whether or not to contribute. Without communication,

  13. Algorithm for Non-proportional Loading in Sequentially Linear Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, C.; Hoogenboom, P.C.J.; Rots, J.G.; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    Sequentially linear analysis (SLA) is an alternative to the Newton-Raphson method for analyzing the nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete and masonry structures. In this paper SLA is extended to load cases that are applied one after the other, for example first dead load and then wind load. It

  14. Biohydrogen production from beet molasses by sequential dark and photofermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgür, E.; Mars, A.E.; Peksel, B.; Louwerse, A.; Yücel, M.; Gündüz, U.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Eroglu, I.

    2010-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production using renewable resources is a promising possibility to generate hydrogen in a sustainable way. In this study, a sequential dark and photofermentation has been employed for biohydrogen production using sugar beet molasses as a feedstock. An extreme thermophile

  15. Retrieval of sea surface velocities using sequential Ocean Colour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequential data of IRS-P4 OCM has been analysed over parts of both east and west coast of India and a methodology to retrieve sea surface current velocities has ... Presently at Applied Geophysical Laboratories, Department of Geophysics, University of Houston, Texas 77204, USA; Marine and Water Resources Group, ...

  16. Focus on Scaffolding Language and Sequential Units during Choral Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Patrick K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study reported in this article was to investigate the instructional discourse of two middle school choral music teachers videotaped during a total of 24 classroom visits. The findings indicate that teacher attention to complete sequential units of instruction (teacher presentation, student interaction, teacher feedback) may…

  17. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AND SEQUENTIAL SAMPLING OF Brevipalpus phoenicis IN CITRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WALTER MALDONADO JR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the pests of citrus, one of the most important is the red and black flat mite Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, which transmits the Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C.When a rational pest control plan is adopted, it is important to determine the correct timing for carrying out the control plan. Making this decision demands constant follow-up of the culture through periodic sampling where knowledge about the spatial distribution of the pest is a fundamental part to improve sampling and control decisions. The objective of this work was to study the spatial distribution pattern and build a sequential sampling plan for the pest. The data used were gathered from two blocks of Valencia sweet orange on a farm in São Paulo State, Brazil, by 40 inspectors trained for the data collection. The following aggregation indices were calculated: variance/ mean ratio, Morisita index, Green’s coefficient, and k parameter of the negative binomial distribution. The data were tested for fit with Poisson and negative binomial distributions using the chi-square goodness of fit test. The sequential sampling was developed using Wald’s Sequential Probability Ratio Test and validated through simulations. We concluded that the spatial distribution of B. phoenicis is aggregated, its behavior best fitted to the negative binomial distribution and we built and validated a sequential sampling plan for control decision-making.

  18. Investigation of the sequential validity of quality improvement team ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Self-assessment is widely used in the health care improvement collaboratives quality improvement (QI) teams' to assess their own performance. There is mixed evidence on the validity of this approach. This study investigated sequential validity of self-assessments in a QI HIV collaborative in Tanzania.

  19. The Efficacy of Sequential Therapy in Eradication of Helicobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... second arm of sequential treatment regimen had consisted ... [9,10] A dual therapy. (PPI plus amoxicillin) administered for less than 7 days was able to achieve a cure rate of up to 50%, and that the efficacy of a triple therapy (PPI, clarithromycin, and ... The eradication rate of the arm of clarithromycin-based.

  20. A solution for automatic parallelization of sequential assembly code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Đorđe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since modern multicore processors can execute existing sequential programs only on a single core, there is a strong need for automatic parallelization of program code. Relying on existing algorithms, this paper describes one new software solution tool for parallelization of sequential assembly code. The main goal of this paper is to develop the parallelizator which reads sequential assembler code and at the output provides parallelized code for MIPS processor with multiple cores. The idea is the following: the parser translates assembler input file to program objects suitable for further processing. After that the static single assignment is done. Based on the data flow graph, the parallelization algorithm separates instructions on different cores. Once sequential code is parallelized by the parallelization algorithm, registers are allocated with the algorithm for linear allocation, and the result at the end of the program is distributed assembler code on each of the cores. In the paper we evaluate the speedup of the matrix multiplication example, which was processed by the parallelizator of assembly code. The result is almost linear speedup of code execution, which increases with the number of cores. The speed up on the two cores is 1.99, while on 16 cores the speed up is 13.88.

  1. Sequential motor skill in preadolescent children: The development of automaticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, M.F.L.; Abrahamse, E.L.; Verwey, Willem B.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated to what extent preadolescent children, like young adults, learn to perform sequential movements in an automatic fashion. A sample of 24 children (mean age = 11.3 years) practiced fixed 3-key and 6-key sequences in the discrete sequence production task by responding to

  2. Sequential Analysis of Metals in Municipal Dumpsite Composts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The heavy metals contents (Pb, Cu, Fe, Cr, Cd, Zn, Mn and Ni) in Municipal dumpsite compost were determined by the sequential extraction method. Chemical parameters such as pH, conductivity, and organic carbon contents of the samples were also determined. Analysis of the extracts was carried out by atomic ...

  3. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  4. In Vivo Evaluation of Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Peter Møller; Lange, Theis

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound in vivo imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamformation (SASB) is compared with conventional imaging in a double blinded study using side-by-side comparisons. The objective is to evaluate if the image quality in terms of penetration depth, spatial resolution, contrast...

  5. Naked exclusion in the lab : The case of sequential contracting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Müller, W.; Suetens, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the naked exclusion model of Rasmusen, Ramseyer and Wiley [1991] and Segal and Whinston [2000b], we examine whether sequential contracting is more conducive to exclusion in the lab, and whether it is cheaper for the incumbent than simultaneous contracting. We find that an incumbent

  6. Orthographic Processing and Visual Sequential Memory in Unexpectedly Poor Spellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Malone, Aisling M.; Redenbach, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Does unexpectedly poor spelling in adults result from inferior visual sequential memory? In one experiment, unexpectedly poor spellers performed significantly worse than better spellers in the immediate reproduction of sequences of visual symbols, but in a second experiment, the effect was not replicated. Poor spellers were also no worse at the…

  7. Group-sequential analysis may allow for early trial termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Vilstrup, Mie H; Halekoh, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    and the final analysis. Other partitions did not suggest early stopping after adjustment for multiple testing due to one influential outlier and our small sample size. CONCLUSIONS: Group-sequential testing may enable early stopping of a trial, allowing for potential time and resource savings. The testing...

  8. A Relational Account of Call-by-Value Sequentiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, Jon Gary; Sandholm, Anders Bo

    2002-01-01

    We construct a model for FPC, a purely functional, sequential, call-by-value language. The model is built from partial continuous functions, in the style of Plotkin, further constrained to be uniform with respect to a class of logical relations. We prove that the model is fully abstract....

  9. A path-level exact parallelization strategy for sequential simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Oscar F.; Baeza, Daniel; Ortiz, Julián M.; Herrero, José R.

    2018-01-01

    Sequential Simulation is a well known method in geostatistical modelling. Following the Bayesian approach for simulation of conditionally dependent random events, Sequential Indicator Simulation (SIS) method draws simulated values for K categories (categorical case) or classes defined by K different thresholds (continuous case). Similarly, Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) method draws simulated values from a multivariate Gaussian field. In this work, a path-level approach to parallelize SIS and SGS methods is presented. A first stage of re-arrangement of the simulation path is performed, followed by a second stage of parallel simulation for non-conflicting nodes. A key advantage of the proposed parallelization method is to generate identical realizations as with the original non-parallelized methods. Case studies are presented using two sequential simulation codes from GSLIB: SISIM and SGSIM. Execution time and speedup results are shown for large-scale domains, with many categories and maximum kriging neighbours in each case, achieving high speedup results in the best scenarios using 16 threads of execution in a single machine.

  10. An Evaluation of the Sequential Anthropology Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, James A., Jr.

    An evaluation of materials in the sequential anthropology curriculum project with regard to student learning and teacher training is presented. The project sample consisted of 2,183 students in grades 1, 2, 4, and 5. Two forms of the anthropology achievement test were administered as pretest and posttest measures to experimental and control groups…

  11. A sequential analysis of classroom discourse in Italian primary schools: the many faces of the IRF pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Luisa; Mameli, Consuelo; Gnisci, Augusto

    2013-09-01

    A sequential analysis of classroom discourse is needed to investigate the conditions under which the triadic initiation-response-feedback (IRF) pattern may host different teaching orientations. The purpose of the study is twofold: first, to describe the characteristics of classroom discourse and, second, to identify and explore the different interactive sequences that can be captured with a sequential statistical analysis. Twelve whole-class activities were video recorded in three Italian primary schools. We observed classroom interaction as it occurs naturally on an everyday basis. In total, we collected 587 min of video recordings. Subsequently, 828 triadic IRF patterns were extracted from this material and analysed with the programme Generalized Sequential Query (GSEQ). The results indicate that classroom discourse may unfold in different ways. In particular, we identified and described four types of sequences. Dialogic sequences were triggered by authentic questions, and continued through further relaunches. Monologic sequences were directed to fulfil the teachers' pre-determined didactic purposes. Co-constructive sequences fostered deduction, reasoning, and thinking. Scaffolding sequences helped and sustained children with difficulties. The application of sequential analyses allowed us to show that interactive sequences may account for a variety of meanings, thus making a significant contribution to the literature and research practice in classroom discourse. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  12. A comparison of flow rates and pressure profiles for N-sequential inlets and three related seal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for choked flows of fluid nitrogen over a range of reduced inlet stagnation temperatures (from 0.67 to ambient) and reduced inlet stagnation pressures to 2. Flow rate and pressure profile comparisons are made between N aligned sequential orifice inlets, a 33-tooth labyrinth seal, a 3-step seal, a cylindrical seal and the classic venturi. Seal effectiveness appears strongly dependent on upstream losses and geometry configuration.

  13. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  14. Managerial adjustment and its limits: sequential fault in comparative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio da Cunha Rezende

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on explanations for sequential faults in administrative reform. It deals with the limits of managerial adjustment in an approach that attempts to connect theory and empirical data, articulating three levels of analysis. The first level presents comparative evidence of sequential fault within reforms in national governments through a set of indicators geared toward understanding changes in the role of the state. In light of analyses of a representative set of comparative studies on reform implementation, the second analytical level proceeds to identify four typical mechanisms that are present in explanations on managerial adjustment faults. In this way, we seek to configure an explanatory matrix for theories on sequential fault. Next we discuss the experience of management reform in the Brazilian context, conferring special attention on one of the mechanisms that creates fault: the control dilemma. The major hypotheses that guide our article are that reforms lead to sequential fault and that there are at least four causal mechanisms that produce reforms: a transactions costs involved in producing reforms; b performance legacy; c predominance of fiscal adjustment and d the control dilemma. These mechanisms act separately or in concert, and act to decrease chances for a transformation of State managerial patterns. Major evidence that is analyzed in these articles lend consistency to the general argument that reforms have failed in their attempts to reduce public expenses, alter patterns of resource allocation, reduce the labor force and change the role of the State. Our major conclusion is that reforms fail sequentially and managerial adjustment displays considerable limitations, particularly those of a political nature.

  15. Finger Tendon Travel Associated with Sequential Trigger Nail Gun Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Brian; Albers, James; Hudock, Stephen; Krieg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT Background Pneumatic nail guns used in wood framing are equipped with one of two triggering mechanisms. Sequential actuation triggers have been shown to be a safer alternative to contact actuation triggers because they reduce traumatic injury risk. However, the sequential actuation trigger must be depressed for each individual nail fired as opposed to the contact actuation trigger, which allows the trigger to be held depressed as nails are fired repeatedly by bumping the safety tip against the workpiece. As such, concerns have been raised about risks for cumulative trauma injury, and reduced productivity, due to repetitive finger motion with the sequential actuation trigger. Purpose This study developed a method to predict cumulative finger flexor tendon travel associated with the sequential actuation trigger nail gun from finger joint kinematics measured in the trigger actuation and productivity standards for wood-frame construction tasks. Methods Finger motions were measured from six users wearing an instrumented electrogoniometer glove in a simulation of two common framing tasks–wall building and flat nailing of material. Flexor tendon travel was calculated from the ensemble average kinematics for an individual nail fired. Results Finger flexor tendon travel was attributable mostly to proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joint motion. Tendon travel per nail fired appeared to be slightly greater for a wall-building task than a flat nailing task. The present study data, in combination with construction industry productivity standards, suggest that a high-production workday would be associated with less than 60 m/day cumulative tendon travel per worker (based on 1700 trigger presses/day). Conclusion and Applications These results suggest that exposure to finger tendon travel from sequential actuation trigger nail gun use may be below levels that have been previously associated with high musculoskeletal disorder risk. PMID

  16. Exploiting an automated microfluidic hydrodynamic sequential injection system for determination of phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongpet, Wanpen; Pencharee, Somkid; Puangpila, Chanida; Kradtap Hartwell, Supaporn; Lapanantnoppakhun, Somchai; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2018-01-15

    A microfluidic hydrodynamic sequential injection (μHSI) spectrophotometric system was designed and fabricated. The system was built by laser engraving a manifold pattern on an acrylic block and sealing with another flat acrylic plate to form a microfluidic channel platform. The platform was incorporated with small solenoid valves to obtain a portable setup for programmable control of the liquid flow into the channel according to the HSI principle. The system was demonstrated for the determination of phosphate using a molybdenum blue method. An ascorbic acid, standard or sample, and acidic molybdate solutions were sequentially aspirated to fill the channel forming a stack zone before flowing to the detector. Under the optimum condition, a linear calibration graph in the range of 0.1-6mg P L-1 was obtained. The detection limit was 0.1mgL-1. The system is compact (5.0mm thick, 80mm wide × 140mm long), durable, portable, cost-effective, and consumes little amount of chemicals (83μL each of molybdate and ascorbic acid, 133μL of the sample solution and 1.7mL of water carrier/run). It was applied for the determination of phosphate content in extracted soil samples. The percent recoveries of the analysis were obtained in the range of 91.2-107.3. The results obtained agreed well with those of the batch spectrophotometric method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term biological hydrogen production by agar immobilized Rhodobacter capsulatus in a sequential batch photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkahlout, Kamal; Alipour, Siamak; Eroglu, Inci; Gunduz, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral

    2017-04-01

    In this study, agar immobilization technique was employed for biological hydrogen production using Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710 (wild type) and YO3 (hup-mutant) strains in sequential batch process. Different agar and glutamate concentrations were tested with defined nutrient medium. Agar concentration 4% (w/v) and 4 mM glutamate were selected for bacterial immobilization in terms of rate and longevity of hydrogen production. Acetate concentration was increased from 40 to 60-100 and 60 mM gave best results with both bacterial strains immobilized in 4% (w/v) agar. Cell concentration was increased from 2.5 to 5 mg dcw mL -1 agar and it was found that increasing cell concentration of wild-type strain caused decrease in yield and productivity while these parameters improved by increasing cell concentration of mutant strain. Also, the hydrogen production time has extended from 17 days up to 60 days according to the process conditions and parameters. Hydrogen production by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria is a convenient technology for hydrogen production as it enables to produce hydrogen with high organic acid concentrations comparing to suspended cultures. Besides, immobilization increases the stability of the system and allowed sequential batch operation for long-term application.

  18. Sequential change detection and monitoring of temporal trends in random-effects meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogo, Samson Henry; Clark, Allan; Kulinskaya, Elena

    2017-06-01

    Temporal changes in magnitude of effect sizes reported in many areas of research are a threat to the credibility of the results and conclusions of meta-analysis. Numerous sequential methods for meta-analysis have been proposed to detect changes and monitor trends in effect sizes so that meta-analysis can be updated when necessary and interpreted based on the time it was conducted. The difficulties of sequential meta-analysis under the random-effects model are caused by dependencies in increments introduced by the estimation of the heterogeneity parameter τ2 . In this paper, we propose the use of a retrospective cumulative sum (CUSUM)-type test with bootstrap critical values. This method allows retrospective analysis of the past trajectory of cumulative effects in random-effects meta-analysis and its visualization on a chart similar to CUSUM chart. Simulation results show that the new method demonstrates good control of Type I error regardless of the number or size of the studies and the amount of heterogeneity. Application of the new method is illustrated on two examples of medical meta-analyses. © 2016 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sequential processing of GNSS-R delay-Doppler maps (DDM's) for ocean wind retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J. L.; Rodriguez-Alvarez, N.; Hoffman, R.; Annane, B.; Leidner, M.; Kaitie, S.

    2016-12-01

    The delay-Doppler map (DDM) is the fundamental data product from GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), generated by cross-correlating the scattered signal with a local signal model over a range of delays and Doppler frequencies. Delay and Doppler form a set of coordinates on the ocean surface and the shape of the DDM is related to the distribution of ocean slopes. Wind speed can thus be estimated by fitting a scattering model to the shape of the observed DDM or defining an observable (e.g. average power or leading edge slope) which characterizes the change in DDM shape. For spaceborne measurements, the DDM is composed of signals scattered from a glistening zone, which can extend for up to 100 km or more. Setting a reasonable resolution requirement (25 km or less) will limit the usable portion of the DDM at each observation to only a small region near the specular point. Cyclone-GNSS (CYGNSS) is a NASA mission to study developing tropical cyclones using GNSS-R. CYGNSS science requirements call for wind retrieval with an accuracy of 10 percent above 20 m/s within a 25 km resolution. This requirement can be met using an observable defined for DDM samples between +/- 0.25 chips in delay and +/- 1 kHz in Doppler, with some filtering of the observations using a minimum threshold for range corrected gain (RCG). An improved approach, to be reviewed in this presentation, sequentially processes multiple DDM's, to combine observations generated from different "looks" at the same points on the surface. Applying this sequential process to synthetic data indicates a significant improvement in wind retrieval accuracy over a 10 km grid covering a region around the specular point. The attached figure illustrates this improvement, using simulated CYGNSS DDM's generated using the wind fields from hurricanes Earl and Danielle (left). The middle plots show wind retrievals using only an observable defined within the 25 km resolution cell. The plots on the right side show the retrievals from

  20. Sequential solvent induced phase transition extraction for profiling of endogenous phytohormones in plants by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bao-Dong; Ye, Er-Cui; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-11-01

    In the current study, a novel method for high-throughput and sensitive determination of 12 phytohormones in plants was developed by using sequential solvent induced phase transition extraction (SIPTE) coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). In sequential SIPTE, 0.1% formic acid (v/v) and 50mM NaHCO3 aqueous solution were used for enrichment and purification of alkaline and acidic phytohormones from the acetonitrile extract of plant tissues in sequence, in which hydrophobic solvent (toluene) was added to the acetonitrile aqueous mixture for driving the phase separation. Under optimized sequential SIPTE conditions, the phytohormones in acetonitrile extract of plant tissues could be effectively enriched and purified, which was in favor of the following UPLC-MS/MS analysis with less matrix effect. The phytohormones could be detected using the developed sequential SIPTE-UPLC-MS/MS method with the limits of the detection (LODs) ranging from 0.56 to 438.60pgmL(-1) and linear range over 2 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients (r)>0.9970. The relative recoveries of the detected phytohormones were in the range of 85.1-114.6%. Finally, the proposed method was applied to simultaneous determination of endogenous phytohormones in different tissues of model plants (Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana) with small amount of sample size (5mg, fresh weight). The proposed method may be suitable for studying the distribution of phytohormones in model plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproducibility and repeatability of same-day two sequential FDG PET/MR and PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshar, David; Bernstine, Hanna; Goldberg, Natalia; Nidam, Meital; Stein, Dan; Abadi-Korek, Ifat; Domachevsky, Liran

    2017-04-05

    To determine PET/CT and PET/MR reproducibility and PET/MR repeatability of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake measurements in tumors in cancer patients. This IRB approved prospective study was performed between October 2015 and February 2016 in consecutive patients who performed same day PET/CT and two sequential PET/MR. Thirty three patients with visible tumors (N = 63) were included. SUV for body weight (SUV) and lean body mass (SUL) were obtained. Volume of interest (VOI) with a threshold of 40% was used and SUV/L's, metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and tumor to liver ratio (T/L) were calculated. Measurements were plotted in a scattered diagram to visually identify correlation, a regression line was drawn and the equation of the line was calculated. Bland-Altman plots expressed as percentages were constructed to assess the agreement between measurements. The maximal clinically acceptable limits range was defined as ±30%. Lesional SUV's, SUL's and MTV corrected to body weight (BW) and lean body mass (LBM) demonstrated strong positive linear correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR and between two sequential PET/MR. The 95% limits of agreement ranged from -27.7 to 17.5 with a mean of -5.1 and -27.6 to 17.9 with a mean of -4.9 for SUVpeak and SULpeak, respectively for sequential PET/MR. Other PET metrics demonstrated limits range that is above ±30% between PET/CT and PET/MR and between two sequential PET/MR. PET/MR SUV/L peak has a clinically acceptable repeatability performance and can be used to evaluate the response to treatment.

  2. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  3. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  4. Time Series Prediction Based on Adaptive Weight Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Junjie Lu; Jinquan Huang; Feng Lu

    2017-01-01

    A novel adaptive weight online sequential extreme learning machine (AWOS-ELM) is proposed for predicting time series problems based on an online sequential extreme learning machine (OS-ELM) in this paper...

  5. Early embryo development in a sequential versus single medium: a randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Hooghe Thomas M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of in vitro fertilization techniques is defined by multiple factors including embryo culture conditions, related to the composition of the culture medium. In view of the lack of solid scientific data and in view of the current general belief that sequential media are superior to single media, the aim of this randomized study was to compare the embryo quality in two types of culture media. Methods In this study, the embryo quality on day 3 was measured as primary outcome. In total, 147 patients younger than 36 years treated with IVF/ICSI during the first or second cycle were included in this study. Embryos were randomly cultured in a sequential (group A or a single medium (group B to compare the embryo quality on day 1, day 2 and day 3. The embryo quality was compared in both groups using a Chi-square test with a significance level of 0.05. Results At day 1, the percentage of embryos with a cytoplasmic halo was higher in group B (46% than in group A (32%. At day 2, number of blastomeres, degree of fragmentation and the percentage of unequally sized blastomeres were higher in group B than in group A. At day 3, a higher percentage of embryos had a higher number of blastomeres and unequally sized blastomeres in group B. The number of good quality embryos (GQE was comparable in both groups. The embryo utilization rate was higher in group B (56% compared to group A (49%. Conclusions Although, no significant difference in the number of GQE was found in both media, the utilization rate was significantly higher when the embryos were cultured in the single medium compared to the sequential medium. The results of this study have a possible positive effect on the cumulative cryo-augmented pregnancy rate. Trial registration number NCT01094314

  6. Sequential shape-selective adsorption and photocatalytic transformation of acrylonitrile production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunrong; Song, Yonghui; Tu, Xiang; Jiang, Yanpeng; Yuan, Yu

    2015-11-15

    Acrylonitrile production wastewater has been widely recognized as one type of refractory organic wastewater because of its complicated composition and low bioavailability. It usually contains plenty of micromolecular nitrile and pyridine, resulting in high chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations. In this study, a novel microporous zeolite, CS-Z1, was developed as an adsorbent for rapidly shape-selective adsorption of the micromolecular pollutants from the acrylonitrile production wastewater, and a visible light-driven Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis was introduced to sequentially treat the residual macromolecular pollutants for complete purification. The adsorption processes by CS-Z1 were mostly achieved within the first 5 min, and the equilibrium was reached quickly after 30 min, where the CODCr, TOC and TN removal efficiencies of the wastewater were as high as 93.5%, 92.2% and 96.8%, respectively, much higher than those by other adsorbents. Furthermore, the adsorption efficiencies of CS-Z1 were barely affected by the variation of pH value and temperature, which was mainly attributed to the shape-selective adsorption mechanism of the CS-Z1 zeolite. The Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis could remove more than 95% of the residual macromolecular pollutants in the wastewater, where a synergistic mechanism of reduction-oxidation/polymerization was proposed. In a 108 h of CS-Z1 adsorption and Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis sequential process, the CODCr, TOC and TN concentrations was reduced to below 20, 7 and 5 mg L(-1), respectively, demonstrating the excellent practical potential of the sequential treatment system for acrylonitrile production wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Competence and Praxis: Sequential Analysis in German Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Olaf Maiwald

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In German social research nowadays most qualitative methodologies employ sequential analysis. This article explores the similarities and differences in conceptualising and practising this method. First, the working consensus, conceived as a shared set of methodological assumptions, is explicated. Second, with regard to three major paradigms of qualitative research in Germany—conversation analysis, objective hermeneutics, and hermeneutic sociology of knowledge—the dif­ferent ways of doing sequential analysis are investigated to locate the points of departure from a working consensus. It is argued that differences arise from different case-perspectives and, relative to that, from different modes of introducing general knowl­edge, i.e. knowledge that is not specific for the analysed case, into the interpretation. An import­ant notion to emerge from the comparison is the distinction between competence and praxis. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503310

  8. Testis sparing surgery for sequential bilateral testicular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Ozdemir, Ahmet Tunc; Akbulut, Ziya; Balbay, M Derya

    2009-06-01

    We present our experience in performing testis sparing surgery (TSS) to treat sequential bilateral testicular tumors. We performed TSS on two patients with bilateral sequential testicular tumors. A 43-year-old patient (Case 1) and a 33-year-old patient (Case 2) had previous inguinal orchiectomy for seminoma. The patients were diagnosed with secondary testicular tumors in the contralateral testes on follow up. They were treated with TSS after frozen section analysis of the peritumoral testicular tissue. Pathologic evaluation of the removed tumors revealed immature teratoma and Leydig cell tumor. Both patients are disease free without local recurrence and do not have erectile dysfunction, and thus do not need androgen replacement therapy after a follow up of 6 months and 44 months, respectively. TSS after frozen section analysis appears to be a safe and feasible procedure that, in carefully selected cases, offers adequate cancer control, preserves sexual function, and provides psychological benefits.

  9. Core/Shell Nanocomposites Produced by Superfast Sequential Microfluidic Nanoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfei; Zhang, Hongbo; Cito, Salvatore; Fan, Jin; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Sikanen, Tiina M; Weitz, David A; Santos, Hélder A

    2017-02-08

    Although a number of techniques exist for generating structured organic nanocomposites, it is still challenging to fabricate them in a controllable, yet universal and scalable manner. In this work, a microfluidic platform, exploiting superfast (milliseconds) time intervals between sequential nanoprecipitation processes, has been developed for high-throughput production of structured core/shell nanocomposites. The extremely short time interval between the sequential nanoprecipitation processes, facilitated by the multiplexed microfluidic design, allows us to solve the instability issues of nanocomposite cores without using any stabilizers. Beyond high throughput production rate (∼700 g/day on a single device), the generated core/shell nanocomposites harness the inherent ultrahigh drug loading degree and enhanced payload dissolution kinetics of drug nanocrystals and the controlled drug release from polymer-based nanoparticles.

  10. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sequential injection analysis for optimization of molecular biology reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter B; Ellington, Andrew D

    2011-03-15

    In order to automate the optimization of complex biochemical and molecular biology reactions, we developed a sequential injection analysis (SIA) device and combined this with a design of experiment (DOE) algorithm. This combination of hardware and software automatically explores the parameter space of the reaction and provides continuous feedback for optimizing reaction conditions. As an example, we optimized the endonuclease digest of a fluorogenic substrate and showed that the optimized reaction conditions also applied to the digest of the substrate outside of the device and to the digest of a plasmid. The sequential technique quickly arrived at optimized reaction conditions with less reagent use than a batch process (such as a fluid handling robot exploring multiple reaction conditions in parallel) would have. The device and method should now be amenable to much more complex molecular biology reactions whose variable spaces are correspondingly larger.

  12. Safeguarding a Lunar Rover with Wald's Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Michael; Dille, Michael; Wong, Uland; Nefian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    The virtual bumper is a safeguarding mechanism for autonomous and remotely operated robots. In this paper we take a new approach to the virtual bumper system by using an old statistical test. By using a modified version of Wald's sequential probability ratio test we demonstrate that we can reduce the number of false positive reported by the virtual bumper, thereby saving valuable mission time. We use the concept of sequential probability ratio to control vehicle speed in the presence of possible obstacles in order to increase certainty about whether or not obstacles are present. Our new algorithm reduces the chances of collision by approximately 98 relative to traditional virtual bumper safeguarding without speed control.

  13. Evolution of Decisions in Population Games with Sequentially Searching Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeas Priklopil

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In many social situations, individuals endeavor to find the single best possible partner, but are constrained to evaluate the candidates in sequence. Examples include the search for mates, economic partnerships, or any other long-term ties where the choice to interact involves two parties. Surprisingly, however, previous theoretical work on mutual choice problems focuses on finding equilibrium solutions, while ignoring the evolutionary dynamics of decisions. Empirically, this may be of high importance, as some equilibrium solutions can never be reached unless the population undergoes radical changes and a sufficient number of individuals change their decisions simultaneously. To address this question, we apply a mutual choice sequential search problem in an evolutionary game-theoretical model that allows one to find solutions that are favored by evolution. As an example, we study the influence of sequential search on the evolutionary dynamics of cooperation. For this, we focus on the classic snowdrift game and the prisoner’s dilemma game.

  14. The use of sequential probabilities in the segmentation of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lugt, A H

    2001-07-01

    The present investigation addresses the possible utility of sequential probabilities in the segmentation of spoken language. In a series of five word- spotting and two control lexical decision experiments, high- versus low-probability consonant-vowel (Experiments 1, 2, 5, and 7) and vowel-consonant (Experiments 1, 3, 4, and 6) strings were presented either in the nonsense contexts of target words (Experiments 1-3) or within the target words themselves (Experiments 4-7). The results suggest that listeners, at least for sequences in the onset position, indeed use sequential probabilities as cues for segmentation. The probability of a sound sequence influenced segmentation more when the sequence occurred within the target words (Experiments 4-7 vs. Experiments 1-3). Furthermore, the effects were reliable only when the sequences occurred in the onset position (Experiments 1, 2, 5, and 7 vs. Experiments 1, 3, 4, and 6).

  15. Group-sequential analysis may allow for early trial termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Vilstrup, Mie H; Halekoh, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    -PET/CT measurements, illuminating the possibility of early trial termination which implicates significant potential time and resource savings. METHODS: Primary lesion maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) was determined twice from preoperative FDG-PET/CTs in 45 ovarian cancer patients. Differences in SUVmax were...... and the final analysis. Other partitions did not suggest early stopping after adjustment for multiple testing due to one influential outlier and our small sample size. CONCLUSIONS: Group-sequential testing may enable early stopping of a trial, allowing for potential time and resource savings. The testing...... strategy must, though, be defined at the planning stage, and sample sizes must be reasonably large at interim analysis to ensure robustness against single outliers. Group-sequential testing may have a place in accuracy and agreement studies....

  16. Why do bidders drop out from a sequential auction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Engelbrecht-Wiggans

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In actual sequential auctions, bidders typically incur a cost in continuing from one sale to the next, and they decide whether or not to continue. To investigate the question "why do bidders drop out'', this paper defines a sequential auction model with continuation costs and an endogenously determined number of bidders at each sale, and characterizes the equilibria in this model. Simple examples illustrate the effect of several possible changes to this model.Este artigo examina um modelo de leilões seqüenciais com custos de participação onde o número de participantes é determinado endogenamente em cada rodada. O artigo caracteriza os lances em eqüilíbrio em cada rodada do leilão seqüencial e ilustra, através de exemplos, os efeitos de diversas mudanças possíveis no modelo.

  17. Exact Group Sequential Methods for Estimating a Binomial Proportion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjia Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We first review existing sequential methods for estimating a binomial proportion. Afterward, we propose a new family of group sequential sampling schemes for estimating a binomial proportion with prescribed margin of error and confidence level. In particular, we establish the uniform controllability of coverage probability and the asymptotic optimality for such a family of sampling schemes. Our theoretical results establish the possibility that the parameters of this family of sampling schemes can be determined so that the prescribed level of confidence is guaranteed with little waste of samples. Analytic bounds for the cumulative distribution functions and expectations of sample numbers are derived. Moreover, we discuss the inherent connection of various sampling schemes. Numerical issues are addressed for improving the accuracy and efficiency of computation. Computational experiments are conducted for comparing sampling schemes. Illustrative examples are given for applications in clinical trials.

  18. Bidding in sequential electricity markets: The Nordic case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Trine Krogh; Juul, Nina; Fleten, Stein-Erik

    2014-01-01

    For electricity market participants trading in sequential markets with differences in price levels and risk exposure, coordinated bidding is highly relevant. We consider a Nordic power producer who engages in the day-ahead spot market and the near real-time balancing market. In both markets......, clearing prices and dispatched volumes are unknown at the time of bidding. However, in the balancing market, the agent faces an additional risk of not being dispatched. Taking into account the sequential clearing of these markets and the gradual realization of market prices, we formulate the bidding...... problem as a multi-stage stochastic program. We investigate whether higher risk exposure can explain the hesitation, often observed in practice, to bid into the balancing market, even in cases of higher expected price levels. Furthermore, we quantify the gain from coordinated bidding, and by deriving...

  19. Exploring the Gap between Perfect Bayesian Equilibrium and Sequential Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Bonanno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In (Bonanno, 2013, a solution concept for extensive-form games, called perfect Bayesian equilibrium (PBE, was introduced and shown to be a strict refinement of subgame-perfect equilibrium; it was also shown that, in turn, sequential equilibrium (SE is a strict refinement of PBE. In (Bonanno, 2016, the notion of PBE was used to provide a characterization of SE in terms of a strengthening of the two defining components of PBE (besides sequential rationality, namely AGM consistency and Bayes consistency. In this paper we explore the gap between PBE and SE by identifying solution concepts that lie strictly between PBE and SE; these solution concepts embody a notion of “conservative” belief revision. Furthermore, we provide a method for determining if a plausibility order on the set of histories is choice measurable, which is a necessary condition for a PBE to be a SE.

  20. Sequential probability ratio tests based on grouped observations

    OpenAIRE

    Eger, Karl-Heinz; Tsoy, Evgeni Borisovich

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with sequential likelihood ratio tests based on grouped observations. It is demonstrated that the method of conjugated parameter pairs known from the non-grouped case can be extended to the grouped case obtaining Waldlike approximations for the OC- and ASN- function. For near hypotheses so-called F-optimal groupings are recommended. As example an SPRT based on grouped observations for the parameter of an exponentially distributed random var...

  1. astroABC: Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elise

    2017-05-01

    astroABC is a Python implementation of an Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo (ABC SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of processes across multiple nodes. It has the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available.

  2. Software for Implementing the Sequential Elimination of Level Combinations Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhyuday Mandal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GAs are a popular technology to search for an optimum in a large search space. Using new concepts of forbidden array and weighted mutation, Mandal, Wu, and Johnson (2006 used elements of GAs to introduce a new global optimization technique called sequential elimination of level combinations (SELC, that efficiently finds optimums. A SAS macro, and MATLAB and R functions are developed to implement the SELC algorithm.

  3. Motor simulation via coupled internal models using sequential Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Dindo H; Zambuto D.; Pezzulo G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a generative Bayesian model for action understanding in which inverse-forward internal model pairs are considered 'hypotheses' of plausible action goals that are explored in parallel via an approximate inference mechanism based on sequential Monte Carlo methods. The reenactment of internal model pairs can be considered a form of motor simulation, which supports both perceptual prediction and action understanding at the goal level. However, this procedure is generally considered to...

  4. Sequential boundaries approach in clinical trials with unequal allocation ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayatollahi Seyyed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical trials, both unequal randomization design and sequential analyses have ethical and economic advantages. In the single-stage-design (SSD, however, if the sample size is not adjusted based on unequal randomization, the power of the trial will decrease, whereas with sequential analysis the power will always remain constant. Our aim was to compare sequential boundaries approach with the SSD when the allocation ratio (R was not equal. Methods We evaluated the influence of R, the ratio of the patients in experimental group to the standard group, on the statistical properties of two-sided tests, including the two-sided single triangular test (TT, double triangular test (DTT and SSD by multiple simulations. The average sample size numbers (ASNs and power (1-β were evaluated for all tests. Results Our simulation study showed that choosing R = 2 instead of R = 1 increases the sample size of SSD by 12% and the ASN of the TT and DTT by the same proportion. Moreover, when R = 2, compared to the adjusted SSD, using the TT or DTT allows to retrieve the well known reductions of ASN observed when R = 1, compared to SSD. In addition, when R = 2, compared to SSD, using the TT and DTT allows to obtain smaller reductions of ASN than when R = 1, but maintains the power of the test to its planned value. Conclusion This study indicates that when the allocation ratio is not equal among the treatment groups, sequential analysis could indeed serve as a compromise between ethicists, economists and statisticians.

  5. Sequential File Programming Patterns and Performance with .NET

    OpenAIRE

    Kukol, Peter; Gray, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Programming patterns for sequential file access in the .NET Framework are described and the performance is measured. The default behavior provides excellent performance on a single disk - 50 MBps both reading and writing. Using large request sizes and doing file pre-allocation when possible have quantifiable benefits. When one considers disk arrays, .NET unbuffered IO delivers 800 MBps on a 16-disk array, but buffered IO delivers about 12% of that performance. Consequently, high-performance f...

  6. From Sequential Extended Regular Expressions to NFA with Symbolic Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimatti, Alessandro; Mover, Sergio; Roveri, Marco; Tonetta, Stefano

    Practical property specification languages such as the IEEE standard PSL use at their core Sequential Extended Regular Expressions (SERE). In order to enable the reuse of traditional verification techniques, it is necessary to translate SEREs into automata. SERE are regular expressions built over alphabets resulting from the state variables of the design under analysis. Thus, a traditional approach to generate the automaton would suffer from the fact that the size of the alphabet is exponential in the number of symbols in the design.

  7. Comment on: "Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Trial Sequential Analyses of Two Cochrane Reviews"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Trial Sequential Analysis is a frequentist method to help researchers control the risks of random errors in meta-analyses (1). Fisher and colleagues used Trial Sequential Analysis on cell therapy for heart diseases (2). The present article discusses the usefulness of Trial Sequential Analysis...

  8. Mechanism of Sequential Swallowing during Straw Drinking in Healthy Young and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Corey, David M.; Hadskey, Leslie D.; Legendre, Calli; Priestly, Daniel H.; Rosenbek, John C.; Foundas, Anne L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has revealed differences between isolated and sequential swallowing in healthy young adults; however, the influence of normal aging on sequential swallowing has not been studied. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of normal aging on deglutition during sequential straw drinking. Videofluoroscopic…

  9. Distribution of aflatoxin in pistachios. 7. Sequential sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzki, T F

    2000-09-01

    Sequential sampling for aflatoxin testing in pistachios is evaluated using the aflatoxin distribution and Monte Carlo results previously obtained (J. Agric. Food Chem. 1999, 47, 3771-3775). The sequential protocol is modeled on the current EU test protocol by applying a three-step sampling, using 10, 20, and 30 kg sample averages. An acceptance level of 15 ng/g of total aflatoxin, under consideration for U.S. standards, is applied. Optimization leads to indifference regions of 2-30 ng/g for the first two steps. The resulting OC curve approximates that for a single 50 kg sample. The sequential protocol is applied to the results for a set of 1293 lots of the 1998 crop year, each tested with a single 10 kg sample. Ninety-five percent of the lots would have been accepted on the basis of the single test and 1.5% would have been rejected, whereas 3.5% of the lots would have required retesting.

  10. Forecasting daily streamflow using online sequential extreme learning machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aranildo R.; Cannon, Alex J.; Hsieh, William W.

    2016-06-01

    While nonlinear machine methods have been widely used in environmental forecasting, in situations where new data arrive continually, the need to make frequent model updates can become cumbersome and computationally costly. To alleviate this problem, an online sequential learning algorithm for single hidden layer feedforward neural networks - the online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM) - is automatically updated inexpensively as new data arrive (and the new data can then be discarded). OSELM was applied to forecast daily streamflow at two small watersheds in British Columbia, Canada, at lead times of 1-3 days. Predictors used were weather forecast data generated by the NOAA Global Ensemble Forecasting System (GEFS), and local hydro-meteorological observations. OSELM forecasts were tested with daily, monthly or yearly model updates. More frequent updating gave smaller forecast errors, including errors for data above the 90th percentile. Larger datasets used in the initial training of OSELM helped to find better parameters (number of hidden nodes) for the model, yielding better predictions. With the online sequential multiple linear regression (OSMLR) as benchmark, we concluded that OSELM is an attractive approach as it easily outperformed OSMLR in forecast accuracy.

  11. Sequential and parallel dual labeling of nanoparticles using click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Hong; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Chang, Huai-Ning; Otis, James B; Baker, James R

    2014-11-01

    Bioorthogonal 'click' reactions have recently emerged as promising tools for chemistry and biological applications. By using a combination of two different 'click' reactions, 'double-click' strategies have been developed to attach multiple labels onto biomacromolecules. These strategies require multi-step modifications of the biomacromolecules that can lead to heterogeneity in the final conjugates. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a set of three trifunctional linkers. The linkers having alkyne and cyclooctyne moieties that are capable of participating in sequential copper(I)-catalyzed and copper-free cycloaddition reactions with azides. We have also prepared a linker comprised of an alkyne and a 1,2,4,5-terazine moiety that allows for simultaneous cycloaddition reactions with azides and trans-cyclooctenes, respectively. These linkers can be attached to synthetic or biological macromolecules to create a platform capable of sequential or parallel 'double-click' labeling in biological systems. We show this potential using a generation 5 (G5) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer in combination with the clickable linkers. The dendrimers were successfully modified with these linkers and we demonstrate both sequential and parallel 'double-click' labeling with fluorescent reporters. We anticipate that these linkers will have a variety of application including molecular imaging and monitoring of macromolecule interactions in biological systems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery: advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjodh; Dohlman, Thomas H; Sun, Grace

    2017-01-01

    The number of cataract surgeries performed globally will continue to rise to meet the needs of an aging population. This increased demand will require healthcare systems and providers to find new surgical efficiencies while maintaining excellent surgical outcomes. Immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) has been proposed as a solution and is increasingly being performed worldwide. The purpose of this review is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of ISBCS. When appropriate patient selection occurs and guidelines are followed, ISBCS is comparable with delayed sequential bilateral cataract surgery in long-term patient satisfaction, visual acuity and complication rates. In addition, the risk of bilateral postoperative endophthalmitis and concerns of poorer refractive outcomes have not been supported by the literature. ISBCS is cost-effective for the patient, healthcare payors and society, but current reimbursement models in many countries create significant financial barriers for facilities and surgeons. As demand for cataract surgery rises worldwide, ISBCS will become increasingly important as an alternative to delayed sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Advantages include potentially decreased wait times for surgery, patient convenience and cost savings for healthcare payors. Although they are comparable in visual acuity and complication rates, hurdles that prevent wide adoption include liability concerns as ISBCS is not an established standard of care, economic constraints for facilities and surgeons and inability to fine-tune intraocular lens selection in the second eye. Given these considerations, an open discussion regarding the advantages and disadvantages of ISBCS is important for appropriate patient selection.

  13. Sequential sampling of Euschistus heros (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Aparecido de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrated pest management programs for soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill must be based on efficient sampling plans for estimating the pest population. Based on the spatial distribution of the Neotropical brown stink bug Euschistus heros (Fabricius, 1794 found on soybean, it was possible to construct a sequential sampling plan for the survey of this insect found on soybean. The experiment was carried out during two growing seasons, 2010/2011 and 2011/2012, using the transgenic soybean cultivar M 7908 RR, in plots of 10,000 m² subdivided into 100 plots of 100 m² (10 m × 10 m. Nymphs > 0.5 cm (4th and 5th instars plus adults were counted weekly from five drop cloth technique samplings per plot. To evaluate insect dispersion in the area, the following indices were used: variance/mean ratio, Morisita's index, Green's coefficient, the k exponent of the negative binomial distribution, and estimation of the common exponent k (kc. To study probabilistic models to describe the spatial distribution of the insects, adjustments of the Poisson and negative binomial distributions were tested. Two sequential sampling plans for separate fields, one for grain production and the other for seed production, were prepared. The data fitted a negative binomial distribution and a sampling plan was drawn up using the sequential likelihood ratio test (SLRT. The maximum sampling unit number expected for control-related decision making was six in grain production fields, and nine in seed production fields.

  14. A Node Linkage Approach for Sequential Pattern Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Osvaldo; Cumplido, René; Villaseñor-Pineda, Luis; Feregrino-Uribe, Claudia; Carrasco-Ochoa, Jesús Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Sequential Pattern Mining is a widely addressed problem in data mining, with applications such as analyzing Web usage, examining purchase behavior, and text mining, among others. Nevertheless, with the dramatic increase in data volume, the current approaches prove inefficient when dealing with large input datasets, a large number of different symbols and low minimum supports. In this paper, we propose a new sequential pattern mining algorithm, which follows a pattern-growth scheme to discover sequential patterns. Unlike most pattern growth algorithms, our approach does not build a data structure to represent the input dataset, but instead accesses the required sequences through pseudo-projection databases, achieving better runtime and reducing memory requirements. Our algorithm traverses the search space in a depth-first fashion and only preserves in memory a pattern node linkage and the pseudo-projections required for the branch being explored at the time. Experimental results show that our new approach, the Node Linkage Depth-First Traversal algorithm (NLDFT), has better performance and scalability in comparison with state of the art algorithms. PMID:24933123

  15. Accurately controlled sequential self-folding structures by polystyrene film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongping; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yong; Lan, Xing; Tice, Jesse

    2017-08-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) printing overcomes the traditional fabrication limitations by designing heterogeneous materials to enable the printed structures evolve over time (the fourth dimension) under external stimuli. Here, we present a simple 4D printing of self-folding structures that can be sequentially and accurately folded. When heated above their glass transition temperature pre-strained polystyrene films shrink along the XY plane. In our process silver ink traces printed on the film are used to provide heat stimuli by conducting current to trigger the self-folding behavior. The parameters affecting the folding process are studied and discussed. Sequential folding and accurately controlled folding angles are achieved by using printed ink traces and angle lock design. Theoretical analyses are done to guide the design of the folding processes. Programmable structures such as a lock and a three-dimensional antenna are achieved to test the feasibility and potential applications of this method. These self-folding structures change their shapes after fabrication under controlled stimuli (electric current) and have potential applications in the fields of electronics, consumer devices, and robotics. Our design and fabrication method provides an easy way by using silver ink printed on polystyrene films to 4D print self-folding structures for electrically induced sequential folding with angular control.

  16. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  17. Sequential adaptation of Nannochloropsis gaditana to table olive processing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Antonio; Contreras, Carmen; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Borja, Rafael; Fermoso, Fernando G

    2017-08-24

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of Nannochloropsis gaditana to grow by sequential adaptation to TOPW (Table olive processing water) at increased substrate concentrations (10-80%). Sequential adaptation allows growing Nannochloropsis gaditana up to 80% TOPW, although the maximum microalgae biomass productions were achieved for percentages of 20-40%, i.e. 0.308 ± 0.005 g VSS (Volatile Suspended Solids)/L. In all growth experiments, proteins were the majority compound in the grown microalgae biomass (0.44 ± 0.05 g/g VSS), whereas phenols were retained up to a mean concentration of 12.1 ± 1.9 mg total phenols/g VSS. The highest microalgae biomass production rate at rate of 80% TOPW took place in the first two days when most nutrients were also removed. Average removal efficiencies at this percentage of TOPW were 69.1%, 50.9%, 54.3% and 71.8% for total organic carbon, total soluble nitrogen, phosphate and total phenols, respectively. Sequential adaptation can ensure the obtaining of a sustainable microalgae culture as a treatment method for TOPW.

  18. Fully vs. Sequentially Coupled Loads Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, Rick; Wendt, Fabian; Musial, Walter; Finucane, Z.; Hulliger, L.; Chilka, S.; Dolan, D.; Cushing, J.; O' Connell, D.; Falk, S.

    2017-06-19

    The design and analysis methods for offshore wind turbines must consider the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic loads and response of the entire system (turbine, tower, substructure, and foundation) coupled to the turbine control system dynamics. Whereas a fully coupled (turbine and support structure) modeling approach is more rigorous, intellectual property concerns can preclude this approach. In fact, turbine control system algorithms and turbine properties are strictly guarded and often not shared. In many cases, a partially coupled analysis using separate tools and an exchange of reduced sets of data via sequential coupling may be necessary. In the sequentially coupled approach, the turbine and substructure designers will independently determine and exchange an abridged model of their respective subsystems to be used in their partners' dynamic simulations. Although the ability to achieve design optimization is sacrificed to some degree with a sequentially coupled analysis method, the central question here is whether this approach can deliver the required safety and how the differences in the results from the fully coupled method could affect the design. This work summarizes the scope and preliminary results of a study conducted for the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement aimed at quantifying differences between these approaches through aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulations of two offshore wind turbines on a monopile and jacket substructure.

  19. [Sequential heart and liver transplantation for familial amyloid polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Laura; Fabregat, Joan; Ramos, Emilio; Baliellas, Carme; Roca, Josep; Casasnovas, Carlos

    2014-03-04

    Combined heart and liver transplantation for familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is currently the best treatment for patients with cardiomyopathy related to FAP. However, its optimal timing and the possibility of domino liver transplantation in this setting remain under discussion. Most such cases in the medical literature have been performed simultaneously, although many of them have required the use of veno-venous bypass and the majority have not used the liver as a graft for domino liver transplantation. We report 3 cases of non-Val30Met mutation that underwent sequential heart and domino liver transplantation at our institution. We describe the 3 cases and the medical literature, with special attention to the reason for sequential heart and liver transplantation, the role of transient elastography in this setting, and the feasibility of domino liver transplantation. In our experience, combined heart and liver transplantation is a feasible but challenging procedure for patients with FAP. Performing the procedure sequentially rather than simultaneously seems safer and easier, both technically and hemodynamically. More importantly, such an approach allows the use of livers from FAP patients as grafts for domino liver transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive processes associated with sequential tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Joanna H; Weir, Alex A S; Clayton, Lisa; Rutz, Christian; Kacelnik, Alex

    2009-08-05

    Using tools to act on non-food objects--for example, to make other tools--is considered to be a hallmark of human intelligence, and may have been a crucial step in our evolution. One form of this behaviour, 'sequential tool use', has been observed in a number of non-human primates and even in one bird, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides). While sequential tool use has often been interpreted as evidence for advanced cognitive abilities, such as planning and analogical reasoning, the behaviour itself can be underpinned by a range of different cognitive mechanisms, which have never been explicitly examined. Here, we present experiments that not only demonstrate new tool-using capabilities in New Caledonian crows, but allow examination of the extent to which crows understand the physical interactions involved. In two experiments, we tested seven captive New Caledonian crows in six tasks requiring the use of up to three different tools in a sequence to retrieve food. Our study incorporated several novel features: (i) we tested crows on a three-tool problem (subjects were required to use a tool to retrieve a second tool, then use the second tool to retrieve a third one, and finally use the third one to reach for food); (ii) we presented tasks of different complexity in random rather than progressive order; (iii) we included a number of control conditions to test whether tool retrieval was goal-directed; and (iv) we manipulated the subjects' pre-testing experience. Five subjects successfully used tools in a sequence (four from their first trial), and four subjects repeatedly solved the three-tool condition. Sequential tool use did not require, but was enhanced by, pre-training on each element in the sequence ('chaining'), an explanation that could not be ruled out in earlier studies. By analyzing tool choice, tool swapping and improvement over time, we show that successful subjects did not use a random probing strategy. However, we find no firm evidence to

  1. Sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy was comparable with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage I/II NK/T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Y L; Kim, S J; Tse, E; Oh, S Y; Kwak, J Y; Eom, H S; Do, Y R; Mun, Y C; Lee, S R; Shin, H J; Suh, C; Chuang, S S; Lee, Y S; Lim, S T; Izutsu, K; Suzuki, R; Relander, T; d'Amore, F; Schmitz, N; Jaccard, A; Kim, W S

    2017-10-24

    In stage I/II natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) had previously been shown to result in superior outcome compared with anthracycline-containing regimens, which have since been considered ineffective. The role of CCRT in comparison with approaches employing non-anthracycline-containing chemotherapy (CT) and sequential radiotherapy (RT) in such patients remains to be defined. Three hundred and three untreated patients (207 men, 96 women; median age: 51, 18-86, years) with stage I/II NK/T-cell lymphoma who had received non-anthracycline-containing regimens were collected from an international consortium and retrospectively analyzed. Treatment included single modality (chemotherapy, CT; radiotherapy, RT), sequential modalities (CT+RT; RT+CT) and concurrent modalities (CCRT; CCRT+CT). The impact of clinicopathologic parameters and types of treatment on complete response (CR) rate, progression-free-survival (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) was evaluated. For CR, stage (p=0.027), prognostic index for NK/T-cell lymphoma (PINK) (P = 0.026) and types of initial treatment (p=0.011) were significant prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. On Cox regression analysis, ECOG performance score (p=0.021) and PINK-EBV DNA (PINK-E) (p=0.002) significantly impacted on PFS; whereas ECOG performance score (p=0.008) and stage (pcomparing CCRT±CT and sequential CT+RT, CCRT±CT patients (n=190) were similar to sequential CT+RT patients (n=54) in all evaluated clinicopathologic parameters except two significantly superior features (higher proportion of non-detectable circulating EBV DNA on diagnosis and lower PINK-E scores). Despite more favorable pre-treatment characteristics, CCRT±CT patients had CR rate, PFS and OS comparable with sequential CT+RT patients on multivariate and Cox regression analyses. In stage I/II NK/T-cell lymphomas, when effective chemotherapeutic regimens were used, CCRT and sequential CT+RT gave similar outcome.

  2. Determination of attapulgite and nifuroxazide in pharmaceutical formulations by sequential digital derivative spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, M Inés; Paine, Maximiliano; Leyton, Patricio; Richter, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    A new method for the sequential determination of attapulgite and nifuroxazide in pharmaceutical formulations by first- and second-derivative spectrophotometry, respectively, has been developed. In order to obtain the optimal conditions for nifuroxazide stability, studies of solvent, light, and temperature effects were performed. The results show that a previous hydrolysis of 2 h in 1.0 x 10(-1)M NaOH solution is necessary in order to obtain stable compounds for analytical purposes. Subsequently, the first- and second-derivative spectra were evaluated directly in the same samples. The sequential determination of the drugs can be performed using the zero-crossing method; the attapulgite determination was carried out using the first derivative at 278.0 nm and the nifuroxazide determination, using the second derivative at 282.0 nm. The determination ranges were 5.7 x 10(-6)-1.0 x 10(-4) and 3.7 x 10(-8) -1.2 x 10(-4)M for attapulgite and nifuroxazide, respectively. Repeatability (relative standard deviation) values of 1.2 and 3.0% were observed for attapulgite and nifuroxazide, respectively. The ingredients commonly found in commercial pharmaceutical formulations do not interfere. The proposed method was applied to the determination of these drugs in tablets. Further, infrared spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry studies were carried out in order to obtain knowledge of the decomposition products of nifuroxazide.

  3. pH-Responsive Wormlike Micelles with Sequential Metastasis Targeting Inhibit Lung Metastasis of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinyu; Yu, Haijun; Bao, Xiaoyue; Cao, Haiqiang; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-02-18

    Cancer metastasis is the main cause for the high mortality in breast cancer patients. Herein, we first report succinobucol-loaded pH-responsive wormlike micelles (PWMs) with sequential targeting capability to inhibit lung metastasis of breast cancer. PWMs can in a first step be delivered specifically to the sites of metastases in the lungs and then enable the intracellular pH-stimulus responsive drug release in cancer cells to improve the anti-metastatic effect. PWMs are identified as nanofibrillar assemblies with a diameter of 19.9 ± 1.9 nm and a length within the 50-200 nm range, and exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior in response to acidic intracellular environments. Moreover, PWMs can obviously inhibit the migration and invasion abilities of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cells, and reduce the expression of the metastasis-associated vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) at 400 ng mL(-1) of succinobucol. In particular, PWMs can induce a higher specific accumulation in lung and be specifically delivered to the sites of metastases in lung, thereby leading to an 86.6% inhibition on lung metastasis of breast cancer. Therefore, the use of sequentially targeting PWMs can become an encouraging strategy for specific targeting and effective treatment of cancer metastasis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Start-up designs for response-adaptive randomization procedures with sequential estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Linda M; Sadiq, Hassan

    2015-09-20

    Response-adaptive randomization procedures are appropriate for clinical trials in which two or more treatments are to be compared, patients arrive sequentially and the response of each patient is recorded before the next patient arrives. However, for those procedures that involve sequential estimation of model parameters, start-up designs are commonly required in order to provide initial estimates of the parameters. In this paper, a suite of such start-up designs for two treatments and binary patient responses are considered and compared in terms of the numbers of patients required in order to give meaningful parameters estimates, the number of patients allocated to the better treatment, and the bias in the parameter estimates. It is shown that permuted block designs with blocks of size 4 are to be preferred over a wide range of parameter values. For the case of two treatments, normal responses and selected start-up procedures, a design incorporating complete randomization followed appropriately by repeats of one of the treatments yields the minimum expected number of patients and is to be preferred. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Sequential sampling of Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Frankliniella schultzei Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on cotton crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M G; Spessoto, R R; Degrande, P E; Rodrigues, T R

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to use the sequential probability ratio test to establish a sequential sampling plan for Aphis gossypii Glover and Frankliniella schultzei Trybom infesting cotton. Field work was conducted at the agricultural experimental station of the Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados during the 2003/2004 and 2004/2005 agricultural years. Aphid colonies and individual thrips in the sampling area were counted and their numbers were recorded. The spatial distribution pattern of A. gossypii and F. schultzei in the cotton culture was aggregated. Sequential sampling plans were developed for aphids and thrips with type I and type II errors set at 0.1, common Kc = 0.6081 (aphids) and = 0. 9449 (thrips), and safety and management levels of 20% (aphids) and 40% (thrips) of infested plants. The sampling plans resulted in two decision boundaries for each species, as follows: the upper boundary, indicating when management (population control) is recommended: S1 = 4.6546 + 0.2849n (aphids), and S1 = 3.6514 + 0.1435n (thrips); and the lower boundary, indicating when population control is not necessary: S0 = -4.6546 + 0.2849n (aphids) and S0 = - 3.6514 + 0.1435n (thrips). The highest probability of error when making a decision was 3% for aphids and 2% for thrips, respectively. The maximum number of samples required to reach a decision was 63 for aphids and 95 for thrips.

  6. The relative accuracy and interpretability of five sequential analysis methods: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Blair P; Yoder, Paul J; Tapp, Jon; Staubitz, Johanna L

    2016-12-01

    A variety of sequential analysis methods exist to quantify close temporal associations between events from direct observation data. In the present study, we compared the relative accuracy and interpretability of five sequential-analysis methods using simulated data. The methods included three existing approaches (event lag, concurrent interval, and time window) and two proposed modifications of the event lag approach (event lag with contiguous pauses and event lag with noncontiguous pauses) designed to address limitations of the existing approaches. We evaluated accuracy on the basis of the extent to which the mean contingency estimates produced by each method approximated a known mean (i.e., zero). We evaluated interpretability on the basis of the extent to which the contingency estimates produced by each method were independent from chance estimates of the two-event sequence. The results indicated that the event lag with contiguous pauses method produced the most accurate and interpretable estimates of contingency. This modified method prevents the total number of event types from influencing contingency estimates, thus solving a problem associated with the traditional event lag method.

  7. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Scriba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors” were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis.Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  8. Sequential inflammatory processes define human progression from M. tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Shankar, Smitha; Hraha, Tom; Thompson, Ethan G; Sterling, David; Nemes, Elisa; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Suliman, Sara; Amon, Lynn M; Mahomed, Hassan; Erasmus, Mzwandile; Whatney, Wendy; Johnson, John L; Boom, W Henry; Hatherill, Mark; Valvo, Joe; De Groote, Mary Ann; Ochsner, Urs A; Aderem, Alan; Hanekom, Willem A; Zak, Daniel E

    2017-11-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms underlying progression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in humans remains limited. To define such mechanisms, we followed M. tuberculosis-infected adolescents longitudinally. Blood samples from forty-four adolescents who ultimately developed tuberculosis disease (“progressors”) were compared with those from 106 matched controls, who remained healthy during two years of follow up. We performed longitudinal whole blood transcriptomic analyses by RNA sequencing and plasma proteome analyses using multiplexed slow off-rate modified DNA aptamers. Tuberculosis progression was associated with sequential modulation of immunological processes. Type I/II interferon signalling and complement cascade were elevated 18 months before tuberculosis disease diagnosis, while changes in myeloid inflammation, lymphoid, monocyte and neutrophil gene modules occurred more proximally to tuberculosis disease. Analysis of gene expression in purified T cells also revealed early suppression of Th17 responses in progressors, relative to M. tuberculosis-infected controls. This was confirmed in an independent adult cohort who received BCG re-vaccination; transcript expression of interferon response genes in blood prior to BCG administration was associated with suppression of IL-17 expression by BCG-specific CD4 T cells 3 weeks post-vaccination. Our findings provide a timeline to the different immunological stages of disease progression which comprise sequential inflammatory dynamics and immune alterations that precede disease manifestations and diagnosis of tuberculosis disease. These findings have important implications for developing diagnostics, vaccination and host-directed therapies for tuberculosis. Clincialtrials.gov, NCT01119521.

  9. Comparing children's Homo sapiens and chimpanzees' Pan troglodytes quantity judgments of sequentially presented sets of items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. BERAN, Julie S. JOHNSON-PYNN, Christopher READY

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We presented a quantity judgment task that involved comparing two sequentially presented sets of items to preschoolers and chimpanzees using nearly identical procedures that excluded verbal instructions to children. Trial difficulty in this task reflected the ratio difference between sets of discrete items where larger ratios (e.g., 0.80 as from comparing 4 to 5 were more difficult than smaller ones (e.g., 0.50 as from comparing 4 to 8. Children also completed verbal-based tasks probing the relationship between counting proficiency and performance on the quantity judgment task of sequentially presented identical sized items. Both species’ performance was best when ratios between comparison sets were small regardless of set size in all types of tasks. Generally, chimpanzees and older children performed better than younger children except at larger ratios. Children’s counting proficiency was not related to success in choosing the larger of two quantities of identical-sized items. These results indicate that chimpanzees and children share an approximate number sense that is reflected through analog magnitude estimation when comparing quantities [Current Zoology 57 (4: 419–428, 2011].

  10. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  11. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions.

  12. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  13. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  14. Sequential radiographic changes of nodules in patients with miliary pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Jae Woo; Park, Chan Sup; Bae, In Young; Kwak, Seung Min; Cho, Chul Ho; Kwon, Min Joong; Joo, Ji Soen; Chung, Won Kyun [Inha University, Songnam (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate sequential changes in miliary nodules, as seen on chest radiographs in patients with miliary tuberculosis. We retrospectively analyzed sequential changes in miliary nodules, as seen on the chest radiographs of 13 patients with miliary tuberculosis who recovered completely after antituberculous medication. Two were children and 11 were adults, and their ages ranged from 2 months to 73 years (mean, 38 years). In cases in which miliary tuberculosis had been diagnosed from initial chest radiographs, follow-up chest radiographs were obtained 5 to 15 (mean, 10) months later. After complete resolution of miliary nodules, as seen on chest radiographs, high-resolution CT scanning was performed in three patients. As seen on follow-up chest radiographs obtained at one week, the number and size of miliary nodules had decreased in eight to nine patients (89%), and on those obtained at one month, these decreases were seen in all 13 patients. The mean duration of complete resolution of miliary nodules was 6.3 months; in children, this was 3.5 (range, 2-5) months, and in adults, 6.8 (range, 3-10) months. In all three patients involved, high-resolution CT scans obtained after complete radiographic resolution of miliary nodules showed no recurrence. In patients with miliary tuberculosis, the size and number of nodules had decreased within one month of adequate chemotherapy and on chest radiographs, complete resolution was seen at 6.3 months, on average. (author). 17 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  15. Effect of Casting Material on the Cast Pressure After Sequential Cast Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Aaron; Shaw, K Aaron; Boomsma, Shawn E; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-01-01

    Circumferential casting is a vital component of nonoperative fracture management. These casts are commonly valved to release pressure and decrease the risk of complications from swelling. However, little information exists regarding the effect of different casting supplies on the pressure within the cast. Seventy-five long-arm casts were performed on human volunteers, divided between 5 experimental groups with 15 casts in each groups. Testing groups consisted of 2 groups with a plaster short-arm cast overwrapped with fiberglass to a long arm with either cotton or synthetic cast padding. The 3 remaining groups included fiberglass long-arm casts with cotton, synthetic, or waterproof cast padding. A pediatric blood pressure cuff bladder was placed within the cast and inflated to 100 mm Hg. After inflation, the cast was sequentially released with pressure reading preformed after each stage. Order of release consisted of cast bivalve, cast padding release, and cotton stockinet release. After release, the cast was overwrapped with a loose elastic bandage. Difference in pressure readings were compared based upon the cast material. Pressures within the cast were found to decrease with sequential release of cast. The cast type had no effect of change in pressure. Post hoc testing demonstrated that the type of cast padding significantly affected the cast pressures with waterproof padding demonstrating the highest pressure readings at all time-points in the study, followed by synthetic padding. Cotton padding had the lowest pressure readings at all time-points. Type of cast padding significantly influences the amount of pressure within a long-arm cast, even after bivalving the cast and cutting the cast padding. Cotton cast padding allows for the greatest change in pressure. Cotton padding demonstrates the greatest change in pressure within a long-arm cast after undergoing bivalve. Synthetic and waterproof cast padding should not be used in the setting of an acute fracture to

  16. Mucosal immunization of rhesus monkeys against respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B and human parainfluenza virus type 3 by using a live cDNA-derived vaccine based on a host range-attenuated bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 vector backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander C; Wenzke, Daniel R; McAuliffe, Josephine M; St Claire, Marisa; Elkins, William R; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2002-02-01

    Reverse genetics was used to develop a two-component, trivalent live attenuated vaccine against human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroups A and B. The backbone for each of the two components of this vaccine was the attenuated recombinant bovine/human PIV3 (rB/HPIV3), a recombinant BPIV3 in which the bovine HN and F protective antigens are replaced by their HPIV3 counterparts (48). This chimera retains the well-characterized host range attenuation phenotype of BPIV3, which appears to be appropriate for immunization of young infants. The open reading frames (ORFs) for the G and F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and B were each placed under the control of PIV3 transcription signals and inserted individually or in homologous pairs as supernumerary genes in the promoter proximal position of rB/HPIV3. The level of replication of rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses in the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys was similar to that of their parent virus rB/HPIV3, and each of the chimeras induced a robust immune response to both RSV and HPIV3. RSV-neutralizing antibody titers induced by rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses were equivalent to those induced by infection with wild-type RSV, and HPIV3-specific antibody responses were similar to, or slightly less than, after infection with the rB/HPIV3 vector itself. This study describes a novel vaccine strategy against RSV in which vaccine viruses with a common attenuated backbone, specifically rB/HPIV3 derivatives expressing the G and/or F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and of RSV subgroup B, are used to immunize by the intranasal route against RSV and HPIV3, which are the first and second most important viral agents of pediatric respiratory tract disease worldwide.

  17. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  18. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  19. Sequential determination of fat- and water-soluble vitamins in Rhodiola imbricata root from trans-Himalaya with rapid resolution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayade, Amol B; Dhar, Priyanka; Kumar, Jatinder; Sharma, Manu; Chaurasia, Om P; Srivastava, Ravi B

    2013-07-30

    A rapid method was developed to determine both types of vitamins in Rhodiola imbricata root for the accurate quantification of free vitamin forms. Rapid resolution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) source operating in multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode was optimized for the sequential analysis of nine water-soluble vitamins (B1, B2, two B3 vitamins, B5, B6, B7, B9, and B12) and six fat-soluble vitamins (A, E, D2, D3, K1, and K2). Both types of vitamins were separated by ion-suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatography with gradient elution within 30 min and detected in positive ion mode. Deviations in the intra- and inter-day precision were always below 0.6% and 0.3% for recoveries and retention time. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) values of retention time for water- and fat-soluble vitamin were ranged between 0.02-0.20% and 0.01-0.15%, respectively. The mean recoveries were ranged between 88.95 and 107.07%. Sensitivity and specificity of this method allowed the limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantitation (LOQ) of the analytes at ppb levels. The linear range was achieved for fat- and water-soluble vitamins at 100-1000 ppb and 10-100 ppb. Vitamin B-complex and vitamin E were detected as the principle vitamins in the root of this adaptogen which would be of great interest to develop novel foods from the Indian trans-Himalaya. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  1. Non-Cross Resistant Sequential Single Agent Chemotherapy in First-Line Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Results of a Phase II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Surmont

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. sequential chemotherapy can maintain dose intensity and preclude cumulative toxicity by increasing drug diversity. Purpose. to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of the sequential regimen of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with good performance status (PS. Patients and methods. gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 was administered on day 1 and 8 of course 1 and 2; Paclitaxel 150 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 of course 3 and 4. Primary endpoint was response rate (RR, secondary endpoints toxicity and time to progression (TTP. Results. Of the 21 patients (median age 56, range 38–80 years; 62% males, 38% females 10% (2/21 had stage IIIB, 90% (19/21 stage IV, 15% PS 0, 85% PS 1. 20% of patients had a partial response, 30% stable disease, 50% progressive disease. Median TTP was 12 weeks (range 6–52 weeks, median overall survival (OS 8 months (range 1–27 months, 1-year survival was 33%. One patient had grade 3 hematological toxicity, 2 patients a grade 3 peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions. sequential administration of gemcitabine followed by paclitaxel in first line treatment of advanced NSCLC had a favourable toxicity profile, a median TTP and OS comparable with other sequential trials and might , therefore, be a treatment option for NSCLC patients with high ERCC1 expression.

  2. Accuracy of respiratory motion measurement of 4D-MRI: A comparison between cine and sequential acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Rhee, DongJoo; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The authors have recently developed a cine-mode T2*/T1-weighted 4D-MRI technique and a sequential-mode T2-weighted 4D-MRI technique for imaging respiratory motion. This study aims at investigating which 4D-MRI image acquisition mode, cine or sequential, provides more accurate measurement of organ motion during respiration. A 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom with a hypothesized tumor was used to simulate the image acquisition and the 4D-MRI reconstruction. The respiratory motion was controlled by the given breathing signal profiles. The tumor was manipulated to move continuously with the surrounding tissue. The motion trajectories were measured from both sequential- and cine-mode 4D-MRI images. The measured trajectories were compared with the average trajectory calculated from the input profiles, which was used as references. The error in 4D-MRI tumor motion trajectory (E) was determined. In addition, the corresponding respiratory motion amplitudes of all the selected 2D images for 4D reconstruction were recorded. Each of the amplitude was compared with the amplitude of its associated bin on the average breathing curve. The mean differences from the average breathing curve across all slice positions (D) were calculated. A total of 500 simulated respiratory profiles with a wide range of irregularity (Ir) were used to investigate the relationship between D and Ir. Furthermore, statistical analysis of E and D using XCAT controlled by 20 cancer patients' breathing profiles was conducted. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was conducted to compare two modes. D increased faster for cine-mode (D = 1.17 × Ir + 0.23) than sequential-mode (D = 0.47 × Ir + 0.23) as irregularity increased. For the XCAT study using 20 cancer patients' breathing profiles, the median E values were significantly different: 0.12 and 0.10 cm for cine- and sequential-modes, respectively, with a p-value of 0.02. The median D values were significantly different: 0.47 and 0.24 cm for cine

  3. Sequential Injection Determination of D-Glucose by Chemiluminescence Using an Open Tubular Immobilised Enzyme Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xuezhu; Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    A sequential injection analysis system is described that incorporates a nylon tubular reactor containing immobilised glucose oxidase, allowing determination of D-glucose by means of subsequent luminol chemiluminescence detection of the hydrogen peroxide generated in the enzymatic reaction....... The operating parameters were optimised by fractional factorial screening and response surface modelling. The linear range of D-glucose determination was 30-600 mu M, With a detection limit of 15 mu M using a photodiode detector. The sampling frequency was 54 h(-1). Lower LOD (0.5 mu M D-glucose) could...... be reached by using a PMT as the detector. Fermentation broth samples were determined and good recoveries were obtained....

  4. Sequential Monte Carlo Localization Methods in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar M. A. Abu Znaid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of digital technology has increased the deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSNs in our daily life. However, locating sensor nodes is a challenging task in WSNs. Sensing data without an accurate location is worthless, especially in critical applications. The pioneering technique in range-free localization schemes is a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC method, which utilizes network connectivity to estimate sensor location without additional hardware. This study presents a comprehensive survey of state-of-the-art SMC localization schemes. We present the schemes as a thematic taxonomy of localization operation in SMC. Moreover, the critical characteristics of each existing scheme are analyzed to identify its advantages and disadvantages. The similarities and differences of each scheme are investigated on the basis of significant parameters, namely, localization accuracy, computational cost, communication cost, and number of samples. We discuss the challenges and direction of the future research work for each parameter.

  5. Simultaneous determination of two active components of pharmaceutical preparations by sequential injection method using heteropoly complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Khair E. A. Al-Shwaiyat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New approach has been proposed for the simultaneous determination of two reducing agents based on the dependence of their reaction rate with 18-molybdo-2-phosphate heteropoly complex on pH. The method was automated using the manifold typical for the sequential analysis method. Ascorbic acid and rutin were determined by successive injection of two samples acidified to different pH. The linear range for rutin determination was 0.6-20 mg/L and the detection limit was 0.2 mg/L (l = 1 cm. The determination of rutin was possible in the presence of up to a 20-fold excess of ascorbic acid. The method was successfully applied to the determination of ascorbic acid and rutin in ascorutin tablets. The applicability of the proposed method for the determination of total polyphenol content in natural plant samples was shown.

  6. Anomaly Detection in Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Using a Sequential Symbolic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomaly detection plays a significant role in helping gas turbines run reliably and economically. Considering the collective anomalous data and both sensitivity and robustness of the anomaly detection model, a sequential symbolic anomaly detection method is proposed and applied to the gas turbine fuel system. A structural Finite State Machine is used to evaluate posterior probabilities of observing symbolic sequences and the most probable state sequences they may locate. Hence an estimation-based model and a decoding-based model are used to identify anomalies in two different ways. Experimental results indicate that both models have both ideal performance overall, but the estimation-based model has a strong robustness ability, whereas the decoding-based model has a strong accuracy ability, particularly in a certain range of sequence lengths. Therefore, the proposed method can facilitate well existing symbolic dynamic analysis- based anomaly detection methods, especially in the gas turbine domain.

  7. Sequential cobalt magnetization collapse in ErCo2: beyond the limits of itinerant electron metamagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenko, D P; Burzo, E; Vlaic, P; Kichanov, S E; Rutkauskas, A V; Savenko, B N

    2015-03-02

    The itinerant electron metamagnetism (IEM) is an essential physical concept, describing magnetic properties of rare earth - transition metal (R-TM) intermetallics, demonstrating technologically important giant magnetoresistance and magnetocaloric effects. It considers an appearance of TM magnetization induced by spontaneous magnetization of surrounding R atoms, which provides significant response of the magnetic and transport properties on variation of external parameters (temperature, pressure, magnetic field) due to strong coupling between magnetic sublattices. The RCo2 compounds were generally considered as model systems for understanding of basic properties of IEM intermetallics. However, microscopic nature of magnetic properties still remains unclear. In our experimental and theoretical study of ErCo2 in a wide range of thermodynamic parameters a sequential collapse of cobalt sublattice magnetization in the background of nearly unchanged Er sublattice magnetization was revealed. The uncoupled magnetizations behavior challenges the IEM concept applicability and evidences more complex nature of magnetism in ErCo2 and related RCo2 systems.

  8. A sequential approach in mathematical programming to include spatial aspects of biodiversity in long range forest management planning

    OpenAIRE

    von Kerkvoorde, Michiel

    1996-01-01

    In the discussion about forest management the maintenance of biodiversity is coming more and more to the fore. Like 120 other countries, Sweden committed itself to a sustainable use of for­ ests at the convention of Rio de Janeiro. Sweden has a long tradition of forest management fo­ cusing on woodproduction. This implies that almost all the forest land is managed and that the area of natural forests is very small. The maintenance of biodiversity should therefor not be lim...

  9. Sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for stage C prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Yuichi; Kawai, Tsuneo; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamauchi, Tamio; Aizawa, Taku (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1993-03-01

    Twenty of 34 stage C cases have been treated by sequential estrogen and radiation in our hospital between 1980 and 1989 and half of them had actually been done staging operation. An average age was 69.3. Tumor differentiations were distributed well in 5 cases, moderately in 5 and poorly in 9. The other unknown differentiation case was diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology. Previously administered estrogens were diethylstilbestrol diphosphate in 15 cases and others in 5. Total doses of 70 Gy in 35 fractions were sequentially delivered to the prostate, involving if necessary the seminal vesicles over a seven-week period by bilateral 120deg pendel using linear accelerator. Radiation field was sized from 6 x 6 to 8 x 8 cm. Estrogens have been continuously administered following radiation in 11 cases. Therapeutic effects upon the prostate were evaluated by digital rectal palpation. Improvement rate and atrophy rate of the primary lesion were 94.4% and 50% respectively. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases and 3 of them recurred within 3 years after initiation of the treatment. Recurred sites were in primary lesion in 2 cases and in bone in two. Five year non-recurrence rate was 81% by Kaplan Meier's method. One of 3 who discontinued hormone administration during or immediately after radiotherapy had local recurrence after 65 months and the other 2 cases died of gastric cancer and unknown cause. Causes of 6 dead cases were one prostate cancer, one gastric cancer, one heart failure, one pneumonia and 2 unknown. The cancer death rate was 25% (1/4 cases). Five year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 59.0%. Our results support the view that the sequential estrogen and radiation therapy for the pathological stage C patients of the prostate cancer may be as preferable as radiation alone for the treatment of stage B prostate cancer. (J.P.N.).

  10. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  11. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  12. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  13. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  14. Sample size determination in group-sequential clinical trials with two co-primary endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Koko; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Kenichi; Evans, Scott R; Sozu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We discuss sample size determination in group-sequential designs with two endpoints as co-primary. We derive the power and sample size within two decision-making frameworks. One is to claim the test intervention’s benefit relative to control when superiority is achieved for the two endpoints at the same interim timepoint of the trial. The other is when the superiority is achieved for the two endpoints at any interim timepoint, not necessarily simultaneously. We evaluate the behaviors of sample size and power with varying design elements and provide a real example to illustrate the proposed sample size methods. In addition, we discuss sample size recalculation based on observed data and evaluate the impact on the power and Type I error rate. PMID:24676799

  15. Overcoming the challenges now limiting islet transplantation: a sequential, integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Antonello; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Inverardi, Luca; Ricordi, Camillo

    2006-10-01

    Steady improvements in islet cell processing technology and immunosuppressive protocols have made pancreatic islet transplantation a clinical reality for the treatment of patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Recent trials are showing that improved glycemic metabolic control, prevention of severe hypoglycemia, and better quality of life can be reproducibly achieved after transplantation of allogeneic islets in patients with unstable T1DM. Despite these encouraging results, challenges ahead comprise obtaining adequate islet cells for transplant, enhancing islets engraftment, sustaining beta cell mass and function over time, and defining effective immune interventions, among others. In order to overcome the current hurdles to the widespread application of islet transplantation there is a need for implementation of integrated, sequential therapeutic approaches.

  16. A sequential binding mechanism in a PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke

    2009-01-01

    of interaction, in particular for single-domain proteins. Here, we found that the PDZ2 domain of SAP97 binds its ligand via a sequential (induced fit) mechanism. We performed binding experiments using SAP97 PDZ2 and peptide ligands and observed biphasic kinetics with the stopped-flow technique, indicating...... that ligand binding involves at least a two-step process. By using an ultrarapid continuous-flow mixer, we then detected a hyperbolic dependence of binding rate constants on peptide concentration, corroborating the two-step binding mechanism. Furthermore, we found a similar dependence of the rate constants...

  17. Trial Sequential Analysis in systematic reviews with meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most meta-analyses in systematic reviews, including Cochrane ones, do not have sufficient statistical power to detect or refute even large intervention effects. This is why a meta-analysis ought to be regarded as an interim analysis on its way towards a required information size...... from traditional meta-analyses using unadjusted naïve 95% confidence intervals and 5% thresholds for statistical significance. Spurious conclusions in systematic reviews with traditional meta-analyses can be reduced using Trial Sequential Analysis. Several empirical studies have demonstrated...

  18. A working-set framework for sequential convex approximation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolpe, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    to guarantee global convergence of the method. The algorithm works directly on the nonlinear constraints in the convex sub-problems and solves a sequence of relaxations of the current sub-problem. The algorithm terminates with the optimal solution to the sub-problem after solving a finite number of relaxations.......We present an active-set algorithmic framework intended as an extension to existing implementations of sequential convex approximation methods for solving nonlinear inequality constrained programs. The framework is independent of the choice of approximations and the stabilization technique used...

  19. Sequential Sampling Models in Cognitive Neuroscience: Advantages, Applications, and Extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstmann, B U; Ratcliff, R; Wagenmakers, E-J

    2016-01-01

    Sequential sampling models assume that people make speeded decisions by gradually accumulating noisy information until a threshold of evidence is reached. In cognitive science, one such model--the diffusion decision model--is now regularly used to decompose task performance into underlying processes such as the quality of information processing, response caution, and a priori bias. In the cognitive neurosciences, the diffusion decision model has recently been adopted as a quantitative tool to study the neural basis of decision making under time pressure. We present a selective overview of several recent applications and extensions of the diffusion decision model in the cognitive neurosciences.

  20. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Collision Avoidance Maneuver Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Markley, F. Landis

    2010-01-01

    When facing a conjunction between space objects, decision makers must chose whether to maneuver for collision avoidance or not. We apply a well-known decision procedure, the sequential probability ratio test, to this problem. We propose two approaches to the problem solution, one based on a frequentist method, and the other on a Bayesian method. The frequentist method does not require any prior knowledge concerning the conjunction, while the Bayesian method assumes knowledge of prior probability densities. Our results show that both methods achieve desired missed detection rates, but the frequentist method's false alarm performance is inferior to the Bayesian method's

  1. Sequential Detection of Fission Processes for Harbor Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Walston, S E; Chambers, D H

    2015-02-12

    With the large increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the timely and accurate detection of special nuclear material (SNM) has become an extremely high priority for many countries concerned with national security. The detection of radionuclide contraband based on their γ-ray emissions has been attacked vigorously with some interesting and feasible results; however, the fission process of SNM has not received as much attention due to its inherent complexity and required predictive nature. In this paper, on-line, sequential Bayesian detection and estimation (parameter) techniques to rapidly and reliably detect unknown fissioning sources with high statistical confidence are developed.

  2. A sequential criterion analysis for assessing coping with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, D C; Sobel, H J; Follick, M J; Youkilis, H D

    1980-01-01

    A three-stage sequential criterion analysis based on the Goldfried-D'Zurilla behavior model is presented as a heuristic approach for studying chronic illness. The three interrelated stages consist of: (a) problem identification, (b) response enumeration, and (c) response evaluation. The utility of this systematic approach for understanding the adaptive process, helping to identify patients who might benefit from intervention, providing content for actual intervention, and reducing the myth of homogeneity among chronic patient populations for both clinicians and researches, is discussed. Examples of the utility of the criterion analysis are provided throughout the paper.

  3. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  4. Feature Extraction in Sequential Multimedia Images: with Applications in Satellite Images and On-line Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Li

    Multimedia data is increasingly important in scientific discovery and people's daily lives. Content of massive multimedia is often diverse and noisy, and motion between frames is sometimes crucial in analyzing those data. Among all, still images and videos are commonly used formats. Images are compact in size but do not contain motion information. Videos record motion but are sometimes too big to be analyzed. Sequential images, which are a set of continuous images with low frame rate, stand out because they are smaller than videos and still maintain motion information. This thesis investigates features in different types of noisy sequential images, and the proposed solutions that intelligently combined multiple features to successfully retrieve visual information from on-line videos and cloudy satellite images. The first task is detecting supraglacial lakes above ice sheet in sequential satellite images. The dynamics of supraglacial lakes on the Greenland ice sheet deeply affect glacier movement, which is directly related to sea level rise and global environment change. Detecting lakes above ice is suffering from diverse image qualities and unexpected clouds. A new method is proposed to efficiently extract prominent lake candidates with irregular shapes, heterogeneous backgrounds, and in cloudy images. The proposed system fully automatize the procedure that track lakes with high accuracy. We further cooperated with geoscientists to examine the tracked lakes and found new scientific findings. The second one is detecting obscene content in on-line video chat services, such as Chatroulette, that randomly match pairs of users in video chat sessions. A big problem encountered in such systems is the presence of flashers and obscene content. Because of various obscene content and unstable qualities of videos capture by home web-camera, detecting misbehaving users is a highly challenging task. We propose SafeVchat, which is the first solution that achieves satisfactory

  5. Sequential Acquisition of Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection Following Genital Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Women: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamnani, Shitaldas J; Nyitray, Alan G; Abrahamsen, Martha; Rollison, Dana E; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Huang, Yangxin; Borenstein, Amy; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of sequential acquisition of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection following a type-specific genital HPV infection for the 9-valent vaccine HPV types and investigate factors associated with sequential infection among men who have sex with women (MSW). Genital and anal specimens were available for 1348 MSW participants, and HPV genotypes were detected using the Roche Linear Array assay. Sequential risk of anal HPV infection was assessed using hazard ratios (HRs) among men with prior genital infection, compared with men with no prior genital infection, in individual HPV type and grouped HPV analyses. In individual analyses, men with prior HPV 16 genital infections had a significantly higher risk of subsequent anal HPV 16 infections (HR, 4.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-15.23). In grouped analyses, a significantly higher risk of sequential type-specific anal HPV infections was observed for any of the 9 types (adjusted HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.32-5.99), high-risk types (adjusted HR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.26, 5.55), and low-risk types (adjusted HR, 5.89; 95% CI, 1.29, 27.01). MSW with prior genital HPV infections had a higher risk of a subsequent type-specific anal infection. The higher risk was not explained by sexual intercourse with female partners. Autoinoculation is a possible mechanism for the observed association. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sequential planning of flood protection infrastructure under limited historic flood record and climate change uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittes, Beatrice; Špačková, Olga; Straub, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Flood protection is often designed to safeguard people and property following regulations and standards, which specify a target design flood protection level, such as the 100-year flood level prescribed in Germany (DWA, 2011). In practice, the magnitude of such an event is only known within a range of uncertainty, which is caused by limited historic records and uncertain climate change impacts, among other factors (Hall & Solomatine, 2008). As more observations and improved climate projections become available in the future, the design flood estimate changes and the capacity of the flood protection may be deemed insufficient at a future point in time. This problem can be mitigated by the implementation of flexible flood protection systems (that can easily be adjusted in the future) and/or by adding an additional reserve to the flood protection, i.e. by applying a safety factor to the design. But how high should such a safety factor be? And how much should the decision maker be willing to pay to make the system flexible, i.e. what is the Value of Flexibility (Špačková & Straub, 2017)? We propose a decision model that identifies cost-optimal decisions on flood protection capacity in the face of uncertainty (Dittes et al. 2017). It considers sequential adjustments of the protection system during its lifetime, taking into account its flexibility. The proposed framework is based on pre-posterior Bayesian decision analysis, using Decision Trees and Markov Decision Processes, and is fully quantitative. It can include a wide range of uncertainty components such as uncertainty associated with limited historic record or uncertain climate or socio-economic change. It is shown that since flexible systems are less costly to adjust when flood estimates are changing, they justify initially lower safety factors. Investigation on the Value of Flexibility (VoF) demonstrates that VoF depends on the type and degree of uncertainty, on the learning effect (i.e. kind and quality of

  7. Water types and their relaxation behavior in partially rehydrated CaFe-mixed binary oxide obtained from CaFe-layered double hydroxide in the 155-298 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugris, Valéria; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Sipiczki, Mónika; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2013-10-29

    Heat-treated CaFe-layered double hydroxide samples were equilibrated under conditions of various relative humidities (11%, 43% and 75%). Measurements by FT-IR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopies revealed that partial to full reconstruction of the layered structure took place. Water types taking part in the reconstruction process were identified via dielectric relaxation measurements either at 298 K or on the flash-cooled (to 155 K) samples. The dynamics of water molecules at the various positions was also studied by this method, allowing the flash-cooled samples to warm up to 298 K.

  8. Use of solid phase extraction for the sequential injection determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2012-08-30

    In this work, a solid phase extraction sequential injection methodology for the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems was developed. The determination of the enzymatic activity was based on the spectrophotometric detection of a coloured product, p-nitrophenol, at 405 nm. The p-nitrophenol is the product of the catalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, a non-coloured substrate. Considering the low levels expected in natural waters and exploiting the fact of alkaline phosphatase being a metalloprotein, the enzyme was pre-concentrated in-line using a NTA Superflow resin charged with Zn(2+) ions. The developed sequential injection method enabled a quantification range of 0.044-0.441 unit mL(-1) of enzyme activity with a detection limit of 0.0082 unit mL(-1) enzyme activity (1.9 μmol L(-1) of pNP) and a determination rate of 17 h(-1). Recovery tests confirmed the accuracy of the developed sequential injection method and it was effectively applied to different natural waters and to plant root extracts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequential Coalescence Enabled Two-Step Microreactions in Triple-Core Double-Emulsion Droplets Triggered by an Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yankai; Ren, Yukun; Hou, Likai; Liu, Weiyu; Deng, Xiaokang; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-12-01

    Advances in microfluidic emulsification have enabled the generation of exquisite multiple-core droplets, which are promising structures to accommodate microreactions. An essential requirement for conducting reactions is the sequential coalescence of the multiple cores encapsulated within these droplets, therefore, mixing the reagents together in a controlled sequence. Here, a microfluidic approach is reported for the conduction of two-step microreactions by electrically fusing three cores inside double-emulsion droplets. Using a microcapillary glass device, monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water droplets are fabricated with three compartmented reagents encapsulated inside. An AC electric field is then applied through a polydimethylsiloxane chip to trigger the sequential mixing of the reagents, where the precise sequence is guaranteed by the discrepancy of the volume or conductivity of the inner cores. A two-step reaction in each droplet is ensured by two times of core coalescence, which totally takes 20-40 s depending on varying conditions. The optimal parameters of the AC signal for the sequential fusion of the inner droplets are identified. Moreover, the capability of this technique is demonstrated by conducting an enzyme-catalyzed reaction used for glucose detection with the double-emulsion droplets. This technique should benefit a wide range of applications that require multistep reactions in micrometer scale. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. High-strength fermentable wastewater reclamation through a sequential process of anaerobic fermentation followed by microalgae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenqiang; Chen, Taojing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Minghong; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the sequential process of anaerobic fermentation followed by microalgae cultivation was evaluated from both nutrient and energy recovery standpoints. The effects of different fermentation type on the biogas generation, broth metabolites' composition, algal growth and nutrients' utilization, and energy conversion efficiencies for the whole processes were discussed. When the fermentation was designed to produce hydrogen-dominating biogas, the total energy conversion efficiency (TECE) of the sequential process was higher than that of the methane fermentation one. With the production of hydrogen in anaerobic fermentation, more organic carbon metabolites were left in the broth to support better algal growth with more efficient incorporation of ammonia nitrogen. By applying the sequential process, the heat value conversion efficiency (HVCE) for the wastewater could reach 41.2%, if methane was avoided in the fermentation biogas. The removal efficiencies of organic metabolites and NH4+-N in the better case were 100% and 98.3%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measure of microscopy mineral image clarity constructed using the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiangzhi

    2013-08-01

    Correctly and effectively quantifying the clarity of microscopy mineral image is important and useful to produce clear image for mineral analysis. To well quantify the clarity of mineral image, an effective measure constructed using the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator is proposed in this article. First, the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator is used to extract the effective features which represent the clarity of mineral image. Second, the multiscale clarity features corresponding to each scale are extracted. Finally, after combining the multiscale clarity features in one feature image, the mean value of the feature image is constructed as the measure of mineral image clarity. Because the sequentially combined toggle and top-hat based contrast operator could effectively extract the clarity features, the clarity features are directly used as the measure of image clarity. Therefore, the proposed measure is effective and reasonable. The experimental results on different types of microscopy mineral images verified the effective performance of the proposed measure. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sequential hypothesis testing for automatic detection of task-related changes in cerebral perfusion in a brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Hayley G; Myrden, Andrew; Li, Michael; Mamun, Khondaker; Chau, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that the cerebral blood flow patterns accompanying cognitive activity are retained in many locked-in patients. These patterns can be monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), a medical imaging technique that measures bilateral cerebral blood flow velocities. Recently, TCD has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, most previous TCD-BCI studies have performed offline analyses with impractically lengthy tasks. In this study, we designed a BCI that automatically differentiates between counting and verbal fluency tasks using sequential hypothesis testing to make decisions as quickly as possible. Ten able-bodied participants silently alternated between counting and verbal fluency tasks within the paradigm of a simulated on-screen keyboard. During this experiment, blood flow velocities were recorded within the left and right middle cerebral arteries using bilateral TCD. Twelve features were used to characterize TCD signals. In a simulated online analysis, sequential hypothesis testing was used to update estimates of class probability every 250 ms as TCD data were processed. Classification was terminated once a threshold level of certainty was reached. Mean classification accuracy across all participants was 72% after an average of 23s, compared to an offline analysis which obtained a classification accuracy of 80% after 45 s. This represents a substantial gain in data transmission rate, while maintaining classification accuracies exceeding 70%. Furthermore, a range of decision times between 19 and 28s was observed, suggesting that the ability of sequential hypothesis testing to adapt the task duration for each individual participant is critical to achieving consistent performance across participants. These results indicate that sequential hypothesis testing is a promising alternative for online TCD-BCIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All

  13. Sequential sorption and desorption of chlorinated phenols in organoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Shin, W S; Kim, Y H; Choi, S J; Jeon, Y W; Song, D I

    2003-01-01

    Effect of pH on the sorption and desorption of the chlorinated phenols (2-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol) in HDTMA-montmorillonite organoclays was investigated using sequential batch experiments. 2,4-dichlorophenol exhibited higher affinity in both sorption and desorption than 2-chlorophenol at pH 4.85 and 9.15. For both chlorophenols, the protonated speciation (at pH 4.85) exhibited a higher affinity in both sorption and desorption than the predominant deprotonated speciation (about 80% and 95% of 2-chlorophenate and 2,4-dichlophenate anions at pH 9.15, respectively). Desorption of chlorinated phenols was strongly dependent on the current pH regardless of their speciation during the previous sorption stage. No appreciable desorption resistance of the chlorinated phenols was observed in organoclays after sequential desorptions. Affinity of both chlorophenols in bisolute competitive sorption and desorption was reduced compared to that in a single-solute system due to the competition between solutes. The ideal adsorbed solution theory coupled with the single-solute Freundlich model successfully predicted the bisolute competitive sorption and desorption equilibria.

  14. Evolutionary Sequential Monte Carlo Samplers for Change-Point Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Dufays

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC methods are widely used for non-linear filtering purposes. However, the SMC scope encompasses wider applications such as estimating static model parameters so much that it is becoming a serious alternative to Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC methods. Not only do SMC algorithms draw posterior distributions of static or dynamic parameters but additionally they provide an estimate of the marginal likelihood. The tempered and time (TNT algorithm, developed in this paper, combines (off-line tempered SMC inference with on-line SMC inference for drawing realizations from many sequential posterior distributions without experiencing a particle degeneracy problem. Furthermore, it introduces a new MCMC rejuvenation step that is generic, automated and well-suited for multi-modal distributions. As this update relies on the wide heuristic optimization literature, numerous extensions are readily available. The algorithm is notably appropriate for estimating change-point models. As an example, we compare several change-point GARCH models through their marginal log-likelihoods over time.

  15. A continuous-time neural model for sequential action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, George; Wyatte, Dean; O'Reilly, Randall C; de Kleijn, Roy; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-11-05

    Action selection, planning and execution are continuous processes that evolve over time, responding to perceptual feedback as well as evolving top-down constraints. Existing models of routine sequential action (e.g. coffee- or pancake-making) generally fall into one of two classes: hierarchical models that include hand-built task representations, or heterarchical models that must learn to represent hierarchy via temporal context, but thus far lack goal-orientedness. We present a biologically motivated model of the latter class that, because it is situated in the Leabra neural architecture, affords an opportunity to include both unsupervised and goal-directed learning mechanisms. Moreover, we embed this neurocomputational model in the theoretical framework of the theory of event coding (TEC), which posits that actions and perceptions share a common representation with bidirectional associations between the two. Thus, in this view, not only does perception select actions (along with task context), but actions are also used to generate perceptions (i.e. intended effects). We propose a neural model that implements TEC to carry out sequential action control in hierarchically structured tasks such as coffee-making. Unlike traditional feedforward discrete-time neural network models, which use static percepts to generate static outputs, our biological model accepts continuous-time inputs and likewise generates non-stationary outputs, making short-timescale dynamic predictions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequential transurethral enucleation of the prostate and laparoscopic bladder diverticulectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Guan, Sheng; Shen, Chen; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Transurethral endoscopic technique and standard laparoscopic technique are surgical options for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) associated with urinary bladder diverticuli (UBD). In this article, we report laparoscopic diverticulectomy (LD) and transurethral plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (TUEP) in the same patient sequentially. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of LD combined with TUEP. An 82-year-old patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia and two secondary large bladder diverticuli underwent sequential TUEP and LD. After completion of the TUEP procedure, the detached adenoma was pushed into the bladder as a whole. Then laparoscopic transperitoneal extravesical diverticulectomy assisted by cystoscopic transillumination was performed immediately, and the enucleated prostate was removed via the neck of the diverticulum. The enucleation time and diverticulectomy time was 18 minutes and 108 minutes, respectively. The catheter was removed on the tenth postoperative day. Transurethral endoscopic surgery combined with LD is a good choice in treating BPH and UBD in one session. But the combined procedure is time-consuming, especially for fragmentation of the prostate. TUEP can greatly reduce the operative time of the combined procedure.

  17. Sequential time interleaved random equivalent sampling for repetitive signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yijiu; Liu, Jingjing

    2016-12-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) based sampling techniques exhibit many advantages over other existing approaches for sparse signal spectrum sensing; they are also incorporated into non-uniform sampling signal reconstruction to improve the efficiency, such as random equivalent sampling (RES). However, in CS based RES, only one sample of each acquisition is considered in the signal reconstruction stage, and it will result in more acquisition runs and longer sampling time. In this paper, a sampling sequence is taken in each RES acquisition run, and the corresponding block measurement matrix is constructed using a Whittaker-Shannon interpolation formula. All the block matrices are combined into an equivalent measurement matrix with respect to all sampling sequences. We implemented the proposed approach with a multi-cores analog-to-digital converter (ADC), whose ADC cores are time interleaved. A prototype realization of this proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling method has been developed. It is able to capture an analog waveform at an equivalent sampling rate of 40 GHz while sampled at 1 GHz physically. Experiments indicate that, for a sparse signal, the proposed CS based sequential random equivalent sampling exhibits high efficiency.

  18. On Lattice Sequential Decoding for The Unconstrained AWGN Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, the performance limits and the computational complexity of the lattice sequential decoder are analyzed for the unconstrained additive white Gaussian noise channel. The performance analysis available in the literature for such a channel has been studied only under the use of the minimum Euclidean distance decoder that is commonly referred to as the lattice decoder. Lattice decoders based on solutions to the NP-hard closest vector problem are very complex to implement, and the search for low complexity receivers for the detection of lattice codes is considered a challenging problem. However, the low computational complexity advantage that sequential decoding promises, makes it an alternative solution to the lattice decoder. In this work, we characterize the performance and complexity tradeoff via the error exponent and the decoding complexity, respectively, of such a decoder as a function of the decoding parameter --- the bias term. For the above channel, we derive the cut-off volume-to-noise ratio that is required to achieve a good error performance with low decoding complexity.

  19. On Lattice Sequential Decoding for The Unconstrained AWGN Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-04-04

    In this paper, the performance limits and the computational complexity of the lattice sequential decoder are analyzed for the unconstrained additive white Gaussian noise channel. The performance analysis available in the literature for such a channel has been studied only under the use of the minimum Euclidean distance decoder that is commonly referred to as the \\\\textit{lattice decoder}. Lattice decoders based on solutions to the NP-hard closest vector problem are very complex to implement, and the search for low complexity receivers for the detection of lattice codes is considered a challenging problem. However, the low computational complexity advantage that sequential decoding promises, makes it an alternative solution to the lattice decoder. In this work, we characterize the performance and complexity tradeoff via the error exponent and the decoding complexity, respectively, of such a decoder as a function of the decoding parameter --- the bias term. For the above channel, we derive the cut-off volume-to-noise ratio that is required to achieve a good error performance with low decoding complexity.

  20. Sequentially solution-processed, nanostructured polymer photovoltaics using selective solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Do Hwan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high-performance sequentially solution-processed organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% for blend films using a donor polymer based on the isoindigo-bithiophene repeat unit (PII2T-C10C8) and a fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C[71]-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). This has been accomplished by systematically controlling the swelling and intermixing processes of the layer with various processing solvents during deposition of the fullerene. We find that among the solvents used for fullerene deposition that primarily swell but do not re-dissolve the polymer underlayer, there were significant microstructural differences between chloro and o-dichlorobenzene solvents (CB and ODCB, respectively). Specifically, we show that the polymer crystallite orientation distribution in films where ODCB was used to cast the fullerene is broad. This indicates that out-of-plane charge transport through a tortuous transport network is relatively efficient due to a large density of inter-grain connections. In contrast, using CB results in primarily edge-on oriented polymer crystallites, which leads to diminished out-of-plane charge transport. We correlate these microstructural differences with photocurrent measurements, which clearly show that casting the fullerene out of ODCB leads to significantly enhanced power conversion efficiencies. Thus, we believe that tuning the processing solvents used to cast the electron acceptor in sequentially-processed devices is a viable way to controllably tune the blend film microstructure. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.