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Sample records for ranges gum woodland

  1. Woodland caribou range occupancy in northwestern Ontario: past and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Racey

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A zone of continuous woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou distribution is defined for northwestern Ontario. This zone establishes a benchmark for measuring the success of future management of habitat and conservation of populations. Inventory of key winter, summer and calving habitats reaffirms the concept of a dynamic mosaic of habitat tracts that supports caribou across the landscape. The historical range recession leading to this current distribution has been associated with resource development, fire and hunting activities over the past 150 years, and numerous attempts at conservation over the last 70 years. The decline was apparently phased according to several periods of development activity: i early exploitation in the early to mid-1800s; ii isolation and extirpation of southern populations due to rapid changes in forest use and access between 1890 and 1930; and iii further loss of the southernmost herds due to forest harvesting of previously inaccessible areas since the 1950s. Lessons learned from history support current conservation measures to manage caribou across broad landscapes, protect southern herds, maintain caribou habitat as part of continuous range, maintain large contiguous tracts of older forest and ensure connectivity between habitat components.

  2. Annual and monthly range fidelity of female boreal woodland caribou in respons to petroleum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyan V. Tracz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum-sector development in northern Alberta, Canada has been implicated as one factor influencing the decline of boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou. Previous research showed that caribou are farther from petroleum-sector disturbances within their home range than expected. As petroleum development increases, the distance caribou can selectively place themselves relative to industrial disturbance must decrease, because distances between disturbances decrease. Conceptually, the number of local disturbances becomes so large that caribou either abandon their local avoidance behaviour or leave their traditional home range. We evaluated whether an intense petroleum- development event in northern Alberta was sufficient to result in home range abandonment by female woodland caribou. Using well locations as an index of petroleum development, we found that caribou studied from 1992 to 2000 did not change their annual or monthly range fidelity as a function of development intensity. Caribou remained in peatland complexes containing a large number of petroleum-sector disturbances rather than move to new areas, presumably because the risks of dispersing across upland habitat to reach other suitable habitat are high. Such range fidelity may have fitness consequences for woodland caribou if they suffer greater predation in areas where petroleum development is occurring.

  3. Canopy, snow, and lichens on woodland caribou range in southeastern Manitoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Schaefer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available I examined the relationships among snow cover (api, lichen abundance, and canopy composition on the range of the Aikens Lake population of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in southeastern Manitoba. Percent cover of forage lichens (Cladina spp. was positively correlated with maximum total thickness and with maximum vertical hardness of api. Mixed communities of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides, spruce (Picea spp., and balsam fir (Abies balsamea showed the most favourable nival conditions for caribou but had low lichen abundance; those dominated by jack pine (Pinus banksiana were the converse. The results suggest an energetic compromise for woodland caribou when foraging for terrestrial lichens. During winter, caribou exhibited significant selection for jack pine communities whereas mixed communities were avoided.

  4. Woodland dynamics at the northern range periphery: a challenge for protected area management in a changing world.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L Powell

    Full Text Available Managers of protected natural areas increasingly are confronted with novel ecological conditions and conflicting objectives to preserve the past while fostering resilience for an uncertain future. This dilemma may be pronounced at range peripheries where rates of change are accelerated and ongoing invasions often are perceived as threats to local ecosystems. We provide an example from City of Rocks National Reserve (CIRO in southern Idaho, positioned at the northern range periphery of pinyon-juniper (P-J woodland. Reserve managers are concerned about P-J woodland encroachment into adjacent sagebrush steppe, but the rates and biophysical variability of encroachment are not well documented and management options are not well understood. We quantified the rate and extent of woodland change between 1950 and 2009 based on a random sample of aerial photo interpretation plots distributed across biophysical gradients. Our study revealed that woodland cover remained at approximately 20% of the study area over the 59-year period. In the absence of disturbance, P-J woodlands exhibited the highest rate of increase among vegetation types at 0.37% yr(-1. Overall, late-successional P-J stands increased in area by over 100% through the process of densification (infilling. However, wildfires during the period resulted in a net decrease of woody evergreen vegetation, particularly among early and mid-successional P-J stands. Elevated wildfire risk associated with expanding novel annual grasslands and drought is likely to continue to be a fundamental driver of change in CIRO woodlands. Because P-J woodlands contribute to regional biodiversity and may contract at trailing edges with global warming, CIRO may become important to P-J woodland conservation in the future. Our study provides a widely applicable toolset for assessing woodland ecotone dynamics that can help managers reconcile the competing demands to maintain historical fidelity and contribute meaningfully

  5. Nicotine Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine chewing gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum is in a class of medications called ...

  6. Simulating range-wide population and breeding habitat dynamics for an endangered woodland warbler in the face of uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Duarte,; Hatfield, Jeffrey; Todd M. Swannack,; Michael R. J. Forstner,; M. Clay Green,; Floyd W. Weckerly,

    2015-01-01

    Population viability analyses provide a quantitative approach that seeks to predict the possible future status of a species of interest under different scenarios and, therefore, can be important components of large-scale species’ conservation programs. We created a model and simulated range-wide population and breeding habitat dynamics for an endangered woodland warbler, the golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia). Habitat-transition probabilities were estimated across the warbler's breeding range by combining National Land Cover Database imagery with multistate modeling. Using these estimates, along with recently published demographic estimates, we examined if the species can remain viable into the future given the current conditions. Lastly, we evaluated if protecting a greater amount of habitat would increase the number of warblers that can be supported in the future by systematically increasing the amount of protected habitat and comparing the estimated terminal carrying capacity at the end of 50 years of simulated habitat change. The estimated habitat-transition probabilities supported the hypothesis that habitat transitions are unidirectional, whereby habitat is more likely to diminish than regenerate. The model results indicated population viability could be achieved under current conditions, depending on dispersal. However, there is considerable uncertainty associated with the population projections due to parametric uncertainty. Model results suggested that increasing the amount of protected lands would have a substantial impact on terminal carrying capacities at the end of a 50-year simulation. Notably, this study identifies the need for collecting the data required to estimate demographic parameters in relation to changes in habitat metrics and population density in multiple regions, and highlights the importance of establishing a common definition of what constitutes protected habitat, what management goals are suitable within those protected

  7. Southwestern U. S. juniper savanna and piñon-juniper woodland communities: Ecological history and natural range of variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Jacobs

    2008-01-01

    Juniper savanna and pinon-juniper woodland communities collectively represent a widespread and diverse vegetation type that occupies foothill and mesa landforms at middle elevations in semi-arid portions of the American Southwest. Ecological understanding and proper management of these juniper and pinon types requires local knowledge of component species, site history...

  8. Woodland Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents tips on nature observation during a woodland hike in the Adirondacks. Discusses engraver beetles and Dutch elm disease, birds' nests, hornets' nests, caterpillar webs, deer and bear signs, woodpecker holes, red squirrels, porcupine and beaver signs, and galls. (SV)

  9. Gum biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... used to close the opening created for the biopsy. ... to eat for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Risks for this procedure include: Bleeding from the biopsy site Infection of the gums Soreness

  10. Tragacanth gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Gavlighi, Hassan Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Tragacanth gum is a plant derived hydrocolloid that has a long history of use in food, pharma, and cosmetics. The gum is mainly produced in the Middle East and permitted for food use in the US and Europe. Tragacanth gum consists of complex, heterogeneous polysaccharides, which contain different...

  11. Production of Gum from Cashew Tree Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. AZEEZ

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at producing gum from cashew tree latex, which can act as substitute for gum Arabic. The method used include drying and size reduction of the exudates gum, sieving of the gum to remove impurities, dissolution of the gum in distilled water, filtration to remove polysaccharide waste and finally concentration and stability of the gum. Glycerine, starch and Zinc oxide are some of the additives used in stabilizing the gum. The pH and Viscosity on addition of various percentage concentration of stabilizing agent were determined. Gum of the best quality was obtained with viscosity and pH of 4.52 Ns/m2 and 4.2 respectively; this is because the natural pH of gum from Acacia Senegal ranges between 3.9 - 4.9. The gum can be used as an alternative for synthetic adhesive used presently for stamps and envelopes.

  12. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appearance. While undergoing treatment for periodontitis, it's especially important to take special care of your teeth and gums to see lasting improvement. This includes flossing and brushing every day and quitting habits that mean bad ...

  13. Long-term avian research at the San Joaquin Experimental Range: recommendations for monitoring and managing oak woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn L. Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Experimental forests and ranges are living laboratories that provide opportunities for conducting scientific research and transferring research results to partners and stakeholders. They are invaluable for their long-term data and capacity to foster collaborative, interdisciplinary research. The San Joaquin Experimental Range (SJER) was established to develop...

  14. Climate change and fire effects on a prairie-woodland ecotone: projecting species range shifts with a dynamic global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David A.; Bachelet, Dominique M.; Symstad, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    Large shifts in species ranges have been predicted under future climate scenarios based primarily on niche-based species distribution models. However, the mechanisms that would cause such shifts are uncertain. Natural and anthropogenic fires have shaped the distributions of many plant species, but their effects have seldom been included in future projections of species ranges. Here, we examine how the combination of climate and fire influence historical and future distributions of the ponderosa pine–prairie ecotone at the edge of the Black Hills in South Dakota, USA, as simulated by MC1, a dynamic global vegetation model that includes the effects of fire, climate, and atmospheric CO2 concentration on vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, we parameterized MC1 for ponderosa pine in the Black Hills, designating the revised model as MC1-WCNP. Results show that fire frequency, as affected by humidity and temperature, is central to the simulation of historical prairies in the warmer lowlands versus woodlands in the cooler, moister highlands. Based on three downscaled general circulation model climate projections for the 21st century, we simulate greater frequencies of natural fire throughout the area due to substantial warming and, for two of the climate projections, lower relative humidity. However, established ponderosa pine forests are relatively fire resistant, and areas that were initially wooded remained so over the 21st century for most of our future climate x fire management scenarios. This result contrasts with projections for ponderosa pine based on climatic niches, which suggest that its suitable habitat in the Black Hills will be greatly diminished by the middle of the 21st century. We hypothesize that the differences between the future predictions from these two approaches are due in part to the inclusion of fire effects in MC1, and we highlight the importance of accounting for fire as managed by humans in assessing both historical species distributions

  15. Climate change and fire effects on a prairie–woodland ecotone: projecting species range shifts with a dynamic global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David A; Bachelet, Dominique M; Symstad, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Large shifts in species ranges have been predicted under future climate scenarios based primarily on niche-based species distribution models. However, the mechanisms that would cause such shifts are uncertain. Natural and anthropogenic fires have shaped the distributions of many plant species, but their effects have seldom been included in future projections of species ranges. Here, we examine how the combination of climate and fire influence historical and future distributions of the ponderosa pine–prairie ecotone at the edge of the Black Hills in South Dakota, USA, as simulated by MC1, a dynamic global vegetation model that includes the effects of fire, climate, and atmospheric CO2 concentration on vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, we parameterized MC1 for ponderosa pine in the Black Hills, designating the revised model as MC1-WCNP. Results show that fire frequency, as affected by humidity and temperature, is central to the simulation of historical prairies in the warmer lowlands versus woodlands in the cooler, moister highlands. Based on three downscaled general circulation model climate projections for the 21st century, we simulate greater frequencies of natural fire throughout the area due to substantial warming and, for two of the climate projections, lower relative humidity. However, established ponderosa pine forests are relatively fire resistant, and areas that were initially wooded remained so over the 21st century for most of our future climate x fire management scenarios. This result contrasts with projections for ponderosa pine based on climatic niches, which suggest that its suitable habitat in the Black Hills will be greatly diminished by the middle of the 21st century. We hypothesize that the differences between the future predictions from these two approaches are due in part to the inclusion of fire effects in MC1, and we highlight the importance of accounting for fire as managed by humans in assessing both historical species distributions

  16. Plio-Pleistocene history and phylogeography of Acacia senegal in dry woodlands and savannahs of sub-Saharan tropical Africa: evidence of early colonisation and recent range expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odee, D W; Telford, A; Wilson, J; Gaye, A; Cavers, S

    2012-01-01

    Drylands are extensive across sub-Saharan Africa, socio-economically and ecologically important yet highly sensitive to environmental changes. Evolutionary history, as revealed by contemporary intraspecific genetic variation, can provide valuable insight into how species have responded to past environmental and population changes and guide strategies to promote resilience to future changes. The gum arabic tree (Acacia senegal) is an arid-adapted, morphologically diverse species native to the sub-Saharan drylands. We used variation in nuclear sequences (internal transcribed spacer (ITS)) and two types of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers (PCR-RFLP, cpSSR) to study the phylogeography of the species with 293 individuals from 66 populations sampled across its natural range. cpDNA data showed high regional and rangewide haplotypic diversity (hT(cpSSR)=0.903–0.948) and population differentiation (GST(RFLP)=0.700–0.782) with a phylogeographic pattern that indicated extensive historical gene flow via seed dispersal. Haplotypes were not restricted to any of the four varieties, but showed significant geographic structure (GST(cpSSR)=0.392; RST=0.673; RST>RST (permuted)), with the major division separating East and Southern Africa populations from those in West and Central Africa. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS data indicated a more recent origin for the clade including West and Central African haplotypes, suggesting range expansion in this region, possibly during the Holocene humid period. In conjunction with paleobotanical evidence, our data suggest dispersal to West Africa, and across to the Arabian Peninsula and Indian subcontinent, from source populations located in the East African region during climate oscillations of the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:22929152

  17. Cork oak woodlands patchiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Augusta; Madeira, Manuel; Plieninger, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The cork oak (Quercus suber L.) woodlands of the agroforestry landscapes of Southwestern Iberia are undergoing drastic change due to severe natural and anthropogenic disturbances. These may eventually result in woodland loss or deforestation, the final step of an ongoing process of woodland...... woodlands exhibited similar trends of decreasing fractional canopy cover and decreasing number of larger patches. Patchiness rather than fractional canopy cover seems, however, to be potentially more useful as a signature of imminent oak woodlands deforestation, given that its contrast before and after...

  18. Dryland resources, livelihoods and institutions : diversity and dynamics in use and management of gum and resin trees in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teshale Woldeamanuel Habebo, Teshale

    2011-01-01

    Dry woodlands comprise the largest forest resources in Ethiopia. An important feature of these forests is their richness in Acacia, Boswellia and Commiphora (ABC) species that produce gum and resin. Gums/resins significantly contribute to rural livelihoods, the national economy, and ecosystem

  19. Rheological and interfacial properties at the equilibrium of almond gum tree exudate (Prunus dulcis) in comparison with gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Sessa, Mariarenata; Ferrari, Giovanna; Hamdi, Salem; Donsi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Almond gum contains an arabinogalactan-type polysaccharide, which plays an important role in defining its interfacial and rheological properties. In this study, rheological and interfacial properties of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions were comparatively investigated. The interfacial tension of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions was measured using the pendant drop method in hexadecane. The asymptotic interfacial tension values for almond gum were significantly lower than the corresponding values measured for gum arabic, especially at high concentration. Rheological properties were characterized by steady and oscillatory tests using a coaxial geometry. Almond gum flow curves exhibited a shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior with a tendency to a Newtonian plateau at low shear rate, while gum arabic flow curves exhibited such behavior only at high shear rate. The influence of temperature (5-50  ℃) on the flow curves was studied at 4% (m/m) gum concentration and the Newtonian viscosities at infinite and at zero shear rate, for gum arabic and almond gum, respectively, were accurately fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The dynamic properties of the two gum dispersions were also studied. Both gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties, with the viscous component being predominant in a wider range of concentrations for almond gum, while for gum arabic the elastic component being higher than the elastic one especially at higher concentrations.The rheological and interfacial tension properties of almond gum suggest that it may represent a possible substitute of gum arabic in different food applications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Abundance and Bloodfeeding Patterns of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in an Oak Woodland on the Eastern Slope of the Northern Coast Range of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Tara C; Woodward, David L; Fang, Ying; Ryan, Bonnie M; Nelms, Brittany M; Scott, Jamesina J; Reisen, William K

    2017-09-01

    The abundance and bloodfeeding patterns of mosquitoes was studied from 2008 to 2010 at an 18 ha. oak woodland in Lake County, CA. Host-seeking females were collected weekly from sunset to sunrise by paired dry-ice-baited CDC style traps, whereas resting females were aspirated from paired walk-in red boxes. Sequences of the COI gene amplified from bloodmeals from engorged resting females were used to identify the bloodmeal hosts. Aedes sierrensis (Ludlow) and Aedes increpitus Dyar complex mosquitoes were univoltine, although the timing of emergence and abundance varied temporally and seemed weather dependent. Abundance of both Anopheles franciscanus McCracken and Anopheles freeborni Aitken peaked in mid to late summer. Females of both genera bloodfed primarily on mule deer and black-tailed jackrabbits, and few fed on either dogs or humans that were consistently present within the woodland. In contrast, multivoltine Culex tarsalis Coquillett and Culex stigmatosoma Dyar were abundant throughout summer, especially from July to September. Both Culex species bloodfed on a wide variety of avian hosts, with most bloodmeals originating from California scrub-jay, wild turkey, oak titmouse, and house finch. Culex tarsalis fed on proportionately more mammals as summer progressed, peaking at 33% in September. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Managing pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried; Kieth E. Severson

    1994-01-01

    A renewed interest in pinyon-juniper woodlands has accelerated debate regarding management of this unique ecosystem. Should these woodlands be managed only to provide livestock forage through overstory removal-popular programs in the 1950s and 1960s-or should they be managed for production of multiple resource products and amenities? Pinyon-juniper woodlands have...

  2. Pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Gerald J.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Allen, Craig D.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Chung-MacCoubrey, Alice L.; Finch, Deborah M.; Tainter, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands are one of the largest ecosystems in the Southwest and in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Fig. 1). The woodlands have been important to the region's inhabitants since prehistoric times for a variety of natural resources and amenities. The ecosystems have not been static; their distributions, stand characteristics, and site conditions have been altered by changes in climatic patterns and human use and, often, abuse. Management of these lands since European settlement has varied from light exploitation and benign neglect, to attempts to remove the trees in favor of forage for livestock, and then to a realization that these lands contain useful resources and should be managed accordingly. Land management agencies are committed to ecosystem management. While there are several definitions of ecosystem management, the goal is to use ecological approaches to create and maintain diverse, productive, and healthy ecosystems (Kaufmann et al. 1994). Ecosystem management recognizes that people are an integral part of the system and that their needs must be considered. Ecological approaches are central to the concept, but our understanding of basic woodland ecology is incomplete, and there are different opinions and interpretations of existing information (Gottfried and Severson 1993). There are many questions concerning proper ecosystem management of the pinyon-juniper woodlands and how managers can achieve these goals (Gottfried and Severson 1993). While the broad concept of ecosystem management generally is accepted, the USDA Forest Service, other public land management agencies, American Indian tribes, and private landowners may have differing definitions of what constitutes desired conditions. Key questions about the pinyon-juniper ecosystems remain unanswered. Some concern the basic dynamics of biological and physical components of the pinyon-juniper ecosystems. Others concern the distribution of woodlands prior to European settlement and changes

  3. Private Woodland Owners' Perspectives on Multifunctionality in English Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Julie; Courtney, Paul; Slee, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed in forest policies to deliver public goods such as biodiversity, recreation, landscape and carbon sequestration, alongside timber production. In light of this, it is important to understand how woodland owners themselves perceive their role in delivering these multiple benefits. With up to 80% of woodland in…

  4. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease in your child: Bleeding Bleeding gums during tooth brushing, flossing or any other time Puffiness Swollen and ... months old, you can begin using toothpaste when brushing his or her teeth. When the gaps between your child's teeth close, ...

  5. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Abizia zygia gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The suspending properties of Albizia zygia gum (family Mimosoideae) were evaluated comparatively with those of Compound Tragacanth, Acacia and Gelatin at concentration range of 0.5 – 4.0%w/v in Sulphadimidine suspension. Characterization tests were carried out on purified Albizia zygia gum. Sedimentation ...

  6. Diversity and dynamics of management of gum and resin resources in Ethiopia: a trade-off between domestication and degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemenih, M.; Wiersum, K.F.; Teshale Woldeamanuel Habebo, Teshale; Bongers, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although the human domestication of forest and tree resources is often considered to result in resource degradation, it may also lead to improved resource potentials. This paper assesses the nature and dynamics of gum and resin focused woodland exploitation and management systems in Ethiopia in the

  7. Hydrologic vulnerability of western US rangelands in the wake of woodland encroachment and increasing wildfire activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon and juniper woodlands have dramatically increased their range in the past 150 years and currently occupy more than 30 million ha of the western US. Range expansion has primarily occurred through encroachment into sagebrush rangelands. Woodland expansion and infill on western rangelands have a...

  8. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF PSYLLIUM GUM FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hojjatoleslamyi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Psyllium (Plantago psyllium is a native plant that grows widely in India, Iran and Pinjab. Studies showed psyllium gum has good rheological properties for using in wide range of food products. In this study, different fractions of psyllium gum extracted by water and alkali treatment. Rheological properties of these fractions determined by Brookfield rheometer (RV DVIII. Obtained data fitted in three temperatures 30, 60 and 80°C by Herschel-bulkly rheological model. Results showed that fractions have different behaviour during heating treatment. The most difference observed in AEG0.5 fraction.

  9. Gums, badgers, and economics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available . Suffice it to say that they are the second most powerful threat to native biodiversity after direct habitat destruction. However, the effect of removing gum trees – on honey production and on the South African economy – is also a complex one. Honey...

  10. Thaumatin and gum arabic allergy in chewing gum factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Mattias P; Glück, Ulrich; Bircher, Andreas J; Heijnen, Ingmar; Pletscher, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Thaumatin is a sweetener and flavor modifier commonly used in the food industry. Likewise, gum arabic is widely used as a food stabilizer and thickening agent. We report here that a powder mixture composed of 10% thaumatin and 90% gum arabic led to allergic symptoms in the upper airways in occupationally exposed individuals: four of eight workers of a chewing gum factory exposed to this powder mixture had pronounced rhinitis. A positive skin prick test result for pure thaumatin was obtained in all four individuals with rhinitis of whom two also had a positive skin prick test result for pure gum arabic and gum arabic-specific IgE. Subsitution of a powdered thaumatin with a liquid form reduced symptoms among the rhinitic workers. Although gum arabic is a well-known potential allergen, we were unable to find prior documentation of allergic symptoms to thaumatin when it is used in the food industry. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Factors influencing woodlands of southwestern North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michele M. Girard; Harold Goetz; Ardell J. Bjugstad

    1987-01-01

    Literature pertaining to woodlands of southwestern North Dakota is reviewed. Woodland species composition and distribution, and factors influencing woodland ecosystems such as climate, logging, fire, and grazing are described. Potential management and improvement techniques using vegetation and livestock manipulation have been suggested.

  12. Pinyon/juniper woodlands [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin J. Tausch; Sharon Hood

    2007-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands occur in 10 states and cover large areas in many of them. These woodlands can be dominated by several species of pinyon pine (Pinus spp. L.) and juniper (Juniperus spp. L.) (Lanner 1975; Mitchell and Roberts 1999; West 1999a). A considerable amount of information is available on the expansion of the woodlands that has occurred over large parts...

  13. Indiana residents' perceptions of woodland management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Witter; Shannon M. Amberg; David J. Case; Phillip T. Seng

    2013-01-01

    A 2009 telephone survey of 1,402 Indiana adults was conducted to assess opinions regarding woodland management. Forty-eight percent said they were "very concerned" about the health and productivity of Indiana's woodlands, and 45 percent, "somewhat concerned." Almost half (47 percent) thought that the state's woodlands are held in about...

  14. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  15. Decision-support tool for management of miombo woodlands: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model complexity is well adapted to the data quality and abundance, and it is dependent on proxies of some main drivers of the dynamic processes. The development of the matrix model is a step forward facilitating better decisions in the management of miombo woodlands. However, data ranges used for calibrating ...

  16. Changing C and N Levels of miombo woodland litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Litterfall was collected fortnightly from four-25 m2 cleared miombo woodland plots for five years. The litter was fractionated and compared for quantity, monthly distribution and concentrations of total C and N. Annual litterfall, starting at the beginning of the dry season (May) to the end of the rainy season (April), ranged from ...

  17. Firewise Landscaping for Woodland Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Close, David

    2015-01-01

    A home in a woodland setting is surrounded by flammable vegetation. Firewise landscaping can help you create a defensible space or buffer zone around your home. This publication details landscaping zones which should be used when planning for fire protections and rates common landscaping plants by flammability.

  18. Status of woodland caribou in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Edmonds

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent review of woodland caribou {Rangifer tarandus caribou status in Alberta estimated that there are between 3600 and 6700 caribou occupying 113 000 km2 of habitat. There are two ecotypes of caribou in Alberta; the mountain ecotype in the west central region and the boreal ecotype primarily in the north. Mountain caribou populations are stable or declining and boreal populations, where data are available, appear to be stable or declining slowly. A major initiative in caribou management in Alberta has been the development of the Woodland Caribou Conservation Strategy. This document was developed over two and a half years by a committee of multi-stakeholder representatives. The past five years has seen an increase in baseline inventory and applied research jointly funded by government, industry and universities, addressing a wide range of management issues from caribou response to logging to interactions of moose, wolves and caribou in the boreal ecosystem. Land use conflicts on caribou range remain high with timber harvesting, oil and gas development, peat moss extraction, coal mining, agricultural expansion and increasing road access overlapping. Cumulative effects of these disturbances are poorly understood and have received little attention to date.

  19. Chewing gums for optimal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Madan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on the general aspects and health benefits of chewing gum. Chewing gums have been used since the time of prehistoric man as a source of entertainment and relaxation. It has also become a trendsetter with the teenagers. Currently, the health benefits of chewing gums are being studied and used in the treatment of various diseases. Certain medications have also been included in gums to act as an alternative drug delivery system. These gums have been found to be successful for the treatment of diseases, such as peptic ulcers, upper digestive tract cancer, oral candidiasis, and so on. It helps to relieve symptoms of xerostomia, Parkinsonism, tooth sensitivity after bleaching, and oral malodor. It helps in maintaining oral health, relieves stress, helps in weight loss, and improves alertness. Chewing gum may be distracting and irritating in numerous social environments, including schools, colleges, and the workplace. Research into the social effects of chewing gums is also necessary to further our knowledge into the psychosocial aspects of these gums.

  20. Mr. Bubble Gum: "Not Now!"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    PreS-Gr 2-- Mr. Bubble Gum is a Level 3 book, the most difficult in this series. In four short stories of varying lengths, an older brother tells about his younger brother Eli, who "sticks to me like bubble gum...

  1. Influence of tragacanth gum in egg white based bioplastics: Thermomechanical and water uptake properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castejón, María Luisa; Bengoechea, Carlos; García-Morales, Moisés; Martínez, Inmaculada

    2016-11-05

    This study aims to extend the range of applications of tragacanth gum by studying its incorporation into bioplastics formulation, exploring the influence that different gum contents (0-20wt.%) exert over the thermomechanical and water uptake properties of bioplastics based on egg white albumen protein (EW). The effect of plasticizer nature was also evaluated through the modification of the water/glycerol ratio within the plasticizer fraction (fixed at 40wt.%). The addition of tragacanth gum generally yielded an enhancement of the water uptake capacity, being doubled at the highest content. Conversely, presence of tragacanth gum resulted in a considerable decrease in the bioplastic mechanical properties: both tensile strength and maximum elongation were reduced up to 75% approximately when compared to the gum-free system. Ageing of selected samples was also studied, revealing an important effect of storage time when tragacanth gum is present, possibly due to its hydrophilic character. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidized Xanthan Gum and Chitosan as Natural Adhesives for Cork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Paiva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural cork stopper manufacturing produces a significant amount of cork waste, which is granulated and combined with synthetic glues for use in a wide range of applications. There is a high demand for using biosourced polymers in these composite materials. In this study, xanthan gum (XG and chitosan (CS were investigated as possible natural binders for cork. Xanthan gum was oxidized at two different aldehyde contents as a strategy to improve its water resistance. This modification was studied in detail by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and the degree of oxidation was determined by the hydroxylamine hydrochloride titration method. The performance of the adhesives was studied by tensile tests and total soluble matter (TSM determinations. Xanthan gum showed no water resistance, contrary to oxidized xanthan gum and chitosan. It is hypothesized that the good performance of oxidized xanthan gum is due to the reaction of aldehyde groups—formed in the oxidation process—with hydroxyl groups on the cork surface during the high temperature drying. Combining oxidized xanthan gum with chitosan did not yield significant improvements.

  3. Whole and crushed nutlets of chia (Salvia hispanica from Mexico as a source of functional gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Segura-Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and functional properties of Mexican chia (Salvia hispanica gums extracted from defatted whole and crushed nutlets using the Soxhlet and SFE-CO2 methods. Chia gums have interesting chemical and functional properties for the food industry. The oil and gum yields were in the range of 1.98-16.42% and 5.81-12.60%, respectively. The defatting procedure did not affect significantly the oil and gum extraction; the nutlet type (whole or crushed was the only parameter influencing the yield. The proximate composition and the protein and fiber contents of chia gum were evaluated. Low contents of protein and fiber and high NFE levels were found in whole nutlet gums. The functional properties of chia gum extracted from whole and crushed nutlets with the Soxhlet and SFE-COs methods showed the following ranges of water absorption capacity of 62.64 to 143.66 g/g, water adsorption capacity of 0.69 to 1.35 g/g, and water and oil holding capacity of 100 to 149.28 g/g and19.5 to 40.4 g/g, respectively. The rheological behavior exhibited by the gums was pseudoplastic or shear thinning. From a functional perspective, chia gum is an important food component due its emulsifier and stabilizer potentials.

  4. Wildlife response to stand structure of deciduous woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Hodorff; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Raymond L. Linder

    1988-01-01

    Deciduous woodlands provide important habitat for wildlife but comprise Fraxinus pennsylvanica) woodlands in northwestern South Dakota. Closed-canopy stands were multilayered communities with dense...

  5. Chewing gum bezoars of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milov, D E; Andres, J M; Erhart, N A; Bailey, D J

    1998-08-01

    Children have chewed gum since the Stone Age. Black lumps of prehistoric tar with human tooth impressions have been found in Northern Europe dating from approximately 7000 BC (Middle Stone Age) to 2000 BC (Bronze Age). The bite impressions suggest that most chewers were between 6 and 15 years of age. The Greeks chewed resin from the mastic tree (mastic gum). North American Indians chewed spruce gum. The first manufacturing patent for chewing gum was issued in 1869 for a natural gum, chicle, derived from the Sopadilla tree, indigenous to Central America. Chewing gum sold today is a mixture of natural and synthetic gums and resins, with added color and flavor sweetened with corn syrup and sugar. Chewing gum is big business. A significant amount of the $21 billion US candy industry sales is from chewing gums, many of which appeal almost exclusively to children. Despite the history and prevalence of gum chewing, the medical literature contains very little information about the adverse effects of chewing gum. In the present report, we briefly review gum-chewing complications and describe three children who developed intestinal tract and esophageal obstruction as a consequence of swallowing gum.

  6. In vitro evaluation of Moringa oleifera gum for colon-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anil Kumar; Jarald, Edwin E; Showkat, Ahmad; Daud, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Moringa gum obtained from stem of the plant Moringa oleifera Lam. belonging to family Moringaceae. Number of naturally occurring polysaccharides obtained from plant (guar gum, inulin), animal (chitosan, chondrotin sulphate), algal (alginates) or microbial (dextran) origin. The present study was evaluated Moringa oleifera gum as a carrier for colon specific drug delivery using in vitro drug release studies. Six formulations of curcumin were prepared using varying concentration of Moringa oleifera gum containing 50 mg curcumin by wet granulation method. Tablets were subjected for evaluation by studying the parameter like hardness, friability, drug content uniformity and in vitro drug release study. Hardness was found to be in the range of 5.5 to 7.3 kg/cm(2), the percentage friability was in the range of 0.60 to 0.89%, and tablet showed 98.99% to 99.89% of the labeled amount of curcumin indicating uniformity in drug content. In vitro drug release study was performed using simulated stomach, intestinal and colonic fluid. The susceptibility of Moringa gum to colonic bacteria was also assessed using drug release study with rat caecal contents. 30% Moringa gum containing formulation (F-3) was shown better drug released that is 90.46%, at the end of 24 h of dissolution study in the presence of rat caecal contents in comparison to 40% Moringa gum containing formulation (F-4) that was 78.03%. The results illustrate the usefulness of Moringa olefera gum as a potential carrier for colon-specific drug delivery.

  7. Effects of chewing gum on cognitive function, mood and physiology in stressed and non-stressed volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Recent research suggests that chewing gum may improve aspects of cognitive function and mood. There is also evidence suggesting that chewing gum reduces stress. It is important, therefore, to examine these two areas and to determine whether contextual factors (chewing habit, type of gum, and personality) modify such effects. The aims of the present study were: (i) to determine whether chewing gum improved mood and mental performance; (ii) to determine whether chewing gum had benefits in stressed individuals; and (iii) to determine whether chewing habit, type of gum and level of anxiety modified the effects of gum. A cross-over study involving 133 volunteers was carried out. Each volunteer carried out a test session when they were chewing gum and without gum, with order of gum conditions counterbalanced across subjects. Baseline sessions were conducted prior to each test session. Approximately half of the volunteers were tested in 75 dBA noise (the stress condition) and the rest in quiet. Volunteers were stratified on chewing habit and anxiety level. Approximately, half of the volunteers were given mint gum and half fruit gum. The volunteers rated their mood at the start and end of each session and had their heart rate monitored over the session. Saliva samples were taken to allow cortisol levels (good indicator of alertness and stress) to be assayed. During the session, volunteers carried out tasks measuring a range of cognitive functions (aspects of memory, selective and sustained attention, psychomotor speed and accuracy). Chewing gum was associated with greater alertness and a more positive mood. Reaction times were quicker in the gum condition, and this effect became bigger as the task became more difficult. Chewing gum also improved selective and sustained attention. Heart rate and cortisol levels were higher when chewing which confirms the alerting effect of chewing gum. Overall, the results suggest that chewing gum produces a number of benefits that are

  8. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and... Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.319 Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums... been associated with the ingestion of water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids...

  9. Studies on some physicochemical properties of Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/ v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  10. STUDIES ON SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA BARK GUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  11. An uncertain future for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou: The impact of climate change on winter distribution in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Masood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Habitat alteration and climate change are two important environmental stressors posing increasing threats to woodland caribou, Rangifer tarandus caribou, in Ontario. Our first objective was to identify the importance of linear features, habitat, and climate on the occurrence of woodland caribou during the winter season using over 30 years of records (1980-2012. Our second objective was to forecast the impacts of climate change on the future occurrence and range of woodland caribou. Woodland caribou occurrence and environmental data collected during 1980 to 2012 were obtained from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR. Logistic regression models were used to identify the importance of linear features, habitat, and climate on woodland caribou. We then forecast future caribou occurrences using 126 future climate projections. Woodland caribou preferred coniferous forests and mixed forests that tended to be associated with increased lichen coverage, and regions with colder winters. Woodland caribou also avoided anthropogenically disturbed regions, such as areas associated with high road density or developed areas. Caribou range extent was projected to contract by 57.2-100% by 2050 and 58.9-100% by 2070. Furthermore, all 126 climate change scenarios forecast a range loss of at least 55% for woodland caribou in Ontario by 2050. We project complete loss of woodland caribou in Ontario if winter temperatures increase by more than 5.6°C by 2070. We found that woodland caribou in Ontario are sensitive to changes in climate and forecasted that an average of 95% of Ontario’s native wood­land caribou could become extirpated by 2070. The greatest extirpations were projected to occur in the northernmost regions of Ontario as well as northeastern Ontario, while regions in western Ontario were projected to have the lowest rates of extirpation. This underscores the importance of mitigating greenhouse gases as a means to protect this iconic species.

  12. Herbal-caffeinated chewing gum, but not bubble gum, improves aspects of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew G

    2011-08-01

    Research has shown that standard chewing gum can affect aspects of both attention and memory. The present study examined the effects of Think Gum®, a caffeinated-herbal chewing gum, on both concentration and memory using a series of paper-based and online testing. Compared to standard chewing gum and a no-gum control, chewing caffeinated-herbal gum during testing improved aspects of memory, but did not affect concentration. The findings suggest that caffeinated-herbal chewing gum is an effective memory aid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of California Oak Woodlands: Uncertainties and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay E. Noel; Richard P. Thompson

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical policy model of oak woodlands is presented. The model illustrates the policy uncertainties that exist in the management of oak woodlands. These uncertainties include: (1) selection of a policy criterion function, (2) woodland dynamics, (3) initial and final state of the woodland stock. The paper provides a review of each of the uncertainty issues. The...

  14. Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... identify underlying conditions or risk factors (such as smoking) that may contribute to gum disease. Examine your gums and note any signs of ... will vary, depending on the extent of the gum disease. Any type of treatment ... as quitting smoking, as a way to improve treatment outcome. Deep ...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  16. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  17. Woodlands Grazing Issues in Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, P.

    2009-04-01

    In Mediterranean basin, woodlands grazing still continue to be important commercial owners' benefits. These owners manage woodlands vegetations as if they were not at risk of degradation and declining. Frequently, no temporally grazing set-aside is taken into account to avoid overgrazing of annual and perennial vegetations. Although less common, in the northern shore of Mediterranean basin undergrazing might increase the frequency and the number of catastrophic forest fires. This under/over grazing regime occurs in the Mediterranean basin woodlands with contrasted differences on land property rights, local economies and government livestock policy incentives. Spain and Tunisia are examples of these Mediterranean livestock contrasts. Most of Spanish Mediterranean woodlands and livestock herds are large private ownerships and owners could maintain their lands and livestock herds properties on the basis of moderate cash-income compensation against land revaluation and exclusive amenity self-consumption. The later is less tangible benefit and it could include family land legacy, nature enjoyment, country stile of life development, social status and so on. In public woodlands, social and environmental goals -as they are cultural heritage, biodiversity loss mitigation, soil conservation and employment- could maintain market unprofitable woodlands operations. Last three decades Spanish Mediterranean woodlands owners have increased the livestock herds incentivized by government subsidies. As result, grazing rent is pending on the level of European Union and Spanish government livestock subsidies. In this context, Spanish Mediterranean woodlands maintain a high extensive livestock stoking population, which economy could be called fragile and environmentally unsustainable because forest degradation and over/under grazing practices. Tunisian Mediterranean woodlands are state properties and livestock grazing is practice as a free private regimen. Livestock herds are small herd

  18. The development of an approach to assess critical loads of acidity for woodland habitats in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Langan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Alongside other countries that are signatories to the UNECE Convention Long Range Transboundary on Air Pollution, the UK is committed to reducing the impact of air pollution on the environment. To advise and guide this policy in relation to atmospheric emissions of sulphur and nitrogen, a critical load approach has been developed. To assess the potential impact of these pollutants on woodland habitats a steady state, simple mass balance model has been parameterised. For mineral soils, a Ca:Al ratio in soil solution has been used as the critical load indicator for potential damage. For peat and organic soils critical loads have been set according to a pH criterion. Together these approaches have been used with national datasets to examine the potential scale of acidification in woodland habitats across the UK. The results can be mapped to show the spatial variability in critical loads of the three principal woodland habitat types (managed coniferous, managed broadleaved/ mixed woodland and unmanaged woodland. The results suggest that there is a wide range of critical loads. The most sensitive (lowest critical loads are associated with managed coniferous followed by unmanaged woodland on peat soils. Calculations indicate that at steady state, acid deposition inputs reported for 1995–1997 result in a large proportion of all the woodland habitats identified receiving deposition loads in excess of their critical load; i.e. critical loads are exceeded. These are discussed in relation to future modelled depositions for 2010. Whilst significant widespread negative impacts of such deposition on UK woodland habitats have not been reported, the work serves to illustrate that if acid deposition inputs were maintained and projected emissions reductions not achieved, the long-term sustainability of large areas of woodland in the UK could be compromised. Keywords: critical loads, acid deposition, acidification, woodland, simple mass balance model

  19. Complex coacervation of whey proteins and gum arabic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinbreck, F.; Vries, de R.J.; Schrooyen, P.; Kruif, de C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein (whey protein isolate, WP) form an electrostatic complex in a specific PH range. Three phase boundaries (PHc, pHphi(l), pHphi(2)) have been determined using an original titration method, newly applied to complex coacervation. It consists of monitoring the

  20. Evaluation of Beilschmiedia Seed Gum as a Tablet Binder | Femi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family Lauraceae) was evaluated for its binding properties at a concentration range of 0.5-10 % w/w in paracetamol tablets with official gelatin as a control. A comparative analysis showed that the granules bound with Beilschmiedia gum were ...

  1. Formulation and In vitro Evaluation of Natural Gum-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    microbeads ranged from 35.3 to 79.8 % and dissolution times, t15 and t80 increased with increase in the concentration of the natural gums present in the blends. Controlled release was obtained for over 4 h and the release was found to be by a combination of diffusion and erosion mechanisms from spherical formulations.

  2. Potential for Ammonia Recapture by Farm Woodlands: Design and Application of a New Experimental Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Theobald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing pressure on farmers in Europe to reduce the emissions of ammonia from their land. Due to the current financial climate in which farmers have to operate, it is important to identify ammonia control measures that can be adopted with minimum cost. The planting of trees around farmland and buildings has been identified as a potentially effective and low-cost measure to enhance ammonia recapture at a farm level and reduce long-range atmospheric transport. This work assesses experimentally what fraction of ammonia farm woodlands could potentially remove from the atmosphere. We constructed an experimental facility in southern Scotland to simulate a woodland shelterbelt planted in proximity to a small poultry unit. By measuring horizontal and vertical ammonia concentration profiles within the woodland, and comparing this to the concentration of an inert tracer (SF6 we estimate the depletion of ammonia due to dry deposition to the woodland canopy. Together with measurements of mean ammonia concentrations and throughfall fluxes of nitrogen, this information is used to provide a first estimate of the fraction of emitted ammonia that is recaptured by the woodland canopy. Analysis of these data give a lower limit of recapture of emitted ammonia, at the experimental facility, of 3%. By careful design of shelterbelt woodlands this figure could be significantly higher.

  3. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-12-15

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  4. Xanthan-A Versatile Gum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Xanthan – A Versatile Gum. Anil Lachke. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 25-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/10/0025-0033. Keywords. Xanthan ...

  5. In search of a critical habitat concept for woodland caribou, boreal population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald D. Racey

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical approach to critical habitat identification has been proposed in the draft National Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, Boreal Population. This approach proposes that critical habitat for boreal caribou be identified as equivalent with caribou ranges and their composite range components, and that it be consistent with the biological needs of a wild, self-sustaining local population of woodland caribou. These components include seasonal ranges, high use areas and calving sites, each of which provide for important ecological functions and are subject to specific risks from human development activities. Protection of critical habitat is accomplished through management of the amount and type of human developments and potential natural disturbances, not by prohibiting all activity. This approach to critical habitat sets the stage for management and monitoring of habitat at spatial and temporal scales appropriate for conservation of a wide ranging species such as woodland caribou.

  6. [done no pages] An overview on applications of guar gum in food systems to modify structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana B. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides define as complex polymers composed of units interlinked with glycosidic bonds originated naturally. Polysaccharides are categorizing in several groups and among them, Gums are those with critical roles in food systems. Guar Gum is imparting softness, emulsification, stabilizing via its addition to formulas. This Gum is a fast soluble in cold water and can be active in a wide range of pH. The aim of this overview is giving an initial concept about guar gum and then convey to an introduction of its applications in food industries.

  7. Status of woodland caribou in western north America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Janet Edmonds

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of current population size and trends of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in seven jurisdictions in western North America shows a wide range of situations. A total maximum population estimate of woodland caribou west of the Ontario/Manitoba border is 61 090. Of 44 herds or populations described in this review: 14 are stable; two are stable to slightly decreasing; four are decreasing; four are increasing; and 22 are of unknown status. Caribou are classified as a threatened species in Alberta and as an endangered species in Washington/Idaho. The decline of caribou in North America following settlement (Bergerud, 1974 has continued along the southern edge of woodland caribou distribution. Direct loss of habitat to logging, mines and dams continued throughout the I960s, 1970s and 1980s. The secondary effects of these habitat changes, (i.e. increased roads leading to increased hunting and poaching, and increased early succession habitat leading to increased alternate prey/predator densities has led in some cases to the total loss or decreased size of local herds. Three ecotypes of woodland caribou are described and their relative distribution delineated. These ecotypes live under different environmental conditions and require different inventory and management approaches. Woodland caribou herds in northern B.C., Yukon and N.W.T. generally are of good numbers and viable (stable or increasing, and management primarily is directed at regulating human harvest and natural predation to prevent, herd declines. Land use activities such as logging or energy development are not extensive. Managers in southern caribou ranges stress the need for a better understanding of caribou population stability within mixed prey/predator regimes; how habitat changes (eg. through logging affect these regimes; and how to develop effective land use guidelines for resource extraction that can sustian caribou populations and maintain resource industries

  8. Towards a Manitoba Hydro boreal woodland caribou strategy: Outcomes from Manitoba Hydro boreal woodland caribou workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona E. Scurrah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Manitoba Hydro is responsible for the continued supply of energy to meet the needs of the province and is committed to protecting the environment when planning the construction and operation of its facilities. Corporate policy dictates ongoing improvement of Environmental Management Systems (EMS in order to meet or surpass regulatory requirements. Environmental objectives are reviewed annually and programs are modified when necessary to address improvements in environmental performance. Manitoba Hydro plans and constructs major transmission projects throughout northern Manitoba which includes areas occupied by boreal woodland caribou. In recognition of the potential issues associated with hydro transmission construction in boreal caribou range, Manitoba Hydro hosted an expert workshop on May 8, 2007 to provide objective advice in the development of a draft corporate strategy that effectively directs targeted monitoring and research for environmental assessment and mitigation. The workshop focused on assessing the potential threats to boreal woodland caribou from a transmission line construction and operation perspective, and identifying appropriate approaches in site selection and environmental assessment (SSEA and long-term monitoring and research. A total of nine threat categories were reviewed to determine the degree and magnitude of potential effects that may result from transmission construction and operation; and of the original nine, five final threat categories were delineated. The main elements of the workshop provided strategic approaches for proactive pre-construction monitoring, research on recruitment and mortality for local populations impacted by ROWs and control areas, and various habitat monitoring, management, and mitigation techniques. Research and monitoring priorities have been identified and continued collaboration with Manitoba Conservation and other land users were also identified.

  9. Investigation of Transport Properties of a New Biomaterials - GUM Mangosteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sourav S.; Sarkar, A.

    2006-06-01

    Biomaterial has occupied leading position in material science for various scientific and technological applications. This present work is carried out over a natural gum extracted from raw fruit of Mangosteen, an east Indian tree (Gercinia Mangostana) following extraction and purification process. Solid specimen of the said gum is developed following sol-gel like process. AC and DC electrical analysis on the dried solid specimen of the gum were carried out and showed high electrical conduction with σ ~ 1 E-03 S/cm, of which ionic and electronic contributions are 70% and 30% respectively. Analysis shows that origin of high electrical conductivity is due to presence of substantial amount of organic acid unit in its polysaccharide background. In fact the observed σ is about 1000 times of that observed in gum Arabica. Optical absorption of this new bio- materials are also studied using UV-VIS analysis. The results show its high absorption co-efficient in UV and blue part of analysed range. A complete electrical characterization of the material have been made. It has also been observed that the electronic conduction can be enhanced to 70% of the total electrical conductivity by forming complex with Iodine and organic (Citric) acid from Lemon fruit. This high potential material is being studied for development of electronic device application.

  10. Caffeine gum minimizes sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rachel A; Kamimori, Gary H; Wesensten, Nancy J; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J

    2013-02-01

    Naps are an effective strategy for maintaining alertness and cognitive performance; however, upon abrupt wakening from naps, sleep inertia (temporary performance degradation) may ensue. In the present study, attenuation of post-nap sleep inertia was attempted by administration of caffeine gum. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 15 healthy, non-smoking adults were awakened at 1 hr. and again at 6 hr. after lights out (0100 and 0600, respectively) and were immediately administered a gum pellet containing 100 mg of caffeine or placebo. A 5-min. psychomotor vigilance task was administered at 0 min., 6 min., 12 min., and 18 min. post-awakening. At 0100, response speed with caffeine was significantly better at 12 min. and 18 min. post-awakening compared to placebo; at 0600, caffeine's effects were evident at 18 min. post-awakening. Caffeinated gum is a viable means of rapidly attenuating sleep inertia, suggesting that the adenosine receptor system is involved in sleep maintenance.

  11. Isolation and characterization of gum from Chrysophyllum albidum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the morphology, physicochemical and compressional characteristics of a natural gum derived from the fruits of Chrysophyllum albidum. Preliminary phytochemical screening and physicochemical properties of Chrysophyllum albidum gum (in comparison with tragacanth gum) were determined while ...

  12. Woodland caribou management in Alberta: historical perspectives and future opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston H. Dzus

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou conservation has been the topic of much debate for the past few decades. By the late 1970s there was growing concern about declining woodland caribou populations and the interaction between industrial activities and woodland caribou. Initial concerns led to the closure of the licensed hunting season in 1981. Early confrontation between government and industry in the late 1980s transformed into a series of evolving collaborative ventures. Improving our understanding of the basic ecology of woodland caribou in Alberta was at the center of early research efforts; more recent studies have examined the effects of industrial activities on caribou and effectiveness of various mitigation factors. Despite having amassed an impressive body of information from a research and monitoring perspective, progress on implementing effective management actions has been less dramatic. Industry has endured significant costs implementing a variety of perceived conservation initiatives, but caribou populations continued to decline through the last few decades. While some parties feel more research is needed, there is growing consensus that changes to habitat as induced by human activities are important factors influencing current caribou declines. Predation is a proximate cause of most caribou mortality. Climate change mediated alterations to habitat and predator-prey interactions remain a key source of uncertainty relative to future caribou population trends. Management actions will need to deal with long term habitat changes associated with human land use and short term implications of increased predation. In 2005, the provincial minister responsible for caribou conservation responded to the draft 2004 recovery plan and created the Alberta Caribou Committee (ACC. The goal of the ACC is to maintain and recover woodland caribou in Alberta’s forest ecosystems while providing opportunities for resource development, following guidance provided by the

  13. Naturalistic assessment of demand for cigarettes, snus, and nicotine gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jeffrey S; Wilson, A George; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Judd, Michael C; Bickel, Warren K

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral economic measures of demand provide estimates of tobacco product abuse liability and may predict effects of policy-related price regulation on consumption of existing and emerging tobacco products. In the present study, we examined demand for snus, a smokeless tobacco product, in comparison to both cigarettes and medicinal nicotine. We used both a naturalistic method in which participants purchased these products for use outside the laboratory, as well as laboratory-based self-administration procedures. Cigarette smokers (N = 42) used an experimental income to purchase their usual brand of cigarettes and either snus or gum (only one product available per session) across a range of prices, while receiving all products they purchased from one randomly selected price. In a separate portion of the study, participants self-administered these products during laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions. Demand elasticity (sensitivity of purchasing to price) was significantly greater for snus than cigarettes. Elasticity for gum was intermediate between snus and cigarettes but was not significantly different than either. Demand intensity (purchasing unconstrained by price) was significantly lower for gum compared to cigarettes, with no significant difference observed between snus and cigarettes. Results of the laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions were generally discordant with measures of demand elasticity, with significantly higher "breakpoints" for cigarettes compared to gum and no significant differences between other study products. Moreover, breakpoints and product purchasing were generally uncorrelated across tasks. Under naturalistic conditions, snus appears more sensitive to price manipulation than either cigarettes or nicotine gum in existing smokers.

  14. Xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris pv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava starch is a main renewable bio-resource with low price and mass production in Guangxi, China. It was used as carbon source in growing Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004 (Xcc 8004) for xanthan gum production in this study. The xanthan gum yield of gelatinized cassava starch was higher than that of ...

  15. Gum chewing affects academic performance in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chewing gum may have an impact on improved memory during specific tasks of recognition and sustained attention. Research objective was to determine the effect of gum chewing on standardized test scores and math class grades of eighth grade students. Four math classes, 108 students, were randomized i...

  16. Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Brushing and flossing help get plaque off your teeth so your mouth can stay healthy. Taking care of your teeth and gums is especially important if you: Have diabetes Have cancer Are an ...

  17. Hydrologic processes in the pinyon-juniper woodlands: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    Hydrologic processes in the pinyon-juniper woodlands of the western region of the United States are variable because of the inherent interactions among the occurring precipitation regimes, geomorphological settings, and edaphic conditions that characterize the ecosystem. A wide range of past and present land-use practices further complicates comprehensive evaluations...

  18. Nutrient Cycling in Managed and Unmanaged Oak Woodland-Grass Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Dahlgren; Michael J. Singer

    1991-01-01

    The influence of oak trees and grazing on nutrient cycling in oak woodland-grass ecosystems was examined at the Sierra Foothill Range Field Station in the northern-Sierra Nevada foothills of California. Nutrient concentrations in ecosystem waterflows (precipitation, canopy throughfall, and soil solutions) were monitored in a non-managed natural area and in an adjacent...

  19. Synthesis of lower treeline limber pine (Pinus flexilis) woodland knowledge, research needs, and management considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Means

    2011-01-01

    Lower treeline limber pine woodlands have received little attention in peer-reviewed literature and in management strategies. These ecologically distinct systems are thought to be seed repositories between discontinuous populations in the northern and central Rocky Mountains, serving as seed sources for bird dispersal between distinct mountain ranges. Their position on...

  20. Restoration of temperate savannas and woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice B. Hanberry; John M. Kabrick; Peter W. Dunwiddie; Tibor Hartel; Theresa B. Jain; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2017-01-01

    Savannas and woodlands are open forest phases that occur along a gradient between grasslands and closed canopy forests. These ecosystems are characterized by open to nearly closed canopies of overstorey trees, relatively sparse midstorey and understorey woody vegetation, and dense, species-rich ground flora. In contrast to closed forests, the dominant and codominant...

  1. Silviculture to restore oak savannas and woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; John M. Kabrick; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2017-01-01

    Variability in historic fire regimes in eastern North America resulted in an array of oak natural communities that were dominant across the region. In the past century, savannas and woodlands have become scarce because of conversion to agriculture or development of forest structure in the absence of fire. Their restoration is a primary goal for public agencies and...

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions from Savanna ( Miombo ) woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural vegetation represents an important sink for greenhouse gases (GHGs); however, there is relatively little information available on emissions from southern African savannas. The effects of clearing savanna woodlands for crop production on soil fluxes of N2O, CO2 and CH4 were studied on clay (Chromic luvisol) and ...

  3. Woodland in Practical Skills Therapeutic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Paula; Gibons, Kenneth; Mata, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Modern urban life provides less opportunities to contact with nature, which is a potential cause of developmental deviances in children. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of woodlands, within the context of Practical Skills Therapeutic Education at the Ruskin Mill College, UK. Data on physical and emotional perceptions were…

  4. Restoration of midwestern oak woodlands and savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan C. Dey; John M. Kabrick

    2015-01-01

    There are various definitions for savanna and woodland in the ecological literature. Characteristic elements of each community are broadly defined and often overlap according to the authorities (Curtis 1959; Nuzzo 1986; Nelson 2010). Some confusion is inevitable when categorizing what is in reality a continuum of states from prairie to forest in which there can be much...

  5. Alien plant invasions in European woodlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Viktoria; Chytrý, Milan; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Pergl, Jan; Hennekens, Stephan; Biurrun, Idoia; Knollová, Ilona; Berg, Christian; Vassilev, Kiril; Rodwell, John S.; Škvorc, Željko; Jandt, Ute; Ewald, Jörg; Jansen, Florian; Tsiripidis, Ioannis; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán; Casella, Laura; Attorre, Fabio; Rašomavičius, Valerijus; Ćušterevska, Renata; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Brunet, Jörg; Lenoir, Jonathan; Svenning, Jens Christian; Kącki, Zygmunt; Petrášová-Šibíková, Mária; Šilc, Urban; García-Mijangos, Itziar; Campos, Juan Antonio; Fernández-González, Federico; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Onyshchenko, Viktor; Pyšek, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Woodlands make up a third of European territory and carry out important ecosystem functions, yet a comprehensive overview of their invasion by alien plants has never been undertaken across this continent. Location: Europe. Methods: We extracted data from 251,740 vegetation plots stored in the

  6. Thermoregulatory capabilities of the woodland dormouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The woodland dormouse, Graphiurus murinus, in common with many other small rodents, enters torpor under conditions of food deprivation and low temperatures. Its thermoregulatory capabilities under more favourable conditions, however, have not been investigated. We measured metabolism and thermoregulation in ...

  7. Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels. EI Nep, BR Conway. Abstract. Purpose: To compare the mucoadhesive performance of grewia polysaccharide gum with those of guar gum, carboxymethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and carbopol 971P. Methods: Grewia polysaccharide gum ...

  8. Examining disadoption of gum arabic production in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahim, A.; Ruben, R.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Gum arabic production in Sudan has developed over the years in a well-established traditional bush-fallow system in which the gum tree (Acacia senegal) is rotated with annual crops. Following the Sahel drought, the gum area has suffered from deforestation and gum production has declined. Several

  9. Brief Report: Gum Chewing Affects Standardized Math Scores in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A.; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; Foreyt, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum…

  10. Binding effectiveness of Colocassia esculenta gum in poorly compressible drugs-paracetamol and metronidazole tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwu, K I; Udeala, O K

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of a polysaccharide gum obtained from the cormels of Colocassia esculenta was evaluated comparatively with acacia and methylcellulose as binders in the formulation of poorly compressible drugs. The granules of these drugs produced by wet massing method using colocassia and acacia gums as binders have high compressibility index indicating poor flow. Based on this parameter, the granules produced with methylcellulose as binder seem to flow better. The properties of tablets evaluated include breaking strength, friability, disintegration time and dissolution rate. The new polysaccharide gum showed better concentration-strength profile than acacia while methylcellulose yielded mechanically more stable tablets than the two binders. The resistance of tablets to abrasion was poor in metronidazole tablets formulated with colocassia gum. The in vitro availability characteristics showed that tablets produced with the new gum show acceptable disintegration time and release profile within a certain range of its concentration in tablets. At 4% w/w nominal concentration of colocassia gum in metronidazole tablets and 6% w/w in paracetamol, tablets show very long disintegration time and prolonged release profile. The binders used for comparison yielded tablets that show better in vitro release characteristics.

  11. Engaging with Peri-Urban Woodlands in England: The Contribution to People’s Health and Well-Being and Implications for Future Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Liz; Morris, Jake; Stewart, Amy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we engage with debates concerning people and their contact with the natural environment as part of everyday life drawing on Irwin’s ideas of co-construction and Gibson’s theory of affordances. We focus on peri-urban woodlands in England as important places where people can interact with nature for health and well-being. Qualitative data were collected in situ via walks in the woods, focus group discussions and photo elicitation, with a sample of 49 people. These methods provide rich data on the wide range of meanings associated with woodlands that can have a perceived impact on people’s health and well-being. The findings link to contemporary debates about health, well-being and ecosystem services. We explore the inter-play between attributes of the physical environment and the range of facilities provided to enable access, social interactions and the benefits people attribute to their woodland experiences. We conclude that peri-urban woodlands can clearly contribute to self-reported health and well-being in multiple ways, and that organized activities can be important for those who face barriers to accessing woodlands. A strong message emerging from the research is the opportunity afforded by woodlands for social connections with others, as well as the provision of a range of sensory benefits and opportunities to observe and enjoy seasonal change in woodlands. Mental restoration via connection with nature also emerged as important, confirming previous research. PMID:24927035

  12. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory: the independent roles of chewing gum and mint flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2008-05-01

    Two experiments independently investigated the basis of the chewing gum induced context-dependent memory effect. At learning and/or recall, participants either chewed flavourless gum (Experiment 1) or received mint-flavoured strips (Experiment 2). No context-dependent memory effect was found with either flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips, indicating that independently the contexts were insufficiently salient to induce the effect. This is found despite participants' subjective ratings indicating a perceived change in state following administration of flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips. Additionally, some preliminary evidence for a non-additive facilitative effect of receiving gum or flavour at either learning and/or recall is reported. The findings raise further concerns regarding the robustness of the previously reported context-dependent memory effect with chewing gum.

  13. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory: The independent roles of chewing gum and mint flavour

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.J.; Miles, C.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments independently investigated the basis of the chewing-gum induced context-dependent memory effect (Baker et al, 2004). At learning and/or recall participants either chewed flavourless gum (Experiment 1) or received mint-flavoured strips (Experiment 2). No context dependent memory effect was found with either flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips, indicating that independently the contexts were insufficiently salient to induce the effect. This is found despite participants’ su...

  14. An induced extrinsic tooth stain prevention model to investigate whitening potential of sugar-free chewing gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Michael Wj; Tian, Minmin; Ramirez, Lilian; Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Proskin, Howard M

    2017-12-01

    To establish an accelerated clinical test method to evaluate the effectiveness of sugar-free gums in prevention of the formation of extrinsic stains when chewed over a 2-week period in conjunction with daily tooth brushing. A secondary objective was to compare three methods for measuring extrinsic stain. 25 healthy adult volunteers were enrolled in a single center, examiner blind, randomized 4-way crossover clinical study. Starting with a stain-free baseline, subjects rinsed five times daily with freshly brewed black tea, followed either by chewing one of three different gums for 12 minutes or not chewing (negative control). Extrinsic stain was measured at 1 and 2 weeks by modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI), digital imaging, and a Vita EasyShade spectrophotometer. At 2 weeks, MLSI scores showed a statistically significant mean reduction of 43% or greater versus no-gum control for all three gum treatments. Digital image analysis and Vita EasyShade measurement showed reductions of yellowness (measured by difference in ∆b* values between the three gums and the non-gum control treatment) ranging from 0.28 to 0.34 and 3.52 to 4.18 Δb* units, respectively, for subjects using the chewing gums versus no-gum control (Peffectively reduce new stain formation along with daily tooth brushing in as little as 2 weeks when used in conjunction with tea rinsing to help promote more rapid stain formation. All three test methods confirmed the results, albeit with different levels of statistical significance. A minor modification of gum base polymer, or change of flavors, did not significantly impact the prevention of new stain formation. Regular consumption of sugar-free chewing gum helps prevent extrinsic dental stain accumulation and provides a simple and enjoyable means for consumers to maintain their natural tooth color.

  15. Xanthan gum stabilized gold nanoparticles: characterization, biocompatibility, stability and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooja, Deep; Panyaram, Sravani; Kulhari, Hitesh; Rachamalla, Shyam S; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-09-22

    Xanthan gum (XG) has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In the present study, we explored the potential of XG in the synthesis of gold nanoparticle. XG was used as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The effect of various formulation and process variables such as temperature, reaction time, gum concentration, gum volume and gold concentration, in GNP preparation was determined. The XG stabilized, rubey-red XGNP were obtained with 5 ml of XG aqueous solution (1.5 mg/ml). The optimum temperature was 80°C whereas the reaction time was 3 h. The optimized nanoparticles were also investigated as drug delivery carrier for doxorubicin hydrochloride. DOX loaded gold nanoparticles (DXGP) were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, FTIR, and DSC analysis. The synthesized nanoparticle showed mean particle size of 15-20 nm and zeta potential -29.1 mV. The colloidal stability of DXGP was studied under different conditions of pH, electrolytes and serum. Nanoparticles were found to be stable at pH range between pH 5-9 and NaCl concentration up to 0.5 M. In serum, nanoparticles showed significant stability up to 24h. During toxicity studies, nanoparticles were found biocompatible and non-toxic. Compared with free DOX, DXGP displayed 3 times more cytotoxicity in A549 cells. In conclusion, this study provided an insight to synthesize GNP without using harsh chemicals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fragmentation patterns of evergreen oak woodlands in Southwestern Iberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, A.; Madeira, M.; Lima Santos, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean evergreen oak woodlands (composed of Quercus suber L. and Quercus rotundifolia Lam.) are becoming increasingly fragmented in the human-modified landscapes of Southwestern Portugal and Spain. Previous studies have largely neglected to assess the spatial changes of oak woodlands...... in relation to their surrounding landscape matrix, and to characterize and quantify woodland boundaries and edges. The present study aims to fill this gap by analyzing fragmentation patterns of oak woodlands over a 50-year period (1958-2007) in three landscapes. Using archived aerial imagery from 1958, 1995...... and 2007, for two consecutive periods (1958-1995 and 1995-2007), we calculated a set of landscape metrics to compare woodland fragmentation over time. Our results indicated a continuous woodland fragmentation characterized by their edge dynamics. From 1958 to 2007, the replacement of open farmland...

  17. Managing fire for woodland caribou in Jasper and Banff National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landon Shepherd

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations in Jasper (JNP and Banff National Parks (BNP have declined since the 1970s, coincident with reduced fire activity in both parks, relative to historic levels. Some researchers have suggested that long periods without fire may cause habitat deterioration for woodland caribou, primarily by reducing available lichen forage. We examined winter habitat selection by woodland caribou at coarse and fine scales based on GPS-derived telemetry data and used models that included stand origin (decade, topography, and several stand structure variables that are related to time since fire, to explore relationships among caribou, lichen, and fire history. Based on the relationships illustrated by the models, we assessed how fire management could be applied to caribou conservation in JNP and BNP. At a coarse scale, caribou selected old forest (> 75 years in landscapes that have likely experienced less frequent wildfire. While the abundance of Cladonia spp. influenced caribou use at fine scales, a preference for areas with older trees within stands was also significant. We conclude that short-term habitat protection for woodland caribou in JNP and BNP likely requires fire exclusion from caribou range.

  18. Allometric Models Based on Bayesian Frameworks Give Better Estimates of Aboveground Biomass in the Miombo Woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shem Kuyah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The miombo woodland is the most extensive dry forest in the world, with the potential to store substantial amounts of biomass carbon. Efforts to obtain accurate estimates of carbon stocks in the miombo woodlands are limited by a general lack of biomass estimation models (BEMs. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of most commonly employed allometric models for estimating aboveground biomass (AGB in miombo woodlands, and to develop new models that enable more accurate estimation of biomass in the miombo woodlands. A generalizable mixed-species allometric model was developed from 88 trees belonging to 33 species ranging in diameter at breast height (DBH from 5 to 105 cm using Bayesian estimation. A power law model with DBH alone performed better than both a polynomial model with DBH and the square of DBH, and models including height and crown area as additional variables along with DBH. The accuracy of estimates from published models varied across different sites and trees of different diameter classes, and was lower than estimates from our model. The model developed in this study can be used to establish conservative carbon stocks required to determine avoided emissions in performance-based payment schemes, for example in afforestation and reforestation activities.

  19. An Evaluation of the Binding Strength of Okra Gum and the Drug Release Characteristics of Tablets Prepared from It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amjad; Qureshi, Farah; Abbas, Nasir; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Ali, Ejaz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the adhesion ability of okra gum, which is gaining popularity as a tablet binder. For this purpose, gum was extracted from okra pods, and the binding strength of different concentrations (1%, 3%, and 5%) was determined quantitatively. Additionally, naproxen sodium tablets were prepared by using okra gum as a binder and were evaluated for their properties including hardness, friability, disintegration time, and dissolution rate. The binding strength values were compared with that of pre-gelatinized starch, a commonly used tablet binder. The results from universal testing machine indicate that the binding strengths of all dispersions of okra increase as the concentration increases from 1% to 5% and ranges from 2.5 to 4.5 N, which are almost twice a high as those of pre-gelatinized starch. The tablets prepared with okra gum have shown good mechanical strength with hardness values of 7–8.5 kg/cm2 and a friability okra gum and 5.05 min with starch paste), and the drug release from these tablets was slower than the formulations with starch. The higher binding ability of okra gum probably linked with its chemical composition as it mainly contains galactose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid. This study concludes that okra gum is a better binder than pre-gelatinized starch, it might be explored in future for introduction as a cost-effective binder in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:28574438

  20. Fractionation of Mastic Gum in Relation to Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sharif Sharifi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mastic gum is a viscous light-green liquid obtained from the bark of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia. which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family. The gum has been fractionated to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the whole gum and its fractions against various strains of Helicobacter pylori. The polymeric gum fraction was separated from the essential oil and the resin (trunk exudates without essential oil to assess and compare the anti-H. pylori activity of the polymer fraction against lower molecular weight fractions, the gum itself and masticated gum. The polymer fraction was also oxidized and assessed for antimicrobial activity.

  1. The Null Effect of Chewing Gum During Hemodialysis on Dry Mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruk, Nazike; Eşer, Ismet

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of chewing gum during hemodialysis on dry mouth and its symptoms. The imposition of fluid restriction and the use of medications that reduce saliva production may lead to dry mouth. This study is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover experimental study. The subjects consisted of 61 hemodialysis patients recruited from 4 dialysis centers in southern Turkey. The data were collected using a Patient Identification Form, a Form for Assessing the Symptoms of Dry Mouth, and a Patient Follow-up Form. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of flow rates. The salivary flow rates of the patients increased during the first hour on the day when gum was chewed, and this increase was statistically significant. However, no significant difference was found between the salivary flow rates at the 0- and 4-hour time points on the day when gum was chewed (P > .05). In addition, the salivary pH values were in the normal range on both days, although the pH values tended to be more acidic on the day when gum was not chewed. Overall, it was found that chewing gum for 15 minutes each hour during a hemodialysis session did not increase the saliva amount, maintain the pH value of the saliva within a normal range, or control dry mouth symptoms.

  2. Xanthan chain length is modulated by increasing the availability of the polysaccharide copolymerase protein GumC and the outer membrane polysaccharide export protein GumB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Estela M; Ielmini, María V; Patel, Yamini N; Bianco, María I; Franceschini, Esteban A; Schneider, Jane C; Ielpi, Luis

    2013-02-01

    Xanthan is a polysaccharide secreted by Xanthomonas campestris that contains pentameric repeat units. The biosynthesis of xanthan involves an operon composed of 12 genes (gumB to gumM). In this study, we analyzed the proteins encoded by gumB and gumC. Membrane fractionation showed that GumB was mainly associated with the outer membrane, whereas GumC was an inner membrane protein. By in silico analysis and specific globomycin inhibition, GumB was characterized as a lipoprotein. By reporter enzyme assays, GumC was shown to contain two transmembrane segments flanking a large periplasmic domain. We confirmed that gumB and gumC mutant strains uncoupled the synthesis of the lipid-linked repeat unit from the polymerization process. We studied the effects of gumB and gumC gene amplification on the production, composition and viscosity of xanthan. Overexpression of GumB, GumC or GumB and GumC simultaneously did not affect the total amount or the chemical composition of the polymer. GumB overexpression did not affect xanthan viscosity; however, a moderate increase in xanthan viscosity was achieved when GumC protein levels were increased 5-fold. Partial degradation of GumC was observed when only that protein was overexpressed; but co-expression of GumB and GumC diminished GumC degradation and resulted in higher xanthan viscosity than individual GumB or GumC overexpression. Compared with xanthan from the wild-type strain, longer polymer chains from the strain that simultaneously overexpressed GumB and GumC were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our results suggest that GumB-GumC protein levels modulate xanthan chain length, which results in altered polymer viscosity.

  3. Response of bird community structure to habitat management in piñon-juniper woodland-sagebrush ecotones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knick, Steven T.; Hanser, Steve; Grace, James B.; Hollenbeck, Jeff P.; Leu, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Piñon (Pinus spp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands have been expanding their range across the intermountain western United States into landscapes dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) shrublands. Management actions using prescribed fire and mechanical cutting to reduce woodland cover and control expansion provided opportunities to understand how environmental structure and changes due to these treatments influence bird communities in piñon-juniper systems. We surveyed 43 species of birds and measured vegetation for 1–3 years prior to treatment and 6–7 years post-treatment at 13 locations across Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. We used structural equation modeling to develop and statistically test our conceptual model that the current bird assembly at a site is structured primarily by the previous bird community with additional drivers from current and surrounding habitat conditions as well as external regional bird dynamics. Treatment reduced woodland cover by >5% at 80 of 378 survey sites. However, habitat change achieved by treatment was highly variable because actual disturbance differed widely in extent and intensity. Biological inertia in the bird community was the strongest single driver; 72% of the variation in the bird assemblage was explained by the community that existed seven years earlier. Greater net reduction in woodlands resulted in slight shifts in the bird community to one having ecotone or shrubland affinities. However, the overall influence of woodland changes from treatment were relatively small and were buffered by other extrinsic factors. Regional bird dynamics did not significantly influence the structure of local bird communities at our sites. Our results suggest that bird communities in piñon-juniper woodlands can be highly stable when management treatments are conducted in areas with more advanced woodland development and at the level of disturbance measured in our study.

  4. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking.

  5. Influencing woodland management using web-based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Thomas; Jeffrey W. Stringer

    2011-01-01

    The University of Kentucky, Department of Forestry Extension delivered hosted Web-based forestry educational programs ("webinars") in 2009 to promote woodland management in Kentucky and engage county extension agents in forestry programming. These webinars were hosted by county extension agents and attended by woodland owners. This hosted webinar approach was...

  6. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zutta, Brian R.; Phillip W. Rundel; Sassan Saatchi; Jorge D. Casana; Paul Gauthier Gauthier; Aldo Soto; Yessenia Velazco; Wolfgang Buermann

    2012-01-01

    Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects...

  7. Oak woodlands and other hardwood forests of California, 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.L. Waddell; T.M. Barrett

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a multiownership assessment of oak woodlands and other hardwood forests in California, excluding only reserved lands outside of national forests. Because sampling intensity on woodlands was doubled from the previous 1981-84 inventory, and because national forests were inventoried, this is the most complete assessment to date for California...

  8. Coarse woody debris in oak woodlands of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William D. Tietje; Karen L. Waddell; Justin K. Vreeland; Charles L. Bolsinger

    2002-01-01

    An extensive forest inventory was conducted to estimate the amount and distribution of coarse woody debris (CWD) on 5.6 million ac of woodlands in California that are outside of national forests and reserved areas. Woodlands consist primarily of oak (Quercus spp.) types and are defined as forestland incapable of producing commercial quantities of...

  9. Removal of pinyon-juniper woodlands on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Peters; Neil S. Cobb

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Pinyon-Juniper (PJ) woodland is the 3rd largest vegetation type in the United States, covering 35.5% of the Colorado Plateau, it is the largest vegetation type administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) on the Colorado Plateau. These woodlands have been increasing dramatically in density and extent over the last 100...

  10. Oak woodland conservation management planning in southern CA - lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi Dagit

    2015-01-01

    The California Oak Woodlands Conservation Act (AB 242 2001) established requirements for the preservation and protection of oak woodlands and trees, and allocated funding managed by the Wildlife Conservation Board. In order to qualify to use these funds, counties and cities need to adopt an oak conservation management plan. Between 2008 and 2011, a team of concerned...

  11. Economic incentives for oak woodland preservation and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi Dagit; Cy Carlberg; Christy Cuba; Thomas Scott

    2015-01-01

    Numerous ordinances and laws recognize the value of oak trees and woodlands, and dictate serious and expensive consequences for removing or harming them. Unfortunately, the methods used to calculate these values are equally numerous and often inconsistent. More important, these ordinances typically lack economic incentives to avoid impacts to oak woodland values...

  12. Silvics and silviculture in the southwestern pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    Southwestern pinyon-juniper and juniper woodlands cover large areas of the western United States. The woodlands have been viewed as places of beauty and sources of valuable resource products or as weed-dominated landscapes that hinder the production of forage for livestock. They are special places because of the emotions and controversies that encircle their management...

  13. Development of eco-friendly submicron emulsions stabilized by a bio-derived gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis María; Ramírez, Pablo; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Santos, Jenifer; Muñoz, José

    2014-11-01

    Many traditional organic solvents are being gradually replaced by ecofriendly alternatives. D-Limonene is a terpenic (bio)-solvent that fulfils the requirements to be considered a green solvent. D-Limonene sub-micron emulsions suffer from Ostwald ripening destabilization. In this study, we examined the influence of the addition of a natural gum (rosin gum) to D-limonene in order to prevent Ostwald ripening. This contribution deals with the study of emulsions formulated with a mixture of D-limonene and rosin gum as dispersed phase and Pluronic PE9400 as emulsifier. The procedure followed for the development of these formulations was based on the application of product design principles. This led to the optimum ratio rosin gum/D-limonene and subsequently to the optimum surfactant concentration. The combination of different techniques (rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to assist in the prediction of the emulsions destabilization process. Not only did the addition of rosin gum highly increase the stability of these emulsions by inhibiting the Ostwald ripening, but it also reduced the emulsions droplet size. Thus, we found that stable sub-micron D-limonene-in-water emulsions have been obtained in the range 3-6 wt% Pluronic PE-9400 by means of a single-step rotor/stator homogenizing process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Physico-chemical characterization of the temperature dependent hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Lei; Lin, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Sun, Da-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The physico-chemical properties and hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum were investigated to evaluate its temperature dependence. The increase of temperature resulted in improved solubility of G. sinensis gum, and the dissolved galactomannan showed decreased degree of galactose substitution (DSGal) and increased molecular weight (p0.96), and the hydration index t0.8 at different temperatures varied in the range of 51-302 min. It was found that galactomannan with low DSGal and high molecular weight exhibited slow hydration rate and poor solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating the masticatory function after mandibulectomy with colour-changing chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Y; Ishida, S; Hasegawa, T; Kobayashi, M; Nibu, K; Komori, T

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the usefulness of colour-changing gum in evaluating masticatory performance after mandibulectomy. Thirty-nine patients who underwent mandibulectomy between 1982 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were recruited in this study. There were 21 male and 18 female subjects with a mean age of 64·7 years (range: 12-89 years) at the time of surgery. The participants included six patients who underwent marginal mandibulectomy, 21 patients who underwent segmental mandibulectomy and 12 patients who underwent hemimandibulectomy. The masticatory function was evaluated using colour-changing chewing gum, gummy jelly and a modified Sato's questionnaire. In all cases, the data were obtained more than 3 months after completing the patient's final prosthesis. The colour-changing gum scores correlated with both the gummy jelly scores (r = 0·634, P masticatory performance after mandibulectomy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Entandophragma angolense Gum as a Novel Binder and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    The present work reports on the mucoadhesive and mechanical properties of the water-soluble gum obtained from Entandophragma angolense when incorporated in oral tablets. Flat-faced chlorpheniramine maleate tablets containing the gum were formulated. The potential for chemical interaction between the gum and ...

  17. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Cola acuminata gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many natural gums are employed as suspending agents in the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The search to develop locally available natural gum from apparently a waste product as an alternative suspending agent stimulated the interest in this present study. Cola acuminata gum (CAG) extracted from Cola ...

  18. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and

  19. Rheological Modeling and Characterization of Ficus platyphylla Gum Exudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnabuk O. Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ficus platyphylla gum exudates (FP gum have been analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and found to be ionic, mildly acidic, odourless, and yellowish brown in colour. The gum is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in ethanol, and insoluble in acetone and chloroform. The nitrogen (0.39% and protein (2.44% contents of the gum are relatively low. The concentrations of the cations were found to increase according to the following trend, Mn>Fe>Zn>Pb>Cu>Mg>Cd>Ca. Analysis of the FTIR spectrum of the gum revealed vibrations similar to those found in polysaccharides while the scanning electron micrograph indicated that the gum has irregular molecular shapes, arranged randomly. The intrinsic viscosity of FP gum estimated by extrapolating to zero concentrations in Huggins, Kraemer, Schulz-Blaschke, and Martin plots has an average value of 7 dL/g. From the plots of viscosity versus shear rate/speed of rotation and also that of shear stress versus shear rate, FP gum can be classified as a non-Newtonian gum with characteristics-plastic properties. Development of the Master_s curve for FP gum also indicated that the gum prefers to remain in a dilute domain (Cgum (calculated from Arrhenius-Frenkel-Eyring plot was relatively low and indicated the presence of fewer inter- and intramolecular interactions.

  20. Granule properties of paracetamol made with Bombax ceiba gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bombax ceiba gum was extracted from the calyx of the Bombax flower using both hot and cold water extraction method. The gum was used as binder to prepare paracetamol granules in concentrations of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 %. Acacia gum was used to prepare the standard at the same concentrations. The granule properties of ...

  1. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria of xanthan gum provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the... notification of preliminary determinations by Commerce that ] imports of xanthan gum from Austria and China...

  2. 77 FR 43857 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria and China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule... materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV ] imports of xanthan gum from Austria...

  3. demonstrating close-packing of atoms using spherical bubble gums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the use of spherical bubble gums (Gum Balls) to demonstrate the close-packing of atoms and ions is presented. Spherical bubble gums having distinctive colours were used to illustrate the different layers in variety of crystalline packing and the formation of tetrahedral and octahedral holes.

  4. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Adansonia digitata gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentation volume and rate, rheology, and ease of redispersion were employed as evaluation parameters. The results showed that both hot and cold water extracts of the gum used at 2-3 % w/v produced a better suspending property than 4 % w/v Compound Tragacanth gum. The suspending ability of the gums was in ...

  5. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test.

  6. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation “gum spirits of turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin (gum...

  7. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  8. THE EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC ORAL TREATMENT ON THE IRON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC TREATMENT ON THE IRON AND PROTEIN STATUS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS. Table 1: Effect of Three Months Gum ... recycling? in a study on animal models of experimental chronic renal failure it ... consuming a low-protein diet with. 50 gram gum arabic/day had a better fecal.

  9. Emulsion stabilizing property of Grewia gum in Arachis oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emulsifying property of grewia gum in arachis oil emulsion was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. The gum was used at 0.1 to 0.4% w/v to stabilize arachis oil emulsion containing 7.5% w/v acacia. The globule size, globule number and viscosity of the ...

  10. Integration of woodland caribou habitat management and forest management in northern Ontario - current status and issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted (E.R Armstrong

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou {Rangifer tarandus caribou range across northern Ontario, occurring in both the Hudson Bay Lowlands and the Boreal Forest. Woodland caribou extend south well into the merchantable forest, occurring in licensed and/or actively managed Forest Management Units (FMU's across the province. Caribou range has gradually but continuously receded northward over the past century. Since the early 1990's, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR has been developing and implementing a woodland caribou habitat management strategy in northwestern Ontario. The purpose of the caribou habitat strategy is to maintain woodland caribou occupancy of currently occupied range in northwestern Ontario. Long-term caribou habitat needs and predator-prey dynamics form the basis of this strategy, which requires the development of a landscape-level caribou habitat mosaic across the region within caribou range. This represents a significant change from traditional forest management approaches, which were based partially upon moose (Alces alces habitat management principles. A number of issues and concerns regarding implications of caribou management to the forest industry are being addressed, including short-term and long-term reductions in wood supply and wood quality, and increased access costs. Other related concerns include the ability to regenerate forests to pre-harvest stand conditions, remote tourism concerns, implications for moose populations, and required information on caribou biology and habitat. The forest industry and other stakeholders have been actively involved with the OMNR in attempting to address these concerns, so that caribou habitat requirements are met while ensuring the maintenance of a viable timber industry, other forest uses and the forest ecosystem.

  11. Relationships of pinon juniper woodland expansion and climate trends in the Walker Basin, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Jonathon

    Landscapes are in constant flux. Vegetation distributions have changed in conjunction with climate, driven by factors such as Milankovitch cycles and atmospheric composition. Until recently, these changes have occurred gradually. Human populations are altering Earth's systems, including atmospheric composition and land use. This is altering vegetation distributions at landscape scales due to changes in species potential niche, as well as current and historical alteration of their realized niche. Vegetation shifts have the potential to be more pronounced in arid and mountainous environments as resources available to plants such as soil moisture are more limiting. In the Great Basin physiographic region of the western United States, woody encroachment of pinon juniper (Pinus monophylla & Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands is well known, but the drivers of its expansion are not well understood across elevational gradients. Predominant theories of future vegetation distribution change due to a changing climate, predict that montane species will move upslope in response to increasing temperatures. In pinon juniper woodlands, the focus has been on downslope movement of woodlands into other ecosystem types. The drivers for this are typically thought to be historical land uses such as grazing and fire exclusion. However, infilling and establishment is occurring throughout its distribution and relatively little attention has been paid to woodland movement uphill. This study focuses on two mountain ranges within the Walker Lake Basin, so as to understand changes occurring along the full gradient of pinon juniper woodlands, from lower to upper treeline, on both the western and eastern side of the ranges. The overall goal of this study was to understand trends of change (increasing, decreasing canopy density) in pinon juniper woodlands and determine if these trends were related to climate change trends. Trends in both vegetation and climate were analyzed for the entire

  12. Evaluation of mechanical properties of unsaturated polyester-guar gum/hydroxypropyl guar gum composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum is a natural polysaccharide that has been explored for various applications. However, there is a limited number of studies in which guar gum has been used as a filler in a polymer. The effect of guar gum and its hydroxypropyl derivatives in unsaturated polyester composites were investigated with respect to their mechanical and chemical properties. The effect of hydroxypropylation and the degree of hydroxypropylation on the properties of resultant composites were also studied. It was observed that the inclusion of guar gum and its derivatives resulted in composites with increased solvent resistance and mechanical properties. An increase in the degree of substitution resulted in increased polymer-filler interaction reflected by a positive effect on the mechanical properties of the composites. These results open an avenue for the use of polysaccharides and their derivatives as eco-friendly fillers as a replacement of mineral fillers.

  13. Carbon stocks, greenhouse gas emissions and water balance of Sudanese savannah woodlands in relation to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the carbon (C) sequestration potential of drylands requires knowledge of the stocks of C in soils and biomass and on the factors affecting them. The overall aim of the study was to determine and evaluate the variation in the C stocks and water balance of Acacia savannah woodlands across the dryland (arid and semi-arid) region (10-16 deg N; 21-36 deg E) of the former Sudan (now mainly in the Republic of the Sudan) and how they are related to climatic factors and may be affected by climate change. The role played by small but numerous brick making industries on woodland deforestation in the region and greenhouse gas production was also investigated. The study region is often referred to as the gum belt because it is the world's major source of gum Arabic, which is harvested from Acacia trees. The soils in the centre and west of the region are mainly Arenosols (sandy soils) and those in the eastern part are mainly Vertisols (clay soils). The soils are C poor and often in a degraded state. This dissertation consists of a summary section and four articles (Study I, II, III and IV). Study I focuses on fuelwood consumption by the brick making industries (BMIs) and associated deforestation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In Study II the C densities (g C m-2) of the woodland tree biomass and soil (1 m) for 39 map sheets covering the study region were determined from national forest inventory data and global soil databases and the dependence on mean annual precipitation (MAP) and mean annual temperature (MAT) determined. The water balance of savannah woodlands for the same 39 map sheets was modelled in Study III and the variation in water balance components across the region evaluated. The potential impacts of climate change on woodland biomass C density and water-use (actual evapotranspiration, AET) was analysed for eight of the map sheets in Study IV. Sudanese BMIs consume a considerable amount of fuelwood that mainly comes from unsustainably managed

  14. Neem Gum as a Binder in a Formulated Paracetamol Tablet with Reference to Acacia Gum BP

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunjimi, Abayomi Tolulope; Alebiowu, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the physical, compressional, and binding properties of neem gum (NMG) obtained from the trunk of Azadirachta indica (A Juss) in a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with official Acacia gum BP (ACA). The physical and flow properties were evaluated using density parameters: porosity, Carr’s index, Hausner’s ratio, and flow rate. Compressional properties were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. The tensile strength, brittle fracture index, and crushing ...

  15. Addiction to the nicotine gum in never smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etter Jean-François

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addiction to nicotine gum has never been described in never smokers or in never users of tobacco. Methods Internet questionnaire in 2004–2006 in a self-selected sample of 434 daily users of nicotine gum. To assess dependence on nicotine gum, we used modified versions of the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Results Five never smokers used the nicotine gum daily. They had been using the nicotine gum for longer than the 429 ever smokers (median = 6 years vs 0.8 years, p = 0.004, and they had higher NDSS-gum Tolerance scores (median = 0.73 vs = -1.0, p = 0.03, a difference of 1.5 standard deviation units. Two never smokers had never used smokeless tobacco, both answered "extremely true" to: "I use nicotine gums because I am addicted to them", both "fully agreed" with: "after a few hours without chewing a nicotine gum, I feel an irresistible urge to chew one" and: "I am a prisoner of nicotine gum". Conclusion This is to our knowledge the first report of addiction to nicotine gum in never users of tobacco. However, this phenomenon is rare, and although the long-term effect of nicotine gum is unknown, this product is significantly less harmful than tobacco.

  16. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Nogourani M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in the first two periods sugar-free or sugar-containing chewing gums (Olips and Orbit, respectively and in the last period did not chew any gum. Participants were asked to chew daily five gum sticks after meals for about twenty minutes. The data were statistically analyzed using Repeated Measure ANOVA and paired-T test. "nResults: The results showed that chewing any gum even sucrose-containing gum decreased the level of dental plaque accumulation (P<0.001. However, the decreasing effect of sugar-free gums was significantly higher (P<0.001. "nConclusion: Although sugar free gum was more effective than sugar containing gum on reducing dental plaque accumulation, chewing even sugar containing gums could decrease the level of dental plaque.

  17. Pressure cell assisted solution characterization of polysaccharides. 2. Locust bean gum and tara gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picout, David R; Ross-Murphy, Simon B; Jumel, Kornelia; Harding, Stephen E

    2002-01-01

    Following the work carried out on guar gum in our first paper of a series, the "pressure cell" solubilization method was applied to two other less highly substituted galactomannans: locust bean gum (LBG) and tara gum. True molecular solution of the polymers was achieved using appropriate temperature, time, and pressure regimes. The technique of capillary viscometry was used to determine the intrinsic viscosity [eta] of the "pressure cell" treated and untreated samples. Molecular weight (M(w)) and radius of gyration (R(g)) were determined by light scattering. The data obtained for LBG and tara gum were compared statistically with reliable data found for guar gum in the literature. The variation in [eta] with M(w) followed the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada relationship, giving the exponent alpha = 0.74 +/- 0.01 for galactomannans consistent with random coil behavior. The characteristic ratio, C(infinity), and the chain persistence length, L(p), were both calculated for LBG and tara gum using the Burchard-Stockmayer-Fixman (BSF) method which is appropriate for flexible to semiflexible chains. A general value of 9 < C(infinity) < 16 and 3 < L(p) < 5 nm can now be estimated with statistical confidence for all galactomannans. According to our statistical analysis, the chain persistence length was found to be insensitive to the degree of galactose substitution.

  18. Chewing gum differentially affects aspects of attention in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucha, Oliver; Mecklinger, Lara; Maier, Kerstin; Hammerl, Marianne; Lange, Klaus W

    2004-06-01

    In a study published previously in this journal (Wilkinson et al., 2002), the effect of chewing gum on cognitive functioning was examined. The results of this study indicated that chewing a piece of gum results in an improvement of working memory and of both immediate and delayed recall of words but not of attention. In the present study, memory and a variety of attentional functions of healthy adult participants were examined under four different conditions: no chewing, mimicking chewing movements, chewing a piece of tasteless chewing gum and chewing a piece of spearmint flavoured chewing gum. The sequence of conditions was randomised across participants. The results showed that the chewing of gum did not improve participants' memory functions. Furthermore, chewing may differentially affect specific aspects of attention. While sustained attention was improved by the chewing of gum, alertness and flexibility were adversely affected by chewing. In conclusion, claims that the chewing a gum improves cognition should be viewed with caution.

  19. Tuliposides and tulipalins in tulip Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, A.; Verpoorte, R.; Gude, H.; Dijkema, M.H.G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Gummosis in tulip bulbs is one of the negative effects of ethylene gas that is produced during storage by Fusarium-infected bulbs on the healthy bulbs. Several aspects of the gummosis process, like the factors inducing it, the underlying carbohydrate metabolism and the composition of the gum have

  20. Flavor release measurement from gum model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovejero-López, I.; Haahr, Anne-Mette; van den Berg, Frans W.J.

    2004-01-01

    -scaled using the signal from acetone in the breath of subjects. Next, APCI-MS and sensory TI curves are smoothed by low-pass filtering. Principal component analysis of the individual curves is used to display graphically the product differentiation by APCI-MS or TI signals. It is shown that differences in gum...

  1. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant... specifications: (1) Residual isopropyl alcohol not to exceed 750 parts per million. (2) An aqueous solution...

  2. PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND gabonensis GUM EXUDATES A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND gabonensis GUM EXUDATES A. Sani Mamman Ibrahim, Abdullahi. Department of Chemistry ibrakimikel@gma. ABSTRACT. Irvingia gabonensis (Aubry-Lecomte ex O'R. North Eastern Nigeria. The plant is. Physicochemical and rheological studies we standard procedures and the results wer.

  3. ESR spectroscopic properties of irradiated gum Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonor, S J; Gómez, J A; Kinoshita, A; Calandreli, I; Tfouni, E; Baffa, O

    2013-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of irradiated gum Arabic with doses between 0.5 and 5 kGy were studied. A linear relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensities of the ESR spectra was observed. ESR spectra of irradiated gum Arabic showed a decay of relative concentrations of free radicals originated by radiation and the production of at least two species of free radicals with half-times: 3.3 and 125.4 h. The results of spectral simulations for these radical groups were giso=2.0046; A=1.2 mT and gx=gy=2.0062, gz=2.0025. Hydration and dehydration of irradiated gum Arabic returns the ESR spectrum to its initial state before irradiation. The results show that ESR can be used as simple and reliable method to detect irradiated gum Arabic up to 60 days after initial radiation with doses on the order of 5 kGy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Emulsifying and suspending properties of cashew gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emulsifying abilities of CG were juxtaposed with those of established AG and both gums were found to produce emulsions of liquid paraffin with varying stabilities. At 10%w/v emulsifier concentration, emulsions made with CG creamed within 24 hours of formulation but at 20%w/v, the emulsion remained stable throughout ...

  5. Xanthan gum and Scleroglucan - how both differ at elevated temperatures. Industrial biopolymers for oilwell drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, P.; Keilhofer, G. [Degussa Construction Polymers GmbH, Trostberg (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Industrial biopolymers produced by microorganisms have become very popular in the oilfield over the last years. Especially Xanthan Gum and Scleroglucan are used extensively as viscosifiers for various drilling fluid applications due to its unique rheological properties. Scleroglucan is known to be more temperature stable than Xanthan Gum. It is distinguished by a better stability against molecular decomposition. Moreover, Scleroglucan offers a better thickening performance at elevated temperatures. This latter aspect is often neglected when temperature stability is discussed. Although the viscosity-behaviour at increased temperature is of decisive importance with regard to downhole conditions. Rheology measurements indicate that Scleroglucan becomes superior to Xanthan Gum even at moderate temperatures of 60 to 80 C (140 to 175 F). At these temperatures and above, Xanthan Gum fluid viscosity drops significantly. Whereas Scleroglucan shows a flat and stable performance profile. This advantage of Scleroglucan first became obvious from a solids settling experiment at 80 C (175 F). It was only the Scleroglucan solution that retained the sized sand particles in suspension. While in the Xanthan Gum solution the solids settled down completely. Surprisingly, from the oilfield-standard FANN 35 SA viscometer this result was not evident. The instrument does not reach the ultra-low-shear range which is most relevant for particle settling. Advanced special instruments are available to cover this. However, it turned out, that also a common Brookfield HAT viscometer is very well suited for this purpose. Equipped with a heating cup and rotating at its lowest speed of 0.5 rpm, the instrument provides a simple and reliable approach to trace suspension capacity with increasing temperature. For example, with 2 ppb of Scleroglucan in a CaCl{sub 2} brine the biopolymer provides a stable Brookfield viscosity of about 20.000 mPas. Whereas with 2 ppb Xanthan Gum it drops down to 5.200 m

  6. The genome of woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaev, Vladimir; Sargent, Daniel J; Crowhurst, Ross N; Mockler, Todd C; Folkerts, Otto; Delcher, Arthur L; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Liston, Aaron; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Burns, Paul; Davis, Thomas M; Slovin, Janet P; Bassil, Nahla; Hellens, Roger P; Evans, Clive; Harkins, Tim; Kodira, Chinnappa; Desany, Brian; Crasta, Oswald R; Jensen, Roderick V; Allan, Andrew C; Michael, Todd P; Setubal, Joao Carlos; Celton, Jean-Marc; Rees, D Jasper G; Williams, Kelly P; Holt, Sarah H; Ruiz Rojas, Juan Jairo; Chatterjee, Mithu; Liu, Bo; Silva, Herman; Meisel, Lee; Adato, Avital; Filichkin, Sergei A; Troggio, Michela; Viola, Roberto; Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Wang, Hao; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Elser, Justin; Raja, Rajani; Priest, Henry D; Bryant, Douglas W; Fox, Samuel E; Givan, Scott A; Wilhelm, Larry J; Naithani, Sushma; Christoffels, Alan; Salama, David Y; Carter, Jade; Lopez Girona, Elena; Zdepski, Anna; Wang, Wenqin; Kerstetter, Randall A; Schwab, Wilfried; Korban, Schuyler S; Davik, Jahn; Monfort, Amparo; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Arus, Pere; Mittler, Ron; Flinn, Barry; Aharoni, Asaph; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Salzberg, Steven L; Dickerman, Allan W; Velasco, Riccardo; Borodovsky, Mark; Veilleux, Richard E; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    The woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca (2n = 2x = 14), is a versatile experimental plant system. This diminutive herbaceous perennial has a small genome (240 Mb), is amenable to genetic transformation and shares substantial sequence identity with the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and other economically important rosaceous plants. Here we report the draft F. vesca genome, which was sequenced to ×39 coverage using second-generation technology, assembled de novo and then anchored to the genetic linkage map into seven pseudochromosomes. This diploid strawberry sequence lacks the large genome duplications seen in other rosids. Gene prediction modeling identified 34,809 genes, with most being supported by transcriptome mapping. Genes critical to valuable horticultural traits including flavor, nutritional value and flowering time were identified. Macrosyntenic relationships between Fragaria and Prunus predict a hypothetical ancestral Rosaceae genome that had nine chromosomes. New phylogenetic analysis of 154 protein-coding genes suggests that assignment of Populus to Malvidae, rather than Fabidae, is warranted.

  7. Intrinsic viscosity of binary gum mixtures with xanthan gum and guar gum: Effect of NaCl, sucrose, and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, J H; Yoo, B

    2017-12-29

    The intrinsic viscosity ([η]) values of binary gum mixtures with xanthan gum (XG) and guar gum (GG) mixed with NaCl and sucrose at different concentrations as well as in the presence of different pH levels were examined in dilute solution as a function of XG/GG mixing ratio (100/0, 75/25, 50/50, and 0/100). Experimental values of concentration (C) and relative viscosity (η rel ) or specific viscosity (η sp ) of gums in dilute solution were fitted to five models to determine [η] values of binary gum mixtures including individual gums. A [η] model (η rel =1+[η]C) of Tanglertpaibul and Rao is recommended as the best model to estimate [η] values for the binary gum mixtures with XG and GG as affected by NaCl, sucrose, and pH. Overall, the synergistic interaction of XG-GG mixtures in the presence of NaCl and sucrose showed a greatly positive variation between measured and calculated values of [η]. In contrast, the binary gum mixtures showed synergy only under an acidic condition (pH3). These results suggest that the NaCl and sucrose addition or acidic condition appears to affect the intermolecular interaction occurred between XG and GG at different gum mixing ratios. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Woodlands: Una forma diferente de gobernar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Insa-Ciriza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Woodlands (Texas es uno de los mejores ejemplos de éxito de los partenariados público-privados entre el Departamento de Urbanismo y Vivienda Americano (Department of Housing and Urban Development, US - HUD y la empresa privada. The Woodlands, que fue creada como una «Nueva Ciudad» por la compañía Mitchell Energy & Development Corporation, ha ido creciendo y creando una masa crítica de residentes, trabajadores, su propio sentido de comunidad y lo más importante, su propia forma de gobierno. Es el único caso en Estados Unidos de ciudad gobernada por asociaciones privadas. Estas asociaciones, representadas por un Consejo de Administración, proveen la mayoría de los servicios públicos a los ciudadanos. En este artículo se muestra lo que llamo «complicidad ciudadana» basada en lo que el Nuevo Servicio Público define como gobierno basado en la comunidad. Ellos no están reinventando ninguna clase de gobierno, lo que están haciendo es crear una nueva forma de gobierno en la que los ciudadanos prefieren tomar el mando que servir. El estudio del caso que muestro nos ayuda a entender cómo una mayor participación de los ciudadanos en las tareas de la administración local puede hacer disminuir visiblemente el poder del promotor en el desarrollo de una Nueva Ciudad. Esta complicidad ciudadana se traduce en términos de implicación de los miembros de la comunidad en el crecimiento y en el Gobierno de la ciudad

  9. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819).

  10. Starch-guar gum extrudates: microstructure, physicochemical properties and in-vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borries-Medrano, Erich; Jaime-Fonseca, Mónica R; Aguilar-Méndez, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    Starch-guar gum mixtures were obtained by extrusion using a three-variable Box-Behnken statistic design. Morphology, expansion index, viscosity, crystallinity and digestion in vitro of the extruded samples were analyzed through response surface methodology (RSM). The extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the samples. Starch-guar gum samples showed expansion index and viscosity up to 1.55 and 1400mPas, respectively. The crystallinity of the samples was modified by adding guar gum to the extrudates, showing correlation between long-range order (X-ray diffraction) and short-range order (FTIR spectroscopy). Guar induced microstructural changes and its role in gelatinization-melting processes was significant. The rate of glucose release decreased from 0.47 to 0.43mM/min when the extrusion temperature decreased. However, adding guar gum to starch had no significant effect on glucose release. Overall, the extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the extruded samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stand biomass and volume estimation for Miombo woodlands at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Tanzania ignored small branches and small trees. Consequently, this study was carried out to develop new individual tree volume and biomass equations, and assess current regeneration status, biodiversity and yield of miombo woodlands ...

  12. Burning in banksia woodlands: how does the fire-free period influence reptile communities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie E Valentine

    Full Text Available Fire is an important management tool for both hazard reduction burning and maintenance of biodiversity. The impact of time since last fire on fauna is an important factor to understand as land managers often aim for prescribed burning regimes with specific fire-free intervals. However, our current understanding of the impact of time since last fire on fauna is largely unknown and likely dependent on vegetation type. We examined the responses of reptiles to fire age in banksia woodlands, and the interspersed melaleuca damplands among them, north of Perth, Western Australia, where the current prescribed burning regime is targeting a fire-free period of 8-12 years. The response of reptiles to fire was dependent on vegetation type. Reptiles were generally more abundant (e.g. Lerista elegans and Ctenophorus adelaidensis and specious in banksia sites. Several species (e.g. Menetia greyii, Cryptoblepharus buchananii preferred long unburnt melaleuca sites (>16 years since last fire, YSLF compared to recently burnt sites (16 YSLF. The terrestrial dragon C. adelaidensis and the skink Morethia obscura displayed a strong response to fire in banksia woodlands only. Highest abundances of the dragon were detected in the recently burnt (35 YSLF banksia woodlands, while the skink was more abundant in older sites. Habitats from a range of fire ages are required to support the reptiles we detected, especially the longer unburnt (>16 YSLF melaleuca habitat. Current burning prescriptions are reducing the availability of these older habitats.

  13. Burning in banksia woodlands: how does the fire-free period influence reptile communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Leonie E; Reaveley, Alice; Johnson, Brent; Fisher, Rebecca; Wilson, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    Fire is an important management tool for both hazard reduction burning and maintenance of biodiversity. The impact of time since last fire on fauna is an important factor to understand as land managers often aim for prescribed burning regimes with specific fire-free intervals. However, our current understanding of the impact of time since last fire on fauna is largely unknown and likely dependent on vegetation type. We examined the responses of reptiles to fire age in banksia woodlands, and the interspersed melaleuca damplands among them, north of Perth, Western Australia, where the current prescribed burning regime is targeting a fire-free period of 8-12 years. The response of reptiles to fire was dependent on vegetation type. Reptiles were generally more abundant (e.g. Lerista elegans and Ctenophorus adelaidensis) and specious in banksia sites. Several species (e.g. Menetia greyii, Cryptoblepharus buchananii) preferred long unburnt melaleuca sites (>16 years since last fire, YSLF) compared to recently burnt sites (16 YSLF). The terrestrial dragon C. adelaidensis and the skink Morethia obscura displayed a strong response to fire in banksia woodlands only. Highest abundances of the dragon were detected in the recently burnt (35 YSLF) banksia woodlands, while the skink was more abundant in older sites. Habitats from a range of fire ages are required to support the reptiles we detected, especially the longer unburnt (>16 YSLF) melaleuca habitat. Current burning prescriptions are reducing the availability of these older habitats.

  14. Burning in Banksia Woodlands: How Does the Fire-Free Period Influence Reptile Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Leonie E.; Reaveley, Alice; Johnson, Brent; Fisher, Rebecca; Wilson, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Fire is an important management tool for both hazard reduction burning and maintenance of biodiversity. The impact of time since last fire on fauna is an important factor to understand as land managers often aim for prescribed burning regimes with specific fire-free intervals. However, our current understanding of the impact of time since last fire on fauna is largely unknown and likely dependent on vegetation type. We examined the responses of reptiles to fire age in banksia woodlands, and the interspersed melaleuca damplands among them, north of Perth, Western Australia, where the current prescribed burning regime is targeting a fire-free period of 8–12 years. The response of reptiles to fire was dependent on vegetation type. Reptiles were generally more abundant (e.g. Lerista elegans and Ctenophorus adelaidensis) and specious in banksia sites. Several species (e.g. Menetia greyii, Cryptoblepharus buchananii) preferred long unburnt melaleuca sites (>16 years since last fire, YSLF) compared to recently burnt sites (16 YSLF). The terrestrial dragon C. adelaidensis and the skink Morethia obscura displayed a strong response to fire in banksia woodlands only. Highest abundances of the dragon were detected in the recently burnt (35 YSLF) banksia woodlands, while the skink was more abundant in older sites. Habitats from a range of fire ages are required to support the reptiles we detected, especially the longer unburnt (>16 YSLF) melaleuca habitat. Current burning prescriptions are reducing the availability of these older habitats. PMID:22496806

  15. Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles for essential oil encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Erick F; Paula, Haroldo C B; de Paula, Regina C M

    2014-01-01

    Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles were prepared via spray-drying, aiming at the development of a biopolymer blend for encapsulation of an essential oil. Nanoparticles were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic volume, surface charge, Lippia sidoides essential oil content and release profile, in addition to being analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis (TGA/DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. Nanoparticles in solution were found to have averaged sizes in the range 223-399 nm, and zeta potential values ranging from -30 to -36 mV. Encapsulated oil levels varied from 1.9 to 4.4% with an encapsulation efficiency of up to 55%. The in vitro release profile showed that between 45 and 95% of oil was released within 30-50h. Kinetic studies revealed that release pattern follow a Korsmeyer-Peppas mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperature dependency of the interaction between xanthan gum and sage seed gum: An interpretation of dynamic rheology and thixotropy based on creep test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Seyed M A; Behrouzian, Fataneh; Alghooneh, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The viscoelastic (transient and dynamic) and time-dependent rheological behaviors of XG (xanthan gum), SSG (sage seed gum) and their blends at various ratios (1-3, 1-1, and 3-1 SSG-XG) and temperatures (10, 30, and 50C) were investigated using creep and recovery analyses. The creep compliance was converted to stress relaxation data; then, the structural kinetic model satisfactorily fitted the time-dependent relaxation modulus. Furthermore, dynamic rheology of mixtures was investigated using creep analyses. The most important contribution of the Maxwell spring to deformation (53.51%), was that corresponding to the SSG at 50C and the most important contribution of the Maxwell dashpot to the maximum deformation, were those corresponding to the XG (61.44%) and 1-3 SSG-XG (58.91%) samples both at 50C. The breakdown rate constant ( α) of the crosslinked gum structure in SSG and 3-1 SSG-XG under the application of external shear stress increases with temperature from 10 to 50C in the range of 0.14-0.32 (1/s) and 0.14-0.24 (1/s), respectively, whereas other dispersions showed the reverse trend. Among all dispersions, only XG and 1-3 SSG-XG demonstrated crossover frequency at 9.95 and 31.47 rad/s, respectively, at 50C, indicative of the lowest entanglement density for 1-3 SSG-XG. The greatest interaction between SSG and XG occurred for 3-1 ratio at 50C, which was confirmed by the Han curves. Hydrocolloid blends, particularly those consisting of xanthan gum and a galactomannan from new source can provide a range of attractive textural properties. Rheological studies contribute to the description of the molecular structure and prediction of the structural changes during their manufacturing processes. Sage seed gum (SSG), as a polyelectrolyte galactomannan, has a great potential to exert stabilizing, thickening, gelling and binding properties in food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical systems. Therefore, we elaborate the interactions between SSG and xanthan gum and also the

  17. Bleeding gums: Duloxetine may be the cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balhara YPS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Duloxetine is a newly introduced drug. It is being prescribed for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain and major depressive disorder. The most frequently observed adverse events with duloxetine are nausea, dry mouth and somnolence, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, feeling of fatigue, dizziness, somnolence, hypohidrosis, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. One of the patients being prescribed the drug developed bleeding gums on being started with the drug which resolved on stopping it. We hereby report this case.

  18. Highly Concentrated Alginate-Gellan Gum Composites for 3D Plotting of Complex Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Rahul Akkineni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering, additive manufacturing (AM technologies have brought considerable progress as they allow the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures with defined architecture. 3D plotting is a versatile, extrusion-based AM technology suitable for processing a wide range of biomaterials including hydrogels. In this study, composites of highly concentrated alginate and gellan gum were prepared in order to combine the excellent printing properties of alginate with the favorable gelling characteristics of gellan gum. Mixtures of 16.7 wt % alginate and 2 or 3 wt % gellan gum were found applicable for 3D plotting. Characterization of the resulting composite scaffolds revealed an increased stiffness in the wet state (15%–20% higher Young’s modulus and significantly lower volume swelling in cell culture medium compared to pure alginate scaffolds (~10% vs. ~23%. Cytocompatibility experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC revealed that cell attachment was improved—the seeding efficiency was ~2.5–3.5 times higher on the composites than on pure alginate. Additionally, the composites were shown to support hMSC proliferation and early osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, print fidelity of highly concentrated alginate-gellan gum composites was comparable to those of pure alginate; after plotting and crosslinking, the scaffolds possessed improved qualities regarding shape fidelity, mechanical strength, and initial cell attachment making them attractive for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Evaluation of masticatory function after maxillectomy using a colour-changing chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Y; Ishida, S; Kobayashi, M; Hasegawa, T; Nibu, K; Komori, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the masticatory dysfunction after maxillectomy using a colour-changing chewing gum. Thirty-nine patients who underwent maxillectomy between January 2002 and May 2010 in the Department of Kobe University Hospital were recruited for this study. There were 20 male and 19 female subjects, with a median age of 73·3 years (range of 44-90) at the time of surgery. The intra-oral conditions after maxillectomy were classified by HS classification, and the masticatory function was evaluated by a colour-changing chewing gum and the results of a modified Sato's questionnaire. The scores of the colour-changing gum were closely correlated with the scores of the modified Sato's questionnaire (r = 0·661, P masticatory dysfunction were the number of anchor teeth ≤2 and a soft palate defect. A colour-changing gum was found to be useful for evaluating the post-operative masticatory function, and it was important to conserve the anchor teeth and the soft palate to avoid masticatory dysfunction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [Effect of chewing gum on halitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca-Monasterios, Fiorella; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; López-López, José

    2014-07-22

    This study aims to estimate the prevalence of oral halitosis in a young population and show the effect of chewing gum on their breath. Prospective, descriptive correlational cross section study. We selected a convenience sample of 121 young individuals and 98 completed the study. It was carried out at the University Dental Hospital-University of Barcelona. The protocol consisted of: questionnaire, oral clinical evaluation, organoleptic tests (OT) and measurement of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) with sulphide monitoring before and after chewing gum during 15 min, with 2 calibrated investigators. A percentage of 87.8 had adequate oral hygiene, 17.3% reported bad breath and 29.6% had xerostomia. Forty-four subjects had a OT grade ≥2; the agreement of examiners was 75%. The VSC in 53 individuals were ≤100 parts per billion (ppb) and in 45 subjects, it was>100 ppb. A post-reduction of VSC of 17.34% was obtained with a mean decrease of 1.8-9.0 ppb (P=.003). The prevalence of halitosis was 36.7%. The use of chewing gum as an adjunct in cases of halitosis decreases the VSC, improving the perception of others and the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Validating the applicability of the GUM procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper is directed at practitioners seeking a degree of assurance in the quality of the results of an uncertainty evaluation when using the procedure in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) (JCGM 100 : 2008). Such assurance is required in adhering to general standards such as International Standard ISO/IEC 17025 or other sector-specific standards. We investigate the extent to which such assurance can be given. For many practical cases, a measurement result incorporating an evaluated uncertainty that is correct to one significant decimal digit would be acceptable. Any quantification of the numerical precision of an uncertainty statement is naturally relative to the adequacy of the measurement model and the knowledge used of the quantities in that model. For general univariate and multivariate measurement models, we emphasize the use of a Monte Carlo method, as recommended in GUM Supplements 1 and 2. One use of this method is as a benchmark in terms of which measurement results provided by the GUM can be assessed in any particular instance. We mainly consider measurement models that are linear in the input quantities, or have been linearized and the linearization process is deemed to be adequate. When the probability distributions for those quantities are independent, we indicate the use of other approaches such as convolution methods based on the fast Fourier transform and, particularly, Chebyshev polynomials as benchmarks.

  2. Guar gum as efficient non-toxic inhibitor of carbon steel corrosion in phosphoric acid medium: Electrochemical, surface, DFT and MD simulations studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messali, M.; Lgaz, H.; Dassanayake, R.; Salghi, R.; Jodeh, S.; Abidi, N.; Hamed, O.

    2017-10-01

    Guar gum is a water-soluble, nonionic, nontoxic, biodegradable and biocompatible hetero polysaccharide with unlimited number of industrial applications. In this study, guar gum was evaluated as a natural inhibitor of carbon steel (CS) corrosion in 2 M H3PO4 solution. The characteristic effect of guar gum on the steel corrosion was studied at concentration ranges from 0.1 to 1.0 g/L at 298-328 K by weight loss and electrochemical methods. Obtained results showed that, the inhibition efficiency (η%) of guar gum decreased slightly when the temperature increased and increased by increasing the inhibitor concentration reaching the maximum value at 1.0 g/L. The adsorption of guar gum on steel surface was studied by the Temkin adsorption model. EIS measurements indicate that the values of the polarization resistance (Rp) of CS in presence of guar gum are significantly higher than that of the untreated surface. Steel surface coated with guar gum was analyzed by SEM, FTIR and XRD. The quantum calculations using DFT method and Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulations were performed to define the relationship between inhibition performance of investigated compound and their molecular structure.

  3. Evaluation of carboxymethyl gellan gum as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Munish; Singh, Seema; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-02-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate carboxymethyl gellan gum as bioadhesive polymer for drug delivery applications. Gellan gum was carboxymethylated by reacting it with monochloroacetic acid. Degree of carboxymethyl substitution was found to be 1.18. Further, carboxymethylation of gellan gum was found to increase its degree of crystallinity, surface roughness and diminish the cation-induced gelation. On comparative evaluation carboxymethyl gellan gum showed 2.71-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than gellan gum. Evaluation of ex vivo ocular tolerance using chorioallantoic membrane of hen's egg and cytotoxicity screening on Vero cells using resazurin assay revealed that caroboxymethyl gellan gum is non-irritant and biocompatible. Ionotiropically gelled beads of carboxymethyl gellan gum formulated using metformin as the model drug and calcium chloride as the cross-linking agent showed ex vivo bioadhesion of 100% over 24h. Further, it was observed that carboxymethyl gellan gum beads released metformin at a rate faster than gellan gum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  5. Brief report: gum chewing affects standardized math scores in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A; Moreno, Jennette P; Foreyt, John P

    2012-04-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum during class and testing, or a control condition with no gum (NGC). Participants included 108 students. The math sections of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) and the Woodcock Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III), and math class grades were used to assess academic performance. Students in the gum chewing condition improved standardized test scores and maintained higher grades in math class compared to those in the no-gum chewing condition. These results are encouraging as gum chewing may be a cost-effective and easily implemented method to increase student performance. NCT00792116. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The genome of woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaev, Vladimir; Sargent, Daniel J; Crowhurst, Ross N; Mockler, Todd C; Folkerts, Otto; Delcher, Arthur L; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Liston, Aaron; Mane, Shrinivasrao P; Burns, Paul; Davis, Thomas M; Slovin, Janet P; Bassil, Nahla; Hellens, Roger P; Evans, Clive; Harkins, Tim; Kodira, Chinnappa; Desany, Brian; Crasta, Oswald R; Jensen, Roderick V; Allan, Andrew C; Michael, Todd P; Setubal, Joao Carlos; Celton, Jean-Marc; Rees, D Jasper G; Williams, Kelly P; Holt, Sarah H; Ruiz Rojas, Juan Jairo; Chatterjee, Mithu; Liu, Bo; Silva, Herman; Meisel, Lee; Adato, Avital; Filichkin, Sergei A; Troggio, Michela; Viola, Roberto; Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Wang, Hao; Dharmawardhana, Palitha; Elser, Justin; Raja, Rajani; Priest, Henry D; Bryant, Douglas W; Fox, Samuel E; Givan, Scott A; Wilhelm, Larry J; Naithani, Sushma; Christoffels, Alan; Salama, David Y; Carter, Jade; Girona, Elena Lopez; Zdepski, Anna; Wang, Wenqin; Kerstetter, Randall A; Schwab, Wilfried; Korban, Schuyler S; Davik, Jahn; Monfort, Amparo; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Arus, Pere; Mittler, Ron; Flinn, Barry; Aharoni, Asaph; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Salzberg, Steven L; Dickerman, Allan W; Velasco, Riccardo; Borodovsky, Mark; Veilleux, Richard E; Folta, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    The woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca (2n = 2x = 14), is a versatile experimental plant system. This diminutive herbaceous perennial has a small genome (240 Mb), is amenable to genetic transformation and shares substantial sequence identity with the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and other economically important rosaceous plants. Here we report the draft F. vesca genome, which was sequenced to ×39 coverage using second-generation technology, assembled de novo and then anchored to the genetic linkage map into seven pseudochromosomes. This diploid strawberry sequence lacks the large genome duplications seen in other rosids. Gene prediction modeling identified 34,809 genes, with most being supported by transcriptome mapping. Genes critical to valuable horticultural traits including flavor, nutritional value and flowering time were identified. Macrosyntenic relationships between Fragaria and Prunus predict a hypothetical ancestral Rosaceae genome that had nine chromosomes. New phylogenetic analysis of 154 protein-coding genes suggests that assignment of Populus to Malvidae, rather than Fabidae, is warranted. PMID:21186353

  7. Status of woodland caribou in Saskatchewan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Rettie

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that woodland caribou in Saskatchewan exist as relatively separate populations within a metapopulation. Preliminary analyses show that individuals within all populations are selecting peatland habitat types (i.e., fens and bogs throughout the year. Despite an absence of hunting, populations south of the Precambrian shield appear to be declining slowly, while those on the southern margin of the shield may be declining more rapidly. The apparent population decline is likely due to high rates of predation, especially on neonates. To maintain viable caribou populations in the region, forestry operations must be managed to maintain adequate amounts of preferred habitat types and connections among populations. At a coarse scale, preferred habitat is that which acts as a refuge from predators. Additional information is required to categorize specific peatland types, as data in the existing provincial forest inventory are inadequate for both selection analysis and management purposes. Ongoing research into revisions to the forest inventory and analyses of bog and fen types selected by caribou are needed to focus future management strategies.

  8. The Distribution and Abundance of an Island Population of Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in the Far North of Their Geographic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Denise C.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Krockenberger, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Koalas are an iconic species of charismatic megafauna, of substantial social and conservation significance. They are widely distributed, often at low densities, and individuals can be difficult to detect, making population surveys challenging and costly. Consequently, koala population estimates have been limited and the results inconsistent. The aims of this study were to estimate the distribution, relative abundance and population size of the koalas on Magnetic Island, far north Queensland. Population densities were estimated in 18 different vegetation types present on the island using a Fecal Standing Crop Method. Koala density ranged from 0.404 ha−1, recorded in forest red gum and bloodwood woodland, to absence from eight of the vegetation types surveyed. The second highest density of 0.297 koalas ha−1 was recorded in mixed eucalypt woodland, which covers 45% of the island. The total abundance of koalas on Magnetic Island, not including those present in urban areas, was estimated at 825±175 (SEM). The large variation in koala density across vegetation types reinforces the need for sampling stratification when calculating abundance over large areas, as uniformity of habitat quality cannot be assumed. In this context, koala populations also occur in low densities in areas generally regarded as poor quality koala habitat. These results highlight the importance of protecting vegetation communities not traditionally considered to have high conservation value to koalas, as these habitats may be essential for maintaining viable, widespread, low-density populations. The results from this study provide a baseline to assess future trends in koala distribution, density and abundance on Magnetic Island. PMID:23527258

  9. The distribution and abundance of an island population of Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus in the far north of their geographic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise C McGregor

    Full Text Available Koalas are an iconic species of charismatic megafauna, of substantial social and conservation significance. They are widely distributed, often at low densities, and individuals can be difficult to detect, making population surveys challenging and costly. Consequently, koala population estimates have been limited and the results inconsistent. The aims of this study were to estimate the distribution, relative abundance and population size of the koalas on Magnetic Island, far north Queensland. Population densities were estimated in 18 different vegetation types present on the island using a Fecal Standing Crop Method. Koala density ranged from 0.404 ha(-1, recorded in forest red gum and bloodwood woodland, to absence from eight of the vegetation types surveyed. The second highest density of 0.297 koalas ha(-1 was recorded in mixed eucalypt woodland, which covers 45% of the island. The total abundance of koalas on Magnetic Island, not including those present in urban areas, was estimated at 825±175 (SEM. The large variation in koala density across vegetation types reinforces the need for sampling stratification when calculating abundance over large areas, as uniformity of habitat quality cannot be assumed. In this context, koala populations also occur in low densities in areas generally regarded as poor quality koala habitat. These results highlight the importance of protecting vegetation communities not traditionally considered to have high conservation value to koalas, as these habitats may be essential for maintaining viable, widespread, low-density populations. The results from this study provide a baseline to assess future trends in koala distribution, density and abundance on Magnetic Island.

  10. Formulation development and evaluation of metformin chewing gum with bitter taste masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Abolfazl Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Metfornin chewing gum had suitable appearance and appropriate invitro characteristics that fallow the pharmacopeia suggestions. This chewable gum showed bitterness suppression with a suitable release rate.

  11. Stabilization of emulsions by gum tragacanth (Astragalus spp.) correlates to the galacturonic acid content and methoxylation degree of the gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Meyer, Anne S.; Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    2013-01-01

    –270 mg/g), and galactose (∼40–140 mg/g), and also contained fucose, rhamnose, and glucose. The ability of the gums to act as stabilizers in whey protein isolate based emulsions varied. The best emulsion stabilization effect, measured as lowest creaming index ratio after 20 days, was obtained with the A....... fluccosus gum. The emulsion stabilization effect correlated linearly and positively to the methoxylation degree, and galacturonic acid content of the gums, but not to acetyl or fucose content. A particularly high correlation was found between methoxyl level in the soluble gum part and emulsion stabilization...

  12. Evaluation of the content of TiO2 nanoparticles in the coatings of chewing gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudefoi, William; Terrisse, Hélène; Popa, Aurelian Florin; Gautron, Eric; Humbert, Bernard; Ropers, Marie-Hélène

    2018-02-01

    Titanium dioxide is a metal oxide used as a white pigment in many food categories, including confectionery. Due to differences in the mass fraction of nanoparticles contained in TiO2, the estimated intakes of TiO2 nanoparticles differ by a factor of 10 in the literature. To resolve this problem, a better estimation of the mass of nanoparticles present in food products is needed. In this study, we focused our efforts on chewing gum, which is one of the food products contributing most to the intake of TiO2. The coatings of four kinds of chewing gum, where the presence of TiO2 was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, were extracted in aqueous phases. The extracts were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to establish their chemical composition, crystallinity and size distribution. The coatings of the four chewing gums differ chemically from each other, and more specifically the amount of TiO2 varies from one coating to another. TiO2 particles constitute the entire coating of some chewing gums, whereas for others, TiO2 particles are embedded in an organic matrix and/or mixed with minerals like calcium carbonate, talc, or magnesium silicate. We found 1.1 ± 0.3 to 17.3 ± 0.9 mg TiO2 particles per piece of chewing gum, with a mean diameter of 135 ± 42 nm. TiO2 nanoparticles account for 19 ± 4% of all particles, which represents a mass fraction of 4.2 ± 0.1% on average. The intake of nanoparticles is thus highly dependent on the kind of chewing gum, with an estimated range extending from 0.04 ± 0.01 to 0.81 ± 0.04 mg of nano-TiO2 per piece of chewing gum. These data should serve to refine the exposure scenario.

  13. Novel calcified gum Arabic porous nano-composite scaffold for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, M; Hasannia, S; Faghihi, Sh; Mashayekhi, F; Zadeh, H H; Mostofi, S B

    2017-07-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical and biological properties of a nanocomposite scaffold containing both mineral and polysaccharide constituents. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (n-HA) was synthesized from dead abra ovata shells using wet chemical methods and was used in different ratios in concert with gum Arabic, a branched plant polysaccharide. N-HA/gum nanocomposite was fabricated with freeze-drying process and characterized by FTIR and SEM for chemical structure and morphology. Porosity was estimated using liquid substitution method. The scaffold mechanical properties were evaluated by compressive test measurement. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed using alkaline phosphatase production and biomineralization was evaluated using Alizarin red assay. Results demonstrated that the hydroxyapatite/gum Arabic nanocomposite had favorable biocompatibility and a similar structure to natural bone matrix. Porous nanocomposite possessed macropore networks with a porosity 87-93% and mean pore size ranging between 164 and 230 μm. The gum/HA with a ratio of 50% w/w HA had the highest compressive modulus of ∼75.3 MPa Pa (MPa) and the ultimate compressive stress of ∼16.6 MPa. C2C12 cells cultured on a scaffold with higher percentage (40 and 50 w/w) of HA demonstrated increased ALP levels and calcium deposition. The data from the present study demonstrated significant changes to the biomechanical properties and osteoconductivity of the nanocomposite scaffold by modulating its mineral content. Nanocomposite scaffolds containing gum and n-HA of 40-50% exhibited highest mechanical properties, as well as supported increased biomineralization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of 90-day oral rat toxicity studies on the food additive, gum ghatti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, Robert R; Davis, Jeffrey; Moser, Glenda; Giri, Dipak K; Hayashi, Shim-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Gum ghatti, a polysaccharide of natural origin, is used in foods as a thickening, gelling, emulsifying and stabilizing agent. In a 90-day toxicity study following Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guideline #408, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (control), 0.5, 1.5 and 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M basal diet. Expected changes included increased full and empty cecal weights in 5% groups. Incidentally 2/10 females from the 5% gum ghatti group had a single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation. In a second 90-day study increased cecal weights were present in Sprague-Dawley females exposed to 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M and NIH-07 basal diets. A single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation occurred in 1/20 control females given AIN-93M basal diet. The colon ulcers were considered a sporadic change possibly attributable to AIN-93M basal diet. In the second study a few statistically significant alterations in clinical chemistry were considered sporadic and unrelated to treatment. Feed consumption among treated and control groups was similar for each sex. Gum ghatti intake at the 5% dietary level ranged from 3044 to 3825mg/kg body weight/day. The 5% dietary administration was a NOAEL in both studies. NOAELs for males and females in the first study were 3044 and 3309mg/kg/day, respectively. NOAELs for females in the second study were 3670 and 3825mg/kg/day for AIN-93M and NIH-07 diets, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A new study of iodine complexes of oxidized gum arabic: An interaction between iodine monochloride and aldehyde groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Akbar; Ganie, Showkat Ali; Mazumdar, Nasreen

    2018-01-15

    Gum arabic, a plant polysaccharide was oxidized with periodate to produce aldehyde groups by the cleavage of diols present in the sugar units. The oxidized gum was then iodinated with iodine monochloride (ICl) and the interaction between electrophilic iodine, I+ and reactive carbonyl groups of the modified gum was studied.Results of titrimetric estimation performed to determine the extent of oxidation and aldehyde content in the oxidized gum showed that degree of oxidation ranged between 19.68-50.19% which was observed to increase with periodate concentration; the corresponding aldehyde content was calculated to be 5.15-40.42%. Different strengths of ICl were used to iodinate the oxidized gum and the iodine content of the complexes varied from 6.11-11.72% as determined by iodometric titration. Structure elucidation of the iodine complexes conclusively established the attachment of ICl molecules to CHO groups. A reaction scheme has been proposed suggesting an electrophilic addition of the reagent to the aldehyde groups, a mechanism that was also supported by iodide ion release studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of asafetida Gum Extract on Blood Parameters and Histopathology of Testes in Male Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ayoubi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferula (Ferula assafetida is a perennial plant which belongs to Umbelliferea family is grow in a wide range of arid and semi-arid regions in Iran. Ferulla assafetida contains compounds including coumarins and sesquiterpens that has been traditionally used to treat diseases such as nervous disorders, asthma, gastrointestinal disease and epilepsy.. Effects of asafetida gum extract on blood parameters and histopathology of testes in male Wistar rat were studied using 32 rats with the initial body weight of 252 ± 4.3 g which randomly divided into 4 groups of 8 rats each the animals were injected with normal saline (control, and 75, 150 and 300 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg body weight of asafetida gum extract respectively. The result showed that, 300mg/kg asafetida gum extract caused adverse effects on blood cholesterol, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine transaminase (ALT concentration, while 75 mg/kg had positive effects on above-mentioned parameters. Serum testosterone significantly decreased by increasing the level of asafetida gum extract and 300 mg/kg group had the lowest serum testosterone concentration. The numbers of Leydig cell layers were suppressed in asafetida-treated animals in comparison with the control. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of asafetida gum extract are dose-dependent and the level 300 mg/kg caused adverse impacts on metabolites and reproductive performance in male Wistar rats. The refers more in vivo studies with bigger experiment population are required.

  17. Importance of dry savanna woodlands in rural livelihoods and wildlife conservation in southeastern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing human population, economic challenges, climate change impacts are intensifying reliance by local communities on savanna woodlands in tropical regions. Knowledge of the importance and value of savanna woodland ecosystems to rural livelihoods and wildlife conservation is therefore needed to

  18. Neem gum as a binder in a formulated paracetamol tablet with reference to Acacia gum BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjimi, Abayomi Tolulope; Alebiowu, Gbenga

    2014-04-01

    This study determined the physical, compressional, and binding properties of neem gum (NMG) obtained from the trunk of Azadirachta indica (A Juss) in a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with official Acacia gum BP (ACA). The physical and flow properties were evaluated using density parameters: porosity, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, and flow rate. Compressional properties were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. The tensile strength, brittle fracture index, and crushing strength-friability/disintegration time ratio were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of paracetamol tablets while the drug release properties of the tablets were assessed using disintegration time and dissolution times. Tablet formulations containing NMG exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing ACA. Neem gum produced paracetamol tablets with lower mechanical strength; however, the tendency of the tablets to cap or laminate was lower when compared to those containing ACA. Inclusion of NMG improved the balance between binding and disintegration properties of paracetamol tablets produced than those containing ACA. Neem gum produced paracetamol tablets with lower disintegration and dissolution times than those containing ACA.

  19. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-01-01

    .... This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  20. Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Technology, University of Jos, Nigeria, 3Pharmacy, School of Applied Sciences,. University of ... Where such polymers are used in eye, nose, ..... process [19]. The possession of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups by grewia gum [8] would enhance formation of hydrogen bonds between the gum and mucus, and may be.

  1. Gellan Gum: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar B. Bajaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharides are water-soluble polymers secreted by microorganisms during fermentation. The biopolymer gellan gum is a relatively recent addition to the family of microbial polysaccharides that is gaining much importance in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its novel properties. It is commercially produced by C. P. Kelco in Japan and the USA. Further research and development in biopolymer technology is expected to expand its use. This article presents a critical review of the available information on the gellan gum synthesized by Sphingomonas paucimobilis with special emphasis on its fermentative production and downstream processing. Rheological behaviour of fermentation broth during fermentative production of gellan gum and problems associated with mass transfer have been addressed. Information on the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gum, enzymes and precursors involved in gellan gum production and application of metabolic engineering for enhancement of yield of gellan gum has been specified. Characteristics of gellan gum with respect to its structure, physicochemical properties, rheology of its solutions and gel formation behaviour are discussed. An attempt has also been made to review the current and potential applications of gellan gum in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  2. Intrinsic viscosity of guar gum in sweeteners solutions | Samavati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheological methods were applied to study the effect of sweeteners on the rheological behavior of guar gum in dilute solutions. The concentration of the sweeteners were 0.1, 0.2%w/v for aspartame, acesulfame-k and cyclamate, and 0.001, 0.002%w/v for neotame. Gum was evaluated for intrinsic viscosity by various ...

  3. Gum Arabic authentication and mixture quantification by near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yongjiang; Sørensen, Klavs Martin; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    by the NIR spectroscopic method. In addition, a partial least squares (PLS) regression model is calibrated to predict the blending percentage of the two pure gum types, producing an accuracy, root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.8%. Sampling of the Gum Arabic ‘tears’ is discussed...

  4. Grewia Gum 1: Some Mechanical and Swelling Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Compacts (500 mg) of both freeze-dried and air-dried grewia gum were separately prepared by compression on a potassium bromide (KBr) press at different pressures and subjected to Heckel analysis. Swelling studies were performed using 200 mg compacts of the gum (freeze-dried or air-dried) compressed on ...

  5. Evaluation of the suspending property of grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in sulphadimidine suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for sulphadimidine. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  6. Suspension Properties Of Binary Mixtures Of Tragacanth Gum And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the effect of irvingia gum on the suspending properties of tragacanth in zinc oxide suspension has been investigated. The gum of Irvingia gabonensis was extracted by macerated and characterized using standard procedures. Batches of zinc oxide suspension were formulated with varying ratios of tragacanth ...

  7. Binding Properties Of A Polymeric Gum From Cola accuminata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The binding properties of a polymeric gum obtained from the pods of Cola accuminata was studied. The tablets produced with the new gum showed good weight uniformity, friability and hardness profiles. However all the tablets produced with 1 % w/w binder; Sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (SCMC) and Cola accuminata ...

  8. Evaluation of the Suspending Property of Grewia Gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in metronidazole suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for metronidazole. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  9. Increased gum arabic production after infestation of Acacia senegal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the beetle Agrilus nubeculosus and gum arabic production by Acacia senegal. Some trees were tapped and left open to facilitate infestation by A. nubeculosus and others were covered with wire mesh as control. Gum yield, physical and chemical properties of ...

  10. Preliminary Investigation of Gum from Hunteria Umbellata Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of the gum obtained from Hunteria umbellata K. Schum (family: Apocynaceae). The gum was extracted from the pulp of fresh fruit pod of Hunteria umbellata using acetone and water (ratio1:2). Granules were prepared by wet granulation technique using varying ...

  11. Oral ulceration due to chronic use of Nicorette gum: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Nagamani; Meinberg, Trudy

    2010-01-01

    Oral ulceration is a common presentation in a dental clinic. These ulcers may be acute or chronic, based on the duration of symptoms. The etiology of oral ulceration can range from trauma to squamous cell carcinoma. It is the responsibility of the dentist to differentiate the various etiologies of oral ulceration for proper management. This case report is presented to remind dentists that the long-term use of Nicorette gum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic oral ulcers.

  12. Microwave assisted synthesis of guar gum grafted sodium acrylate/cloisite superabsorbent nanocomposites: reaction parameters and swelling characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhitha, M; Sailaja, R R N; Priyambika, V S; Ravibabu, M V

    2014-04-01

    In this study, superabsorbent nanocomposites of guar gum grafted sodium acrylate have been synthesized via both microwave and conventional techniques. The reaction parameters of both techniques were optimized and the microwave assisted method was proved to have higher grafting yield with lesser time of reaction as compared to the conventional method. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that cloisite was exfoliated and uniformly dispersed in guar gum grafted sodium acrylate matrix. The results show that introducing cloisite into the guar gum grafted sodium acrylate network improved the swelling capability and the swelling rate of the superabsorbent nanocomposite was found to be enhanced at an optimal loading of 10% cloisite. The nanocomposites showed high water absorbency within a wide pH range. Preliminary studies on crystal violet dye removal showed promising results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sonication-Based Improvement of the Physicochemical Properties of Guar Gum as a Potential Substrate for Modified Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddique Akber Ansari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels.

  14. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viinanen, Arja; Salokannel, Maija; Lammintausta, Kaija

    2011-01-01

    Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria. PMID:21747872

  15. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Viinanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria.

  16. 77 FR 33560 - Eastern Maine Railway Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-Woodland Rail, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Eastern Maine Railway Company--Trackage Rights Exemption-- Woodland Rail, LLC Pursuant to a written trackage rights agreement dated April 30, 2012, Woodland Rail, LLC (Woodland Rail... a rail line known as the Calais Industrial Track (the Line). The Line is approximately 11.83 track...

  17. Land Cover Change and Woodland Degradation in a Charcoal Producing Semi-Arid Area in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiruki, H.M.; van der Zanden, E.H.; Malek, Z.; Verburg, P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Woodlands in Kenya are undergoing land cover change and degradation leading to loss of livelihoods. Uncontrolled charcoal production, although a livelihood source for communities living in woodland areas of Kenya, leads to woodland degradation. We used Landsat imagery, field plot data and household

  18. Age structure and expansion of pinon-juniper woodlands: a regional perspective in the Intermountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard F. Miller; Robin J. Tausch; E. Durant McArthur; Dustin D. Johnson; Stewart C. Sanderson

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the expansion of woodlands in the Intermountain West; however, few have compared the chronology of expansion for woodlands across different geographic regions or determined the mix and extent of presettlement stands. We evaluated tree age structure and establishment for six woodlands in four ecological provinces in the central and...

  19. Avian use of successional cottonwood (Populus deltoides) woodlands along the middle Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; John E. Gobeille

    2004-01-01

    Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) woodlands are important habitats for birds. Yet, little is known of the relations between bird habitat and succession in these woodlands. We studied the bird community in cottonwood woodlands from early to late seral stages along the Missouri River in central South Dakota from 1990 to 1992 to describe quantitative...

  20. An Analysis of Government Actions for the Protection and Recovery of Forest-dwelling Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J.A. Wilkinson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Government of Ontario has legal responsibilities to protect and recover the province’s population of forest-dwelling woodland caribou, which is classified as a threatened species. Loss and fragmentation of habitat caused by commercial timber harvesting, land clearing, and linear disturbances such as road building have resulted in range recession. Ontario’s Woodland Caribou Conservation Plan (2009 serves as the provincial government’s response to a recovery strategy. This paper contends that the likelihood of success for this conservation plan is low as it focuses on mitigating rather than eliminating threats, relies on the unproven and circumspect hypothesis that woodland caribou will re-occupy logged habitat, and lacks clarity and details on implementation. Sound government action focused on protection and recovery is needed to prevent the imperilment and extirpation of this species at risk.

  1. Occurrence of gum spots in black cherry after partial harvest cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1990-01-01

    Bark beetles, primarily the bark beetle Phlosotribus liminori (Harris), are the major cause of gum spots in sawtimber-size black cherry Prunus serotina Ehrh. Approximately 90 percent of all gum spots in the bole sections are caused by bark beetles. Gum spots were studied in 95 black cherry trees near Parsons, West Virginia. Over 50 percent of the bark beetle-caused gum...

  2. Flavor-Enhanced Modulation of Cerebral Blood Flow during Gum Chewing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Flavor perception, the integration of taste and odor, is a critical factor in eating behavior. It remains unclear how such sensory signals influence the human brain systems that execute the eating behavior.WE TESTED CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW (CBF IN THE FRONTAL LOBES BILATERALLY WHILE SUBJECTS CHEWED THREE TYPES OF GUM WITH DIFFERENT COMBINATIONS OF TASTE AND ODOR: no taste/no odor gum (C-gum, sweet taste/no odor gum (T-gum, and sweet taste/lemon odor gum (TO-gum. Simultaneous recordings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD and near infrared spectrometer (NIRS were used to measure CBF during gum chewing in 25 healthy volunteers. Bilateral masseter muscle activity was also monitored.We found that subjects could discriminate the type of gum without prior information. Subjects rated the TO-gum as the most flavorful gum and the C-gum as the least flavorful. Analysis of masseter muscle activity indicated that masticatory motor output during gum chewing was not affected by taste and odor. The TCD/NIRS measurements revealed significantly higher hemodynamic signals when subjects chewed the TO-gum compared to when they chewed the C-gum and T-gum.These data suggest that taste and odor can influence brain activation during chewing in sensory, cognitive, and motivational processes rather than in motor control.

  3. Analysis of a gum from the exudates of Dichrostachys cinerea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-06

    Jul 6, 2011 ... Only little research is currently underway on gums from African plants, yet Africa imports a lot of gums for pharmaceutical and food industries. This study was aimed to investigate the rheological properties, and the moisture and ash contents of the isolated gum resins from Dichrostachys cinerea. The gum.

  4. The ecology and management of the Miombo woodlands for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is new and increasing emphasis on the contribution of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) to improving the livelihoods of rural communities and therefore the need for sustainable management of forest ecosystems of the Miombo woodlands to ensure the continued availability of these NTFPs. This paper examines and ...

  5. Regional variations in biomass distribution in Brazilian savanna woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.d.C. de Miranda; M. Bustamente; M. Palace; S. Hagen; M. Keller; L.G. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The Cerrado, the savanna biome in central Brazil, mostly comprised of woodland savanna, is experiencing intense and fast land use changes. To understand the changes in Cerrado carbon stocks, we present an overview of biomass distribution in different Cerrado vegetation types (i.e., grasslands, shrublands and forestlands). We surveyed 26 studies including 170 Cerrado...

  6. Cryptic indirect effects of exurban edges on a woodland community

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. J. Warren; S. M. Pearson; S. Henry; K. Rossouw; J. P. Love; M. J. Olejniczak; Katherine Elliott; M. A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Exurban development (e.g., second homes) in woodlands spreads urban land use impacts beyond suburbs, but because exurban developments often retain many components of original ecosystem structure—such as a forest canopy rather than open lawn—their ecological impacts may be underestimated. Changes in seed-dispersing ant behavior prompted by exurban land use,...

  7. Impact of crop producer price change on quantities of woodland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... produced by these households will affect quantities of woodland products that are harvested. The data used for this study was mainly collected in a questionnaire survey that covered ten villages in the Romwe community in Chivi District, southern Zimbabwe. The Zimbabwe Science News Volume 36 (1+ 2) 2002, pp. 37-41 ...

  8. Physio-climatic classification of South Africa's woodland biome

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fairbanks, DHK

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available is carried out to determine class membership. The final map of custom physio-climatic regions is described, and these custom regions are compared with a vegetation potential map of the woodland types identified in the South African summer rainfall zone....

  9. The colonisation of woodland gaps by ferns and horsetails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, P.

    2010-01-01

    In the Voorsterbos, a planted woodland on a former sea-floor (the Netherlands), artificial gaps within stands of Fagus sylvatica on boulder clay were monitored for five or six years after cutting. Ten fern species and three species of horsetail established in these gaps, with Dryopteris cristata,

  10. Diversity, Structure and Regeneration Status of the Woodland and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted on the woodland and riverine vegetation of Sire Beggo in Gololcha District, eastern Ethiopia with the aim of documenting the floristic composition, population structure and identifying major plant community types. ... Vegetation classification was performed using TWINSPAN software package.

  11. Recent land cover and use changes in Miombo woodlands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forest and wood land ecosystems in Tanzania occupy more than 45% of the land area, more than two thirds of which made up of the Miombo woodland. The main form of land use in the Miombo region has long been shifting and small-scale sedentary cultivation. The lack of infrastructure and prevalence of deadly diseases ...

  12. Restoration of temperate savannas and woodlands [Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice B. Hanberry; John M. Kabrick; Peter W. Dunwiddie; Tibor Hartel; Theresa B. Jain; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2017-01-01

    Savannas and woodlands are open forest phases that occur along a gradient between grasslands and closed canopy forests. These ecosystems are characterized by open to nearly closed canopies of overstorey trees, relatively sparse midstorey and understorey woody vegetation, and dense, species-rich ground flora. In contrast to closed forests, the dominant and codominant...

  13. A National Perspective on Women Owning Woodlands (WOW) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Emily S.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a national overview of women owning woodlands (WOW) networks and the barriers and successes they encounter. Qualitative interview data with key network leaders were used for increasing understanding of how these networks operate. Network leaders were all connected professionally, and all successful WOW networks involved…

  14. Explaining the forest product selling behavior of private woodland owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Larsen; David A. Gansner; David A. Gansner

    1973-01-01

    A multiple-variable screening technique, AID, was used to explain the forest-product-sales behavior of private woodland owners. Results provide a basis for policy-related inferences and suggest an optimal strategy for encouraging sales of forest products.

  15. Teacher-in-Residence at the Woodland Park Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantert, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a field trip program to the Woodland Park Zoological Gardens, Seattle, Washington, which includes an indoor lecture-discussion and tours of the zoological facility led by docents. An educational survey revealed that fourth graders asked the greatest number of logical animal biology questions and had the highest interest in reading…

  16. Phytoecological study of Tetraclinis articulata in the woodland of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytoecological study of Tetraclinis articulata in the woodland of Beni Affene, Sdamas Chergui (Tiaret, Algeria). M.E. Azzaoui, M Maatoug, M Berrayah. Abstract. The Mediterranean flora is definitely considered as an exceptional diversity that deserves particular attention to be conserved. This work aims to quantify the ...

  17. Estimating wood volume from canopy area in deciduous woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we tested the predictive ability of canopy area in estimating wood volume in deciduous woodlands of Zimbabwe. The study was carried out in four sites of different climatic conditions. We used regression analysis to statistically quantify the prediction of wood volume from canopy area at species and stand level ...

  18. Chew on this: No support for facilitating effects of gum on spatial task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Ingo W; Gittler, Georg; Waldherr, Karin; Pietschnig, Jakob

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether chewing of gum facilitates spatial task performance in healthy participants, two behavioral experiments were performed. In the first experiment, spatial task performance of 349 men and women preceding and after treatment administration (saccharated chewing gum, sugar-free chewing gum, no chewing gum) was assessed using effect modeling by means of Item Response Theory. In the second experiment, another 100 participants were either administered sugar-free chewing gum or no chewing gum during spatial task performance. Effects of gum in the second study were assessed by standard means of data analysis. Results indicated no significant effects of either chewing gum or sugar on spatial task performance in either experiment. Our findings are consistent with recent studies investigating the influences of chewing gum on various memory functions, extending them by another measure of cognitive ability. Thus, further doubt is cast on enhancing effects of chewing gum on cognitive task performance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Carboxymethylation of Cassia angustifolia seed gum: synthesis and rheological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Gaurav; Pandey, I P; Joshi, Gyanesh

    2015-03-06

    The seeds of Cassia angustifolia are a rich source of galactomannan gum. The seed gums possess a wide variety of industrial applications. To utilize C. angustifolia seed gum for broader industrial applications, the carboxymethyl-Cassia angustifolia seed gum (CM-CAG) was synthesized. The gum was etherified with sodium monochloroacetate (SMCA) in a methanol-water system in presence of alkali (NaOH) at different reaction conditions. The variables studied includes alkali concentration, SMCA concentration, methanol:water ratio, liquor:gum ratio, reaction temperature and time. The extent of carboxymethylation was determined as degree of substitution (DS). The optimum conditions for preparing CM-CAG (DS=0.474) comprised 0.100 mol of NaOH, 0.05 mol of SMCA, 80% of methanol:water ratio (as % methanol) and liquor:gum ratio (v/w) of 10:1 at 75 °C for 60 min using 0.03 mol (as AGU) of CAG. Rheological studies showed CM-CAG to exhibit non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, relatively high viscosity, cold water solubility and solution stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Gum Chewing on the Volume and pH of Gastric Contents: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K; Reihmer, Joel; Gouda, Gowri B; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2015-04-01

    Insufficient fasting prior to endoscopic procedures performed under sedation may result in potential aspiration of gastric contents. Fasting as per ASA guidelines is recommended prior to these procedures. However, the effect of chewing gum on fasting status has been a subject of debate and often leads to procedural delays. Evaluation of the effect of chewing gum on the gastric volume and pH. In this randomized controlled prospective observer blinded trail, ASA I-III patients aged more than 18 years scheduled for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or a combined EGD and colonoscopy under conscious sedation were studied. Patients randomized to the chewing gum group (Group-C) were allowed to chew gum until just before the start of their procedure; the remaining patients were included into Group-NC. After sedation and endoscope insertion, stomach contents were aspirated under vision of a gastroenterologist (blinded to groups). Volume and pH of gastric contents aspirated from 67 patients (34 in Group-C and 33 in Group-NC) were analyzed. The demographic parameters of the groups were comparable. Gastric volume (median-interquartile range) was statistically higher in Group-C (13 ml (7.75-40.75) vs Group-NC 6 ml (1.00-14.00) (P pH in both groups was comparable: 2.84 ± 2.11 in Group-C and 3.79 ± 2.53 in Group-NC (P = 0.141). Although our results show gastric volume in patients chewing gum was statistically higher, clinical relevance of such a small difference is questionable. Thus patients who chewed gum inadvertently prior to procedure should not be denied or delayed administration of sedative and anesthetic medications.

  1. Characterization of some psorosis and concave gum isolates from northwestern Argentina Caracterización de aislamientos de psorosis y concave gum del noroeste argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Figueroa

    Full Text Available The Citrus Sanitation Center of the Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres in Tucumán, Argentina, has developed a virus bank of various graft-transmissible citrus pathogens found in northwestern Argentina. In this bank, several psorosis and concave gum isolates are maintained in Pineapple sweet orange seedlings. In order to characterize these pathogens, 11 isolates were indexed to seedlings of Pineapple sweet orange, Dweet tangor, Eureka lemon plus Etrog citron budded on rough lemon seedlings. Cross protection was applied for identifying psorosis-A. Symptoms obtained were variable and ranged from mild to very severe. A clear effect of temperature on symptom expression, and distinct differences in the reactions between psorosis-A and concave gum viruses were detected.El Centro de Saneamiento de Citrus de la Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, de Tucumán, Argentina, ha constituido un banco de virus de cítricos con material recolectado en la región noroeste del país. El mismo cuenta con varios aislamientos de psorosis y concave gum que se mantienen en plantas de naranjo dulce Pineapple. Con el objetivo de caracterizar biológicamente 11 de estos aislamientos, se inocularon plantines de naranjo dulce Pineapple, Dweet tangor, limonero Eureka y plantas injertadas de cidro Etrog en limoneros rugoso. Las pruebas con Pineapple se realizaron por duplicado bajo dos condiciones de temperatura: frías y calientes. La confirmación de psorosis A se realizó mediante prueba de protección cruzada con un aislamiento de psorosis B. Los resultados obtenidos muestran una amplia diversidad biológica entre los aislamientos, con expresión de síntomas que variaron desde suaves a muy severos. Se confirmó la presencia de psorosis A y se encontró que los aislamientos de "concave gum" del banco de virus no estaban en mezcla con psorosis. El efecto de la temperatura en la manifestación de los síntomas fue significativo y se

  2. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rafiei, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can help smokers to quit smoking. Nicotine chewing gum has attracted the attention from pharmaceutical industries to offer it to consumers as an easily accessible NRT product. However, the bitter taste of such gums may compromise their acceptability by patients. This study was, therefore, designed to develop 2 and 4 mg nicotine chewing gums of pleasant taste, which satisfy the consumers the most. Materials and Methods: Nicotine, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, different sweetening and taste-masking agents, and a flavoring agent were added to the gum bases at appropriate temperature. The medicated gums were cut into pieces of suitable size and coated by acacia aqueous solution (2% w/v), sugar dusting, followed by acacia–sugar–calcium carbonate until a smooth surface was produced. The gums’ weight variation and content uniformity were determined. The release of nicotine was studied in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer using a mastication device which simulated the mastication of chewing gum in human. The Latin Square design was used for the evaluation of organoleptic characteristics of the formulations at different stages of development. Results: Most formulations released 79–83% of their nicotine content within 20 min. Nicotine-containing sugar-coated gums in which aspartame as sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as flavoring agents were incorporated (i.e. formulations F19-SC and F20-SC, respectively) had optimal chewing hardness, adhering to teeth, and plumpness characteristics, as well as the most pleasant taste and highest acceptability to smokers. Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking. PMID:23326788

  3. Gum chewing modulates heart rate variability under noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Noriko; Morita, Manabu

    2012-12-01

    Gum chewing may relieve stress, although this hypothesis has not been proven. Heart-rate variability (HRV) is commonly used to measure stress levels. However, it is not known if gum chewing modulates HRV under acute stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gum chewing on HRV under acute stress. A cross-over study involving 47 non-smoking healthy subjects, aged 22-27 years, was carried out. The subjects received a stress procedure with gum chewing (GS group) and without gum chewing (S group). Additionally, the other 20 subjects were allocated to the gum chewing without stress group (G group). The GS and S groups were exposed to noise for 5 min (75 dBA) as stress. Before and after stress exposure/gum chewing, participants completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and a single Stress Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measurement. HRV measurement was performed before and during stress/gum chewing for 5 min. After the stress procedure, VAS score significantly increased in the GS and S groups. During the stress procedure, the GS group showed a significantly lower level of high frequency (HF) and higher levels of low frequency (LF) and LF/HF than the S group. However, there were no significant differences in the scores of the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and VAS between the two stress groups. These findings suggest that gum chewing modulates HRV, but may not relieve acute stress caused by noise.

  4. National recovery strategy for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, boreal population, in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Hervieux

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Recovery planning for the boreal population of woodland caribou is a complex task, spanning eight Canadian provinces and territories. To accommodate unique situations across the country, recovery planning for this Species at Risk Act-listed threatened species is occurring at both provincial/ territorial and national levels. The national recovery strategy strives to identify nationally important issues and provide direction for provinces and territories as they plan and implement boreal caribou recovery within their jurisdictions. The national vision is to conserve and recover boreal caribou and their habitat across Canada. Specific goals are to: 1 Prevent extirpation of local boreal caribou populations from all existing caribou ranges; and 2 Maintain or enhance local boreal caribou populations at or to self-sustaining levels within all existing caribou ranges; and 3 Maintain or enhance boreal caribou habitat to support self-sustaining local populations. Nineteen broad national approaches are identified. These approaches include items relating to: habitat planning and management, caribou population monitoring and management, management of human-caused mortality, management of other wildlife species, consideration of government legislation and policy,promotion of stewardship and public outreach, and research. Specific outcomes are provided for each stated recovery approach. For more information on Canada's national recovery strategy for the boreal population of woodland caribou please see www.speciesatrisk.gc.ca/recovery/default_e.cfm

  5. Estimating forest and woodland aboveground biomass using active and passive remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Aboveground biomass was estimated from active and passive remote sensing sources, including airborne lidar and Landsat-8 satellites, in an eastern Arizona (USA) study area comprised of forest and woodland ecosystems. Compared to field measurements, airborne lidar enabled direct estimation of individual tree height with a slope of 0.98 (R2 = 0.98). At the plot-level, lidar-derived height and intensity metrics provided the most robust estimate for aboveground biomass, producing dominant species-based aboveground models with errors ranging from 4 to 14Mg ha –1 across all woodland and forest species. Landsat-8 imagery produced dominant species-based aboveground biomass models with errors ranging from 10 to 28 Mg ha –1. Thus, airborne lidar allowed for estimates for fine-scale aboveground biomass mapping with low uncertainty, while Landsat-8 seems best suited for broader spatial scale products such as a national biomass essential climate variable (ECV) based on land cover types for the United States.

  6. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.J.; Miles, C.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum, however a context dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous ...

  7. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum; however, a context-dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous research.

  8. Modification mechanism of sesbania gum, and preparation, property, adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongbo; Gao, Shiqi; Li, Yanping; Dong, Siqing

    2016-09-20

    This paper studied the modification mechanism of Sesbania gum (SG) by means of the variations in the numbers of surface hydroxyl groups on the granules, Schiff's agent coloration of aldehyde groups, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), etc., and also examined the preparation, property and adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum (DCLSG). The results showed that the surface hydroxyl numbers of cross-linked sesbania gum (CLSG) decreased with increasing the cross-linking degree. The distribution of the aldehyde groups on the DCLSG particles was nonuniform because most of aldehyde groups mainly located on the edge of particles. The cross-linking occurred only on the surface of SG particles. The oxidization occurred not only on the surface of SG particles, but also in the interior of particles. The cross-linking or oxidization changed the thermal properties, and reduced the swelling power, viscosity, alkali and acid resistance of SG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Hasler-Nguyen, Nathalie; Saroea, Geoffrey

    2008-08-11

    Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B) on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C) and human saliva (D). Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances) using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*), red-green (a) and yellow-blue (b). Medicated chewing gums (A and B) removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C) had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  10. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroea Geoffrey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C and human saliva (D. Methods Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*, red-green (a and yellow-blue (b. Results Medicated chewing gums (A and B removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. Conclusion The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  11. Manage or convert Boswellia woodlands? Can frankincense production payoff?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejene, T.; Lemenih, M.; Bongers, F.

    2013-01-01

    African dry forests provide non-timber forest products (NTFPs) of high commercial value, such as frankincense and gum arabic. Nonetheless, their deforestation and conversion to croplands is intensifying. Expected higher financial return from crop production is a main driver of conversion, but

  12. Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles for drug delivery applications: Preparation and preliminary in-vitro investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodi, G., E-mail: gianina.dodi@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi (Romania); SCIENT — Research Centre for Instrumental Analysis, Bucharest (Romania); Pala, A. [University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Barbu, E. [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Peptanariu, D. [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi (Romania); Hritcu, D.; Popa, M.I. [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi (Romania); Tamba, B.I. [“Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi (Romania)

    2016-06-01

    Carboxymethyl guar gum (CMGG) synthesized from commercially available polysaccharide was formulated into nanoparticles via ionic gelation using trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP) as cross-linking agent. Characterisation using a range of analytical techniques (FTIR, NMR, GPC, TGA and DLS) confirmed the CMGG structure and revealed the effect of the CMGG and STMP concentration on the main characteristics of the obtained nanoformulations. The average nanoparticle diameter was found to be around 208 nm, as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Experiments using simulated gastric and intestinal fluids evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour of the nanoformulations loaded with Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model drug (loading capacity in excess of 83%), as monitored by UV–Vis. While dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed, the nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at concentrations below 0.3 mg/mL. Results obtained so far suggest that carboxymethylated guar gum nanoparticles formulated with STMP warrant further investigations as polysaccharide based biocompatible drug nanocarriers. - Highlights: • Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles preparation by ionic gelation • The optimum synthesis system designed particles around 200 nm • The nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at specific concentrations • The loaded formulations evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour • The results encourage further investigations as polysaccharidic drug nanocarriers.

  13. Hybrid nanomaterials based on gum Arabic and magnetite for hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, M Fernanda; Coral, Diego F; Fernández van Raap, Marcela B; Alvarez, Mariana; Lassalle, Verónica

    2017-05-01

    In this study, one-step co-precipitation method was conveniently adapted to obtain novel nanomaterials based on Gum Arabic and magnetite. Two synthesis procedures were evaluated: one employing the solid biopolymer in the co-precipitation media; a second using an aqueous solution of the polysaccharide. An exhaustive characterization of both formulations was performed using several specific techniques. The obtained data confirmed the successful incorporation of the gum Arabic on the magnetic core. Values of hydrodynamic diameters, measured by dynamic light scattering, in aqueous dispersions were about 70-80nm, while sizes lower than 20nm were registered by TEM microscopy. Surface charge of gum Arabic coated magnetic nanoparticles was significantly different from the corresponding to raw materials (magnetite and GA). This fact confirmed the formation of hybrid nanosystems with novel and specific properties. The potential utility of these materials was tested regarding to magnetic hyperthermia therapy under radiofrequency fields. Magnetocalorimetric measurements were performed in a wide range of field amplitude and frequency. Specific absorption rate of 218W/gFe was determined at field frequency of 260kHz and amplitude of 52kA/m. These results demonstrate their viability to be applied in tumor ablation treatments. Using the linear response theory and restricting field parameters to the accepted biomedical window, maximum useful value of 74w/gFe is predicted at 417kHz and 12kA/m. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of image processing to assess emulsion stability and emulsification properties of Arabic gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Abdullah; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Asghari, Ali; Akhavan, Sahar

    2015-08-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an effective methodology to determine the optimum levels of independent variables leading to maximize stability of O/W emulsions containing Arabic gum, as a natural emulsifier and stabilizer. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to determine the effect of Arabic gum content (2%, 5%, and 8% (w/w)), homogenization time (5, 12.5, and 20 min) and storage temperature (4, 22, and 40 °C). Image processing was used to determine emulsion stability based on responses including creaming index, centrifugal stability, viscosity, color parameters, and D32 and D43 indices. For each response, a second-order polynomial model with high coefficient of determination (R(2)) values ranging from 0.95 to 0.989 was developed using multiple linear regression analysis. The optimization results showed that the overall optimum region with the highest stability was found to be at the combined levels of 5.81% (w/w) Arabic gum content, 5 min homogenization time, and 22 °C for storage temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ask a Periodontist (Frequently Asked Questions about Gum Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Academy of Periodontology Announces First Recipient of SUNSTAR Innovation Grant American Academy of Periodontology Names New Executive ... in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to ...

  16. THE EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC ORAL TREATMENT ON THE IRON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), .... receiving exogenous recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and ... Table 3: Effect of Three Months Gum Arabic Treatment on Serum Total Protein Concentration in Chronic Renal Failure Patients and Normal Subjects. Group A ...

  17. Evaluation of mucoadhesive potential of gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Munish; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    The study involves mucoadhesive evaluation by formulating buccal discs using fluconazole as the model drug. The effect of compression pressure and gum cordia/lactose ratio on the ex vivo bioadhesion time and in vitro release of fluconazole was optimized using central composite experimental design. It was observed that the response ex vivo bioadhesion time was affected significantly by the proportion of gum cordia in the buccal discs while the in vitro release of fluconazole from the buccal discs was influenced significantly by the compression pressure. The optimized batch of buccal discs comprised of gum cordia/lactose - 0.66, fluconazole - 20 mg and was compressed at the pressure of 6600 kg. Further, it provided the ex vivo bioadhesion of 22 h and in vitro release of 80% in 24h. In conclusion, gum cordia is a promising bucoadhesive polymer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Physicochemical and functional parameters of Cochlospermum vitifolium (bototo gum exudate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Coromoto Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical parameters of Cochlospermum vitifolium they were evaluated and were linked to certain functional properties of industrial interest. The physicochemical parameters were determined by the classic methodology used for carbohydrates and the functional properties, as reported in the literature. The results obtained showed that the gum object of this study is low soluble in water, which corresponds with relatively high values of swelling indexes and water absorption capacity. Also, the intrinsic viscosity of the C. vitifolium exudate was related to a high molar mass, in the order of 106. Its emulsifying capacity is high, which is attributed to hydrophobic groups present in its structure. The gum gels at a minimum concentration, similar to that of the gum karaya (4.5%, but the gel that forms agglomerates, it is not uniform. The C. vitifolium gum exhibits important physicochemical and functional parameters which could serve as a criterion for testing its use in various industries.

  19. Marijuana May Make Your Gums Go to Pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166148.html Marijuana May Make Your Gums Go to Pot People ... but it was surprising to see that recreational cannabis [pot] users may also be at risk," said ...

  20. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen...

  1. Studies on some Physicochemical Properties of the Plant Gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. senegal, A. sieberiana and A. nilotica) in Batagarawa, Katsina State, were determined and compared. Data generated from the study confirm that there are a number of physicochemical differences between the gum exudates.

  2. Cetirizine release from cyclodextrin formulated compressed chewing gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojanov, Mladen; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    2012-01-01

    Beside the efficient effect on masking cetirizine bitter taste, the cyclodextrins (CDs) as well could have influence on the release from the formulation. In vitro release profiles of cetirizine from compressed chewing gums containing α-, β- and γ-CD were investigated using a three cell chewing...... instead the complexes with respect to release yield. Thus unnecessary expenses for the complex preformulation may be avoided. Keywords: Cetirizine, chewing gum, cyclodextrin, complex, drug release...

  3. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani M.; Banihashemi M

    2010-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval) was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index) in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in th...

  4. Land clearing and greenhouse gas emissions from Jatropha biofuels on African Miombo Woodlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romijn, Henny A., E-mail: h.a.romijn@tue.nl [Technology and Development Studies, Faculty of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The paper investigates greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from land use change associated with the introduction of large-scale Jatropha curcas cultivation on Miombo Woodland, using data from extant forestry and ecology studies about this ecosystem. Its results support the notion that Jatropha can help sequester atmospheric carbon when grown on complete wastelands and in severely degraded conditions. Conversely, when introduced on tropical woodlands with substantial biomass and medium/high organic soil carbon content, Jatropha will induce significant emissions that offset any GHG savings from the rest of the biofuel production chain. A carbon debt of more than 30 years is projected. On semi-degraded Miombo the overall GHG balance of Jatropha is found to hinge a lot on the extent of carbon depletion of the soil, more than on the state of the biomass. This finding points to the urgent need for detailed measurements of soil carbon in a range of Miombo sub-regions and similar tropical dryland ecosystems in Asia and Latin America. Efforts should be made to clarify concepts such as 'degraded lands' and 'wastelands' and to refine land allocation criteria and official GHG calculation methodologies for biofuels on that basis.

  5. Mapping forest stand complexity for woodland caribou habitat assessment using multispectral airborne imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Hu, B.; Woods, M.

    2014-11-01

    The decline of the woodland caribou population is a result of their habitat loss. To conserve the habitat of the woodland caribou and protect it from extinction, it is critical to accurately characterize and monitor its habitat. Conventionally, products derived from low to medium spatial resolution remote sensing data, such as land cover classification and vegetation indices are used for wildlife habitat assessment. These products fail to provide information on the structure complexities of forest canopies which reflect important characteristics of caribou's habitats. Recent studies have employed the LiDAR system (Light Detection And Ranging) to directly retrieve the three dimensional forest attributes. Although promising results have been achieved, the acquisition cost of LiDAR data is very high. In this study, utilizing the very high spatial resolution imagery in characterizing the structural development the of forest canopies was exploited. A stand based image texture analysis was performed to predict forest succession stages. The results were demonstrated to be consistent with those derived from LiDAR data.

  6. Characterization of Grewia Gum, a Potential Pharmaceutical Excipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah.I.Nep

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Grewia gum was extracted from the inner stem bark of Grewia mollis and characterized by several techniques such as gas chromatography (GC, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis of the extracted sample. Spectroscopic techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and 1H and 13C NMR techniques were also used to characterize the gum. The results showed that grewia gum is a typically amorphous polysaccharide gum containing glucose, rhamnose, galactose, arabinose and xylose as neutral sugars. It has an average molecular weight of 5925 kDa expressed as the pullulan equivalent. The gum slowly hydrated in water, dispersing and swelling to form a highly viscous dispersion exhibiting pseudoplastic flow behaviour. The polysaccharide gum is thermally stable and may have application as stabilizer or suspending agent in foods, cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals. It may have application as a binder or sustained-release polymer matrix in tablets or granulations.

  7. GumTree—An integrated scientific experiment environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tony; Hauser, Nick; Götz, Andy; Hathaway, Paul; Franceschini, Fredi; Rayner, Hugh; Zhang, Lidia

    2006-11-01

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis.

  8. GumTree-An integrated scientific experiment environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Tony [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: Tony.Lam@ansto.gov.au; Hauser, Nick [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Goetz, Andy [ESRF, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Hathaway, Paul [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Franceschini, Fredi [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Rayner, Hugh [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Zhang, Lidia [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis.

  9. Evaluation of carboxymethyl moringa gum as nanometric carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpy; Abhishek; Ahuja, Munish

    2017-10-15

    In the present study, carboxymethylation of Moringa oleifera gum was carried out by reacting with monochloroacetic acid. Modified gum was characterised employing Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Rheology study. The carboxymethyl modification of moringa gum was found to increase its degree of crystallinity, reduce viscosity and swelling, increase the surface roughness and render its more anionic. The interaction between carboxymethyl moringa gum and chitosan was optimised by 2-factor, 3-level central composite experimental design to prepare polyelectrolyte nanoparticle using ofloxacin, as a model drug. The optimal calculated parameters were found to be carboxymethyl moringa gum- 0.016% (w/v), chitosan- 0.012% (w/v) which provided polyelectrolyte nanoparticle of average particle size 231nm and zeta potential 28mV. Carboxymethyl moringa gum-chitosan polyelectrolyte nanoparticles show sustained in vitro release of ofloxacin upto 6h which followed first order kinetics with mechanism of release being erosion of polymer matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of guar and xanthan gums on functional properties of mango (Mangifera indica) kernel starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Anjum; Alam, Feroz; Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Hasnain, Abid

    2016-12-01

    The effects of different concentrations of guar and xanthan gums on functional properties of mango kernel starch (MKS) were studied. Both guar and xanthan gum enhanced the water absorption of MKS. The addition of xanthan gum appeared to reduce the SP (swelling power) and solubility at higher temperatures while guar gum significantly enhanced the SP as well as solubility of MKS. The addition of both gums produced a reinforcing effect on peak viscosity of MKS as compared to control. Pasting temperature of MKS was higher than that of starch modified by gums indicating ease of gelatinization. Guar gum played an accelerative effect on setback but xanthan gum delayed the setback phenomenon during the cooling of the starch paste. Both gums were found to be effective in reducing the syneresis while gel firmness was markedly improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Will ecosystem management supply woodland caribou habitat in northwestern Ontario?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Euler

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem management is emerging as an important concept in managing forests. Although the basic conceptual idea is not new, important defining principles are developing that elucidate some of the specific attributes of ecosystem management. These principles include: the maintenance of all ecosystems in the managed forest, rhe emulation of natural disturbance patterns on rhe landscape and the insurance that structure and function of forested ecosystems are conserved. Forest management has an impact on woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, although the presence of wolves (Canis lupus and moose (Alces alces in the same northern ecosystems also affects the caribou-forestry interacrion. Specific management for caribou as a featured species has been proposed, based on managing large landscape blocks. Ecosystem management would also produce habitat in a manner that might accomplish the goal of conserving woodland caribou as well as maintaining other important ecosystem functions.

  12. Estimating Arrival Numbers for Informal Recreation: A Geographical Approach and Case Study of British Woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Schaafsma

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel methodology for generating models of demand for informal outdoor recreation. We analyze visitor data from multiple forest sites across Great Britain. We introduce a wide range of variables typically omitted from most economic demand models of recreation. These include on-site characteristics, and off-site locational drivers of visitation including substitute and complement availability. A Poisson multilevel model is used to model visitor counts, and the methodology is applied to a dataset of more than 10,000 visits to open-access woodland sites. Results confirm it identifies a broader range of demand drivers than previously observed. The use of nationally available explanatory variables enhances the transferability and hence general applicability of the methodology.

  13. The effect of temperature on the colligative properties of food-grade konjac gum in water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Joanna; Kaczmarczyk, Kacper; Ptaszek, Anna; Goik, Urszula; Ptaszek, Paweł

    2017-10-15

    This research paper presents the results of tests on the colligative properties of konjac gum chains in water solutions. For this purpose, the measurements of osmotic pressure and intrinsic viscosity of aqueous solutions, in the function of konjac gum concentration and temperature were carried out. The applied methods allowed for the determination of the second osmotic virial coefficients B 2 , which raised with the increase of temperature. It indicate that increase of temperature causes higher affinity of polysaccharide's chains to water. It was determined, that the osmotic average molecular mass of the konjac gum in non-purified solutions increases with temperature (1.07×10 5 -3.80×10 5 g×mol -1 ). Values of the reduced viscosity linearly increased in range 18-29dL×g for all temperatures. Received values of the Huggins constant (0.81-1.72) lead that water is poor solvent for konjac gum. The theta (θ) conditions were extrapolated for non-purified solutions - 325K (52°C), and interpolated for purified solutions - 307K (34°C). Based on the results of tests using the dynamic light scattering, the values of two main relaxation times (fast - 0.4-1.8ms and slow components - 4300-5500ms) were determined (the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts). The obtained autocorrelation functions were characteristic for sol type systems or these which indicate a gel-like structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A condition metric for Eucalyptus woodland derived from expert evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Steve J; Bruce, Matthew J; Griffioen, Peter; Dodd, Amanda; White, Matthew D

    2018-02-01

    The evaluation of ecosystem quality is important for land-management and land-use planning. Evaluation is unavoidably subjective, and robust metrics must be based on consensus and the structured use of observations. We devised a transparent and repeatable process for building and testing ecosystem metrics based on expert data. We gathered quantitative evaluation data on the quality of hypothetical grassy woodland sites from experts. We used these data to train a model (an ensemble of 30 bagged regression trees) capable of predicting the perceived quality of similar hypothetical woodlands based on a set of 13 site variables as inputs (e.g., cover of shrubs, richness of native forbs). These variables can be measured at any site and the model implemented in a spreadsheet as a metric of woodland quality. We also investigated the number of experts required to produce an opinion data set sufficient for the construction of a metric. The model produced evaluations similar to those provided by experts, as shown by assessing the model's quality scores of expert-evaluated test sites not used to train the model. We applied the metric to 13 woodland conservation reserves and asked managers of these sites to independently evaluate their quality. To assess metric performance, we compared the model's evaluation of site quality with the managers' evaluations through multidimensional scaling. The metric performed relatively well, plotting close to the center of the space defined by the evaluators. Given the method provides data-driven consensus and repeatability, which no single human evaluator can provide, we suggest it is a valuable tool for evaluating ecosystem quality in real-world contexts. We believe our approach is applicable to any ecosystem. © 2017 State of Victoria.

  15. Solar drying of uruguayan red gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ono

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he use of solar energy as an alternative to non-renewable energy sources has been widely researched in the last decades. Compared to air drying, solar drying kilns can better control the drying process, resulting in a higher quality of the dry wood and lower final wood moisture content values. Investment and running costs for a solar drying kiln are lower than those of a conventional kiln. Moreover, the solar drying process can be advantageous for drying hardwoods which are traditionally considered difficult to dry such as eucalyptus wood of medium and high density (Red gums, known in Spanish as “Eucaliptos colorados”. The solar drying kiln naturally incorporates a daily high relative humidity period that can be similar to a conditioning or steaming step, although at a lower temperature.This results in fewer defects due to the drying process.A pilot scale 2.5 m3 semi-greenhouse type solar wood drying kiln was constructed at LATU (Uruguay Technological Laboratory in Montevideo, Uruguay. The operating conditions and the results from two drying runs are presented. Two species of red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm., ADD 870 kg/m3, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh., ADD 800 kg/m3 were dried from initial average moisture contents (WMC of around 60% down to 10.0% and 12.7% in 108 days and 76 days, respectively. Boards were provided by the Grupo Forestal San Gregorio from trees harvested at Tacuarembo and Paysandu Departments from cattle shelter forests 60 and 70 years old.Mean volume shrinkage was 18% for E. tereticornis, and 16% for E. camaldulensis, and the level of defects was moderate. Residual stresses and moisture content gradients were observed for both species. Final moisture content values were similar compared to those obtained in conventional drying kilns but with longer drying periods and lower operating costs. This would make the solar drying process attractive to small and medium sized forest products industries in a small country

  16. Arborealities: The Tactile Ecology of Hardy’s Woodlanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Cohen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article asks what consequences two recent movements in scholarship - affect theory and environmental studies - might have for understanding the Victorian tactile imagination. Thomas Hardy's 1887 novel 'The Woodlanders' provides a means of addressing this question, for it shares with posthumanist critics a view that people are material things in a world of things, and that the world is itself a collection of vital agencies and networked actors. Hardy shows how a tactile modality provides a point of entry into discussions of both affect and ecology, situating the human in a proximate, contiguous relation to both bodily and environmental materialities. 'The Woodlanders' offers a world in which trees, in particular, work on - and are in turn worked on by - human objects; a world in which, one might say, the trees are people and the people are trees. This arboreality is far from a sentimental oneness with nature, nor is it an exercise in anthropomorphization. Instead, it provides a recognition of the inhuman, material, and sensate aspects of the human; or, perhaps better, of the human as rooted, budding, leafy, and abloom. Like some recent theoretical accounts, 'The Woodlanders' disperses agency among human and non-human elements alike, employing a tactile mode of representation to break down distinctions between them. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  17. Predicting Polylepis distribution: vulnerable and increasingly important Andean woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Zutta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polylepis woodlands are a vital resource for preserving biodiversity and hydrological functions, which will be altered by climate change and challenge the sustainability of local human communities. However, these highaltitude Andean ecosystems are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to anthropogenic pressure including fragmentation, deforestation and the increase in livestock. Predicting the distribution of native woodlands has become increasingly important to counteract the negative effects of climate change through reforestation and conservation. The objective of this study was to develop and analyze the distribution models of two species that form extensive woodlands along the Andes, namely Polylepis sericea and P. weberbaueri. This study utilized the program Maxent, climate and remotely sensed environmental layers at 1 km resolution. The predicted distribution model for P. sericea indicated that the species could be located in a variety of habitats along the Andean Cordillera, while P. weberbaueri was restricted to the high elevations of southern Peru and Bolivia. For both species, elevation and temperature metrics were the most significant factors for predicted distribution. Further model refinement of Polylepis and other Andean species using increasingly available satellite data demonstrate the potential to help define areas of diversity and improve conservation strategies for the Andes.

  18. Woodland Extraction from High-Resolution CASMSAR Data Based on Dempster-Shafer Evidence Theory Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lijun Lu; Wenjun Xie; Jixian Zhang; Guoman Huang; Qiwei Li; Zheng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Mapping and monitoring of woodland resources is necessary, since woodland is vital for the natural environment and human survival. The intent of this paper is to propose a fusion scheme for woodland extraction with different frequency (P- and X-band) polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) and interferometric SAR (InSAR) data. In the study area of Hanjietou, China, a supervised complex Wishart classifier based on the initial polarimetric feature analysis was first applied to the PolSAR...

  19. [Vertical distribution characteristics of N2O emission in tea garden and its adjacent woodland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-chao; Han, Wen-yan; Li, Xin; Li, Zhi-xin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we determined the vertical distribution of N2O emission rates in tea soils and its adjacent woodland soils. The results showed that total nitrogen contents, N2O fluxes and cumulative emissions in the tea garden and woodland decreased with the increasing depth of the soil layer, and their average values were greater in tea garden than in woodland. Generally, pH, soil water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N contents had a downward trend with the increasing depth of soil layer. The WSON, MBN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N contents from each soil layer were greater in tea garden than in woodland, but the pH value in tea garden was lower than that in woodland. The N2O emission rate was significantly positively related with TN, MBN and NH(4+)-N contents, but not with pH value. The N2O emission rate was significantly correlated with WSON content in woodland, but not in tea garden. The N20 emission rate was significantly correlated with NO(3-)-N concentration in tea garden, but not in woodland. WSON/TN and N2O-N/SMBN were averagely greater than in tea garden in woodland, and SMBN/TN was opposite. These results indicated that tea soil was not conducive to accumulate nitrogen pool, maintain soil quality and its sustainable use compared to woodland.

  20. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  1. Population ecology of vervet monkeys in a high latitude, semi-arid riparian woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pasternak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Narrow riparian woodlands along non-perennial streams have made it possible for vervet monkeys to penetrate the semi-arid karoo ecosystem of South Africa, whilst artificial water points have more recently allowed these populations to colonize much more marginal habitat away from natural water sources. In order to better understand the sequelae of life in these narrow, linear woodlands for historically ‘natural’ populations and to test the prediction that they are ecologically stressed, we determined the size of troops in relation to their reliance on natural and artificial water sources and collected detailed data from two river-centred troops on activity, diet and ranging behaviour over an annual cycle. In comparison to other populations, our data indicate that river-centred troops in the karoo were distinctive primarily both for their large group sizes and, consequently, their large adult cohorts, and in the extent of home range overlap in what is regarded as a territorial species. Whilst large group size carried the corollary of increased day journey length and longer estimated interbirth intervals, there was little other indication of the effects of ecological stress on factors such as body weight and foraging effort. We argue that this was a consequence of the high density of Acacia karroo, which accounted for a third of annual foraging effort in what was a relatively depauperate floristic habitat. We ascribed the large group size and home range overlap to constraints on group fission.Conservation implications: The distribution of group sizes, sampled appropriately across habitats within a conservation area, will be of more relevance to management than average values, which may be nothing more than a statistical artefact, especially when troop sizes are bimodally distributed.

  2. Decadal changes in phenology of peak abundance patterns of woodland pond salamanders in northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Deahn M.; Ribic, Christine; Beck, Albert J.; Higgins, Dale; Eklund, Dan; Reinecke, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Woodland ponds are important landscape features that help sustain populations of amphibians that require this aquatic habitat for successful reproduction. Species abundance patterns often reflect site-specific differences in hydrology, physical characteristics, and surrounding vegetation. Large-scale processes such as changing land cover and environmental conditions are other potential drivers influencing amphibian populations in the Upper Midwest, but little information exists on the combined effects of these factors. We used Blue-spotted (Ambystoma laterale Hallowell) and Spotted Salamander (A. maculatum Shaw) monitoring data collected at the same woodland ponds thirteen years apart to determine if changing environmental conditions and vegetation cover in surrounding landscapes influenced salamander movement phenology and abundance. Four woodland ponds in northern Wisconsin were sampled for salamanders in April 1992-1994 and 2005-2007. While Blue-spotted Salamanders were more abundant than Spotted Salamanders in all ponds, there was no change in the numbers of either species over the years. However, peak numbers of Blue-spotted Salamanders occurred 11.7 days earlier (range: 9-14 days) in the 2000s compared to the 1990s; Spotted Salamanders occurred 9.5 days earlier (range: 3 - 13 days). Air and water temperatures (April 13- 24) increased, on average, 4.8°C and 3.7°C, respectively, between the decades regardless of pond. There were no discernible changes in canopy openness in surrounding forests between decades that would have warmed the water sooner (i.e., more light penetration). Our finding that salamander breeding phenology can vary by roughly 10 days in Wisconsin contributes to growing evidence that amphibian populations have responded to changing climate conditions by shifting life-cycle events. Managers can use this information to adjust monitoring programs and forest management activities in the surrounding landscape to avoid vulnerable amphibian

  3. Non-equilibrium hillslope dynamics and irreversible landscape changes at a shifting pinyon-juniper woodland ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Joseph R.; McFadden, Leslie D.; Roberts, Leah M.; Wawrzyniec, Tim F.; Scuderi, Louis A.; Meyer, Grant A.; King, Matthew P.

    2014-11-01

    Pinyon-juniper woodlands of the western United States frequently exist within topographically complex landscapes where varied slope aspect yields substantial, local microclimate variation. Vegetation composition and cover typically change markedly along the gradient of relatively mesic northern aspects to more xeric southern aspects. Ecohydrological processes including precipitation runoff, soil moisture storage, and erosion are strongly influenced by vegetation. In certain cases, reduction of plant cover may set self-enhancing feedbacks in motion that lead to further declines of both vegetation and soils, and in some cases, replacement of woodlands with more xerophytic vegetation. The first place such change is likely to occur is in the ecotone between the drier southern aspects and moister north aspects. We studied vegetation, soils, and soil erosion in two small (1-2 ha) drainage basins in northeastern Arizona where pinyon-juniper woodlands occupy northern aspects, grading to shrub-dominated vegetation on more xeric southern aspects. Mapping of soil thickness, use of tree-root exposure to measure long-term soil erosion rates, and data on tree mortality and establishment indicate that the ecotone between woodland and more xerophytic vegetation has apparently been shifting for centuries, with a reduction in woodland vegetation. Erosion rates on xeric aspects ranged from 14 to 23 cm per century in one basin and as much as 60 cm per century in the other basin. In contrast, mesic aspects showed either no net soil losses over the last several centuries or rates significantly less than on the xeric aspects. Exposure of small roots (soils. The contrasting sets of self-enhancing feedback dynamics on xeric vs. mesic aspects not only produce different states in vegetation and soils, they also set in motion the production of pronounced geomorphic contrasts that probably require centuries to millennia to develop. The ongoing ecohydrological transitions in the more xeric

  4. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibya Sundar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w, containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation.

  5. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcia Demello Luvielmo; Caroline Dellinghausen Borges; Daniela Deoliveira Toyama; Claire Tondo Vendruscolo; Adilma Regina Pippa Scamparini

    2016-01-01

      The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95...

  6. Aplikasi Campuran Alginat Dari Sargassum Crassifolium Dan Gum Sebagai Pengental Textile Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaryono Subaryono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian aplikasi campuran alginat dari Sargassum crassifolium dan gum untuk meningkatkan viskositas alginat sebagai pengental pada textile printing telah dilakukan. Viskositas campuran alginat dengan guar gum, gum arab, dan locust bean gum diamati pada penyimpanan selama 8 jam. Produk terbaik diujikan sebagai pengental pada textile printing. Campuran alginat dengan guar gum pada perbandingan 90:10 dan 80:20 meningkatkan viskositas dan stabilitas alginat selama penyimpanan. Campuran alginat dengan gum arab dan locust bean gum akan menurunkan viskositas alginat sehingga tidak sesuai untuk aplikasi textile printing. Aplikasi campuran alginat dengan guar gum 90:10 dan 80:20 sebagai pengental pada tekstil printing menghasilkan produk akhir yang setara dengan pengental komersial manutex.

  7. Volume and aboveground biomass models for dry Miombo woodland in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwakalukwa, Ezekiel Edward; Meilby, Henrik; Treue, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tools to accurately estimate tree volume and biomass are scarce for most forest types in East Africa, including Tanzania. Based on a sample of 142 trees and 57 shrubs from a 6,065 ha area of dry miombo woodland in Iringa rural district in Tanzania, regression models were developed for volume...... and biomass of three important species, Brachystegia spiciformis Benth. (n=40), Combretum molle G. Don (n=41), and Dalbergia arbutifolia Baker (n=37) separately, and for broader samples of trees (28 species, n=72), shrubs (16 species, n=31), and trees and shrubs combined (44 species, n=104). Applied...... of the predictions tended to increase from general to species-specific models. Except for a few volume and biomass models developed for shrubs, all models had R2 values of 96–99%. Thus, the models appear robust and should be applicable to forests with similar site conditions, species, and diameter ranges....

  8. Woodland caribou calf recruitment in relation to calving/post-calving landscape composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. McCarthy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, Newfoundland’s woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou population has declined by an estimated 66%. Low calf recruitment has been associated to the decline, possibly triggered by increasing calf predation and/or decreasing resources. To investigate the role of landscape composition in this system, we studied the yearly (2005-2008 calving/post-calving range (CPCR of 104 satellite-collared females belonging to six herds. We mapped nine disturbance factors (e.g. roads, logging, etc, as well as vegetation cover types (e.g. coniferous, deciduous forests, etc, and determined the total area they occupied within CPCRs yearly for each herd. Using an information theoretic approach, we assessed the model that best explained variation in recruitment using these components. Based on corrected Akaike Information Criterion, the model that best explained variation in calf recruitment included total disturbance and deciduous forest area, both showing the expected negative relationship with calf recruitment. Other landscape variables among the models with ΔAICc < 2 were mixed forest, also with a suggested negative relationship, and barrens and wetlands with a significant positive trend. This study highlights the need to minimize total disturbance footprint and account for resulting changes in forest composition within CPCRs during land use planning. Expanding forestry operations and road infrastructure in critical woodland caribou habitat across Canada may additionally contribute to habitat loss via fragmentation. This in turn, may lead to range recession beyond the initial local avoidance footprint. We see the possibility of using calf recruitment models based on landscape parameters, among others, to predict the impact of new industrial developments on calf recruitment.

  9. Evidence for a role for the gumB and gumC gene products in the formation of xanthan from its pentasaccharide repeating unit by Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojnov, A A; Zorreguieta, A; Dow, J M; Daniels, M J; Dankert, M A

    1998-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the extracellular polysaccharide xanthan in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is directed by a cluster of 12 genes, gumB-gumM. Several xanthan-deficient mutants of the wild-type strain 8004 have previously been described which carry Tn5 insertions in this region of the chromosome. Here it is shown that the transposon insertion in one of these mutants, strain 8397, is located 15 bp upstream of the translational start site of the gumB gene. EDTA-treated cells of strain 8397 were able to synthesize the lipid-linked pentasaccharide repeating unit of xanthan from the three nucleotide sugar donors (UDP-glucose, GDP-mannose and UDP-glucuronic acid) but were unable to polymerize the pentasaccharide into mature xanthan. A subclone of the gum gene cluster carrying gumB and gumC restored xanthan production to strain 8397 to levels approximately 28% of the wild-type. In contrast, subclones carrying gumB or gumC alone were not effective. These results are discussed with reference to previous speculations, based on computer analysis, that gumB and gumC are both involved in the translocation of xanthan across the bacterial membranes.

  10. Oxidation of cashew tree gum exudate polysaccharide with TEMPO reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Pablyana L.R.; Maciel, Jeanny S.; Paula, Regina C.M. de; Feitosa, Judith P.A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Sierakowski, Maria Rita [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br

    2007-07-01

    Cashew gum (CG), an exudate polysaccharide from Anacardium occidentale trees, was oxidized with TEMPO reagent and the product (CGOX) characterized by spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and NMR), chromatographic analyses (HPLC and GPC), viscosity measurements and thermal analysis (TGA). The yield of the reaction product was 96%. The uronic acid content in starting gum (7.2 m%) was increased to 36 m%. The degree of oxidation based on free galactose and glucose units was 68%. NMR data show that oxidation occurred preferentially at primary carbons of galactose units. High degradation degree after oxidation was estimated by the difference on the expected and observed {eta}{sub CGOX}/{eta}{sub CG} ratio. The presence of organic and inorganic impurities in the new polyelectrolyte was detected by TGA. A less thermally stable cashew gum is formed after the oxidation with TEMPO based on initial decomposition temperature and IPDT. (author)

  11. Fluoride and urea chewing gums in an intra-oral experimental caries model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjogren, K; Ruben, J; Lingstrom, P; Lundberg, AB; Birkhed, D

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of sugar-free chewing gums containing fluoride (F) and urea in an intra-oral experimental caries model. Placebo chewing gums (without any active ingredient) and no gum served as controls. Fifteen subjects participated in a cross-over,

  12. The impact of chewing gum on halitosis parameters: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Francisco Wilker Mustafa Gomes; Friedrich, Stephanie Anagnostopoulos; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2017-02-17

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of chewing gum on halitosis parameters. Three databases were searched with the following focused question: 'Can chewing gum additionally reduce halitosis parameters, such as organoleptic scores and volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), when compared to a control treatment'? Controlled clinical trials presenting at least two halitosis measurements (organoleptic scores and/or VSC) were included. Ten studies were included, and different active ingredients were used. One study was performed using a chewing gum without any active ingredient. Chewing gum containing probiotic bacterium was shown to significantly reduce the organoleptic scores. Chewing gums containing zinc acetate and magnolia bark extract as well as allylisothiocyanate (AITC) with zinc lactate significantly reduced the levels of VSC in comparison to a placebo chewing gum. Furthermore, a sodium bicarbonate-containing chewing gum significantly reduced the VSC levels in comparison to rinsing with water. Furthermore, eucalyptus-extract chewing gum showed significant reductions in both organoleptic scores and VSC when compared with a control chewing gum. Chewing gum containing sucrose was able to reduce the VSC levels, in comparison to xylitol and zinc citrate chewing gum, but only for 5 min. It was concluded that chewing gums containing probiotics Lactobaccilus, zinc acetate and magnolia bark extract, eucalyptus-extract, and AITC with zinc lactate may be suitable for halitosis management. However, the low number of included studies and the high heterogeneity among the selected studies may limit the clinical applications of these findings.

  13. Gum spots in black cherry caused by natural attacks of peach bark beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode

    1981-01-01

    Peach bark beetles, Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris), made abortive attacks on healthy black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh., trees. The beetle attacks caused five types of gum spots in the wood and a gummy exudate on the bark. The most extensive and common types of gum spot were single and multiple rows of interray gum spots that...

  14. Gum spots caused by cambium miners in black cherry in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode; John E. Baumgras

    1980-01-01

    Six types of gum spots in black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh. were associated with parenchyma flecks caused by the cambium miner Phytobia pruni (Gross). The number of parenchyma flecks and associated gum spots increased with the height of the tree. Four percent of the flecks produced gum spots in the first 18 to 20 feet of the...

  15. Evaluation of Beilschmiedia Seed Gum as a Tablet Binder MN FEMI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hardness, disintegration time and dissolution rate increased with increase in concentration of. Beilschmiedia gum. Tablets containing 5 % w/w of Beilschmiedia gum had a binding capacity approximately twice that of gelatin with a dissolution rate of 91 % after 30 min. The results obtained suggest that Beilschmiedia gum ...

  16. Acute and chronic effects of gum chewing on food reinforcement and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Christine; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-04-01

    Although chewing gum has been considered a potential method for reducing energy intake, little empirical data exist to support this idea. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that chewing gum before eating reduces motivation to eat, hunger, and energy intake. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments in which participants chewed gum prior to completing a food reinforcement task or before all eating occasions for two of three weeks. In Experiment 1, we found that chewing gum had no influence on the reinforcing value of food, but chewing mint gum reduced liking of and energy intake from fruit. In addition, chewing gum reduced self-reported hunger immediately after gum chewing and after eating compared with the no gum condition. In Experiment 2, gum chewing had no significant effect on total energy intake, but participants consumed fewer meals, consumed more energy per meal, and had a lower nutrient adequacy ratio during the gum chewing weeks. These studies provide no evidence that acute or chronic gum chewing reduces hunger or energy intake. In fact, chewing mint-flavored gum may deter consumption of fruit and reduce diet quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 78 FR 33354 - Xanthan Gum From Austria: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair... final determination in the antidumping (``AD'') investigation of xanthan gum from Austria.\\1\\ On March 4... the Preliminary Determination. The Department has determined that xanthan gum from Austria is being...

  18. The effect of gum Arabic oral treatment on the iron and protein status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of gum Arabic oral treatment on the iron and protein status in chronic renal failure patients under regular hemodialysis in Central Sudan L'effet du ... and gum arabic (50 g/day) treatment; Group B (n=14): CRF patients under LPD, gum arabic, iron (ferrous sulphate 200 mg/day) and folic acid (5 mg/day) treatment; ...

  19. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The

  20. Land Cover Change in Northern Botswana: The Influence of Climate, Fire, and Elephants on Semi-Arid Savanna Woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tyler Fox

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex couplings and feedback among climate, fire, and herbivory drive short- and long-term patterns of land cover change (LCC in savanna ecosystems. However, understanding of spatial and temporal LCC patterns in these environments is limited, particularly for semi-arid regions transitional between arid and more mesic climates. Here, we use post-classification analysis of Landsat TM (1990, ETM+ (2003, and OLI (2013 satellite imagery to classify and assess net and gross LCC for the Chobe District, a 21,000 km2 area encompassing urban, peri-urban, rural, communally-managed (Chobe Enclave, and protected land (Chobe National Park, CNP, and six protected forest reserves. We then evaluate spatiotemporal patterns of LCC in relation to precipitation, fire detections (MCD14M, 2001–2013 from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, and dry season elephant (Loxodonta africana aerial survey data (2003, 2006, 2012, 2013. Woodland cover declined over the study period by 1514 km2 (16.2% of initial class total, accompanied by expansion of shrubland (1305 km2, 15.7% and grassland (265 km2, 20.3%. Net LCC differed importantly in protected areas, with higher woodland losses observed in forest reserves compared to the CNP. Loss of woodland was also higher in communally-managed land for the study period, despite gains from 2003–2013. Gross (class changes were characterized by extensive exchange between woodland and shrubland during both time steps, and a large expansion of shrubland into grassland and bare ground from 2003–2013. MODIS active fire detections were highly variable from year to year and among the different protected areas, ranging from 1.8 fires*year−1/km2 in the Chobe Forest Reserve to 7.1 fires*year−1/km2 in the Kasane Forest Reserve Extension. Clustering and timing of dry season fires suggests that ignitions were predominately from anthropogenic sources. Annual fire count was significantly related to total annual rainfall

  1. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected.

  2. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. Results: One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. Conclusion: After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected. PMID:26605214

  3. Safety Assessment of Microbial Polysaccharide Gums as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of 34 microbial polysaccharide gums for use in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. The microbial polysaccharide gums named in this report have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, including emulsion stabilizer, film former, binder, viscosity-increasing agent, and skin-conditioning agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Eddy flux and leaf level measurements of biogeni VOC emissions from Mopane woodland of Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenberg, J.P.; Guenter, A.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Hewwit, C.N.; James, A.E.; Owen, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions were measured in a mopane woodland near Maun, Botswana in January–February 2001 as part of SAFARI 2000. This landscape is comprised of more than 95% of one woody plant species, Colophospermum mopane (Caesalpinaceae). Mopane woodlands extend over a

  5. Facilitation of Quercus ilex recruitment by shrubs in Mediterranean open woodlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.; Ouden, den J.; Diaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Question: Insufficient tree regeneration threatens the long-term persistence of biodiverse Mediterranean open oak woodlands. Could shrubs, scarce due to decades of management (clearing and ploughing), facilitate holm oak recruitment at both acorn and seedling stages? Location: Open oak woodlands in

  6. Small mammals in successional prairie woodlands of the northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; John E. Gobeille

    2001-01-01

    Prairie woodlands comprise about 1 percent of the landscape in the northern Great Plains. However, prairie woodlands provide habitat for far more than 1 percent of the wildlife species that occur in the prairie region. With increasing pressures on natural resources, managers need methods for managing wildlife habitat and biodiversity that are based on ecological...

  7. Effects of short-rotation controlled burning on amphibians and reptiles in pine woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; D. Craig Rudolph; Ronald E. Thill

    2012-01-01

    Fire is being used increasingly as a forest management tool throughout North America, but its effects on reptiles and amphibians in many ecosystems are unclear. Open woodlands with understories dominated by herbaceous vegetation benefit many wildlife species, but maintaining these woodlands requires frequent burning. Although many studies have compared herpetofaunal...

  8. Drought induced tree mortality and ensuing bark beetle outbreaks in southwestern pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Clifford; Monique E. Rocca; Robert Delph; Paulette L. Ford; Neil S. Cobb

    2008-01-01

    The current drought and ensuing bark beetle outbreaks during 2002 to 2004 in the Southwest have greatly increased tree mortality in pinyon-juniper woodlands. We studied causes and consequences of the drought-induced mortality. First, we tested the paradigm that high stand densities in pinyon-juniper woodlands would increase tree mortality. Stand densities did not...

  9. Diversity of woodlands in the groundnut basin of Kaffrine region in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-03-30

    Mar 30, 2013 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: This work has examined the current state of woodlands in the groundnut basin to determine its importance. Methodology and results: The floristic diversity of woodlands in the Groundnut Basin of was studied through ecological parameters. The woody flora contained 75 species with ...

  10. Working woodlands: public demand, owner management, and government intervention in conserving mediterranean ranches and dehesas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo Campos-Palacín; Lynn Huntsinger; Richard Standiford; David Martin-Barroso; Pedro Mariscal-Lorente; Paul F. Starrs

    2002-01-01

    The contributions of California and Spanish oak woodlands to owners, neighbors, and society are undervalued. Recent Spanish studies have begun to identify the components of value provided by traditional oak woodland agro-sylvo-pastoral systems, including environmental and self-consumption values. Work in California has revealed that self-consumption by owners, benefits...

  11. A Comparison of Management Strategies in the Oak Woodlands of Spain and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn Huntsinger; James W. Bartolome; Paul F. Starrs

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics, uses, and management of oak woodlands and savannas in California and southern Spain are compared. There are many similarities between the Spanish dehesa and the California oak woodland. Both are located in Mediterranean climate zones, and are used predominantly for livestock grazing. However the Spanish dehesa is a more diverse and long-standing...

  12. Facilitation of Quercus ilex recruitment by shrubs in Mediterranean open woodlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christian; den Ouden, Jan; Diaz, Mario

    Question: Insufficient tree regeneration threatens the long-term persistence of biodiverse Mediterranean open oak woodlands. Could shrubs, scarce due to decades of management ( clearing and ploughing), facilitate holm oak recruitment at both acorn and seedling stages? Location: Open oak woodlands in

  13. USDA Forest Service National Woodland Owner Survey, 2011-2013: design, implementation, and estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Brenton J. Dickinson; Jaketon H. Hewes; Sarah M. Butler; Kyle Andrejczyk; Marla. Markowski-Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    The National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS) is conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program to increase the understanding of the attitudes, behaviors, and demographics of private forest and woodland ownerships across the United States. The information is intended to help policy makers, resource managers, educators, service providers, and...

  14. Fire regimes and variability in aboveground woody biomass in miombo woodland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, Makoto; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Poulter, Ben; Williams, Mathew; Ciais, Philippe; Bellassen, Valentin; Ryan, Casey M.; Yue, Chao; Cadule, Patricia; Peylin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This study combined a process-based ecosystem model with a fire regime model to understand the effect of changes in fire regime and climate pattern on woody plants of miombo woodland in African savanna. Miombo woodland covers wide areas in Africa and is subject to frequent anthropogenic fires. The

  15. Evaporation, sensible heat and canopy conductance of fallow savannah and patterned woodland in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabat, P.; Dolman, A.J.; Elbers, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The behaviour of evaporation, sensible heat and canopy conductance of fallow savannah and patterned woodland in the Sahel is studied for the HAPEX-Sahel Intensive Observation Period. Both fallow savannah and patterned woodland reach evaporation rates of 4–5 mm day−1 during the rainy part of the IOP

  16. Energy-conserving site design: case study, The Woodlands, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, M

    1980-03-01

    The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located north of Houston. It includes 22,000 acres and the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center called the Metro Center and several additional tracts, such as the Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Each village is to be structured around one large and several supporting neighborhood centers. Ultimate population is planned to be 150,000. Included in this report are sections on background, team structure and organization, methodological considerations, the conventional and energy-conserving plan, constraints to implementation, and general conclusions and next phases.

  17. Vegetation structure characteristics and relationships of Kalahari woodlands and savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Privette, JL

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available modeling has become widespread (e.g., Potter et al., 1993, 1998; Sellers et al., 1996). Nevertheless, knowledge of vegetation canopy struc- ture remains incomplete in many remote areas, such as sub-Saharan Africa. First, comparatively small changes... 929 460 Colophospermum mopane woodland with patches of Terminalia sericea thicket Harry Oppenheimer Okavango Research Centre; Measurements were 3km east of a permanent flux tower 23.591E Okwa River Crossing, Botswana 22.411S 1089 407 Open Kalahari...

  18. Monitoring vegetation dynamics and carbon stock density in miombo woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Natasha S; Matos, Céu N; Moura, Isabel R; Washington-Allen, Robert A; Ribeiro, Ana I

    2013-11-09

    The United Nation's Program for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) aims to reduce the 20% contribution to global emissions of greenhouse gases from the forest sector, offering a financial value of the carbon stored in forests as an incentive for local communities. The pre-requisite for the setup of a participatory REDD + Program is the monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of baseline carbon stocks and their changes over time. In this study, we investigated miombo woodland's dynamics in terms of composition, structure and biomass over a 4-year period (2005-2009), and the Carbon Stock Density (CSD) for the year 2009. The study was conducted in the Niassa National Reserve (NNR) in northern Mozambique, which is the 14th largest protected area in the world. Mean tree density distributed across 79 species increased slightly between 2005 and 2009, respectively, from 548 to 587 trees ha-1. Julbernardia globiflora (Benth.) was the most important species in this area [importance value index (IVI2005= 61 and IVI2009 = 54)]. The woodlands presented an inverted J-shaped diametric curve, with 69% of the individuals representing the young cohort. Woody biomass had a net increase of 3 Mg ha-1 with the highest growth observed in Dyplorhynchus condilocarpon (Müll.Arg.) Pichon (0.54 Mg ha-1). J. globiflora had a net decrease in biomass of 0.09 Mg ha-1. Total CSD density was estimated at ca. 67 MgC ha-1 ± 24.85 with soils (average 34.72 ± 17.93 MgC ha-1) and woody vegetation (average 29.8 MgC ha-1 ± 13.07) representing the major carbon pools. The results point to a relatively stable ecosystem, but they call for the need to refocus management activities. The miombo woodlands in NNR are representative of the woodlands in the eco-region in terms of vegetation structure and composition. They experienced net increase in woody biomass, a considerable recruitment level and low mortality. According to our results, NNR

  19. The Adolescent Condition in Thomas Hardy's The Woodlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, Rosanna

    In The Woodlanders, Hardy examines the intersections between adolescence as scientific fact and adolescence as utilitarian economic construction. Hardy posits that the emergence of adolescence as a social category provides an opportunity for further, excessive control of young women in a patriarchal society when science is taken at its word, but, paradoxically, also opens up a space for a new kind of freedom and rebellion when the adolescent condition of nineteenth-century scientific theorists is seized for the very subversive qualities which the Victorians oppose.

  20. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  1. Vegetation structure and small-scale pattern in Miombo Woodland, Marondera, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Campbell

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim ol this paper is to describe woodland structure and small-scale patterning of woody plants at a miombo site, and to relate these to past disturbance and soil properties. Brachystegia spiciformis Benth. and Julbemardia globiflora (Benth. Troupin were the most frequent woody plants at the five hectare site, with size-class distributions which were markedly skewed towards the smaller size classes. The vegetation structure at the site and the increase in basal area over the past thirty years point to considerable disturbance prior to the present protected status. Six woodland subtypes were identified, grouped into two structural types: open and closed woodland. The distribution of woodland subtypes related closely to certain soil properties. It was hypothesized that the distribution of open and closed woodland is stable and a positive feedback mechanism by which this occurs is postulated.

  2. Grewia gum as a potential aqueous film coating agent. I: Some physicochemical characteristics of fractions of grewia gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikoni J Ogaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Grewia gum has received attention as a polymeric pharmaceutical excipient in the recent times, being employed as a suspending, film coating, mucoadhesive, and binding agent. The low aqueous solubility, however, has limited its characterization and application. Objective: The purpose of this study was to fractionate and evaluate some physicochemical properties of the gum. Materials and Methods: Aqueous dispersion of the gum was treated at 80΀C for 30 min in the presence of sodium chloride and was subsequently fractionated by successively centrifuging it at 3445 rpm for 30 min. Skeletal density, solubility, particle size, and rheological as well as thermal characteristics of the fractions were evaluated. The 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and near infrared (NIR profiles of the fractions were also investigated. The solubility of the gum increased up to fourfold while the viscosity decreased from 244 to as low as70 cP at 40 rpm with some fractions. Results: Grewia gum and the fractions showed good thermal stability exhibiting no thermal events, but charred irreversibly at 297΀C irrespective of the fraction. The molecular weight averages by weight and by number of the fractions were between 233,100 and 235,000. The 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra showed broad peaks. The NMR and NIR spectra suggested the presence of -OH and -OCH 3 functional groups in this gum. Conclusion: The fractionation improved solubility and facilitated further investigations on its characteristics that may have implication on its processing, application, and optimization as a potential pharmaceutical excipient.

  3. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: III. The results from Black Wood and Bridgets Farm compared with those from other woodland and grassland sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United Kingdom the planting of broadleaved woodland has led to concerns about the impact on water resources. Comparative studies, typically using soil water measurements, have been established to compare water use of broadleaved woodland and grassland. The diversity of outcomes from these studies makes it difficult to make any consistent prediction of the hydrological impact of afforestation. Most studies have shown greater drying of soils under broadleaved woodland than under grass. However, two studies in a beech wood growing on shallow soils above chalk at Black Wood, Micheldever, Hampshire showed little overall difference between broadleaved woodland and grass, either in soil water abstraction or in evaporation. Two factors are thought to contribute to the different results from Black Wood. It is known that evaporation can be considerably enhanced at the edges of woodlands or in small areas of woodlands. The studies at Black Wood were made well within a large area of fairly uniform woodland. Other studies in which a difference occurred in soil drying between broadleaved woodland and grass used measurements made in small areas of woodlands or at woodland edges. Another important difference between comparison of woodland at Black Wood and grassland growing nearby, also on shallow soils above Chalk, compared to other broadleaved woodland/grass comparisons, growing on other geologies, is the influence of the Chalk. Although vegetation such as grass (and woodland does not populate the chalk profusely with roots, water can be removed from the Chalk by the roots which proliferate at the soil/chalk interface and which can generate upward water movement within the Chalk. Published work showed that only in a very dry summer did the evaporation from grass growing on shallow soils above chalk fall below potential. In broadleaved woodland/grass comparisons on non-chalky soils it is possible that moisture deficits in the soil below the grass may

  4. Population ecology of two woodland caribou herds in the southern Yukon

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    Richard Farnell

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid 1980's, the Aishihik herd of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou declined from approximately 1500 to 583 animals. During the same period a nearby herd, the Wolf Lake Herd increased from approximately 664 to 1249 animals. This paper compares aspects of the ecology of these two herds to determine how these relationships conform to a general model of caribou population ecology described by Seip (1992. Comparisons include caribou demographic characteristics and distribution patterns, predator densities, abundance of alternate prey, human hunting and snow depth on caribou winter range. Ecological differences between herds were apparent in the ratio of prime bulls to cows, the abundance of moose (Alces alces, the occurrence of coyotes (Canis latrans, late winter snow conditions, and access to hunting. We hypothesize that the Wolf Lake herd was able to grow because wolves {Canis lupus preyed mainly on the relatively abundant moose population. A highly clumped winter caribou distribution may have further reduced the impact of wolf predation on the Wolf Lake herd. In contrast, the decline of the Aishihik herd was accompanied by a relative scarcity of moose, few prime aged caribou bulls probably due to a more liberal trophy harvest, and wider late-winter dispersion that offered wolves greater access to caribou. The decline may have been exaggerated by the peak in the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus cycle which may have temporarily improved wolf pup survival. We suspect that moose are normally the primary prey of wolves in the Yukon and that a decline in moose eventually results in their being too scarce to offer an economical prey choice, prompting a prey switch to caribou. Results of our analyses conform incompletely to Seip's (1992 model for woodland caribou population ecology, particularly because the Wolf Lake herd prospered where moose were relatively abundant.

  5. Exploring the Potential of Mesquite Gum-Nopal Mucilage Mixtures: Physicochemical and Functional Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Camargo, Stefani; Gallardo-Rivera, Raquel; Barragán-Huerta, Blanca E; Dublán-García, Octavio; Román-Guerrero, Angélica; Pérez-Alonso, César

    2018-01-01

    In this work the physicochemical and functional properties of mesquite gum (MG) and nopal mucilage (NM) mixtures (75-25, 50-50, 25-75) were evaluated and compared with those of the individual biopolymers. MG-NM mixtures exhibited more negative zeta potential (ZP) values than those displayed by MG and NM, with 75-25 MG-NM showing the most negative value (-14.92 mV at pH = 7.0), indicative that this biopolymer mixture had the highest electrostatic stability in aqueous dispersions. Viscosity curves and strain amplitude sweep of aqueous dispersions (30% w/w) of the individual gums and their mixtures revealed that all exhibited shear thinning behavior, with NM having higher viscosity than MG, and all displaying fluid-like viscoelastic behavior where the loss modulus predominated over the storage modulus (G″>G'). Differential Scanning Calorimetry revealed that MG, NM, and MG-NM mixtures were thermally stable with decomposition peaks in a range from 303.1 to 319.6 °C. From the functional properties viewpoint, MG (98.4 ± 0.7%) had better emulsifying capacity than NM (51.9 ± 2.0%), while NM (43.0 ± 1.4%) had better foaming capacity than MG. MG-NM mixtures acquired additional functional properties (emulsifying and foaming) regarding the individual biopolymers. Therefore, MG-NM mixtures represent interesting alternatives for their application as emulsifying and foaming agents in food formulations. Mesquite gum (MG) and nopal mucilage (NM) are promising raw materials with excellent functional properties whose use has been largely neglected by the food industry. This work demonstrates MG-NM mixtures acquired additional functional properties regarding the individual biopolymers, making these mixtures multifunctional ingredients for the food industry. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Woodland caribou population decline in Alberta: fact or fiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey J.A. Bradshaw

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We re-assessed the view of a major woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou population decline in Alberta. Several historical publications and provincial documents refer to this drastic decline as the major premise for the designation of Alberta's woodland caribou an endangered species. In the past, wildlife management and inventory techniques were speculative and limited by a lack of technology, access and funding. The accepted trend of the decline is based on many speculations, opinions and misinterpretation of data and is unsubstantiated. Many aerial surveys failed to reduce variance and did not estimate sightability. Most surveys have underestimated numbers and contributed unreliable data to support a decline. Through forest fire protection and the presence of extensive wetlands, the majority of potential caribou habitat still exists. Recreational and aboriginal subsistence hunting does not appear to have contributed greatly to mortality, although data are insufficient for reliable conclusions. Wolf (Canis lupus, population fluctuations are inconclusive and do not provide adequate information on which to base prey population trends. The incidence of documented infection by parasites in Alberta is low and likely unimportant as a cause of the proposed decline.

  7. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO2 and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Vieira Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO2 and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO2 and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance.

  8. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory effects: a re-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Christopher; Johnson, Andrew J

    2007-03-01

    Two experiments re-examined whether chewing spearmint gum affects initial word learning and/or immediate recall for a word list. Both experiments failed to show effects of chewing gum at learning or recall, nor did they suggest that chewing gum produces a context-dependent memory effect. This was true when extraneous contextual cues at learning and recall were minimised (Experiment 2). Together, the data are inconsistent with [Wilkinson, L., Scholey, A. & Wesnes, K. (2002). Chewing gum selectively improves aspects of memory in healthy volunteers. Appetite, 38, 235-236.] claim that chewing gum aids immediate recall of visually presented words. Our results are consistent with [Baker, J. R., Bezance, J. B., Zellaby, E. & Aggleton, J. P. (2004). Chewing gum can produce context-dependent effects upon memory. Appetite, 43, 207-210.] finding that chewing gum of itself is not a sufficient condition to provoke context-dependent learning with immediate testing.

  9. Effects of chewing gum on the stress and work of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew P; Woods, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Recent research has indicated that chewing gum can relieve perceptions of stress in an occupational sample (Smith, 2009). In the present study, 72 students completed 2 weeks of either chewing gum or refraining from chewing gum. They completed scales measuring perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and single item measures of work levels and tiredness. These were completed both pre- and post-treatment. Perceived stress decreased as a function of the amount of gum chewed. The chewing gum condition was also associated with a decrease in not getting enough academic work done. There were no significant effects of chewing gum on mental health outcomes. These results confirm some of findings from previous studies of chewing gum and stress in other samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree, Ceratonia siliqua (Linne), a leguminous evergreen tree, with lesser quantities of seed coat and germ. (b) The...(o)(28) of this chapter. Beverages and beverage bases, nonalcoholic, § 170.3(n)(3) of this chapter...

  11. Terpenoids of Boswellia neglecta oleo-gum resin

    OpenAIRE

    L. O. A. Manguro; S. O.Wagai; J. O. Onyango

    2016-01-01

    Oleo-gum resin exudate from Boswellia neglecta afforded a new ursane-type triterpene characterized as 3α-acetoxy-28-hydroxy-11-oxours-12-en-24-ioc acid (1) together with twelve known compounds. Their structural elucidation was accomplished using physical, chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  12. Terpenoids of Boswellia neglecta oleo-gum resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. A. Manguro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oleo-gum resin exudate from Boswellia neglecta afforded a new ursane-type triterpene characterized as 3α-acetoxy-28-hydroxy-11-oxours-12-en-24-ioc acid (1 together with twelve known compounds. Their structural elucidation was accomplished using physical, chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  13. Evaluation of the bioadhesive property of Grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tablets formulated by wet granulation contained 75 mg of the drug and 15 or 20 %w/w of the gum. Similar tablets made differently with carbopol 934, tragacanth and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) were used as basis for comparison. Hydration of tablets and substrate surfaces was done using 0.1N hydrochloric ...

  14. Gellan gum fluid gels for topical administration of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Mohammed H; Conway, Barbara R; Mills, Thomas; Smith, Alan M

    2016-12-30

    Diclofenac topical formulations are often preferred for drug administration to patients who experience serious GIT problems. Absorption of the drug through the skin, however, can be challenging due to the natural protective feature of the stratum corneum (SC). In this article, fluid gels prepared from gellan gum were explored as a topical drug delivery vehicle. Rheological analysis of the formulations showed that it was possible to produce a topical gel with a viscosity and the mechanical strength similar to that of the commercially available Voltaren® gel using 1% w/w of a 50:50 low acyl/high acyl (LA/HA) gellan blend. Soft-tribology was used to assess the lubrication properties of gellan fluid gels. The lubrication of the gellan gum fluid gel formulations at high rubbing speeds was similar to the lubrication of the Voltaren® gel. The use of gellan gum dramatically increased skin permeation of diclofenac when compared with the commercially available formulation and could be controlled by changing the gellan gum concentration and/or sodium ion concentration in the formulation. This study highlights the potential use of fluid gels that can be easily tuned to have physical properties suitable for topical formulations with the added advantage of increasing drug permeation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Components responsible for the emulsification properties of corn fibre gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An emulsion was prepared using corn fibre gum (CFG) and the resulting oil and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation. The material adsorbed onto the surface of the oil droplets in the oil phase was desorbed using surfactant. The desorbed CFG and the non adsorbed CFG that remained present in...

  16. Improved emulsification performance of corn fiber gum following maturation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) in the solid state (milled powder form) was subjected to a maturation treatment by heating under atmospheric pressure at 110 degrees C for 5 (CFG5) and 24 hours (CFG24). The treatment reduced the solubility and aggregation of the proteinaceous component with increased heating t...

  17. Viscofying properties of corn fiber gum with various polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of corn fiber gum (CFG) on the aqueous solutions of a series of widely-used commercial polysaccharides has been studied by rheological techniques using stress synergism index to evaluate its viscosifying action. Though CFG solution exhibited Newtonian fluid behaviour with a very low vis...

  18. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrabolulu, Hande; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun; Şen, Murat

    2018-03-01

    In our previous study, we have investigated the effect of gamma rays on xanthan gum in the solid state and it was determined that dose rate was an important factor effecting the radiation degradation of xanthan gum. In the present study, in order to provide a better understanding of how ionizing radiation effect xanthan gum, we have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on aqueous solutions of xanthan at various concentrations (0.5-4%). Xanthan solutions were irradiated with gamma rays in air, at ambient temperature, at different dose rates (0.1-3.3-7.0 kGy/h) and doses (2.5-50 kGy). Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. It was determined that, solution concentration was a factor effecting the degradation chemical yield and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Chain scission reactions were more effective for lower solution concentrations.

  19. Gum acacia coating with garlic and cinnamon as an alternate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum acacia coating with garlic and cinnamon as an alternate, natural preservative for meat and fish. ... The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by macrobroth dilution method against five spoilage and disease causing bacteria (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus ...

  20. Cashew gum and gelatin blend for food packaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashew gum (CG) and gelatin (G) films were developed using the casting method and response surface methodology. The objective was produce packaging films from CG/G blends that exhibit effective barrier properties. A study of zeta potential versus pH was first carried out to determine the isoelectric...

  1. Gum from the bark of Anogeissius leiocarpus as a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The granule elegance, mean particle size and particle size distribution, bulk, tapped and true densities, friability, angle of repose and compressibility (Carr's index) were determined and used to assess the gum relative to PVP and corn starch in granule formulation. Results of the various studies showed that lower ...

  2. Increased gum arabic production after infestation of Acacia senegal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... disease, changes in climate, changes in the economical development, or ... species of Acacia trees botanically, only two species, ... joined to the main chain by 1,6-linkages. Only a few plant species are cultivated at present to obtain gums used in the food industry as additives; most of them belong to the.

  3. Synthesis and optimization of polyacrylamide and gum arabic graft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graft copolymerization of polyacrylamide onto gum arabic was carried out in aqueous medium at room temperature (30oC) using various initiator (ceric ion) and monomer (acrylamide) concentrations. The extent of graft copolymer formation was determined in terms of percentage graft yield. The results obtained showed that ...

  4. Two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test for evaluating masticatory performance in children with mixed dentition: validity and reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, M S; Güçlü, B; Schimmel, M; Akyüz, S

    2017-11-01

    The unappealing taste of the chewing material and the time-consuming repetitive task in masticatory performance tests using artificial foodstuff may discourage children from performing natural chewing movements. Therefore, the aim was to determine the validity and reliability of a two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test for masticatory performance (MP) assessment in mixed dentition children. Masticatory performance was tested in two groups: systemically healthy fully dentate young adults and children in mixed dentition. Median particle size was assessed using a comminution test, and a two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test was applied for MP analysis. Validity was tested with Pearson correlation, and reliability was tested with intra-class correlation coefficient, Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman plots. Both comminution and two-colour chewing gum mixing ability tests revealed statistically significant MP differences between children (n = 25) and adults (n = 27, both P colour chewing gum mixing ability tests was positive and significant (r = 0·418, P = 0·002). Correlations for interobserver reliability and test-retest values were significant (r = 0·990, P = 0·0001 and r = 0·995, P = 0·0001). Although both methods could discriminate MP differences, the comminution test detected these differences generally in a wider range compared to two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test. However, considering the high reliability of the results, the two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test can be used to assess masticatory performance in children, especially at non-clinical settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Use of island and mainland shorelines by woodland caribou during the nursery period in two northern Ontario parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Carr

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Predation is considered a primary limiting factor of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations across North America. Caribou are especially vulnerable to predation during their first few weeks of life and have evolved space-use strategies to reduce predation risk through habitat selection during the critical calving and nursery period. We assessed landscape-scale physical characteristics and landcover types associated with caribou nursery sites in Wabakimi and Woodland Caribou Provincial Parks in northern Ontario to better understand nursery site selection in relatively undisturbed landscapes. Although free from industrial activity, these protected areas may subject caribou to human recreational disturbance, so our secondary objective was to evaluate female caribou nursery site selection relative to human recreational activities. We determined that parturient caribou selected landscape characteristics at multiple spatial scales that may reduce predation risk during the calving and nursery period. Generally, female caribou in both parks selected larger lakes with larger than average sized islands configured within shorter than average distances to other islands or landforms that might facilitate escape from predators. The majority of caribou nursery areas in both parks occurred on islands rather than the mainland shoreline of lakes that were surveyed. The nearest landform for escape from these nursery sites on islands was typically another island, and most often 2-3 islands, suggesting parturient caribou may choose islands clustered together as part of their escape strategy. In Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, caribou nursery sites occurred more often in coniferous landcover than expected from availability, while in Wabakimi Provincial Park caribou used sparse, mixed and coniferous forests for nursery activity. Caribou cow-calf pairs typically used areas for nursery activity that were 9.1 km (± 1.0 km, range 2.3-20.6 km in

  6. Sensory and rheological characteristics of thickened liquids differing concentrations of a xanthan gum-based thickener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeri; Hwang, Han-Im; Song, Ki-Won; Lee, Jeehyun

    2017-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and compare sensory characteristics of beverages and soups thickened with different concentrations of a xanthan gum-based thickener, and to examine, using rheological measurement, whether the viscosity of the thickened liquids conformed to the recommendations of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) Task Force. Beverages tested included water, apple juice, orange juice, soymilk, and Yakult. The thickening agent was added to samples at concentrations of 1, 2, or 3%. Addition of the thickening agent had a significant effect on the appearance, texture, and starchy flavor, which were evaluated by descriptive sensory evaluation. The reference standards of viscosity used in sensory descriptive analysis could be useful to practitioners who have to make dysphagia diets and need to learn to make them properly. In rheological measurement, viscosity of thickened liquids in stationary state would be perceived as higher compared to that while swallowing, because of the shear thinning property. This could lead to noncompliance of the medical advice or malnutrition. It is necessary to determine optimal proportion of xanthan gum-based thickener or uncover alternatives, which have shear thinning properties lower than those of xanthan gum, for the acceptance of dysphagia patients. There was no pudding-like viscosity as classified by NDD, when prepared following instructions. Future studies should include higher concentrations of thickener to find out the concentration of the thickener resulting in pudding-like viscosity as recommended by NDD. When a manufacturer modifies or develops a xanthan gum-based thickener, findings from this study can be utilized to understand sensory and rheological characteristics of thickened liquid. For practitioners who have to make dysphagia diets, the reference standards of viscosity used in sensory descriptive analysis could be helpful for deciding the viscosity level of thickened liquids based only on visual

  7. Above- and Belowground Biomass Models for Trees in the Miombo Woodlands of Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud J. Kachamba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present general (multiple tree species from several sites above- and belowground biomass models for trees in the miombo woodlands of Malawi. Such models are currently lacking in the country. The modelling was based on 74 trees comprising 33 different species with diameters at breast height (dbh and total tree height (ht ranging from 5.3 to 2 cm and from 3.0 to 25.0 m, respectively. Trees were collected from four silvicultural zones covering a wide range of conditions. We tested different models including dbh, ht and wood specific gravity ( ρ as independent variables. We evaluated model performance using pseudo-R2, root mean square error (RMSE, a covariance matrix for the parameter estimates, mean prediction error (MPE and relative mean prediction error (MPE%. Computation of MPE% was based on leave-one-out cross-validation. Values of pseudo-R2 and MPE% ranged 0.82–0.97 and 0.9%–2.8%, respectively. Model performance indicated that the models can be used over a wide range of geographical and ecological conditions in Malawi.

  8. Habitat Restoration as a Key Conservation Lever for Woodland Caribou: A review of restoration programs and key learnings from Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bentham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Recovery Strategy for the Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou, Boreal Population in Canada (EC, 2012, identifies coordinated actions to reclaim woodland caribou habitat as a key step to meeting current and future caribou population objectives. Actions include restoring industrial landscape features such as roads, seismic lines, pipelines, cut-lines, and cleared areas in an effort to reduce landscape fragmentation and the changes in caribou population dynamics associated with changing predator-prey dynamics in highly fragmented landscapes. Reliance on habitat restoration as a recovery action within the federal recovery strategy is high, considering all Alberta populations have less than 65% undisturbed habitat, which is identified in the recovery strategy as a threshold providing a 60% chance that a local population will be self-sustaining. Alberta’s Provincial Woodland Caribou Policy also identifies habitat restoration as a critical component of long-term caribou habitat management. We review and discuss the history of caribou habitat restoration programs in Alberta and present outcomes and highlights of a caribou habitat restoration workshop attended by over 80 representatives from oil and gas, forestry, provincial and federal regulators, academia and consulting who have worked on restoration programs. Restoration initiatives in Alberta began in 2001 and have generally focused on construction methods, revegetation treatments, access control programs, and limiting plant species favourable to alternate prey. Specific treatments include tree planting initiatives, coarse woody debris management along linear features, and efforts for multi-company and multi-stakeholder coordinated habitat restoration on caribou range. Lessons learned from these programs have been incorporated into large scale habitat restoration projects near Grande Prairie, Cold Lake, and Fort McMurray. A key outcome of our review is the opportunity to provide a

  9. Saffron and beetroot extracts encapsulated in maltodextrin, gum Arabic, modified starch and chitosan: Incorporation in a chewing gum system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chranioti, Charikleia; Nikoloudaki, Aspasia; Tzia, Constantina

    2015-08-20

    Maltodextrin (MD-21DE), gum Arabic (GA), gum Arabic-modified starch (GA-MS), modified starch-chitosan (MS-CH) and modified starch-maltodextrin-chitosan (MS-MD-CH) were used as agents for beetroot and saffron coloring-extracts microencapsulation by freeze drying. The produced powders were evaluated in terms of coloring strength (E) during storage at 40°C for 10 weeks and a first-order kinetic was applied. Color parameters (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and ΔE(*)) and water sorption behavior was also studied. Moreover, incorporation of the powders in a chewing gum model system was conducted. The type of encapsulating agent significantly (PGA>GA-MS>MS-CH>MS-MD-CH. The water sorption study revealed that MD and GA kept their structural integrity up to water activities of 0.66 and 0.82, respectively. The chewing gum samples produced with coloring extracts encapsulated in GA-MS showed the greatest a(*)(for beetroot) and b(*) (for saffron) values indicating a better protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of lipids, phenolic acids, and protein rich components to emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum and acacia gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a proprietary alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. When purified CFG prepared by this process was hydrolyzed with concentrated base (1.5 N methanolic KOH at 70 °C for one hour) considerable ...

  11. Saproxylic beetles of the Po plain woodlands, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogliani, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Forest ecosystems play an important role for the conservation of biodiversity, and for the protection of ecological processes. The Po plain woodlands which once covered the whole Plain, today are reduced in isolated highly threatened remnants by modern intensive agriculture. These close to natural floodplain forests are one of the most scarce and endangered ecosystems in Europe. Saproxylic species represent a major part of biodiversity of woodlands. The saproxylic insects are considered one of the most reliable bio-indicators of high-quality mature woodlands and have a very important role in regard to the protection and monitoring of forest biodiversity due to their highly specific living environments. As a result of the dramatic reduction of mature forests and the decreased availability of deadwood most of the saproxylic communities are greatly diminishing. The study was conducted in the Ticino Valley Regional Park and the aim is to contribute to the expansion of knowledge on the saproxylic beetles of Lombardy. We investigated 6 sampling sites belonging to alluvial and riparian mixed forests. For each forest we selected 12 trees. For beetles’ collection we used two different traps: Eclector Traps and Trunk Window Traps (total of 72 traps and 864 samples collected). We determined 4.387 beetles from 87 saproxylic species belonging to 21 families. Of these species 51 were not included in the previous checklist of the Park. By comparing the two different techniques used for catching saproxylic beetles, we found a significantly high difference in species richness between Window Traps (WT) and Eclector Traps (ET) with a higher number of species captured in the Window Traps. However, the combined use of two different types of traps significantly expanded the spectrum of insects captured Among the species reported as Least Concern in the IUCN Red List, we found interesting species such as the Elateridae Calambus bipustulats, the Eucnemidae Melasis buprestoides

  12. Molecular and functional characteristics of purified gum from Australian chia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Adhikari, Raju; Kasapis, Stefan; Adhikari, Benu

    2016-01-20

    Chia seed gum (CSG) was extracted from the seed coat of Salvia hispanica, purified in the laboratory and its chemical composition and functional properties were investigated. CSG was found to comprise 93.8% carbohydrate consisting of xylose, glucose, arabinose, galactose, glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid as monosaccharide units. The presence of uronic acids was reflected in the anionic behavior of the CSG solution over a wide range of pH (≥ 1.8). The solubility of CSG increased slightly with temperature and pH of the aqueous medium. CSG was able to resist pyrolytic decomposition at temperatures well in excess of 250 °C, and exhibited a high water holding capacity (23 times of its own weight). The surface activity and emulsifying properties of CSG were found to be either superior or comparable to other common gums and industrial polysaccharides indicating the potential of CSG as an effective thickener and stabilizer of processed foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Value added product recovery from sludge generated during gum arabic refining process by vermicomposting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Veena; Satyanarayan, Sanjeev; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-09-01

    Gum arabic is multifunctional and used in food products, pharmaceutical, confectionery, cosmetic, printing and textile industry. Gum arabic has an excellent market and its production is being increased to meet the market demand. In the process, huge quantity of solid waste is generated during its refining process. An attempt has been made to vermicompost this organic waste using Eudrilus eugeniae. This research work is first of its kind. Literature on this substrate has not been reported anywhere else for vermicomposting. Results were excellent with volatile solid reduction of 51.34 %; C/N ratio reduced to 16.31 % indicating efficient loss of carbon as carbon dioxide during vermicomposting period. Manurial value, i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in the range, required for the plants also increased. Porosity of 67.74 % and water holding capacity of 65.75 % were observed. The maturity of the vermicompost was evaluated through scanning electron microscopy wherein the complete conversion of large raw material particles into finer particles forming a uniform matrix with more surface area was observed indicating its efficient conversion. Microbial quality of vermicompost was also studied. The final vermicompost is free of fungal cells and pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Socialist and postsocialist land-use legacies determine farm woodland composition and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Schaich, H.

    2014-01-01

    European agroecosystems host a variety of farm woodlands that act as primary determinants of biodiversity and ecosystem services. While woodland areas have been in decline worldwide, they have regionally increased, for example, in Eastern Germany. This study performs a quantitative and spatially...... explicit assessment of differences in species richness, diversity, and evenness as well as forest physiognomy and structure among Eastern German farm woodlands established during (1) the presocialist era (until 1945), (2) the socialist era (1945-1990), and (3) the postsocialist era (after 1990). Aerial...

  15. Estimating Size and Trend of the North Interlake Woodland Caribou Population Using Fecal-DNA and Capture-Recapture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Peter N; Arnason, Arni Neil; Manseau, Micheline; Cross, Dale; Whaley, Kent; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    along the southern part of their range. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the applicability and success of non-invasive genetic sampling in monitoring populations of woodland caribou. © 2012 The Wildlife Society.

  16. Determination of the Degree of Substitution of Cationic Guar Gum by Headspace-Based Gas Chromatography during Its Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaofang; Guo, Congbao; Feng, Jiarui; Yu, Teng; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Guangxue; Xie, Wei-Qi

    2017-08-16

    This study reports on a headspace-based gas chromatography (HS-GC) technique for determining the degree of substitution (DS) of cationic guar gum during the synthesis process. The method is based on the determination of 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride in the process medium. After a modest pretreatment procedure, the sample was added to a headspace vial containing bicarbonate solution for measurement of evolved CO2 by HS-GC. The results showed that the method had a good precision (relative standard deviation of <3.60%) and accuracy for the 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride measurement, with recoveries in the range of 96-102%, matching with the data obtained by a reference method, and were within 12% of the values obtained by the more arduous Kjeldahl method for the calculated DS of cationic guar gum. The HS-GC method requires only a small volume of sample and, thus, is suitable for determining the DS of cationic guar gum in laboratory-scale process-related applications.

  17. Evaluation of gum mastic (Pistacia lentiscus as a microencapsulating and matrix forming material for sustained drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh M. Morkhade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a natural gum mastic was evaluated as a microencapsulating and matrix-forming material for sustained drug release. Mastic was characterized for its physicochemical properties. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. Matrix tablets were prepared by wet and melt granulation techniques. Diclofenac sodium (DFS and diltiazem hydrochloride (DLTZ were used as model drugs. Mastic produced discrete and spherical microspheres with DLTZ and microcapsules with DFS. Particle size and drug loading of microparticles was in the range of 22–62 µm and 50–87%, respectively. Increase in mastic: drug ratio increased microparticle size, improved drug loading and decreased the drug release rate. Microparticles with gum: drug ratio of 2:1 could sustain DLTZ release up to 12 h and released 57% DFS in 12 h. Mastic produced tablets with acceptable pharmacotechnical properties. A 30% w/w of mastic in tablet could sustain DLTZ release for 5 h from wet granulation, and DFS release for 8 h and 11 h from wet and melt granulation, respectively. Results revealed that a natural gum mastic can be used successfully to formulate matrix tablets and microparticles for sustained drug release.

  18. UAV – a useful tool for monitoring woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmarz Anna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial systems are in many countries one of the most dynamically developing branches of technology. They have also been recognized and are being utilized by scientists who find remote sensing indispensable in their work. Today, it is increasingly common to find research teams utilizing so-called drones in field research. Unmanned systems are becoming ever more important for environment monitoring by, on the one hand, providing data from inaccessible or remote areas, and, on the other hand, reducing the human costs required by traditional large field teams while also increasing the efficiency of the work. This paper presents the possibility of utilizing UAVs for image data collection in woodland areas.

  19. Surveying woodland raptors by broadcast of conspecific vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, J.A.; Fuller, M.R.; Kopeny, M.

    1990-01-01

    We surveyed for raptors in forests on study areas in five of the eastern United States. For Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperi), Red-shouldered Hawks (Buteo lineatus), and Barred Owls (Strix varia) the contact rates obtained by broadcasting taped vocalizations of conspecifics along roads were significantly greater than contact rates obtained by only looking and listening from the roadside. Broad-winged Hawks (B. platypterus) were detected only after their calls were broadcast. Most raptors were detected within 10 min of the beginning of the broadcasts. Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis) and Goshawks (A. gentilis) nested infrequently on our study areas, and we were unable to increase detections of these species. Generally, point count transects along woodland roads, from which conspecific vocalizations were broadcast, resulted in higher species specific detection rates than when walking, driving continuously, or only looking and listening for raptors at roadside stops.

  20. Challenging the Woodfuel Crisis in West African Woodlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansfort, Sofie Louise; Mertz, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Fear of an upcoming woodfuel crisis caused by increasing woodfuel consumption in Bamako has had great influence on forestry policies aiming to reduce the impacts of urban woodfuel consumption. During the last 20 years, energy gap analyses—the relationship between supply and demand of woodfuels...... to evaluate its sustainability using a simple methodology such as the energy gap analysis. Trends over the last 20 years show a highly efficient woodfuel system that has adapted to changing circumstances, ensuring a continued affordable woodfuel supply for the urban residents. Better data on the productivity......—have been produced by the government of Mali to prove the impacts of woodfuel consumption in Bamako on surrounding woodlands. This study evaluates the methodology and data used to describe this woodfuel crisis through a comparison with regional and historical data. The results of the energy gap analyses...

  1. Preliminary research on environmental impact of woodland grazing by pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Mani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 6 castrate pigs about 30 kg live weight each entered in a fence into hilly woodland area. The pigs were bred until about 140 kg live weight. After 10 months of pasture breeding, the environmental damages (cover ground, plants and soil characteristics by rooting and trampling were evaluated. The damages to cover ground and to shrubs and to physical structure (Fissures and Aggregate stability caused hydro-geological instability with soil erosion and landslides. Removing surface layers of soil caused considerable loss of organic matter (Total Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen, microbial activity (Microbial ATP and breathing and enzyme activity changes (Total β−glucosidase and Extra cellular β−glucosidase. Damages to native plants are different in relation to the root and the trunk kinds, and to the palatability of leaves and apexes which result inversely related whit the abundance of disagreeable substances content (ADL, Tannins, Resins, Latex.

  2. A comparison of corn fiber gum, hydrophobically modified starch, gum arabic and soybean soluble polysaccharide: interfacial dynamics, viscoelastic response at oil/water interfaces and emulsion stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interfacial rheology of polysaccharide adsorption layers of corn fiber gum (CFG), octenyl succinate anhydride-modified starch (OSA-s), gum arabic (GA) and soybean soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) at the oil/water interface and their emulsifying properties in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were compa...

  3. Phytoliths in woody plants from the Miombo woodlands of Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Julio; Bennett, Tim; Esselmont, Chris; Simpson, Steven; Walde, Dale

    2009-07-01

    There are no descriptions of phytoliths produced by plants from the 'Zambezian' zone, where Miombo woodlands are the dominant element of the largest single phytochorion in sub-Saharan Africa. The preservation of phytoliths in fossil records of Africa makes phytoliths a tool to study early plant communities. Paleo-ethnobotanical interpretation of phytoliths relies on the comparison of ancient types with morphotypes extracted from living reference collections. Phytoliths were extracted from plant samples representing 41 families, 77 genera and 90 species through sonic cleaning, dry ashing and acid treatment; and phytoliths thus extracted were quantified. For each species, an average of 216 phytoliths were counted. The percentage of each morphotype identified per species was calculated, and types were described according to the descriptors from the International Code for Phytolith Nomenclature. Phytolith assemblages were subject to discriminant analysis, cluster analysis and principal component analysis. Phytoliths were grouped into 57 morphotypes (two were articulated forms and 55 were discrete shapes), and provide a reference collection of phytolith assemblages produced by Miombo woody species. Common and unique morphotypes are described and taxonomic and grouping variables are looked into from a statistical perspective. The first quantitative taxonomy of phytoliths from Miombos is presented here, including new types and constituting the most extensive phytolith key for any African ecoregion. Evidence is presented that local woody species are hypervariable silica producers and their phytolith morphotypes are highly polymorphic. The taxonomic significance of these phytoliths is largely poor, but there are important exceptions that include the morphotypes produced by members from >10 families and orders. The typical phytolithic signal that would allow scientists to identify ancient woodlands of 'Zambezian' affiliation comprises only half of the original number of

  4. Effects of chewing gum on mood, learning, memory and performance of an intelligence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Recent research suggests that chewing gum may increase alertness and lead to changes in cognitive performance. The present study examined effects of chewing gum on these functions within the context of a single study. This study had four main aims. The first was to examine whether chewing gum improved learning and memory of information in a story. The second aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved test performance on a validated intellectual task (the Alice Heim task). A third aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved performance on short memory tasks (immediate and delayed recall of a list of words, delayed recognition memory, retrieval from semantic memory, and a working memory task). The final aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved mood (alertness, calm and hedonic tone). A cross-over design was used with gum and no-gum sessions being on consecutive weeks. In each week, volunteers attended for two sessions, two days apart. The first session assessed mood, immediate recall of information from a story and performance on short memory tasks. The second session assessed mood, delayed recall of information from a story and performance of an intelligence test (the Alice Heim test). There were no significant effects of chewing gum on any aspect of recall of the story. Chewing gum improved the accuracy of performing the Alice Heim test which confirms the benefits of gum on test performance seen in an earlier study. Chewing gum had no significant effect on the short memory tasks. Chewing gum increased alertness at the end of the test session in both parts of the study. This effect was in the region of a 10% increase and was highly significant (P < 0.001). The results of this study showed that chewing gum increases alertness. In contrast, no significant effects of chewing gum were observed in the memory tasks. Intellectual performance was improved in the gum condition. Overall, the results suggest further research on the alerting effects of

  5. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    Appendix II of The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of the following: Metro Center Program, Conventional Plan Building Prototypes and Detail Parcel Analysis, Energy Plan Building Prototypes, and Energy Plan Detail Parcel Analysis.

  6. Monitoring forest carbon in a Tanzanian woodland using interferometric SAR: a novel methodology for REDD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solberg, Svein; Gizachew, Belachew; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Bollandsås, Ole Martin; Mauya, Ernest William; Olsson, Håkan; Malimbwi, Rogers; Zahabu, Eliakimu

    2015-01-01

    ... as a basis for a reference emission level. Working in a miombo woodland in Tanzania, we here aim at demonstrating a novel 3D satellite approach based on interferometric processing of radar imagery (InSAR...

  7. The Role of Small Woodland Remnants on Ground Dwelling Insect Conservation in Chaco Serrano, Central Argentina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Laura Moreno; María Guadalupe Fernández; Silvia Itati Molina; Graciela Valladares

    2013-01-01

    .... In this study, the effects of patch size, isolation, and edge/interior localization on the ground dwelling insect communities in the Chaco Serrano woodland remnants in central Argentina were examined...

  8. Quantifying water requirements of riparian river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia: Implications for the management of environmental flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Tanya M.; Colloff, Matthew J.; Davies, Micah; Koul, Vijay; Benyon, Richard G.; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    Water resource development and drought have altered river flow regimes, increasing average flood return intervals across floodplains in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, causing health declines in riparian river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) forests and woodlands. Environmental flow allocations helped to alleviate water stress during the recent Millennium Drought (1997–2010), however, quantification of the flood frequency required to support healthy E. camaldulensis communities is still needed. We quantified water requirements of E. camaldulensis for two years across a flood gradient (trees inundated at frequencies of 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10 years) at Yanga National Park, New South Wales to help inform management decision-making and design of environmental flows. Sap flow, evaporative losses and soil moisture measurements were used to determine transpiration, evapotranspiration and plant-available soil water before and after flooding. A formula was developed using plant-available soil water post-flooding and average annual rainfall, to estimate maintenance time of soil water reserves in each flood frequency zone. Results indicated that soil water reserves could sustain 1:2 and 1:5 trees for 15 months and six years, respectively. Trees regulated their transpiration rates, allowing them to persist within their flood frequency zone, and showed reduction in active sapwood area and transpiration rates when flood frequencies exceeded 1:2 years. A leaf area index of 0.5 was identified as a potential threshold indicator of severe drought stress. Our results suggest environmental water managers may have greater flexibility to adaptively manage floodplains in order to sustain E. camaldulensis forests and woodlands than has been appreciated hitherto.

  9. Karakterisasi dan Sifat Fisik Sistem Koaservasi Gelatin - Gum Akasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komari Komari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex coacervation system of gelatin solution of 1% and acacia gum of 1% could be developed for encapsulation of bio-active materials. The system had been developed to measured optimum pH of coacervate formation, coaservate recovery, viscosity and density of the solution sistem for predicting its membran thickness on covering the bio-active materials. Results showed that using turbidity measurement, pH of the system could recovery of the coacervate of the sistem was 3,5 and the dried coacervate recoveri was 81±4%. The mixture of gelatin solution of 1% and gum acacia solution of 1% were measured for density and viscosity and the results were 1,0876 ± 0,0045 g/ml and 0,986±0,025 mPa.s, respectively. This physical characteristics could be used for calculating membran thickness for certain bio-active material to be coated.

  10. Sulfomethylated graft copolymers of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, I.W.; Empey, R.A.; Racciato, J.S.

    1978-08-08

    A water-soluble anionic graft copolymer of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide is described in which at least part of the amide function of the acrylamide portion of the copolymer is sulfomethylated and the xanthan gum portion of the copolymer is unreacted with formaldehyde. The copolymer is sulfomethylated by reaction with formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite. The formaldehyde does not cause any appreciable cross-linking between hydroxyl groups of the xanthan moieties. The sulfomethylation of the acrylamido group takes place at temperatures from 35 to 70 C. The pH is 10 or higher, typically from 12 to 13. The degree of anionic character may be varied by adjusting the molar ratio of formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite with respect to the copolymer. 10 claims.

  11. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-07-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has gained acceptance amongst the paediatric community as it is very well tolerated and is safe. The adverse effects of this therapy is minimal consisting mainly of local side effects within the oral cavity such as itching of the mouth, swelling of the lips and less frequently abdominal pain, wheezing and urticaria has been described. This report is to highlight another local side effect of sublingual immunotherapy which has been observed in 3 of our patients. This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  12. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Solís, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry. PMID:26904622

  13. Expression, purification and crystallization of the outer membrane lipoprotein GumB from Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Melisa; Salinas, Silvina R; Bianco, María I; Ielpi, Luis

    2012-10-01

    GumB is a predicted outer membrane lipoprotein that is involved in the synthesis and/or secretion of xanthan gum. This exopolysaccharide, produced by Xanthomonas campestris, is valuable in industry because of its important rheological properties. Solution of the GumB structure will provide insight into the polymerization and/or secretion mechanisms of xanthan gum. GumB was overexpressed and purified and diffraction-quality crystals of native GumB were obtained. A complete data set was collected to 2.54 Å resolution with an R(p.i.m.) of 0.034. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 84.4, b = 90.5, c = 120.7 Å.

  14. Antioxidant Effect of Xanthan Gum on Ram Sperm after Freezing and Thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastal, G DA; Silva, E F; Mion, B; Varela Junior, A S; Rosa, C E; Corcini, C D; Mondadori, R G; Vieira, A D; Bianchi, I; Lucia, T

    Xanthan gum is used as thickener in media to preserve food products, having cryoprotectant and antioxidant properties that may be relevant for sperm cryopreservation. To evaluate the effects of adding xanthan gum to freezing extenders on post-thawing quality and oxidant activity of ram sperm. Ejaculates from seven rams extended TRIS-egg yolk-glycerol were split in three treatments including xanthan gum (0.15%; 0.20%; and 0.25%) and a control with no xanthan gum. After thawing, motility and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with 0.20% and 0.25% xanthan gum were lower than for the control (P membrane, acrosome and DNA did not differ (P > 0.05). Xanthan gum at 0.20% and 0.25% may be an efficient antioxidant for frozen-thawed ram sperm, due to the reduction in ROS production.

  15. Management of blue gum eucalyptus in California requires region-specific consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Wolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blue gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus is a large tree native to Australia that was widely planted throughout California for reforestation, building and timber, but in some areas has spread beyond its planted borders and substantially altered wildlands. Due to its fast growth, large size and reproductive potential, blue gum's impacts on native vegetation, wildlife and ecosystem processes are of concern, particularly in areas with reliable year-round rainfall or fog, where it is most likely to spread. Depending on levels of invasion and rate of spread, blue gum may have negative, positive or neutral impacts on fire regimes, water and nutrient availability, understory vegetation and higher trophic levels. Additional research on the abiotic and biotic impacts of blue gum, quantitative estimates of area covered by blue gum, and weed risk assessments that allow for region-specific climatic information and management goals to be incorporated are needed to guide management of blue gum populations.

  16. Protein-free cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and rheological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-free cress seed gum (PFCSG) was obtained by precipitation of crude cress seed gum (CSG) withethanol followed by treatment with protease. Molecular weight, moisture, ash and uronic acids contentdecreased after elimination of protein. Elimination of protein improved significantly rheological...... proper-ties and thermal stability of cress seed gum. Mechanical spectra of the CSG and PFCSG were classified asweak gels and PFCSG showed stronger and more elastic network structure. The gum dispersions exhib-ited strong shear-thinning behavior which was described satisfactory by the Herschel......-Bulkley and Mooremodels. Protein-free cress seed gum had higher apparent and intrinsic viscosities than the crude gum.CSG indicated lower hysteresis loop area, but degree of structural recovery of the samples showed no sig-nificant difference. The main decomposition of PFCSG started above 213◦C with two peaks (at 261...

  17. Efficacy of baking soda-containing chewing gum in removing natural tooth stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, S M; Conforti, N; Berkowitz, H

    2001-07-01

    A 14-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 126 healthy volunteers to compare the efficacy of twice-daily use of 3 baking soda-containing chewing gums in removing natural tooth stain when used in conjunction with a program of regular oral hygiene. All 3 chewing gums significantly reduced extrinsic stain (P Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) reduced dental stain by 70.8%, compared to reductions of 71.9% and 65.3%, after use of 2 experimental gum formulations. Whitened appearance improved by 1.73 shade tabs using AHDC gum, and up to 2.49 shade tabs with the experimental formulations. These results suggest that the use of baking soda-containing gum after meals, in conjunction with good oral hygiene, can improve both extrinsic dental staining and the whitened appearance of teeth.

  18. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydra...

  19. Gellan gum microgel-reinforced cell-laden gelatin hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyeongho; Olsen, Bradley D.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The relatively weak mechanical properties of hydrogels remain a major drawback for their application as load-bearing tissue scaffolds. Previously, we developed cell-laden double-network (DN) hydrogels that were composed of photocrosslinkable gellan gum (GG) and gelatin. Further research into the materials as tissue scaffolds determined that the strength of the DN hydrogels decreased when they were prepared at cell-compatible conditions, and the encapsulated cells in the DN hydrogels did not f...

  20. Chewing gum and lozenges as delivery systems for noscapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard Jensen, L.; Christrup, Lona Louring; Menger, N.

    1991-01-01

    Chewing gum and lozenges were evaluated as delivery systems for noscapine with the aim of developing improved antitussive preparations. The formulations studied were prepared with both the water-soluble hydrochloride salt of noscapine and with the poorly soluble embonate salt and noscapine free b...... in vitro and in vivo and is therefore not a suitable dosage form. Only a lozenge formulation containing noscapine base fulfilled the requirements of taste acceptability and adequate release properties....

  1. Adult sudden death caused by aspiration of chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njau, S N

    2004-01-28

    A case of a fatal foreign material aspiration is presented in the following text. A 24-year-old white male died suddenly. A piece of chewing gum lodged in a pool of frothy fluid was revealed at autopsy. Microscopic examinations revealed atelectasia emphysema, eosinophilic exudate and empty spaces. Blood and urine samples were analyzed, for alcohol and drug use by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on an Abbott AXSYM system. No alcohol or other drugs were detected in blood or urine.

  2. Effect of irradiation on functional properties of Gum Tragacanth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Mollakhalili meybodi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: irradiation is a physical treatment in which products are exposed to ionized radiation such as gamma and x rays to improve the security and quality. Hydrocolloids are components that are used in food science to improve texture properties. Exposing to irradiation treatment may change structural and functional properties. By regard to the importance of irradiation on decontaminating of hydrocolloids in food application, the aim of this study is studying the effect of irradiation at different doses on functional properties of Gum Tragacanth in food application. Material and methods: effect of irradiation treatment was studied on the rheological properties, zeta potential, particle size distribution and surface tension of dispersion systems contained 0/5% w/ w gum tragacanth that is irradiated at different doses (0, 0.75. 3, 5 kGy. The effect of irradiation on rheological properties was monitored by rheometer. In order to monitor the effect of irradiation treatment on particle size distribution, zeta potential and surface tension, particle sizer, Brookhaven zeta plus and tensiometer sere used respectively. All treatments were performed three times and the data were analyzed by one way ANOVA. Significant differences between means were identified (P values < 0.05 using Duncan test. Results: Irradiation, change rheologiacal properties and particle size distribution of dispersion contained gum tragacanth. Irradiation treatment up to 0.75 kGy increase zeta potential, but irradiating at higher doses decrease it again. Results of studying parameters showed that irradiation changes the functional properties by affecting on structure. These changes depend on irradiation dose Conclusion: Gum tragacanth irradiation may improve the functional properties by affecting on structure.

  3. Cryoextraction: A novel approach to remove aspirated chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of aspirated foreign bodies can prove challenging at times, requiring even rigid bronchoscopy. Cryotherapy probes have been reported to help with extraction of foreign bodies. We present a case where successful "cryoextraction" was performed on an aspirated chewing gum. The case highlights the fact that this technique is useful to extract all materials that have water content. This technique can be performed through flexible bronchoscopy and can save patients from more aggressive approaches.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Pistacia khinjuk Gum Nanoparticles Using Response Surface Method: Evaluation of Its Anti-Bacterial Performance and Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fattahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to prepare a novel, natural nanoparticle (NP as a drug carrier, which also has inherent therapeutic effects. Methods: Pistacia khinjuk gum NPs were prepared and Response surface methodology (RSM was used for statistical analysis of data and optimizing the size of NPs. Results: NPs were in the range of 75.85–241.3 nm. The optimization study was carried out, and an optimized size (70.86nm was obtained using DMSO as a solvent. The volume of the organic phase was 111.25µl, and the concentration of gum was 1% w/v. The cell viability assay was performed on the pure gum and NPs toward β-TC3, MCF7, and HT29 cell lines. It was observed that NPs have higher cytotoxic activity in comparison with pure gum, and that the IC50value was achieved at 1% of NPs in β-TC3 cells. The obtained NPs demonstrated antibacterial activity against two bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: Altogether, according to the obtained results, these NPs with inherent cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity are an attractive carrier for drug delivery.

  5. Comparison of Nostocean hormogonium induction and its motility on solid plates between agar and gellan gum at varying gel matrix concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizuka, Hiroaki; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-29

    To establish a sensitive bioassay for Nostocean hormogonium induction, we compared the effectiveness of the morpho-differentiation induction on two gelled plates, agar and gellan gum, for anacardic acid C15:1-Δ 8 decyl ester (1) (100 nmol/disc). On BG-11 0 (nitrogen-free) medium-based 0.6 and 0.8% agar plates, Nostoc sp. strain Yaku-1 isolated from a coralloid root of Cycas revoluta in Yakushima Island showed clear morpho-differentiation from filamentous aggregates into hormogonia, and the induced hormogonia dispersed within 24 h; however, similar hormogonium formation was not observed at agar concentrations of 1.0% or higher. Conversely, hormogonium induction was considerably more pronounced on gellan gum plates than those on agar plates through concentrations ranging from 0.6 to 1.6% even after 12 h of incubation, particularly active on the 0.8-1.0% gellan gum plates. Thus, gellan gum plates can achieve clear results within 12 h and are thus highly useful for primary screening for hormogonium-inducing factors (HIFs).

  6. Mapping forest stand complexity for woodland caribou habitat assessment using multispectral airborne imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, W.; Hu, B.; Woods, M.

    2014-01-01

    The decline of the woodland caribou population is a result of their habitat loss. To conserve the habitat of the woodland caribou and protect it from extinction, it is critical to accurately characterize and monitor its habitat. Conventionally, products derived from low to medium spatial resolution remote sensing data, such as land cover classification and vegetation indices are used for wildlife habitat assessment. These products fail to provide information on the structure complexi...

  7. THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE GUM AND OF THE DESMODONTIUM

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    M. NICULESCU

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gum and the desmodontium are constituent parts of the morpho-functional complex of the parodontium. Depending on its topographic situation, we can describe three portions of the gum: alveolar, marginal and interdental, each one having its features. Within the gum, the collagen fibres from the subepihtelial net are grouped in alveologingival, dentogingival, circular and interdental, the last ones being seen by us as a single group, called peridental fibres. The desmodontium or the alveolodental ligament or the parodontal ligament makes the relation between the alveolar bone and the radicular cement within the dentoalveolar articulation, articulation known under the name of gomphosis, a syndesmose that does not allow any movement to the tooth. Depending on their topographic situation, the collagen fibres in the constitution of the alveolodental ligament, also called cemento-alveolar fibres, can be divided in marginal, intermediary and apical. The alveolodental ligament has the important role in the transmission of the chewing forces to the resistance structures within the functional architectonics of the cranium.

  8. Effect of chewing gum on the bowel motility after cholecystectomy

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    Khadije Yazdi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative ileus is common after cholecystectomy, causes gas retension, distention, nausea, vomiting, and even pain. Chewing gum is a type of sham feeding that may reduce the duration of postoperative ileus. This study determines the effect of chewing gum in the immediate postoperative period to facilitate ileus recovery following cholecystectomy. Material & Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial in 2009. Twenty-four patients undergoing cholecystectomy and they divided in to two equal groups (n=12. Patients in group A chewed sugarless gum there time after surgery, each time 20 miniutes in 4, 10 and 18 hours after finishing sugery. Demographics, intraoperative, and postoperative care data did not reveal any significant difference between two groups. The data resending the first passage of flatus, defecation and bowel sound in every 2 hours for each patient completed in questioning. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version-13.5 and student t-test. Results: The first bowel sound heard 3 ±1.3 and 2.8 ±1.3 hours post-operatively in cases and controls, respectively. The above findings were not significant between two groups. Furthermore gas passing reported at 18.3±10.5 and 36.28±12.6 hours post-operation in case and control groups respectively. The first defecation was occured at 36.8 ±21.7 and 69.5 ±19.2 hours after operation in case and control groups, respectively

  9. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: I. Soil water changes below beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

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    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible effects of broadleaved woodland on recharge to the UK Chalk aquifer have led to a study of evaporation and transpiration from beech woodland (Black Wood and pasture (Bridgets Farm, growing in shallow soils above chalk in Hampshire. Eddy correlation measurements of energy balance components above both the forest and the grassland enabled calculation of latent heat flux (evaporation and transpiration as a residual. Comparative measurements of soil water content and soil water potential in 9 m profiles under both forest and grassland found changes in soil water content down to 6 m at both sites; however, the soil water potential measurements showed upward movement of water only above a depth of about 2 m. Below this depth, water continued to drain and the soil water potential measurements showed downward movement of water at both sites, notwithstanding significant negative soil water potentials in the chalk and soil above. Seasonal differences occur in the soil water content profiles under broadleaved woodland and grass. Before the woodland foliage emerges, greater drying beneath the grassland is offset in late spring and early summer by increased drying under the forest. Yet, when the change in soil water profiles is at a maximum, in late summer, the profiles below woodland and grass are very similar. A comparison of soil water balances for Black Wood and Bridgets Farm using changes in soil water contents, local rainfall and evaporation measured by the energy balance approach allowed drainage to be calculated at each site. Although seasonal differences occurred, the difference in cumulative drainage below broadleaved woodland and grass was small.

  10. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karami Nogourani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1–3, and 3–6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (<0.001. The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1–3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  11. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello Luvielmo, Márcia; Borges,Caroline Dellinghausen; de Oliveira Toyama, Daniela; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini,Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on g...

  12. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in...

  13. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Rubi Segura-Campos; Norma Ciau-Solís; Gabriel Rosado-Rubio; Luis Chel-Guerrero; David Betancur-Ancona

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submit...

  14. Evaluation of Gum of Moringa oleifera as a Binder and Release Retardant in Tablet Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, D. S.; Choudhury, N. S. K.; Yedukondalu, M.; S Si; Gupta, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the potential of gum from Moringa oleifera to act as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulations. The effect of calcium sulphate dihydrate (water insoluble) and lactose (water soluble) diluent on the release of propranolol hydrochloride was studied. The DSC thermograms of drug, gum and mixture of gum/drug indicated no chemical interaction. Tablets (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were prepared containing calcium sulphate dihydrate as diluent, propran...

  15. Effect of Chewing Bicarbonate-containing Sugar-free Gum on the Salivary pH: An in vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ballal, Raksha K; Bhat, Sham S; Ramdas, Shenoy Shailesh; Ballal, Shrinidhi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of chewing gum on the salivary pH and to compare the effect of chewing bicarbonate-containing sugar-free gum on salivary pH against that of standard sugar-free gum. The experiment was carried out on 30 volunteers aged 20-22 years (mean age = 21 years) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The test gum was sugar-free greenmint-flavored bicarbonate-containing gum and the standard control was sugar-free spearmint-flavored gum. The pH...

  16. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for...

  17. Application of cashew tree gum on the production and stability of spray-dried fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrel, Diego Alvarenga; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Fernandes, Regiane Victória de Barros; Antoniassi, Rosemar; de Faria-Machado, Adelia Ferreira; Feitosa, Judith Pessoa de Andrade; de Paula, Regina Celia Monteiro

    2017-04-15

    Evaluation of cashew gum compared to conventional materials was conducted regarding properties and oxidative stability of spray-dried fish oil. Emulsions produced with cashew gum showed lower viscosity when compared to Arabic gum. The particle size was larger (29.9μm) when cashew gum was used, and the encapsulation efficiency reached 76%, similar to that of modified starch but higher than that for Arabic gum (60%). The oxidation process for the surface oil was conducted and a relative lower formation of oxidation compounds was observed for the cashew gum treatment. GAB model was chosen to describe the moisture adsorption isotherm behaviours. Microparticles produced using Arabic and cashew gums showed greater water adsorption when exposed to higher relative humidities. Microparticles produced using cashew gum were more hygroscopic however encapsulation efficiency were higher and surface oil oxidation were less pronounced. Cashew gum can be further explored as an encapuslant material for spray drying processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. EVALUATION OF MORINGA OLEIFERA GUM AS A BINDER IN TABLET FORMULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Patil Basawaraj S.; Soodam Srinivas R; Kulkarni Upendra; Korwar Prakassh G.

    2010-01-01

    Various plant gums have been used as binders in tablet formulations. But still finding novel binder for the manufacture of tablets, in pharmaceutical industry. The Moringa oleifera gum was found its binding property. In the present study Moringa oleifera gum was employed as a binding agent in Chloroquine phosphate tablets at concentrations of 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 % w/w, in comparison with potato starch. The properties of Moringa oleifera gum were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, tappe...

  19. Single-Dose and Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Nicotine 6 mg Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Anna; Rasmussen, Thomas; Kraiczi, Holger

    2017-04-01

    Under-dosing is a recognized problem with current nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Therefore, a new 6mg nicotine gum has been developed. To compare the nicotine uptake from the 6mg gum versus currently available NRT products, two pharmacokinetic studies were performed. In one randomized crossover study, 44 healthy adult smokers received single doses of 6, 4, and 2mg nicotine gum, and 4mg nicotine lozenge on separate occasions. In a separate randomized crossover multiple-dose study over 11 hours, 50 healthy adult smokers received one 6mg gum every hour and 90 minutes, respectively, one 4mg gum every hour, and one 4mg lozenge every hour. In both studies, blood samples were collected over 12 hours to determine single-dose and multiple-dose pharmacokinetic variables. In the single-dose study, the amount of nicotine released from the 2, 4, and 6mg gums (1.44, 3.36, and 4.94mg) as well as the resulting maximum concentration and area under the curve (5.9, 10.1, and 13.8ng/mL, and 17.1, 30.7, 46.2ng/mL × h, respectively) increased with dose. The maximum concentration and area under the curve of the 6mg gum were 44% and 30% greater, respectively, than those for 4mg lozenge. Upon hourly administration, the steady-state average plasma nicotine concentration with 6mg gum (37.4ng/mL) was significantly higher than those for 4mg lozenge (28.3ng/mL) and 4mg gum (27.1ng/mL). Nicotine delivery via the 6mg gum results in higher plasma nicotine concentrations after a single dose and at steady state than with currently available oral NRT. Under-dosing is a recognized problem with current NRT. Therefore, a new 6mg nicotine gum has been developed. Our studies show that upon single-dose and multiple-dose administration, the 6mg gum releases and delivers more nicotine to the systemic circulation than 2mg gum, 4mg gum, and 4mg lozenge. Thus, each 6mg nicotine gum provides a higher degree of nicotine substitution and/or lasts for a longer period of time than currently available nicotine

  20. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacognostic studies of gums collected from aprocot trees growing in Armenia and perspectives of their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichoyan, N

    2009-11-01

    Plant polysaccharides are widely used in the food and confectionary industries, as an emulsifier, flavour encapsulator, and thickening agent. The apricot tree has a gum that oozes out in the spring and it seems to be a lot like gum Arabic. Gums collected from apricot trees growing in Armenia (RA) are considered as exudates of ecological significance. Besides, in food industry it can entirely replace the more expensive gum Arabic as well as its synthetic derivatives. Periodically organized resource potential studies in the regions of RA gives the opportunity to have an exact notion of biological and utilized resources of gums as a natural exudates of cultivated apricot trees of the country. The study was conducted on gums collected from the apricot trees of Armavir region (Armavir, Edjmiatsin, Baghramyan) that were purified by general physical methods without any chemical or enzymatic influence. According to obtained results--from one apricot tree was collected 54.15+/- 4.41 g/m(2), the biological resource of apricot gum was 45 ton. We also determined the quantities of Mg, K and Ca in apricot gum by atomic--absorptive method (Mg - 18 mg/kg; Ca - 5.8 mg/kg; K - 15.7 mg/kg). The study results also revealed that addition of gummi armeniaca increases the yeast biomass up to 55%. According to above mentioned and the great resources of raw material of apricot tree gum it can be approved its usage in the food industry in Armenia.

  2. Roost selection by barbastelle bats (Barbastella barbastellus, Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae in beech woodlands of central Italy

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    Danilo Russo

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The barbastelle bat, Barbastella barbastellus (Schreber, 1774 is a medium-sized, tree-dwelling vespertilionid classified as ?Endangered? in Italy; in western Europe it may be one of the rarest bat species. B. barbastellus shows roosting preferences that should be regarded as a key point in conservation protocols. We examined roost selection in a breeding population of B. barbastellus from the Abruzzo Lazio and Molise National Park (central Italy at three levels: woodland structure and management type; tree characteristics; and cavity characteristics. In 2001-2002, we fitted 31 adult B. barbastellus (29 lactating females, one pregnant female and one male with 0.48g radio-tags and tracked them to their roost-trees. The bats were tracked for 4.5 ± 3.7 days (range: 0-12 days. We located 33 roosts used by 25 subjects (1.8±1.2 roosts/bat, range 1-5. The bats switched roosts frequently: 13 bats used more than one tree over the study period. A chi-square analysis showed that the roosts were not distributed at random across woodland categories: unmanaged woodland was positively selected, whereas shelterwood-harvested woodland was used in proportion to its availability, and ?pastures+scattered trees? was avoided. Twenty out of 33 roost trees were dead Fagus sylvatica trees; conversely, living F. sylvatica dominated in a tree sample obtained at random; dead trees were used more than expected (Χ² test, P <0.001. Overall, roost trees were significantly taller and had a larger diameter at breast?s height and more cavities than random trees; they also had a lower percent canopy closure than random trees. To highlight which variables were actually associated with selection, we devised a logistic regression model. The full model was significant (P <0.001; removal of tree type and tree height affected the model significantly, but the other variables did not produce detectable effects. The

  3. Study on plant Gums and their new development in application: with focus on tragacanth, guar and arabic Gum; a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hassanpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gums refer to a type of polysaccharides which are used to increase viscosity and create some other functional properties such as thickening agent, emulsifying agent, stabilizer, crystal inhibitor and so forth. They are classifying based on their nature and originality including, microbial, plant, exudate and animal Gums. This article shortly reviews a group of plant Gums and recent findings in their application. Gums or Hydrocolloids are main compounds which create stability of emulsion via entering into water phase. The importance of these compounds is on viscosity and electrostatic reactions to stabilize nonalcoholic emulsion with below properties; 1 easily soluble in cold water, 2 the lowest amount of viscosity in water, 3 having maximum level of emulsifier amount, 4 no creation of gelling. Diversity and functionality of Gums and regarding their still novelty in food industries have made Gums one of the main additives in food formulations. Since sourced of Gums are different we must focus on using them together to improve their synergistic effect but interactions among them and combined matrixes produced by them also need to be studied in details.

  4. Association patterns in saproxylic insect networks in three Iberian Mediterranean woodlands and their resistance to microhabitat loss.

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    Javier Quinto

    Full Text Available The assessment of the relationship between species diversity, species interactions and environmental characteristics is indispensable for understanding network architecture and ecological distribution in complex networks. Saproxylic insect communities inhabiting tree hollow microhabitats within Mediterranean woodlands are highly dependent on woodland configuration and on microhabitat supply they harbor, so can be studied under the network analysis perspective. We assessed the differences in interacting patterns according to woodland site, and analysed the importance of functional species in modelling network architecture. We then evaluated their implications for saproxylic assemblages' persistence, through simulations of three possible scenarios of loss of tree hollow microhabitat. Tree hollow-saproxylic insect networks per woodland site presented a significant nested pattern. Those woodlands with higher complexity of tree individuals and tree hollow microhabitats also housed higher species/interactions diversity and complexity of saproxylic networks, and exhibited a higher degree of nestedness, suggesting that a higher woodland complexity positively influences saproxylic diversity and interaction complexity, thus determining higher degree of nestedness. Moreover, the number of insects acting as key interconnectors (nodes falling into the core region, using core/periphery tests was similar among woodland sites, but the species identity varied on each. Such differences in insect core composition among woodland sites suggest the functional role they depict at woodland scale. Tree hollows acting as core corresponded with large tree hollows near the ground and simultaneously housing various breeding microsites, whereas core insects were species mediating relevant ecological interactions within saproxylic communities, e.g. predation, competitive or facilitation interactions. Differences in network patterns and tree hollow characteristics among

  5. Association patterns in saproxylic insect networks in three Iberian Mediterranean woodlands and their resistance to microhabitat loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, Javier; Marcos-García, María de los Ángeles; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Rico-Gray, Víctor; Galante, Eduardo; Micó, Estefanía

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of the relationship between species diversity, species interactions and environmental characteristics is indispensable for understanding network architecture and ecological distribution in complex networks. Saproxylic insect communities inhabiting tree hollow microhabitats within Mediterranean woodlands are highly dependent on woodland configuration and on microhabitat supply they harbor, so can be studied under the network analysis perspective. We assessed the differences in interacting patterns according to woodland site, and analysed the importance of functional species in modelling network architecture. We then evaluated their implications for saproxylic assemblages' persistence, through simulations of three possible scenarios of loss of tree hollow microhabitat. Tree hollow-saproxylic insect networks per woodland site presented a significant nested pattern. Those woodlands with higher complexity of tree individuals and tree hollow microhabitats also housed higher species/interactions diversity and complexity of saproxylic networks, and exhibited a higher degree of nestedness, suggesting that a higher woodland complexity positively influences saproxylic diversity and interaction complexity, thus determining higher degree of nestedness. Moreover, the number of insects acting as key interconnectors (nodes falling into the core region, using core/periphery tests) was similar among woodland sites, but the species identity varied on each. Such differences in insect core composition among woodland sites suggest the functional role they depict at woodland scale. Tree hollows acting as core corresponded with large tree hollows near the ground and simultaneously housing various breeding microsites, whereas core insects were species mediating relevant ecological interactions within saproxylic communities, e.g. predation, competitive or facilitation interactions. Differences in network patterns and tree hollow characteristics among woodland sites clearly

  6. Impact of a prescribed fire on soil water repellency in a Banksia woodland (Western Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Miller, Ben; Tangney, Ryan; Miller, Russell; González-Pérez, José A.; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION The Swan Coastal plain of Western Australia is dominated by fire-prone banksia woodland (Burrows and McCaw, 1990). In these areas, prescription burning is often used to reduce the risk of wildfires, by reducing available fuels (Boer et al., 2009). Little research has been conducted on the effects of prescription burning on Banksia woodlands, and, in particular, information on the impacts on soil properties and soil water repellency (SWR) is scarce. Here, we have studied the impact of fire on SWR in a Banksia woodland and monitored its evolution in the medium-term. It is expected that results are useful for management and restoration of fire-affected Banksia woodlands. METHODS An experimental fire was conducted on May 7th 2015 in Kings Park, Perth, Western Australia. The fire affected an area of 6 ha of mixed Banksia/Allocasuarina woodland under moderate fire intensity. At the time of ignition, the wind speed below the canopy was 1.2 km/h. During the prescribed burning, air temperatures were on average 20 ± 1 °C and relative humidity ranged between 45 and 55% (measured using a Kestrel portable weather station). Fuel moisture averaged 11.8% (measured using Wiltronics moisture meter) and soil moisture at 1 cm deep ranged from 0.1% to 8.6% (measured with a PR2 soil profile probe attached to a HH2 data logger). Temperatures greater than 120 °C were measured 1 cm below the soil surface using iButton temperature sensors. SWR was measured under lab conditions in oven-dry samples (48 h, 105 °C) with the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test. Soil microbial activity was determined with the 1-day CO2 test that is based on the measurement of the CO2 burst produced after moistening dry soil (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016). PRELIMINARY RESULTS AND DISCUSSION SWR was severe in the control (mean WDPT = 2608 s) and pre-burned areas (2722 s). One week after the prescribed fire, persistence of soil water repellency remained stable in the burned area (2402 s). In

  7. Electrospinning of PLGA/gum tragacanth nanofibers containing tetracycline hydrochloride for periodontal regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar-Mohammadi, Marziyeh [Textile Engineering Group, Department of Engineering, University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, M. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Prabhakaran, M.P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Bahrami, S. Hajir, E-mail: hajirb@aut.ac.ir [Textile Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramakrishna, S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-01-01

    Controlled drug release is a process in which a predetermined amount of drug is released for longer period of time, ranging from days to months, in a controlled manner. In this study, novel drug delivery devices were fabricated via blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning using poly lactic glycolic acid (PLGA), gum tragacanth (GT) and tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as a hydrophilic model drug in different compositions and their performance as a drug carrier scaffold was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that fabricated PLGA, blend PLGA/GT and core shell PLGA/GT nanofibers had a smooth and bead-less morphology with the diameter ranging from 180 to 460 nm. Drug release studies showed that both the fraction of GT within blend nanofibers and the core–shell structure can effectively control TCH release rate from the nanofibrous membranes. By incorporation of TCH into core–shell nanofibers, drug release was sustained for 75 days with only 19% of burst release within the first 2 h. The prolonged drug release, together with proven biocompatibility, antibacterial and mechanical properties of drug loaded core shell nanofibers make them a promising candidate to be used as drug delivery system for periodontal diseases. - Highlights: • Novel drug loaded blend (PG-TCH) and core shell nanofibers (PG(cs)-TCH) from PLGA and gum tragacanth (GT) fabricated • Prolonged release of TCH with lower burst release and high mechanical strength in wet and dry conditions for nanofibers • Proven cytocompatibility properties and low rigidity/stiffness suggest PG(cs)-TCH nanfiber for periodontal regeneration.

  8. Under-utilisation of organic wastes during brownfield regeneration to community woodland: tackling the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Francis E; Doick, Kieron J; Atkinson, Gail E; Chenoweth, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of brownfield land to greenspace is a governmental policy objective of many European countries. Healthy vegetation establishment and growth is an essential component of successful greenspace establishment, and research has shown that a planting medium of an appropriate standard for supporting vegetation can be created through amendment of soil-forming materials with organic wastes. However, failed regeneration projects suggest that barriers may exist that prevent the use of suitable quality soil materials. The aim of this research was to identify barriers to the use of organic wastes for improving soil materials for brownfield regeneration to community woodland. We conducted interviews with a range of professionals experienced in regeneration to greenspace, and used content analysis on interview transcripts. A diverse set of barriers was revealed, including a low technical awareness among some professional groups of how to improve soil quality, coupled with a low awareness of the published technical guidance. Other barriers include regulatory and project management issues, which influence the timings and economics of raising brownfield soil quality. We highlight areas in which future efforts may be focused to improve the quality of planting media used in land regeneration. Such effort will improve the sustainability of greenspaces created and complement effective management of organic waste streams.

  9. Little Smoky Woodland Caribou Calf Survival Enhancement Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkby G. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Little Smoky woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus herd is a boreal ecotype located in west central Alberta, Canada. This herd has declined steadily over the past decade and is currently thought to number approximately 80 animals. Factors contributing to the herds' decline appear related to elevated predator-caused mortality rates resulting from industrial caused landscape change. At current rates of decline, the herd is at risk of extirpation. A calf survival enhancement project was initiated in the first half of 2006 as a means of enhancing recruitment while other longer-term approaches were implemented. A total of 10 pregnant females were captured in early March and held in captivity until all calves were at least 3 weeks old. Before release, calves were radiocollared with expandable drop-off collars. Following release, survival of mother and offspring were tracked at intervals until the fall rut. Survival of penned calves was compared to "wild-born" calves at heel of non captive radiocollared females. This approach is compared to other techniques designed to increase recruitment in caribou.

  10. A Spectral Evaluation of Models Performances in Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, R.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Abramowitz, G.; Carrara, A.; Correia, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Papale, D.; Pearson, D.; Pereira, J.; Piao, S.; Rambal, S.; Sonnentag, O.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem processes are influenced by climatic trends at multiple temporal scales including diel patterns and other mid-term climatic modes, such as interannual and seasonal variability. Because interactions between biophysical components of ecosystem processes are complex, it is important to test how models perform in frequency (e.g. hours, days, weeks, months, years) and time (i.e. day of the year) domains in addition to traditional tests of annual or monthly sums. Here we present a spectral evaluation using wavelet time series analysis of model performance in seven Mediterranean Oak Woodlands that encompass three deciduous and four evergreen sites. We tested the performance of five models (CABLE, ORCHIDEE, BEPS, Biome-BGC, and JULES) on measured variables of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In general, model performance fails at intermediate periods (e.g. weeks to months) likely because these models do not represent the water pulse dynamics that influence GPP and ET at these Mediterranean systems. To improve the performance of a model it is critical to identify first where and when the model fails. Only by identifying where a model fails we can improve the model performance and use them as prognostic tools and to generate further hypotheses that can be tested by new experiments and measurements.

  11. Grassland to woodland transitions: Dynamic response of microbial community structure and carbon use patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Courtney A.; Filley, Timothy R.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Rowe, Helen I.

    2016-06-01

    Woodland encroachment into grasslands is a globally pervasive phenomenon attributed to land use change, fire suppression, and climate change. This vegetation shift impacts ecosystem services such as ground water allocation, carbon (C) and nutrient status of soils, aboveground and belowground biodiversity, and soil structure. We hypothesized that woodland encroachment would alter microbial community structure and function and would be related to patterns in soil C accumulation. To address this hypothesis, we measured the composition and δ13C values of soil microbial phospholipids (PLFAs) along successional chronosequences from C4-dominated grasslands to C3-dominated woodlands (small discrete clusters and larger groves) spanning up to 134 years. Woodland development increased microbial biomass, soil C and nitrogen (N) concentrations, and altered microbial community composition. The relative abundance of gram-negative bacteria (cy19:0) increased linearly with stand age, consistent with decreases in soil pH and/or greater rhizosphere development and corresponding increases in C inputs. δ13C values of all PLFAs decreased with time following woody encroachment, indicating assimilation of woodland C sources. Among the microbial groups, fungi and actinobacteria in woodland soils selectively assimilated grassland C to a greater extent than its contribution to bulk soil. Between the two woodland types, microbes in the groves incorporated relatively more of the relict C4-C than those in the clusters, potentially due to differences in below ground plant C allocation and organo-mineral association. Changes in plant productivity and C accessibility (rather than C chemistry) dictated microbial C utilization in this system in response to shrub encroachment.

  12. Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Cibils; Mark Petersen; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management. The...

  13. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Ribeiro Barros de ALENCAR

    Full Text Available Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive enamel loss. Material and Methods: During three experimental crossover phases (one phase per group of seven days each, eight volunteers wore palatal devices with human enamel blocks. The groups were: GI – Sugar free chewing gum with CPP-ACP; GII – Conventional sugar free chewing gum; and GIII – No chewing gum (control. Erosive challenge was extraorally performed by immersion of the enamel blocks in cola drink (5 min, 4x/day. After each challenge, in groups CPP and No CPP, volunteers chewed one unit of the corresponding chewing gum for 30 minutes. Quantitative analysis of enamel loss was performed by profilometry (µm. Data were analyzed by Repeated-Measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05. Conclusion The CPP-ACP chewing gum was not able to enhance the anti-erosive effect of conventional chewing gum against enamel loss.

  14. Optimizing the production of welan gum by Alcaligenes facalis NX-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... These predicted values were also verified by validation experiments. Key words: Alcaligenes facalis NX-3, Medium optimization, Plackett–Burman design, statistical experiment design, welan gum. ... However, it has not yet been reported as a means to study and optimize process parameters for welan gum ...

  15. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    emulsifying properties of cress seed gum and there was no significant difference among the purified samples. Crude gum showed the lowest foaming properties, while samples I and E (purified using ethanol) showed the highest foaming capacity and foam stability, respectively. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  16. Evaluation of the suspening property of Grewia gum in zinc oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in zinc oxide suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for zinc oxide. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  17. Effect of chewing gums containing the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on oral malodour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette K; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjörg

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of chewing gums containing probiotic bacteria on oral malodour. The null hypothesis was that no difference would be displayed compared with placebo gums. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five healthy young adults with self-reported malodorous morning breath completed...

  18. Evaluation of the Binding Effect of Local Gum of Boswellia papyrifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boswellia papyrifera is one of the chief gum resin producing tree species in Ethiopia. Frankincense harvested from it is the most widely traded one. Frankincense is used for a variety of purposes from traditional medicine to industries such as pharmaceutical, perfume and food industries. In this work, B. papyrifera gum has ...

  19. Analysis of a gum from the exudates of Dichrostachys cinerea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The moisture content obtained was 15.8 ± 0.3%, which was rather too high and would only be suitable for formulations that need to remain moisturized. The gum from this plant had little ... In conclusion, this gum has potential as a product for the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. Further studies are needed to ...

  20. Unveiling the Sources of Chromium in Pictorialist Photographs: Gum-Dichromate Process or Paper Sizing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Centeno, Silvia A; Kennedy, Nora W

    2015-01-01

    For this issue of Hand Papermaking devoted to paper sizing, we offer a review and extension of pertinent results obtained in our investigations of the gum-dichromate photographic process, commonly known as the gum-bichromate process.1 We have published three articles to date on our findings; this...

  1. 77 FR 65361 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of...: Karine Gziryan (Austria) or Brandon Farlander (People's Republic of China), AD/CVD Operations, Office 4... xanthan gum from Austria and the People's Republic of China.\\1\\ The notice of initiation stated that the...

  2. 77 FR 34997 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling... from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized...

  3. Effect of chewing gum use on oral hygiene and volatile sulphur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chewing of gum has been favoured by many people because of its beneficial effects. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the difference between the oral hygiene status, organoleptic assessment, self perception of malodour as well as the mouth- air volatile sulphur compound concentration of chewing gum ...

  4. Intra-species variation of the properties of gum exudates from Acacia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum exudates from Acacia senegal var. senegal and Acacia seyal var. fistula from Tanzania have been analyzed and their inter- and intra-species variation of their properties evaluated. The results show that significant inter-species variation of the properties of the gum exudates from the two species exist, whereas only ...

  5. An assessment of the soil-conditioning capacity of gums exuded by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the soil conditioning capacity of tree gums based on the level of resistance to crumble posed by moulds of treated soils to the impacts of artificial raindrops. Gums exuded by trees viz., Acacia occidental and Parkia bicolor as well as a sample of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) were used as soil conditioners.

  6. Investigation of the effect of zinc oxide-modified gum Arabic on polar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum Arabic solution, a water-based adhesive, was modified with zinc oxide filler and the formulation was applied on wood, ceramic, glass and textile substrates. A strip of paper was used as a common adherent to all the substrates. Zinc oxide increased the viscosity of 30wt% gum Arabic solution and increased bond ...

  7. Compositional analysis and rheological characterization of gum tragacanth exudates from six species of Iranian Astragalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaghi, Sima; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Zargaraan, Azizollaah

    2011-01-01

    . In general, the results indicated that the six varieties of gum tragacanth studied exhibited significantly different rheological properties; therefore, these different gums may find use in a variety of applications as stabilisers, thickeners, emulsifiers and suspending agents depending on their rheological...

  8. Market-driven production with transaction costs outlook: Gum arabic collection systems in Senegal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujawamariya, G.; Burger, C.P.J.; Haese, D' M.F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Low returns from marketing of non-timber forest products such as gum arabic restrict the collection of these products. A hypothesis is tested that access to good markets motivates collectors to harvest and market gum arabic. Analyses of the choice of participation in group marketing, sale price,

  9. Dilute solution, flow behavior, thixotropy and viscoelastic characterization of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, rheological properties of cress seed gum (CSG) and its fractions (F1, F2, F3; fractionated using stepwise extraction with water) were investigated. Cress seed gum and its fractions revealed random coil conformation in dilute regimes; chain flexibility and intrinsic viscosity...... indicated that CSG and the fractions exhibited significantly different rheological properties....

  10. Evaluation of Native and Cross-Linked Acacia Senegal Gums as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies indicated the compatibility of the gums with the model drug, theophylline. Dissolution studies showed AS, Cross-linked var. karensis (CAS) and var. senegal (CAH) can sustain the release of the drug beyond 12 h at higher gum concentrations (p < 0.05) indicating the ...

  11. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  12. Economic analysis of deforestation : the case of the gum Arabic belt in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahim, A.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Gum Arabic; Deforestation; Entry and Exit; Real options Drought; Socio-economic, Oligopoly; Interdependent markets; Stackelberg.The gum arabic belt inSudanoffered in the past an

  13. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALENCAR, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Cristina; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; RIOS, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive enamel loss. Material and Methods: During three experimental crossover phases (one phase per group) of seven days each, eight volunteers wore palatal devices with human enamel blocks. The groups were: GI – Sugar free chewing gum with CPP-ACP; GII – Conventional sugar free chewing gum; and GIII – No chewing gum (control). Erosive challenge was extraorally performed by immersion of the enamel blocks in cola drink (5 min, 4x/day). After each challenge, in groups CPP and No CPP, volunteers chewed one unit of the corresponding chewing gum for 30 minutes. Quantitative analysis of enamel loss was performed by profilometry (µm). Data were analyzed by Repeated-Measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05). Conclusion The CPP-ACP chewing gum was not able to enhance the anti-erosive effect of conventional chewing gum against enamel loss. PMID:28678944

  14. Investigation of mass attenuation coefficient of almond gum bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboard as equivalent human tissue using XRF technique in the 16.6-25.3 keV photon energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Baker; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Hashim, Rokiah; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the novel use of almond gum as a binder in manufacturing Rhizophora spp. particleboard. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was employed for analysis under photon energy range of 16.6-25.3 keV. Results showed that almond gum-bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboard can be used as tissue-equivalent phantom in diagnostic radiation. The calculated mass attenuation coefficients of the particleboards were consistent with the values of water calculated using XCOM program for the same photon energies, with p values of 0.056, 0.069, and 0.077 for samples A8, C0, and C8, respectively. However, no direct relationship was found between the percentage of adhesive and the mass attenuation coefficient. The results positively supported the use of almond gum as a binding agent in the fabrication of particleboards, which can be used as a phantom material in dosimetric and quality control applications.

  15. Potential benefits of chewing gum for the delivery of oral therapeutics and its possible role in oral healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Maitra, Amarnath; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the years, chewing gum has developed from a candy towards an oral health-promoting nutraceutical. This review summarizes evidence for the oral health benefits of chewing gum, emphasizing identification of active ingredients in gum that facilitate prevention and removal of oral

  16. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... imports from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized... preliminary determinations by the Department of Commerce that imports of xanthan gum from Austria and China...

  17. 78 FR 2251 - Xanthan Gum From Austria: Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria: Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less Than... determines that xanthan gum from Austria is being, or is likely to be, sold in the United States at less than... Investigation: Xanthan Gum from Austria,'' (``Preliminary Decision Memorandum'') from Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  18. In vivo mucoadhesive strength appraisal of gum Manilkara zapota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sudarshan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mucilage (MMZ extracted from the seeds of Manilkara zapota(Linn. P. Royen syn. using maceration techniques was evaluated for mucoadhesive strength by various in vitro and in vivo methods. The result showed that mucoadhesive strength of seeds mucilage have comparable property toward natural and synthetic polymers such as Guar Gum and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC E5LV under the experimental conditions used in this study. Briefly, it could be concluded that the seed mucilage of Manilkara zapota can be used as a pharmaceutical excipient in oral mucoadhesive drug delivery systems. Further, it may be appropriate to study the changes in these properties after chemical modifications.

  19. Selective depression behavior of guar gum on talc-type scheelite flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-zhong; Gu, Guo-hua; Wu, Xiang-bin; Zhao, Kai-le

    2017-08-01

    The depression behavior and mechanism of guar gum on talc-type scheelite flotation were systematically investigated by flotation experiments, adsorption tests, zeta-potential measurements, and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The flotation results for monominerals, mixed minerals, and actual mineral samples indicated that guar gum exhibited much higher selective depression for talc than for scheelite. Bench-scale closed-circuit tests showed that a tungsten concentrate with a WO3 grade of 51.43% and a WO3 recovery of 76.18% was obtained. Adsorption tests, zeta-potential measurements, and infrared spectral analyses confirmed that guar gum absorbed more strongly onto the talc surface than onto the scheelite surface because of chemisorption between guar gum and talc. This chemisorption is responsible for the guar gum's highly selective depression for talc and small depression for scheelite. The flotation results provide technical support for talc-type scheelite flotation.

  20. Tragacanth Gum: Structural Composition, Natural Functionality and Enxymatic Conversion as Source of Potential Prebiotic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan

    species of Iranian Astragalus for their emulsion stabilizing effects and their detailed chemical composition in order to examine any possible correlation between the make-up and the emulsion stabilizing properties of gum tragacanth. Also, enzymatic modification of highly fucose content of tragacanth gum...... of this gum with arabinogalactan and fucoxylogalacturonans in the structure of we decided to evaluate bioactivity of this gum. To date, different commercial of prebiotic compound available but still new compound is needed and interested. The main process for the production of prebiotic is enzymatic process...... that the structure of gum tragacanthfractions was different and included 1,4-bonded galacturonic acid backbone with terminally linked fucose and (1,),2-linked xylose, as well as terminally linked xylose called fucoxylogalacturonan. In addition, the presence of (1,),4-galactose linkages and 1,5 Ara linkage presumably...

  1. Synthesis, physico-chemical and biomedical applications of sulfated Aegle marmelos gum: Green chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jindal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed at obtaining a sulfated derivative of gum obtained from partially ripe fruits of Aegle marmelos employing the ultrasonication technique. Elemental analysis and FTIR-ATR studies confirmed successful sulfation. The molarity of sulfuric acid exerted maximum influence on the degree of substitution followed by reaction temperature and reaction time. The sulfated derivative showed higher swelling in both acidic and alkaline pH as compared to the unmodified gum. It also possessed higher negative zeta potential, higher viscosity, work of shear, firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and index of viscosity as compared to both unmodified gum as well as sodium alginate. Sulfated derivative was superior to unmodified gum and sodium alginate in terms of antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities. The sulfated sample appears to be a potential substitute over the unmodified gum sample and sodium alginate for modulating the physicochemical properties of food and drug release dosage forms.

  2. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: A comprehensive rheological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    , the storage modulus (G′) was higher than the loss modulus (G″), and mechanical spectra of the crude and purified cress seed gums were classified as weak gels. The purified samples had stronger and more elastic network structure than the crude gum (CSG) and the gel network got stronger along the series of I......, EI and E. All the gum dispersions indicated shear-thinning behavior and the viscosity of the samples followed the order of E > EI > I > CSG. Herschel-Bulkley model was the best model to describe steady shear flow behavior and Arrhenius-type model was also applied to describe the effect of temperature....... Crude cress seed gum and EI showed the highest and the lowest activation energy, respectively. The crude and purified gums indicated thixotropic behavior and CSG exhibited the lowest hysteresis loop area and the highest structural recovery. All the samples revealed random coil conformation in dilute...

  3. The social value of carbon sequestered in Great Britain's woodlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, Julii; Bateman, Ian J.; Lovett, Andrew A. [Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The economic value of carbon storage associated with British woodland is calculated. Models were developed to estimate C flux associated with live trees, forest floor litter, soils, wood products, harvest, fossil fuel used in manufacturing and C displacement from biofuels and products for representative British plantation species: Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and beech (Fagus sylvatica). Map databases of publicly and privately owned woodlands were compiled for Great Britain. Carbon flux was determined for individual woodland sites, and monetised using candidate parameters for the social discount rate (1, 3, 3.5 or 5%) and social value of carbon (USD109.5, USD1, USD10 or USD17.10/t). A conventional discount function was applied. Final results are expressed as Net Present Values, for the base year 2001, with discounting commencing in 2002. The minimum suggested NPV (discount rate = 3% and social value of carbon = USD1) of GB woodlands already existing in 2001 is USD82 million, with a further USD72 million that might be added by future afforestation. These figures rise dramatically if a discount rate of 1% and social value of sequestered carbon = USD109.5/t are assumed. The calculated total value of C stored in British woodland depends significantly on parameter assumptions, especially about appropriate discount rate and social value of sequestered carbon. (author)

  4. Effects of woodland islets introduced in a Mediterranean agricultural landscape on local bird communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Razola

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses whether the afforestation approach consisting in the introduction of woodland islets in “agricultural seas” can reconcile the restoration of woody vegetation and the persistence of open-habitat bird populations, providing further opportunities for other forest species to enrich bird diversity at the landscape level. We compared the species richness and abundance of bird communities in a field with 16 introduced woodland islets and in a nearby abandoned field located in central Spain during spring and winter time. The woodland islets presented higher accumulated species richness as well as a higher probability of finding new species if sampling effort were increased only in winter time. These trends were the opposite during spring time. Mean species richness and mean bird abundance were lower at the woodland islets than at the abandoned field in both seasons. We found a higher abundance of open-habitat specialist species in the abandoned field. Woodland islets favoured the wintering of chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita. We did not find any effects on the only forest specialist species (blue tit Parus caeruleus in spring. Bird richness and abundance were higher in edge islets than in inner islets. The introduction of larger and mixed plantations connected by hedgerows and a management that favoured the development of big trees, a lower tree density and a diverse shrub layer could promote bird diversity, allowing forest specialists and open-habitat species to coexist at the landscape scale.

  5. Revision of Wenyonia Woodland, 1923 (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea) from catfishes (Siluriformes) in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffner, Bjoern C; Jirků, Miloslav; Mahmoud, Zuheir N; Scholz, Tomáš

    2011-06-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Wenyonia Woodland, 1923 (Caryophyllidea: Caryophyllaeidae), parasites of catfishes in Africa, are revised. This revision is based on material from large-scale sampling, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Senegal and the Sudan between 2006 and 2009, and the examination of all of the type-specimens available. The following six species are considered valid and their redescriptions are provided: Wenyonia virilis Woodland, 1923 (type-species; new synonym W. kainjii Ukoli, 1972); W. acuminata Woodland, 1923; W. longicauda Woodland, 1937; W. minuta Woodland, 1923 (new synonym W. mcconnelli Ukoli, 1972); W. synodontis Ukoli, 1972; and W. youdeoweii Ukoli, 1972. A key to the identification of Wenyonia spp. is provided and numerous new hosts and geographical records are reported. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of the 28S rRNA gene of four species divided the monophyletic genus into two lineages, one represented by W. acuminata and W. minuta and another one composed of W. virilis and W. youdeoweii.

  6. Unsustainable charcoal production as a contributing factor to woodland fragmentation in southeast Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruuska, Eeva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from a holistic research approach, this paper contributes to the studies of land cover change and sustainable development in Kenya, and to the planning of sustainable future in Dakatcha Woodland, SE Kenya. As an un-protected global hotspot for biodiversity, Dakatcha Woodland has suffered from unsustainable forest resource use. The relation of charcoal production to land cover change and its socio-economic impact are studied in detail. A supervised land cover classification formed using four SPOT satellite images from 2005/06 and 2011 revealed that the woodland is fragmenting and the Important Bird Area (IBA demarcation should be reconsidered. Through in-situ observation, household questionnaires and semi-structured expert interviews it was found that more than half of the 90 households assessed are involved in charcoal production which is higher figure than peer studies have suggested, and that the charcoal network offers income to many, but bears an negative impact on the environment. It was discovered that, like in Kenya, in Dakatcha Woodland, too, the demand for woodfuels (charcoal and fuelwood is one of the key drivers of deforestation and land degradation. As such, woodfuel energy is a cross cutting issue, tying together forest resources, livelihoods and sustainable development, and thus demands further research. Forest management of Dakatcha Woodland must be planned in accordance with all stakeholders in a sustainable manner, drawing from agroforestry and participatory forest management systems, and keeping environmental factors in mind for the maintenance of ecosystem services.

  7. Detection of soil erosion with Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin Paul

    1987-01-01

    Pinyon-Juniper woodlands dominate approximately 24.3 million hectares (60 million acres) in the western United States. The overall objective was to test the sensitivity of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) spectral data for detecting varying degrees of soil erosion within the Pinyon-Juniper woodlands. A second objective was to assess the potential of the spectral data for assigning the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) crop management (C) factor values to varying cover types within the woodland. Thematic Mapper digital data for June 2, 1984 on channels 2, 3, 4, and 5 were used. Digital data analysis was performed using the ELAS software package. Best results were achieved using CLUS, an unsupervised clustering algorithm. Fifteen of the 40 Pinyon-Juniper signatures were identified as being relatively pure Pinyon-Juniper woodland. Final analysis resulted in the grouping of the 15 signatures into three major groups. Ten study sites were selected from each of the three groups and located on the ground. At each site the following field measurements were taken: percent tree canopy and percent understory cover, soil texture, total soil loss, and soil erosion rate estimates. A technique for measuring soil erosion within Pinyon-Juniper woodlands was developed. A theoretical model of site degradation after Pinyon-Juniper invasion is presented.

  8. KARAKTERISTIK EMULSI SANTAN DAN MINYAK KEDELAI YANG DITAMBAH GUM ARAB DAN SUKROSA ESTER [Emulsion Characteristics of Coconut Milk and Soybean Oil Added with Gum Arabic and Sucrose Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Hartayanie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High saturated fatty acid content in coconut milk can be reduced by adding unsaturated fat. Pretreatment such as pasteurisation, homogenization or stabilizer and emulsifier addition are essential to prevent emulsion deterioration that could happen in few hours. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate combination of gum arabic and sucrose ester to produce good emulsion stability based on its physical and chemical characteristics. Furthermore this study also aimed to determine correlation between creaming index and other characteristics of coconut milk emulsion. Emulsion stability of mixed coconut milk in sterile glass bottles was observed for 7 days under 23-24°C. Stabilizer and emulsifier added were gum arabic and sucrose ester in five combinations, i.e. 6% gum arabic, 0.3% sucrose ester, 6% gum arabic + 0.3% sucrose ester, 3% gum arabic + 0.15% sucrose ester and 4.5% gum arabic + 0.225% sucrose ester. The physical characteristics evaluated were creaming index, total color change, viscosity and droplet distribution, while the chemical characteristics observed included pH, TBA value, and protein content. Data were analyzed by One Way Anova at 95% significant level to determine the differences among treatments. Bivariate Pearson Correlation was used in order to determine the interaction among sample characteristics. The data showed that, gum arabic and sucrose ester can maintain the emulsion stability. A combination of 4.5% gum arabic and 0.225% sucrose ester provided the best physicochemical characteristics with the lowest creaming index and decreased viscosit, and uniform droplet distribution.

  9. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Re-annotation of the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Omar; Shahan, Rachel; Liu, Zhongchi; Slovin, Janet P; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2015-01-27

    Fragaria vesca is a low-growing, small-fruited diploid strawberry species commonly called woodland strawberry. It is native to temperate regions of Eurasia and North America and while it produces edible fruits, it is most highly useful as an experimental perennial plant system that can serve as a model for the agriculturally important Rosaceae family. A draft of the F. vesca genome sequence was published in 2011 [Nat Genet 43:223,2011]. The first generation annotation (version 1.1) were developed using GeneMark-ES+[Nuc Acids Res 33:6494,2005]which is a self-training gene prediction tool that relies primarily on the combination of ab initio predictions with mapping high confidence ESTs in addition to mapping gene deserts from transposable elements. Based on over 25 different tissue transcriptomes, we have revised the F. vesca genome annotation, thereby providing several improvements over version 1.1. The new annotation, which was achieved using Maker, describes many more predicted protein coding genes compared to the GeneMark generated annotation that is currently hosted at the Genome Database for Rosaceae ( http://www.rosaceae.org/ ). Our new annotation also results in an increase in the overall total coding length, and the number of coding regions found. The total number of gene predictions that do not overlap with the previous annotations is 2286, most of which were found to be homologous to other plant genes. We have experimentally verified one of the new gene model predictions to validate our results. Using the RNA-Seq transcriptome sequences from 25 diverse tissue types, the re-annotation pipeline improved existing annotations by increasing the annotation accuracy based on extensive transcriptome data. It uncovered new genes, added exons to current genes, and extended or merged exons. This complete genome re-annotation will significantly benefit functional genomic studies of the strawberry and other members of the Rosaceae.

  11. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of bleeding from gums for last 24 hrs. His blood profile revealed; platelet count of 36,000, total wite blood cell (WBC count of 6000/cumm, differential leukocyte count (DLC (P45, L53, E2, and hemoglobin 12 g/dL. Patient sera was positive for dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen, anti-dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM, and anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies. Discussion: Here is a case report capable of changing our vision that acute gingival bleeding can also occur in dengue fever. Dengue fever can also be considered as one of the differential diagnosis for the acute gingival bleeding.

  12. Solubilisation of Persian gum: Chemical modification using acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samari-Khalaj, Masumeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2017-08-01

    Persian gum (PG), mountain almond tree (Amygdalus scoparia) exudate, is a transparent and natural edible gum which consists of soluble (SFPG, 25-30wt%) and insoluble (IFPG, 70-75wt%) fractions. Therefore, in the present study, using response surface methodology (RSM), the influence of concentration (0.64-7.36wt%), acrylamide (0.070-0.120mol), temperature (19.77-70.23°C), and time (0.32-3.68h) on solubilizing and some other properties of IFPG were investigated. Based on our findings, the highest solubility (64wt%) was achieved at the presence of 6wt% IFPG, and 0.08mol acrylamide at 60°C after 3h. Intrinsic viscosity and molecular weight determination also confirmed modification reaction which led to reduction in molecular weight. In addition, the effect of pH and electrolytes on rheological properties showed that the soluble part of IFPG which modified at optimum conditions had an anionic structure similar to conventional SFPG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Methotrexate loaded gellan gum microparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanka, Mukesh; Shetty, Chaitra; Srivastava, Rohit

    2017-12-06

    Recently, polysaccharides based microparticles have been found to offer an attractive potential as a carrier in drug delivery field. In this study, bare gellan gum microparticles (GG MPs) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded gellan gum microparticles (MTX-GG MPs) prepared by using simple water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion solvent diffusion method. The developed microparticles (MPs) were found discretely distributed in a spherical shape. MTX has been encapsulated in microparticles with 84.8 ± 1.68% encapsulation efficiency (%EE) and 6.45 ± 0.07% loading capacity (%LC). The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) characterization of the MPs clearly indicated the physical encapsulation of MTX into polymeric matrix of MPs. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) characterization showed slightly higher thermal stability of MTX-GG MPs in comparison to the GG MPs. In vitro release study of MTX-GG MPs showed 84% drug release within 24 h. The hemolysis study of GG MPs and MTX-GG MPs on human red blood cells (RBCs) showed <1.0% hemolysis. The cell viability studies on L929 showed GG MPs, and MTX-GG MPs are biocompatible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. MUSE: computational aspects of a GUM supplement 1 implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martin; Wolf, Marco; Rösslein, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    The new guideline GUM Supplement 1—Propagation of Distributions Using a Monte Carlo Method (GS1) is currently published by JCGM/WG1. It describes an approximate method to calculate the measurement uncertainty in nearly all areas of metrology. In this way it overcomes the various limitations and drawbacks of the uncertainty propagation detailed in GUM. However, GS1 demands a software implementation in contrast to the uncertainty propagation. Therefore we have developed a software tool called MUSE (Measurement Uncertainty Simulation and Evaluation), which is a comprehensive implementation of GS1. In this paper we present the major computational aspects of the software which are the sampling from probability density functions (PDFs), an efficient way to propagate the PDFs with the help of a block design through the equation of the measurand and the calculation of the summarizing parameters based on these blocks. Also the different quality measures which are in place during the life cycle of the tool are elaborated.

  15. The water balance components of undisturbed tropical woodlands in the Brazilian cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P. T. S.; Wendland, E.; Nearing, M. A.; Scott, R. L.; Rosolem, R.; da Rocha, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    Deforestation of the Brazilian cerrado region has caused major changes in hydrological processes. These changes in water balance components are still poorly understood but are important for making land management decisions in this region. To better understand pre-deforestation conditions, we determined the main components of the water balance for an undisturbed tropical woodland classified as "cerrado sensu stricto denso". We developed an empirical model to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ET) by using flux tower measurements and vegetation conditions inferred from the enhanced vegetation index and reference evapotranspiration. Canopy interception, throughfall, stemflow, surface runoff, and water table level were assessed from ground measurements. We used data from two cerrado sites, Pé de Gigante (PDG) and Instituto Arruda Botelho (IAB). Flux tower data from the PDG site collected from 2001 to 2003 were used to develop the empirical model to estimate ET. The other hydrological processes were measured at the field scale between 2011 and 2014 at the IAB site. The empirical model showed significant agreement (R2 = 0.73) with observed ET at the daily timescale. The average values of estimated ET at the IAB site ranged from 1.91 to 2.60 mm day-1 for the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Canopy interception ranged from 4 to 20 % and stemflow values were approximately 1 % of the gross precipitation. The average runoff coefficient was less than 1 %, while cerrado deforestation has the potential to increase that amount up to 20-fold. As relatively little excess water runs off (either by surface water or groundwater), the water storage may be estimated by the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. Our results provide benchmark values of water balance dynamics in the undisturbed cerrado that will be useful to evaluate past and future land-cover and land-use changes for this region.

  16. Eastern wood-pewee (Contopus virens) breeding demography across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah W. Kendrick; Frank R. Thompson; Jennifer L. Reidy

    2013-01-01

    Better knowledge of bird response to savanna and woodland restoration is needed to inform management of these communities. We related temporal and habitat variables to breeding demography and densities of the Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens) across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest. We determined nest success, clutch size, young fledged...

  17. Natural and anthropogenic fire regimes, vegetation effects, and potential impacts on the avifauna of California oak woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn L. Purcell; Scott L. Stephens

    2005-01-01

    Fire was once an important component of the disturbance regime in oak woodlands of the Sierra Nevada foothills. In addition to lightning-ignited fires, anthropogenic sources of ignition have historically been important until fire suppression activities in the mid- 20th century lengthened fire return intervals. Few fire history studies have addressed oak woodlands, and...

  18. Modeling wind fields and fire propagation following bark beetle outbreaks in spatially-heterogeneous pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman R. Linn; Carolyn H. Sieg; Chad M. Hoffman; Judith L. Winterkamp; Joel D. McMillin

    2013-01-01

    We used a physics-based model, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, to explore changes in within-stand wind behavior and fire propagation associated with three time periods in pinyon-juniper woodlands following a drought-induced bark beetle outbreak and subsequent tree mortality. Pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes are highly heterogeneous. Trees often are clumped, with sparse patches...

  19. Tree stocking affects winter bird densities across a gradient of savanna, woodland, and forest in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah W. Kendrick; Frank R., III Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Savanna and woodland were historically prevalent in the midwestern United States, and managers throughout the area are currently attempting to restore these communities. Better knowledge of the responses of breeding and non-breeding birds to savanna and woodland restoration is needed to inform management.We surveyed abundance of winter resident birds across a gradient...

  20. Potential effects of sudden oak death on small mammals and herpetofauna in coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas J. Tempel; William D. Tietje

    2006-01-01

    Within San Luis Obispo County, California, coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) woodlands provide important habitat for many wildlife species (see Tietje and others, this volume). Unfortunately, many of these woodlands are at high risk of sudden oak death (SOD) infection should the pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) become established...

  1. Anchor chaining’s influence on soil hydrology and seeding success in burned piñon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most commonly used rehabilitation treatments for the restoration of burned piñon (Pinus ssp.) and juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands, but the success rate of this treatment is notoriously low. In piñon-juniper woodlands, post-fire soil water repellency can impair rese...

  2. Assessing mechanical mastication and thinning-piling-burning treatments on the pinyon-juniper woodlands of southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald Gottfried; Steve Overby

    2011-01-01

    New knowledge of fire regimes in the pinyon-juniper woodlands of the interior western United States has altered management views. Once known as being at low wildfire risk, these woodlands are now at a higher risk for severe wildfires because of high tree densities exacerbated by ongoing drought and region-wide bark beetle (Ips confusus) infestation. To help reduce...

  3. Habitat fragmentation impacts mobility in a common and widespread woodland butterfly: do sexes respond differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergerot Benjamin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theory predicts a nonlinear response of dispersal evolution to habitat fragmentation. First, dispersal will be favoured in line with both decreasing area of habitat patches and increasing inter-patch distances. Next, once these inter-patch distances exceed a critical threshold, dispersal will be counter-selected, unless essential resources no longer co-occur in compact patches but are differently scattered; colonization of empty habitat patches or rescue of declining populations are then increasingly overruled by dispersal costs like mortality risks and loss of time and energy. However, to date, most empirical studies mainly document an increase of dispersal associated with habitat fragmentation. We analyzed dispersal kernels for males and females of the common, widespread woodland butterfly Pararge aegeria in highly fragmented landscape, and for males in landscapes that differed in their degree of habitat fragmentation. Results The male and female probabilities of moving were considerably lower in the highly fragmented landscapes compared to the male probability of moving in fragmented agricultural and deciduous oak woodland landscapes. We also investigated whether, and to what extent, daily dispersal distance in the highly fragmented landscape was influenced by a set of landscape variables for both males and females, including distance to the nearest woodland, area of the nearest woodland, patch area and abundance of individuals in the patch. We found that daily movement distance decreased with increasing distance to the nearest woodland in both males and females. Daily distances flown by males were related to the area of the woodland capture site, whereas no such effect was observed for females. Conclusion Overall, mobility was strongly reduced in the highly fragmented landscape, and varied considerably among landscapes with different spatial resource distributions. We interpret the results relative to different cost

  4. Habitat fragmentation impacts mobility in a common and widespread woodland butterfly: do sexes respond differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerot, Benjamin; Merckx, Thomas; Van Dyck, Hans; Baguette, Michel

    2012-04-27

    Theory predicts a nonlinear response of dispersal evolution to habitat fragmentation. First, dispersal will be favoured in line with both decreasing area of habitat patches and increasing inter-patch distances. Next, once these inter-patch distances exceed a critical threshold, dispersal will be counter-selected, unless essential resources no longer co-occur in compact patches but are differently scattered; colonization of empty habitat patches or rescue of declining populations are then increasingly overruled by dispersal costs like mortality risks and loss of time and energy. However, to date, most empirical studies mainly document an increase of dispersal associated with habitat fragmentation. We analyzed dispersal kernels for males and females of the common, widespread woodland butterfly Pararge aegeria in highly fragmented landscape, and for males in landscapes that differed in their degree of habitat fragmentation. The male and female probabilities of moving were considerably lower in the highly fragmented landscapes compared to the male probability of moving in fragmented agricultural and deciduous oak woodland landscapes. We also investigated whether, and to what extent, daily dispersal distance in the highly fragmented landscape was influenced by a set of landscape variables for both males and females, including distance to the nearest woodland, area of the nearest woodland, patch area and abundance of individuals in the patch. We found that daily movement distance decreased with increasing distance to the nearest woodland in both males and females. Daily distances flown by males were related to the area of the woodland capture site, whereas no such effect was observed for females. Overall, mobility was strongly reduced in the highly fragmented landscape, and varied considerably among landscapes with different spatial resource distributions. We interpret the results relative to different cost-benefit ratios of movements in fragmented landscapes.

  5. Short-term effects of a green coffee extract-, Garcinia c ambogia- and L-carnitine-containing chewing gum on snack intake and appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Finlayson, Graham; Martínez, Ana; Fischman, Daniela; Beneitez, Analisa; Ferrero, Alejandro J; Fernández, Belisario E; Mayer, Marcos A

    2016-11-24

    Different studies have assessed the influence of chewing gum to aid control of appetite and reduce food intake. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effects of chewing gum on satiety, food hedonics and snack intake and to explore the potential effects of the combination of Garcinia c ambogia, green coffee extract and L-carnitine on satiety, when administered in a gum format. This was a prospective study in which 57 subjects randomly received three kinds of treatments, in a crossover design: (1) active gum; (2) placebo gum; and (3) no gum. Food preferences and appetite sensations were evaluated by means of the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire and visual analog scales. There was a significant reduction in low-fat sweet snack intake with placebo gum and the active gum compared to no gum and a reduction in high-fat sweet snack intake with the active gum compared to placebo gum and no gum. Total caloric intake was only reduced in the active gum condition. Both the active and placebo gum conditions significantly reduced hunger and prospective food consumption and increased fullness compared to no gum and were associated with a reduced wanting for sweet food in the LFPQ, consistent in a reduction in the relative preference for sweet snacks versus savoury snacks. This study supports the notion that chewing gum containing nutraceutical products might aid in the control over snack intake and reduce hunger sensations.

  6. Population trends of woodland birds from the North American Breeding Bird Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterjohn, B.G.; Sauer, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Population trends of woodland birds were summarized from BBS data over 1966-1991, 1966-1979, and 1982-1991. For the entire woodland bird assemblage, increasing species outnumbered decreasing species in all regions except central North America during 1966-1991. However, the proportion of decreasing species increased in most regions during the 19821991 interval. This population trend was most apparent for Neotropical migrants with 15 increasing and 2 decreasing species during 1966-1979 but only 4 increasing and 16 decreasing species during 1980-1991. Short-distance migrants and permanent residents had nearly equal numbers of increasing and decreasing species during both intervals.

  7. Air humidity as key determinant of morphogenesis and productivity of the rare temperate woodland fern Polystichum braunii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerbrock, R; Leuschner, C

    2016-07-01

    (1) Most ferns are restricted to moist and shady habitats, but it is not known whether soil moisture or atmospheric water status are decisive limiting factors, or if both are equally important. (2) Using the rare temperate woodland fern Polystichum braunii, we conducted a three-factorial climate chamber experiment (soil moisture (SM) × air humidity (RH) × air temperature (T)) to test the hypotheses that: (i) atmospheric water status (RH) exerts a similarly large influence on the fern's biology as soil moisture, and (ii) both a reduction in RH and an increase in air temperature reduce vigour and growth. (3) Nine of 11 morphological, physiological and growth-related traits were significantly influenced by an increase in RH from 65% to 95%, leading to higher leaf conductance, increased above- and belowground productivity, higher fertility, more epidermal trichomes and fewer leaf deformities under high air humidity. In contrast, soil moisture variation (from 66% to 70% in the moist to ca. 42% in the dry treatment) influenced only one trait (specific leaf area), and temperature variation (15 °C versus 19 °C during daytime) only three traits (leaf conductance, root/shoot ratio, specific leaf area); RH was the only factor affecting productivity. (4) This study is the first experimental proof for a soil moisture-independent air humidity effect on the growth of terrestrial woodland ferns. P. braunii appears to be an air humidity hygrophyte that, whithin the range of realistic environmental conditions set in this study, suffers more from a reduction in RH than in soil moisture. A climate warming-related increase in summer temperatures, however, seems not to directly threaten this endangered species. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  8. Group dynamics of zebra and wildebeest in a woodland savanna: effects of predation risk and habitat density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Thaker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group dynamics of gregarious ungulates in the grasslands of the African savanna have been well studied, but the trade-offs that affect grouping of these ungulates in woodland habitats or dense vegetation are less well understood. We examined the landscape-level distribution of groups of blue wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, and Burchell's zebra, Equus burchelli, in a predominantly woodland area (Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa; KGR to test the hypothesis that group dynamics are a function of minimizing predation risk from their primary predator, lion, Panthera leo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using generalized linear models, we examined the relative importance of habitat type (differing in vegetation density, probability of encountering lion (based on utilization distribution of all individual lions in the reserve, and season in predicting group size and composition. We found that only in open scrub habitat, group size for both ungulate species increased with the probability of encountering lion. Group composition differed between the two species and was driven by habitat selection as well as predation risk. For both species, composition of groups was, however, dominated by males in open scrub habitats, irrespective of the probability of encountering lion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Distribution patterns of wildebeest and zebra groups at the landscape level directly support the theoretical and empirical evidence from a range of taxa predicting that grouping is favored in open habitats and when predation risk is high. Group composition reflected species-specific social, physiological and foraging constraints, as well as the importance of predation risk. Avoidance of high resource open scrub habitat by females can lead to loss of foraging opportunities, which can be particularly costly in areas such as KGR, where this resource is limited. Thus, landscape-level grouping dynamics are species specific and particular to the

  9. Study of antimicrobial activity and atomic force microscopy imaging of the action mechanism of cashew tree gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Débora A; Ribeiro, Alexandra C; Costa, Eduardo M; Fernandes, João C; Tavaria, Freni K; Araruna, Felipe Bastos; Eiras, Carla; Eaton, Peter; Leite, José Roberto S A; Manuela Pintado, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of two grades of cashew tree gum (crude and purified) against eight microorganisms and to analyze the mechanism of cashew tree gum antimicrobial action via atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The results indicated strong antimicrobial properties of pure cashew tree gum against all tested microorganisms, except for Candida albicans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. On the other hand crude cashew gum showed antimicrobial activity only against Gram-positive bacteria (MRSA, MSSA, Listeria innocua and Enterococcus faecium). Atomic force microscopy imaging showed that pure cashew tree gum lead to bacterial cell collapse. In conclusion cashew tree gum presented relevant antimicrobial activity against most of the studied bacteria, and the purification of the cashew gum affected its antimicrobial spectrum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In Vivo Release Kinetics and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Polyphenols-Enriched Chewing Gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gums may be particularly effective means for delivering and maintaining bioactive molecules, included in the gum formulation, able to have an anti-cariogenic effect. The purposes of this study were: to develop novel chewing gums containing quercetin (Qt; to evaluate their release using in vivo trial; finally, to test their in vivo antibacterial effect against oral Streptococcus mutans strains. A preliminary study was performed to produce new gums, enriched with the polyphenol quercetin. Then, a first in vivo experimental study was assessed to test the percentages of Qt released in the saliva of young volunteers. Moreover, a second clinical trial was performed to analyze the antibacterial capability of these enriched chewing gums against S. mutans strains after 14 days of daily consumption. The release analysis showed that a more effective release of Qt occurs in the first minutes of chewing, and it does not change saliva pH values. Moreover, Qt included in gums demonstrates an effective antibacterial activity, showing a reduction of the concentration of S. mutans strains in saliva samples, especially after 7 days. Qt included in experimental chewing gums could be efficiently released into the oral cavity and could promote an effective anti-caries concentration in volunteer’s saliva, without changing salivary pH values.

  11. Thiol derivatization of Xanthan gum and its evaluation as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish; Mehta, Heena

    2015-10-20

    Thiol-derivatization of xanthan gum polysaccharide was carried out by esterification with mercaptopropionic acid and thioglycolic acid. Thiol-derivatization was confirmed by Fourier-transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Xanthan-mercaptopropionic acid conjugate and xanthan-thioglycolic acid conjugate were found to possess 432.68mM and 465.02mM of thiol groups as determined by Ellman's method respectively. Comparative evaluation of mucoadhesive property of metronidazole loaded buccal pellets of xanthan and thiolated xanthan gum using chicken buccal pouch membrane revealed higher ex vivo bioadhesion time of thiolated xanthan gum as compared to xanthan gum. Improved mucoadhesive property of thiolated xanthan gum over the xanthan gum can be attributed to the formation of disulfide bond between mucus and thiolated xanthan gum. In vitro release study conducted using phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) revealed a sustained release profile of metronidazole from thiolated xanthan pellets as compared to xanthan pellets. In conclusion, thiolation of xanthan improves its mucoadhesive property and sustained the release of metronidazole over a prolonged period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2015-04-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in delivering of antioxidants: butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid (AA). Coated and uncoated peanuts were stored at 35 °C for 126 days and coating carrier effectiveness was measured by following lipid oxidation using chemical parameters (peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive species) and sensory evaluation (oxidized flavor). Significant differences (p cordia was found better than CMC to deliver the antioxidants. Gum cordia based coating in combination with BHA/BHT exhibited highest protection (290 % higher shelf life than control) based on peroxide value (40 meq.O2 kg(-1)) followed by gum codia plus BHT (244 %), gum cordia plus BHA (232 %), CMC plus BHA/BHT (184 %), CMC plus BHA (139 %), CMC plus BHT (119 %), gum cordia plus AA (96 %) and CMC plus AA (46 %).

  13. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L. Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Rubi Segura-Campos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chia (Salvia hispanica L. constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG and gum partly defatted (PDCG. Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P<0.05. The PDCG had higher protein, ash, and carbohydrates content than the FCG, in addition to higher water-holding (110.5 g water/g fiber and water-binding capacities (0.84 g water/g fiber. The FCG had greater oil-holding capacity (25.7 g oil/g fiber and water absorption capacity (44 g water/g fiber. In dispersion trials, the gums exhibited a non-Newtonian fluid behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry.

  14. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Solís, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P oil-holding capacity (25.7 g oil/g fiber) and water absorption capacity (44 g water/g fiber). In dispersion trials, the gums exhibited a non-Newtonian fluid behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry.

  15. Optimal experimental conditions for Welan gum production by support vector regression and adaptive genetic algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Li

    Full Text Available Welan gum is a kind of novel microbial polysaccharide, which is widely produced during the process of microbial growth and metabolism in different external conditions. Welan gum can be used as the thickener, suspending agent, emulsifier, stabilizer, lubricant, film-forming agent and adhesive usage in agriculture. In recent years, finding optimal experimental conditions to maximize the production is paid growing attentions. In this work, a hybrid computational method is proposed to optimize experimental conditions for producing Welan gum with data collected from experiments records. Support Vector Regression (SVR is used to model the relationship between Welan gum production and experimental conditions, and then adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA, for short is applied to search optimized experimental conditions. As results, a mathematic model of predicting production of Welan gum from experimental conditions is obtained, which achieves accuracy rate 88.36%. As well, a class of optimized experimental conditions is predicted for producing Welan gum 31.65g/L. Comparing the best result in chemical experiment 30.63g/L, the predicted production improves it by 3.3%. The results provide potential optimal experimental conditions to improve the production of Welan gum.

  16. Optimal experimental conditions for Welan gum production by support vector regression and adaptive genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwei; Yuan, Xiang; Cui, Xuerong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Leiquan; Zhang, Weishan; Lu, Qinghua; Zhu, Hu

    2017-01-01

    Welan gum is a kind of novel microbial polysaccharide, which is widely produced during the process of microbial growth and metabolism in different external conditions. Welan gum can be used as the thickener, suspending agent, emulsifier, stabilizer, lubricant, film-forming agent and adhesive usage in agriculture. In recent years, finding optimal experimental conditions to maximize the production is paid growing attentions. In this work, a hybrid computational method is proposed to optimize experimental conditions for producing Welan gum with data collected from experiments records. Support Vector Regression (SVR) is used to model the relationship between Welan gum production and experimental conditions, and then adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA, for short) is applied to search optimized experimental conditions. As results, a mathematic model of predicting production of Welan gum from experimental conditions is obtained, which achieves accuracy rate 88.36%. As well, a class of optimized experimental conditions is predicted for producing Welan gum 31.65g/L. Comparing the best result in chemical experiment 30.63g/L, the predicted production improves it by 3.3%. The results provide potential optimal experimental conditions to improve the production of Welan gum.

  17. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance.

  18. Effect of Guar Gum with Sorbitol Coating on the Properties and Oil Absorption of French Fries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bo; Fan, Daming; Li, Jinwei; Duan, Zhenhua; Fan, Liuping

    2017-12-13

    This paper investigated the effects of guar gum with sorbitol coating on the oil absorption of French fries by combined dye oil methods, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that pretreatment of blanching with calcium ions and coating with guar gum and sorbitol could significantly reduce the structural oil (STO) and penetrated surface oil (PSO) of French fries and have no negative effects on its texture and also effectively control the final moisture content (p French fries with guar gum and sorbitol reduced by 50.8%, 33.1% and 30.6%, respectively. CLSM photographs confirmed that STO significantly reduced after coating with guar gum and sorbitol, followed by PSO. In the process of frying, the coatings of guar gum or guar gum with sorbitol could effectively prevent oil from infiltrating the potato tissue, which can be seen in the SEM photographs. The barrier properties of French fries were enhanced by coating guar gum, and sorbitol was added to avoid pores and cracks. Blanching with calcium ion can significantly reduce the final moisture content of coating French fries.

  19. Binding of the substrate UDP-glucuronic acid induces conformational changes in the xanthan gum glucuronosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, S R; Petruk, A A; Brukman, N G; Bianco, M I; Jacobs, M; Marti, M A; Ielpi, L

    2016-06-01

    GumK is a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase of Xanthomonas campestris that is involved in xanthan gum biosynthesis. GumK belongs to the inverting GT-B superfamily and catalyzes the transfer of a glucuronic acid (GlcA) residue from uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcA (UDP-GlcA) to a lipid-PP-trisaccharide embedded in the membrane of the bacteria. The structure of GumK was previously described in its apo- and UDP-bound forms, with no significant conformational differences being observed. Here, we study the behavior of GumK toward its donor substrate UDP-GlcA. Turbidity measurements revealed that the interaction of GumK with UDP-GlcA produces aggregation of protein molecules under specific conditions. Moreover, limited proteolysis assays demonstrated protection of enzymatic digestion when UDP-GlcA is present, and this protection is promoted by substrate binding. Circular dichroism spectroscopy also revealed changes in the GumK tertiary structure after UDP-GlcA addition. According to the obtained emission fluorescence results, we suggest the possibility of exposure of hydrophobic residues upon UDP-GlcA binding. We present in silico-built models of GumK complexed with UDP-GlcA as well as its analogs UDP-glucose and UDP-galacturonic acid. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also show that a relative movement between the domains appears to be specific and to be triggered by UDP-GlcA. The results presented here strongly suggest that GumK undergoes a conformational change upon donor substrate binding, likely bringing the two Rossmann fold domains closer together and triggering a change in the N-terminal domain, with consequent generation of the acceptor substrate binding site. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. [Effect of two kinds of chewing gums on dental plaque pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chen-bin; Tao, Dan-ying; Wang, Shun; Feng, Xi-ping

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the change of plaque pH after chewing 2 kinds of gums. The investigation consisted of 8 healthy subjects (aged 23-27 years, 4 males and 4 females) who refrained from toothbrushing for 24 hours before the test. The pH of dental plaque was measured using a Beetrode pH microelectrode before and after sucrose challenge with a 10% sucrose solutions at 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes as the baseline data. One week later the pH of dental plaque was measured again before the rinse and then the subjects rinsed with a 10% sucrose solutions. After 1 minute the sugar-free chewing gum was given and started to chew for 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes. The pH of dental plaque was measured at the same time on the non-chewing side. One week later the same test was carried out but the chewing gum was changed to tea polyphenol gum. Dental plaque pH value were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and SNK using SPSS 10.0 software package. Compared with the baseline chewed either tea polyphenol gum or sugar-free gum could increase the plaque pH recovery due to the sucrose rinsing challenge and it could maintain the dental plaque pH above the resting value. There was no statistically significant difference between tea polyphenol gum and sugar-free gum (P>0.05). Both gums can increase the plaque pH and decrease the risk of caries.

  1. Nanostructured SnO{sub 2} encapsulated guar-gum hybrid nanocomposites for electrocatalytic determination of hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Priya [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Srivastava, Manish [Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Verma, Ranjana [Solar Energy Material Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784 028 (India); Kumar, Manish [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Kumar, D., E-mail: dkumar@dce.ac.in [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Singh, Jay, E-mail: jay_singh143@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with synthesis of sol–gel derived tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles encapsulated in to guar gum (GG) biopolymer as the organic–inorganic hybrid materials for the determination of hydrazine. The organic–inorganic hybrid combines the perfunctory strength offered by the inorganic SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with flexible binding sites provided by the organic biopolymer (GG) solution by the ultrasonication. The phase identification, crystalline size, surface morphology and optical properties of prepared SnO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}-GG nanocomposites has been investigated through FT-IR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TEM, UV–Vis, and PL techniques. The colloidal solution of SnO{sub 2} and GG is electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto the indium tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate and studied for the electrooxidation of hydrazine. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the linearity between the current response and the hydrazine concentration has been obtained in the range of 2–22 mM, with a low detection limit of 2.76 mM and a high sensitivity of 5.72 μA cm{sup −2}. Based on the linear increase in amperometric current, a sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor is constructed. The proposed SnO{sub 2}-GG/ITO electrode shows a good response time (35 s), reproducibility, and long-term stability. The obtained results suggest that SnO{sub 2}-GG nanocomposites electrode provides a favorable sensing platform for the electrochemical studies. In addition, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies are used to evaluate the kinetic parameters. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of sol–gel derived tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles grafted in to gaur gum (GG) organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposite for determination of hydrazine (HZ). Under optimized experimental conditions, SnO{sub 2}-GG/ITO electrode shows, linearity 2–22 mM, and detection limit 2.769 mM with high sensitivity of 5.72 μA cm{sup −2}. The results clearly suggest that SnO{sub 2}-GG

  2. STABILITY OF KETOPROFEN COATED BY CHITOSAN-GUAR GUM GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwantiningsih Sugita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The coating stability of ketoprofen by chitosan-guar gum gel has been studied. Into 228.6 mL of 1.75% (w/v chitosan solution in 1% (v/v acetic acid, 38.1 mL of guar gum (gg solution was added with concentration variation of 0.35, 0.55, and 0.75% (w/v for ketoprofen microcapsules, and stirred with magnetic stirrer until homogenous. Afterwards, 7.62 mL of glutaraldehyde (glu was added slowly under stirring, with concentrations varied: 3, 3.5, and 4% (v/v. All mixtures were shaked for 20 min for homogenization. Into each microcapsule mixture for ketoprofen, a solution of 2 g of ketoprofen in 250 mL of 96% ethanol was added. Every mixture was then added with 5 mL of 2% Tween-80 and stirred with magnetic stirrer for an hour at room temperature. Conversion of suspension into fine powders/granules (microcapsules was done by using spray dryer. Every microcapsule formula was packed into capsules, as much as 100 g per capsule. The capsules were contained in 100-mL dark bottles and the bottles were kept in climatic chamber at (40 ± 2 °C and RH (75 ± 5 % for 3 months. The microcapsule stabilities were tested chemically and physically. The result showed that formulation of ketoprofen preparation composed of 1.75% (w/v chitosan, 0.35% (w/v gg, and 3.50% (v/v glu, was relatively the best, with ketoprofen percentage left in microcapsule after 3 months, degradation rate constant, and shelf life of 80.33%, 0.0351 % week-1, and 18.92 months, respectively. Reaction kinetic model for this formula followed Prout-Tompkins equation and the degradation of ketoprofen was seem to follow autocatalytic reaction mechanism controlled by the formation and growth of reaction core.   Keywords: Ketoprofen, chitosan-guar gum gel

  3. The effect of chewing gum's flavor on salivary flow rate and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Karami-Nogourani, Maryam; Kowsari-Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini-Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chewing sugar-free gums is a convenient way to increase salivary flow. Salivary flow increases in response to both gustatory (taste) and mechanical (chewing) stimuli, and chewing gum can provide both of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of five different flavors of sugar-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH. Materials and Methods: Fifteen dental students volunteered at the same time on six consecutive days, to collect one minute u...

  4. Natural gums of plant origin as edible coatings for food industry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anuradha; Tyagi, Shvetambri; Gupta, Rajinder K; Tyagi, Yogesh K

    2017-12-01

    Natural plant-based gums and their derivatives are widely utilized in food industries, however, their applications as edible coatings to extend fresh fruits and vegetable shelf-life has been explored recently. These natural polymeric polysaccharides have many advantages as compared to synthetic polymers, because they are biodegradable, nontoxic, economical and easily available in the environment. Natural gums can also be semi synthetically modified to produce derivatives, which can easily compete with the synthetic preservatives available on the food market. In this review, the recent developments in the use of natural gums and their derivatives as edible coatings have been explored and discussed.

  5. Chewing gum does not induce context-dependent memory when flavor is held constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Amy A; Sun, Justin; Golding, Abbe C; Prevost, Darius

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the effect of chewing gum on memory when flavor is held constant. Four separate groups of participants (total n=101) completed a word recall task. At learning and recall, participants either chewed a piece of gum or sucked a sweet. Each participant completed the memory task twice, once with abstract words and once with concrete words. A significant effect of word type (concrete vs. abstract) was found, however recall performance was not improved by matched oral activity at learning and recall. The results cast further doubt on the ability of chewing gum to induce context-dependent memory effects.

  6. Relative bioavailability of methadone hydrochloride administered in chewing gum and tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Angelo, H.R.; Bonde, J.

    1990-01-01

    Methadone administered in chewing gum in doses of 16.7-22.6 mg to seven patients in a study using an open balanced cross-over design, was compared with 20 mg of methadone given perorally as tablets. There was no significant difference in the AUC/D obtained after administration of chewing gum...... and tablets (p>0.05). It is concluded that the chewing gum formulation should be considered for further testing with respect to suppression of abstinence syndrome in narcotic addicts....

  7. Estimating aboveground biomass in Kalahari woodlands: inferring soil erosional and distributional processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    Maps which accurately quantify vegetation carbon, or above ground biomass (AGB) and its changes, are not only essential for ecosystem monitoring, but also for understanding controls on ecosystem carbon, associated soil organic carbon (SOC) and the global carbon cycle. Throughout the rangelands of Namibia, two vegetation cover change processes are widespread, firstly, deforestation and forest degradation, and secondly, the encroachment of the herbaceous and grassy layers by woody strata. Both processes effect a range of key ecosystem services, including SOC dynamics by facilitating erosion and altering soil re-distributional processes. Yet, the spatial and temporal intensity of these vegetation change processes and hence their effect on SOC, remain poorly quantified. This study therefore aims to distinguish and map the extent of both deforestation and woody thickening and associated AGB changes, and gain an understanding of the spatial distribution of land degradation risk areas. We map AGB at two periods (2007 and 2015) for part of the Namibian Kalahari woodland savannah, by modelling forest inventory measurements as a function of a fusion of radar and optical satellite imagery. We then process a change detection and validate both individual and change maps using independent field and satellite data. Results show widespread increases and declines in both areal extent and quantity of AGB, suggesting (i) important vegetation change processes (i.e. both deforestation and woody thickening), and (ii) associated changes in soil quality. Indeed, woody thickening has been found to mask land degradation, through the replacement of herbaceous layers with hardy shrubs, leading to increases in erosional processes. These results are in agreement with previous studies, which identify both extensive greening and small-scale deforestation. Keywords: Soil Organic Carbon, Erosion, deposition, Above Ground Biomass; Savannah; Rangeland; Carbon; Remote Sensing; Change detection

  8. Genea, Genabea and Gilkeya gen. nov.: ascomata and ectomycorrhiza formation in a Quercus woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Trappe, James M; Rizzo, David M

    2006-01-01

    Genea and Genabea are considered ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbionts of higher plants, but because of their hypogeous habit, dark coloration and the small size of their ascomata, relatively little is known about these genera. Ascomata of six morphological species of Genea and one of Genabea were frequently collected at a single site in xeric Quercus woodlands of California's Sierra Nevada foothills. While most collections were easily referred to known species, those putatively identified as Genea harknessii and Genea arenaria were problematic. Genea harknessii collections appeared relatively homogenous based on morphology, but significant ITS variation revealed by rDNA sequencing suggested cryptic species diversity. Specimens of G. arenaria approximated the brief, original species description except for abundant clumps of septate setae formed at the apex of peridial warts. To verify the identity of this species we reexamined the holotype and analyzed morphology and ITS sequences of G. arenaria ascomata from a wide geographic range. To authenticate the EM status of Genea and Genabea with Quercus we collected healthy EM of Quercus douglasii and Quercus wislizenii and compared their ITS sequences to those from ascomata. We detected nine distinct ITS types of Genea and Genabea on roots. Two new species described here as Genea bihymeniata sp. nov. and Genea cazaresii sp. nov., were discovered during study of herbarium specimens. A phylogenetic analysis of 28 s rDNA from Genea and Genabea indicated three distinct lineages: Genea, Genabea and a third represented by Genea intermedia. For the latter we propose Gilkeya gen. nov. to accommodate the single known species, Gilkeya compacta comb. nov. A dichotomous key to all known Genea, Genabea and Gilkeya spp. from western North America is presented.

  9. Preparation and characterization of a chemically sulfated cashew gum polysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura Neto, Erico de; Maciel, Jeanny da S.; Cunha, Pablyana L. R.; Paula, Regina Celia M. de; Feitosa, Judith P.A., E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Cashew gum (CG) was sulfated in pyridine:formamide using chlorosulfonic acid as the reagent. Confirmation of sulfation was obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy through the presence of an asymmetrical S=O stretching vibration at 1259 cm{sup -1}. The degrees of substitution were 0.02, 0.24 and 0.88 determined from the sulfur percentage. 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data showed that the sulfation occurred at primary carbons. An increase of at least 4% of the solution viscosity was observed due to sulfation. The thermal gravimetric curves (TGA) indicate that the derivatives are stable up to ca. 200 deg C. The sulfated CG is compared to carboxymethylated CG in order to verify the possibility of the use of the former in the preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes; the latter is already being used for this application. (author)

  10. An outflow linked to a YSO in Gum 31?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Bosch, G.; Vásquez, J.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with 10349-5824, a young stellar object located on the edge of the H ii region Gum31, with the aim of investigating the existence of bipolar outflows. We use CO(2-1) line observations obtained with the APEX telescope, H line observations on the K band taken with Flamingos 2 in Gemini South and additional data from at 4.5, 8 and 24 m. J103648.97-584010.7 (1), classified as class II, coincides with extended emission in 4.5 m, suggesting the presence of bipolar flows, and with H emission at 2.12 m. Three extended sources detected in H at 0.5 and 1.5 of 1 could also suggest the presence of shocked gas. Additional evidence of bipolar outflows comes from CO(2-1) spectra.

  11. Structure and composition of Androstachys johnsonii woodland across various strata in Gonarezhou National Park, southeast Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.; Chikorowondo, G.; Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Muvengwi, J.

    2011-01-01

    A study on the structure and composition of Androstachys johnsonii Prain (Euphorbiaceae) woodland across three strata was conducted in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), southeast Zimbabwe. Specifically, the objectives of the study were: (i) to determine the spatial structure and composition of A.

  12. Prescribed fire and oak sapling physiology, demography, and folivore damage in an Ozark woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Alexander Wait; Douglas P. Aubrey

    2014-01-01

    Prescribed fire is a tool in wildlife management for restoring and maintaining midwestern oak woodlands. The success of some of the wildlife management objectives depends upon opening the canopy, new oak (Quercus spp.) saplings entering the canopy, and removal of cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.). We examined population...

  13. Co-adapting societal and ecological interactions following large disturbances in urban park woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret Carreiro; Wayne Zipperer

    2011-01-01

    The responses of urban park woodlands to large disturbances provide the opportunity to identify and examine linkages in social-ecological systems in urban landscapes.We propose that the Panarchy model consisting of hierarchically nested adaptive cycles provides a useful framework to evaluate those linkages.We use two case studies as examples – Cherokee Park in...

  14. Structure and composition of Spirostachys africana woodland stands in Gonarezhou National Park, southeast Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.; Gandiwa, P.; Mxoza, T.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the structure and composition of Spirostachys africana woodlands in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), southeast Zimbabwe. We divided the GNP into three strata, namely northern, central and southern GNP, based on physical feature such as major perennial rivers. The main objective was to

  15. Metapopulation shift and survival of woodland birds under climate change: will species be able to track?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, P.; Verboom-Vasiljev, J.; Vos, C.C.; Jochem, R.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change has been widely recognized as a key factor driving changes in species distributions. In this study we use a metapopulation model, with a window of suitable climate moving polewards, to explore population shifts and survival of woodland birds under different climate change scenarios

  16. Phenology and climate relationships in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forest and woodland communities of southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Gretchen A.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Evelsizer, Ross J.; Vogelmann, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) occurs over wide geographical, latitudinal, elevational, and environmental gradients, making it a favorable candidate for a study of phenology and climate relationships. Aspen forests and woodlands provide numerous ecosystem services, such as high primary productivity and biodiversity, retention and storage of environmental variables (precipitation, temperature, snow–water equivalent) that affect the spring and fall phenology of the aspen woodland communities of southwestern Colorado. We assessed the land surface phenology of aspen woodlands using two phenology indices, start of season time (SOST) and end of season time (EOST), from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database of conterminous U.S. phenological indicators over an 11-year time period (2001–2011). These indicators were developed with 250 m resolution remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer processed to highlight vegetation response. We compiled data on SOST, EOST, elevation, precipitation, air temperature, and snow water equivalent (SWE) for selected sites having more than 80% cover by aspen woodland communities. In the 11-year time frame of our study, EOST had significant positive correlation with minimum fall temperature and significant negative correlation with fall precipitation. SOST had a significant positive correlation with spring SWE and spring maximum temperature.

  17. Bird community relationships to succession in green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; John E. Gobeille

    1998-01-01

    We studied the relationship between breeding birds and seral stages of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) woodlands in central South Dakota between 1990 and 1992. Stands of early seral green ash undergoing primary succession had few small trees with western snowberry (Symphoricarpos occidentalis) in the understory. Some early seral...

  18. Preliminary survey of the marketing of farm woodland products in the northern New England states

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Rettie; Wayne G. Banks; George E. Doverspike

    1949-01-01

    The Station in l948 initiated a study of the problems of marketing and pricing of farm woodland products. The first step in this project involved some preliminary surveys designed to give an over-all view of the principal conditions and problems.

  19. Historical oak woodland detected through Armillaria mellea damage in fruit orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan K. Brown

    2002-01-01

    The wholesale destruction of oak woodland by North American settlers in the Santa Clara Valley is attested in early county histories and other sources. Early plats and field notes by government and private surveyors, which are the most useful kind of sources as to the distribution and extent of the lost oak groves, still leave serious gaps in our knowledge. A further...

  20. Bird species associated with green ash woodlands in the Slim Buttes, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Hodorff; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1986-01-01

    In western South Dakota, native deciduous woodlands are uncommon, constituting less than 1% of the total land area (Boldt et al. 1978). The Green Ash/Common Chokecherry (Fraxinus pennsylvanica/Prunus virginiana) habitat type is the major deciduous habitat type in northwestern South Dakota (Hansen and Hoffman 1985). This type occurs in depressions,...

  1. Rainfall, soil moisture, and runoff dynamics in New Mexico pinon-juniper woodland watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Ochoa; Alexander Fernald; Vincent Tidwell

    2008-01-01

    Clearing trees in pinon-juniper woodlands may increase grass cover and infiltration, leading to reduced surface runoff and erosion. This study was conducted to evaluate pinon-juniper hydrology conditions during baseline data collection in a paired watershed study. We instrumented six 1.0 to 1.3 ha experimental watersheds near Santa Fe, NM to collect rainfall, soil...

  2. From protege to nurse plant : Establishment of thorny shrubs in grazed temperate woodlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christian; Ruifrok, Jasper Laurens

    Question Thorny shrubs play keystone roles in grazed ecosystems by defending non-protected plants against herbivores, but their establishment in grazed ecosystems is poorly understood. Which factors control establishment of recruits of thorny nurse shrubs in grazed temperate woodlands? Location

  3. Microsite and time since prescribed fire's influence on soil microbiology in a pinyon woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin M. Rau; Robert R. Blank; Tye Morgan

    2008-01-01

    Pinyon-juniper (Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frém.? Juniperus osteosperma Torr.) encroachment into sagebrush grasslands is a continuing problem in the Western United States. Prescribed burning has been suggested to slow woodland encroachment. We examined surface soil microbial community structure using Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA...

  4. An old-growth definition for xeric pine and pine-oak woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Murphy; Gregory J. Nowacki

    1997-01-01

    The old-growth characteristics of xeric pine and pine-oak woodlands are summarized from a survey of the available scientific literature. This type occurs throughout the South and is usually found as small inclusions on ridgetops and south-facing slopes in the mountains or on excessively drained, sandy uplands in gentle terrain. Historically, this type has had frequent...

  5. Woodland restoration in Scotland: ecology, history, culture, economics, politics and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Richard

    2009-07-01

    In the latter half of the 20th century, native pine woodlands in Scotland were restricted to small remnant areas within which there was little regeneration. These woodlands are important from a conservation perspective and are habitat for numerous species of conservation concern. Recent developments have seen a large increase in interest in woodland restoration and a dramatic increase in regeneration and woodland spread. The proximate factor enabling this regeneration is a reduction in grazing pressure from sheep and, particularly, deer. However, this has only been possible as a result of a complex interplay between ecological, political and socio-economic factors. We are currently seeing the decline of land management practices instituted 150-200 years ago, changes in land ownership patterns, cultural revival, and changes in societal perceptions of the Scottish landscape. These all feed into the current move to return large areas of the Scottish Highlands to tree cover. I emphasize the need to consider restoration in a multidisciplinary framework which accounts not just for the ecology involved but also the historical and cultural context.

  6. Woodland pond salamander abundance in relation to forest management and environmental conditions in northern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deahn M. Donner; Christine A. Ribic; Albert J. Beck; Dale Higgins; Dan Eklund; Susan. Reinecke

    2015-01-01

    Woodland ponds are important landscape features that help sustain populations of amphibians that require this aquatic habitat for successful reproduction. Species abundance patterns often reflect site-specific differences in hydrology, physical characteristics, and surrounding vegetation. Large-scale processes such as changing land cover and environmental conditions...

  7. Models for estimation of tree volume in the miombo woodlands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study developed models for estimating total, merchantable stem and branches volume applicable for the entire miombo woodlands of Tanzania. ... The relative mean prediction error of the general total tree volume model with diameter at breast height and tree height was lower (0.6%) than those of the previously ...

  8. Factors affecting soil fauna feeding activity in a fragmented lowland temperate deciduous woodland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake E Simpson

    Full Text Available British temperate broadleaf woodlands have been widely fragmented since the advent of modern agriculture and development. As a result, a higher proportion of woodland area is now subject to edge effects which can alter the efficiency of ecosystem functions. These areas are particularly sensitive to drought. Decomposition of detritus and nutrient cycling are driven by soil microbe and fauna coactivity. The bait lamina assay was used to assess soil fauna trophic activity in the upper soil horizons at five sites in Wytham Woods, Oxfordshire: two edge, two intermediate and one core site. Faunal trophic activity was highest in the core of the woodland, and lowest at the edge, which was correlated with a decreasing soil moisture gradient. The efficiency of the assay was tested using four different bait flavours: standardised, ash (Fraxinus excelsior L., oak (Quercus robur L., and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.. The standardised bait proved the most efficient flavour in terms of feeding activity. This study suggests that decomposition and nutrient cycling may be compromised in many of the UK's small, fragmented woodlands in the event of drought or climate change.

  9. Changing forest-woodland-savanna mosaics in Uganda: with implications for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangendo, G.

    2005-01-01

    Forest-Woodland-Savanna (FWS) mosaics are complex, highly varied and dynamic landscapes.Until recently, they were considered poor in terms of biodiversity. Consequently, only few scientific studies have been done on them and little attention has been paid to their

  10. Landowner total income from oak woodland working landscapes in Spain and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose L. Oviedo; Lynn Huntsinger; Pablo Campos

    2015-01-01

    Conventional accounting of agricultural income focuses on the commercial operating income from oak woodland ranches, omitting the value of amenities to the landowner and real capital gains, which includes land revaluation (appreciation). These accounting exercises also mix income earned through self-employed (landowner and household) labor with ranch operating income,...

  11. Nutrient and sediment transport from a new vineyard within oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce Larsen; LynneDee Althouse; Daniel Meade; Mark Battany

    2008-01-01

    Water quality was investigated in the vicinity of Cuesta Ridge Vineyard, San Luis Obispo County, where drainages carry water from chaparral, oak woodland, and a new vineyard. Three drainages were instrumented with gauges above and below the vineyard for stage height and turbidity to assess the effectiveness of water quality protection measures at the Cuesta Ridge...

  12. Inconsistent application of environmental laws and policies to California's oak woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory A. Giusti; Adina M. Merenlender

    2002-01-01

    We examine inconsistencies in the application of environmental laws and policies to California's oak woodlands and associated resources. Specifically, large-scale vegetation removals receive different levels of environmental oversight depending on location, tree species, and the final land use designation. Hence, situations arise where the scale of impacts to the...

  13. Design, implementation, and analysis methods for the National Woodland Owner Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Earl C. Leatherberry; Michael S. Williams; Michael S. Williams

    2005-01-01

    The National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS) is conducted by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program to increase our understanding of private forest-land owners in the United States. The information is intended to help policy makers, resource managers, and others interested in the forest resources of the United States better understand the social...

  14. Impacts of wildfire severity on hydraulic conductivity in forest, woodland, and grassland soils (Chapter 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary

    2011-01-01

    Forest, woodland, and grassland watersheds throughout the world are major sources of high quality water for human use because of the nature of these soils to infiltrate, store, and transmit most precipitation instead of quickly routing it to surface runoff. This characteristic of these wildland soils is due to normally high infiltration rates, porosities, and hydraulic...

  15. Effect of cultural treatments on regeneration of native woodlands on the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel W. Uresk; Charles E. Boldt

    1986-01-01

    Two cultural treatments were evaluated over a 6-year post-treatment period to determine their effect on regeneration of native woodlands in southwestern North Dakota. Cultural treatments included livestock exclusion and the combination of felling and removal of low-vigor trees and transplanting of woody plants. Shrub density varied by species when grazed and ungrazed...

  16. Four millennia of woodland structure and dynamics at the Arctic treeline of eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Sarah; Payette, Serge

    2010-05-01

    Paleoecological analysis using complementary indicators of vegetation and soil can provide spatially explicit information on ecological processes influencing trajectories of long-term ecosystem change. Here we document the structure and dynamics of an old-growth woodland before and after its inception 1000 years ago. We infer vegetation and soil characteristics from size and age distributions of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), soil properties, plant fossils, and paleosols. Radiocarbon ages of charcoal on the ground and in the soil indicate that the fire return interval was approximately 300 years between 2750 and 1000 cal. yr BP. No fire evidence was found before and after this period despite the presence of spruce since 4200 cal. yr BP. The size structures of living and dead spruce suggest that the woodland is in equilibrium with present climate in absence of fire. Tree establishment and mortality occurred regularly since the last fire event around 950 cal. yr BP. Both layering and occasional seeding have contributed to stabilize the spatial distribution of spruce over the past 1000 years. Since initial afforestation, soil development has been homogenized by the changing spatial distribution of spruce following each fire. We conclude that the history of the woodland is characterized by vegetation shifts associated with fire and soil disturbances and by millennial-scale maintenance of the woodland's structure despite changing climatic conditions.

  17. Urbanization level and woodland size are major drivers of woodpecker species richness and abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Myczko

    Full Text Available Urbanization is a process globally responsible for loss of biodiversity and for biological homogenization. Urbanization may have a direct negative impact on species behaviour and indirect effects on species populations through alterations of their habitats, for example patch size and habitat quality. Woodpeckers are species potentially susceptible to urbanization. These birds are mostly forest specialists and the development of urban areas in former forests may be an important factor influencing their richness and abundance, but documented examples are rare. In this study we investigated how woodpeckers responded to changes in forest habitats as a consequence of urbanization, namely size and isolation of habitat patches, and other within-patch characteristics. We selected 42 woodland patches in a gradient from a semi-natural rural landscape to the city centre of Poznań (Western Poland in spring 2010. Both species richness and abundance of woodpeckers correlated positively to woodland patch area and negatively to increasing urbanization. Abundance of woodpeckers was also positively correlated with shrub cover and percentage of deciduous tree species. Furthermore, species richness and abundance of woodpeckers were highest at moderate values of canopy openness. Ordination analyses confirmed that urbanization level and woodland patch area were variables contributing most to species abundance in the woodpecker community. Similar results were obtained in presence-absence models for particular species. Thus, to sustain woodpecker species within cities it is important to keep woodland patches large, multi-layered and rich in deciduous tree species.

  18. Developing a woodland caribou habitat mosaic on the Ogoki-Nakina North Forests of northwestern Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Armstrong

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ogoki-North Nakina Forests consist of (10 638 km2 unroaded boreal forest approximately 400 km northeast of Thunder Bay, Ontario (lat 50°- 51°31'N, long 86°30'- 89°W. Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou inhabit discrete portions within these forests based on minimal current and past historical data. As part of the Forest Management Planning process, for the period 1997-2097, a woodland caribou habitat mosaic has been developed to coordinate present and future forest management activities with the retention and development of current and future woodland caribou habitat. Several criteria including, past fire history, forest structure, age, species composition, proximity to current road access and location of existing and potential caribou habitat, helped identify and delineate 50 mosaic harvest blocks. Each harvest block will be logged in one of five 20 year periods over a 100 year rotation (1997¬2097. The harvest blocks have been developed to simulate a pattern of past wildfire history in an area that has not been subjected to past forest management activities, while managing for woodland caribou, a locally featured species.

  19. Unleached Prosopis litter inhibits germination but leached stimulates seedling growth of dry woodland species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muturi, Gabriel M.; Poorter, Lourens; Bala, Pauline; Mohren, Godefridus M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Prosopis chilensis-Prosopis juliflora hybrid (hereinafter referred to as Prosopis species) invade riverine Acacia woodlands and replace indigenous Acacia tortilis through mechanism that are not yet well understood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that dense shade and allelopathic effects of

  20. Ecohydrology of pinon-juniper woodlands in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: Runoff, erosion, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig D. Allen

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an extended abstract only) Woodlands of pinon (Pinus edulis) and oneseed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) in the Jemez Mountains at Bandelier National Monument in northern New Mexico exhibit greatly accelerated rates of soil erosion, triggered by historic land use practices (livestock grazing and fire suppression). This erosion is degrading these...