WorldWideScience

Sample records for ranger district lawrence

  1. 75 FR 3195 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Mill Creek; Allotment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Mill Creek; Allotment... Mountain Ranger District. These four allotments are: Cox, Craig, Mill Creek, and Old Dry Creek. The.... ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Bill Queen, District Ranger, Lookout Mountain District, Ochoco National...

  2. 75 FR 71666 - Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Deschutes County, OR; West Bend...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Forest Service Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Deschutes County, OR; West Bend... Jeffries, District Ranger, Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District, Red Oaks Square, 1230 NE. Third Street, Suite A...-Fort Rock Ranger District, Red Oaks Square, 1230 NE. Third Street, Suite A-262, Bend, Oregon 97701...

  3. 75 FR 43138 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson...-acre Howard Elliot Johnson project area, which is approximately 23 miles east of Prineville, Oregon... Maurice Evans, Acting District Ranger, Lookout Mountain District, Ochoco National Forest, 3160 NE. Third...

  4. 78 FR 38287 - Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Forest Service Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project AGENCY: Forest Service. ACTION: Notice; Correction. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District published a document in the Federal Register of June 17...

  5. 78 FR 24717 - Crescent Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Klamath County, Oregon; Marsh Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... Forest Service Crescent Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Klamath County, Oregon; Marsh Project... statement (EIS) for a project called Marsh, in the southwestern portion of the Crescent Ranger District just... areas such as the Marsh project area provide to people. The focal point of the planning area is Big...

  6. 76 FR 315 - Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Oregon; Popper Vegetation Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Leader, Sisters Ranger District, Pine Street and Highway 20, POB 249, Sisters, Oregon 97759, or submit to... INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Keown, Team Leader, Sisters Ranger District, Pine Street and Highway 20, POB 249... wildlife species and other ecological processes. These no treatment areas include nesting, roosting, and...

  7. 77 FR 58354 - Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for... Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District and FHWA are withdrawing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy Tinderholt, Project Leader, Bend- Fort Rock Ranger District, 63095...

  8. 76 FR 23273 - Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Deschutes County, Oregon; Mt. Bachelor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... Forest Service Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Deschutes County, Oregon; Mt... Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Shane Jeffries, District Ranger, Bend-Fort Rock..., Recreation Team Leader, Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District, Red Oaks Square, 1230 NE Third Street Suite A-262...

  9. 77 FR 49775 - Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Wisdom and Wise River Ranger Districts; Montana; North and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... Forest Service Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Wisdom and Wise River Ranger Districts; Montana..., Wisdom/Wise River District Ranger at (406) 689-3243 or via email at [email protected] . Individuals who... Official The Wisdom/Wise River District Ranger will be the responsible official. Nature of Decision To Be...

  10. 75 FR 14419 - Camp Tatiyee Land Exchange on the Lakeside Ranger District of the Apache-Sitgreaves National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... National Forest (CNF); one 11.15 parcel to the Prescott National Forest (PNF); and five parcels totaling..., Safford, and Douglas Ranger Districts of the CNF; Bradshaw Ranger District of the PNF; Cave Creek, Tonto... the PNF, ASNFs and TNF and presented the ASNFs with their proposal for the Camp Tatiyee Land Exchange...

  11. 75 FR 16728 - Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... the project area by managing for early development (post disturbance), mid development closed, mid... Forest Service Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest... disclose the effects of ] managing forest vegetation in a manner that increases resiliency of the Beaver...

  12. 78 FR 36163 - Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Forest Service Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to...

  13. 75 FR 10457 - Andrew Pickens Ranger District; South Carolina; AP Loblolly Pine Removal and Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... The Andrew Pickens Ranger District proposes the following treatments: Regeneration Harvest, With... species (sprouts and seedlings) within 1-2 years after the initial post-harvest prescribed burn. These... manual and mechanical treatment. Woodlands are forests with relatively low tree densities of 25-60...

  14. Reassessment of Loblolly Pine Decline on the Oakmulgee Ranger District, Talladega National Forest, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan J. Hess; William J. Otroana; John P. Jones; Arthur J. Goddard; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    1999-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) decline has been a management concern on the Oakmulgee Ranger District since the 1960's. The symptoms include sparse crowns, reduced radial growth, deterioration of fine roots, decline, and mortality of loblolly pine by age 50.

  15. 78 FR 3879 - Ochoco National Forest, Paulina Ranger District; Oregon; Fox Canyon Cluster Allotment Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Paulina Ranger District; Oregon; Fox Canyon Cluster Allotment Management Plan Project EIS AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Resource Management Plan (Forest Plan), as amended, and other applicable legal requirements within the...

  16. 75 FR 54085 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Doc No: 2010-22037] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, Rio Grande National Forest, USDA. ACTION: Corrected Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement...

  17. 75 FR 9388 - Prescott National Forest, Bradshaw Ranger District; Arizona; Bradshaw Vegetation Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: This project is a proposal to improve the health of fire adapted ecosystems while simultaneously reducing hazardous fuels on the Bradshaw Ranger District. The project area encompasses about 55...

  18. 76 FR 13344 - Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Forest Service Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project, Ashland Ranger District, Custer National Forest... Environmental Impact Statement for the Beaver Creek Landscape Management Project in the Federal Register (75 FR... Creek Landscape Management Project was published in the Federal Register on October 15, 2010 (75 FR...

  19. 76 FR 76689 - Cibola National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District, NM, Mount Taylor Combined Exploratory Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... project area. The exploratory drilling in this area would be phased over the course of six years; 51 holes... drilling on the Cibola National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District. There are two areas identified for exploration; the Bajillos project area is approximately 2,894 acres and is located in T. 12 N, R. 8 W...

  20. 76 FR 67130 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Big Piney Ranger District; Wyoming; Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    .... Approximately five percent of the project area is within the DFC 12 (Backcountry Big-game Hunting, Dispersed... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest; Big Piney Ranger District; Wyoming; Environmental Impact... miles northwest of Big Piney, Wyoming, and is situated on the east side of the northern end of the...

  1. 75 FR 71668 - Cibota National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District, NM, Roca Honda Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... uranium mine at the Roca Honda claims. The purpose of the EIS is to evaluate the environmental impacts of... Forest Service Cibota National Forest, Mount Taylor Ranger District, NM, Roca Honda Mine AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. SUMMARY: Roca Honda...

  2. 76 FR 22363 - Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... best available science, the Forest Supervisor will decide: Whether to select the proposed action or one... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact...

  3. 75 FR 44936 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 146 (Friday, July 30, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 44936] [FR Doc No: C1-2010-17803] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and Vegetation Management Project EIS Correction In...

  4. Landscape-scale fire restoration on the big piney ranger district in the Ozark highlands of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Andre; McRee Anderson; Douglas Zollner; Marie Melnechuk; Theo Witsell

    2009-01-01

    The Ozark-St. Francis National Forest, The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Arkansas Forestry Commission, private landowners, and others are currently engaged in a collaborative project to restore the oak-hickory and pine-oak ecosystems of the Ozark Highlands on 60,000 acres of the Big Piney Ranger District. Frequent historical fires...

  5. 78 FR 33047 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe-Atoma Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area... Ski Tahoe (Mt. Rose) to expand its lift and terrain network. The project is located approximately 12.... Fax to 775-355-5399. Please use a fax cover sheet and include ``Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area EIS...

  6. 75 FR 71414 - Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Forest Service Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010... prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: Taos Ski Valley (TSV) is a downhill ski area located... (Phase I) projects included in the Taos Ski Valley (TSV) 2010 Master Development Plan (MDP). These...

  7. 76 FR 60451 - Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... Forest Service Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010... authorize several (Phase 1) projects included in the Taos Ski Valley (TSV) 2010 Master Development Plan (MDP... Service proposes to authorize under a separate SUP to John Cottam, the relocation of the Alpine Village...

  8. Snag densities in old-growth stands on the Gasquet Ranger District, Six Rivers National Forest, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Jimerson

    1989-01-01

    Baseline levels for densities of snags (standing dead trees) wered etermined in undisturbed old-growth stands on the Gasquet Ranger District. Six Riven National Forest, California. Snag species, number, diameter at breast height (d.b.h.), height, cavity type, cavity use, decay class, and snag origin were recorded on 317 plots over a 2-year period. The 2121 snags...

  9. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  10. 75 FR 48927 - Sierra National Forest, Bass Lake Ranger District, California, Fish Camp Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark Lemon, Interdisciplinary Team Leader, at Sierra National Forest, Bass Lake Ranger... sustain a fire) wildland urban intermix area, (3) increase the vigor and health of mixed conifer stands...

  11. Energy Efficiency, Water Efficiency, and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: San Juan National Forest - Dolores Ranger District, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandt, Alicen J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kiatreungwattana, Kosol [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-26

    This report summarizes the results from an energy efficiency, water efficiency, and renewable energy site assessment of the Dolores Ranger District in the San Juan National Forest in Colorado. A team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the assessment with United States Forest Service (USFS) personnel on August 16-17, 2016, as part of ongoing efforts by USFS to reduce energy and water use and implement renewable energy technologies. The assessment is approximately an American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Level 2 audit and meets Energy Independence and Security Act requirements.

  12. 77 FR 51513 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rhonda O'Byrne, District Ranger, Northern Hills Ranger District, 605...'Byrne, District Ranger, 2014 N. Main, Spearfish, SD 57783, or by email to [email protected] , or via...

  13. 75 FR 21577 - Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Powers Ranger District, Coos County, OR; Eden Ridge Timber...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... natural succession processes. The residual trees would have less competition for sunlight, water and soil... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Powers Ranger... growth, crown development, vigor and overall stand health, improved root strength on residual trees...

  14. 76 FR 6395 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... comments should be sent to Rhonda O'Byrne, 2014 N. Main, Spearfish, SD 57783. Comments may also be sent via... CONTACT: Rhonda O'Byrne, District Ranger, Northern Hills Ranger District, 605-642-4622. Individuals who...

  15. 75 FR 45090 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... comments should be sent to Rhonda O'Byrne, 2014 N. Main, Spearfish, SD 57783. Comments may also be sent via... CONTACT: Rhonda O'Byrne, District Ranger, Northern Hills Ranger District, 605-642-4622. Individuals who...

  16. 75 FR 37753 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... comments should be sent to Rhonda O'Byrne, 2014 N. Main, Spearfish, SD 57783. Comments may also be sent via... CONTACT: Rhonda O'Byrne, District Ranger, Northern Hills Ranger District, 605-642-4622. Individuals who...

  17. 76 FR 29191 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... Northern Hills Ranger District Office at 2014 N. Main. Written comments should be sent to Rhonda O'Byrne... facilitate entry into the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rhonda O'Byrne, District Ranger...

  18. Allegheny County Park Rangers Outreach

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Launched in June 2015, the Allegheny County Park Rangers program reached over 48,000 people in its first year. Park Rangers interact with residents of all ages and...

  19. Postcolonial Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Crunfli, Édina Pereira

    2006-01-01

    Tese (doutorado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Comunicação e Expressão. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Letras/Inglês e Literatura Correspondente. Este trabalho lida com a produção de D.H.Lawrence enquanto o escritor inglês residia no México em 1923 e 1924, o romance The Plumed Serpent e os ensaios da coleção Mornings in Mexico, analisados de uma perspectiva pós-colonial. O projeto parte do pressuposto de que é tarefa do crítico pós-colonial, como Edward Said argumenta,...

  20. 77 FR 18997 - Rim Lakes Forest Restoration Project; Apache-Sitgreavese National Forest, Black Mesa Ranger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-7527] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Rim Lakes Forest Restoration Project; Apache-Sitgreavese National Forest, Black Mesa Ranger District, Coconino County, AZ AGENCY: Forest.... Forest Service (FS) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on a proposed action to conduct...

  1. The History of the 2nd Ranger Company

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bond, Victor

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to uncover the history of the 2nd Ranger Company and to determine the impact segregation had on the selection, training, and combat operations of the 2nd Ranger Company...

  2. 75th Ranger Regiment Nutrition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Siple Medical Training Culinary Advisor Warfighter Nutrition Conference USUHS, Bethesda, MD 15 JULY 2008 Report Documentation Page Form...Performance Nutrition ◘ Sports Medicine ◘ Mental Toughness The RAW Program Team Approach: Commander’s Program! • Ranger Leaders • Culinary ...training Overweight Fitness screening, staged training Previous Heat Injury Medical history and record screening Contributory Medical Issues Medical

  3. Of Power Rangers and V-Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, Chris J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study of the effects of violence on elementary students which used the television program Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, and found increased aggression which parents should be concerned about. Offers suggestions for parents and teachers, including taking action against violent programming, utilizing technology which bans unwanted…

  4. Hampton Lawrence Carson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ing the evolution of reproductive isolation. Hampton Lawrence Carson was born in Philadelphia in. 1914 into a family which counted several scientists among its members. He went on to study zoology at the. University of Pennsylvania, obtaining his A. B. in 1936 and his Ph. D. in 1943, for a cytogenetic analysis of naturally.

  5. The Stephen Lawrence Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseley, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the effect of the Macpherson Inquiry Report into the murder of Stephen Lawrence, a black man, on efforts to reduce institutional bias in Great Britain, claiming that there has been much more institutional indifference than institutional change since the report was published. Notes the need to rid society of racism in education. (SM)

  6. The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: Teachers Voice Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Diane E.; Carlsson-Paige, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Presents the results of a study exploring teachers' concerns and observations of how the "Power Rangers" television series affects children in their classrooms. Teachers' concerns focus on violence, aggressive play, confusion about fantasy and reality, obsessive involvement with the Power Rangers, and use of them as role models for…

  7. Learning about Real-Life Heroes: Forest Rangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Susan; Fonville, Beth

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that when children show interest in television superheroes, build on that interest in the classroom by introducing them to real-life heroes in the community. Using forest rangers as an example, offers a variety of activities, books, and resources that can introduce children to forest rangers and the work they do to protect forest…

  8. Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction Of Rangers In Yankari Game ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to identify the various factors affecting the job satisfaction level of rangers in Yankari Game Reserve, Bauchi, Nigeria. Data were collected using structured questionnaire comprising four facets: personal characteristics of the rangers, job satisfaction, motivation, and work environment. Data were ...

  9. Fermi, Heisenberg y Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ynduráin, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    Los azares de las onomásticas hacen coincidir en este año el centenario del nacimiento de tres de los más grandes físicos del siglo XX. Dos de ellos, Fermi y Heisenberg, dejaron una marca fundamental en la ciencia (ambos, pero sobre todo el segundo y, el primero, también en la tecnología. Lawrence, indudablemente de un nivel inferior al de los otros dos, estuvo sin embargo en el origen de uno de los desarrollos tecnológicos que han sido básicos para la exploración del universo subnuclear en la segunda mitad del siglo que ha terminado hace poco, el de los aceleradores de partículas.

  10. Mighty Morphin Power Ranger Play: Research and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosser, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    Explores the question of whether or not Mighty Morphin Power Rangers-type aggressive play is developmentally appropriate for the early childhood classroom. Compares results from research in child development to the reality of television programming, highlighting the relationship between television violence and children's aggressive behavior. (AA)

  11. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  12. Natural resources youth training program (NRYTP), resource rangers 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    In 2010, for a second year, the natural resources youth training program (NRYTP) was developed in northern Manitoba thanks to Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak Inc. (MKO) and the collaboration of 42 sponsors. 16 aboriginal youth representing six northern communities took part in the five-week program located at the Egg Lake camp. The objective was to provide these resources rangers with knowledge and training in the most widespread resource sectors in northern Manitoba, including mining, forestry and hydropower. Trainers and experts provided by industry partners offered training sessions, hands-on work experience and other activities to help resource rangers to acquire a better understanding of the employability in this field in the northern region and the knowledge and skills the resource-based careers require. Life and professional skills training was given by the camp staff and local professionals. On-site elders and cultural events also allowed the integration of a northern Cree cultural component. Three staff members, a cook and elders assisted daily the resource rangers. Many improvements and refinements have been made since the success of the 2009 program, including the involvement of a larger number of communities, program contributors and program graduates. The program length has doubled and the number of jobs created has increased, important cultural aspects were introduced and the overall expenses were reduced.

  13. PeakRanger: A cloud-enabled peak caller for ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Robert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, coupled with massively parallel short-read sequencing (seq is used to probe chromatin dynamics. Although there are many algorithms to call peaks from ChIP-seq datasets, most are tuned either to handle punctate sites, such as transcriptional factor binding sites, or broad regions, such as histone modification marks; few can do both. Other algorithms are limited in their configurability, performance on large data sets, and ability to distinguish closely-spaced peaks. Results In this paper, we introduce PeakRanger, a peak caller software package that works equally well on punctate and broad sites, can resolve closely-spaced peaks, has excellent performance, and is easily customized. In addition, PeakRanger can be run in a parallel cloud computing environment to obtain extremely high performance on very large data sets. We present a series of benchmarks to evaluate PeakRanger against 10 other peak callers, and demonstrate the performance of PeakRanger on both real and synthetic data sets. We also present real world usages of PeakRanger, including peak-calling in the modENCODE project. Conclusions Compared to other peak callers tested, PeakRanger offers improved resolution in distinguishing extremely closely-spaced peaks. PeakRanger has above-average spatial accuracy in terms of identifying the precise location of binding events. PeakRanger also has excellent sensitivity and specificity in all benchmarks evaluated. In addition, PeakRanger offers significant improvements in run time when running on a single processor system, and very marked improvements when allowed to take advantage of the MapReduce parallel environment offered by a cloud computing resource. PeakRanger can be downloaded at the official site of modENCODE project: http://www.modencode.org/software/ranger/

  14. D.H. Lawrence and modern destructiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, D

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses twentieth century societal destructiveness as reflected in four key prose works by D.H. Lawrence--the novels Sons and Lovers, Women in Love, Lady Chatterley's Lover and the early travel book Twilight in Italy. Sons and Lovers, which projects the young Lawrence persona's struggle between life and death, partly accounts for a deepening sensitivity to life and death in modern society in Lawrence's subsequent works. It is seen that Lawrence's writings depict the perilous trends today towards the mechanization of our fundamental being, and the resultant life-threatening qualities of sensationalism and reduction of the individual inner life.

  15. Elimination of 1994 Gender Restriction: Will Earning the Ranger Tab Achieve Full Career Potential for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    45 Excerpts from the Kotter Model...implementation of DADT and the DADT Repeal Act. The implementation guidance was delivered by the National Leadership to the forces through the Service Chiefs...enter the Regiment either through the Ranger Training Battlaion or after completion of Ranger School and serving in a key leadership position in a

  16. Ecology of Lawrence Livermore Laboratoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, D.R.

    1977-03-10

    The ecological impact of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on man, plants and animals, soil, water, and air has been on the positive side since the removal of much of the former airbase runway system. Many new trees have been planted, and the total biological energy has been increased. Although there has been destruction of some native plants, many new ecological niches have been formed. Cliff swallows, quail, and other birds have been able to find territories. Even a muskrat has appeared from the overflow storm drains. Opossums, brush rabbits, field mice, and predatory birds (kites, hawks, eagles, and sparrow hawks) are numerous. The use of herbicides and insecticides has upset the balance somewhat, but California poppies, owl clover, dragonflies, lacewings, bees, and wasps indicate that the effects are limited and that there is a wealth of animal life in the open areas and around the buildings.

  17. Is that Gun for the Bears? The National Park Service Ranger as a Historically Contradictory Figure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice B Kelly Pennaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Yellowstone Model” of exclusionary, or fortress conservation, has spread widely across the globe since 1872. While in many other countries there has been a concomitant ever-increasing militarisation of park guards, the history of the United States (US Park Ranger offers an alternative narrative. This paper traces the complex history of the US Park ranger through time to show how the Ranger as an outward embodiment of state power has been contradicted by administrative and practical logics directing rangers to educate, welcome, and guide park visitors. Rangers' work as territorial enforcers, and as strong-arms of the state has been tempered and defined by multiple disciplining forces over time. Using a political ecology approach, this paper examines how shifting political economic contexts, shifts in park use and park visitors, and a changing national law enforcement milieu influenced how and in what ways National Park Rangers have performed law enforcement in US parks over the past 100 years. The paper concludes by laying out why comparisons between US National Park Rangers and park guards in other parts of the world may be troubled by a number of socioeconomic and political factors.

  18. Mr Lawrence'ilt best-of

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Renee Meriste ja muusikaettevõtte Eesti Artistide Agentuuri poolt välja antavate heliplaatide seas ka 12. dets. ilmuvast rokkansambli Mr. Lawrence kogumikalbumist "Greatest Hits", heliplaatide sarjast "Eesti Rock Antoloogia"

  19. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Debieux, S.; Drielsma, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Husi, C.; Karadzhov, Y.; Masciocchi, F.; Nicola, L.; Messomo, E.Noah; Rothenfusser, K.; Sandstrom, R.; Wisting, H.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  20. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Capponi, M.; Iaciofano, A.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Ishimoto, S.; Filthaut, F.; Hansen, O.M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Bene, P.; Blondel, A.; Cadoux, F.; Debieux, S.; Drielsma, F.; Graulich, J.S.; Husi, C.; Karadzhov, Y.; Masciocchi, F.; Nicola, L.; Messomo, E.Noah; Rothenfusser, K.; Sandstrom, R.; Wisting, H.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Watson, S.; Wilson, A.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J.C.; Soler, F.J.P.; Cooke, P.; Gamet, R.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Barber, G.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Uchida, M.A.; Blackmore, V.J.; Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.H.; Lau, W.; Rayner, M.A.; Tunnell, C.D.; Booth, C.N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Nicholson, R.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P.J.; Dick, A.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D.; Whyte, C.G.; Young, A.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R.; Kyberd, P.; Littlefield, M.; Nebrensky, J.J.; Bross, A.D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Bowring, D.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Hanlet, P.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Torun, Y.; Blot, S.; Kim, Y.K.; Bravar, U.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Luo, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Summers, D.J.; Cline, D.; Yang, X.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.G.; Heidt, C.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  1. Are ranger patrols effective in reducing poaching-related threats within protected areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennnifer F.; Mulindahabi, Felix; Masozera, Michel K.; Nichols, James; Hines, James; Turikunkiko, Ezechiel; Oli, Madan K.

    2018-01-01

    Poaching is one of the greatest threats to wildlife conservation world-wide. However, the spatial and temporal patterns of poaching activities within protected areas, and the effectiveness of ranger patrols and ranger posts in mitigating these threats, are relatively unknown.We used 10 years (2006–2015) of ranger-based monitoring data and dynamic multi-season occupancy models to quantify poaching-related threats, to examine factors influencing the spatio-temporal dynamics of these threats and to test the efficiency of management actions to combat poaching in Nyungwe National Park (NNP), Rwanda.The probability of occurrence of poaching-related threats was highest at lower elevations (1,801–2,200 m), especially in areas that were close to roads and tourist trails; conversely, occurrence probability was lowest at high elevation sites (2,601–3,000 m), and near the park boundary and ranger posts. The number of ranger patrols substantially increased the probability that poaching-related threats disappear at a site if threats were originally present (i.e. probability of extinction of threats). Without ranger visits, the annual probability of extinction of poaching-related threats was an estimated 7%; this probability would increase to 20% and 57% with 20 and 50 ranger visits per year, respectively.Our results suggest that poaching-related threats can be effectively reduced in NNP by adding ranger posts in areas where they do not currently exist, and by increasing the number of patrols to sites where the probability of poaching activities is high.Synthesis and applications. Our application of dynamic occupancy models to predict the probability of presence of poaching-related threats is novel, and explicitly considers imperfect detection of illegal activities. Based on the modelled relationships, we identify areas that are most vulnerable to poaching, and offer insights regarding how ranger patrols can be optimally deployed to reduce poaching-related threats and

  2. Conservation′s Ambiguities: Rangers on the Periphery of the W Park, Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Poppe

    2012-01-01

    This article demonstrates the central role of ambiguity in the (re)production process of conservation practice. It argues that some current political economy as well as environmentality approaches to research conservation practice fail to capture the complexity of the lived experience of local conservationists. The article focuses on the multiple identities of rangers in interaction with other residents at the periphery of the W Park in Burkina Faso, as rangers are local conservationists who ...

  3. Park Rangers' Behaviors and Their Effects on Tourists and Tibetan Macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt. Huangshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Rie; Sheeran, Lori K; Li, Jin-Hua; Sun, Lixing; Wang, Xi; Pritchard, Alexander J; DuVall-Lash, Alexander S; Wagner, R Steve

    2014-09-15

    Previous studies have reported the negative impacts of tourism on nonhuman primates (NHPs) and tourists and advocated the improvement of tourism management, yet what constitutes good quality management remains unclear. We explored whether rates of macaque aggression and self-directed behaviors (SDBs) differed under the supervision of two park ranger teams at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys (VWM) in Mt. Huangshan, Anhui Province, China. The two ranger teams provisioned and managed a group of macaques on an alternating monthly basis. Monkey, tourist and ranger behaviors were collected from August 16-September 30, 2012. Macaque aggression and SDB rates did not differ significantly under the management of the two teams. Overall, there was little intervention in tourist-macaque interactions by park rangers, and even when rangers discouraged tourists' undesirable behaviors, tourist interactions with monkeys persisted. Furthermore, only one or sometimes two park rangers managed monkeys and tourists, and rangers established dominance over the monkeys to control them. In order to effectively manage tourists and monkeys by a single park ranger, we recommend that rangers: (1) prohibit tourists from feeding; (2) move around the viewing platform more frequently; and (3) limit the number of tourists each visiting session.

  4. The Cossack Ranger II Seismograph, Research And Outreach Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husebye, E. S.; Fedorenko, Y. V.; Pilgaev, S. V.; Matveeva, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    geoscience disciplines. Another project novelety is that the seismographs (Cossack Ranger II) would be assembled in Bulgaria thus ensuring low prices and local maintenance skills. SENSES will also introduce electronic learning modules for instructions at school levels on earthquake risks and hazard mitigations. This appears to be a most efficient way of informing the public at large about various types of natural hazards. In this presentations, we give details on the geophoned based seismograph Codssack Ranger II, record analysis, seismic processing scheme in a high school environment and the most difficult part promote geoscience for high school students.

  5. Autonomous Navigation with Constrained Consistency for C-Ranger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs have become the most widely used tools for undertaking complex exploration tasks in marine environments. Their synthetic ability to carry out localization autonomously and build an environmental map concurrently, in other words, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM, are considered to be pivotal requirements for AUVs to have truly autonomous navigation. However, the consistency problem of the SLAM system has been greatly ignored during the past decades. In this paper, a consistency constrained extended Kalman filter (EKF SLAM algorithm, applying the idea of local consistency, is proposed and applied to the autonomous navigation of the C-Ranger AUV, which is developed as our experimental platform. The concept of local consistency (LC is introduced after an explicit theoretical derivation of the EKF-SLAM system. Then, we present a locally consistency-constrained EKF-SLAM design, LC-EKF, in which the landmark estimates used for linearization are fixed at the beginning of each local time period, rather than evaluated at the latest landmark estimates. Finally, our proposed LC-EKF algorithm is experimentally verified, both in simulations and sea trials. The experimental results show that the LC-EKF performs well with regard to consistency, accuracy and computational efficiency.

  6. 75 FR 47755 - Black Hills National Forest, Mystic Ranger District, South Dakota, Pactola Project Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings #0;and investigations, committee meetings... including forest resources from an existing insect and disease epidemic (mountain pine beetle), creating a... forest resources, from the existing insect and disease (mountain pine beetle) epidemic. Restore resource...

  7. 77 FR 66578 - San Bernardino National Forest, Mountaintop Ranger District, CA, Santa Ana Watershed Hazardous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ...., tree regeneration layers, snags) and horizontal (e.g., downed woody material) heterogeneity. There is a... sensitive resources (e.g., heritage resources, rare plants, riparian areas, designated Critical Habitat, etc... around adjacent communities. The proposed action also includes reforestation/native plant restoration in...

  8. 78 FR 45495 - Conejos Peak Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Cumbres Vegetation Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... potential to damage public or private propert y as they fall; (3) Re-plant portions of harvested s t ands to... existing regeneration and where aspen sprouting is unlikely, in order to maintain diverse forest cover over...

  9. 75 FR 31418 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, Council Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek-Council...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... large diameter ponderosa pine) and road construction have affected forest, grassland, shrubland plant... biomass on 700 acres by regeneration harvest treatments followed by prescribed burning to promote fire...

  10. Tongass National Forest Transportation System Opportunity Study : Final Report for Hoonah and Wrangell Ranger Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Tongass National Forest (NF) is in Southeast Alaska, a region rich in natural and cultural resources, which is currently undergoing significant economic change. This study examines how the existing assets of the Tongass NF's transportation system can...

  11. 77 FR 17007 - Kootenai National Forest, Cabinet Ranger District, Montana Pilgrim Timber Sale Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... age class structure, via use of timber harvesting and prescribed fire use. Big game forage would be... managed for big game summer range. Subsequent analyses of potential environmental effects were documented... the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8 a.m...

  12. 75 FR 78208 - Black Hills National Forest, Northern Hills Ranger District; South Dakota; Steamboat Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... fuels treatments to provide structural diversity in big game winter range, reduce the risk of mountain... telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339... greater structural diversity in an area managed for big game winter range, to reduce the risk of mountain...

  13. 75 FR 64243 - Umatilla National Forest, Walla Walla Ranger District; Oregon Tollgate Fuels Reduction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ...) trees and dead and down material. These activities would occur adjacent to private property and FR 64... permit, 4 NFS campgrounds, 6 trailheads, 1 ski area, 4 snowparks and other FS facilities. The area is one... reduction prescriptions include crown reduction, dead and down material removal, and ladder fuel reduction...

  14. 77 FR 59163 - Andrew Pickens Ranger District; South Carolina; AP Loblolly Pine Removal and Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... initial post-harvest prescribed burn to reduce competition. These methods would be applied up to two more... treatment and the miles of system and temporary roads based on better mapping and additional field survey... column, correct the ``Proposed Action'', heading to read: Regeneration Harvest, With Reserves (Cut-and...

  15. 76 FR 31932 - Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Pintler Ranger District; Montana; Flint Foothills...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... pine and harvest post and poles on 863 acres, commercial thin ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir on 1,007... ranging in size from two to 196 acres. Harvest and treatment methods would include ground-based and cable... INFORMATION: Purpose and Need for Action The purpose and need for the proposal is to (1) salvage harvest dead...

  16. 77 FR 14727 - Tongass National Forest Wrangell Ranger District; Alaska; Wrangell Island Project Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... would be used as needed. Harvest would include helicopter, ground based, and cable-yarding systems and... treatments, erosion control, fish passage improvements. Other activities may include recreation enhancements...-growth management, road and access management, economic and rural stability, wildlife habitat, aquatic...

  17. 75 FR 81210 - Wrangell Ranger District; Alaska; Wrangell Island Project Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... include helicopter, ground based, and cable-yarding systems and include even-aged and uneven-aged harvest..., erosion control, vegetation removal, or road relocation); recreation activities (for example, campground... transition from old-growth harvest to young-growth management, road management, economic and rural stability...

  18. 76 FR 7807 - Thorne Bay Ranger District; Alaska; Big Thorne Project Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... would be used as needed. Harvest would include helicopter, ground- based, and cable yarding systems and... ``red pipes'' or bridges, erosion control, vegetation removal, or road relocation); recreation... young-growth management, road management, economic and rural stability, subsistence, deer, watersheds...

  19. 75 FR 10456 - Kootenai National Forest, Fortine Ranger District, Montana; Galton Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ...) Designate mountain bike use that is compatible with the Montana Wilderness Study Act; (5) Designate allowed... safety. Proposed Action The Proposed Action would result in a year round travel plan for the Galton..., mountain bikes and over-snow vehicles. Comment Requested This notice of intent initiates the scoping...

  20. 78 FR 20613 - Ochoco National Forest, Paulina Ranger District; Oregon; Wolf Creek Vegetation and Fuels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... analyze the effects of managing vegetation and fuels within the 24,506 acre Wolf project area, which is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Marszal, Project Leader at 3160 NE Third Street, Prineville, Oregon 97754, or at...

  1. 76 FR 22670 - Black Hills National Forest, Hell Canyon Ranger District, South Dakota, Vestal Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... potential for high severity wildfire adjacent to the at-risk community of Custer, SD. The proposal is being... the town of Custer, SD and overall fire hazard in the area is high due to dense stand conditions and... area are privately owned, with an estimated 3,194 private structures. Proposed Action Thin and harvest...

  2. 76 FR 22075 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; CO; Black Mesa Vegetation Management Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Mesa Vegetation Management Project Public Comment. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diana McGinn at 719... Management'', then ``Projects'' on the left side of the Web page. Individuals who use telecommunication...

  3. 78 FR 49722 - Tongass National Forest Wrangell Ranger District; Alaska; Wrangell Island Project Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... managment. Preliminary Permits, Licenses or Other Requirements U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Spill... review under Section 402 of the Clean Water Act (402); Solid Waste Disposal Permit. State of Alaska...

  4. 76 FR 9740 - Plumas National Forest, Feather River Ranger District; California; On Top Hazardous Fuels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... species and to move the landscape towards an uneven-aged, multistory, fire-resilient forest. Prescriptions would treat surface, ladder, and crown fuels to reduce risk from wildfires to rural communities and...; underburning 3,020 acres (800 acres underburn only and 2,220 acres follow-up underburn for mechanically thinned...

  5. 77 FR 21721 - Sierra National Forest, Bass Lake Ranger District, California, Whisky Ecosystem Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... intensity of wildfires within and outside of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) and restore other ecological... fire) wildland urban intermix area, and surrounding forest by reducing the potential for... management to prevent and control infestations of noxious weeds; Restore production and enhance vitality of...

  6. 77 FR 10472 - San Bernardino National Forest, Mountaintop Ranger District, California, Mitsubishi South Quarry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ..., ECORP Consulting, Inc. 215 N. 5th Street, Redlands, CA 92374. Comments may also be sent via email to... sloped inward toward the vertical wall to capture any precipitation or runoff. The individual benches... lands, which have been verified by the Forest Service to contain occupied endangered species habitat on...

  7. 75 FR 32738 - Gallatin National Forest-Hebgen Lake Ranger District; MT; Lonesome Wood Vegetation Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ....us , or via facsimile to 406-587-2528. Electronic comments must be submitted in Microsoft Word format... of fire spread and long spotting distances for firebrands are expected under the existing conditions...

  8. 76 FR 41753 - Sierra National Forest, Bass Lake Ranger District, California, Grey's Mountain Ecosystem...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... completed utilizing thinning of pre-commercial and commercial conifers, mastication and/or dozer piling and... deficit for wildlife habitat use. Potential methods to achieve this desired level of CWD includes falling...

  9. 76 FR 4860 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Marks Creek Allotment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... livestock stocking rates, active management of livestock, relocation or reconstruction of existing water..., fisheries, water quality, sensitive plants, and on the introduction and/or spread of invasive plants, as...

  10. 75 FR 18144 - Kemmerer Ranger District, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyoming Kemmerer Grazing and Rangeland...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... identified. Grazing practices addressing frequency of grazing and of rest from grazing will be guided by the... such as amount of ground cover, sign of active erosion and healing of headcuts. Other Best Management...

  11. 77 FR 23658 - Six Rivers National Forest, Gasquet Ranger District, California, The Smith River National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Smith River National Recreation Area Restoration and Motorized Travel Management Project AGENCY: Forest... minimizing ecological and cultural resource risk. In addition, this project restores terrestrial and aquatic... unauthorized routes (UAR) that pose a risk to ecological resources will be restored to reduce risk to resources...

  12. 75 FR 8297 - Tongass National Forest, Thorne Bay Ranger District, Thorne Bay, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ..., USDA. ACTION: Cancellation of Notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement published... prepare Kosciusko Island Timber Sale Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess and disclose the environmental effects of timber harvest and road building to provide timber for the Tongass National Forest...

  13. 76 FR 35396 - Black Hills National Forest, Mystic Ranger District, South Dakota, Section 30 Limestone Mining...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: A Plan of Operation has been submitted by Pete Lien and Sons, Inc., for.... The proposal is to mine within Pennington County, South Dakota, totaling approximately 100 acres about... Intent and the new estimated Final EIS publication date. DATES: The final environmental impact statement...

  14. 76 FR 65681 - Black Hills National Forest, Mystic Ranger District, South Dakota, Calumet Project Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... wildland-urban interface. The proposal is being planned for the 31,772 acre Calumet Project Area that... fire and fuels hazard reduction needs in the wildland-urban interface; support or opposition to forest... and in the wildland- urban interface. Moreover, it is appropriate that proposed actions be designed in...

  15. 76 FR 71935 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District, Nevada and California, Bordertown to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Bordertown 120 kV transmission line on..., Bordertown to California 120 kV Transmission Line AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to... determine and analyze the effects of the proposed Bordertown 120 kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line project on...

  16. 78 FR 15681 - Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Dillon Ranger District; Montana; Birch, Willow, Lost Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... would be treated through mechanical, commercial, burning, lop and scattering, and/or mastication. A total of 3,440 acres of Douglas-Fir would be treated through commercial thin, mastication, and/or... mastication. A total of 6,292 acres of Shrub-Grasslands would be treated through lop and scatter, burning...

  17. 76 FR 54730 - Rubicon Trail Easement, Eldorado National Forest, Pacific Ranger District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... erosion and sedimentation. In July 2004, the El Dorado County Board of Supervisors issued a state of local... facilities along the Rubicon Trail at Spider Lake or Buck Island Reservoir primitive camping areas. Once in...

  18. 77 FR 36251 - Intermountain Region, Boise National Forest; Emmett Ranger District, Idaho; Scriver Creek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ..., Boise National Forest at the address above. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf.... Environmental Protection Agency. Early notice of importance of public participation in subsequent environmental...

  19. 78 FR 12714 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, New Meadows Ranger District, Idaho; Lost Creek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... resiliency; (3) reduce the risk of uncharacteristic and undesirable wildland fire; (4) restore habitat... rerouting trails, installing trail signs, installing toilets, improving and constructing trailhead parking... comment, will become part of the public record for this proposed action. Comments submitted anonymously...

  20. 78 FR 56610 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This... Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York, has a vertical clearance...

  1. 78 FR 66265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This... Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York, has a vertical clearance...

  2. Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the location of the Town of Cary’s four Town Council districts.Please note that one district, District A, is split into two geo-spatial areas. One area is in...

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buscheck, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swanson, K. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  5. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  8. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  9. Obituary: Lawrence Hugh Aller, 1913-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, James B.

    2003-12-01

    The announcement still lies in my inbox: ``Lawrence Aller died last Sunday." On 16 March 2003, one of the world's fine astronomers passed away at the age of 89, leaving behind a legacy that will ripple as long as there are students of the celestial science, one that incorporated observation, theory, education, care, decency, and kindness. Lawrence was born in the humblest of conditions in Tacoma, Washington, on 24 September 1913. His mother, Lella (Belle) Allen, was a homemaker and his father Leslie Aller, was an occassional printer and gold prospector who thought that the use of the mind was a waste of time. With fierce persistence and dedication, Lawrence pulled off a feat that would probably not be possible now: getting into college without having finished high school, the result of being dragged to work in his father's primitive gold mining camp. His interest, sparked by leaflets from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and by Russell, Dugan, and Stewart's venerable textbook, led him to a correspondence, and finally a meeting, with Donald Menzel of Harvard, who persuaded the admissions director of the University of California at Berkeley to admit him in 1932. From there, Lawrence went on to graduate school at Harvard and the Harvard Society of Fellows, where he studied with Menzel and developed his interest in stellar and nebular astronomy. After working in the War effort, he made his professorial debut at Indiana University, where he stayed until 1948 before leaving for the University of Michigan. Residing there for the next 14 years, he established his research reputation and helped develop the Michigan graduate program. In 1962, the opportunity arose to return to California, to UCLA, where he again was instrumental in founding a PhD program. There he stayed, through his retirement in 1984, doing research right up to the end. Eight other schools received him as visiting professor. Lawrence knew that to make inroads into astronomy, he needed to apply

  10. Conservation′s Ambiguities: Rangers on the Periphery of the W Park, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Poppe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates the central role of ambiguity in the (reproduction process of conservation practice. It argues that some current political economy as well as environmentality approaches to research conservation practice fail to capture the complexity of the lived experience of local conservationists. The article focuses on the multiple identities of rangers in interaction with other residents at the periphery of the W Park in Burkina Faso, as rangers are local conservationists who simultaneously submit to and produce conservation practices. Park rangers are village men who are recruited under the banner of community participation in conservation projects and state forestry. On a day-to-day basis, these rangers help the foresters with the management of the natural resources on the one hand, and guide tourists, especially in the hunting concessions, on the other. They occupy ambiguous positions at the crossroads of conservationist, state, political, economic, spiritual, social, and cultural practices, inherent to their conservation occupations at the lowest echelon, where residents have to transform conservation policies into practices. It is precisely this ambiguity that turns out to ensure the conservation implementation.

  11. View invariant gesture recognition using the CSEMSwissRanger SR-2 camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Fihl, Preben

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of range information acquired by a CSEM SwissRanger SR-2 camera for view invariant recognition of one and two arms gestures. The range data enables motion detection and 3D representation of gestures. Motion is detected by double difference range images and filtered...

  12. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  14. Autogrammid, oma aja märk / Mike Lawrence

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Autogrammide kogumisest, nende ehtsusest, sportlastele kuulunud esemete kollektsioneerimisest. Lisatud: Kollektsionääride maiuspalu. Autor Mike Lawrence on oksjonifirma Bonhams/Brooks konsultant, ajakirjanik

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  16. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... 34893) governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at... Channel, Lawrence, NY'', in the Federal Register (78 FR 34893). The temporary deviation concerned was for...

  17. 78 FR 34893 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at...

  18. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Henry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armstrong, Dave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, Rick G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, Nicholas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, Steven J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, Craig [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, Valerie R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, Allen R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, Kelly R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hollister, Rod K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, Gene [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, Donald H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nelson, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, Heather L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, Lisa E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, Crystal A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, Alison A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, Anthony M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kent R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, Jim S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-19

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, V. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Veseliza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff

  2. Self and Suffering: Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence and the War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feyel, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    Although Virginia Woolf’s opinion of Lawrence was to evolve over the years, she always harboured certain reservations about his writings: [It’s] the preaching [in Lawrence] that rasps me [...] [Lawrence...

  3. RangerMaster{trademark}: Real-time pattern recognition software for in-field analysis of radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, W.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ziemba, F.; Szluk, N. [Quantrad Sensor, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    RangerMaster{trademark} is the embedded firmware for Quantrad Sensor`s integrated nuclear instrument package, the Ranger{trademark}. The Ranger{trademark}, which is both a gamma-ray and neutron detection system, was originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for in situ surveys at the Plutonium Facility to confirm the presence of nuclear materials. The new RangerMaster{trademark} software expands the library of isotopes and simplifies the operation of the instrument by providing an easy mode suitable for untrained operators. The expanded library of the Ranger{trademark} now includes medical isotopes {sup 99}Tc, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 111}In, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 133}Xe, {sup 103}Pa, and {sup 131}I; industrial isotopes {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 60}Co, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 207}Bi; and nuclear materials {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 239}Pu. To accomplish isotopic identification, a simulated spectrum for each of the isotopes was generated using SYNTH. The SYNTH spectra formed the basis for the knowledge-based expert system and selection of the regions of interest that are used in the pattern recognition system. The knowledge-based pattern recognition system was tested against actual spectra under field conditions.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that

  5. Early days in the Lawrence Laboratory. [Through 1940

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, E.M.

    1976-10-01

    Events at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley to the end of 1940 are recalled. Radiation detection, discovery of new isotopes and elements, and accelerators are among the subjects included. 29 photographs. (RWR)

  6. D.H. Lawrence's conception of the unconscious | Eruvbetine | Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , this work compares his work with that of Freud, as cited, utilised and criticised by Lawrence. Similarities are established in their basic delimitations of the unconscious while differences in their approaches are identified as the main source of ...

  7. EPA Selects Lawrence, Mass. Group for Brownfields Job Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, EPA announced that the Merrimack Valley Workforce Investment Board, of Lawrence, Mass., was one of 14 organizations nationwide selected to receive funding to operate environmental job training programs for local unemployed residents.

  8. Chemical analysis of sediments from the St. Lawrence River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides the results of a preliminary study of sediment contaminant levels in the St. Lawrence River. Sediment was sampled at 1 6 different locations...

  9. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Spatiotemporal trends of illegal activities from ranger-collected data in a Ugandan national park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchlow, R; Plumptre, A J; Driciru, M; Rwetsiba, A; Stokes, E J; Tumwesigye, C; Wanyama, F; Beale, C M

    2015-10-01

    Within protected areas, biodiversity loss is often a consequence of illegal resource use. Understanding the patterns and extent of illegal activities is therefore essential for effective law enforcement and prevention of biodiversity declines. We used extensive data, commonly collected by ranger patrols in many protected areas, and Bayesian hierarchical models to identify drivers, trends, and distribution of multiple illegal activities within the Queen Elizabeth Conservation Area (QECA), Uganda. Encroachment (e.g., by pastoralists with cattle) and poaching of noncommercial animals (e.g., snaring bushmeat) were the most prevalent illegal activities within the QECA. Illegal activities occurred in different areas of the QECA. Poaching of noncommercial animals was most widely distributed within the national park. Overall, ecological covariates, although significant, were not useful predictors for occurrence of illegal activities. Instead, the location of illegal activities in previous years was more important. There were significant increases in encroachment and noncommercial plant harvesting (nontimber products) during the study period (1999-2012). We also found significant spatiotemporal variation in the occurrence of all activities. Our results show the need to explicitly model ranger patrol effort to reduce biases from existing uncorrected or capture per unit effort analyses. Prioritization of ranger patrol strategies is needed to target illegal activities; these strategies are determined by protected area managers, and therefore changes at a site-level can be implemented quickly. These strategies should also be informed by the location of past occurrences of illegal activity: the most useful predictor of future events. However, because spatial and temporal changes in illegal activities occurred, regular patrols throughout the protected area, even in areas of low occurrence, are also required. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Fisheries Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Fisheries districts data layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset...

  12. Warden Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a representation overlay of warden (areas of responsibility). The Vermont Warden Districts layer is part of a dataset that contains administrative...

  13. Forestry Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Forestry Districts layer is part of a dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. This is a layer file which...

  14. Wastewater Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Wastewater districts layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes...

  15. Park Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Parks Districts layer is part of a dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature classes for...

  16. Wildlife Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Wildlife Districts layer is part of a larger dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature...

  17. Congressional Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer depicts the 114th Congressional Districts for the United States. Found within this layer is the listing of the 114th House of Representatives. Elected to...

  18. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  19. Analysis of GRACE Range-rate Residuals with Emphasis on Reprocessed Star-Camera Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Flury, J.; Naeimi, M.; Bandikova, T.; Guerr, T. M.; Klinger, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since March 2002 the two GRACE satellites orbit the Earth at rela-tively low altitude. Determination of the gravity field of the Earth including itstemporal variations from the satellites' orbits and the inter-satellite measure-ments is the goal of the mission. Yet, the time-variable gravity signal has notbeen fully exploited. This can be seen better in the computed post-fit range-rateresiduals. The errors reflected in the range-rate residuals are due to the differ-ent sources as systematic errors, mismodelling errors and tone errors. Here, weanalyse the effect of three different star-camera data sets on the post-fit range-rate residuals. On the one hand, we consider the available attitude data andon other hand we take the two different data sets which has been reprocessedat Institute of Geodesy, Hannover and Institute of Theoretical Geodesy andSatellite Geodesy, TU Graz Austria respectively. Then the differences in therange-rate residuals computed from different attitude dataset are analyzed inthis study. Details will be given and results will be discussed.

  20. Ranger© - An Affordable, Advanced, Next-Generation, Dual-Pol, X-Band Weather Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedronsky, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Enterprise Electronics Corporation (EEC) Ranger© system is a new generation, X-band (3 cm), Adaptive Polarization Doppler Weather Surveillance Radar that fills the gap between high-cost, high-power traditional radar systems and the passive ground station weather sensors. Developed in partnership with the University of Oklahoma Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC), the system uses relatively low power solid-state transmitters and pulse compression technology to attain nearly the same performance capabilities of much more expensive traditional radar systems. The Ranger© also employs Adaptive Dual Polarization (ADP) techniques to allow Alternating or Simultaneous Dual Polarization capability with total control over the transmission polarization state using dual independent coherent transmitters. Ranger© has been designed using the very latest technology available in the industry and the technical and manufacturing experience gained through over four decades of successful radar system design and production at EEC. The entire Ranger© design concept emphasizes precision, stability, reliability, and value using proven solid state technology combined with the most advanced motion control system ever conceived for weather radar. Key applications include meteorology, hydrology, aviation, offshore oil/gas drilling, wind energy, and outdoor event situational awareness.

  1. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  2. 77 FR 4757 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; McKay Fuels and Vegetation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... habitat where it occurs in the project area. Soil Productivity. Maintenance of soil productivity is an..., soil can become displaced and compacted, which can impact productivity. Water Quality. The main streams... extremely labor- intensive and the Forest Service depends on these markets to pay for the work that is...

  3. 77 FR 36994 - Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master Development Plan--Phase 1 Projects... included in the Taos Ski Valley (TSV) 2010 Master Development Plan (MDP). All proposed projects would be..., Taos Ski Valley MDP--Phase 1 Projects, 208 Cruz Alta Road, Taos, NM 87571. Comments may also be sent...

  4. 77 FR 2508 - Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Powers Ranger District, Coos County, OR; Eden Ridge Timber...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... seventy-five (75) treatment units would be designed for timber harvest with associated harvest systems... woody debris would be retained where feasible to maintain or improve forest diversity. Post- treatment... variable density thinning treatments designed to control stocking and maintain or improve overall forest...

  5. 75 FR 1587 - Medford-Park Falls Ranger District, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Park Falls Hardwoods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... introduced insect that has the potential to devastate all native ash species similar to what occurred to the... the existing trees to encourage regeneration of an understory, to encourage age-class development, or.... Scoping Process This notice of intent initiates the scoping process, which guides the development of the...

  6. 75 FR 19936 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests, Brush Creek/Hayden Ranger District Saratoga, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ..., deadfall in beetle-kill areas has the potential to slow or prevent forest regeneration; negatively impact... products; promote forest regeneration; reduce hazard trees from high priority areas affecting public safety; improve recreational facilities and opportunities; improve wildlife habitat diversity; repair soil and...

  7. 78 FR 4377 - Idaho Panhandle National Forests, Coeur d'Alene River Ranger District, Shoshone County, ID...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... activities included in the proposed action are road storage, road reconstruction and maintenance, site... standards, improve the abundance of fisheries and other aquatic organisms, and improve the longevity of road... activities included in the proposed action are road storage, road reconstruction and maintenance, site...

  8. 76 FR 2878 - Six Rivers National Forest, Mad River Ranger District, CA; Buck Mountain Vegetation and Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Endangered Species Act requires consultation with the United States National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... work closely with this agency through the fisheries biologist to fulfill consultation requirements for... trails, and landings, activity fuel treatments, and road maintenance/minor reconstruction along haul...

  9. 77 FR 27013 - Ketchikan-Misty Fiords Ranger District; Tongass National Forest; Alaska; Saddle Lakes Timber Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... operators, and value-added wood product industries in Southeast Alaska who contribute to the local and... and facilitate a sustainable wood product industry. Proposed Action The proposed action would harvest... desired conditions of the Forest Plan, and to facilitate the transition to a sustainable wood product...

  10. 77 FR 26733 - Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest; Evanston-Mountain View Ranger District; Utah; Smiths Fork...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Highway 150, Suite A, Evanston, Wyoming. In addition, comments can be submitted electronically to... effects of tree mortality associated with the mountain pine beetle epidemic to restore healthy ecological...

  11. 75 FR 5941 - Umatilla National Forest, Walla Walla Ranger District, Walla Walla, WA; Cobbler II Timber Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... would be treated in harvest units. Treatments would include mechanical mastication, grapple piling, hand... sensitive species remaining after harvest. Mastication would be used to treat both activity fuels and...

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2007-05-24

    For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer

  13. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Walker

    2014-03-05

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  14. Case Study: Mobile Photovoltaic System at Bechler Meadows Ranger Station, Yellowstone National Park (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The mobile PV/generator hybrid system deployed at Bechler Meadows provides a number of advantages. It reduces on-site air emissions from the generator. Batteries allow the generator to operate only at its rated power, reducing run-time and fuel consumption. Energy provided by the solar array reduces fuel consumption and run-time of the generator. The generator is off for most hours providing peace and quiet at the site. Maintenance trips from Mammoth Hot Springs to the remote site are reduced. The frequency of intrusive fuel deliveries to the pristine site is reduced. And the system gives rangers a chance to interpret Green Park values to the visiting public. As an added bonus, the system provides all these benefits at a lower cost than the basecase of using only a propane-fueled generator, reducing life cycle cost by about 26%.

  15. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  16. Lawrence Hoba's depiction of the post-2000 Zimbabwean land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article examines Lawrence Hoba's The Trek and Other Stories (2009), which describes experiences from the post-2000 land invasions and fast-track land reform in Zimbabwe. It analyses selected short stories in relation to other Zimbabwean fictional works about land and the definition and restoration of dignified and ...

  17. Copyright in the Balance: LJ Talks with Lawrence Lessig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2002-01-01

    Discusses copyright issues of interest to librarians with Lawrence Lessig, a legal scholar on copyright, technology, and the Constitution. Topics include Eldred v. Ashcroft; copyright extensions; balancing interests of copyright owners with future creators and the public; privacy, fair use, and public domain; and the Digital Millennium Copyright…

  18. Crystal clear the autobiographies of Sir Lawrence and Lady Bragg

    CERN Document Server

    Thomson, Patience

    2015-01-01

    The main body of this book contains the hitherto unpublished autobiographies of both William Lawrence Bragg, an innovative scientist who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, and his wife, Alice, a Mayor of Cambridge and National Chairman of Marriage Guidance. Their autobiographies give unusual insights into the lives and times of two distinguished people and the real personalities behind their public appearance.

  19. An Existentialist Perspective on Wole Soyinka's Writings Lawrence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    An Existentialist Perspective on Wole Soyinka's Writings. Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi*. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ujah.v12i2.3. Abstract. This essay sets out to account for the existential import of the writings of Wole Soyinka. It submits that the writings of Wole. Soyinka define life as a void in search of meaning which man.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  1. William Henry Bragg (1862-1942) William Lawrence Bragg (1890 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. William Henry Bragg (1862-1942) William Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971). Featured Scientist Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1210-1210. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. O mito da serpente em D. H. Lawrence = The serpent myth in D. H. Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Leal Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho propõe um estudo do mito da serpente, na obra A serpenteemplumada, de D. H. Lawrence, baseado na trajetória mítica do herói, estabelecida por Joseph Campbell e na crítica junguiana da cultura. Kate, a protagonista, empreende uma busca de renascimento psicológico e espiritual, ao chegar à terra primitiva do México. Tal busca simboliza um retorno ao mundo primitivo da Grande Mãe, entendido, do ponto de vista psicológico, como o inconsciente. Assim como o processo de individuação, descrito por Jung, essa personagem enfrenta rompimentos e dificuldades no decorrer da expansão da consciência. Neste sentido, a serpente simboliza tanto o que é viperino na natureza humana, quanto à sabedoria do corpo e dos instintos.This paper proposes a study on the myth of the serpent in D. H. Lawrence’s The Plumed Serpent, based on Joseph Campbell’s mythical map of the hero’s journey and Jungian criticism. Kate, the femaleprotagonist, embarks on a quest for spiritual-psychological rebirth in the primitive lands of Mexico. Following the pattern of Jung’s individuation process and exploring many recurrent symbols in the narrative, we intend to show how Kate faces ruptures anduncertainties as her consciousness is getting into a process of expansion. According to our analysis, the serpent illustrates the Self’s paradoxical aspect, representing both the viper sideof the human being as well as its knowledge.

  3. Analytical capabilities and services of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division. [Methods available at Lawrence Livermore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmacher, R.; Crawford, R.

    1978-03-09

    This comprehensive guide to the analytical capabilities of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division describes each analytical method in terms of its principle, field of application, and qualitative and quantitative uses. Also described are the state and quantity of sample required for analysis, processing time, available instrumentation, and responsible personnel.

  4. Government Districts, Other, Voting districts, fire districts, inspector districts, engineering districts, school zones, recreation leagues, Published in 2014, Not Applicable scale, City of Huntsville Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Government Districts, Other dataset current as of 2014. Voting districts, fire districts, inspector districts, engineering districts, school zones, recreation leagues.

  5. The contribution made by T.E. Lawrence to the theory of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lawrence was basically an academic thrown into the hurly-burly of leading an Arab revolt against Turkish domination. It could be said that the war in the Middle East was a sideshow of the First World War and Lawrence's part was a ' ... sideshow to the sideshow' Why then has Lawrence been remembered when greater ...

  6. Six-Month Results From the Initial Randomized Study of the Ranger Paclitaxel-Coated Balloon in the Femoropopliteal Segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausback, Yvonne; Willfort-Ehringer, Andrea; Sievert, Horst; Geist, Volker; Lichtenberg, Michael; Del Giudice, Costantino; Sauguet, Antoine; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan; Marx, Claudia; Ströbel, Armin; Schult, Ingolf; Scheinert, Dierk

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the performance of the Ranger paclitaxel-coated balloon vs uncoated balloon angioplasty for femoropopliteal lesions. Between January 2014 and October 2015, the prospective, randomized RANGER SFA study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02013193) enrolled 105 patients with symptomatic lower limb ischemia (Rutherford category 2-4) and stenotic lesions in the nonstented femoropopliteal segment at 10 European centers. Seventy-one patients (mean age 68±8 years; 53 men) were enrolled in the Ranger drug-coated balloon (DCB) arm and 34 patients (mean age 67±9 years; 23 men) were assigned to the control group. Six-month analysis included angiographic late lumen loss and safety and clinical outcomes assessments. Baseline characteristics of the DCB and control groups were similar, as were lesion lengths (68±46 vs 60±48 mm; p=0.731), severity of calcification (p=0.236), and the prevalence of occlusions (34% vs 34%; p>0.999). At 6 months, late lumen loss was significantly less for the DCB group vs controls (-0.16±0.99 vs 0.76±1.4; p=0.002). The DCB group had significantly greater freedom from binary restenosis (92% vs 64%; p=0.005) and primary patency rates (87% vs 60%; p=0.014). Target lesion revascularization rates were 5.6% in the DCB group and 12% in the control group (p=0.475). No target limb amputations or device-related deaths occurred in either group. Six-month results suggest that Ranger DCB treatment effectively inhibited restenosis in symptomatic femoropopliteal disease, resulting in improved vessel patency and a low revascularization rate in the short term compared with uncoated balloon angioplasty.

  7. Monitoring species of mammals using track collection by rangers in the Tilarán mountain range, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Arévalo, J. Edgardo; Méndez, Yoryineth; Vargas, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Although monitoring of animal populations for informed decision making is fundamental for the conservation and management of biodiversity, monitoring programs are not widely implemented. In addition, monitoring plans often represent an economic burden for many conservation organizations. Here we report on the monitoring of five focal species of mammals in the Tilarán mountain range, Costa Rica. We used a participatory approach in which trained rangers of four institutions conducted trail surv...

  8. The dirt: industrial disease and conflict at St. Lawrence, Newfoundland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rennie, Rick

    2008-01-01

    ... Miners' Museum; courtesy of the Town Council of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. Printed and bound in Canada by Hignell Book Printing Published in Canada by Fernwood Publishing Site 2A, Box 5, 32 Oceanvista Lane Black Point, Nova Scotia, B0J 1B0 and #8 - 222 Osborne St., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3L 1Z3 www.fernwoodpublishing.ca This book has been published with ...

  9. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O. (eds.)

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  11. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  12. Autonomous Navigation Based on SEIF with Consistency Constraint for C-Ranger AUV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV has to solve two essential problems in underwater environment, namely, localization and mapping. SLAM is one novel solution to estimate locations and maps simultaneously based on motion models and sensor measurements. Sparse extended information filter (SEIF is an effective algorithm to reduce storage and computational costs of large-scale maps in the SLAM problem. However, there exists the inconsistency in the SEIF since the rank of the observability matrix of linearized error-state model in SLAM system is higher than that of the nonlinear SLAM system. By analyzing the consistency of the SEIF-based SLAM from the perspective of observability, a SLAM based on SEIF with consistency constraint (SEIF-CC SLAM is developed to improve the estimator’s consistency. The proposed algorithm uses the first-ever available estimates to calculate SEIF Jacobians for each of the state variables, called the First Estimates Jacobian (FEJ. Then, the linearized error-state model can keep the same observability as the underlying nonlinear SLAM system. The capability of autonomous navigation with the proposed algorithm is validated through simulations experiments and sea trials for a C-Ranger AUV. Experimental results show that the proposed SEIF-CC SLAM algorithm yields more consistent and accurate estimates compared with the SEIF-based SLAM.

  13. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. 1 fig.

  14. Laser guide star measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, H.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.; Duff, J.; Gavel, D.; Horton, J.; Max, C.; Olivier, S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Waltjen, K.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies from the Laser Guide Star Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Photometry of the return signal has shown that the photon return is approximately 10 photons/cm{sup 2}ms at the pupil of the receiving telescope in agreement with a detailed model of the sodium interaction. Wavefronts of the laser guide star have also been measured with a Shack-Hartmann technique and power spectra have been shown to agree with those of nearby natural stars. Plans for closed loop demonstrations using the laser guide star at LLNL and nearby Lick Observatory are discussed.

  15. Storm water modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veis, Christopher [Montana Tech of the Univ. of Montana, Butte, MT (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Storm water modeling is important to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for compliance with regulations that govern water discharge at large industrial facilities. Modeling is also done to study trend in contaminants and storm sewer infrastructure. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was used to simulate rainfall events at LLNL. SWMM is a comprehensive computer model for simulation of urban runoff quantity and quality in storm and combined sewer systems. Due to time constraints and ongoing research, no modeling was completed at LLNL. With proper information about the storm sewers, a SWMM simulation of a rainfall event on site would be beneficial to storm sewer analyst.

  16. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  17. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  18. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community Development...

  19. The Environmental Surveillance Program of the Lawrence BerkeleyLaboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ralph H.

    1976-04-01

    The major radiological environmental impact of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is due to the operation of four particle accelerators in the pursuit of fundamental research in various disciplines including biology, chemistry, medicine and physics. Potential sources of population exposure at the Laboratory are discussed. The major source of population exposure due to accelerator operation arises from the prompt radiation field which consists principally of neutrons and photons. Release of small quantities of radionuclides is also a potential source of population exposure but is usually an order of magnitude less significant. Accelerator produced radiation levels at the Laboratory boundary are comparable with the magnitudes of the fluctuations found in the natural background radiation. Considerable effort has, therefore, been expended in understanding the magnitude of the components of natural background at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, so that the magnitude of Laboratory-produced radiation may be accurately determined. Environmental monitoring of accelerator-produced radiation and of radionuclides is carried on throughout the Laboratory, at the Laboratory perimeter, and in the regions surrounding the Laboratory. The techniques used are described. Finally, the models used to calculate population exposure are described and discussed.

  20. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  1. An Investigation of the Ranger V-770-8 Engine Installation for the Edo XOSE-1 Airplane I : Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, M. Arnold; Conway, Robert N.

    1945-01-01

    Engine temperature data and cooling correlating analyses of the engine and oil cooler are presented in connection with an investigation of the cowling and cooling of the ranger V-770-8 engine installation in the Edo XOSE-1 airplane. Three types of baffles were installed in the course of the tests: the conventional, the turbulent-flow, and the NACA diffuser baffles. Each of the types was of merit in cooling a different region on the cylinder. Incorporation of the best features of the three types into one baffle, a method which appears to be feasible, would provide improvements in cylinder cooling.

  2. Quadrinhos nacionais no ciberespaço: uma análise de Combo Ranger nos âmbitos digital e impresso

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOS, Roberto Elísio dos; Corrêa,Victor Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    O presente artigo trata das estratégias adotadas para a criação das histórias em quadrinhos para a internet, e tem como objeto de estudo Combo Rangers. As semelhanças e diferenças entre sua versão impressa e a virtual são analisadas neste texto. A escolha dessa história se deve por Combo Rangers ter sido a história em quadrinhos brasileira pioneira a ser realizada em ambas as maneiras, impressa, e vendida em bancas e livrarias, e disponibilizada no ambiente virtual, com acesso gratuito. Th...

  3. 78 FR 76100 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices for Pre-Decisional Administrative Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... National Forest Forest Supervisor decisions Whitman District Ranger decisions Baker City Herald, Baker City... Ranger decisions The Register Guard, Eugene, Oregon Detroit District Ranger decisions Statesman Journal..., Chehalis, Washington Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Forest Supervisor decisions Darrington District...

  4. Seip-lawrence Syndrome (Three Cases in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S.N. Reddy

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A, rare episode of Seip-Lawrence syndrome manifesting in all three case siblings of consanpinous parents is reported. Two children we′re male and one female. They exhibited low intelligence,′ gaunt facies, depressed bridge of nose, large low-sct ears, thick lips and protruberant abdomen. Skin was showing hypermelanosis, hypertrichosis, absence of subcutaneous fat and acan nigricaFNx01s with′ very prominent perianal rUgO6itiS In addition, the first child was short statured having hypertrophic Clitoris, hepatomcoy, left ventricular hypertro hy, hyperglycaemia and glycossuria- without ketoacidosis. The second child was, having enlargement of penis, left ventricular hypertrophy,,hepatospienomegaly and abnormal GTT. The third and the youngest child was having only cutaneous changes and no viscoromegaly or biochemical abnormality. Nou Of these patients were having gigantism and advanced bone age.

  5. The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, L

    2006-09-07

    The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has four major areas of work: (1) Programmatic Support -- Programs are areas which receive funding to develop solutions to problems or advance basic science in their areas (Stockpile Stewardship, Homeland Security, the Human Genome project). Computer scientists are 'matrixed' to these programs to provide computer science support. (2) Livermore Computer Center (LCC) -- Development, support and advanced planning for the large, massively parallel computers, networks and storage facilities used throughout the laboratory. (3) Research -- Computer scientists research advanced solutions for programmatic work and for external contracts and research new HPC hardware solutions. (4) Infrastructure -- Support for thousands of desktop computers and numerous LANs, labwide unclassified networks, computer security, computer-use policy.

  6. 78 FR 58049 - Proposed Establishment of the Adelaida District, Creston District, El Pomar District, Paso Robles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton Gap District... Robles Willow Creek District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton... Creek, San Miguel District, Santa Margarita Ranch, and Templeton Gap District viticultural areas within...

  7. Estonia's defence dollars spent wisely? / Tony Lawrence, Kaarel Kaas ; interv. Joel Alas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise Kaitseuuringute Keskuse teadurid Tony Lawrence ja Kaarel Kaas kommenteerivad Eestis Suurbritannia kaitseatasheena töötanud kolonelleitnant Glen Granti kriitikat kaitsejõudude efektiivsuse osas, Eesti kaitsepoliitikat, küberrünnakut Eestile, kahe Eesti rahukaitseväelase surma missioonil Afganistanis ning üldsuse suhtumist Eesti osalemisele rahvusvahelistel missioonidel. Lisa: Tony Lawrence; Kaarel Kaas

  8. VT School Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Vermont School Districts and one Interstate School District. Part of data sets which model Vermont's education system governance boudaries for...

  9. Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a representation overlay of Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts (areas of responsibility). The Vermont Lieutenant Chief Warden Districts layer is part...

  10. California Political Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a series of district layers pertaining to California'spolitical districts, that are derived from the California State Senateand State Assembly information....

  11. National Register Historic Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The National Register Historic District layer is a shape file showing the boundaries of Historic Districts that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  12. Legislative Districts - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Each coverage contains a COVER-ID field that defines the House or Senate district number. Kansas House and Senate districts were created by the Legislative Research...

  13. State Water Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — State Water Project District boundaries are areas where state contracts provide water to the district in California. This database is designed as a regions polygon...

  14. Private Water Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Private Water District boundaries are areas where private contracts provide water to the district in California. This database is designed as a regions polygon...

  15. 75 FR 1010 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ..., Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN On December 18, 2009, CSX Transportation, Inc... Albany, in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN.\\1\\ The line traverses United...

  16. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

  19. Overview of photonics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeske, F.; Deri, B.; Dijaili, S.; Lee, H.; Lowry, M.; McConaghy, C.; Patterson, F.; Pocha, M.; Strand, T.

    1994-05-01

    Much of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) expertise in photonics was acquired in the execution of the Nuclear Testing mission. As LLNL refocuses its resources into areas that have dual benefit for the nation, their photonics program is beginning to apply these unique capabilities to key national issues involving high-speed communications, while retaining the expertise to apply the technology to defense missions. Much of the exciting work being done at LLNL will have applications in photonics systems and experiments to be used in space. The authors will describe research being conducted in the following areas: high-speed, 50 ohm, phased-matched modulators and their applications to digital links; promising new research on flat-panel displays that will be full color, fast response, very thin, and have a very high resolution; all optical switches that are extremely fast, integrable and do not have the latency problems that exist with current optical switches; semiconductor optical amplifiers that are monolithically integrable, more flexible and less expensive than existing fiber amplifiers; novel, semiconductor waveguide devices; and automated packaging techniques that will lower the cost of photonics components. Much of this research can directly benefit the development of space systems where reliability, size and cost are important considerations. Additional applications in commercial communications and in military system qualifies the photonics research at LLNL as multi-use technology.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2015 Annual Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim, P

    2017-08-11

    FY2015 financial results reflect a year of significant scientific, operational and financial achievement for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Complementing many scientific accomplishments, Berkeley Lab completed construction of four new research facilities: the General Purpose Laboratory, Chu Hall, Wang Hall and the Flexlab Building Efficiency Testbed. These state-of-the-art facilities allow for program growth and enhanced collaboration, in part by enabling programs to return to the Lab’s Hill Campus from offsite locations. Detailed planning began for the new Integrative Genomics Building (IGB) that will house another major program currently located offsite. Existing site infrastructure was another key focus area. The Lab prioritized and increased investments in deferred maintenance in alignment with the Berkeley Lab Infrastructure Plan, which was developed under the leadership of the DOE Office of Science. With the expiration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, we completed the close-out of all of our 134 ARRA projects, recording total costs of $331M over the FY2009-2015 period. Download the report to read more.

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  2. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  3. 2020 Foresight Forging the Future of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) of 2020 will look much different from the LLNL of today and vastly different from how it looked twenty years ago. We, the members of the Long-Range Strategy Project, envision a Laboratory not defined by one program--nuclear weapons research--but by several core programs related to or synergistic with LLNL's national security mission. We expect the Laboratory to be fully engaged with sponsors and the local community and closely partnering with other research and development (R&D) organizations and academia. Unclassified work will be a vital part of the Laboratory of 2020 and will visibly demonstrate LLNL's international science and technology strengths. We firmly believe that there will be a critical and continuing role for the Laboratory. As a dynamic and versatile multipurpose laboratory with a national security focus, LLNL will be applying its capabilities in science and technology to meet the needs of the nation in the 21st century. With strategic investments in science, outstanding technical capabilities, and effective relationships, the Laboratory will, we believe, continue to play a key role in securing the nation's future.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  6. Diagnostic pitfalls in a young Romanian ranger with an acute psychotic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy EE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Elöd Ernö Nagy,1,2 Attila Rácz,3 Edit Urbán,4 Gabriella Terhes,4 Timea Berki,5 Emöke Horváth,6 Anca M Georgescu,7 Iringó E Zaharia-Kézdi71Department of Pharmaceutical Biochemistry, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Târgu-Mureş, 2Laboratory of Medical Analysis, Mures Clinical County Hospital, 3II. Psychiatry Clinic, Mures Clinical County Hospital, Târgu Mureş, Romania; 4Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Microbiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, 5Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; 6Department of Pathology, 7I. Clinic of Infectious Disease, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Târgu Mureş, RomaniaAbstract: The identification and distinction of the pathological conditions underlying acute psychosis are often challenging. We present the case of a 35-year-old ranger who had no history of acute or chronic infectious disease or any previous neuropsychiatric symptoms. He arrived at the Psychiatry Clinic and was admitted as an emergency case, displaying bizarre behavior, hallucinations, paranoid ideation, and delusional faults. These symptoms had first appeared 7 days earlier. An objective examination revealed abnormalities of behavior, anxiety, visual hallucinations, choreiform, and tic-like facial movements. After the administration of neuroleptic and antidepressant treatment, he showed an initial improvement, but on day 10 entered into a severe catatonic state with signs of meningeal irritation and was transferred to the intensive care unit. An electroencephalogram showed diffuse irritative changes, raising the possibility of encephalitis. Taking into consideration the overt occupational risk, Borrelia antibody tests were prescribed and highly positive immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG titers were obtained from serum, along with IgG and antibody index positivity in cerebrospinal fluid. In parallel, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies and a whole

  7. Review of Prior Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit Evaluation: A Report to Snohomish Public Utilities District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Phillip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2014-11-01

    Snohomish County Public Utilities District (the District or Snohomish PUD) provides electricity to about 325,000 customers in Snohomish County, Washington. The District has an incentive programs to encourage commercial customers to improve energy efficiency: the District partially reimburses the cost of approved retrofits if they provide a level of energy performance improvement that is specified by contract. In 2013 the District contracted with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide a third-party review of the Monitoring and Verification (M&V) practices the District uses to evaluate whether companies are meeting their contractual obligations. This work helps LBNL understand the challenges faced by real-world practitioners of M&V of energy savings, and builds on a body of related work such as Price et al. (2013). The District selected a typical project for which they had already performed an evaluation. The present report includes the District's original evaluation as well as LBNL's review of their approach. The review is based on the document itself; on investigation of the load data and outdoor air temperature data from the building evaluated in the document; and on phone discussions with Bill Harris of the Snohomish County Public Utilities District. We will call the building studied in the document the subject building, the original Snohomish PUD report will be referred to as the Evaluation, and this discussion by LBNL is called the Review.

  8. Beyond Lawrence v. Texas: crafting a fundamental right to sexual privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasullo, Kristin

    2009-05-01

    After the watershed 2003 U.S. Supreme Court decision Lawrence v.Texas, courts are faced with the daunting task of navigating the bounds of sexual privacy in light of Lawrence's sweeping language and unconventional structure. This Note focuses on the specific issue of state governments regulating sexual device distribution. Evaluating the substantive due process rights of sexual device retailers and users, this Note ultimately argues that the privacy interest identified in Lawrence is sufficiently broad to protect intimate decisions to engage in adult consensual sexual behavior, including the liberty to sell, purchase, and use a sexual device.

  9. Hydraulic Evaluation of Culvert Valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 5- 7 Hydraulic Evaluation of Culvert Valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway Co as ta l a nd H...client/default. ERDC/CHL TR-15-7 June 2015 Hydraulic Evaluation of Culvert Valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway...ERDC/CHL TR-15-7 ii Abstract The aged, double-skin-plate valves of the Eisenhower and Snell Locks on the St. Lawrence Seaway are being replaced

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  11. Status of the belugas of the St Lawrence estuary, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the estuary of the St Lawrence river in Quebec, Canada, was depleted by unregulated hunting, not closed until 1979. Surveys in 1977 showed only a few hundred in the population. Surveys since then have produced increasing estimates of population indices. An estimate of the population, fully corrected for diving animals, was 1,238 (SE 119 in September 1997. The population was estimated to have increased from 1988 through 1997 by 31.4 belugas/yr (SE 13.1. Observations of population age structure, as well as data on age at death obtained from beach-cast carcasses, do not indicate serious problems at the population level, although there are indications that mortality of the oldest animals may be elevated. Few animals appear to live much over 30 years. From examination of beach-cast carcasses, it appears that most deaths are due to old age and disease; hunting is illegal, ship strikes and entrapments in fishing gear are rare, ice entrapments and predation are unknown. Among beach-cast carcasses recovered and necropsied, about 23% of the adults have malignant cancers, while most of the juveniles have pneumonia; other pathological conditions are diverse. No factors are known to be limiting numbers of this population. Habitat quality factors, including persistent contaminants, boat traffic and harassment, may affect the population’s rate of increase, but these effects have not been quantitatively evaluated. Comprehensive legislation exists with powers to protect the population and the environment of which it is a component, but application and enforcement of the laws is not without problems.

  12. Exploring Viral Genomics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilpatrick, K; Hiddessen, A

    2007-08-22

    This summer I had the privilege of working at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the Nonproliferation, Homeland and International Security Directorate in the Chemical and Biological Countermeasures Division. I worked exclusively on the Viral Identification and Characterization Initiative (VICI) project focusing on the development of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The goal of VICI is to combine several disciplines such as molecular biology, microfluidics, and bioinformatics in order to detect viruses and identify them in order to effectively and quickly counter infectious disease, natural or engineered. The difficulty in such a countermeasure is that little is known about viral diversity due to the ever changing nature of these organisms. In response, VICI is developing a new microfluidic bioanalytical platform to detect known and unknown viruses by analyzing every virus in a sample by isolating them into picoliter sized droplets on a microchip and individually analyzing them. The sample will be injected into a channel of oil to form droplets that will contain viral nucleic acids that will be amplified using PCR. The multiplexed PCR assay will produce a series of amplicons for a particular virus genome that provides an identifying signature. A device will then detect whether or not DNA is present in the droplet and will sort the empty droplets from the rest. From this point, the amplified DNA is released from the droplets and analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis in order to read out the series of amplicons and thereby determine the identity of each virus. The following figure depicts the microfluidic process. For the abovementioned microfluidic process to work, a method for detecting amplification of target viral nucleic acids that does not interfere with the multiplexed biochemical reaction is required for downstream sorting and analysis. In this report, the successful development of a multiplexed PCR assay using SYBR Green I

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  15. St. Lawrence Seaway : overview of safety, efficiency, operational, and environmental issues : discussion paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This report is the first in a series of two reports focused on identifying opportunities for application of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)technology or equivalent to address challenges and/or opportunities in the St. Lawrence Seaway....

  16. St. Lawrence Seaway : potential opportunities for the application of information and communication technologies : discussion paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This report is the second in a series of two reports focused on identifying opportunities for application of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)technology or equivalent to address challenges and/or opportunities in the St. Lawrence Seaway...

  17. Reading Orientalism and the Crisis of Epistemology in the Novels of Lawrence Durrell

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, James

    1999-01-01

    In his article, "Reading Orientalism and the Crisis of Epistemology in the Novels of Lawrence Durrell," James Gifford argues that Edward Said's Orientalism has had a far reaching impact on the study of literature as well as in Comparative Literature, especially in works which depict the "Eastern Other." However, a question arises in those texts which have completed the philosophical motion from existentialism to epistemological skepticism such as the novels of Lawrence Durrell. For example, i...

  18. Lawrence y la naturaleza: una empatía sinestésica

    OpenAIRE

    Mateo Martínez, José

    1988-01-01

    The synesthesia is perhaps one of the most significant stylistic recourses used by D. H. Lawrence when he undertakes the task of resolving in a literary fashion one of his favourite topics: the physical and spiritual communion between his characters and Nature. With its use, Lawrence manages, by mixing and confusing the different sensorial perceptions, to enhance the discursive level and the dramatic tension, adding new deep and symbolic tonalities to the narrative momentum. In this pap...

  19. Toxic compounds and health and reproductive effects in St. Lawrence Beluga Whales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beland, P.; Michaud, R. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); DeGuise, S. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Canada)); Girard, C.; Lagace, A. (Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec (Canada)); Martineau, D. (St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Muir, D.C.G. (Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)); Norstorm, R.J. (National Wildlife Research Center, Hull, Quebec (Canada)); Pelletier, E. (INRS-Oceanologie, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada)); Ray, S. (Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)) (and others)

    1993-01-01

    An epidemiologic study was carried out over a period of 9 years on an isolated population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) residing in the St. Lawrence estuary (Quebec, Canada). More than 100 individual deaths were aged, and/or autopsied and analyzed for toxic compounds, and the population was surveyed for size and structure. Arctic belugas and other species of whales and seals from the St. Lawrence were used for comparison. Population dynamics: Population size appeared to be stable and modeling showed this stable pattern to result from low calf production and/or low survival to adulthood. Toxicology: St. Lawrence belugas had higher or much higher levels of mercury, lead, PCBs, DDT, Mirex, benzo[a]pyrene metabolites, equivalent levels of dioxins, furans, and PAH metabolites, and much lower levels of cadmium than Arctic belugas. In other St. Lawrence cetaceans, levels of PCBs and DDT were inversely related to body size, as resulting from differences in metabolic rate, diet, and trophic position, compounded by length of residence in the St. Lawrence basin. St. Lawrence belugas had much higher levels than predicted from body size alone; levels increased with age in both sexes, although unloading by females through the placenta and/or lactation was evidenced by overall lower levels in females and very high burdens in some calves. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Scientists in Gray Flannel Suits: Ernest Lawrence and the Development of Color Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebke, Joshua

    Physicists and historians typically remember Ernest Lawrence for one of two activities, his development of the cyclotron or his advocacy for atomic weapons. The two labs that he established in support of such endeavors are still named after him in California: Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore. But there was a third accomplishment for which Lawrence believed he would always be remembered: the development of color television. In 1950, he sold a half stake of his company, Chromatic Television Laboratories, to Paramount Pictures for 1 million. That decade, Lawrence and his employees, especially Luis Alvarez and Edwin McMillan, designed cathode-ray tubes for color televisions while they championed hydrogen bombs. Although their commitment to the second was attributed to patriotism and their interest in the first was dismissed as a hobby, it is not so easy to disentangle their motives. Color screens were needed for more than variety shows and sitcoms; they displayed incoming missiles in vivid color. No company has ever been led by three future Nobel Laureates, yet Chromatic Television Laboratories was a failure. Even so, Lawrence had a profound influence on the development of color television, and I will tell this story for the first time.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  2. Historic Context and Building Assessments for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Built Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, R. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sullivan, M. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-09-14

    This document was prepared to support u.s. Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) compliance with Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a DOE/NNSA laboratory and is engaged in determining the historic status of its properties at both its main site in Livermore, California, and Site 300, its test site located eleven miles from the main site. LLNL contracted with the authors via Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to prepare a historic context statement for properties at both sites and to provide assessments of those properties of potential historic interest. The report contains an extensive historic context statement and the assessments of individual properties and groups of properties determined, via criteria established in the context statement, to be of potential interest. The historic context statement addresses the four contexts within which LLNL falls: Local History, World War II History (WWII), Cold War History, and Post-Cold War History. Appropriate historic preservation themes relevant to LLNL's history are delineated within each context. In addition, thresholds are identified for historic significance within each of the contexts based on the explication and understanding of the Secretary of the Interior's Guidelines for determining eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. The report identifies specific research areas and events in LLNL's history that are of interest and the portions of the built environment in which they occurred. Based on that discussion, properties of potential interest are identified and assessments of them are provided. Twenty individual buildings and three areas of potential historic interest were assessed. The final recommendation is that, of these, LLNL has five individual historic buildings, two sets of historic objects, and two historic districts eligible for the National Register. All are

  3. DHS-STEM Internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, B

    2008-08-18

    This summer I had the fortunate opportunity through the DHS-STEM program to attend Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) to work with Tom Slezak on the bioinformatics team. The bioinformatics team, among other things, helps to develop TaqMan and microarray probes for the identification of pathogens. My main project at the laboratory was to test such probe identification capabilities against metagenomic (unsequenced) data from around the world. Using various sequence analysis tools (Vmatch and Blastall) and several we developed ourselves, about 120 metagenomic sequencing projects were compared against a collection of all completely sequenced genomes and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) current probe database. For the probes, the Blastall algorithms compared each individual metagenomic project using various parameters allowing for the natural ambiguities of in vitro hybridization (mismatches, deletions, insertions, hairpinning, etc.). A low level cutoff was used to eliminate poor sequence matches, and to leave a large variety of higher quality matches for future research into the hybridization of sequences with mutations and variations. Any hits with at least 80% base pair conservation over 80% of the length of the match. Because of the size of our whole genome database, we utilized the exact match algorithm of Vmatch to quickly search and compare genomes for exact matches with varying lower level limits on sequence length. I also provided preliminary feasibility analyses to support a potential industry-funded project to develop a multiplex assay on several genera and species. Each genus and species was evaluated based on the amount of sequenced genomes, amount of near neighbor sequenced genomes, presence of identifying genes--metabolistic or antibiotic resistant genes--and the availability of research on the identification of the specific genera or species. Utilizing the bioinformatic team's software, I was able to develop and

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  5. Experimental comparison of performances of Mega Acer Kit, Ranger and ThermoSens according to flow rates and distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hong Ju; Kim, Sang Hun; An, Tae Hun; Kim, Dong Joon

    2017-02-07

    We experimentally investigated the fluid warming performances of three warmers with different technology, according to flow rates and distances. We used the following intravenous fluid warmers: Mega Acer Kit (Group M, n = 8), Ranger (group R, n = 8), and ThermoSens (group T, n = 8). Fluids that had been stored in the operating room over the previous 24 h were delivered at sequent flow rates of from 440 mL/h up to 2500 mL/h through preheated warming devices. The fluid temperatures were recorded at the inlet point, 76-cm proximal (Pout1) and 166-cm distal outlet points (Pout2) every 1 min for 10 min. We repeated each test eight times. The delivered fluid temperature [mean (95% confidence interval)] was significantly higher in group M than group R and T at flow rates up to 650 mL/h with the highest value at 440 mL/h [34.30 (33.35-35.24)°C] (P flow rates over 1140 mL/h at Pout1 [36.67 (36.62-36.73)°C and 37.85 (37.52-38.17)°C at 2500 mL/h, respectively] (P flow rates for each device (P flow rates. Furthermore, the device performance is more effective with shorter extension lines.

  6. FPGA Implementation of an Amplitude-Modulated Continuous-Wave Ultrasonic Ranger Using Restructured Phase-Locking Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sumathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate ultrasonic range finder employing Sliding Discrete Fourier Transform (SDFT based restructured phase-locked loop (RPLL, which is an improved version of the recently proposed integrated phase-locking scheme (IPLL, has been expounded. This range finder principally utilizes amplitude-modulated ultrasonic waves assisted by an infrared (IR pilot signal. The phase shift between the envelope of the reference IR pilot signal and that of the received ultrasonic signal is proportional to the range. The extracted envelopes are filtered by SDFT without introducing any additional phase shift. A new RPLL is described in which the phase error is driven to zero using the quadrature signal derived from the SDFT. Further, the quadrature signal is reinforced by another cosine signal derived from a lookup table (LUT. The pulse frequency of the numerically controlled oscillator (NCO is extremely accurate, enabling fine tuning of the SDFT and RPLL also improves the lock time for the 50 Hz input signal to 0.04 s. The percentage phase error for the range 0.6 m to 6 m is about 0.2%. The VHDL codes generated for the various signal processing steps were downloaded into a Cyclone FPGA chip around which the ultrasonic ranger had been built.

  7. Groundwater Managment Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset outlines the location of the five Groundwater Management Districts in Kansas. GMDs are locally formed and elected boards for regional groundwater...

  8. 115th Congressional Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer depicts the 115th Congressional Districts for the United States, with attributes listing the elected officials for the 115th Congress. Elected to a...

  9. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  10. Solid Waste Management Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Solid waste management districts layer is part of a dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. This dataset...

  11. NM School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The dataset represents the boundaries of all public school districts in the state of New Mexico. The source for the data layer is the New Mexico Public Education...

  12. Floodplain District Permit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The purpose of a Floodplain District Permit (FPDP) is to control floodplain development in order to protect persons and property from danger and destruction and to...

  13. NM Property Tax Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This layer represents boundaries for New Mexico tax district "OUT" categories and incorporated/municipal "IN" categories as identified on the "Certificate of Tax...

  14. ACT250 Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The ACT 250 Districts layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes...

  15. The changing media representation of T. E. Lawrence and celebrity culture in Britain, 1919-1935

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new analysis of representations of T. E. Lawrence to explore how the media created celebrity identities in interwar Britain. Examining his appearance in seventeen national newspapers and in newsreels between 1919 and 1935, it shows how earlier press depictions that borrowed from Lowell Thomas’s portrayal of him as the mythical ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ were disrupted by a nascent media-driven celebrity culture which aimed to uncover intimate details of the lives of the so-c...

  16. Mr. Lawrence tuleb Rabarockiks kokku! Peer Günt uues kuues. Pervert ja ämma unistus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Rockansamblist Mr. Lawrence, albumitest "Mr. Lawrence", "Swing", "Sitandspin". Soome hardrock'i ansamblist Peer Günt, albumist "Backseat". Etno-folkrockansamblist Dagö (kontsert 15. juunil Rabarockil), albumitest "Toiduklubi", "Hiired tuules", "Joonistatud mees". Info festivalist: www.rabarock.delfi.ee / www.rabarock.ee

  17. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Saul Perlmutter, a member of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Physics Division and leader of the international Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the Department of Energy's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category" (1/2 page).

  18. Integrated Migratory Bird Planning in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck Hayes; Andrew Milliken; Randy Dettmers; Kevin Loftus; Brigitte Collins; Isabelle Ringuet

    2005-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast and Eastern Habitat Joint Ventures hosted two international planning workshops to begin the process of integrating bird conservation strategies under the North American Bird Conservation Initiative in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region. The workshops identified priority species and habitats, delineated focus areas,...

  19. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 4. Appendixes D - F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    Oswigo 904 Cspe Vincent 904 Total 1808 10. St. Lawrence Rivec Cape Vicent o Alexandria 271.1 Alexe -d:ia through Ogdensburg 4950 Ogdensburg t, Massena 4856...it appears that these vibrations may well be severe. The distrubance is limited to an area between Frechette Point and Six-Mile Point of the river

  20. Unequivocal Acceptance--Lessons from the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Explores the question of "institutional racism" in England in the context of the Stephen Lawrence murder investigation and considers the implications of the racist charges leveled at the police after this investigation for the educational system. Calls for attention to institutional racism in the British schools. (SLD)

  1. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory selects Intel Itanium 2 processors for world's most powerful Linux cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intel Corporation, system manufacturer California Digital and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced they are building one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. The supercomputer project, codenamed "Thunder," uses nearly 4,000 Intel® Itanium® 2 processors... is expected to be complete in January 2004" (1 page).

  3. Bringing Theory into Practice: A Study of Effective Leadership at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Leadership development, a component of HRD, is becoming an area of increasingly important practice for all organizations. When companies such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory rely on knowledge workers for success, leadership becomes even more important. This research paper tests the hypothesis that leadership credibility and the courage…

  4. Attraction of Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to eugenol-baited traps in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (the northern corn rootworm) is a native North American leaf beetle and a major pest of corn. However, adult D. barberi forage in various habitats outside of corn, including soybean, roadside vegetation, and prairie. Eugenol is a common floral volatile that ha...

  5. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taffet, M.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Oberdorfer, J.A. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); McIlvride, W.A. (Weiss Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  6. Lawrence Augustus Oxley: The Beginnings of Social Work among Blacks in North Carolina Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Details Lawrence Oxley's work as director of the Division of Work among Blacks from 1925 to 1934. Discusses racial attitudes and legal injustices toward Blacks. Oxley addressed social problems of Blacks such as unfair capital punishment, juvenile delinquency, and lack of social services. (KS)

  7. Tolerance, Acceptance and the Virtue of Orthonomy: A Reply to Lawrence Blum and Brenda Almond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurria, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the "Journal of Moral Education," 39(2), Brenda Almond and Lawrence Blum debate the importance of tolerance versus acceptance in sex education. Blum defines acceptance as "positive regard", in contradistinction to mere tolerance, "a live and let live attitude toward others, an acceptance of coexistence, but with a…

  8. Hamilton district energy project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsales, D. [Hamilton Community Energy, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This presentation began with a description of the Hamilton District Energy Project. A piping distribution system delivers the energy. For those buildings located in the close vicinity of the central energy centre, heating and cooling are provided. The Hamilton City Hall, the Copps Coliseum, and a host of other buildings located downtown are included in this project. Both the proximity to the energy centre and the pipe infrastructure are important components for the delivery of the energy. A natural gas burning engine is part of the energy centre. Direct waste is minimized since waste exhaust is used to heat water. Individual energy transfer systems, much smaller than the equipment being replaced, are used for each building connected to the district energy network. All emission requirements are met by district heating, which is a reliable source of energy and more efficient. There are instances where only more efficient energy solutions are available to a municipality when renewable energy sources are not feasible. figs.

  9. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - MDC_CommunityDevelopmentDistrict

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Community Development Districts (CDDs) are special taxing districts or local units of special-purpose government. A CDD may charge separate non-ad valorem special...

  10. District-Level Downsizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Draconian cuts have become the order of business for many school districts since the economic recession hit in 2008. But for the coming school year, "draconian" has taken on an even harsher meaning, as states from California and Texas to Illinois and New York wrestle with deficits in the tens of billions of dollars and make…

  11. perceptions in Dedza District

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    logistical problems. HCWs identified the tendency of patients with ТВ to seek traditional and private healthcare services, the association of ТВ with HIV/AIDS, difficulties in. Abstract traveling to .... "Even those who come to collect the sputum sometimes take time ... when you complain they [district staff] say transport problem ...

  12. State Highway District Boundaries - 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data represents the NM Department of Transportation District boundaries as legislatively defined (i.e. these are not maintenance defined districts).

  13. Problems of Affluent School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoone, Eugene P.

    All school districts are affected by the stagnant economy, the growing needs of the public sector, the increased burden of transfer payments, and the limited growth of public revenues. Retrenchment is common to all school districts, but it may be more severe in affluent districts. By 1969-70, suburban school systems were the clear-cut expenditure…

  14. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake...

  15. District energy a global solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damecour, R.; Andersson, B. [Kattner/FVB District Energy Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-08-01

    An overview of the development of district energy systems throughout the world is provided. Significant district energy data is provided for Canada, the United States, East Asia, Korea, Japan, China, Eastern Europe and Russia, Estonia, and Sweden. The overall conclusion is that district energy systems are here to stay and have a good chance of succeeding provided that the concept has the support of business, municipalities and national governments. The 40 years old district heating system in Vasteras, Sweden, the oldest and most successful district energy system in the world, was highlighted.

  16. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  17. Targeted sustainable development: 15 years of government and community intervention on the St. Lawrence River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Serge; Painchaud, Jean; Dugas, Clément

    2006-02-01

    From 1988 to 2003, the St. Lawrence Action Plan, a Canada - Quebec cooperation agreement on the St. Lawrence River, helped to mobilize a still-growing number of stakeholders in the conservation and protection of this great river and generated tangible results in a number of areas of intervention. The successes enjoyed in the area of industrial, agricultural and urban clean-up, in protecting plant and animal species and their habitats, and in acquiring new knowledge on the state and trends of the ecosystem reflect the sustained efforts of government and non-government partners over the course of those 15 years. The committed involvement of local communities provides assurance of the sustainable development of this vast ecosystem.

  18. Water-quality characteristics for selected streams in Lawrence County, South Dakota, 1988-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Joyce E.; Hayes, Timothy Scott

    2000-01-01

    During the 1980?s, significant economic development and population growth began to occur in Lawrence County in the northern part of the Black Hills of western South Dakota. Rising gold prices and heap-leach extraction methods allowed the economic recovery of marginal gold ore deposits, resulting in development of several large-scale, open-pit gold mines in Lawrence County. There was increasing local concern regarding potential impacts on the hydrologic system, especially relating to the quantity and quality of water in the numerous streams and springs of Lawrence County. In order to characterize the water quality of selected streams within Lawrence County, samples were collected from 1988 through 1992 at different times of the year and under variable hydrologic conditions. During the time of this study, the Black Hills area was experiencing a drought; thus, most samples were collected during low-flow conditions.Streamflow and water-quality characteristics in Lawrence County are affected by both geologic conditions and precipitation patterns. Most streams that cross outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation lose all or large part of their streamflow to aquifer recharge. Streams that are predominantly spring fed have relatively stable streamflow, varying slightly with dry and wet precipitation cycles.Most streams in Lawrence County generally have calcium magnesium bicarbonate type waters. The sites from the mineralized area of central Lawrence County vary slightly from other streams in Lawrence County by having higher concentrations of sodium, less bicarbonate, and more sulfate. False Bottom Creek near Central City has more sulfate than bicarbonate. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and cyanide concentrations were at or near the laboratory reporting limits for most sites and did not exceed any of the water-quality standards. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations at Annie Creek near Lead, Whitetail Creek at Lead, Squaw Creek near Spearfish, and Spearfish Creek

  19. Shark predation on migrating adult american eels (Anguilla rostrata) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Benchetrit, José; Castonguay, Martin

    2012-01-01

    to identify the eel predators, we compared their vertical migratory behavior with those of satellite-tagged porbeagle shark and bluefin tuna, the only endothermic fishes occurring non-marginally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. We accurately distinguished between tuna and shark by using the behavioral criteria...... generated by comparing the diving behavior of these two species with those of our unknown predators. Depth profile characteristics of most eel predators more closely resembled those of sharks than those of tuna. During the first days following tagging, all eels remained in surface waters and did not exhibit...... itself may contribute to increasing the eel's susceptibility to predation, we discuss evidence suggesting that predation of silver-stage American eels by porbeagle sharks may represent a significant source of mortality inside the Gulf of St. Lawrence and raises the possibility that eels may represent...

  20. Enchanting and Disenchanted Narratives: Fairy Tales and the Short Fiction of Katherine Mansfield and DH Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Casado Villanueva, María

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation aims to explore the relevance of intertextual references to the fairy tale in the short fiction of two modernist authors, Katherine Mansfield and D.H. Lawrence. This dissertation departs from the hypothesis that both the narrative models and the recurrent motifs of the literary fairy tale provided both authors with a rich system of references despite the fact that most modernist authors attempted to detach the short story from traditional forms of narration. T...

  1. Habitat selection and foraging ecology of seabirds in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Guse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on at-sea distribution, habitat selection and foraging ecology of seabirds in a seabird hotspot, the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Analyses are based on standardized ship-based surveys with oceanographic sampling, and equipment of breeding birds with data loggers. The Northern Gannet as focal species was most abundant. At-sea totals for the Southern Gulf proved regional and international importance for several species. New insights into links between seabirds and at-sea habitats wer...

  2. The Art of the Possible: T. E. Lawrence and Coalition Liaison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    During the same period Lawrence also became interested in medieval architecture, collecting brass rubbings from medieval churches in the area, as well as...considered individually, to truly achieve understanding one needed to see and appreciate the byzantine and convoluted interplay between them over hundreds of...reticence was Paris’s postwar desire to rule Lebanon and Syria: Lebanon because France felt protective of the large Maronite Christian community

  3. Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

    2007-01-22

    A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

  4. 2003 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. Preliminary evidence of neurotoxicity associated with eating fish from the Upper St. Lawrence River Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, D; Bélanger, S; Larribe, F; Panisset, M; Bowler, R; Baldwin, M; Lebel, J; Hudnell, K

    1998-01-01

    Pollution of hydrographic basins has affected the flora and fauna that thrive in these aquatic ecosystems, and fish, which constitute an important food resource, often contain a plethora of potentially toxic chemicals. In a major research project on early neurotoxic effects of environmental exposure to manganese among residents in Southwest Quebec, fish consumption from 2 lakes of the Upper St. Lawrence River System, was surveyed as a potential confounding factor. Participants were selected using a random, stratified sampling strategy from lists of the Quebec Health Plan. Following exclusions, 273 men and women between 20-69 years were retained for the present analysis. A total of 103 (37.7%) reported eating fish from the Upper St. Lawrence. Although fisheaters and non-fisheaters were similar for most socio-demographic variables, significantly more fisheaters (65.2%) reported consuming alcoholic beverages as compared to non-fisheaters (42.4%) (Chi Sq. performed similarly on tests of sensory function, visual memory and recognition, fine motor performance and some motor tests, but fisheaters performed significantly more poorly (peating from these two lakes, and the characterization of fish dietary habits has many limitations. Nevertheless, the findings are sufficiently compelling to warrant further studies, since fish from the Upper St. Lawrence Lakes are known to contain multiple neurotoxic substances.

  6. The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes region: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Douglas R.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2003-01-01

    An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review. The authors found 74 papers mentioning Great Lakes oligochaete species. The majority of these papers were published in the 1980s. The literature review and additional collections resulted in 15 species being added to the previous list. Nine taxa were removed from the previous list due to misidentification, synonymies, level of identification, or inability to confirm the identity. Based on this review, 101 species of Oligochaeta are now known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes watershed. Of these, 95 species are known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes proper, with an additional 6 species recorded from the inland waters of the watershed. The greatest diversity of oligochaete species was found in the inland waters of the region (81) followed by Lake Huron (72), Lake Ontario (65), Lake Erie (64), Lake Superior (63), Lake Michigan (62), St. Marys River (60), Niagara River (49), Saginaw Bay (44), St. Clair River (37), Lake St. Clair (36), St. Lawrence River (27), and the Detroit River (21). Three species are suspected of being introduced, Branchiura sowerbyi, Gianius aquaedulcisand Ripistes parasita, and two are believed to be endemic, Thalassodrilus hallae andTeneridrilus flexus.

  7. Immune competence of rats fed with beluga whale blubber from the contaminated St. Lawrence estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brousseau, P.; Lapierre, P.; Guise, S. De; Beland, P.; Martineau, D.; Fournier, M. [Univ. of Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Over the last decades, high concentrations of environmental contaminants such as PCBs have been measured in the tissues of many species of marine mammals from different parts of the world. Even though many deleterious effects of these compounds have been reported in laboratory animals, the overall risk associated with these contaminants in wild animals is still not clearly understood. However, necropsy of St. Lawrence belugas showed numerous severe and disseminated infections with rather mildly pathogenic bacteria. Moreover, 37% of all the tumors reported in cetaceans were observed in St. Lawrence beluga whales. Indeed, both observations suggest immunosuppression. The aim of the study was to determine if contaminants present in fat tissues of belugas might provoke deleterious effect to their immune system if, under some circumstances, they are released into the circulation. To assess their immunotoxic potential, rats were fed for two months on a diet in which the lipids originated from the blubber of either highly polluted St. Lawrence belugas or relatively uncontaminated arctic belugas. Then, multiple immune responses were monitored. Those include phagocytosis, plaque forming cells, oxidative burst, natural killer cells, immunophenotyping and mitogenic assay. The results obtained show that only the humoral response of rats was impaired by the treatment. By combining all this information, the authors propose possible mechanisms of action to explain potential long-term consequences of environmental pollution.

  8. 75 FR 8428 - The Indiana Rail Road Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Martin and Lawrence Counties, IN; CSX...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... (Bedford Industrial Track). Letters of protest and requests for public hearing have been filed by: The... Mayor; Douglas England, City of New Albany Mayor; David Branneman, Lawrence County Tourism Commission...

  9. Government Districts, Other - MDC_CommissionDistrict2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Polygon feature class representing the Redistricting Commission Plan 11-15, adopted November 15, 2001. This Commission District Boundary layer becomes effective...

  10. Fabien Desage, David Guéranger, La politique confisquée. Sociologie des réformes et des institutions intercommunales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Reigner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available « L’intercommunalité comme la démocratie sont des affaires trop sérieuses pour être laissées aux seuls élus. » (p.229. Le ton est donné et c’est toute la thèse des auteurs, Fabien Desage et David Guéranger, qui est synthétisée là. Ces derniers se placent sur le registre de l’intervention pour dénoncer l’absence de publicité qui caractérise selon eux le fonctionnement politique de gouvernements intercommunaux « invisibles ». Pour ce faire, ils mutualisent dans cet ouvrage leurs travaux de rec...

  11. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 1. Body of report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Comparative core flood testing of preserved Ranger Zone core rock samples was completed; the past year's results were discouraging. In contrast, Ranger sand pack alkaline flood tests gave encouraging results. New insights were gained on in-situ alkaline consumption. Dehydration of sodium orthosilicate water-produced water-crude oil systems does not appear to create any operational problems. The alkaline injection facilities were completed and placed in operation on March 27, 1980. The preflush injection, which was composed of 11.5 million barrels of softened fresh water with an average 0.96% of salt, was completed at that time. The total preflush amounted to approximately 10 pore volume percent. The 0.4% sodium orthosilicate-1.0% salt-soft fresh water injection started at the end of the preflush. A loss of injectivity began at the same time as alkaline injection, which is attributed to divalent ions in the salt brine. Salt was removed temporarily from the system on May 30, 1980. No injection wells were redrilled during the year. Other than plug back of one injector and one producer because of bad liners and repair of one injection well with an inner liner, well work was routine and minor in nature. Dual injection strings were transferred from one well to another. One of the injection wells whose injectivity was damaged by the alkaline-salt injection was successfully stimulated. The pilot was self certified under the tertiary incentive program and cost recoupments obtained. Preparations are underway for making the alkaline flood simulator performance prediction for the pilot. Laboratory testing is actively underway in an attempt to quickly find a remedy for the floc formation that occurs on mixing the salt brine and dilute alkaline solution. Volume 1 describes the activities for this period. Volumes 2 and 3 contain appendices.

  12. Groundwater quality in the Delaware and St. Lawrence River Basins, New York, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 10 production and domestic wells in the Delaware River Basin in New York and from 20 production and domestic wells in the St. Lawrence River Basin in New York from August through November 2010 to characterize groundwater quality in the basins. The samples were collected and processed by standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 147 physiochemical properties and constituents, including major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radionuclides, and indicator bacteria.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Response to the Federal Communication Commission Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowls, F

    2000-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting UWB research for the past few decades and submits a general comments section and a paragraph by paragraph response for consideration. In general, the proposed rules look very sound and encouraging for promoting use of the spectrum by both government and commercial users. General comments include recommending minimum frequency spreading specification, possibly clarifying the peak power limits and keeping the high frequency limit as high as possible. LLNL finds that minimum interference occurs by keeping wideband wide and narrowband narrow and keeping the middle ground clear.

  14. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  15. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  16. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  17. Redesigning the District Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodas, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we look at the inner workings of a school district through the lens of the "district operating system (DOS)," a set of interlocking mutually-reinforcing modules that includes functions like procurement, contracting, data and IT policy, the general counsel's office, human resources, and the systems for employee and family…

  18. VT Data - Overlay District 20170710, South Burlington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Overlay data for the City of South Burlington included in this data:Flood Plain Overlay DistrictTraffic Overlay DistrictInterstate Highway Overlay DistrictData not...

  19. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

  20. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  1. Trophic interactions in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Must the blue whale compete for krill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkoff, C.; Comtois, S.; Chabot, D.

    2013-09-01

    Inverse methodology was used to construct a mass-balance model of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) for the 2008-2010 time period. Our first objective was to make an overall description of community structure, trophic interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the vertebrate and invertebrate communities of the ecosystem. A second objective was to identify other important predators of krill, and to assess if these compete with blue whales, listed as endangered under the Canadian Species at Risk Act in 2005 (northwest Atlantic population). The Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are summer feeding grounds for blue whales and other marine mammals. Blue whales eat only euphausiids (krill) and require dense concentrations of prey to meet their energy requirements, which makes them particularly vulnerable to changes in prey availability. In the LSLE, many species from secondary producers (hyperiid amphipods, other macrozooplankton) to top predators (fish, birds, and marine mammals) consumed euphausiids. Consequently, krill predators were found at all consumer trophic levels. However, our results showed that only about 35% of the estimated euphausiid production was consumed by all predator species combined. Euphausiid did not seem to be a restricted resource in the LSLE ecosystem, at least during the study period. The blue whale did not appear to have to compete for krill in the LSLE.

  2. Trophic structure of macrobenthos in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, G.; Savenkoff, C.; Olivier, M.; Stora, G.; Juniper, K.; Caron, A.; Gagné, J.-P.; Legendre, L.; Mulsow, S.; Grant, J.; Roy, S.; Grehan, A.; Scaps, P.; Silverberg, N.; Klein, B.; Tremblay, J.-E.; Therriault, J.-C.

    2000-04-01

    The Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf provide a diversity of oceanographic conditions in a continental margin setting. Climate is markedly seasonal, and bathymetry and hydrodynamic conditions cover a broad range, significantly influencing the patterns of organic matter sedimentation and, potentially, benthic community dynamics. Samples for analysis of benthic macrofauna and sediment microorganisms were collected at six stations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and the Scotian Shelf during winter and summer cruises, as part of the Canadian Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. Multivariate analyses indicate significant site-related trends in trophic guilds, benthic assemblages, and microbial activity, some of which are related to geomorphological characteristics (bathymetry, topography, and substratum). Macrofaunal trophic guild data show that the stations with relatively deep settling basins (Cabot Strait and Emerald Basin), dominated by surface deposit feeders, were distinct from stations with sloping bottoms (Anticosti Gyre and Anticosti Channel), where subsurface deposit feeders dominated or surface and subsurface deposit feeders were equally abundant. Deposit feeders (surface and subsurface trophic groups) made up >60% of the benthic communities, except at the Scotian slope station where they represented 44% of the total benthic abundances. Based on the data collected in both the water column and the sediment at three deep stations in the GSL, we hypothesize that the proportion of surface and subsurface deposit feeders, and thus the nature of bioturbation activity, is related to the magnitude and pattern of organic matter supply from the euphotic zone.

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  5. VT Data - Scenic Overlay District 20110301, Winhall

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Scenic Restriction overaly districts for the Town of Winhall, Vermont. Other overlay districts (Transfer of Development Rights, and Conservation & Recreational...

  6. Middle pleistocene mollusks from St. Lawrence Island and their significance for the paleo-oceanography of the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, D.M.; Rowland, R.W.; Patton, W.W.

    1972-01-01

    Drift, evidently of Illinoian age, was deposited on St. Lawrence Island at the margin of an ice cap that covered the highlands of the Chukotka Peninsula of Siberia and spread far eastward on the continental shelf of northern Bering Sea. Underlying the drift on the northwestward part of the island are mollusk-bearing beds deposited during the Kotzebuan Transgression. A comparison of mollusk faunas from St. Lawrence Island, Chukotka Peninsula, and Kotzebue Sound suggests that the present northward flow through Bering and Anadyr Straits was reversed during the Kotzebuan Transgression. Cold arctic water penetrated southward and southwestward bringing an arctic fauna to the Gulf of Anadyr. Warmer Pacific water probably entered eastern Bering Sea, passed eastward and northeastward around eastern and northern St. Lawrence Island, and then became entrained in the southward currents that passed through Anadyr Strait. ?? 1972.

  7. THE DISTRICT OF CODRU – DISTRICT OR LAND?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONA-MONICA CHITA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The District of Codru – District or Land? The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate why the ethnographic Codru is a “district” (ținut and not a “land” (țară – the term used by most people. To achieve this goal, we analyzed the significance of the two concepts, as well as their characteristic elements. Following the first part of the paper we presented connotations that have known “district and land” over time, and in the second part we presented the differences between the two concepts, with application to the District of Codru. Presentation and analysis of the situation eventually led to support the fact that the ethnographic Codru is a “district” – a unique mental space.

  8. 2006 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Lidar: North District

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for the Southwest Florida Water Management District's FY2006 Digital Orthophoto (B089) and LiDAR...

  9. Fire and EMS Districts - MDC_LifeSafetyInspDistrict

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — The Fire Prevention Department Inspector District layer is a polygon feature class created for the Miami-Dade Fire Prevention Deparment (MDFPD). It contains the...

  10. Characterization of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations and their correlation with field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchok, Catherine L.

    During four field seasons from 1998--2001, 115 hours of acoustic recordings were made in the presence of the well-studied St. Lawrence population of blue whales. The primary field site for this study was the estuary region of the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada) with most recordings made between mid-August and late October. Effort was concentrated in the daylight hours, although occasionally extending past nightfall. An inexpensive and portable recording system was built that was easy to deploy and provided quality recordings in a variety of sea conditions. It consisted of a calibrated omni-directional hydrophone with a flat (+/-3dB) response from 5Hz to 800Hz; and a surface isolation buoy to minimize the vertical movement of the sensor. During the recording sessions detailed field notes were taken on all blue whales within sight, with individual identities confirmed through photo-identification work between sessions. Notes were also taken on all other species sighted during the recording sessions. Characterization of the more than one-thousand blue whale calls detected during this study revealed that the St. Lawrence repertoire is much more extensive than previously reported. Three infrasonic (<20Hz) and four audible range (30--200Hz) call types were detected in this study, with much time/frequency variation seen within each type. The infrasonic calls were long (5--30s) in duration and arranged into regularly patterned series. These calls were similar in call characteristics and spacing to those detected in the North Atlantic, but had much shorter and more variable patterned series. The audible call types were much shorter (1--4s), and occurred singly or in irregularly spaced clusters, although a special patterning was seen that contained both regular and irregular spaced components. Comparison of the daily, seasonal, and spatial distributions of calling behavior with those of several biological parameters revealed interesting differences between the three call

  11. Quality Circles for School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Shaker A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the applicability of quality circles in schools. Examines elements of a successful quality circle program, the decision to have such a program, establishing quality circles, potential problems, and the use of quality circles in school districts. (CT)

  12. VT Senate Districts 1992 - polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The senatorial district designations for this layer were taken from a trace map of unknown origin. A visual compilation of the traced lines and...

  13. VT Senate Districts 1992 - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The senatorial district designations for this layer were taken from a trace map of unknown origin. A visual compilation of the traced lines and...

  14. Allegheny County School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the school district boundaries within Allegheny County If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open...

  15. Districts for 104th Congress

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon coverage of 104th Congressional District boundaries obtained from the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The 103rd Congress was the first Congress that...

  16. Boise geothermal district heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. New Mexico Property Tax Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This layer represents boundaries for New Mexico tax district "OUT" categories and incorporated/municipal "IN" categories as identified on the "Certificate of Tax...

  18. Assessment of Eligibility to National Register of Historic Places Building 431 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M A; Ullrich, R A

    2003-05-07

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to demolish the original sections of Building 431 at its main site in Livermore, California. As this action will constitute an undertaking within the regulatory constraints of the National Historic Preservation Act, LLNL arranged for an assessment of the building's historic significance. This report provides a brief history of the magnetic fusion energy research activities housed in Building 431 and a historic assessment of the building. The final recommendation of the report is that, although Building 431 housed some significant breakthroughs in accelerator technology and magnetic mirror plasma confinement, it lacks integrity for the periods of significance of those developments. It is, therefore, not eligible to the National Register of Historic Places.

  19. 2002 Small Mammal Inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, E; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    To assist the University of California in obtaining biological assessment information for the ''2004 Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'', Jones & Stokes conducted an inventory of small mammals in six major vegetation communities at Site 300. These communities were annual grassland, native grassland, oak savanna, riparian corridor, coastal scrub, and seep/spring wetlands. The principal objective of this study was to assess the diversity and abundance of small mammal species in these communities, as well as the current status of any special-status small mammal species found in these communities. Surveys in the native grassland community were conducted before and after a controlled fire management burn of the grasslands to qualitatively evaluate any potential effects of fire on small mammals in the area.

  20. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1980-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site is an office building in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply from 23 to 33% of the space heating load and part of the hot water load. The solar heating system is equipped with 1428 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 2000-gallon water storage tank, and two gas-fired boilers to supply auxiliary heat for both space heating and domestic hot water. Poor performance is reported, with the solar fraction being only 4%. Also given are the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and the coefficient of performance. The performance data are given for the collector, storage, solar water heating and solar space heating subsystems as well as the total system. Typical system operation and solar energy utilization are briefly described. The system design, performance evaluation techniques, weather data, and sensor technology are presented. (LEW)

  1. Light is a Messenger - The Life and Science of William Lawrence Bragg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Graeme K.

    2004-10-01

    Light is a Messenger , is the first biography of William Lawrence Bragg, who was only 25 when he won the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics-the youngest person ever to win a Nobel Prize. It describes how bragg discovered how to use X-rays to determine the arrangement of atoms in crystals and his pivotal role in developing this technique to the point that the structures of the most complex molecules known to man-the proteins and nucelic acids-could be solved. Although Bragg's Nobel Prize was for Physics, his research profoundly affected chemistry and the new field of molecular biology, of which he became a founding figure. This book explains how these revolutionary scientific events occurred while Bragg struggled to emerge from the shadow of his father, Sir William Bragg, and amidst a career-long rivalry with the brilliant American chemist, Linus Pauling.

  2. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed.

  3. Mesocarnivore Surveys on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, H O; Smith, D A; Cypher, B L; Kelly, P A; Woollett, J S

    2004-11-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), operated under cooperative agreement between the University of California and the U. S. Department of Energy, administers and operates an approximately 11 mi{sup 2} (28 km{sup 2}) test site in the remote hills at the northern end of the South Coast Ranges of Central California (Figure 1). Known as Site 300, this expanse of rolling hills and canyons supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. The facility serves a variety of functions related to testing non-nuclear explosives, lasers, and weapons subsystems. The primary purpose of this project was to determine the presence of any mesocarnivores on Site 300 that use the property for foraging, denning, and other related activities. The surveys occurred from mid-September to mid-October, 2002.

  4. Computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuk, K.

    1995-11-01

    The current computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is that of a central server that is accessed by a terminal or terminal emulator. The initiative to move to a client/server environment is strong, backed by desktop machines becoming more and more powerful. The desktop machines can now take on parts of tasks once run entirely on the central server, making the whole environment computationally more efficient as a result. Services are tasks that are repeated throughout the environment such that it makes sense to share them; tasks such as email, user authentication and file transfer are services. The new client/;server environment needs to determine which services must be included in the environment for basic functionality. These services then unify the computing environment, not only for the forthcoming ASSIST+, but for Administrative Information Systems as a whole, joining various server platforms with heterogeneous desktop computing platforms.

  5. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  6. Fifty Years of Progress, 1937-1987 [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL, LBNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, T. F. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    This booklet was prepared for the 50th anniversary of medical and biological research at the Donner Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. The intent is to present historical facts and to highlight important facets of fifty years of accomplishments in medical and biological sciences. A list of selected scientific publications from 1937 to 1960 is included to demonstrate the character and lasting importance of early pioneering work. The organizational concept is to show the research themes starting with the history, then discoveries of medically important radionuclides, then the use of accelerated charged particles in therapy, next human physiology studies then sequentially studies of biology from tissues to macromolecules; and finally studies of the genetic code.

  7. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S. [Golder Associates, Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline.

  9. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C.; Brekke, D.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs.

  11. Dynamic mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Charlotte R; Poulain, Alexandre J; Ridal, Jeffrey J; Blais, Jules M

    2014-12-01

    A dynamic mass balance model was developed for the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario that predicts and hindcasts mercury concentrations and fluxes in three forms, elemental Hg (Hg(0)), divalent mercury (Hg(2+)), and methyl mercury (MeHg), in a six compartment environment (air, water, porewater, sediment, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates). Our objective was to construct a dynamic mass balance model for mercury in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall, Ontario based on the framework and results of a steady-state mass balance model developed previously for this site. The second objective was to estimate industrial mercury emissions based on mercury residues deposited in sediments prior to 1970, the year when regulations were implemented to reduce mercury pollution in the environment. We compiled mercury concentrations, fluxes, and transformation rates from previous studies completed in this section of the river (area of approximately 100km(2)) to develop the model. Estimated mercury concentrations in all media were similar to measured data (R(2)=0.99), with only minor exceptions, providing a satisfactory overall description of the mercury loadings and transformation rates of the different mercury species. The estimated historical emissions prior to 1970 from local industries along the Cornwall waterfront were approximately 400kgyear(-1). A storm sewer discharge of 5000m(3)/day resulted in a significant increase in mercury concentrations, particularly in sediment (617ngg(-1) to 624ngg(-1); p=0.004). Model results suggest that discharges of mercury from sources such as local industries and storm sewers have an impact on mercury in media such as sediment and water. This model should provide a basis for predicting and hindcasting mercury concentrations in other river environments as well, because it considers three distinct forms of mercury, and contains environmental media common to all rivers, including some (e.g. periphyton) not typically included in

  12. Feeding by grey seals in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and around Newfoundland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Hammill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet composition of grey seals in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Gulf and around the coast of Newfoundland, Canada, was examined using identification of otoliths recovered from digestive tracts. Prey were recovered from 632 animals. Twenty-nine different prey taxa were identified. Grey seals sampled in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence fed mainly on capelin, mackerel, wolffish and lumpfish during the spring, but consumed more cod, sandlance and winter flounder during late summer. Overall, the southern Gulf diet was more diverse, with sandlance, Atlantic cod, cunner, white hake and Atlantic herring dominating the diet. Capelin and winter flounder were the dominant prey in grey seals sampled from the east coast of Newfoundland, while Atlantic cod, flatfish and capelin were the most important prey from the south coast. Animals consumed prey with an average length of 20.4 cm (Range 4.2-99.2 cm. Capelin were the shortest prey (Mean = 13.9 cm, SE = 0.08, N = 1126, while wolffish were the longest with the largest fish having an estimated length of 99.2 cm (Mean = 59.4, SE = 2.8, N = 63. In the early 1990s most cod fisheries in Atlantic Canada were closed because of the collapse of the stocks. Since then they have shown limited sign of recovery. Diet samples from the west coast of Newfoundland indicate a decline in the contribution of cod to the diet from the pre-collapse to the postcollapse period, while samples from the southern Gulf indicate little change in the contribution of cod.

  13. 76 FR 20971 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Intent To File License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of..., 2011. d. Submitted By: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of Project... Regulatory Affairs, Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, California 95381, 209-883-8241 and...

  14. 77 FR 16828 - Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Dispute Resolution Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of... relicensing proceeding for the Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project No. 2299-075.\\1\\ Turlock Irrigation District and the Modesto Irrigation District (collectively, the Districts), are co-licensees for the Don Pedro...

  15. 77 FR 4291 - Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed... any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District, as the..., Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, CA 95381. Greg Dias or Representative, Modesto...

  16. 77 FR 5507 - Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed... any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District, as the..., Sacramento, CA 95816. Robert Nees, or Representative, Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, CA...

  17. 75 FR 66721 - Newspapers To Be Used for Publication of Legal Notice of Appealable Decisions and Publication of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ..., OK. Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, published daily in Little Rock... daily (Sunday through Friday) in Helena, AR. Sylamore Ranger District: Stone County Leader, published...

  18. 78 FR 21340 - Media Outlets for Publication of Legal and Action Notices in the Southern Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Gazette, published daily in Idabel, OK Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette..., published daily (Sunday through Friday) in Helena, AR Sylamore Ranger District: Stone County Leader...

  19. 76 FR 19030 - Newspapers To Be Used for Publication of Legal Notice of Appealable Decisions and Publication of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ..., OK. Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, published daily in Little Rock... Friday) in Helena, AR. Sylamore Ranger District: Stone County Leader, published weekly (Wednesday) in...

  20. 75 FR 20807 - Newspapers To Be Used for Publication of Legal Notice of Appealable Decisions and Publication of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ..., OK. Poteau-Cold Springs Ranger District: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, published daily in Little Rock... Helena, AR. Sylamore Ranger District: Stone County Leader, published weekly (Wednesday) in Mountain View...

  1. 76 FR 75866 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Comments, Decisions and Objections by Forest Supervisor and Santa Catalina Ranger District are published in... and El Rito Ranger District Notices are published in:--``Rio Grande Sun'', Espanola, New Mexico...

  2. Improved secondary oil recovery by controlled waterflooding-pilot demonstration: Ranger Zone, Fault Block VII, Wilmington Field. Phase IV. Quarterly report, April-June 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-12

    The project is an improved waterflood demonstration of alkaline water-flooding in a typical well flood pattern of the Ranger Zone of the Long Beach Unit portion of the Wilmington Field. A mixture of 0.4% sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate in fresh water containing 0.75 to 1.0% salt is being injected to improve oil recovery. The demonstration pattern in which D.O.E. participated involves the input of approximately 30,000 to 34,000 B/D water in 8 injection wells which surround 11 active producers in an area of 93 acres. Reservoir engineering studies have shown that the total area being affected by the injection in these 8 wells is much larger, being approximately 200 acres including areas situated both north and south. If the alkaline injection is successful, improved flood efficiency should occur as demonstrated by reduced water-oil ratios and increased oil recovery. Chemical injection continued in the quarter. A simple long term solution to the floc formed on mixing the dilute alkaline solution with the concentrated salt brine was not found. Alternating one week slug injection of soft water with alkali and then soft water with salt continued throughout the quarter. A four-hour soft water spacer with no chemicals was placed between the slugs. Injection and oil, water production data are presented. 7 figures, 1 table.

  3. Improved secondary oil recovery by controlled waterflooding-pilot demonstration: Ranger Zone, Fault Block VII, Wilmington Field. Phase IV. Quarterly report, January-March, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-12

    The project is an improved waterflood demonstration of alkaline waterflooding in a typical well flood pattern of the Ranger Zone of the Long Beach Unit portion of the Wilmington Field. A mixture of 0.4% sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate in fresh water containing 0.75 to 1.0% salt is being injected to improve oil recovery. The demonstration pattern in which DOE participated involves the input of approximately 30,000 to 34,000 B/D water in 8 injection wells which surround 11 active producers in an area of 93 acres. Reservoir engineering studies have shown that the total area being affected by the injection in these 8 wells is much larger, being approximately 200 acres including areas situated both north and south. If the alkaline injection is successful, improved flood efficiency should occur as demonstrated by reduced water-oil ratios and increased oil recovery. Chemical injection continued in the quarter. A simple long term solution to the floc formed on mixing the dilute alkaline solution with the concentrated salt brine was not found. Alternating one week slug injection of soft water with alkali and then soft water with salt continued throughout the quarter. A four-hour soft water spacer with no chemicals was placed between the slugs. Injection data and graphs showing performance of the area are presented. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Comparison of the McGrath® Series 5 and GlideScope® Ranger with the Macintosh laryngoscope by paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation performed by paramedics using the Macintosh blade for direct laryngoscopy is associated with a high incidence of complications. The novel technique of video laryngoscopy has been shown to improve glottic view and intubation success in the operating room. The aim of this study was to compare glottic view, time of intubation and success rate of the McGrath® Series 5 and GlideScope® Ranger video laryngoscopes with the Macintosh laryngoscope by paramedics. Methods Thirty paramedics performed six intubations in a randomised order with all three laryngoscopes in an airway simulator with a normal airway. Subsequently, every participant performed one intubation attempt with each device in the same manikin with simulated cervical spine rigidity using a cervical collar. Glottic view, time until visualisation of the glottis and time until first ventilation were evaluated. Results Time until first ventilation was equivalent after three intubations in the first scenario. In the scenario with decreased cervical motion, the time until first ventilation was longer using the McGrath® compared to the GlideScope® and AMacintosh (p ® device (p Conclusions The learning curve for video laryngoscopy in paramedics was steep in this study. However, these data do not support prehospital use of the McGrath® and GlideScope® devices by paramedics.

  5. Comparison of the McGrath® Series 5 and GlideScope® Ranger with the Macintosh laryngoscope by paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepho, Tim; Weinert, Kathrin; Heid, Florian M; Werner, Christian; Noppens, Rüdiger R

    2011-01-17

    Out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation performed by paramedics using the Macintosh blade for direct laryngoscopy is associated with a high incidence of complications. The novel technique of video laryngoscopy has been shown to improve glottic view and intubation success in the operating room. The aim of this study was to compare glottic view, time of intubation and success rate of the McGrath® Series 5 and GlideScope® Ranger video laryngoscopes with the Macintosh laryngoscope by paramedics. Thirty paramedics performed six intubations in a randomised order with all three laryngoscopes in an airway simulator with a normal airway. Subsequently, every participant performed one intubation attempt with each device in the same manikin with simulated cervical spine rigidity using a cervical collar. Glottic view, time until visualisation of the glottis and time until first ventilation were evaluated. Time until first ventilation was equivalent after three intubations in the first scenario. In the scenario with decreased cervical motion, the time until first ventilation was longer using the McGrath® compared to the GlideScope® and AMacintosh (p success rate for endotracheal intubation was similar for all three devices. Glottic view was only improved using the McGrath® device (p < 0.001) compared to using the Macintosh blade. The learning curve for video laryngoscopy in paramedics was steep in this study. However, these data do not support prehospital use of the McGrath® and GlideScope® devices by paramedics.

  6. Immune functions in the Fisher rat fed beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) blubber from the contaminated St. Lawrence estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapierre, P.; Guise, S. De [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Biologiques; Muir, D.C.G. [Freshwater Inst., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Norstrom, R. [Environment Canada, Hull, Quebec (Canada); Beland, P. [St. Lawrence National Inst. of Ecotoxicology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Fournier, M. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Biologiques]|[INRS-Sante, Pointe-Claire, Quebec (Canada)]|[IML, Mont Joli, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans

    1999-02-01

    In order to assess the immunotoxic potential of food naturally contaminated with PCBs and other organohalogens, Fisher rats were fed a diet in which the lipids originated from the blubber of either a highly polluted St. Lawrence beluga or a relatively uncontaminated Arctic beluga. After a period of 2 months, different immune functions were evaluated, including lymphoblastic transformation, natural killer cell activity, plaque-forming cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and immunophenotyping. For all assays, rats fed at St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet or a mixture of Arctic and St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet were not different from control rats fed a diet containing Arctic beluga blubber. These results are inconsistent with the well-known immunosuppressive effects of organochlorines in numerous species and with the lesions suggestive of organochlorine-related immunosuppression that are observed in St. Lawrence belugas. The lack of observable immunotoxic effects in rats fed contaminated beluga blubber might be explained by antagonistic effects in the organohalogen mixture, by a response specific to the rat, by a strain-related lack of sensitivity to organochlorines, or by insufficient dose due to the shortness of the exposure period or the route of exposure.

  7. A practical MRI grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee: Association with Kellgren–Lawrence radiographic scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee-Jin, E-mail: parkhiji@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo, E-mail: samskim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Yeon, E-mail: parkhiji@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Noh-Hyuck, E-mail: nhpark904@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yeon, E-mail: zzzz3@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Jung, E-mail: yoonchoi99@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyun-Jun, E-mail: ostrich-13@hanmail.net [Department of Occupational Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-ku, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To propose a reproducible and constant MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint that provides high interobserver and intraoberver agreement and that does not require complicated calculation procedures. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 44 men and 65 women who underwent both MRI and plain radiography of the knee at our institution. All patients were older than 50 years of age (mean 57.7) and had clinically suspected osteoarthritis of the knee. The standard of 4 grades on the MR grade scale was based mainly on cartilage injury and additional findings. Kellgren–Lawrence grades were assessed for the same patient group. The relationship between the results was determined. Statistical analyses were performed including kappa statistics, categorical regression analysis and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results: The interobserver and intraoberver agreements between the two readers in the grading of osteoarthritis were found to be almost perfect. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were slightly lower for the MR grading system than for the Kellgren–Lawrence grading scale. The correlation between the MR grade and Kellgren–Lawrence grade was very high and did not differ with patient age. The MR grades were highly correlated with the Kellgren–Lawrence grades and showed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreements. Conclusion: This new MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint is reproducible and may be helpful for the grading of osteoarthritis of the knee without requiring reference to plain radiography.

  8. Severe Dumping Syndrome in a 6-year-old Girl with Congenital Microgastria Treated by Hunt-Lawrence Pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filisetti, Claudia; Maestri, Luciano; Meroni, Milena; Marinoni, Federica; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Microgastria is a rare congenital condition often associated with other anomalies. In the present report we describe the case of a 6-year-old girl with isolated CM who presented with dumping syndrome successfully treated by a Hunt-Lawrence pouch.

  9. Lawrence Lessig, The architecture of access to scientific knowledge: just how badly we have messed this up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Pievatolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available E’ una conferenza tenuta da Lawrence Lessig al Cern di Ginevra il 18 aprile di quest’anno. Il suo video è disponibile presso il Cern Document Server; a partire da qui si possono trovare i sottotitoli in inglese e in altre lingue, compresa quella italiana. Lessig esordisce proponendo due impressioni. La prima è un effetto chiamato [...

  10. A spatiotemporal model for snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) stock size in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadigan, Noel G.; Wade, Elmer; Nielsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We develop a high-resolution spatiotemporal model of stock size and harvest rates for snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, which supports an economically important fishery off the east coast of Canada. It is a spatial and weekly model during 1997–2014 that utilize...

  11. 78 FR 40260 - International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Regulation The International Joint Commission (IJC) is inviting the public to comment on a proposal for managing... be included in the record of public comment. The International Joint Commission was established under...

  12. Certification of district heating substations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-01-15

    These Technical Regulations, F:103-6, have been produced and published by the Swedish District Heating Association in conjunction with manufacturers. Approved testing is part of the process of obtaining certification for a district heating substation. In addition, the process includes a review of documentation and of the manufacturer's production inspection procedures. A certified unit fulfils the requirements set out in the Association's document F:101, General Technical Requirements. Until further notice, the Association has selected SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden for certification of district heating substations. Certification means that the quality and function/performance of a prefabricated district heating substation have been examined and approved. Certification test method F:103-6 includes both static and dynamic tests and inspections. Detailed information on the district heating substation and its properties is given in the certification test reports. The unique feature of this certification is that the test reports are in the public domain. This is possible because the Association has full right of insight into the certification process, and because testing is performed in accordance with test programmes and procedures decided by the Association. In this document (F: 103-6), the Association specifies what is to be reported when SP carries out inspections at the manufacturer's premises. This can include details of claims lodged with the manufacturer and/or non-compliances with the required specification of the district heating substation. Such cases will be considered by a Certification Panel. Test reports and certificates provide information on the district heating substation's properties and performance, which can be used when assessing the substations. The technical tests do not address the long-term properties of substations, but SP's inspection specifically includes visual examination and application of its

  13. District heat in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langseth, Benedicte; Havskjold, Monica

    2009-03-15

    District heat regulation - in Sweden: New district heat law (2008). The district heat suppliers are instructed to negotiate the price and other terms of delivery with the costumers when requested by the costumers. If the parties are unable to find an agreement, the can have the authorities arbitrate for them. More openness (e.g. annual reports). In Finland: The district heat suppliers decide their own prices. Has to reflect the costs, but allow for district heat expansion and a reasonable profit. Same price for same type of costumers. Regulated by general legislation (competition and consumer protection legislation). In Denmark: Designated areas for district heat and natural gas where electric heating is prohibited. 'Hvile i seg selv' principle. In Norway: District heat concessions are mandatory for installations over 10 MW. The municipality can decide that connection is mandatory, but not use of district heat. District heat price can not exceed electricity price. (AG)

  14. Mo & Fe Influences on Nitrate Assimilation in Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, M. R.; Salk, K.; Avolio, L. N.; Chappaz, A.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Ontario has undergone a steady increase in nitrate since the early 1970s, a phenomenon also occurring in other large lakes. Possible causes of this increase include rising urban and agricultural runoff, atmospheric deposition, less demand for N due to effective point source P control, and trace metal-N co-limitation as observed in Lake Erie. Despite the abundance of nitrate in Lake Ontario, heterocystous cyanobacteria have been detected here setting up the paradoxical situation wherein some cyanobacteria are investing in the more costly diazotrophy whilst surrounded by a form of N that requires less energy and metal quota to assimilate. Mo and Fe are involved in reductive nitrate assimilation making it possible that reductive nitrate assimilation in Lake Ontario is limited in phytoplankton by low trace metal bioavailability. To test this hypothesis, 1-d enrcihment experiments were conducted using trace metal clean techniques in June 2013 at two coastal sites in Lake Ontario, and 4-d enrichment experiments were conducted in July 2013 on main channel waters of the St. Lawrence River, the outflow of Lake Ontario. Water was sampled from the metalimnion of Lake Ontario and from surface water of the main channel of the river. Water was enriched with the the following treatments in triplicate: control, 100 nM KH2PO4, 50 nM FeCl3, 50 nM Na2MoO4, and a mix of P, Fe & Mo. Experiments in the river showed significant effects due to P (increase in Chl-a, NO3 and SiO2 drawdown, changes in phytoplankton community, increase in photosynthetic efficiency [Fv/Fm]) but less impact of trace metals relative to control, presumably due to greater ambient trace metal bioavailability. As measured using FluoroProbe, the phytoplankton community changed very little (over 1 d) in lake waters; there was no significant change in total chl-a. However, as in the river, Fv/Fm revealed significant metal and P effects with the P, Fe & Mo mix being significantly greater than control (Fig. 1; we

  15. Final Report for the Arroyo Las Positas Maintenance Impact Study, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hattem, M; Paterson, L

    2006-01-12

    In 2000, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Environmental Protection Department, in coordination with Plant Engineering (PE), began dredging sections of the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP) to alleviate concerns about flooding of sensitive facilities within the mainsite of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to reduce potential impacts on the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii), LLNL proposed to dredge sections of the ALP in a ''checkerboard pattern'', resulting in a mosaic of open water habitat and vegetated sections (Figure 1). The Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan (Plan) was coordinated with both state and federal agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Game (CDF&G), San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (SFRWQCB), and the Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE). Water Discharge Requirements (WDRs) were issued for this project on December 30, 1999 (Order No. 99-086) by the SFRWQCB. Provision 19 of the WDRs outlined a five-year (2000 through 2004) Maintenance Impact Study (MIS) that LLNL began in coordination with dredging work that was conducted as part of the Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan. Provision 20 of these WDRs requires LLNL to submit a final report of the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for this project to the SFRWQCB. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for Arroyo Las Positas and meet the requirements of Provision 20. A description of the annual monitoring included in this Maintenance Impact Study is included in the methods section of this report. Initially the Plan called for dredging the entire length of the Arroyo Las Positas (approximately 6,981 linear feet) over a 5-year period to minimize temporal impacts on the California red-legged frog. Dredging occurred in 2000 ({approx}1,300 ft.), 2001 ({approx}800 ft.), and 2002 ({approx}1,200 ft.), which

  16. Numerical analysis of temperature distribution due to basement radiogenic heat production, St. Lawrence Lowlands, eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hejuan; Giroux, Bernard; Harris, Lyal B.; Mansour, John

    2017-04-01

    Although eastern Canada is considered as having a low potential for high-temperature geothermal resources, the possibility for additional localized radioactive heat sources in Mesoproterozoic Grenvillian basement to parts of the Palaeozoic St. Lawrence Lowlands in Quebec, Canada, suggests that this potential should be reassessed. However, such a task remains hard to achieve due to scarcity of heat flow data and ambiguity about the nature of the basement. To get an appraisal, the impact of radiogenic heat production for different Grenville Province crystalline basement units on temperature distribution at depth was simulated using the Underworld Geothermal numerical modelling code. The region south of Trois-Rivières was selected as representative for the St. Lawrence Lowlands. An existing 3D geological model based on well log data, seismic profiles and surface geology was used to build a catalogue of plausible thermal models. Statistical analyses of radiogenic element (U, Th, K) concentrations from neighbouring outcropping Grenville domains indicate that the radiogenic heat production of rocks in the modelled region is in the range of 0.34-3.24 μW/m3, with variations in the range of 0.94-5.83 μW/m3 for the Portneuf-Mauricie (PM) Domain, 0.02-4.13 μW/m3 for the Shawinigan Domain (Morin Terrane), and 0.34-1.96 μW/m3 for the Parc des Laurentides (PDL) Domain. Various scenarios considering basement characteristics similar to the PM domain, Morin Terrane and PDL Domain were modelled. The results show that the temperature difference between the scenarios can be as much as 12 °C at a depth of 5 km. The results also show that the temperature distribution is strongly affected by both the concentration of radiogenic elements and the thermal conductivity of the basement rocks. The thermal conductivity in the basement affects the trend of temperature change between two different geological units, and the spatial extent of thermal anomalies. The validity of the results was

  17. Populations, productivity, and feeding habits of seabirds on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska: Final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Hatch, Scott A.; Roberts, Bay D.; Lidster, Wayne W.; Wells, John L.; Haney, J. Christopher

    1988-01-01

    A field camp was established at Kongkok Bay near the southwest cape of St. Lawrence Island and occupied continuously from 24 May to 2 September 1987. Permanent study plots were selected for both cliff and crevice-nesting species, and regular observations were made throughout the breeding season to document attendance patterns, breeding phenology, and success. Periodic collections of adults offshore and of chick meals in the colonies were used to determine the food habits of study species. Additional plots for population monitoring of murres and kittiwakes were established in colonies near Savoonga on the north side of the island, and counts were made there between 23 July and 1 August. Shore based work was supplemented with offshore studies of seabird foraging distribution from the USFWS vessel TIGLAX between 18 August and 3 September 1987.Populations of all study species in the Kongkok Bay area increased since the last study of seabirds there (murres 20, kittiwakes 87, Least Auklets 8, Crested Auklets 442). Pelagic Cormorants, Common Murres, and Thick-billed Murres exhibited average, or above average, breeding success at Kongkok in 1987. Black-legged Kittiwakes exhibited near-total reproductive failure. Crested and Least Auklets had high levels of breeding success after the effects of observer disturbance were taken into account. Predation by microtine rodents and foxes was a significant source of chick mortality on auklets.Feeding concentrations were found primarily north of Gambell in the Anadyr Strait or western Chirikof Basin. Kittiwakes were dispersed widely over the study area. Diets of all species studied were normal and, with the exception of kittiwakes, there was no evidence of problems in obtaining food.Current methods for assessing population changes in cliff-nesting species are considered adequate, but better techniques are needed for crevice-nesting auklets. Time-lapse photography offers the greatest potential for monitoring auklet numbers. A protocol

  18. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tests - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A

    2011-02-28

    This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and supports the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper

  19. Industrial District as a Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza MOHAMMADY GARFAMY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comparison study of industrial districts in two European countries, Spain and Sweden, using the conceptual framework of corporation. The relevance of this approach is based on the specific qualities that the industrial districts have, including the preexisting conditions, local traditions, products and production characteristics, marketing strategies, local policies and present challenges. The findings indicate the ways in which different patterns of inter-firm relationships, organization of production and dynamics of local alliances have shaped divergent regional responses to the industrial construction.

  20. 76 FR 30094 - Central Montana Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Judith Ranger District, 109 Central Ave. Written comments may be submitted as described under... Judith Ranger District. Please call ahead to (406) 566-2292 to facilitate entry into the building to view comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wiseman, District Ranger, Lewis and Clark National Forest...

  1. 75 FR 16422 - Plumas National Forest, California, Keddie Ridge Hazardous Fuels Reduction Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... USDA Forest Service, Plumas National Forest, Mt. Hough Ranger District will prepare and environmental..., Interdisciplinary Team Leader, Mt. Hough Ranger District, 39696 Highway 70, Quincy, CA 95971. Comments may be: (1..., Interdisciplinary Team Leader, Mt. Hough Ranger District, 39696 Highway 70, Quincy, CA 95971. Telephone: (530) 283...

  2. 76 FR 34034 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices by the Intermountain Region; Utah, Idaho, Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... portion: Reno Gazette-Journal Austin District Ranger decisions: The Battle Mountain Bugle Bridgeport and...-Journal Regional Forester decisions affecting National Forests in Wyoming: Casper Star-Tribune Regional... District Ranger decisions: Messenger-Index District Ranger decisions for Idaho City and Mountain Home...

  3. 78 FR 33799 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices by the Intermountain Region; Utah, Idaho, Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... Spring Mountains National Recreation Area District Ranger decisions: Las Vegas Review Journal Tonopah... decisions affecting National Forests in Nevada: Reno Gazette-Journal Regional Forester decisions affecting... District Ranger decisions for Idaho City and Mountain Home: Idaho Statesman Lowman District Ranger...

  4. Future Services for District Heating Solutions in Residential Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannele Ahvenniemi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The underlying assumption of this study is that in order to retain the competitiveness while reaching for the EU targets regarding low-energy construction, district heating companies need to develop new business and service models. How district heating companies could broaden their perspective and switch to a more service-oriented way of thinking is a key interest of our research. The used methods in our study are house builder interviews and a questionnaire. With the help of these methods we discussed the potential interest in heating related services acquiring a comprehensive understanding of the customer needs. The results indicate the importance of certain criteria when choosing the heating system in households: easiness, comfort and affordability seem to dominate the house builders’ preferences. Also environmental awareness seems to be for many an important factor when making a decision about the heating of the house. Altogether, based on the results of this study, we suggest that the prospects of district heating could benefit from highlighting certain aspects and strengths in the future. District heating companies need to increase flexibility, readiness to adopt new services, to invest in new marketing strategies and improving the communication skills.

  5. Application and optimization of input parameter spaces in mass flow modelling: a case study with r.randomwalk and r.ranger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Julia; Zangerl, Christian; Mergili, Martin

    2017-04-01

    r.randomwalk is a GIS-based, multi-functional, conceptual open source model application for forward and backward analyses of the propagation of mass flows. It relies on a set of empirically derived, uncertain input parameters. In contrast to many other tools, r.randomwalk accepts input parameter ranges (or, in case of two or more parameters, spaces) in order to directly account for these uncertainties. Parameter spaces represent a possibility to withdraw from discrete input values which in most cases are likely to be off target. r.randomwalk automatically performs multiple calculations with various parameter combinations in a given parameter space, resulting in the impact indicator index (III) which denotes the fraction of parameter value combinations predicting an impact on a given pixel. Still, there is a need to constrain the parameter space used for a certain process type or magnitude prior to performing forward calculations. This can be done by optimizing the parameter space in terms of bringing the model results in line with well-documented past events. As most existing parameter optimization algorithms are designed for discrete values rather than for ranges or spaces, the necessity for a new and innovative technique arises. The present study aims at developing such a technique and at applying it to derive guiding parameter spaces for the forward calculation of rock avalanches through back-calculation of multiple events. In order to automatize the work flow we have designed r.ranger, an optimization and sensitivity analysis tool for parameter spaces which can be directly coupled to r.randomwalk. With r.ranger we apply a nested approach where the total value range of each parameter is divided into various levels of subranges. All possible combinations of subranges of all parameters are tested for the performance of the associated pattern of III. Performance indicators are the area under the ROC curve (AUROC) and the factor of conservativeness (FoC). This

  6. A Comparison between Local and Global Spaceborne Chlorophyll Indices in the St. Lawrence Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Montes-Hugo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne chlorophyll indices based on red fluorescence (wavelength = 680 nm and water leaving radiance (Lw in the visible spectrum (i.e., 400–700 nm were evaluated in the St Lawrence Estuary (SLE during September of 2011. Relationships between chlorophyll concentration (chl and fluorescence were constructed based on fluorescence line height (FLH measurements derived from a compact laser-based spectrofluorometer developed by ENEA (CASPER and using spectral bands corresponding to the satellite sensor MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer. Chlorophyll concentration as estimated from CASPER (chlCASPER was relatively high NE of the MTZ (upper Estuary, and nearby areas influenced by fronts or freshwater plumes derived from secondary rivers (lower estuary. These findings agree with historical shipboard measurements. In general, global chl products calculated from Lw had large biases (up to 27-fold overestimation and 50-fold underestimation with respect to chlCASPER values. This was attributed to the smaller interference of detritus (mineral + organic non-living particulates and chromophoric dissolved organic matter on chlCASPER estimates. We encourage the use of spectrofluorometry for developing and validating remote sensing models of chl in SLE waters and other coastal environments characterized by relatively low to moderate (<10 g·m−3 concentrations of detritus.

  7. Plasma experiments with 1. 06-. mu. m lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Manes, K.R.; Storm, E.K.; Boyle, M.J.; Brooks, K.M.; Haas, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Rupert, V.C.

    1976-12-20

    Recent laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have provided basic data concerning: laser beam propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas, electron energy transport processes that transfer the absorbed laser energy to the high-density ablation region, the general fluid dynamic expansion and compression of the heated plasma, and the processes responsible for the production of 14-MeV neutrons during implosion experiments. Irradiation experiments were performed with Nd:YAG glass laser systems: the two-beam Janus (less than or equal to40 J/100 ps, approx.0.4 TW) and Argus (less than or equal to140 J, 35 ps, approx.4 TW), and the single beam Cyclops (less than or equal to70 J/100 ps, approx.0.7 TW). Two classes of targets have been used: glass microshells (approx.40 to 120 ..mu..m in diameter with approx.0.75-..mu..m-thick walls) filled with an equimolar deuterium-tritium mixture, and disks (approx.160 to 600 ..mu..m in diameter and approx. 10 ..mu..m thick) of several compositions. The targets were supported in vacuum (pressure less than or equal to10/sup -5/ Torr) by thin glass stalks. This paper reports on results related to the propagation, absorption, and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets.

  8. Cost benefit analysis of waste compaction alternatives at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a cost benefit analysis of the potential procurement and operation of various solid waste compactors, or, of the use of commercial compaction services, for compaction of solid transuranic (TRU), low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. The cost benefit analysis was conducted to determine if increased compaction capacity at HWM might afford the potential for significant waste volume reduction and annual savings in material, shipping, labor, and disposal costs. In the following cost benefit analysis, capital costs and recurring costs of increased HWM compaction capabilities are considered. Recurring costs such as operating and maintenance costs are estimated based upon detailed knowledge of system parameters. When analyzing the economic benefits of enhancing compaction capabilities, continued use of the existing HWM compaction units is included for comparative purposes. In addition, the benefits of using commercial compaction services instead of procuring a new compactor system are evaluated. 31 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  9. Building an internet-based workflow system - the case of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, C. W., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr System provides a showcase for the ways in which emerging technologies can help streamline procurement processes and improve the coordination between participants in engineering projects by allowing collaboration in ways that have not been possible before. The project also shows the success of a highly pragmatic approach that was initiated by the end user community, and that intentionally covered standard situations, rather than aiming at also automating the exceptions. By helping push purchasing responsibilities down to the end user, thereby greatly reducing the involvement of the purchasing department in operational activities, it was possible to streamline the process significantly resulting in time savings of up to 90%, major cost reductions, and improved quality. Left with less day-to- day purchasing operations, the purchasing department has more time for strategic tasks such as selecting and pre-qualifying new suppliers, negotiating blanket orders, or implementing new procurement systems. The case shows once more that the use of information technologies can result in major benefits when aligned with organizational adjustments.

  10. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  11. Fire History of Appalachian Forests of the Lower St-Lawrence Region (Southern Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Payette

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugar maple (Acer saccharum forests are among the main forest types of eastern North America. Sugar maple stands growing on Appalachian soils of the Lower St-Lawrence region are located at the northeastern limit of the northern hardwood forest zone. Given the biogeographical position of these forests at the edge of the boreal biome, we aimed to reconstruct the fire history and document the occurrence of temperate and boreal trees in sugar maple sites during the Holocene based on soil macrocharcoal analysis. Despite having experienced a different number of fire events, the fire history of the maple sites was broadly similar, with two main periods of fire activity, i.e., early- to mid-Holocene and late-Holocene. A long fire-free interval of at least 3500 years separated the two periods from the mid-Holocene to 2000 years ago. The maple sites differ with respect to fire frequency and synchronicity of the last millennia. According to the botanical composition of charcoal, forest vegetation remained relatively homogenous during the Holocene, except recently. Conifer and broadleaf species coexisted in mixed forests during the Holocene, in phase with fire events promoting the regeneration of boreal and temperate tree assemblages including balsam fir (Abies balsamea and sugar maple.

  12. Special-Status Plant Species Surveys and Vegetation Mapping at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-10-03

    This report presents the results of Jones & Stokes special-status plant surveys and vegetation mapping for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Special-status plant surveys were conducted at Site 300 in April to May 1997 and in March to April 2002. Eight special-status plants were identified at Site 300: large-flowered fiddleneck, big tarplant, diamond-petaled poppy, round-leaved filaree, gypsum-loving larkspur, California androsace, stinkbells, and hogwallow starfish. Maps identifying the locations of these species, a discussion of the occurrence of these species at Site 300, and a checklist of the flora of Site 300 are presented. A reconnaissance survey of the LLNL Livermore Site was conducted in June 2002. This survey concluded that no special-status plants occur at the Livermore Site. Vegetation mapping was conducted in 2001 at Site 300 to update a previous vegetation study done in 1986. The purpose of the vegetation mapping was to update and to delineate more precisely the boundaries between vegetation types and to map vegetation types that previously were not mapped. The vegetation map is presented with a discussion of the vegetation classification used.

  13. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  14. Climate systems modeling on massively parallel processing computers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, W.F.; Mirin, A.A.; Bolstad, J.H. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A comprehensive climate system model is under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The basis for this model is a consistent coupling of multiple complex subsystem models, each describing a major component of the Earth`s climate. Among these are general circulation models of the atmosphere and ocean, a dynamic and thermodynamic sea ice model, and models of the chemical processes occurring in the air, sea water, and near-surface land. The computational resources necessary to carry out simulations at adequate spatial resolutions for durations of climatic time scales exceed those currently available. Distributed memory massively parallel processing (MPP) computers promise to affordably scale to the computational rates required by directing large numbers of relatively inexpensive processors onto a single problem. We have developed a suite of routines designed to exploit current generation MPP architectures via domain and functional decomposition strategies. These message passing techniques have been implemented in each of the component models and in their coupling interfaces. Production runs of the atmospheric and oceanic components performed on the National Environmental Supercomputing Center (NESC) Cray T3D are described.

  15. Delineation of Waters of the United States for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-09-25

    This report presents the results of a delineation of waters of the United States, including wetlands, for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California. Jones & Stokes mapped vegetation at Site 300 in August, 2001, using Global Positioning System (GPS) data recorders to collect point locations and to record linear features and map unit polygons. We identified wetlands boundaries in the field on the basis of the plant community present. We returned to collect additional information on wetland soils on July 3, 2002. Forty-six wetlands were identified, with a total area of 3.482 hectares (8.605 acres). The wetlands include vernal pools, freshwater seeps, and seasonal ponds. Wetlands appearing to meet the criteria for federal jurisdictional total 1.776 hectares (4.388 acres). A delineation map is presented and a table is provided with information on the type, size, characteristic plant species of each wetland, and a preliminary jurisdictional assessment.

  16. Update of Earthquake Strong-Motion Instrumentation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Robert C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Following the January 1980 earthquake that was felt at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a network of strong-motion accelerographs was installed at LLNL. Prior to the 1980 earthquake, there were no accelerographs installed. The ground motion from the 1980 earthquake was estimated from USGS instruments around the Laboratory to be between 0.2 – 0.3 g horizontal peak ground acceleration. These instruments were located at the Veterans Hospital, 5 miles southwest of LLNL, and in San Ramon, about 12 miles west of LLNL. In 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested to know the status of our seismic instruments. We conducted a survey of our instrumentation systems and responded to DOE in a letter. During this survey, it was found that the recorders in Buildings 111 and 332 were not operational. The instruments on Nova had been removed, and only three of the 10 NIF instruments installed in 2005 were operational (two were damaged and five had been removed from operation at the request of the program). After the survey, it was clear that the site seismic instrumentation had degraded substantially and would benefit from an overhaul and more attention to ongoing maintenance. LLNL management decided to update the LLNL seismic instrumentation system. The updated system is documented in this report.

  17. Mitigation Monitoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY00 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcguff, R R

    2003-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed eight years of implementing the mitigation measures from the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of LLNL and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. This eighth annual report documents LLNL's implementation of the mitigation measures during the fiscal year ending September 30, 2000 (FY00). It provides background information on the mitigation measures, describes activities undertaken during FY00, and documents changes in the monitoring program. Table 1 on page 12, provides a numerical listing of each mitigation measure, the department responsible for implementing it, and the location within this report where the status is discussed. The discussion of the mitigation measures is organized by the University of California (UC)'s three categories of approaches to implementation: project-specific, service-level and administrative. Table 2 on page 19, Table 6 on page 55, and Table 7 on page 63 provide a detailed discussion of each mitigation measure, including LLNL's implementation strategy and the status as of the end of the fiscal year. Table 3 on page 37, Table 4 on page 46, and Table 5 on page 47 list each construction project undertaken in FY00 and the mitigation measures implemented.

  18. Interview with Lawrence Weed, MD— The Father of the Problem-Oriented Medical Record Looks Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lee

    2009-01-01

    I first met Lawrence Weed, MD, in 1972 when I was a third-year medical student at the University of Vermont. To this day I remember his passion for a disciplined approach to medical record documentation to optimize the care provided to each individual patient. Now, 35 years later, I was privileged to meet with Dr Weed at his home in Vermont. We discussed when he first was alerted to the nonscientific approach clinicians use to make decisions on patients. The rest of the interview time was spent with Dr Weed teaching me about the solution that he has spent the last 30 years designing and implementing. This interview is published to complement the editorial in the most recent issue of The Permanente Journal (Spring 2009;13[2]:85-7). We believe that in the era of health care reform and quality improvement initiatives, it is important that the medical community take a close look at Dr Weed's total approach decision-making information support defined in this interview. — Lee Jacobs, MD PMID:20740095

  19. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-30

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  20. The Secret Life of Archives: Sally Siddons, Sir Thomas Lawrence, and The Material of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Engel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay is in two parts, in the first I attempt to map out strategies for considering archival materials through the lens of performance, and in the second I enact or perform some of those strategies through a close reading of a letter from Sally Siddons, daughter of the famous actress Sarah Siddons, to the renown portrait painter and rakish bad boy, Sir Thomas Lawrence. I present a methodology that considers archival researchers as tourists who approach archival objects and images as material for curating a virtual exhibition. I argue that this strategy allows us to recognize and attempt to envision the interdisciplinary relationship amongst archival materials in order to imagine them in spatial, theatrical, and visual proximity to one another. In this way as researchers we are performing a kind of re-enactment, an animation, of the secret life of archives, which attempts to account the embodied traces of the past by providing an accessible thought provoking map for audiences.

  1. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  2. Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V. R., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

  3. Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hetch Hetchy Pump Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, L; Kato, T; Van Hattem, M

    2007-06-28

    The purpose of this biological assessment is to review the proposed Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project in sufficient detail to determine to what extent the proposed action may affect any of the threatened, endangered, proposed, or sensitive species and designated or proposed critical habitats listed below. In addition, the following information is provided to comply with statutory requirements to use the best scientific and commercial information available when assessing the risks posed to listed and/or proposed species and designated and/or proposed critical habitat by proposed federal actions. This biological assessment is prepared in accordance with legal requirements set forth under regulations implementing Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (50 CFR 402; 16 U.S.C 1536 (c)). It is our desire for the Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project to receive incidental take coverage for listed species and critical habitat within the greater project area by means of amending the previous formal Section 7 consultation (1-1-04-F-0086) conducted a few hundred meters downstream by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2002. All conservation measures, terms and conditions, and reporting requirements from the previous Biological Opinion (1-1-04-F-0086) have been adopted for this Biological Assessment and/or amendment.

  4. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory East Avenue/Emergency Response Planning Traffic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiegel, T

    2002-02-15

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) are located at the eastern end of the City of Livermore. Recently the research facilities have been placed on heightened security alerts due to the events of September 11. To respond to the security concerns, LLNL and SNL have proposed to place East Avenue between South Vasco Road and Greenville Road under administrative control. This type of control would require security check points at both ends of this segment of East Avenue, including a truck inspection facility west of the Greenville Road intersection. In this configuration, East Avenue would be closed to general public traffic. The purpose of this traffic study is to determine the potential traffic impact of placing East Avenue under administrative control. The primary focus of the traffic study is to evaluate the proposed modifications to the geometry and operation of East Avenue between South Vasco Road and Greenville Road. The study also includes a review of a traffic study prepared for the closure of East Avenue in 1989 to determine if the assumptions and conclusions of that study remain valid.

  6. Workplace investigation of increased diagnosis of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.H. II; Patterson, H.W.; Hatch, F.; Discher, D.; Schneider, J.S.; Bennett, D.

    1994-08-01

    Based on rates for the surrounding communities, the diagnosis rate of malignant melanoma for employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 1972 to 1977 was three to four times higher than expected. In 1984 Austin and Reynolds concluded, as a result of a case-control study, that five occupational factors were {open_quotes}causally associated{close_quotes} with melanoma risk at LLNL. These factors were: (1) exposure to radioactive materials, (2) work at Site 300, (3) exposure to volatile photographic chemicals, (4) presence at the Pacific Test Site, and (5) chemist duties. Subsequent reviews of the Austin and Reynolds report concluded that the methods used were appropriate and correctly carried out. These reports did determine, however, that Austin and Reynolds` conclusion concerning a causal relationship between occupational factors and melanoma among employees was overstated. There is essentially no supporting evidence linking the occupational factors with melanoma from animal studies or human epidemiology. Our report summarizes the results of further investigation of potential occupational factors.

  7. Screening Program Reduced Melanoma Mortality at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1984-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, MD, J S; II, PhD, D; MD, PhD, M

    2006-10-12

    Worldwide incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased substantially, and no screening program has yet demonstrated reduction in mortality. We evaluated the education, self examination and targeted screening campaign at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from its beginning in July 1984 through 1996. The thickness and crude incidence of melanoma from the years before the campaign were compared to those obtained during the 13 years of screening. Melanoma mortality during the 13-year period was based on a National Death Index search. Expected yearly deaths from melanoma among LLNL employees were calculated by using California mortality data matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and adjusted to exclude deaths from melanoma diagnosed before the program began or before employment at LLNL. After the program began, crude incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm decreased from 18 to 4 cases per 100,000 person-years (p = 0.02), while melanoma less than 0.75mm remained stable and in situ melanoma increased substantially. No eligible melanoma deaths occurred among LLNL employees during the screening period compared with a calculated 3.39 expected deaths (p = 0.034). Education, self examination and selective screening for melanoma at LLNL significantly decreased incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm and reduced the melanoma-related mortality rate to zero. This significant decrease in mortality rate persisted for at least 3 yr after employees retired or otherwise left the laboratory.

  8. National strategic challenges and the role of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Chrzanowski, P.L.; Werne, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The end of the Cold War was a water-shed event in history--an event that calls for re-evaluation of the basic assumptions and priorities of US national security that have gone essentially unchallenged for nearly 50 years. Central to this re-evaluation are the changing needs for federal Science and Technology (S and T) investment to underpin national and economic security and the role of the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories in fulfilling those needs. The three nuclear weapons laboratories-Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)-are major constituents of DOE`s national laboratory system. They helped win the Cold War, and will undoubtedly continue to support US security S and T requirements. This paper discusses of the role these three laboratories, and LLNL in particular, can play in supporting the nation`s S and T priorities. The paper also highlights some of the changes that are necessary for the laboratories to effectively support the national S and T and economic competitiveness agenda. These issues are important to DOE and laboratory managers responsible for the development of strategic direction and implementation plans.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

    1981-08-21

    The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

  10. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  11. Competition with Charters Motivates Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Marc J.; Lueken, Martin F.; Egalite, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of market-based education reform often argue that introducing charter schools and other school choice policies creates a competitive dynamic that will prompt low-performing districts to improve their practice. Rather than simply providing an alternative to neighborhood public schools for a handful of students, the theory says, school…

  12. health in Wakiso District, Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objective: Bride price payment is a gender issue with implications on gender relations in different socio-cultural contexts. It also impacts. Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights. In a qualitative study on the perceptions of domestic violence in Wakiso district, payment of bride price emerged as one of the ...

  13. Location - Managed Facility - St. Paul District (MVP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — St. Paul District - US Army Corps of Engineers Managed Facility locations. District headquarters, Natural Resource, Recreation, Lock and Dam, and Regulatory offices...

  14. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor District, Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes activities for Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor...

  15. Iowa Congressional Districts for 2013-2022

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Congressional district boundaries, enacted April 19, 2011, effective beginning with the elections in 2012 for the 113th U.S. Congress. The districts will remain in...

  16. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor District, Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes activities for Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor...

  17. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor District, Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes activities for Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor...

  18. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor District, Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes activities for Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor...

  19. Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge : Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor District, Savanna District : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge summarizes activities for Winona District, La Crosse District, McGregor...

  20. U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This layer is a polygonal dataset that represents land and maritime boundaries for each representative United States Coast Guard district, which includes district 1,...

  1. ranger en prison : « Mes fers sont prêts ; la liberté m’inspire ; Je vais chanter son hymne glorieux »

    OpenAIRE

    Leterrier, Sophie-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Le célèbre chansonnier Béranger a fait deux séjours en prison sous la Restauration. L’article analyse comment ces épisodes ont servi sa popularité, dans le cadre d’une véritable stratégie, passant à la fois par la diffusion des textes et par l’image. Il analyse les chansons écrites en prison, et montre comment elles illustrent la position du chansonnier et son défi au pouvoir. The famous Beranger was sent to prison twice during Restoration. The contribution shows how theses incarcerations ...

  2. 75 FR 35778 - Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of... Competing Applications June 16, 2010. On February 1, 2010, Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal...

  3. 75 FR 43958 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Application for Amendment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of...: May 24, 2010. d. Applicant: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of.... g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 USC 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Turlock Irrigation...

  4. Groundwater and geothermal: urban district heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounts, R.; Frazier, A.; Wood, E.; Pyles, O.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes how several cities use groundwater and geothermal energy in district heating systems. It begins with groundwater, introducing the basic technology and techniques of development, and describing two case studies of cities with groundwater-based district heating systems. The second half of the report consists of three case studies of cities with district heating systems using higher temperature geothermal resources.

  5. School District Leadership: Systems, Strategies, and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovash, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    The researcher studied eight Minnesota school district leadership systems, strategies, and structures and the effect on student achievement. Quantitative research methods were used to collect data from the eight Minnesota school districts. The population included eight northwestern Minnesota public school districts identified for "Needing…

  6. The Phantom Mandate: District Capacity for Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Judy; Hange, Jane; Copeland, Glenda

    Nearly every state focuses on implementing standards-based systems but supports educational reform in as many different ways as there are states. An examination of 15 districts located in 13 states suggests, however, that some states and districts have policies and practices in common that support a district's capacity for reform, whether there is…

  7. Sharing Local Revenue: One District's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, David S.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of U.S. school districts are considered independent and have taxing authority; the remaining districts rely on revenue and budgetary approval from their local government. In the latter case, localities often use some form of negotiated process to determine the amount of revenue their school districts will receive. Typically, a…

  8. Characteristics of High-Performing School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Azah, Vera N.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study inquired about characteristics of districts which influence changes in student achievement and how those characteristics are developed. Staff in 49 Ontario districts were surveyed to estimate the status of nine district characteristics on changes in provincial tests of math and language achievement over five years. A…

  9. Cyclone hazard proneness of districts of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Out of 96 districts, 12 are very highly prone, 41 are highly prone, 30 are moderately prone, and the remaining 13 districts are less prone. This classification of coastal districts based on hazard may be considered for all the required purposes including coastal zone management and planning. However, the vulnerability of the ...

  10. The Philadelphia School District's Ongoing Financial Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, John; Kuperberg, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the budget crisis that the School District of Philadelphia has faced for the past few years. Three specific events triggered the 2012 crisis: an abrupt reduction in federal and state funding, the inability of the district to cut many of its costs, and political pressures on the district to spend available revenues in a given…

  11. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300, Biological Review, January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Lisa E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, Jim S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) is required to conduct an ecological review at least every five years to ensure that biological and contaminant conditions in areas undergoing remediation have not changed such that existing conditions pose an ecological hazard (Dibley et al. 2009a). This biological review is being prepared by the Natural Resources Team within LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area (EFA) to support the 2013 five-year ecological review.

  13. A case-control study of malignant melanoma among Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employees: A critical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupper, L.L.; Setzer, R.W.; Schwartzbaum, J.; Janis, J.

    1987-07-01

    This document reports on a reevaluation of data obtained in a previous report on occupational factors associated with the development of malignant melanomas at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current report reduces the number of these factors from five to three based on a rigorous statistical analysis of the original data. Recommendations include restructuring the original questionnaire and trying to contact more individuals that worked with volatile photographic chemicals. 17 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs. (TEM)

  14. Forecasting the Major Influences of Predation and Environment on Cod Recovery in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Bousquet; Emmanuel Chassot; Duplisea, Daniel E.; Mike O Hammill

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring thi...

  15. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research

  16. Visibility of St Lawrence belugas to aerial photography, estimated by direct observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The depleted population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the St Lawrence estuary, Canada, was monitored by periodic photographic aerial surveys. In order to correct counts made on aerial survey film and to obtain an estimate of the true size of the population, the diving behaviour and the visibility from the air of these animals was studied. A Secchi-disk turbidity survey in the belugas’ summer range showed that water clarity varied between 1.5 m and 11.6 m. By studying aerial photographs of sheet-plastic models of belugas that had been sunk to different depths below the surface, we found that models of white adults could be seen down to about the same depth as a Secchi disk, but no deeper. Smaller models of dark-grey juveniles could only be seen down to about 50% of Secchi-disk depth. By observing groups of belugas from a hovering helicopter and recording their disappearances and re-appearances, it was found that they were visible for 44.3% of the time, and that an appropriate correction for single photographs would be to multiply the photographic count by about 222% (SE 20%. For surveys in which there was overlap between adjacent frames, the estimated correction would be 209% (SE 16%. This correction factor was slightly conservative and gave an estimate of the true size of the population, based on a single survey, of 1,202 belugas (SE 189 in 1997. An estimate for 1997 based on smoothing 5 surveys 1988–1997 was 1,238 (SE 119.

  17. Preliminary simulation of contaminant migration in ground water at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, A.F.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKereghan, P.F.; Nichols, E.M. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States)] [eds.] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This report reviews a set of two-dimensional ground water flow and contaminant transport simulations in the upper aquifer materials beneath Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The transport simulations focus on the migration, dilution, extraction, and potential degradation of existing aqueous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water, under both ambient flow and remedial pumping conditions. Simulations are used to show how, where, and at what rate vertically-averaged concentrations decrease to acceptable levels. Both the flow and transport calculations are made with a slightly modified version of the CFEST finite-element code. The hydrogeologic study area is defined to be the upper 200 feet of the saturated sediments within a 25 square mile area surrounding LLNL. Migration calculations focus on a single surrogate total-VOC (TVOC), equal to the sum of all VOC concentrations. Under natural flow conditions, and in the absence of intrinsic contaminant degradation, the results indicate that 800 y are required for the vertically-averaged TVOC concentrations to reduce to 5 parts per billion (ppb) or less in all parts of the study area. Although contaminant levels at several nearby agricultural wells may exceed 5 ppb during this time, levels at the municipal pumping wells in downtown Livermore never exceed 1 ppb. Under non-remedial conditions with an assumed linear TVOC degradation model corresponding to a 50 y half-life, simulation results indicate that all concentrations reduce to 5 ppb in 160 y, with very little impact on water quality at neighboring agricultural or municipal wells. Results of three additional simulations of TVOC migration under the influence of remedial pumping wells indicate that vertically-averaged TVOC concentrations uniformly reach 5 ppb (or below) within 50 to 75 y with little or no impact on water quality at nearby agricultural and municipal wells.

  18. A Rose By Other Names: Some General Musings on Lawrence and Colleagues' Hidden Curriculum Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Martimianakis, Maria Athina

    2017-11-07

    In this Commentary, the authors explore the scoping review by Lawrence and colleagues by challenging their conclusion that with over 25 years' worth of "ambiguous and seemingly ubiquitous use" of the hidden curriculum construct in health professions education scholarship, it is time to either move to a more uniform definitional foundation or abandon the term altogether. The commentary authors counter these remedial propositions by foregrounding the importance of theoretical diversity and the conceptual richness afforded when the hidden curriculum construct is used as an entry point for studying the interstitial space between the formal and a range of other-than-formal domains of learning. Further, they document how tightly-delimited scoping strategies fail to capture the wealth of educational scholarship that operates within a hidden curriculum framework, including "hidden" hidden curriculum articles, studies that employ alternative constructs, and investigations that target important tacit socio-cultural influences on learners and faculty without formally deploying the term. They offer examples of how the hidden curriculum construct, while undergoing significant transformation in its application within the field of health professions education, has created the conceptual foundation for the application of a number of critical perspectives that make visible the field's political investments in particular forms of knowing and associated practices. Finally, the commentary authors invite readers to consider the methodological promise afforded by conceptual heterogeneity, particularly strands of scholarship that resituate the hidden curriculum concept within the magically expansive dance of social relationships, social learning, and social life that form the learning environments of health professions education.

  19. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, R. F. [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities.

  20. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-10-31

    This study of the hydrogeology of Chicken Creek Canyon wasconducted by the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This canyon extends downhill fromBuilding 31 at LBNL to Centennial Road below. The leading edge of agroundwater tritium plume at LBNL is located at the top of the canyon.Tritium activities measured in this portion of the plume during thisstudy were approximately 3,000 picocuries/liter (pCi/L), which issignificantly less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinkingwaterof 20,000 pCi/L established by the Environmental ProtectionAgency.There are three main pathways for tritium migration beyond theLaboratory s boundary: air, surface water and groundwater flow. Thepurpose of this report is to evaluate the groundwater pathway.Hydrogeologic investigation commenced with review of historicalgeotechnical reports including 35 bore logs and 27 test pit/trench logsas well as existing ERP information from 9 bore logs. This was followedby field mapping of bedrock outcrops along Chicken Creek as well asbedrock exposures in road cuts on the north and east walls of the canyon.Water levels and tritium activities from 6 wells were also considered.Electrical-resistivity profiles and cone penetration test (CPT) data werecollected to investigate the extent of an interpreted alluvial sandencountered in one of the wells drilled in this area. Subsequent loggingof 7 additional borings indicated that this sand was actually anunusually well-sorted and typically deeply weathered sandstone of theOrinda Formation. Wells were installed in 6 of the new borings to allowwater level measurement and analysis of groundwater tritium activity. Aslug test and pumping tests were also performed in the wellfield.

  1. Progress in safety and environmental aspects of inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Meier, W R

    2000-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is making significant progress in several areas related to the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of inertial fusion energy (IFE). A detailed accident analysis has been completed for the HYLIFE-II power plant design. Additional accident analyses are underway for both the HYLIFE-II and Sombrero designs. Other S and E work at LLNL has addressed the issue of the driver-chamber interface and its importance for both heavy-ion and laser-driven IFE. Radiation doses and fluences have been calculated for final focusing mirrors and magnets and shielding optimization is underway to extend the anticipated lifetimes for key components. Target designers/fabrication specialists have been provided with ranking information related to the S and E characteristics of candidate target materials (e.g., ability to recycle, accident consequences, and waste management). Ongoing work in this area will help guide research directions and the selection of target materials. Published and continuing work on fast ignition has demonstrated some of the potentially attractive S and E features of such designs. In addition to reducing total driver energies, fast ignition may ease target fabrication requirements, reduce radiation damage rates, and enable the practical use of advanced (e.g., tritium-lean) labels with significantly reduced neutron production rates, the possibility of self-breeding targets, and dramatically increased flexibility in blanket design. Domestic and international collaborations are key to success in the above areas. A brief summary of each area is given and plans for future work are outlined.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters requested this report to verify that Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) properly categorized hazardous waste shipped offsite from 1984 to 1991. LLNL categorized the waste shipments by the new guidelines provided on the definition of radioactive waste. For this validation, waste that has had no radioactivity added by DOE operations is nonradioactive. Waste to which DOE operations has added or concentrated any radioactivity is radioactive. This report documents findings from the review of available LLNL hazardous waste shipment information and summarizes the data validation strategy. The report discusses administrative and radiological control procedures in place at LLNL during the data validation period. It also describes sampling and analysis and surface survey procedures used in determining radionuclide concentrations for offsite release of hazardous waste shipments. The evaluation team reviewed individual items on offsite hazardous waste shipments and classified them, using the DOE-HQ waste category definitions. LLNL relied primarily on generator knowledge to classify wastes. Very little radioanalytical information exists on hazardous wastes shipped from LLNL. Slightly greater than one-half of those hazardous waste items for which the documentation included radioanalytical data showed concentrations of radioactivity higher than the LLNL release criteria used from 1989 to 1991. Based on this small amount of available radioanalytical data, very little (less than one percent) of the hazardous waste generated at the LLNL main site can be shown to contain DOE added radioactivity. LLNL based the criteria on the limit of analytical sensitivity for gross alpha and gross beta measurements and the background levels of tritium. Findings in this report are based on information and documentation on the waste handling procedures in place before the start of the hazardous waste shipping moratorium in May 1991.

  3. Environmental assessment for the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory proposes to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) to treat explosive waste at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site, Site 300. It is also proposed to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life in accordance with the regulations. The facility would replace the existing Building 829 Open Burn Facility (B829) and would treat explosive waste generated at the LLNL Livermore Site and at Site 300 either by open burning or open detonation, depending on the type of waste. The alternatives addressed in the 1992 sitewide EIS/EIR are reexamined in this EA. These alternatives included: (1) the no-action alternative which would continue open burning operations at B829; (2) continuation of only open burning at a new facility (no open detonation); (3) termination of open burning operations with shipment of explosive waste offsite; and (4) the application of alternative treatment technologies. This EA examines the impact of construction, operation, and closure of the EWTF. Construction of the EWTF would result in the clearing of a small amount of previously disturbed ground. No adverse impact is expected to any state or federal special status plant or animal species (special status species are classified as threatened, endangered, or candidate species by either state or federal legislation). Operation of the EWTF is expected to result in a reduced threat to involved workers and the public because the proposed facility would relocate existing open burning operations to a more remote area and would incorporate design features to reduce the amount of potentially harmful emissions. No adverse impacts were identified for activities necessary to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life.

  4. The Relationship between Student Achievement, School District Economies of Scale, School District Size, and Student Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between student achievement, school district economies of scale, school district size and student socioeconomic status were measured for 131 school districts in the state of Oregon. Data for school districts ranging in size from districts with around 300 students to districts with more than 40,000 students were collected for…

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  6. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40

  7. Impact of Recent Constraints on Intellectual Freedom on Science and Technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J

    2000-11-12

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in 1952 to meet the nation's need for an expanded nuclear weapons research and development (R&D) capability. LLNL quickly grew to become a full-fledged nuclear weapons design laboratory with a broad range of technical capabilities similar to those of our sister laboratory--Los Alamos--with which we shared mission responsibilities. By its very nature, nuclear weapons R&D requires some of the most advanced science and technology (S&T). Accordingly, there is an obvious need for careful attention to ensure that appropriate security measures exist to deal with the sensitive aspects of nuclear weapons development. The trade-off between advancing S&T at the Laboratory and the need for security is a complex issue that has always been with us, As Edward Teller noted in a recent commentary in a May, 1999 editorial in the New York Times: ''The reaction of President Harry Truman to the leaking of information is well known. He imposed no additional measures for security. Instead, we have clear knowledge that the disclosures by (Klaus) Fuchs caused Truman to call for accelerated work on all aspects of nuclear weapons. The right prescription for safety is not reaction to dangers that are arising, but rather action leading to more knowledge and, one hopes, toward positive interaction between nations.'' To explore the issue of intellectual freedom at a national security laboratory such as LLNL, one must understand the type of activities we pursue and how our research portfolio has evolved since the Laboratory was established. Our mission affects the workforce skills, capabilities, and security measures that the Laboratory requires. The national security needs of the US have evolved, along with the S&T community in which the Laboratory resides and to which it contributes. These factors give rise to a greater need for the Laboratory to interact with universities, industry, and other national

  8. district.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dujardin B, Haelterman E, Van Damme W, Kegels G. The adequacy of one sputum smear for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis. Am J Pubi Hlth 1997; 87: 1234-1235. 16. Narain R, Nair SS, Naganna К, Chandrasekhar P, Ramanatha Rao G, Lai P. Problems in defining a "case" of pulmonary tuberculosis in prevalence ...

  9. Hydrographic climatology in the Gulf of St. Lawrence: its recent trends and an estuarine regime of interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovsky, Alexander; Yashayaev, Igor; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Combining hydrographic data from the NOAA NODC World Ocean Database and the archive of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography we construct a hydrographic climatology of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and analyze interannual to multidecadal variability of its principal water masses. Our analysis is based on the assumption that buoyancy is a primary forcing mechanism defining thermohaline fields and driving circulation in GSL, which in turn dictates the selection of representative transects. We analyze ensembles of hydrographic conditions, parameters of seasonal cycle, seasonal-to-interannual anomalies and long-term trends in each distance-depth bin of several transects orthogonal or tangential to the principal pathways of buoyancy-driven flows in GSL. In the Cabot Strait, the surface layer exhibits freshening while the bottom layer (affected by the Atlantic water influx) becomes warmer and saltier. The latter tendency can be traced along the axis of the entire Laurentian Channel and becomes even stronger further inland (e.g., off Anticosti Isl.). This enhancement in two-layer estuarine exchange flow is likely related to the freshening effect of the melting ice further north advected into the Gulf, or to the stronger freshwater discharge mixing in the Gulf. Indeed, the near-surface coastal bin off Nova Scotia occupied by the coastal buoyancy current originating from the St. Lawrence estuary does not reveal similar freshening. Interannual variability of temperature and salinity also exhibits patterns of estuarine exchange: near-bottom temperature and salinity indicative of the return flow from the Atlantic into GSL correlate with the St. Lawrence River discharge. The coastal buoyancy current responds to variations in the freshwater discharge by its expansion offshore while the salinity variations near the coast do not show a significant relationship with the discharge. Accelerating departure of hydrographic anomalies from their record-mean trends is observed over the

  10. Rehabilitation of district heating networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottosson, Peter [AaF-Energikonsult Syd AB (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    Often the choice is between reparation or exchange of a damaged section of the network. If the exchange is based on the wrong assumptions, large sections of undamaged pipelines could be removed. Most important for the district heating company is to decide which strategy to use for the future exchange of the pipelines. Whichever strategy used, it has to based on an assessment of the network and/or assumptions based on that assessment. The question if it is possible extend the life span of the pipelines arises. What is the most economical choice, the exchange or the renovation. (au)

  11. Goldin ja Katz meeste ning naiste palgalõhest / Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz ; toimetanud Steven D. Levitt, Stephen Dubner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goldin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Harvardi ülikooli tööturu uurimisele spetsialiseerunud majandusteadlased ning meeste ja naiste palgalõhe teema spetsialistid Claudia Goldin ja Lawrence Katz vastavad küsimustele, mis puudutavad võrdse haridusega meeste ja naiste tegelikku palgaerinevust, palgalõhet meeste ja naiste vahel siis, kui mitte arvestada tööaega, naiste suutlikkust pidada palgaläbirääkimisi ning tegevusalasi, kuhu peaksid mehed ja naised pürgima või mida vältima

  12. St. Lawrence Seaway N.Y. Feasibility Study for Additional Locks and Other Navigation Improvements: Plan of Study. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    Duluth-Superior and Thunder Bay) to Canadian ports on Lake Ontario and lower St. Lawrence River ports for domestic consumption and export transshipment...in these areas are dogwoods (Cornus ap.), branbles (Rubus pf.), viburnums (Viburnum sj., and apple (Pyrus malus . Tree species include elm (Ulmus...Overseas Canadian Domestic 1970 114,475,222 10,503,475 23,841,808 80,129,939 1971 105,027,016 14,381,139 19,581,163 71,064,714 1972 108,938,909

  13. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  14. 77 FR 21556 - Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Supplement to Notice of Study Dispute Resolution Technical Conference On March 16, 2012...

  15. Faunal diversity of Satara District, Maharashtra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Sayyed

    2016-01-01

    Satara District of Maharashtra State is a part of northern Western Ghats and Deccan Plateau biogeographic zones.  The data on various faunal groups was collected from the extensive study carried out during the period between 2007 and 2010, covering different parts of the district.  The present study reports faunal diversity of the district with 677 species under 150 families belonging to 11 different groups.  Overall, the district has substantial faunal diversity.  Out of the total species, 9...

  16. Lowex-fernwaerme; multilevel district heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, A.; Rhein, M.; Wirths, A.; Robbi, S.; Gross, S.; Richter, W.; Knorr, M.

    2008-09-15

    In this paper district heating systems from the generator to the consumer are examined and it is presented an overview on possibilities and effects caused by lowering the flow and the return temperature to improve the efficiency of district heating. The main interest contains an optimization tool for production planning of district heating generators. As main next step the simulation model will be parameterised by the load curves, figure lines and technical restrictions that each subtopic came and is coming up with. This will enable the user to asses the functionality, efficiency and economical effects of a decreasing exergy level within a new or existing district heating system.

  17. 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Werner, Sven; Wiltshire, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines the concept of 4th Generation District Heating (4GDH) including the relations to District Cooling and the concepts of smart energy and smart thermal grids. The motive is to identify the future challenges of reaching a future renewable non-fossil heat supply as part...... of the implementation of overall sustainable energy systems. The basic assumption is that district heating and cooling has an important role to play in future sustainable energy systems – including 100 percent renewable energy systems – but the present generation of district heating and cooling technologies will have...

  18. Reinstating district nursing: A UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Hannah

    2017-09-01

    As policy directives gather pace for service provision to be delivered in primary care, district nursing has not been recognised as a valuable asset to facilitate this agenda. Investment in district nursing and specialist district nursing education has fallen. This is concurrent with an ageing district nursing workforce, a lack of recruitment and growing caseloads, as district nursing adapts to meet the challenges of the complexities of contemporary healthcare in the community. The district nurse role is complex and multifaceted and includes working collaboratively and creatively to coordinate care. Redressing the shortages of specialist district nurse practitioners with increased numbers of health care support workers will not replace the skill, knowledge, experience required to meet the complex care needs of today's society. District nursing needs to be reinstated as the valuable asset it is, through renewed investment in the service, research development and in specialist practice education. To prevent extinction district nurses need to be able to demonstrate and articulate the complexities and dynamisms of the role to reinstate themselves to their commissioners as a valuable asset for contemporary practice that can meet current health and social care needs effectively. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anthropological District. Notes for an anthropological study of the industrial districts

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Fontefrancesco

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses industrial district theory as objects of anthropological enquiry. Providing a review of the history of studies in industrial anthropology and industrial district theory, the articles explores extended case method and in the multi-sited ethnography as viable methodologies to make industrial district an object of anthropological research practice and epistemology.

  20. Budget Stability, Revenue Volatility, and District Relations: Determinants of Georgia ELOST Distribution to Municipal School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinagel, Tyler P.

    2014-01-01

    School districts across the United States are often forced into situations where limited public funds must be distributed among multiple districts. These are often reliant on distribution rates negotiated by district leadership and elected officials. An example of this is Georgia's 1% Education Local Option Sales Tax (ELOST). The tax is collected…

  1. 78 FR 3892 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status On January 9, 2013, the Modesto Irrigation District (Modesto) filed a motion for...

  2. The Aspiring Adept: Robert Boyle and His Alchemical Quest (Lawrence M. Principe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    Robert Boyle is widely regarded as the Father of Modern Chemistry, who broke once and for all from the irrational, misguided alchemy that preceded him. One of the goals of this carefully researched and argued new book by Lawrence M. Principe, Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Institute for the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at The Johns Hopkins University, is to refute the two errors in this characterization of Boyle and to understand his life, thought, and work in the intellectual and social context of his time. This book is not for the casual reader; it is a detailed scholarly treatise in the history of science, but it provides a fresh and interesting perspective on Boyle and on the development of chemistry in the 17th century. Boyle is usually characterized as a modern scientist and his most famous book, The Skeptical Chymist, as a critique of traditional alchemy. Principe demonstrates that this characterization is based on a selective and sometimes incorrect reading of Boyle's works. Like Newton, Boyle was deeply involved in traditional transmutational alchemy, reading the works of other alchemists, performing experiments, and even witnessing transmutations. Alchemy, however, was not a monolith and Boyle adhered to what Principe tentatively identifies as a uniquely English school of supernatural alchemy. According to Principe, The Skeptical Chymist was mainly a criticism of the Paracelsians interested in chemical medicine rather than a defense of what we would now regard as modern chemistry. To further support his characterization of Boyle and to better reveal Boyle's involvement in alchemyparticularly the transmutation of base metals to gold, termed chrysopoeiaPrincipe has reconstructed from some 20 fragments one of Boyle's alchemical manuscripts, his Dialogue on the Transmutation of Metals. The full text of this lost work is included as Appendix 1. Two other primary sources, Interview Accounts of Transmutations and

  3. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship Internship Experience at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, J

    2006-08-30

    As a DHS intern at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), I was a member of the Agricultural Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (AgDDAP) under the mentorship of Benjamin Hindson. This group is focused on developing assays for the rapid detection of animal diseases that threaten agriculture in the United States. The introduction of a foreign animal disease to the US could potentially result in devastating economic losses. The 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK cost over 20 billion dollars and resulted in the death of over 6 million animals. FMD virus is considered to be one of greatest threats to agriculture due to its high infectivity, robustness, and broad species range. Thus, export of meat and animal products from FMD endemic countries is strictly regulated. Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult animals, morbidity is close to 100%. FMD also causes overall production (i.e. milk, mass) to decrease dramatically and can reduce it permanently. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of FMD and other foreign animal diseases is essential to prevent these diseases from spreading and becoming endemic to the country. Every hour delay in the detection of FMD is estimated to cost up to 3 million dollars. Diagnosis of FMD is often complicated by other diseases manifesting similar symptoms in the animal, such as vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, etc. Typically, diagnosis cannot be made by clinical signs alone and samples must be sent away for testing. Depending on the test, such as in virus isolation, this can take several days. AgDDAP had previously developed a high-throughput multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rule-out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and six other look-alike diseases. This assay is intended for use in FMD surveillance, differential diagnosis in an outbreak scenario, and to establish an FMD-clean state after an outbreak. PCR based assays are favorable for multiple reasons. Viral nucleic acids can be

  4. A New Kind of School District: How Local Leaders Can Create Charter Districts. The Nuts & Bolts of Charter Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan

    This short paper discusses the advantages of and outlines key design issues for creating charter districts. The design issues are divided into three categories representing the three central elements of the environment the districts are trying to create for their schools: the opportunity to perform, incentives to perform, and capacity to perform.…

  5. DNA barcoding of marine crustaceans from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence: a regional-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovici, Adriana E; Sainte-Marie, Bernard; Dufresne, France

    2009-05-01

    Marine crustaceans are known as a group with a high level of morphological and ecological diversity but are difficult to identify by traditional approaches and usually require the help of highly trained taxonomists. A faster identification method, DNA barcoding, was found to be an effective tool for species identification in many metazoan groups including some crustaceans. Here we expand the DNA barcode database with a case study involving 80 malacostracan species from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence. DNA sequences for 460 specimens grouped into clusters corresponding to known morphological species in 95% of cases. Genetic distances between species were on average 25 times higher than within species. Intraspecific divergence was high (3.78-13.6%) in specimens belonging to four morphological species, suggesting the occurrence of cryptic species. Moreover, we detected the presence of an invasive amphipod species in the St Lawrence Estuary. This study reconfirms the usefulness of DNA barcoding for the identification of marine crustaceans. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Stable isotope evidence for glacial lake drainage through the St. Lawrence Estuary, eastern Canada, ~13.1-12.9 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Rayburn, J.A.; Guilbault, J.-P.; Thunell, R.; Franzi, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Postglacial varved and rhythmically-laminated clays deposited during the transition from glacial Lake Vermont (LV) to the Champlain Sea (CS) record hydrological changes in the Champlain-St. Lawrence Valley (CSLV) at the onset of the Younger Dryas ∼13.1–12.9 ka linked to glacial lake drainage events. Oxygen isotope (δ18O) records of three species of benthic foraminifera (Cassidulina reniforme, Haynesina orbiculare, Islandiella helenae) from six sediment cores and the freshwater ostracode Candona from one core were studied. Results show six large isotope excursions (∼0.5 to >2‰) in C. reniforme δ18O values, five excursions in H. orbiculare (freshwater species in varve-like sediments indicate complex hydrological changes in the earliest Champlain Sea, including brief (sub-annual) periods of complete freshening. One hypothesis to explain these results is that multiple abrupt freshwater influx events caused surface-to-bottom freshening of the Champlain Sea over days to weeks. The most likely source of freshwater would have been drainage of the Morehead Phase of glacial Lake Agassiz, perhaps in a series of floods, ultimately draining out the St. Lawrence Estuary.

  7. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  8. Automatic recognition of fin and blue whale calls for real-time monitoring in the St. Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouy, Xavier; Bahoura, Mohammed; Simard, Yvan

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring blue and fin whales summering in the St. Lawrence Estuary with passive acoustics requires call recognition algorithms that can cope with the heavy shipping noise of the St. Lawrence Seaway and with multipath propagation characteristics that generate overlapping copies of the calls. In this paper, the performance of three time-frequency methods aiming at such automatic detection and classification is tested on more than 2000 calls and compared at several levels of signal-to-noise ratio using typical recordings collected in this area. For all methods, image processing techniques are used to reduce the noise in the spectrogram. The first approach consists in matching the spectrogram with binary time-frequency templates of the calls (coincidence of spectrograms). The second approach is based on the extraction of the frequency contours of the calls and their classification using dynamic time warping (DTW) and the vector quantization (VQ) algorithms. The coincidence of spectrograms was the fastest method and performed better for blue whale A and B calls. VQ detected more 20 Hz fin whale calls but with a higher false alarm rate. DTW and VQ outperformed for the more variable blue whale D calls.

  9. Implementation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Elementary Science Study of Nature (LESSON) in North Alabama elementary and middle schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.Y. (Alabama A and M Univ., Normal, AL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    The Alabama A M University - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Elementary Science Study of Nature (ALALESSON) was designed to improve elementary and middle school science in North Alabama by involving teachers in two-week summer workshop as well as other follow-up activities. The purpose of the activities was to increase the science knowledge of the teachers and to provide them with materials and activities for hands-on science lessons. The summer workshops, conducted during the summers of 1984 and 1985, provided instruction and materials for activities in the area of biology, chemistry, physics, and electricity and magnetism. The materials included equipment thats total value was over $400.00. Additionally, a manual containing 43 lessons which induced background information, experiments and activities for classroom and home use was provided to each teacher. During the course of the project activities, the teachers interacted with fourteen scientists from Alabama A M University, four scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, eight staff members from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, three staff members from the University of Alabama at Huntsville Johnson Environmental Education Center, two North Alabama teachers who served as presenters, and one NASA Teacher in Space Finalist, Kathleen Beres. This report will thus detail activities during the period July 1984--June 1989.

  10. Forecasting the major influences of predation and environment on cod recovery in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E; Hammill, Mike O

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010-2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry.

  11. Forecasting the major influences of predation and environment on cod recovery in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bousquet

    Full Text Available The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010-2040 to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry.

  12. State and district policy influences on district-wide elementary and middle school physical education practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F; Eyler, Amy; Carnoske, Cheryl; Slater, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    To examine the influence of state laws and district policies on district-wide elementary school and middle school practices related to physical education (PE) time and the percentage of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) time during PE. Multivariate, cross-sectional analysis of state laws, district wellness and PE policies, and district PE practices for school year 2010-2011 controlling for district-level urbanicity, region, size, race/ethnicity of students, and socioeconomic status and clustered on state. One hundred ninety-five public school districts located in 42 states. District-level PE coordinators for the included districts who responded to an online survey. Minutes and days of PE per week and percent time spent in MVPA during PE time. District PE coordinators reported significantly less PE time than national standards-82.9 and 189.6 minutes at the elementary school and middle school levels, respectively. Physical education was provided an average of 2.5 and 3.7 days per week, respectively; and the percentage of MVPA time in PE was 64.4% and 65.7%, respectively. At the elementary school level, districts in either states with laws governing PE time or in a state and district with a law/policy reported significantly more days of PE (0.63 and 0.67 additional days, respectively), and districts in states with PE time laws reported 18 more minutes of PE per week. At the middle school level, state laws were associated with 0.73 more days of PE per week. Neither state laws nor district policies were positively associated with percent MVPA time in PE. State laws and district policies can influence district-level PE practices-particularly those governing the frequency and duration of PE-although opportunities exist to strengthen PE-related laws, policies, and practices.

  13. Wireless Wide Area Networks for School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Prakash

    This paper considers a basic question that many schools districts face in attempting to develop affordable, expandable district-wide computer networks that are resistant to obsolescence: Should these wide area networks (WANs) employ wireless technology, stick to venerable hard-wired solutions, or combine both. This publication explores the…

  14. New Mexico's Very Small School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Doug

    The report addresses characteristics and concerns of New Mexico's 19 smallest school districts with a 1981-82 average daily membership ranging from 262 to 60 students. Information was gathered from a Public School Finance Division questionnaire sent to the 19 superintendents; from a December 1981 meeting with 10 of the smallest districts; from…

  15. District Leaders' Framing of Educator Evaluation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfin, Sarah L.; Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Gonzales, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Educator evaluation systems have recently undergone scrutiny and reform, and district and school leaders play a key role in interpreting and enacting these systems. This article uses framing theory to understand district leaders' interpretation and advancement of a state's new educator evaluation policy. Research Methods: The article…

  16. Income Segregation between Schools and School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Ann; Reardon, Sean F.; Jencks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although trends in the racial segregation of schools are well documented, less is known about trends in income segregation. We use multiple data sources to document trends in income segregation between schools and school districts. Between-district income segregation of families with children enrolled in public school increased by over 15% from…

  17. Performance of District Disaster Management Teams after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Uganda is vulnerable to several natural, man-made and a hybrid of disasters including drought, famine, floods, warfare, and disease outbreaks. We assessed the district disaster team's performance, roles and experiences following the training. Findings: The disasters most commonly experienced by the district ...

  18. Collaborative Strategic Decision Making in School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazer, S. David; Rich, William; Ross, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The dual purpose of this paper is to determine how superintendents in US school districts work with stakeholders in the decision-making process and to learn how different choices superintendents make affect decision outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This multiple case study of three school districts employs qualitative methodology to…

  19. Superintendent Leadership: Focusing on District Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tanya A.; Adams, Jeffery S.; Smith, Dwayne E.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning project focusing on superintendent leadership and stakeholder influence of school district culture. Current research findings suggest the importance of superintendent leadership in assessing, influencing, and enhancing school district culture. Multiple scholars wrote literature in the area of…

  20. Crafting Legitimacy in District-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechasseur, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Background/Context: Partnering across districts, schools, and other community organizations has become ubiquitous as a policy for promoting change. Despite growing attention to and scholarship on district-community partnerships, there is little examination of the organizational mechanisms involved in sustaining them. Purpose/Objectives: This study…

  1. Energy Assessment of Automated Mobility Districts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuche [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Automated vehicles (AVs) are increasingly being discussed as the basis for on-demand mobility services, introducing a new paradigm in which a fleet of AVs displace private automobiles for day-to-day travel in dense activity districts. This project examines such a concept to displace privately owned automobiles within a region containing dense activity generators (jobs, retail, entertainment, etc.), referred to as an automated mobility district (AMDs). The project reviews several such districts including airport, college campuses, business parks, downtown urban cores, and military bases, with examples of previous attempts to meet the mobility needs apart from private automobiles, some with automated technology and others with more traditional transit based solutions. The issues and benefits of AMDs are framed within the perspective of intra-district, inter-district, and border issues, and the requirements for a modeling framework are identified to adequately reflect the breadth of mobility, energy, and emissions impact anticipated with AMDs.

  2. Faunal diversity of Satara District, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sayyed

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Satara District of Maharashtra State is a part of northern Western Ghats and Deccan Plateau biogeographic zones.  The data on various faunal groups was collected from the extensive study carried out during the period between 2007 and 2010, covering different parts of the district.  The present study reports faunal diversity of the district with 677 species under 150 families belonging to 11 different groups.  Overall, the district has substantial faunal diversity.  Out of the total species, 94 are recorded as endemic species, 35 species are listed as threatened under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and 38 species are listed in the different schedules of Indian Wildlife (Protection Act 1972 (as amended up to 2013.  The information on geographical distribution pattern of mammalian species in the district is also provided. 

  3. Solar district heating and cooling: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Mora, Nicolas; Bava, Federico; Andersen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Both district heating and solar collector systems have been known and implemented for many years. However, the combination of the two, with solar collectors supplying heat to the district heating network, is relatively new, and no comprehensive review of scientific publications on this topic could...... be found. Thus, this paper summarizes the literature available on solar district heating and presents the state of the art and real experiences in this field. Given the lack of a generally accepted convention on the classification of solar district heating systems, this paper distinguishes centralized...... and decentralized solar district heating as well as block heating. For the different technologies, the paper describes commonly adopted control strategies, system configurations, types of installation, and integration. Real‐world examples are also given to provide a more detailed insight into how solar thermal...

  4. Spin systems and Political Districting Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C.-I [Department of Physics, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan 111 (China)]. E-mail: cichou@faculty.pccu.edu.tw; Li, S.-P. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China)

    2007-03-15

    The aim of the Political Districting Problem is to partition a territory into electoral districts subject to some constraints such as contiguity, population equality, etc. In this paper, we apply statistical physics methods to Political Districting Problem. We will show how to transform the political problem to a spin system, and how to write down a q-state Potts model-like energy function in which the political constraints can be written as interactions between sites or external fields acting on the system. Districting into q voter districts is equivalent to finding the ground state of this q-state Potts model. Searching for the ground state becomes an optimization problem, where optimization algorithms such as the simulated annealing method and Genetic Algorithm can be employed here.

  5. EPA Recognizes Charleston County School District for Reducing Food Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the Charleston County School District for the District's achievements in reducing food waste. The District cultivated one of the state's first student-driven commercial compostin

  6. 7 CFR 906.121 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN... districts of the production area specified in § 906.20 Districts are reestablished as a single district comprising the entire production area. ...

  7. Hastings Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Hastings Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments for the 1977 calendar year. The report begins by giving District...

  8. Malaria prevalence in endemic districts of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ubydul; Ahmed, Syed Masud; Hossain, Shahed; Huda, Mamun; Hossain, Awlad; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Mondal, Dinesh; Khan, Wasif Ali; Khalequzzaman, Mohammod; Haque, Rashidul

    2009-08-25

    Following the 1971 ban of DDT in Bangladesh, malaria cases have increased steadily. Malaria persists as a major health problem in the thirteen south-eastern and north-eastern districts of Bangladesh. At present the national malaria control program, largely supported by the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM), provides interventions including advocacy at community level, Insecticide Treated Net (ITN) distribution, introduction of Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT) and combination therapy with Coartem. It is imperative, therefore, that baseline data on malaria prevalence and other malaria indicators are collected to assess the effectiveness of the interventions and rationalize the prevention and control efforts. The objective of this study was to obtain this baseline on the prevalence of malaria and bed net use in the thirteen malaria endemic districts of Bangladesh. In 2007, BRAC and ICDDR,B carried out a malaria prevalence survey in thirteen malaria endemic districts of Bangladesh. A multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used and 9750 blood samples were collected. Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT) were used for the diagnosis of malaria. The weighted average malaria prevalence in the thirteen endemic districts was 3.97%. In five south-eastern districts weighted average malaria prevalence rate was 6.00% and in the eight north-eastern districts weighted average malaria prevalence rate was (0.40%). The highest malaria prevalence was observed in Khagrachari district. The majority of the cases (90.18%) were P. falciparum infections. Malaria morbidity rates in five south-eastern districts was 2.94%. In eight north-eastern districts, morbidity was 0.07%. Bangladesh has hypoendemic malaria with P. falciparum the dominant parasite species. The malaria situation in the five north-eastern districts of Bangladesh in particular warrants urgent attention. Detailed maps of the baseline malaria prevalence and summaries of the data collected are provided along with the

  9. Sparse district-heating in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Stefan Forsaeus [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Building Technology and Mechanics, P.O. Box 24036, SE-400 22 Goeteborg (Sweden); Reidhav, Charlotte [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Lygnerud, Kristina [Goeteborg University, School of Business, Economics and Law, Department of Business Administration, P.O. Box 610, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Werner, Sven [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2008-07-15

    This paper presents a review of the sparse district-heating research programme undertaken in Sweden between 2002 and 2006. The goal of the programme was to increase the future competitiveness for district heat in low heat density areas, e.g., suburban single-family houses and small villages. Such areas are unfavourable, since revenues from heat sold are low compared with the investment cost for the local distribution network. In Sweden, district heat has a dominant position in the heat market for residential and service-sector buildings. In order for the business to grow, it is necessary to increase the rate of expansion in the detached-house segment. This is why the programme was initiated. The extent of the programme was set at EUR 3.6 million with equal financing from the Swedish District-Heating Association and the Swedish Energy-Agency. The research was carried out in three phases: a state of the art survey; a development phase focused on productivity gains where new research on both technology and customer interaction was performed; and finally a demonstration phase where new methods were tested in full-scale field operation. The programme has shown that the Swedish district-heating industry needs to adjust in order to reach a higher profitability for sparse district-heating investments. Tradition from large-scale high-density district heating is hard to scale to fit sparse district-heating systems. For example, the construction becomes very labour intensive and the industry is weak when it comes to market-oriented business logic, sales and private customer interaction. Innovation seems to be a way forward and active management of innovations is a way to create increased value of the investments. Other keys to improving the profitability of sparse district-heating investments are more efficient working routines (resulting in higher productivity) and revised ways of customer communications. These seem more important than increasing efficiency in district

  10. Malaria prevalence in endemic districts of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubydul Haque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following the 1971 ban of DDT in Bangladesh, malaria cases have increased steadily. Malaria persists as a major health problem in the thirteen south-eastern and north-eastern districts of Bangladesh. At present the national malaria control program, largely supported by the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM, provides interventions including advocacy at community level, Insecticide Treated Net (ITN distribution, introduction of Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT and combination therapy with Coartem. It is imperative, therefore, that baseline data on malaria prevalence and other malaria indicators are collected to assess the effectiveness of the interventions and rationalize the prevention and control efforts. The objective of this study was to obtain this baseline on the prevalence of malaria and bed net use in the thirteen malaria endemic districts of Bangladesh. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 2007, BRAC and ICDDR,B carried out a malaria prevalence survey in thirteen malaria endemic districts of Bangladesh. A multi-stage cluster sampling technique was used and 9750 blood samples were collected. Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT were used for the diagnosis of malaria. The weighted average malaria prevalence in the thirteen endemic districts was 3.97%. In five south-eastern districts weighted average malaria prevalence rate was 6.00% and in the eight north-eastern districts weighted average malaria prevalence rate was (0.40%. The highest malaria prevalence was observed in Khagrachari district. The majority of the cases (90.18% were P. falciparum infections. Malaria morbidity rates in five south-eastern districts was 2.94%. In eight north-eastern districts, morbidity was 0.07%. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Bangladesh has hypoendemic malaria with P. falciparum the dominant parasite species. The malaria situation in the five north-eastern districts of Bangladesh in particular warrants urgent attention. Detailed maps of the

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA. Performance at levels greater than those established by this document will provide a higher level of fire safety, fire protection, or loss control and is encouraged. In Section 7, Determination of Baseline Needs, a standard template was used to describe the process used that involves separating basic emergency response needs into nine separate services. Each service being evaluated contains a determination of minimum requirements, an analysis of the requirements, a statement of minimum performance, and finally a summary of the minimum performance. The requirement documents, listed in Section 5, are those laws, regulations, DOE Directives, contractual obligations, or LLNL policies that establish service levels. The determination of minimum requirements section explains the rationale or method used to determine the minimum requirements.

  12. VT Data - Cons/Rec Overlay District 20110301, Winhall

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Conservation and Recreatioal Protection overaly districts for the Town of Winhall, Vermont. Other overlay districts (Transfer of Development Rights, and Scenic...

  13. Louisiana State Senate Districts from LEGIS source data, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (2004) [la_senate_districts_LEGIS_2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Louisiana State Senate Districts. The district boundaries are the result of legislative acts and redistricting. Reapportionment (redistricting) occurs during the...

  14. Louisiana State House Districts from LEGIS source data, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (2004) [la_house_districts_LEGIS_2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Louisiana State House Districts. The district boundaries are the result of legislative acts and redistricting. Reapportionment (redistricting) occurs during the next...

  15. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  16. District-heating system, La Grande, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The area suggested for district heating feasibility study encompassed slightly over 400 acres extending north and south from the geographic center of the city. This district was subdivided into 8 areas, which include the Grande Ronde Hospital, Eastern Oregon State College, La Grande school district, one institutional area, one commercial area and three residential areas. Basic space heating loads developed for the various areas after a survey by county personnel and computation using a computer program form the basis for this economic feasibility study.

  17. Induction of gene responses in St. Lawrence River northern pike (Esox lucius) environmentally exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Magali; Douville, Mélanie; Despatie, Simon-Pierre; De Silva, Amila O; Spencer, Christine

    2013-08-01

    Municipal waste water effluents (MWWEs) are important sources of chemical contamination for aquatic environments. This study investigated the presence and effects of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in environmentally exposed northern pike (Esox lucius) collected upstream and downstream a major municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP) in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. Twelve PFCs, including the newly detected perfluoroethylcyclohexane sulfonate (PFECHS), were quantified in fish muscle, liver, and plasma. Additionally, the expression of eight genes and the activity of three biomarkers were analyzed in fish tissues at both sites. Mean ∑PFC concentration in fish plasma collected upstream the WWTP was 185ng/g w.w. compared to 545ng/g w.w. downstream the point of release. PFECHS was quantified for the first time in St. Lawrence River fish (mean plasma concentration in MWWE fish: 5.07±4.72ng/g w.w.). Results of transcriptomic responses were tissue-specific and indicated significant up-regulation for metallothionein (MT) in blood and MT, glutathion-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and cytochromes P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in gill tissue of fish collected in the MWWE suggesting greater stress responses for organisms at this location. Significant relationships were found between vitellogenin (Vtg) gene expression in liver, Vtg activity in plasma and perfluorotridecanoic acid (PFTrA), perfluorotetradecanoic acid (PFTeA), and perfluorodecane sulfonate (PFDS) plasma concentrations. The possible endocrine effects of these PFCs should be further investigated. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipophilic antioxidants and lipid peroxidation in yellow perch subjected to various anthropogenic influences along the St. Lawrence River (QC, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Catherine; Houde, Magali; Brodeur, Philippe; Spear, Philip; Boily, Monique

    2017-05-01

    In Lake Saint-Pierre (LSP), the last great widening of the St. Lawrence River (province of Québec, Canada), the yellow perch has been experiencing a significant decline since the mid-1990s. The combined effect of several stressors (deterioration of habitats appropriate for reproduction and growth, invasive species and poor water quality) seems to exert considerable influence on the yellow perch population in LSP, characterized by low recruitment. To better understand possible stressor effects at the biochemical level, LSP yellow perch were compared with other sites along a gradient of increasing human influences from upstream to downstream along the St. Lawrence River. Morphometry (size, weight, circumference and Fulton's condition factor) and biomarkers associated to the peroxidation of lipids, lipophilic antioxidants (α-tocopherol and carotenoids), along with retinoids (vitamins A1and A2) and proteins were compared between sites at the larval, juvenile and adult stages. Fulton's condition factor was similar between sites for juveniles but was significantly lower in LSP adults, suggesting a weakened physiological condition. In most contaminated sites as LSP, lipid peroxidation tended to be higher in juveniles and adults whereas the lipophilic antioxidant lycopene and proteins content were lower. Retinyl esters were significantly lower for LSP fish compared to other sites, not only in larvae but also in the livers of juveniles and adults. These results are consistent with possible altered metabolism in the retinoid system of LSP yellow perch. The overall results reflect the "pressure" gradient tested, where the yellow perch from the most affected sites located downstream had impaired physiological and biochemical conditions compared to the upstream sectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Allegheny County Magisterial Districts Outlines (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the magisterial districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  20. FOUNDING OF THE DISTRICT HOSPITAL IN NIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misa Zivic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After the liberation of Nis from the Turks which took place on January 11th, 1878, there were two military hospitals: one was next to The Skull Tower and the other on the road to Leskovac and there was Islahana the civil institution which was not the forerunner of the district hospital in Nis. At first, they founded the military hospital in Nis in 1878 and then they founded The District Hospital on July 17th in 1881. The first director of the District hospital was Anton Zajicek. He is also the first graduated medical doctor in Nis. The District Hospital was situated on the left bank of the Nisava river in a private house.

  1. Allegheny County Voting District (2015) Web Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This webmap demarcates municipal voting districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  2. Allegheny County Voting District (2016) Web Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This webmap demarcates municipal voting districts in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data...

  3. VT Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts is established by a municipality around an area that requires public infrastructure to encourage public and private real...

  4. Hammond Sanitary District Clean Water Act Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hammond Sanitary District (HSD), located in Hammond, Indiana, serves over 170,000 customers in the City of Hammond and Town of Munster, and also provides wastewater treatment to the customer communities of Highland, and Griffith.

  5. Moving Women Up the District Ladder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merri Rosenberg

    2017-01-01

    ..., was clearly moving on a fast track. [...]when her husband, who works in educational technology in another Ohio district, spotted a promotional notice on the AASA website about the association's upcoming Women's Leadership Consortium...

  6. 7 CFR 917.14 - District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... line from the northeast corner of Solano County to the town of Rio Vista. (d) El Dorado District... includes and consists of Alameda County, Monterey County, Santa Clara County, San Mateo County, Santa Cruz...

  7. School District Finance Survey, 2013-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Education — School District Finance Survey, 2013–14 (F-33 2013–14) is a study that is part of the Common Core of Data (CCD) program; program data is available since 1989–90 at ....

  8. NM Property Tax Districts November 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This layer represents boundaries for New Mexico tax district "OUT" categories and incorporated/municipal "IN" categories as identified on the "Certificate of Tax...

  9. Performance analysis of hybrid district heating system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikulandric, Robert; Krajačić, Goran; Khavin, Gennadii

    2013-01-01

    could reach up to 20% with utilisation of solar energy as supplement energy source in traditional fossil fuel based district heating systems. In this work, the performance of hybrid district energy system for a particular location will be analysed. For performance analysis, mathematical model...... more extensively used in district heating systems either separately or as a supplement to traditional fossil fuels in order to achieve national energy policy objectives. However, they are still facing problems such as high intermittences, high energy production costs and low load factors as well...... sources that can complement each other on daily and yearly basis and reduce negative aspects of particular energy source utilisation. In district heating systems, hybridisation could be performed through utilisation of renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Potential of fuel and emission reduction...

  10. Narrative Report Fergus Falls Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Minnesota Wetlands Complex outlines District accomplishments for FY 1974. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  11. Windom Wetland Management District : Fiscal Year 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Windom Wetland Management District summarizes activities during the 2002 fiscal year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  12. 7 CFR 906.20 - Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... determining the basis for selecting producer committee members the following districts of the production area...

  13. Minnesota Wild and Scenic River Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — District boundaries for wild, scenic, and recreational rivers designated under the Minnesota State Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Includes portions of the Minnesota...

  14. Hypoxia in the St. Lawrence Estuary: How a Coding Error Led to the Belief that “Physics Controls Spatial Patterns”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourgault, D.; Cyr, F.

    2015-01-01

    Two fundamental sign errors were found in a computer code used for studying the oxygenminimum zone (OMZ) and hypoxia in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. These errorsinvalidate the conclusions drawn from the model, and call into question a proposed mechanismfor generating OMZ that challenges

  15. The elegant velvet glove: A textual and visual reading of the gothicised female form in Lawrence Durrell’s 'The Alexandria quartet'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuiter, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    My thesis analyses the gothicisation of the female form in ‘The Alexandria quartet’ written by the English novelist Lawrence Durrell. In this study I show how Durrell's concern with the themes of space-time-memory, ambiguity, multiple perspectives, metaphoric imagery, buried or not-so-buried acts of

  16. Optimising corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Andersen, A.

    2002-01-01

    A three-year project - financially supported by the Nordic Industrial Fund - on monitoring of corrosion in district heating systems has been initiated with participation of researchers and industrial partners in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The primary objective of the project...... is to improve the quality control in district heating systems by corrosion monitoring. In Danish systems electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarisation resistance (LPR), high-sensitive electrical resistance (ER) technology, crevice corrosion probes, as well as weight loss coupons...

  17. District heating substations - design and installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-12-15

    These technical regulations for district heating substations are sector-wide regulations for the Swedish district heating sector, describing the design, installation, use and maintenance of substations. If a district heating substation is to operate in the best possible way, the building's space heating and domestic hot water systems must comply with the requirements in these regulations and with those issued by public authorities. These regulations also describe aspects that must be considered when substations need to be replaced. The use then of correct values for the building energy requirements ensures that the new substation will be properly matched to its duties. These regulations are intended for use by: - those responsible for contacts between the district heating supplier and the customer. - those who own, operate and/or administer a building or facility that is heated by district heating. - those who design, manufacture, purchase, test or install substations. It is recommended that enquiries should refer to the Swedish District Heating Association's technical regulations when specifying requirements. The procurement criteria described in these regulations should be applied when evaluating tenders

  18. Biomass universal district heating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltero Victor Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In mild climate regions Directive 27/2012 EU application for developing sustainable district heating networks in consolidated urban nucleus is a challenge. In Spain most of the municipalities above 5,000 inhabitants have a reliable natural gas network and individual heating systems at homes. In this work a new heating network paradigm is proposed, the biomass universal heating network in rural areas. This model involves all the economic, legal and technical aspects and interactions between the different agents of the systems: provider company, individual and collective end-users and local and regional administration. The continental region in Spain has 588 municipalities with a population above 1,500 inhabitants close to forest biomass with renewable use. In many of these cases the regulation identifies the ownership of the forest resources use. The universal heating networks are a great opportunity for energy saving of 2,000 GWh, avoiding 2.7 million tons of CO2 emissions and with a global annual savings for end users of 61.8 million of euros. The presented model is easily extrapolated to other small municipalities in Europe. The real application of the model is presented for three municipalities in different locations of Spain where Universal Heating Networks are under development. The analysis show the interest of the integrated model for the three cases with different structural agents and relationships between them. The use of sustainable forest resources, extracted and managed by local companies, strengths circular economy in the region with a potential global economic impact above 200 M€.

  19. Biomass universal district heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltero, Victor Manuel; Rodríguez-Artacho, Salvador; Velázquez, Ramón; Chacartegui, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    In mild climate regions Directive 27/2012 EU application for developing sustainable district heating networks in consolidated urban nucleus is a challenge. In Spain most of the municipalities above 5,000 inhabitants have a reliable natural gas network and individual heating systems at homes. In this work a new heating network paradigm is proposed, the biomass universal heating network in rural areas. This model involves all the economic, legal and technical aspects and interactions between the different agents of the systems: provider company, individual and collective end-users and local and regional administration. The continental region in Spain has 588 municipalities with a population above 1,500 inhabitants close to forest biomass with renewable use. In many of these cases the regulation identifies the ownership of the forest resources use. The universal heating networks are a great opportunity for energy saving of 2,000 GWh, avoiding 2.7 million tons of CO2 emissions and with a global annual savings for end users of 61.8 million of euros. The presented model is easily extrapolated to other small municipalities in Europe. The real application of the model is presented for three municipalities in different locations of Spain where Universal Heating Networks are under development. The analysis show the interest of the integrated model for the three cases with different structural agents and relationships between them. The use of sustainable forest resources, extracted and managed by local companies, strengths circular economy in the region with a potential global economic impact above 200 M€.

  20. Effects of zebra mussels, obtained from Lake Erie and St Lawrence River, as a food source on immune system of lesser scaup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flipo, D.; Fournier, M. [Univ. du Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Beaulieu, C.; Tessier, C. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    A feeding study was undertaken to assess the influence of a zebra mussel diet from Lake Erie and the St.Lawrence river on the immune system of lesser scaup. The Great lakes and the St.Lawrence river are known to be among the most contaminated waters found in the country. Analytical studies have shown that zebra mussels are contaminated by organochlorines and other pollutants. The occurrence of these toxicants in the food diet of lesser scaup can cause serious injuries. The immune system, in its capacity to destroy foreign particles and protect the host against diseases, can serve as a useful sentinel of the health status of these environmentally stressed organisms. Immune parameters of lesser scaup fed with zebra mussels from Lake Erie or the St. Lawrence river were evaluated. The duration of the feeding trial was nine weeks. Phagocytic activity and oxidative bursts of heterophils were evaluated by flow cytometry. Intracellular thiol levels of lymphocytes and heterophils were also determined by flow cytometry. The results showed a dimunition of phagocytic activity and bactericidal potential after 6 weeks of the zebra mussel diet compared to the control. These results may be associated with pathology problems encountered in treated groups at the end of the diet. Birds from the St. Lawrence River group (40%) and the Lake Erie group (40%) demonstrated variable degrees of pododermatitis compared to the control group. The intracellular level of thiol was consistently found to be elevated in lymphocytes and heterophyls from birds feeding with on the St. Lawrence River. In conclusion, flow cytometry assays like phagocytosis, oxidative burst and thiol staining can serve as biomarkers of the immune status of birds and can give important information for evaluating the health of birds exposed to environmental contamination.

  1. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

    2002-07-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

  2. District Paid Insurance Programs in California School Districts 1977-78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California School Boards Association, Sacramento.

    This publication presents 1977-78 data on employee insurance programs provided by 1,078 California school districts and county offices of education that responded to a statewide survey conducted by the California State Department of Education. Individual school districts are listed alphabetically within categories according to the type of district…

  3. What Do Effective District Leaders Do? Strategies for Evaluating District Leadership. Policy Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Katie; Yoder, Nick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the Common Core State Standards and teacher evaluation reform, school leaders increasingly look to district leaders for support, coaching, and leadership. District leaders--superintendents, assistant or area superintendents, specialists, principal supervisors, and school business administrators--can hold varying and multiple roles…

  4. Malaria in Wanokaka and Loli sub-districts, West Sumba District, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syafruddin, D.; Asih, P.B.; Coutrier, F.N.; Trianty, L.; Noviyanti, R.; Luase, Y.; Sumarto, W.; Caley, M.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Malaria has long been known as one of the major public health problems in West Sumba District, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia. To obtain baseline data for establishment of a suitable malaria control program in the area, malariometric surveys were conducted in two sub-districts, Wanokaka and

  5. Blue Valley School District: Kansas District Extends Growth Measurement to the Early Grades, Experiences Measurable Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Blue Valley, the fourth largest school district in Kansas, covers 91 square miles. More than 20,000 K-12 students attend its 34 schools ( five high schools, nine middle schools, and 20 elementary schools). Of the district's students, 8% qualify for free and reduced lunch and about 3% are English Language Learners. Blue Valley began using Measures…

  6. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-01-30

    This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater

  7. District heating in Italy; Genesi ed evoluzione del district heating in Italia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchi, E. [Milan Politecnico (Italy). Dip. di energetica

    1998-12-01

    The legislative act establishing the electric monopoly virtually shut out the district heating associated with electricity cogeneration, while other laws, issued to counteract the effects of oil shocks, allowed municipal utilities to do so. Thus, district heating has experienced some development, though well below its possibilities. The article analyses the reasons for this lagging, reports district heating data and projects its forecasts against the Kyoto Protocol objectives. [Italiano] La legge istitutiva del monopolio elettrico ha di fatto impedito il district heating associato alla cogenerazione di elettricita`, mentre le leggi tese a contrastare gli effetti delle crisi energetiche lo hanno reso possibile ad opera delle aziende municipali: un certo sviluppo si e` verificato, seppure ben al di sotto delle possibili potenzialita`. L`articolo analizza i motivi di questo rallentato sviluppo, riporta i dati del district heating e ne proietta le previsioni lungo gli obiettivi del Protocollo di Kyoto.

  8. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-03-08

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions.

  9. Contaminant Uptake and Demography of the Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hattem, M G; Santolo, G

    2005-02-23

    Concentrations of eleven potential environmental contaminants (metals) in the blood and retrice feathers of fledged-Hatch Year and adult loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) were examined at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 and a control site, in San Joaquin and Contra Costa Counties, California. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine, through non-lethal means, if loggerhead shrikes are exposed to metals at Site 300 and whether specific demographic variables (i.e., clutch size, fledgling success, etc.) are affected. Loggerhead shrikes at Site 300 had higher blood concentrations of metals, especially birds on the west side of the site, when compared to control site birds. Metal concentrations in the feathers of control site birds tended to be higher than Site 300 shrikes. Blood concentrations of metals in loggerhead shrikes from both Site 300 and the control site were well below the Most Tolerant Dietary Level (MTDL) for domestic birds for all metals except selenium. Clutch size was similar to other populations but one deformed embryo was discovered in a failed egg. The results of this pilot study suggest further work is needed to understand possible synergistic effects related to other contaminants of concern found at Site 300 and overall population variability.

  10. Preliminary archaeological survey of proposed gas well locations in Green Township (Scioto County) and Elizabeth Township (Lawrence County) Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.B.; Peebles, C.S.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1978-10-24

    The present archaeological survey and cultural resource assessment were conducted for the United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in areas to be disturbed by gas well drilling and holding pond construction. The project area is the Pine Creek drainage system, which is a tributary of the Ohio River in Scioto and Lawrence Counties, Ohio. The literature search indicated that prehistoric archaeological sites do occur and have been documented in the Pine Creek drainage system. Presently, no archaeological sites have been reported in locations of direct impact. The literature search also indicated that historic features from the early iron industry period, ca. 1840 to 1870, are likely to occur throughout the project area. Field reconnaissance identified three prehistoric archaeological sites and one historic site in and adjacent to the proposed locations of disturbance. Two sites were determined to be of significant research value and may be nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. Consequently, recommendations were made to minimize the adverse effects of the proposed drilling project on these archaeological sites.

  11. Outcomes of a Latino Community-Based Intervention for the Prevention of Diabetes: The Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockene, Ira S.; Tellez, Trinidad L.; Rosal, Milagros C.; Reed, George W.; Mordes, John; Merriam, Philip A.; Olendzki, Barbara C.; Handelman, Garry; Nicolosi, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the effectiveness of a community-based, literacy-sensitive, and culturally tailored lifestyle intervention on weight loss and diabetes risk reduction among low-income, Spanish-speaking Latinos at increased diabetes risk. Methods. Three hundred twelve participants from Lawrence, Massachusetts, were randomly assigned to lifestyle intervention care (IC) or usual care (UC) between 2004 and 2007. The intervention was implemented by trained Spanish-speaking individuals from the community. Each participant was followed for 1 year. Results. The participants’ mean age was 52 years; 59% had less than a high school education. The 1-year retention rate was 94%. Compared with the UC group, the IC group had a modest but significant weight reduction (−2.5 vs 0.63 lb; P = .04) and a clinically meaningful reduction in hemoglobin A1c (−0.10% vs −0.04%; P = .009). Likewise, insulin resistance improved significantly in the IC compared with the UC group. The IC group also had greater reductions in percentage of calories from total and saturated fat. Conclusions. We developed an inexpensive, culturally sensitive diabetes prevention program that resulted in weight loss, improved HbA1c, and improved insulin resistance in a high-risk Latino population. PMID:22390448

  12. Post-rehabilitation flow monitoring and analysis of the sanitary sewer system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstetter, E.R.; Littlefield, D.C.; Villegas, M.

    1996-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is operated by the University of California under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Livermore site, approximately 50 miles southeast of San Francisco, occupies 819 acres. So far, there have been three phases in an assessment and rehabilitation of the LLNL sanitary sewer system. A 1989 study that used data collected from December 1, 1988, to January 6, 1989, to determine the adequacy of the LLNL sewer system to accommodate present and future peak flows. A Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation (SSR) project, from October of 1991 to March of 1996, in which the system was assessed and rehabilitated. The third study is the post-rehabilitation assessment study that is reported in this document. In this report, the sanitary sewer system is described, and the goals and results of the 1989 study and the SSR project are summarized. The goals of the post-rehabilitation study are given and the analytical procedures and simulation model are described. Results, conclusions, and recommendations for further work or study are given. Field operations are summarized in Appendix A. References are provided in Appendix B.

  13. Test of CAP88-PC's Predicted Concentrations of Tritium in Air at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S R

    2003-11-06

    Based on annual tritium release rates from the five sources of tritium at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Tritium Research Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratory, the regulatory dispersion and dose model, CAP88-PC, was used to predict tritium concentrations in air at perimeter and offsite air surveillance monitoring locations for 1986 through 2001. These predictions were compared with mean annual measured concentrations, based on biweekly sampling. Deterministic predictions were compared with deterministic observations using predicted-to-observed ratios. In addition, the uncertainty on observations and predictions was assessed: when the uncertainty bounds of the observations overlapped with the uncertainty bounds of the predictions, the predictions were assumed to agree with the observations with high probability. Deterministically, 54% of all predictions were higher than the observations, and 96% fell within a factor of three. Accounting for uncertainty, 75% of all predictions agreed with the observations; 87% of the predictions either matched or exceeded the observations. Predictions equaled or exceeded observations at those sampling locations towards which the wind blows most frequently, except those in the hills. Under-predictions were seen at locations towards which the wind blows infrequently when released tritium was from elevated sources. When a high fraction of tritium was from area (diffuse) sources, predictions matched observations.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  16. Sustainability Profile for Urban Districts in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

      The paper concerns the development of sustainability profiles for districts in Copenhagen. This work is currently being carried out by the Danish Building Research Institute, the Technical University of Copenhagen, and the municipality of Copenhagen. The aim of the project is to develop a first...... model for sustainability profiles for districts in Copenhagen that includes environmental, social and environmental indicators. The work is strongly inspired by the Dutch model 'DPL' (Dutch acronym for Duurzaamheid Prestatie voor een Locatie, ‘Sustainability-Profile for Districts'), which has been quite...... interest of the municipality. This allows a DPL-assessment to be carried out rather smoothly, and thus increase the use amongst municipalities. The DPL-assessment does not provide any 'scientific' correctness, but must be seen as a model open for interpretations and discussions of the local sustainability...

  17. Making Use of District and School Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol S. Parke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how districts can better use their extensive student databases and other existing data to explore questions of interest. School districts are required to maintain a wealth of student information in electronic data systems and other formats. The meaningfulness of the data depends to a large degree on whether they can understand the information and use it to guide their efforts. The considerations and guidelines presented here are organized into six components which include identifying the broad area, creating specific questions, roles and trust, sample and methodology, presentation of results, and outcomes and further directions. Two examples are used throughout the paper to illustrate each component. One is from a study of high school mathematics in an urban school district, the other is from a teacher-initiated effort to better understand students' perceptions of their middle school. Recommendations are offered throughout for encouraging effective data use in decision-making.

  18. Planning analyses for geothermal district heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Karkheck, J.

    1979-12-01

    Methodology and data bases are described which can provide a comprehensive planning assessment of the potential for geothermal district heating in any US market. This economic systems model encompasses life-cycle costing over a period of rising competitive fuel prices, it addresses the expansion and financing of a district system over time, and it includes an overall optimization of system design. The elemental area for all analyses is the census tract, for which published data allow estimation of residential and commercial heating demands, building retrofit requirements, and competitive fuel consumption and cost. A system type design, an appropriate hot water district piping system, and costing of heat supply is performed for groups of contiguous tracts in any urban market. Groups are aggregated, in decreasing benefit to cost order, to achieve optimal systems. A specific application for Salt Lake City, Utah, is also described.

  19. Adoption law: a district nurse's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2011-04-01

    The Government wants to see a large rise in the use of adoption as a means of giving children a secure, loving and permanent home. Guidance coming into effect from April calls for a more pragmatic approach to adoption placements, and calls for the active promotion of the adoption process by health and social care professionals. District nurses will encounter people interested in becoming prospective adopters, but who are unsure if their background or lifestyle makes them eligible. It is essential that district nurses have a working understanding of the guidance and provisions of the Adoption and Children Act 2002 to confidently advise others about adoption and clarify any issues raised.

  20. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...